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Sample records for liquid crystal-forming molecules

  1. Nonchiral polar smectic liquid crystals formed by bent-core molecules: weak coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranjc, Tomaz

    2002-12-01

    The structure and dynamic properties of achiral polar smectic liquid crystals formed by bow shaped molecules is considered and described by two two-dimensional order parameters, \\vec P and \\vec ξ. The first, polarization order parameter, gives the average projection of the arrow vectors on the smectic layer planes. The second, tilt order parameter, gives the average magnitude and direction of the tilt. To study the possible liquid crystal structures and their properties, a discrete phenomenological model taking into account the competing interactions between the nearest-neighbor smectic layers is used. The free energy of the system is expressed as a sum over smectic layers with terms modeling the appropriate intralayer and interlayer interactions and written only in terms of the arrow and the string order parameters. The free energy is then minimized in order to obtain stable structures and deduce their optical properties. There exist solutions for the case of strong coupling between the polarization and the tilt order parameters arising from attractive intralayer van der Waals and from steric interactions. In this contribution, we focus our attention to the case of weak coupling between the two order parameters and investigate possible structures and related optical properties of the system.

  2. Metallotropic liquid crystals formed by surfactant templating of molten metal halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James D.; Keary, Cristin L.; Thornton, Todd A.; Novotnak, Mark P.; Knutson, Jeremey W.; Folmer, Jacob C. W.

    2006-04-01

    Liquid crystals consist of anisotropic molecular units, and most are organic molecules. Materials incorporating metals into anisotropic molecules, described as metallomesogens, have been prepared. Anisotropic structures such as one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional layers are frequently observed in solid-state inorganic materials, however, little is understood about structural organization in melts of such materials. Achieving liquid-crystalline behaviour in inorganic fluids should be possible if the anisotropic structure can be retained or designed into the molten phase. We demonstrated the ability to engineer zeolite-type structures into metal halide glasses and liquids. In this work we have engineered lamellar, cubic and hexagonal liquid-crystalline structure in metal-halide melts by controlling the volume fraction and nature of the inorganic block (up to 80 mol%) with respect to alkylammonium surfactants. The high metal content of these liquid-crystalline systems significantly advances the field of metallomesogens, which seeks to combine magnetic, electronic, optical, redox and catalytic properties common to inorganic materials with the fluid properties of liquid crystals.

  3. Supramolecular [60]fullerene liquid crystals formed by self-organized two-dimensional crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Ren, Xiangkui; Gu, Yan; Song, Bo; Sun, Hao-Jan; Yang, Shuang; Chen, Erqiang; Tu, Yingfeng; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Yaowen; Zhu, Xiulin

    2015-01-02

    Fullerene-based liquid crystalline materials have both the excellent optical and electrical properties of fullerene and the self-organization and external-field-responsive properties of liquid crystals (LCs). Herein, we demonstrate a new family of thermotropic [60]fullerene supramolecular LCs with hierarchical structures. The [60]fullerene dyads undergo self-organization driven by π-π interactions to form triple-layer two-dimensional (2D) fullerene crystals sandwiched between layers of alkyl chains. The lamellar packing of 2D crystals gives rise to the formation of supramolecular LCs. This design strategy should be applicable to other molecules and lead to an enlarged family of 2D crystals and supramolecular liquid crystals.

  4. Self-assembled molecular wires of discotic liquid crystal formed with the crucial contribution of solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Hyun; Kim, Kyung Ho; Sosa Vargas, Lydia; Takanishi, Yoichi; Kim, Youn Sang; Yamamoto, Jun; Shimizu, Yo; Park, Yung Woo; Lagerwall, Jan Pf; Scalia, Giusy

    The self-organization of discotic liquid crystal molecules allows the spontaneous formation of well-aligned and tens of micrometer long molecular wires. In this work, we present a study based on hexapentyloxytriphenylene (HAT5) to investigate the molecular wire formation mechanism induced by solvents with selected characteristics, including chemical structure, boiling point, vapor pressure, and surface tension. The aromaticity in solvents such as toluene and benzene promotes the assembly into very long and thin wires entering into the structures, while chain-like solvents promotes more disordered structures. This finding allows a guided formation of different nanostructures from the same type of molecules just by choosing the type of solvent according to the need. Raman spectroscopy supports the idea of an active role of aromatic solvents entering into the molecular structure between discotic molecules with good quality intermolecular order. Highly aligned molecular wires bridging electrodes on SiO2 substrate show a clearly higher electrical conductivity compared to disorganized aggregates and bare HAT5. DLS and X-ray scattering were also used to investigate films and solutions. We finally discuss possible mechanisms behind the hierarchical assembly of the nanowires. NRF.

  5. Crystal forms of naproxen.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Soon; Sohn, Young-Taek

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the existence of polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs of naproxen and the transformation of crystal forms. Four crystal forms of naproxen have been isolated by recrystallization and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetric analysis. The differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffractometry patterns of the four crystal forms were different respectively. In the dissolution studies in pH 6.8 ± 0.05 buffer equilibrated at 37 ± 0.5°C, the solubility of four crystal forms was similar (within the error range). After storage of 1 month at 0% RH (silica gel, 20°C), 52% RH (saturated solution of Na(2)Cr(2)O(7.2)H(2)O/20°C) and 95% RH (saturated solution of Na(2)HPO(4)/20°C), Form 2 and Form 4 were transformed to Form 1, but Form 3 and Form 1 were not transformed and they were shown to have a good physical stability at room temperature for 1 month.

  6. Phase Behavior of Liquid Crystals Formed in [C12mim]CI/H2O and [C12mim]CI/Alcohols Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Mei-shan; Wu, Zhi-yan; Wang, Lu-yan; Wu, Xin-zhou; Tao, Xu-tang

    2009-10-01

    Phase behaviors of different binary systems involving 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C12mim]Cl) and H2O, [C12mim]Cl and different alcohols (1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol and 1-octanol) are investigated at 25 °C. Hexagonal liquid crystal phase (H1) is identified in [C12mim]Cl/H2O system, and lamellar liquid-crystalline (Lα) phase is found in [C12mim]Cl/alcohols systems by using polarized optical microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. The formation of such phases is considered as a synergetic result of the solvatophobic force and the hydrogen-bonded network comprising an imidazolium ring, chloride ion and water (or alcohols), which can be confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. It is noticeable that in [C12mim]Cl/1-octanol system, the lattice spacings of lamellar phase increase with increasing C12mimCl concentration, which is opposite to the results of [C12mim]Cl/H2O system. This may result mainly from stronger static repulsion among hydrophilic headgroups of imidazolium salts arranged in the bilayers of lamellar structures. Further measurements by differential scanning calorimetry indicate that the lamellar phase is stable within a wide temperature range above room temperature. However, the lattice spacings decrease with the increase of temperature, which may be due to the softening of the hydrocarbon chain of [C12mim]Cl molecules. In different alcohols systems, it is found that the lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal structure is easier to be formed when the carbon chain length becomes longer.

  7. Studying how protein crystals form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Watching molecules of the iron-storing protein apoferritin come together to form a nucleus reveals some interesting behavior. In this series of images, researchers observed clusters of four molecules at the corners of a diamond shape (top). As more molecules attach to the cluster, they arrange themselves into rods (second from top), and a raft-like configuration of molecules forms the critical nucleus (third from top), suggesting that crystal growth is much slower than it could be were the molecules arranged in a more compact formation. In the final image, a crystallite consisting of three layers containing approximately 60 to 70 molecules each is formed. Atomic force microscopy made visualizing the process of nucleation possible for the first time. The principal investigator is Peter Vekilov, of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Vekilov's team at UAH studies protein solutions as they change phases from liquids to crystalline solids. They want to know if the molecules in the solution interact with one another, and if so, how, from the perspectives of thermodynamics and kinetics. They want to understand which forces -- electrical, electrostatic, hydrodynamic, or other kinds of forces -- are responsible for the interactions. They also study nucleation, the begirning stage of crystallization. This process is important to understand because it sets the stage for crystal growth in all kinds of solutions and liquid melts that are important in such diverse fields as agriculture, medicine, and the fabrication of metal components. Nucleation can determine the rate of crystal growth, the number of crystals that will be formed, and the quality and size of the crystals.

  8. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Täuber, Daniela; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule (SM) methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC). Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC. PMID:24077123

  9. Insertion of liquid crystal molecules into hydrocarbon monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Piotr Mann, Elizabeth K.; Lacks, Daniel J.; Jákli, Antal

    2014-08-07

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the molecular mechanisms of vertical surface alignment of liquid crystals. We study the insertion of nCB (4-Cyano-4{sup ′}-n-biphenyl) molecules with n = 0,…,6 into a bent-core liquid crystal monolayer that was recently found to provide good vertical alignment for liquid crystals. The results suggest a complex-free energy landscape for the liquid crystal within the layer. The preferred insertion direction of the nCB molecules (core or tail first) varies with n, which can be explained by entropic considerations. The role of the dipole moments was found to be negligible. As vertical alignment is the leading form of present day liquid crystal displays (LCD), these results will help guide improvement of the LCD technology, as well as lend insight into the more general problem of insertion of biological and other molecules into lipid and surfactant layers.

  10. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  11. A new crystal form of a hyperthermophilic endocellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-06-18

    The hyperthermostable endocellulase from P. furiosus was crystallized at pH 5.5. The new crystal form has symmetry consistent with space group C2 and exhibits a structure different from that of the protein crystallized at pH 9.0. The hyperthermophilic glycoside hydrolase family endocellulase 12 from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (EGPf; Gene ID PF0854; EC 3.2.1.4) catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of the β-1,4-glucosidic linkage in β-glucan in lignocellulose biomass. A crystal of EGPf was previously prepared at pH 9.0 and its structure was determined at an atomic resolution of 1.07 Å. This article reports the crystallization of EGPf at the more physiologically relevant pH of 5.5. Structure determination showed that this new crystal form has the symmetry of space group C2. Two molecules of the enzyme are observed in the asymmetric unit. Crystal packing is weak at pH 5.5 owing to two flexible interfaces between symmetry-related molecules. Comparison of the EGPf structures obtained at pH 9.0 and pH 5.5 reveals a significant conformational difference at the active centre and in the surface loops. The interfaces in the vicinity of the flexible surface loops impact the quality of the EGPf crystal.

  12. Localized single molecule isotherms of DNA molecules at confined liquid-solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liang, Heng; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Ma, Yinfa

    2009-03-15

    The study of dynamics and thermodynamics of single biological molecules at confined liquid-solid interfaces is crucially important, especially in the case of low-copy number molecules in a single cell. Using a high-throughput single molecule imaging system and Lagrangian coordinates of single molecule images, we discovered that the local equilibrium isotherms of single lambdaDNA molecules at a confined liquid-solid interface varied from a stair type for the regions of single or double molecular DNA to a mild "S" type for the regions of triple molecular DNA spots, which does not agree with the conventional equilibrium isotherms in the literature. Single molecule images in time sequence for different lambdaDNA concentrations were statistically analyzed by measuring preferential partitioning from shearing effects, which were used to measure the local velocity of DNA molecules by directly observing the migration of DNA fluorescence spots for the 12 continuous images. The local linear velocity of hydrodynamic flow was calculated by the Hagen-Poiseuille equation in different microregions with a local Lagrangian approach. The local single molecule isotherms for the tracked molecules in the regions of single, double, or triple molecular DNA layers within the laminar flows were obtained according to the average local velocities of both the stochastic molecule events and the corresponding local Poiseuille flows. A millisecond and microvolume approach to directly determine local single molecule isotherms at confined liquid-solid interfaces was established, and the microspace scale effects on the types of isotherms were discovered. This study may have significant impact on preparations of low-copy number proteins in a single cell, membrane separations, and other bioseparation studies.

  13. Attosecond dynamics of electrons in molecules and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woerner, Hans Jakob

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes following light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. In this lecture, I will discuss two recent experiments carried out in our group that measure the atomic-scale motion of charge with attosecond temporal resolution (1 as = 10-18 s). The first experiment is carried out on isolated, spatially oriented molecules in the gas phase. We advance high-harmonic spectroscopy to resolve spatially and temporally the migration of an electron hole immediately following ionization of iodoacetylene, while simultaneously demonstrating extensive control over the process. A multidimensional approach, based on the measurement of both even and odd harmonic orders, enables us to reconstruct both quantum amplitudes and phases of the electronic states with a resolution of ~ 100 as. We separately reconstruct quasi-field-free and laser-controlled charge migration as a function of the spatial orientation of the molecule and determine the shape of the hole created by ionization. The second experiment is carried out on a free-flowing microjet of liquid water. We use an attosecond pulse train synchronized with a near-infrared laser pulse to temporally resolve the process of photoemission from liquid water using the RABBIT technique. We measure a delay on the order of 50 as between electrons emitted from the HOMO of liquid water compared to that of gas-phase water and a substantially reduced modulation contrast of the corresponding sidebands. Since our measurements on solvated water molecules are referenced to isolated ones, the measured delays reflect (i) the photoionization delays caused by electron transport through the aqueous environment and (ii) the effect of solvation on the parent molecule. The relative modulation contrast, in turn, contains information on (iii) the modification of transition amplitudes and (iv) dephasing processes. These experiments make the liquid phase and its fascinating

  14. Single Molecule Electrochemical Detection in Aqueous Solutions and Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Byers, Joshua C; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Perry, David; McKelvey, Kim; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-10-20

    Single molecule electrochemical detection (SMED) is an extremely challenging aspect of electroanalytical chemistry, requiring unconventional electrochemical cells and measurements. Here, SMED is reported using a "quad-probe" (four-channel probe) pipet cell, fabricated by depositing carbon pyrolytically into two diagonally opposite barrels of a laser-pulled quartz quadruple-barreled pipet and filling the open channels with electrolyte solution, and quasi-reference counter electrodes. A meniscus forms at the end of the probe covering the two working electrodes and is brought into contact with a substrate working electrode surface. In this way, a nanogap cell is produced whereby the two carbon electrodes in the pipet can be used to promote redox cycling of an individual molecule with the substrate. Anticorrelated currents generated at the substrate and tip electrodes, at particular distances (typically tens of nanometers), are consistent with the detection of single molecules. The low background noise realized in this droplet format opens up new opportunities in single molecule electrochemistry, including the use of ionic liquids, as well as aqueous solution, and the quantitative assessment and analysis of factors influencing redox cycling currents, due to a precisely known gap size.

  15. Two dimensional NMR of liquids and oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gochin, M.

    1987-02-01

    Chapter 1 discusses the quantum mechanical formalism used for describing the interaction between magnetic dipoles that dictates the appearance of a spectrum. The NMR characteristics of liquids and liquid crystals are stressed. Chapter 2 reviews the theory of multiple quantum and two dimensional NMR. Properties of typical spectra and phase cycling procedures are discussed. Chapter 3 describes a specific application of heteronuclear double quantum coherence to the removal of inhomogeneous broadening in liquids. Pulse sequences have been devised which cancel out any contribution from this inhomogeneity to the final spectrum. An interpretation of various pulse sequences for the case of /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H is given, together with methods of spectral editing by removal or retention of the homo- or heteronuclear J coupling. The technique is applied to a demonstration of high resolution in both frequency and spatial dimensions with a surface coil. In Chapter 4, multiple quantum filtered 2-D spectroscopy is demonstrated as an effective means of studying randomly deuterated molecules dissolved in a nematic liquid crystal. Magnitudes of dipole coupling constants have been determined for benzene and hexane, and their signs and assignments found from high order multiple quantum spectra. For the first time, a realistic impression of the conformation of hexane can be estimated from these results. Chapter 5 is a technical description of the MDB DCHIB-DR11W parallel interface which has been set up to transfer data between the Data General Nova 820 minicomputer, interfaced to the 360 MHz spectrometer, and the Vax 11/730. It covers operation of the boards, physical specifications and installation, and programs for testing and running the interface.

  16. Preliminary crystallographic studies of four crystal forms of serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. C.; Chang, B.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Krishnasami, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Several crystal forms of serum albumin suitable for three-dimensional structure determination have been grown. These forms include crystals of recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, baboon serum albumin, and canine serum albumin. The intrinsic limits of X-ray diffraction for these crystals are in the range 0.28-0.22 nm. Two of the crystal forms produced from human and canine albumin include incorporated long-chain fatty acids. Molecular replacement experiments have been successfully conducted on each crystal form using the previously determined atomic coordinates of human serum albumin illustrating the conserved tertiary structure.

  17. Long DNA Molecules at Liquid-Solid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuilov, Vladimir; Li, B.; Sokolov, J.; Rafailovich, M.; Chu, B.

    2006-03-01

    The electrophoresis of long DNA molecules was studied using a newly developed method of electrophoresis on flat surfaces [1] in the regime of strong electrostatic interaction. The mobility of lambda- DNA molecules on this surface was found to scale as the square root of the persistent length with the ionic strength at high buffer. This experimental result indicates that at high buffer concentration the separation mechanism of solid-liquid interface electrophoresis is expected to be due to surface friction rather than biased reptation [2-4]. At low buffer concentrations the DNA chains are stretched .The electric double layer is responsible for a velocity profile of the electroosmotic flow. The net electrophoretic mobility of longer DNA, being trapped closer to the surface as found to be higher then for the shorter ones in the electric field. [1]. N. Pernodet, V. Samuilov, K. Shin, et al. Physical Review Letters, 85 (2000) 5651-5654. [2] Y.-S. Seo, V.A. Samuilov, J. Sokolov, et al. Electrophoresis, 23 (2002) 2618-2625. [3] Y.-S. Seo, H.. Luo, V. A. Samuilov, et al. DNA Electrophoresis on nanopatterned surfaces, Nano Letters, 4, 2004, 659-664.

  18. Deterministically Polarized Fluorescence from Single Dye Molecules Aligned in Liquid Crystal Host

    SciTech Connect

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.; Knox, R.; Freivald, P.; Boyd, R. W.; Stroud, Jr., C. R.; Marshall, K.L.

    2005-09-30

    We demonstrated for the first time to our konwledge deterministically polarized fluorescence from single dye molecules. Planar aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts provide deterministic alignment of single dye molecules in a preferred direction.

  19. Crystallization and Characterization of Galdieria sulphuraria RUBISCO in Two Crystal Forms: Structural Phase Transition Observed in P21 Crystal Form

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Michael; Stec, Boguslaw

    2007-01-01

    We have isolated ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO) from the red algae Galdieria Sulphuraria. The protein crystallized in two different crystal forms, the I422 crystal form being obtained from high salt and the P21 crystal form being obtained from lower concentration of salt and PEG. We report here the crystallization, preliminary stages of structure determination and the detection of the structural phase transition in the P21 crystal form of G. sulphuraria RUBISCO. This red algae enzyme belongs to the hexadecameric class (L8S8) with an approximate molecular weight 0.6MDa. The phase transition in G. sulphuraria RUBISCO leads from two hexadecamers to a single hexadecamer per asymmetric unit. The preservation of diffraction power in a phase transition for such a large macromolecule is rare.

  20. Mirror Symmetry Breaking by Chirality Synchronisation in Liquids and Liquid Crystals of Achiral Molecules.

    PubMed

    Tschierske, Carsten; Ungar, Goran

    2016-01-04

    Spontaneous mirror symmetry breaking is an efficient way to obtain homogeneously chiral agents, pharmaceutical ingredients and materials. It is also in the focus of the discussion around the emergence of uniform chirality in biological systems. Tremendous progress has been made by symmetry breaking during crystallisation from supercooled melts or supersaturates solutions and by self-assembly on solid surfaces and in other highly ordered structures. However, recent observations of spontaneous mirror symmetry breaking in liquids and liquid crystals indicate that it is not limited to the well-ordered solid state. Herein, progress in the understanding of a new dynamic mode of symmetry breaking, based on chirality synchronisation of transiently chiral molecules in isotropic liquids and in bicontinuous cubic, columnar, smectic and nematic liquid crystalline phases is discussed. This process leads to spontaneous deracemisation in the liquid state under thermodynamic control, giving rise to long-term stable symmetry-broken fluids, even at high temperatures. These fluids form conglomerates that are capable of extraordinary strong chirality amplification, eventually leading to homochirality and providing a new view on the discussion of emergence of uniform chirality in prebiotic systems.

  1. Self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in organic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shih-Huang

    2007-12-01

    Amphiphilic molecules are well-known for their ability to self-assemble in water to form structures such as micelles and vesicles. In comparison, much less is known about amphiphilic self-assembly in nonpolar organic liquids. Such "reverse" self assembly can produce many of the counterparts to structures found in water. In this dissertation, we focus on the formation and dynamics of such reverse structures. We seek to obtain fundamental insight into the driving forces for reverse self-assembly processes. Three specific types of reverse structures are studied: (a) reverse wormlike micelles, i.e., long, flexible micellar chains; (b) reverse vesicles, i.e., hollow containers enclosed by reverse bilayers; and (c) organogel networks. While our focus is on the fundamentals, we note that reverse structures can be useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery, controlled release, hosts for enzymatic reactions, and templates for nanomaterials synthesis. In the first part of this study, we describe a new route for forming reverse wormlike micelles in nonpolar organic liquids. This route involves the addition of trace amounts of a bile salt to solutions of the phospholipid, lecithin. We show that bile salts, due to their unique "facially amphiphilic" structure, can promote the aggregation of lecithin molecules into these reverse micellar chains. The resulting samples are viscoelastic and show interesting rheological properties. Unusual trends are seen in the temperature dependence of their rheology, which indicates the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the formation of these micelles. Another remarkable feature of their rheology is the presence of strain-stiffening, where the material becomes stiffer at high deformations. Strain-stiffening has been seen before for elastic gels of biopolymers; here, we demonstrate the same properties for viscoelastic micellar solutions. The second reverse aggregate we deal with is the reverse vesicle. We present a

  2. NMR STUDIES OF LIQUID CRYSTALS AND MOLECULES DISSOLVED IN LIQUID CRYSTAL SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Drobny, G.P.

    1982-11-01

    This thesis describes several studies in which nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure, orientation and dynamics of liquid crystal mesogens and molecules dissolved in liquid crystalline phases. In addition, a modern high field nmr spectrometer is described which has been used to perform such nmr studies. Chapter 1 introduces the quantum mechanical formalisms used throughout this thesis and briefly reviews the fundamentals of nuclear spin physics and pulsed nmr spectroscopy. First the density operator is described and a specific form for the canonical ensemble is derived. Then Clebsch-Gordon coefficients, Wigner rotation matrices, and irreducible tensor operators are reviewed. An expression for the equilibrium (Curie) magnetization is obtained and the linear response of a spin system to a strong pulsed r.f. irradiation is described. Finally, the spin interaction Hamiltonians relevant to this work are reviewed together with their truncated forms. Chapter 2 is a deuterium magnetic resonance study of two 'nom' liquid crystals which possess several low temperature mesomorphic phases. Specifically, deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy is used to determine the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules in smectic phases, the changes in molecular orientation and motion that occur at smectic-smectic phase transitions, and the order of the phase transitions. For both compounds, the phase sequence is determined to be isotropic, nematic, smectic A, smectic C, smectic B{sub A}, smectic B{sub C}, and crystalline. The structure of the smectic A phase is found to be consistent with the well-known model of a two dimensional liquid in which molecules are rapidly rotating about their long axes and oriented at right angles to the plane of the layers. Molecules in the smectic C phase are found to have their long axes tilted with respect to the layer normal, and the tilt angle is temperature dependent, increasing from zero at the smectic A

  3. Crystallization from microemulsions ? a novel method for the preparation of new crystal forms of aspartame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, Helga; Garti, N.; Kamyshny, A.

    1999-03-01

    Solubilization and crystallization of the artificial sweetener aspartame (APM), in water/isooctane microemulsions stabilized with sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) has been investigated. The amount of aspartame that could be solubilized depended primarily on the amount of surfactant and on the temperature. The maximum AOT/aspartame molar ratio at the w/o interface is shown to be 6.2 at 25°C. It was concluded that the dipeptide is located at the w/o interface interspersed between surfactant molecules and that it acts as a cosurfactant. A new crystal form, APM III, was obtained by cooling of hot w/isooctane/AOT microemulsions containing solubilized aspartame. The new crystal form exhibits a distinct X-ray diffraction powder pattern, as well as changes in the FTIR spectra, thermogravimetric and DSC patterns. H-NMR spectra of APM III dissolved in D 2O were identical to the spectrum of commercial aspartame recorded under the same conditions. The new crystal form has greatly improved dissolution kinetics.

  4. Insights into the crystallisation process from anhydrous, hydrated and solvated crystal forms of diatrizoic acid.

    PubMed

    Fucke, Katharina; McIntyre, Garry J; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Wilkinson, Clive; Edwards, Alison J; Howard, Judith A K; Steed, Jonathan W

    2015-01-12

    Diatrizoic acid (DTA), a clinically used X-ray contrast agent, crystallises in two hydrated, three anhydrous and nine solvated solid forms, all of which have been characterised by X-ray crystallography. Single-crystal neutron structures of DTA dihydrate and monosodium DTA tetrahydrate have been determined. All of the solid-state structures have been analysed using partial atomic charges and hardness algorithm (PACHA) calculations. Even though in general all DTA crystal forms reveal similar intermolecular interactions, the overall crystal packing differs considerably from form to form. The water of the dihydrate is encapsulated between a pair of host molecules, which calculations reveal to be an extraordinarily stable motif. DTA presents functionalities that enable hydrogen and halogen bonding, and whilst an extended hydrogen-bonding network is realised in all crystal forms, halogen bonding is not present in the hydrated crystal forms. This is due to the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network based on individual enclosed water squares, which is not amenable to the concomitant formation of halogen bonds. The main interaction in the solvates involves the carboxylic acid, which corroborates the hypothesis that this strong interaction is the last one to be broken during the crystal desolvation and nucleation process.

  5. Imposed Orientation of Dye Molecules by Liquid Crystals and an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadlej-Sosnowska, Nina

    1980-01-01

    Describes experiments using dye solutions in liquid crystals in which polar molecules are oriented in an electrical field and devices are constructed to change their color in response to an electric signal. (CS)

  6. Molecular structure of two crystal forms of cyclic triadenylic acid at 1A resolution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y G; Robinson, H; Guan, Y; Liaw, Y C; van Boom, J H; van der Marel, G A; Wang, A H

    1998-08-01

    The three dimensional structures of cyclic deoxytriadenylic acid, c-d(ApApAp), from two different trigonal crystal forms (space groups P3 and R32) have been determined by x-ray diffraction analysis at 1A resolution. Both structures were solved by direct methods and refined by anisotropic least squares refinement to R-factors of 0.109 and 0.137 for the P3 and R32 forms, respectively. In both crystal forms, each of the two independent c-d(ApApAp) molecules sits on the crystallographic 3-fold axis. All four independent c-d(ApApAp) molecules have similar backbone conformations. The deoxyriboses are in the S-type pucker with pseudorotation angles ranging from 156.7 degrees to 168.6 degrees and the bases have anti glycosyl torsion angles (chi falling in two ranges, one at -104.3 degrees and the other ranging from -141.0 degrees to -143.8 degrees). In the R32 form, a hexahydrated cobalt(II) ion is found to coordinate through bridging water molecules to N1, N3, and N7 atoms of three adjacent adenines and oxygen atoms of phosphates. Comparison with other structures of cyclic oligonucleotides indicates that the sugar adopts N-type pucker in cyclic dinucleotides and S-type pucker in cyclic trinucleotides, regardless whether the sugar is a ribose or a deoxyribose.

  7. The crystal-forming strains of Bacillus laterosporus.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, T A; Minenkova, I B; Orlova, M V; Lecadet, M M; Azizbekyan, R R

    1996-06-01

    Bacillus laterosporus is a spore-forming bacterium characterized by its ability to produce a canoe-shaped lamellar parasporal inclusion, adjacent to the spore. In some B. laterosporus strains crystalline inclusions of various shapes and sizes, which are released separately from spores during the lysis of the sporangium, were also produced. The morphological characteristics of two crystal-forming strains, B. laterosporus BL 16-92 and LAT 006, were investigated.

  8. Studies on ultrathin films of tricycloquinazoline (TCQ) based discotic liquid crystal molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Raj Kumar; V, Manjuladevi; Karthik, C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2013-03-01

    The assembly of disk-shaped molecules on surfaces has drawn considerable attention because of their unique electro-optical properties. We have studied the monolayer of the tricycloquinazoline based disk-shaped (TCQCB) molecules at air-water and air-solid interfaces. The TCQCB molecules form a stable Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface. The monolayer exhibits gas, low density liquid (L1), and high density liquid (L2) phases. In L1 and L2 phases, the molecules prefer edge-on conformation. The atomic force microscope study on the Langmuir-Blodgett films of the molecules reveals a structural transformation. The elongated domains in the film deposited in L1 phase transformed to a compact grainy texture in the film deposited in the L2 phase.

  9. Redistribution of fluorescent molecules at the solid/liquid interface with total internal reflection illumination.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin; Ye, Zhongju; Luo, Wenjuan; Chen, Bo; Xiao, Lehui

    2016-08-01

    Many intriguing physical and chemical processes commonly take place at the solid/liquid interface. Total internal reflection illumination, together with single molecule spectroscopy, provides a robust platform for the selective exploration of kinetic processes close the interface. With these techniques, it was observed that the distribution of Rhodamine B molecules close to a solid/liquid interface could be regulated in a photo-induced route. The laser-induced repulsion force at this interface is enough to compromise the Brownian diffusion of single molecules in a range of several hundred nanometers normal to the solid/liquid interface. This observation is fundamentally and practically interesting because moderate laser intensity is enough to initiate this repulsion effect. Therefore, it might display extensive applications in the development of photo-modulation technique with high throughput capability.

  10. Temperature dependence of local solubility of hydrophobic molecules in the liquid-vapor interface of water.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kiharu; Sumi, Tomonari; Koga, Kenichiro

    2014-11-14

    One important aspect of the hydrophobic effect is that solubility of small, nonpolar molecules in liquid water decreases with increasing temperature. We investigate here how the characteristic temperature dependence in liquid water persists or changes in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface. From the molecular dynamics simulation and the test-particle insertion method, the local solubility Σ of methane in the liquid-vapor interface of water as well as Σ of nonpolar solutes in the interface of simple liquids are calculated as a function of the distance z from the interface. We then examine the temperature dependence of Σ under two conditions: variation of Σ at fixed position z and that at fixed local solvent density around the solute molecule. It is found that the temperature dependence of Σ at fixed z depends on the position z and the system, whereas Σ at fixed local density decreases with increasing temperature for all the model solutions at any fixed density between vapor and liquid phases. The monotonic decrease of Σ under the fixed-density condition in the liquid-vapor interface is in accord with what we know for the solubility of nonpolar molecules in bulk liquid water under the fixed-volume condition but it is much robust since the solvent density to be fixed can be anything between the coexisting vapor and liquid phases. A unique feature found in the water interface is that there is a minimum in the local solubility profile Σ(z) on the liquid side of the interface. We find that with decreasing temperature the minimum of Σ grows and at the same time the first peak in the oscillatory density profile of water develops. It is likely that the minimum of Σ is due to the layering structure of the free interface of water.

  11. The Analysis of the Human High Affinity IgE Receptor FceRIa from Multiple Crystal Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Garman, S.C.; Sechi, S.; Kinet, J.-P.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-05

    We have solved the structure of the human high affinity IgE receptor, Fc{var_epsilon}RI{alpha}, in six different crystal forms, showing the structure in 15 different chemical environments. This database of structures shows no change in the overall shape of the molecule, as the angle between domains 1 and 2 (D1 and D2) varies little across the ensemble. However, the receptor has local conformational variability in the C' strand of D2 and in the BC loop of D1. In every crystal form, a residue inserts between tryptophan residues 87 and 110, mimicking the position of a proline from the IgE ligand. The different crystal forms reveal a distribution of carbohydrates lining the front and back surfaces of the structure. An analysis of crystal contacts in the different forms indicates regions where the molecule interacts with other proteins, and reveals a potential new binding site distal to the IgE binding site. The results of this study point to new directions for the design of molecules to inhibit the interaction of Fc{var_epsilon}RI{alpha} with its natural ligand and thus to prevent a primary step in the allergic response.

  12. Molecular dynamics study on condensation/evaporation coefficients of chain molecules at liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Takematsu, Masaki; Mizuguchi, Hirotaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2015-07-01

    The structure and thermodynamic properties of the liquid-vapor interface are of fundamental interest for numerous technological implications. For simple molecules, e.g., argon and water, the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior depends strongly on their translational motion and the system temperature. Existing molecular dynamics (MD) results are consistent with the theoretical predictions based on the assumption that the liquid and vapor states in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface are isotropic. Additionally, similar molecular condensation/evaporation characteristics have been found for long-chain molecules, e.g., dodecane. It is unclear, however, whether the isotropic assumption is valid and whether the molecular orientation or the chain length of the molecules affects the condensation/evaporation behavior at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, MD simulations were performed to study the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior of the straight-chain alkanes, i.e., butane, octane, and dodecane, at the liquid-vapor interface, and the effects of the molecular orientation and chain length were investigated in equilibrium systems. The results showed that the condensation/evaporation behavior of chain molecules primarily depends on the molecular translational energy and the surface temperature and is independent of the molecular chain length. Furthermore, the orientation at the liquid-vapor interface was disordered when the surface temperature was sufficiently higher than the triple point and had no significant effect on the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior. The validity of the isotropic assumption was confirmed, and we conclude that the condensation/evaporation coefficients can be predicted by the liquid-to-vapor translational length ratio, even for chain molecules.

  13. Molecular dynamics study on condensation/evaporation coefficients of chain molecules at liquid-vapor interface.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Takematsu, Masaki; Mizuguchi, Hirotaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2015-07-07

    The structure and thermodynamic properties of the liquid-vapor interface are of fundamental interest for numerous technological implications. For simple molecules, e.g., argon and water, the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior depends strongly on their translational motion and the system temperature. Existing molecular dynamics (MD) results are consistent with the theoretical predictions based on the assumption that the liquid and vapor states in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface are isotropic. Additionally, similar molecular condensation/evaporation characteristics have been found for long-chain molecules, e.g., dodecane. It is unclear, however, whether the isotropic assumption is valid and whether the molecular orientation or the chain length of the molecules affects the condensation/evaporation behavior at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, MD simulations were performed to study the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior of the straight-chain alkanes, i.e., butane, octane, and dodecane, at the liquid-vapor interface, and the effects of the molecular orientation and chain length were investigated in equilibrium systems. The results showed that the condensation/evaporation behavior of chain molecules primarily depends on the molecular translational energy and the surface temperature and is independent of the molecular chain length. Furthermore, the orientation at the liquid-vapor interface was disordered when the surface temperature was sufficiently higher than the triple point and had no significant effect on the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior. The validity of the isotropic assumption was confirmed, and we conclude that the condensation/evaporation coefficients can be predicted by the liquid-to-vapor translational length ratio, even for chain molecules.

  14. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  15. Dielectric relaxations of small carbohydrate molecules in the liquid and glassy states

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, T.R.; Ring, S.G.; Whittam, M.A.

    1992-06-25

    Dielectric relaxations of several vitreous and liquid monosaccharides were measured at 100 - 10{sup 5} Hz and -100 to 150 {degrees}C. Depending upon the molecule, one or two relaxations were observed. Primary alcohol moieties on the monosaccharide conferred higher activation energies than those without, such as xylitol and glucitol. 19 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Homeotropic orientation of a nematic liquid crystal by bent-core molecules adsorbed on its surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jiyong; Yang, Seungbin; Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Jongyoon; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kang, Shin-Woong; Choi, E.-Joon

    2015-06-01

    We reported the promotion of a homeotropic alignment of a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) by bent-core liquid-crystal (BLC) Molecules adsorbed its surface. The BLC was mixed at various concentrations with the NLC, and the mixtures were injected into an empty cell with a cell gap of 13 μm. Although the pure NLC showed a heterogeneous orientation, the BLC-NLC mixture was gradually transformed to a homeotropic alignment with increasing concentration of the BLC. We investigated the surface topography of the samples by using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and found that the BLC molecules were segregated into a polyimide (PI) surface and formed protrusion domains with diameters of 50-100 nm. The BLC protrusions might promote the homeotropic orientation of the NLC molecules.

  17. Packing forces in nine crystal forms of cutinase.

    PubMed

    Jelsch, C; Longhi, S; Cambillau, C

    1998-05-15

    During the characterization of mutants and covalently inhibited complexes of Fusarium solani cutinase, nine different crystal forms have been obtained so far. Protein mutants with a different surface charge distribution form new intermolecular salt bridges or long-range electrostatic interactions that are accompanied by a change in the crystal packing. The whole protein surface is involved in the packing contacts and the hydrophobicities of the protein surfaces in mutual contact turned out to be noncorrelated, which indicates that the packing interactions are nonspecific. In the case of the hydrophobic variants, the packing contacts showed some specificity, as the protein in the crystal tends to form either crystallographic or noncrystallographic dimers, which shield the hydrophobic surface from the solvent. The likelihood of surface atoms to be involved in a crystal contact is the same for both polar and nonpolar atoms. However, when taking areas in the 200-600 A2 range, instead of individual atoms, the either highly hydrophobic or highly polar surface regions were found to have an increased probability of establishing crystal lattice contacts. The protein surface surrounding the active-site crevice of cutinase constitutes a large hydrophobic area that is involved in packing contacts in all the various crystalline contexts.

  18. Incorporation of ionic liquid into porous polymer monoliths to enhance the separation of small molecules in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiafei; Bai, Ligai; Wei, Zhen; Qin, Junxiao; Ma, Yamin; Liu, Haiyan

    2015-06-01

    An ionic liquid was incorporated into the porous polymer monoliths to afford stationary phases with enhanced chromatographic performance for small molecules in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The effect of the ionic liquid in the polymerization mixture on the performance of the monoliths was studied in detail. While monoliths without ionic liquid exhibited poor resolution and low efficiency, the addition of ionic liquid to the polymerization mixture provides highly increased resolution and high efficiency. The chromatographic performances of the monoliths were demonstrated by the separations of various small molecules including aromatic hydrocarbons, isomers, and homologues using a binary polar mobile phase. The present column efficiency reached 27 000 plates/m, which showed that the ionic liquid monoliths are alternative stationary phases in the separation of small molecules by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  19. Light-induced director-controlled microassembly of dye molecules from a liquid crystal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloschenko, D.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    1999-11-01

    We report on a light-induced phenomenon in dye-doped liquid crystals (LCs) with the distinctive features of molecular transport and assembly at micron scales. Under single-beam laser irradiation, the dye molecules phase separate from the LC host and assemble onto the cell substrate. Although the intensity of incident light is uniform within the irradiated area, the density of the adsorbed dye is modulated in accord with the director modulation of the LC. The dye molecules form a surface imprint that portrays orientational distortions of the LC host.

  20. An orthorhombic crystal form of cyclohexaicosaose, CA26.32.59 H(2)O: comparison with the triclinic form.

    PubMed

    Nimz, O; Gessler, K; Usón, I; Saenger, W

    2001-11-08

    Cycloamylose containing 26 glucose residues (cyclohexaicosaose, CA26) crystallized from water and 30% (v/v) polyethyleneglycol 400 in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) in the highly hydrated form CA26.32.59 H(2)O. X-ray analysis of the crystals at 0.85 A resolution shows that the macrocycle of CA26 is folded into two short left-handed V-amylose helices in antiparallel arrangement and related by a twofold rotational pseudosymmetry as reported recently for the (CA26)(2).76.75 H(2)O triclinic crystal form [Gessler, K. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1999, 96, 4246-4251]. In the orthorhombic crystal form, CA26 molecules are packed in motifs reminiscent of V-amylose in hydrated and anhydrous forms. The intramolecular interface between the V-helices in CA26 is dictated by formation of an extended network of interhelical C-H...O hydrogen bonds; a comparable molecular arrangement is also evident for the intermolecular packing, suggesting that it is a characteristic feature of V-amylose interaction. The hydrophobic channels of CA26 are filled with disordered water molecules arranged in chains and held in position by multiple C-H...O hydrogen bonds. In the orthorhombic and triclinic crystal forms, the structures of CA26 molecules are equivalent but the positions of the individual water molecules are different, suggesting that the patterns of water chains are perturbed even by small structural changes associated with differences in packing arrangements in the two crystal lattices rather than with differences in the CA26 geometry.

  1. Conformational flexibility in the apolipoprotein E amino-terminal domain structure determined from three new crystal forms: implications for lipid binding.

    PubMed Central

    Segelke, B. W.; Forstner, M.; Knapp, M.; Trakhanov, S. D.; Parkin, S.; Newhouse, Y. M.; Bellamy, H. D.; Weisgraber, K. H.; Rupp, B.

    2000-01-01

    An amino-terminal fragment of human apolipoprotein E3 (residues 1-165) has been expressed and crystallized in three different crystal forms under similar crystallization conditions. One crystal form has nearly identical cell dimensions to the previously reported orthorhombic (P2(1)2(1)2(1)) crystal form of the amino-terminal 22 kDa fragment of apolipoprotein E (residues 1-191). A second orthorhombic crystal form (P2(1)2(1)2(1) with cell dimensions differing from the first form) and a trigonal (P3(1)21) crystal form were also characterized. The structures of the first orthorhombic and the trigonal form were determined by seleno-methionine multiwavelength anomalous dispersion, and the structure of the second orthorhombic form was determined by molecular replacement using the structure from the trigonal form as a search model. A combination of modern experimental and computational techniques provided high-quality electron-density maps, which revealed new features of the apolipoprotein E structure, including an unambiguously traced loop connecting helices 2 and 3 in the four-helix bundle and a number of multiconformation side chains. The three crystal forms contain a common intermolecular, antiparallel packing arrangement. The electrostatic complimentarity observed in this antiparallel packing resembles the interaction of apolipoprotein E with the monoclonal antibody 2E8 and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Superposition of the model structures from all three crystal forms reveals flexibility and pronounced kinks in helices near one end of the four-helix bundle. This mobility at one end of the molecule provides new insights into the structural changes in apolipoprotein E that occur with lipid association. PMID:10850798

  2. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chempath, Shaji; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  3. Synthesis of ferrite nanocrystals stabilized by ionic-liquid molecules through a thermal decomposition route.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Dapeng; Wang, Xiao; Song, Shuyan; Zhang, Hongjie

    2011-01-17

    A series of M(x) Fe(3-x) O(4) (M=Fe, Co, Ni, Zn; 0≤x≤1) ferrite nanocrystals stabilized by ionic-liquid molecules have been successfully synthesized through a thermal decomposition route. Instead of the widely used long-chain lipid surfactants and high-boiling solvents, the ionic-liquid molecules not only played the role of surfactants, but also served as reaction and dispersion media simultaneously in the preparation of ferrite nanocrystals. Due to their good fluidity under magnetic fields and high ionic conductivity, the ionic-liquid molecules and M(x) Fe(3-x) O(4) ferrite nanocrystal-based conducting ferrofluids were successfully used as electrolytes in an AC circuit. The open or closed state of the circuit was directly controlled by moving a permanent magnet so as to tune the position of the ferrofluids, and consequently, resulted in the "off" or "on" state of the four indicative yellow-light-emitting diodes. These results demonstrate that the conducting ferrofluids successfully play the role of "magnetic switch".

  4. Graphene via Molecule-Assisted Ultrasound-Induced Liquid-Phase Exfoliation: A Supramolecular Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eredia, Matilde; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) material holding unique optical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. The combination of these exceptional characteristics makes graphene an ideal model system for fundamental physical and chemical studies as well as technologically ground breaking material for a large range of applications. Graphene can be produced either following a bottom-up or top-down method. The former is based on the formation of covalent networks suitably engineered molecular building blocks undergoing chemical reaction. The latter takes place through the exfoliation of bulk graphite into individual graphene sheets. Among them, ultrasound-induced liquid-phase exfoliation (UILPE) is an appealing method, being very versatile and applicable to different environments and on various substrate types. In this chapter, we describe the recently reported methods to produce graphene via molecule-assisted UILPE of graphite, aiming at the generation of high-quality graphene. In particular, we will focus on the supramolecular approach, which consists in the use of suitably designed organic molecules during the UILPE of graphite. These molecules act as graphene dispersion-stabilizing agents during the exfoliation. This method relying on the joint effect of a solvent and ad hoc molecules to foster the exfoliation of graphite into graphene in liquid environment represents a promising and modular method toward the improvement of the process of UILPE in terms of the concentration and quality of the exfoliated material. Furthermore, exfoliations in aqueous and organic solutions are presented and discussed separately.

  5. Determination of protein surface excess on a liquid/solid interface by single-molecule counting.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Tang, Hui; Gai, Hongwei; Dong, Xiuling; Wang, Qi; Yeung, Edward S

    2009-08-01

    Determination of protein surface excess is an important way of evaluating the properties of biomaterials and the characteristics of biosensors. A single-molecule counting method is presented that uses a standard fluorescence microscope to measure coverage of a liquid/solid interface by adsorbed proteins. The extremely low surface excess of lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA), in a bulk concentration range from 0.3 nmol L(-1) (0.02 microg mL(-1)) to 3 nmol L(-1) (0.2 microg mL(-1)), were measured by recording the counts of spatially isolated single molecules on either hydrophilic (glass) or hydrophobic (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) surfaces at different pH. The differences observed in amounts of adsorbed proteins under different experimental conditions can be qualitatively explained by the combined interactions of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. This, in turn, implies that single-molecule counting is an effective way of measuring surface coverage at a liquid/solid interface.

  6. Viscosity of liquid mixtures: The Vesovic-Wakeham method for chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wijn, Astrid S.; Riesco, Nicolas; Jackson, George; Martin Trusler, J. P.; Vesovic, Velisa

    2012-02-01

    New expressions for the viscosity of liquid mixtures, consisting of chain-like molecules, are derived by means of Enskog-type analysis. The molecules of the fluid are modelled as chains of equally sized, tangentially joined, and rigid spheres. It is assumed that the collision dynamics in such a fluid can be approximated by instantaneous collisions. We determine the molecular size parameters from the viscosity of each pure species and show how the different effective parameters can be evaluated by extending the Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method. We propose and implement a number of thermodynamically consistent mixing rules, taking advantage of SAFT-type analysis, in order to develop the VW method for chain molecules. The predictions of the VW-chain model have been compared in the first instance with experimental viscosity data for octane-dodecane and methane-decane mixtures, thus, illustrating that the resulting VW-chain model is capable of accurately representing the viscosity of real liquid mixtures.

  7. Chiral molecules split light: Reflection and refraction in a chiral liquid.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ambarish; Fischer, Peer

    2006-10-27

    A light beam changes direction as it enters a liquid at an angle from another medium, such as air. Should the liquid contain molecules that lack mirror symmetry, then it has been predicted by Fresnel that the light beam will not only change direction, but will actually split into two separate beams with a small difference in the respective angles of refraction. Here we report the observation of this phenomenon. We also demonstrate that the angle of reflection does not equal the angle of incidence in a chiral medium. Unlike conventional optical rotation, which depends on the path-length through the sample, the reported reflection and refraction phenomena arise within a few wavelengths at the interface and thereby suggest a new approach to polarimetry that can be used in microfluidic volumes.

  8. Molecular threading: mechanical extraction, stretching and placement of DNA molecules from a liquid-air interface.

    PubMed

    Payne, Andrew C; Andregg, Michael; Kemmish, Kent; Hamalainen, Mark; Bowell, Charlotte; Bleloch, Andrew; Klejwa, Nathan; Lehrach, Wolfgang; Schatz, Ken; Stark, Heather; Marblestone, Adam; Church, George; Own, Christopher S; Andregg, William

    2013-01-01

    We present "molecular threading", a surface independent tip-based method for stretching and depositing single and double-stranded DNA molecules. DNA is stretched into air at a liquid-air interface, and can be subsequently deposited onto a dry substrate isolated from solution. The design of an apparatus used for molecular threading is presented, and fluorescence and electron microscopies are used to characterize the angular distribution, straightness, and reproducibility of stretched DNA deposited in arrays onto elastomeric surfaces and thin membranes. Molecular threading demonstrates high straightness and uniformity over length scales from nanometers to micrometers, and represents an alternative to existing DNA deposition and linearization methods. These results point towards scalable and high-throughput precision manipulation of single-molecule polymers.

  9. Spherical tensor analysis of polar liquid crystals with biaxial and chiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Zhong-can, Ou-Yang

    2012-11-01

    With the help of spherical tensor expression, an irreducible calculus of a Lth-rank macroscopic susceptibility χ for a polar liquid crystal (PLC) of biaxial and chiral molecules written as the average of molecular hyperpolarizability tensor β associated with their spherical orientational order parameters (0⩽l⩽L) is presented. Comprehensive formulas of L=1,2 have been obtained and the latter explains the optical activity and spontaneous splay texture observed in bent-core PLC. The expression of L=3 specifies for the molecules with D2 symmetry which can be applied to analyze the nonlinear optical second harmonic generation (SHG) observed in proteins, peptides, and double-stranded DNA at interfaces.

  10. Transient self-interaction of light in a liquid-crystal polymer film containing azodye molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, A N

    1999-07-31

    Transient self-interaction of low-power He - Ne laser radiation (1 < 50 mW cm{sup -2} ) in a liquid-crystal polymer film containing chemically bound azodye molecules was observed experimentally. The self-interaction occurred in the region of a temperature-induced phase transition in the polymer film and was accompanied by the formation of quasi-periodic ring-shaped structures in the distribution of the transmitted light intensity. (this issue is dedicated to the memory of s a akhmanov)

  11. Crystal forms of a lysine-49 phospholipase A 2 from the eastern cottonmouth snake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, Laura L.; Rydel, Timothy J.; Muchmore, Steven W.; Holland, Debra R.; Watenpaugh, Keith D.; Finzel, Barry C.; Einspahr, Howard M.

    1990-09-01

    As part of an effort to determine the structure of a lysine-49 variant phospholipase A 2 from the venom of a North American pit viper, the eastern cottonmouth ( Agkistrodon piscivorus piscivorus), we have produced five different crystal forms grown under a variety of crystallization conditions. They include an orthorthombic form (P2 12 12 1 or P2 12 12; a=87.8(3) Å, b=76.2(3) Å, c=57.4(4) Å), an hexagonal form (space group P6 122 or its enantiomer; a= b=62.22(3) Å, c=137.1(3) Å) and two tetragonal forms - a neutral pH form (space group P4 12 12 or its enantiomer; a = b = 81.99(3) Å) and high pH form (space group P4 12 12; a = b = 71.5(1) Å, c = 57.6(2) Å one molecule per asymmetric unit) — the latter of which was used for structure determination.

  12. Effect of confinement on ionic liquid molecules in porous polymeric network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Prasad; Yuan, Shichen; Miyoshi, Toshikazu, , Dr.; Jana, Sadhan, , Dr.

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have attractive physicochemical properties but their room temperature liquid state necessitates pairing of IL with other solid, porous materials for fabrication of devices. Such materials are called ionogels. Loading of bulky IL molecules in the pores can dramatically affect the physical properties as function of the pore surface chemistry, pore size, and IL polarity. In this study porous syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) network was made via thermos-reversible gelation. 1-Butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR14TFSI) is incorporated into the pores of sPS. DSC study and the temperature dependence of 13C-CPMAS NMR show that on confinement; the melting point of PYR14TFSI contained in the ionogel increased in comparison to the bulk PYR14TFSI. At room temperature, WAXD study of the ionogels showed diffraction pattern for PYR14TFSI in nanopores, correspondingly 1H NOESY experiments show strong non-bonded cation-cation correlation in ionogels. The results for the bulk IL does not show non-bonded correlation at room temperature, this increment of local order in ionogel might be the results of crystallization of IL molecules in confined geometry.

  13. Room temperature ionic liquids interacting with bio-molecules: an overview of experimental and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Ballone, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    We briefly review experimental and computational studies of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) interacting with important classes of biomolecules, including phospholipids, peptides and proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates. Most of these studies have been driven by the interest for RTILs applications as solvents. Thus, available experimental data cover primarily thermodynamic properties such as the reciprocal solubility of RTILs and bio-molecules, as well as phase boundaries. Less extensive data are also available on transport properties such as diffusion and viscosity of homogeneous binary (RTILs/biomolecules) and ternary (RTIL/biomolecules/water) solutions. Most of the structural information at the atomistic level, of interest especially for biochemical, pharmaceutical and nanotechnology applications, has been made available by molecular dynamics simulations. Major exceptions to this statement are represented by the results from NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, by selected neutron and X-ray scattering data, and by recent neutron reflectometry measurements on lipid bilayers on surfaces, hydrated by water-RTIL solutions. A final section of our paper summarizes new developments in the field of RTILs based on amino acids, that combine in themselves the two main aspects of our discussion, i.e. ionic liquids and bio-molecules.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary analysis of active nitroalkane oxidase in three crystal forms

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Akanksha; Valley, Michael P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.; Orville, Allen M.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO), a flavoprotein cloned and purified from Fusarium oxysporum, catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones, with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. In this paper, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of three crystal forms of active nitroalkane oxidase are described. The first crystal form belongs to a trigonal space group (either P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.8, c = 487.0 Å) and diffracts to at least 1.6 Å resolution. Several data sets were collected using 2θ and κ geometry in order to obtain a complete data set to 2.07 Å resolution. Solvent-content and Matthews coefficient analysis suggests that crystal form 1 contains two homotetramers per asymmetric unit. Crystal form 2 (P212121; a = 147.3, b = 153.5, c = 169.5 Å) and crystal form 3 (P31 or P32; a = b = 108.9, c = 342.5 Å) are obtained from slightly different conditions and also contain two homotetramers per asymmetric unit, but have different solvent contents. A three-wavelength MAD data set was collected from selenomethionine-enriched NAO (SeMet-NAO) in crystal form 3 and will be used for phasing. PMID:15272176

  15. Extensive database of liquid phase diffusion coefficients of some frequently used test molecules in reversed-phase liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Song, Huiying; Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Adams, Erwin; Desmet, Gert; Cabooter, Deirdre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion plays an important role in all aspects of band broadening in chromatography. An accurate knowledge of molecular diffusion coefficients in different mobile phases is therefore crucial in fundamental column performance studies. Correlations available in literature, such as the Wilke-Chang equation, can provide good approximations of molecular diffusion under reversed-phase conditions. However, these correlations have been demonstrated to be less accurate for mobile phases containing a large percentage of acetonitrile, as is the case in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. A database of experimentally measured molecular diffusion coefficients of some 45 polar and apolar compounds that are frequently used as test molecules under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and reversed-phase conditions is therefore presented. Special attention is given to diffusion coefficients of polar compounds obtained in large percentages of acetonitrile (>90%). The effect of the buffer concentration (5-10mM ammonium acetate) on the obtained diffusion coefficients is investigated and is demonstrated to mainly influence the molecular diffusion of charged molecules. Diffusion coefficients are measured using the Taylor-Aris method and hence deduced from the peak broadening of a solute when flowing through a long open tube. The validity of the set-up employed for the measurement of the diffusion coefficients is demonstrated by ruling out the occurrence of longitudinal diffusion, secondary flow interactions and extra-column effects, while it is also shown that radial equilibration in the 15m long capillary is effective.

  16. Ultrafast molecular dynamics of liquid aromatic molecules and the mixtures with CCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    The ultrafast molecular dynamics of liquid aromatic molecules, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, cumene, and 1,3-diphenylpropane, and the mixtures with CCl4 have been investigated by means of femtosecond optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. The picosecond Kerr transients of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and cumene and the mixtures with CCl4 show a biexponential feature. 1,3-Diphenylpropane and the mixtures with CCl4 show triexponential picosecond Kerr transients. The slow relaxation time constants of the aromatic molecules and the mixtures with CCl4 are qualitatively described by the Stoke-Einstein-Debye hydrodynamic model. The ultrafast dynamics have been discussed based on the Kerr spectra in the frequency range of 0-800 cm-1 obtained by the Fourier transform analysis of the Kerr transients. The line shapes of the low-frequency intermolecular spectra located at 0-180 cm-1 frequency range have been analyzed by two Brownian oscillators (˜11 cm-1 and ˜45 cm-1 peaks) and an antisymmetric Gaussian function (˜65 cm-1 peak). The spectrum shape of 1,3-diphenylpropane is quite different from the spectrum shapes of the other aromatic molecules for the low magnitude of the low-frequency mode of 1,3-diphenylpropane and/or an intramolecular vibration. Although the concentration dependences of the low- and intermediate-frequency intermolecular modes (Brownian oscillators) do not show a significant trend, the width of high-frequency intermolecular mode (antisymmetric Gaussian) becomes narrower with the higher CCl4 concentration for all the aromatics mixtures with CCl4. The result indicates that the inhomogeneity of the intermolecular vibrational mode in aromatics/CCl4 mixtures is decreasing with the lower concentration of aromatics. The intramolecular vibrational modes of the aromatic molecules observed in the Kerr spectra are also shown with the calculation results based on the density functional theory.

  17. Diffusion of permanent liquid dye molecules in human hair investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekara, M N; Ranganathaiah, C

    2009-02-15

    The diffusion behavior of a commercial permanent liquid hair dye in human hair has been investigated using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and gravimetric sorption method. The positron technique makes it possible to non-invasively characterize the angstrom sized free volume holes in hair, which are supposed to be express pathways for diffusion of small molecules. The o-Ps lifetime parameters tau3 and I3 decrease rapidly during the first 60 min of sorption time. The overall decrease in o-Ps lifetime (tau3) was well over 200 ps and o-Ps intensity (I3) drops by 3.5%. These positron results are explained in terms of dye molecules filling the free volume holes and hair morphology. The dye penetrates the cuticle rapidly, but slowly in cortex. The first hour of dyeing appears to be the most effective period of deposition of dye molecules within hair. These results are well corroborated by the sorption results which suggest that the dye diffusion is essentially a diffusion controlled (i.e. Fickian) process, with no observable relaxation effects. In the latter part of the sorption, where positron parameters remain almost constant, mass increase might be due to surface adhesion. These two stages of sorption are well separated by the positron technique. The sorption curve also yielded an average value of apparent diffusivity of the dye in hair. From this study, we conclude that the free volume theory and positron technique, widely used in polymer research, may expediently be used to understand hair properties, more importantly diffusion of dye molecules.

  18. Review of crystalline structures of some selected homologous series of rod-like molecules capable of forming liquid crystalline phases.

    PubMed

    Zugenmaier, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structures of four homologous series of rod-like molecules are reviewed, two of which form hydrogen bonds and two with a symmetric chemical constitution. Many of the compounds investigated turn into liquid crystalline phases upon temperature increase. It is of valuable interest to know possible conformations and possible packing arrangements as prerequisites to model liquid crystalline structures. The hydrogen bonds of homologous series of pure 4-(ω-hydroxyalkyloxy)-4'-hydroxybiphenyl (HnHBP, n the alkyloxy tail length) are realized through head to tail arrangements of the hydroxyl groups and crystallize except one compound in chiral space groups without the molecules containing any asymmetric carbon. The hydrogen bonds of the homologous series of 4-substituted benzoic acids with various lengths of the tail provide dimers through strong polar bonding of adjacent carboxyl groups and thus provide the stiff part of a mesogenic unit prerequisite for liquid crystalline phases. The homologous series of dialkanoyloxybiphenyls (BP-n, n = 1, 19), of which nine compounds could be crystallized, show liquid crystalline behavior for longer alkane chain lengths, despite the high mobility of the alkane chain ends already detectable in the crystal phase. A single molecule, half a molecule or two half molecules form the asymmetric unit in a centrosymmetric space group. The homologous series of 1,4-terephthalidene-bis-N-(4'-n-alkylaniline) (TBAA-n) exhibit a large variety of packing arrangements in the crystalline state, with or without relying on the symmetry center within the molecules.

  19. Solvated water molecules and hydrogen-bridged networks in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corongiu, Giorgina; Clementi, Enrico

    1993-02-01

    We have analyzed the molecular-dynamics (MD) trajectories for the oxygen and hydrogen atoms of liquid water, at six temperatures (from hot, T=361 K, to supercooled water, T=242 K); in the MD simulations the Nieser-Corongiu-Clementi ab initio potential has been used, since it yields reliable x-ray and neutron-diffraction data as well as infrared, Raman, and neutron-scattering spectra. Our analysis leads to two complementary models where we can consider each water as a solvated molecule (placed at the center of a solvation shell) or as a component of a cyclic polymer, a substructure of the hydrogen-bonded network. In the first solvation shell all water molecules are solvated with coordination values in the range 2-8. The most probable solvation number is four, at low temperature, and five at high temperature considering oxygen-oxygen pairs; however, the coordination number is four at all the temperatures if we consider oxygen-hydrogen pairs. The lifetime of the tetra coordinated complexes is the largest one and increases as temperature decreases. The computed population of cyclic polymers is highest for the pentameters in the studied temperature range, the second most probable cyclic structure is for hexamers. The average O-O distances in the liquid are temperature dependent and shorter than those in the gas phase, approaching ice values at low temperature (except for cyclic trimers, for which the O-O distance is nearly temperature independent). As a preliminary result, the lifetime of the polygons is estimated to be around 0.01 ps.

  20. Two-dimensional self-assembly of dendritic amphiphilic molecule with ferroncenyl subsitutuents at the liquid/solid interface.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinrui; Cheng, Zhiyu; Xu, Li; Ren, Biye; Deng, Wenli

    2013-02-01

    Two-dimensional self-assembly of dendritic amphiphilic molecule with ferroncenyl subsitutuents (2,3,4-tri-(11-ferroncenyl)undecyloxybenzoic acid, Fc3COOH) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy at the liquid/solid interface. Fc3COOH molecule formed an ordered molecular nanostructure--an alternating big/small bright dots pattern on the graphite surface extended to several hundred nanometers. On the basis of the simulation and combined with our STM results, it is concluded that the molecular adsorption conformation has an appreciable effect on the interactions of molecule-molecule and molecule-substrate. The pi-pi interactions between ferrocene groups together with the van der Waals interactions between alkyl chains direct the stacking behavior of Fc3COOH molecules. Due to the steric constraints, no hydrogen bonding between the carboxyl groups was formed during the self-assembly.

  1. Relaxation of rotational angular momentum of polar diatomic molecules in simple liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, A.; Perez, J.

    2007-03-15

    The relaxation processes of rotational angular momentum of polar diatomic molecules diluted in simple liquids are analyzed by applying a non-Markovian relaxation theory to the study of the binary time autocorrelation function of the angular momentum. This non-Markovian theory was previously applied to the study of the infrared and Raman spectroscopy, and also to the analysis of the rotational energy relaxation processes. We have obtained non-Markovian evolution equations for the two-time j-level angular momentum correlation components involved in the angular momentum correlation function. In these equations, the time-dependent angular momentum transfer rates and the pure orientational angular transfer rates are given in terms of the binary time autocorrelation function of the diatomic-solvent anisotropic interaction. The non-Markovian evolution equations converge to Markovian ones in the long time limit, reaching the angular momentum transfer rates in the usual time-independent form. Alternative time scales for the angular relaxation processes, relative to the individual rotational processes as well as to the global decay correlations, are introduced and analyzed. The theory is applied to the study of the angular momentum relaxation processes of HCl diluted in liquid SF{sub 6}, a system for which rotational energy relaxation and infrared and Raman spectroscopy was previously analyzed in the scope of the same theory.

  2. The electro-optical behavior of liquid crystal molecules on the surface of SiO2 inorganic thin films.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shi-Joon; Yang, Kee-Jeong; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Do, Yun Seon; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Byeong-Dae

    2009-12-01

    Inorganic thin films are well known for the liquid crystal alignment layers for LCoS application due to the higher thermal and photochemical stability of inorganic materials. The switching time of liquid crystals is the important factor for the projection application and the faster switching time is required for the high quality display. The switching behavior of liquid crystal molecules on inorganic thin films might be closely related with the surface properties of the inorganic thin films. Therefore the understanding of surface properties of the inorganic thin films is required for the enhancement of the switching time of liquid crystals of LCoS devices. In this work, we prepared the SiO2 inorganic thin films and the electro-optical behavior of liquid crystal molecules on SiO2 thin film was investigated. The sputtering condition of SiO2 thin film was closely related with the thickness and the surface morphology of SiO2 thin film. The switching time of liquid crystals with negative dielectric constant on SiO2 inorganic thin films was dominantly affected by the size of protrusion on the surface of SiO2 thin film and the surface roughness of SiO2 thin film was also related with the switching time of liquid crystals. From these results, it is possible to prepare the SiO2 inorganic thin film suitable for the liquid crystal alignment layer for VAN LC mode.

  3. Manipulation of an existing crystal form unexpectedly results in interwoven packing networks with pseudo-translational symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Janice M.; Aloise, Martin N.; Powell, Harold R.; Schmeing, T. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multimodular enzymes that synthesize a myriad of diverse molecules. Tailoring domains have been co-opted into NRPSs to introduce further variety into nonribosomal peptide products. Linear gramicidin synthetase contains a unique formylation-tailoring domain in its initiation module (F-A-PCP). The structure of the F-A di-domain has previously been determined in a crystal form which had large solvent channels and no density for the minor Asub subdomain. An attempt was made to take advantage of this packing by removing the Asub subdomain from the construct (F-AΔsub) in order to produce a crystal that could accommodate the PCP domain. In the resulting crystal the original packing network was still present, but a second network with the same packing and almost no contact with the original network took the place of the solvent channels and changed the space group of the crystal. PMID:27710934

  4. Real-time single-molecule observations of proteins at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Blake Brianna

    Non-specific protein adsorption to solid surfaces is pervasive and observed across a broad spectrum of applications including biomaterials, separations, pharmaceuticals, and biosensing. Despite great interest in and considerable literature dedicated to the phenomena, a mechanistic understanding of this complex phenomena is lacking and remains controversial, partially due to the limits of ensemble-averaging techniques used to study it. Single-molecule tracking (SMT) methods allow us to study distinct protein dynamics (e.g. adsorption, desorption, diffusion, and intermolecular associations) on a molecule-by-molecule basis revealing the protein population and spatial heterogeneity inherent in protein interfacial behavior. By employing single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (SM-TIRFM), we have developed SMT methods to directly observe protein interfacial dynamics at the solid-liquid interface to build a better mechanistic understanding of protein adsorption. First, we examined the effects of surface chemistry (e.g. hydrophobicity, hydrogen-bonding capacity), temperature, and electrostatics on isolated protein desorption and interfacial diffusion for fibrinogen (Fg) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Next, we directly and indirectly probed the effects of protein-protein interactions on interfacial desorption, diffusion, aggregation, and surface spatial heterogeneity on model and polymeric thin films. These studies provided many useful insights into interfacial protein dynamics including the following observations. First, protein adsorption was reversible, with the majority of proteins desorbing from all surface chemistries within seconds. Isolated protein-surface interactions were relatively weak on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces (apparent desorption activation energies of only a few kBT). However, proteins could dynamically and reversibly associate at the interface, and these interfacial associations led to proteins remaining on the

  5. Investigations of the Structure and Hydrogen Bonding of Water Molecules at Liquid Surfaces by Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    studies conducted for the first time at liquid surfaces are also described. In these studies the intermolecular and intramolecular coupling of vibrational ... modes in the water molecules are diminished. The results of these and above mentioned studies provide valuable information for those interested in developing theoretical descriptions of water at surfaces and interfaces.

  6. Ionic liquid crystals formed by self-assembly around an anionic anthracene core.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jean-Hubert; Camerel, Franck; Barberá, Joaquín; Retailleau, Pascal; Ziessel, Raymond

    2009-08-17

    We have designed and synthesised a series of modular, mesogenic complexes based on anthracene-2,6-disulfonate and trialkoxybenzyl-functionalised imidazolium cations. Each complex contains a central, rigid, dianionic anthracene core and two flexible monocations bearing paraffin chains anchored on imidazolium rings. Anthracene-2,6-disulfonate can be crystallised with various simple alkylammonium ions and, in the case of +N(CH3)2(C16H33)2, a crystal structure determination has shown that the long paraffinic chains are intercalated between the anthracene moieties. The dianion forms columnar mesophases with trialkoxybenzylimidazolium cations, as identified by polarising optical microscopy and X-ray scattering measurements. Differential scanning calorimetry studies confirmed mesomorphic behaviour from room temperature to about 200 degrees C for alkyl chains containing 8, 12 and 16 carbon atoms. The strong luminescence of anthracene is maintained in the mesophase and fluorescence measurements confirmed the presence of J aggregates in all cases. The new functional materials described herein provide an easy access to stable and luminescent mesomorphic materials engineered by an ionic self-assembly process.

  7. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (II): Applications to formation and combustion reactions of liquid organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM), which was recently developed for evaluating condensed-phase thermodynamics by quantum chemical calculations (Nakai and Ishikawa, 2014), was applied to formation and combustion reactions of simple organic molecules. The conventional ideal gas model (IGM) considerably overestimated the entropies of the liquid molecules. The HSM could significantly improve this overestimation; mean absolute deviations for the Gibbs energies of the formation and combustion reactions were (49.6, 26.7) for the IGM and (9.7, 5.4) for the HSM in kJ/mol.

  8. Indirect estimation of structural nanoheterogeneity of crystal-forming media (melts)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askhabov, Askhab

    2015-04-01

    Many experimental data testifying of ultramicroheterogeneous structure (nanoheterogeneity) of crystal-forming media has been accumulated by this time [1]. Numerous attempts of theoretical substantiation of existence in supersaturated (overcooled) medium of differently structured atomic-molecular formations named differently-associates, clusters etc. are also widely known. In particular, formation in crystal-forming media of specific nanoclusters of "hidden phase" (quatarons) is the key idea of the concept of cluster self-organization of matter at nanolevel in nonequilibrium conditions, developed by us [2]. However the question on whether there is any connection between structured of medium and such a fundamental its characteristic as surface tension (specific surface energy) was not discussed yet. In this work we propose a simple way of determination of the first correction to surface energy (tension) on curvature of interphase boundary, on this basis an attempt on the solution of the problem of connection of the crystal - forming media structure with values of their surface energy is undertaken. The question theory is given in our earlier published work [3]. As a result we obtained the data that evidence of nanoheterogeneity of crystal-forming media even near to equilibrium. According to the calculations made under the obtained formulas with use of known values of surface tension of melts, the quataron structures characterizing structural nanoheterogeneity of crystal-forming media, close to melting temperature represent cluster formation consisting of small number of atoms. In geometrical interpretation, despite the non - rigid structure and oscillating character of bonds between atoms, the quatarons in most cases can be characterized in terms of simple polyhedrons - from an octahedron with number of surface atoms n=6 to truncated icosahedrons (n=60). It is also obvious that these areas of structural nanoheterogeneity in melt can be considered as an area of short

  9. "Bicontinuous cubic" liquid crystalline materials from discotic molecules: a special effect of paraffinic side chains with ionic liquid pendants.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Akhtarul; Motoyanagi, Jin; Yamamoto, Yohei; Fukushima, Takanori; Kim, Jungeun; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Tagawa, Seiichi; Aida, Takuzo

    2009-12-16

    Triphenylene (TP) derivatives bearing appropriate paraffinic side chains with imidazolium ion-based ionic liquid (IL) pendants were unveiled to display a phase diagram with liquid crystalline (LC) mesophases of bicontinuous cubic (Cub(bi)) and hexagonal columnar (Col(h)) geometries. While their phase transition behaviors are highly dependent on the length of the side chains and the size of the ionic liquid pendants, TPs with hexadecyl side chains exclusively form a Cub(bi) LC assembly over an extremely wide temperature range of approximately 200 degrees C from room temperature when the anions of the IL pendants are relatively small. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis suggested that the Cub(bi) LC mesophase contains pi-stacked columnar TP arrays with a plane-to-plane separation of approximately 3.5 A. Consistently, upon laser flash photolysis, it showed a transient microwave conductivity comparable to that of a Col(h) LC reference.

  10. Preliminary characterization of two different crystal forms of acylphosphatase from the hyperthermophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Zuccotti, Simone; Rosano, Camillo; Bemporad, Francesco; Stefani, Massimo; Bolognesi, Martino

    2005-01-01

    S. solfataricus acylphosphatase has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. Preliminary characterization of a triclinic and a monoclinic crystal form is reported and data were collected to 1.27 and 1.90 Å, respectively. Acylphosphatase is a ubiquitous small enzyme that was first characterized in mammals. It is involved in the hydrolysis of carboxyl-phosphate bonds in several acylphosphate substrates, such as carbamoylphosphate and 1,3-biphosphoglycerate; however, a consensus on acylphosphatase action in vivo has not yet been reached. Recent investigations have focused on acylphosphatases from lower phyla, such as Drosophila melanogaster and Escherichia coli, in view of the application of these small proteins as models in the study of folding, misfolding and aggregation processes. An acylphosphatase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has been cloned, expressed and purified. Here, the growth and characterization of a triclinic and a monoclinic crystal form of the hyperthermophilic enzyme are reported; X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.27 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively.

  11. Salt or cocrystal of salt? Probing the nature of multicomponent crystal forms with infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Cameron Capeletti; Guimarães, Freddy Fernandes; Ribeiro, Leandro; Martins, Felipe Terra

    2016-10-01

    The recognition of the nature of a multicomponent crystal form (solvate, salt, cocrystal or cocrystal of salt) is of great importance for pharmaceutical industry because it is directly related to the performance of a pharmaceutical ingredient, since there is interdependence between the structure, its energy and its physical properties. In this context, here we have identified the nature of multicomponent crystal forms of the anti-HIV drug lamivudine with mandelic acid through infrared spectroscopy. These investigated crystal forms were the known S-mandelic acid cocrystal of lamivudine R-mandelate trihydrate (1), a cocrystal of salt, and lamivudine R-mandelate (2), a salt. This approach also supports the identification and distinction of both ionized and unionized forms of mandelic acid in the infrared spectrum of 1. In this way, infrared spectroscopy can be useful to distinguish a cocrystal of salt from either salt or cocrystal forms. In the course of this study, for the first time we have also characterized and determined the crystal structure of R-mandelic acid cocrystal of sodium R-mandelate (3).

  12. Sent packing: protein engineering generates a new crystal form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DsbA1 with increased catalytic surface accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Roisin M. Coinçon, Mathieu; Tay, Stephanie; Heras, Begoña; Morton, Craig J.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2015-11-26

    The crystal structure of a P. aeruginosa DsbA1 variant is more suitable for fragment-based lead discovery efforts to identify inhibitors of this antimicrobial drug target. In the reported structures the active site of the protein can simultaneously bind multiple ligands introduced in the crystallization solution or via soaking. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen for which new antimicrobial drug options are urgently sought. P. aeruginosa disulfide-bond protein A1 (PaDsbA1) plays a pivotal role in catalyzing the oxidative folding of multiple virulence proteins and as such holds great promise as a drug target. As part of a fragment-based lead discovery approach to PaDsbA1 inhibitor development, the identification of a crystal form of PaDsbA1 that was more suitable for fragment-soaking experiments was sought. A previously identified crystallization condition for this protein was unsuitable, as in this crystal form of PaDsbA1 the active-site surface loops are engaged in the crystal packing, occluding access to the target site. A single residue involved in crystal-packing interactions was substituted with an amino acid commonly found at this position in closely related enzymes, and this variant was successfully used to generate a new crystal form of PaDsbA1 in which the active-site surface is more accessible for soaking experiments. The PaDsbA1 variant displays identical redox character and in vitro activity to wild-type PaDsbA1 and is structurally highly similar. Two crystal structures of the PaDsbA1 variant were determined in complex with small molecules bound to the protein active site. These small molecules (MES, glycerol and ethylene glycol) were derived from the crystallization or cryoprotectant solutions and provide a proof of principle that the reported crystal form will be amenable to co-crystallization and soaking with small molecules designed to target the protein active-site surface.

  13. Determination of the structure of liquids containing free radical molecules: Inter-molecular correlations in liquid chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakura, H.; Ogata, N.; Kawakita, Y.; Ohara, K.; Takeda, S.

    2013-04-01

    X-ray diffraction spectra of liquid ClO2 at 204, 223, 248 and 273 K were measured at the BL04B2 beamline in the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The obtained structure factors are well reproduced by reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) structural modelling. With increasing temperature, the first peak located at around Q = 1.8 Å -1 slightly shifts to higher Q and the tail at the lower-Q side intensifies. In the pair distribution function, g(r), the intensity of the peak at around 3.2 Å that corresponds to the nearest-neighbour distance decreases with increasing temperature. The analysis of the RMC configurations shows that strong directional O-O interaction exists in liquid ClO2 and the instantaneous inter-molecular orientation depends on this interaction.

  14. Premelted liquid water in frozen soils and its interaction with bio-molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, H.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    While liquid water in bulk is unstable on the surface of Mars, there is a possibility for the persistence of thin films of liquid water in the Martian regolith as a result of interfacial forces between the interstitial ice and the soil grains even below the bulk melting temperature. This is referred to as premelting. We present a calculation of the liquid fraction of frozen soils which takes into account premelting in combination with the effect of ionic impurities and the curvature induced freezing point depression (Gibbs-Thomson effect). We introduce a revised density functional theory which accurately treats a simple model for confined liquid water. We use the theory to study how biological matter (antifreeze proteins in particular) inside a narrow liquid cavity in ice interacts with the surrounding ice-water interface. Because in this case the interface is concave and hence the Gibbs-Thomson effect is antagonistic to the liquid phase, the protein-ice interaction is responsible for the persistence of liquid water.

  15. Comparison of four different crystal forms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESX-1 secreted protein regulator EspR.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Shanti P; Meena, Sita R; Saxena, Ajay K

    2014-04-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESX-1 secreted protein regulator (EspR, Rv3849) is the key protein that delivers bacterial proteins into the host cell during mycobacterial infection. EspR binds directly to the espACD operon and is involved in transcriptional activation. In the current study, M. tuberculosis EspR has been crystallized and its X-ray structure has been determined at 3.3 Å resolution in a P3221 crystal form. EspR forms a physiological dimer in the crystal. Each EspR monomer contains an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. The EspR structure in the P3221 crystal form was compared with previously determined EspR structures in P32, P21 and P212121 crystal forms. Structural comparison analysis indicated that the N-terminal helix-turn-helix domain of EspR acquires a rigid structure in the four crystal forms. However, significant structural differences were observed in the C-terminal domain of EspR in the P21 crystal form when compared with the P3221 and P32 crystal forms. The interaction, stabilization energy and buried surface area analysis of EspR in the four different crystal forms have provided information about the physiological dimer interface of EspR.

  16. Influence of pH, particle size and crystal form on dissolution behaviour of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Avramescu, M-L; Rasmussen, P E; Chénier, M; Gardner, H D

    2017-01-01

    Solubility is a critical component of physicochemical characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and an important parameter in their risk assessments. Standard testing methodologies are needed to estimate the dissolution behaviour and biodurability (half-life) of ENMs in biological fluids. The effect of pH, particle size and crystal form on dissolution behaviour of zinc metal, ZnO and TiO2 was investigated using a simple 2 h solubility assay at body temperature (37 °C) and two pH conditions (1.5 and 7) to approximately frame the pH range found in human body fluids. Time series dissolution experiments were then conducted to determine rate constants and half-lives. Dissolution characteristics of investigated ENMs were compared with those of their bulk analogues for both pH conditions. Two crystal forms of TiO2 were considered: anatase and rutile. For all compounds studied, and at both pH conditions, the short solubility assays and the time series experiments consistently showed that biodurability of the bulk analogues was equal to or greater than biodurability of the corresponding nanomaterials. The results showed that particle size and crystal form of inorganic ENMs were important properties that influenced dissolution behaviour and biodurability. All ENMs and bulk analogues displayed significantly higher solubility at low pH than at neutral pH. In the context of classification and read-across approaches, the pH of the dissolution medium was the key parameter. The main implication is that pH and temperature should be specified in solubility testing when evaluating ENM dissolution in human body fluids, even for preliminary (tier 1) screening.

  17. Intramolecular electron transfer within a covalent, fixed-distance donor-acceptor molecule in an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Jenny V; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2007-10-11

    Intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and recombination within the donor-acceptor molecule 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide-pyromellitimide, 5ANI-PI, are studied using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy in the room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [EMIM][Tf2N]. The rate constants of both photoinduced charge separation and charge recombination for 5ANI-PI in [EMIM][Tf2N] are comparable to those observed in pyridine, which has a static dielectric constant similar to that of [EMIM][Tf2N] but a viscosity that is nearly 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of [EMIM][Tf2N]. The electron-transfer dynamics of 5ANI-PI in [EMIM][Tf2N] are compared to those in pyridine as a function of temperature and are discussed in the context of recently reported ionic liquid solvation studies.

  18. Cybotactic behavior in the de Vries smectic-A* liquid-crystal structure formed by a silicon-containing molecule.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Shin, Tae Joo; Gong, Tao; Shen, Yongqiang; Korblova, Eva; Shao, Renfan; Walba, David M; Clark, Noel A; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2014-03-01

    We have identified a metastable liquid-crystal (LC) structure in the de Vries smectic-A* phase (de Vries Sm-A*) formed by silicon-containing molecules under certain boundary conditions. The phase transition with the metastable structure was observed in a LC droplet placed on a planar aligned substrate and LCs confined in the groove of a silicon microchannel. During the rapid cooling step, a batonnet structure was generated as an intermediate and metastable state prior to the transition that yielded the thermodynamically stable toric focal conic domains. This distinctive behavior was characterized using depolarized reflection light microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction techniques. We concluded that the silicon groups in the molecules that formed the de Vries phase induced the formation of layered clusters called cybotactic structures. This observation is relevant to an exploration of the physical properties of cybotactic de Vries phases and gives a hint as to their optoelectronic applications.

  19. Cybotactic behavior in the de Vries smectic-A* liquid-crystal structure formed by a silicon-containing molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Shin, Tae Joo; Gong, Tao; Shen, Yongqiang; Korblova, Eva; Shao, Renfan; Walba, David M.; Clark, Noel A.; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2014-03-01

    We have identified a metastable liquid-crystal (LC) structure in the de Vries smectic-A* phase (de Vries Sm-A*) formed by silicon-containing molecules under certain boundary conditions. The phase transition with the metastable structure was observed in a LC droplet placed on a planar aligned substrate and LCs confined in the groove of a silicon microchannel. During the rapid cooling step, a batonnet structure was generated as an intermediate and metastable state prior to the transition that yielded the thermodynamically stable toric focal conic domains. This distinctive behavior was characterized using depolarized reflection light microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction techniques. We concluded that the silicon groups in the molecules that formed the de Vries phase induced the formation of layered clusters called cybotactic structures. This observation is relevant to an exploration of the physical properties of cybotactic de Vries phases and gives a hint as to their optoelectronic applications.

  20. The Amphiphilic Character of Cellulose Molecules in True Solution in Solvent Mixtures Containing Ionic Liquid and its Utilization in Emulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napso, Sofia; Cohen, Yachin; Rein, Dmitry; Khalfin, Rafail; Szekely, Noemi

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable material in nature that is utilized as a raw material for fabrication of synthetic products. Although it is not soluble in common solvents, there is significant interest in the use of solvent mixtures containing ionic liquids (IL) and polar organic solvents for cellulose dissolution. We present evidence for true molecular dissolution of cellulose in binary mixtures of common polar organic solvents with an ionic liquid, using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, small-angle neutron-, x-ray- and static light scattering. In particular, the measured low values of the molecular, gyration radius and persistence length indicate the absence of significant aggregation of the dissolved chains. We conjecture that the dissolved cellulose chains are amphiphilic. This can be inferred from the facile fabrication of cellulose-encapsulated colloidal oil-in-water or water-in-oil dispersions. This may be done by mixing water, oil and cellulose solution in an ionic liquid. A more practical alternative is to form first a hydrogel from the cellulose/ionic liquid solution by coagulation with water and applying it to sonicated water/oil or oil/water mixtures. Apparently the dissolution/ regeneration process affords higher mobility to the cellulose molecules so an encapsulation coating can be formed at the water-oil interface.

  1. Interpretation of unusual textures in the B2 phase of a liquid crystal composed of bent-core molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J.; Folcia, C.; Etxebarria, J.; Gimeno, N.; Ros, M.

    2003-07-01

    A liquid crystal material of bent-core molecules is investigated by means of optical texture observations, x-ray measurements, and miscibility studies. While the x-ray and miscibility data point towards a B2 phase, the texture is however unusual, showing optical isotropy and segregation in two domains with opposite gyrations. It is shown that the texture can be interpreted successfully in terms of a smectic-CAPA structure in small domains with random orientations. The optical activity data are also explained semiquantitatively.

  2. Liquid Crystalline Assembly of Coil-Rod-Coil Molecules with Lateral Methyl Groups into 3-D Hexagonal and Tetragonal Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuoshi; Lan, Yu; Zhong, Keli; Liang, Yongri; Chen, Tie; Jin, Long Yi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis and self-assembly behavior of coil-rod-coil molecules, consisting of three biphenyls linked through a vinylene unit as a conjugated rod segment and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 7, 12 and 17, incorporating lateral methyl groups between the rod and coil segments as the coil segment. Self-organized investigation of these molecules by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal polarized optical microscopy (POM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals that the lateral methyl groups attached to the surface of rod and coil segments, dramatically influence the self-assembling behavior in the liquid-crystalline mesophase. Molecule 1 with a relatively short PEO coil length (DP = 7) self-assembles into rectangular and oblique 2-dimensional columnar assemblies, whereas molecules 2 and 3 with DP of 12 and 17 respectively, spontaneously self-organize into unusual 3-dimensional hexagonal close-packed or body-centered tetragonal assemblies. PMID:24699045

  3. Intense pumping and time- and frequency-resolved CARS for driving and tracking structural deformation and recovery of liquid nitromethane molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chang; Wu, Hong-lin; Song, Yun-fei; He, Xing; Yang, Yan-qiang; Tan, Duo-wang

    2015-11-01

    A modified CARS technique with an intense nonresonant femtosecond laser is presented to drive the structural deformation of liquid nitromethane molecules and track their structural relaxation process. The CARS spectra reveal that the internal rotation of the molecule can couple with the CN symmetric stretching vibration and the molecules undergo ultrafast structural deformation of the CH3 groups from 'opened umbrella' to 'closed umbrella' shape, and then experience a structural recovery process within 720 fs.

  4. Molecule-specific interactions of diatomic adsorbates at metal-liquid interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Kaech, Andres; Hamm, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast vibrational dynamics of small molecules on platinum (Pt) layers in water are investigated using 2D attenuated total reflectance IR spectroscopy. Isotope combinations of carbon monoxide and cyanide are used to elucidate inter-adsorbate and substrate-adsorbate interactions. Despite observed cross-peaks in the CO spectra, we conclude that the molecules are not vibrationally coupled. Rather, strong substrate-adsorbate interactions evoke rapid (∼2 ps) vibrational relaxation from the adsorbate into the Pt layer, leading to thermal cross-peaks. In the case of CN, vibrational relaxation is significantly slower (∼10 ps) and dominated by adsorbate-solvent interactions, while the coupling to the substrate is negligible.

  5. Structure and dynamics of high- and low-density water molecules in the liquid and supercooled regimes.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Joan Manuel; Rodriguez Fris, J Ariel; Accordino, Sebastián R; Malaspina, David C; Appignanesi, Gustavo A

    2016-12-01

    By combining the local structure index with potential energy minimisations we study the local environment of the water molecules for a couple of water models, TIP5P-Ew and SPC/E, in order to characterise low- and high-density "species". Both models show a similar behaviour within the supercooled regime, with two clearly distinguishable populations of unstructured and structured molecules, the fraction of the latter increasing with supercooling. Additionally, for TIP5P-Ew, we find that the structured component vanishes quickly at the normal liquid regime (above the melting temperature). Thus, while SPC/E provides a fraction of structured molecules similar to that found in X-ray experiments, we show that TIP5P-Ew underestimates such value. Moreover, unlike SPC/E, we demonstrate that TIP5P-Ew does not follow the linear dependence of the logarithm of the structured fraction with inverse temperature, as predicted by the two-order parameter model. Finally, we link structure to dynamics by showing that there exists a strong correlation between structural fluctuation and dynamics in the supercooled state with spatial correlations in both static and dynamic quantities.

  6. Label-free liquid crystal biosensor for L-histidine: A DNAzyme-based platform for small molecule assay.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shuzhen; Ding, Huazhi; Wu, Yan; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a novel DNAzyme-based liquid crystal (LC) biosensor with high sensitivity for L-histidine, which is based on L-histidine-mediated formation of DNA duplexes by cleaving DNAzyme using L-histidine, resulting in a remarkable optical signal. Firstly, an optimal amount of capture probe is bound to the glass slide, which changes the surface topology as little as possible and shows a zero-background for the sensing system. When the DNAzyme molecule is cleaved by the target, L-histidine, a partial substrate strand is produced, which in turn can hybridize with the capture probe, forming a DNA duplex. The DNA duplexes induce LC molecules to undergo a homeotropic-to-tiled transition, obtaining a remarkable optical signal. The results show that the DNAzyme-based LC biosensor is highly sensitive to L-histidine with a detection limit of 50 nM. Compared with previously reported multi-step amplified methods, this newly designed assay system for L-histidine has no amplified procedures with comparable sensitivity. This method is an unprecedented example of DNAzyme-based LC biosensor for small molecules, which has potential to offer a DNAzyme-based LC model used in various targets.

  7. Role of quantum fluctuations in structural dynamics of liquids of light molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, A.; Novikov, V. N.; Kisliuk, A.; Richert, R.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    A possible role of quantum effects, such as tunneling and zero-point energy, in the structural dynamics of supercooled liquids is studied by dielectric spectroscopy. The presented results demonstrate that the liquids, bulk 3-methyl pentane and confined normal and deuterated water, have low glass transition temperature and unusually low for their class of materials steepness of the temperature dependence of structural relaxation (fragility). Although we do not find any signs of tunneling in the structural relaxation of these liquids, their unusually low fragility can be well described by the influence of the quantum fluctuations. Confined water presents an especially interesting case in comparison to the earlier data on bulk low-density amorphous and vapor deposited water. Confined water exhibits a much weaker isotope effect than bulk water, although the effect is still significant. We show that it can be ascribed to the change of the energy barrier for relaxation due to a decrease in the zero-point energy upon D/H substitution. The observed difference in the behavior of confined and bulk water demonstrates high sensitivity of quantum effects to the barrier heights and structure of water. Moreover, these results demonstrate that extrapolation of confined water properties to the bulk water behavior is questionable.

  8. Role of quantum fluctuations in structural dynamics of liquids of light molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, A.; Novikov, V. N.; Kisliuk, A.; Richert, R.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2016-12-16

    A possible role of quantum effects, such as tunneling and zero-point energy, in the structural dynamics of supercooled liquids is studied by dielectric spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that the liquids, bulk 3-methyl pentane and confined normal and deuterated water, have low glass transition temperature and unusually low for their class of materials steepness of the temperature dependence of structural relaxation (fragility). Although we do not find any signs of tunneling in the structural relaxation of these liquids, their unusually low fragility can be well described by the influence of the quantum fluctuations. Confined water presents an especially interesting case in comparison to the earlier data on bulk low-density amorphous and vapor deposited water. Confined water exhibits a much weaker isotope effect than bulk water, although the effect is still significant. Here, we show that it can be ascribed to the change of the energy barrier for relaxation due to a decrease in the zeropoint energy upon D/H substitution. We observed a difference in the behavior of confined and bulk water demonstrates high sensitivity of quantum effects to the barrier heights and structure of water. Moreover, these results demonstrate that extrapolation of confined water properties to the bulk water behavior is questionable.

  9. Role of quantum fluctuations in structural dynamics of liquids of light molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Agapov, A.; Novikov, V. N.; Kisliuk, A.; ...

    2016-12-16

    A possible role of quantum effects, such as tunneling and zero-point energy, in the structural dynamics of supercooled liquids is studied by dielectric spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that the liquids, bulk 3-methyl pentane and confined normal and deuterated water, have low glass transition temperature and unusually low for their class of materials steepness of the temperature dependence of structural relaxation (fragility). Although we do not find any signs of tunneling in the structural relaxation of these liquids, their unusually low fragility can be well described by the influence of the quantum fluctuations. Confined water presents an especially interesting case inmore » comparison to the earlier data on bulk low-density amorphous and vapor deposited water. Confined water exhibits a much weaker isotope effect than bulk water, although the effect is still significant. Here, we show that it can be ascribed to the change of the energy barrier for relaxation due to a decrease in the zeropoint energy upon D/H substitution. We observed a difference in the behavior of confined and bulk water demonstrates high sensitivity of quantum effects to the barrier heights and structure of water. Moreover, these results demonstrate that extrapolation of confined water properties to the bulk water behavior is questionable.« less

  10. Role of quantum fluctuations in structural dynamics of liquids of light molecules.

    PubMed

    Agapov, A; Novikov, V N; Kisliuk, A; Richert, R; Sokolov, A P

    2016-12-21

    A possible role of quantum effects, such as tunneling and zero-point energy, in the structural dynamics of supercooled liquids is studied by dielectric spectroscopy. The presented results demonstrate that the liquids, bulk 3-methyl pentane and confined normal and deuterated water, have low glass transition temperature and unusually low for their class of materials steepness of the temperature dependence of structural relaxation (fragility). Although we do not find any signs of tunneling in the structural relaxation of these liquids, their unusually low fragility can be well described by the influence of the quantum fluctuations. Confined water presents an especially interesting case in comparison to the earlier data on bulk low-density amorphous and vapor deposited water. Confined water exhibits a much weaker isotope effect than bulk water, although the effect is still significant. We show that it can be ascribed to the change of the energy barrier for relaxation due to a decrease in the zero-point energy upon D/H substitution. The observed difference in the behavior of confined and bulk water demonstrates high sensitivity of quantum effects to the barrier heights and structure of water. Moreover, these results demonstrate that extrapolation of confined water properties to the bulk water behavior is questionable.

  11. Effect of co-solutes and process variables on crystallinity and the crystal form of freeze-dried myo-inositol.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Ken-Ichi; Kusano, Riho; Arai, Ryoko; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ito, Masataka; Shibata, Hiroko; Sugano, Kiyohiko; Goda, Yukihiro; Terada, Katsuhide

    2016-07-25

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate how co-solutes affect the crystallization of small solute molecules during freeze-drying and subsequent storage. Crystallization profiles of myo-inositol and its mixture with dextran 40k in frozen solutions and dried solids were assessed by thermal analysis (DSC), powder-X-ray diffraction, and simultaneous DSC and PXRD analysis. Higher mass ratios of dextran maintained myo-inositol in the non-crystalline mixture state, in frozen solutions, during freeze-drying process, and exposure of dried solids to higher temperatures. Co-lyophilization with a lower mass ratio of dextran resulted in solids containing a variety of myo-inositol crystal forms and crystallinity depending on the composition and thermal history of the process. Heating of some inositol-rich amorphous solids showed crystallization of myo-inositol in the metastable form and its transition to stable form before melting. Heat-treatment of inositol-rich frozen solutions resulted in high crystallinity stable-form inositol solids, leaving dextran in the amorphous state. Sufficient direct molecular interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding) should explain the stability of dextran-rich amorphous solids. Optimizing solute composition and processes should be a potent way to control crystal form and crystallinity of components in freeze-dried formulations.

  12. Crystal-contact engineering to obtain a crystal form of the Kelch domain of human Keap1 suitable for ligand-soaking experiments.

    PubMed

    Hörer, Stefan; Reinert, Dirk; Ostmann, Katja; Hoevels, Yvette; Nar, Herbert

    2013-06-01

    Keap1 is a substrate adaptor protein for a Cul3-dependent ubiquitin ligase complex and plays an important role in the cellular response to oxidative stress. It binds Nrf2 with its Kelch domain and thus triggers the ubiquitinylation and degradation of Nrf2. Oxidative stress prevents the degradation of Nrf2 and leads to the activation of cytoprotective genes. Therefore, Keap1 is an attractive drug target in inflammatory diseases. The support of a medicinal chemistry effort by structural research requires a robust crystallization system in which the crystals are preferably suited for performing soaking experiments. This facilitates the generation of protein-ligand complexes in a routine and high-throughput manner. The structure of human Keap1 has been described previously. In this crystal form, however, the binding site for Nrf2 was blocked by a crystal contact. This interaction was analysed and mutations were introduced to disrupt this crystal contact. One double mutation (E540A/E542A) crystallized in a new crystal form in which the binding site for Nrf2 was not blocked and was accessible to small-molecule ligands. The crystal structures of the apo form of the mutated Keap1 Kelch domain (1.98 Å resolution) and of the complex with an Nrf2-derived peptide obtained by soaking (2.20 Å resolution) are reported.

  13. Two new crystal forms of the choline-binding domain of the major pneumococcal autolysin: insights into the dynamics of the active homodimer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; García, Ernesto; López, Rubens; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2002-08-02

    Very little is known about the in vivo regulation of the catalytic activity of the major pneumococcal autolysin (LytA), a surface-exposed enzyme that rules the self-destruction of pneumococcal cells through degradation of their peptidoglycan backbone. Two new crystal forms of the cell wall anchoring domain of LytA were obtained, and their structures were solved and refined to 2.4A and 2.8A resolution. The domain is a homodimer with a boomerang-like shape in which the tertiary structure of each monomer is comprised by six independent beta hairpins arranged in a superhelical fashion. Choline molecules at the hydrophobic interface of consecutive hairpins maintain this unique structure. The C-terminal hairpin (last 13 residues of LytA) in the solenoid is responsible for the formation of the catalytically active homodimer. Although the general fold in the structures derived from both crystal forms is essentially the same, two different conformations of the basic homodimer are observed. Biochemical approaches have demonstrated the fundamental role of the 11 C-terminal residues in the catalytic activity of LytA. The studies reported here reveal the importance of some amino acid residues at the C terminus in the determination of the relative distance of the active dimeric form of the autolysin, which appears to be essential for the catalytic activity of this enzyme.

  14. Self-diffraction at a dynamic photonic crystal formed in a colloidal solution of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. M.; Golinskaya, A. D.; Ezhova, K. V.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Dneprovskii, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    Self-diffraction at a one-dimensional dynamic photonic crystal formed in the colloidal solution of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots has been discovered. This self-diffraction appears simultaneously with self-diffraction at induced transparency channels at the resonant excitation of the main electron-hole (excitonic) transition of quantum dots by two laser beams with a Gaussian intensity distribution over the cross section. It is shown that a nonlinear change in the absorption of colloidal quantum dots results in the formation of a transparency channel and an induced amplitude diffraction grating, and a significant nonlinear change in the refractive index (Δ n ≈ 10-3) in the absorbing medium is responsible for the formation of the dynamic photonic crystal. Self-diffracted laser beams are revealed propagating not only in directions corresponding to self-diffraction at the induced diffraction grating but also in directions satisfying the Laue condition.

  15. Structure of struthiocalcin-1, an intramineral protein from Struthio camelus eggshell, in two crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arellano, Rayana R; Medrano, Francisco J; Moreno, Abel; Romero, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms produce minerals. One remarkable example is the formation of eggshells in birds. Struthiocalcins present in the ostrich (Struthio camellus) eggshell matrix act as biosensors of calcite growth during eggshell formation. Here, the crystal structure of struthiocalcin-1 (SCA-1) is reported in two different crystal forms. The structure is a compact single domain with an α/β fold characteristic of the C-type lectin family. In contrast to the related avian ovocleidin OC17, the electrostatic potential on the molecular surface is dominated by an acidic patch. Scanning electron microscopy combined with Raman spectroscopy indicates that these intramineral proteins (SCA-1 and SCA-2) induce calcium carbonate precipitation, leading to the formation of a stable form of calcite in the mature eggshell. Finally, the implications of these two intramineral proteins SCA-1 and SCA-2 in the nucleation of calcite during the formation of eggshells in ratite birds are discussed.

  16. Morphology and solubility of multiple crystal forms of Taka-amylase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, Kumiko; Yamamoto, Tenyu; Oheda, Tadashi; Sato, Kiyotaka; Sazaki, Gen; Matsuura, Yoshiki

    2001-01-01

    An α-amylase originating from a mold Aspergillus oryzae, Taka-amylase A (Mr of 52 kDa, pI of 3.8), has been purified to an electrophoretically single band grade. Crystallization behaviors were investigated using ammonium sulfate and polyethleneglycol 8000 as precipitants. The variations in the morphology of the crystals obtained with changing crystallization parameters are described. Five apparently different crystal forms were obtained, and their morphology and crystallographic data have been determined. Solubility values of four typical forms were measured using a Michelson-type two-beam interferometer. The results of these experiments showed that this protein can be a potentially interesting and useful model for crystal growth study with a gram-amount availability of pure protein sample.

  17. Mesomorphic and physicochemical properties of liquid crystal mixture composed of chiral molecules with perfluorinated terminal chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, Wojciech; Marzec, Monika; Juszyńska-Gałązka, Ewa; Węgłowska, Dorota

    2017-02-01

    New binary mixture of thermotropic liquid crystalline compounds, possessing both ferro- and antiferroelectric smectic C* phases, has been studied by complementary methods: calorimetric, X-ray powder diffractometry and electro-optic. Additionally, quantum-chemical model based on the density functional theory was also applied. It was found that mixture studied did not exhibit antiferroelectric phase at any rate of heating or cooling in contradiction to its ingredients. On the other hand it has a wide temperature range of ferroelectric smectic C* phase, which is invariant with respect to different heating and cooling rates within the range of thermal hysteresis. Furthermore, temperature dependence of switching time and spontaneous polarization were measured.

  18. Multipulse polarisation selective spectroscopy of rotational and vibrational responses of molecules in a liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, V G

    2013-02-28

    The amplitude control of time-resolved optical responses in a liquid is theoretically analysed under nonresonant irradiation of the system by a train of femtosecond pulses with parallel and orthogonal polarisations. The control parameters, specifying the excitation scenarios, are the duration of pulses, their relative intensities, polarisation, and the delays between the pulses. It is shown that the choice of specific excitation scenarios transfers the system into a state in which only one response is detected from a set of responses of coherent intramolecular Raman active vibrational modes, coherent molecular librations and orientational rotations. (laser spectroscopy)

  19. Three-dimensional structures of a humanized anti-IFN-gamma Fab (HuZAF) in two crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Philip C; Terzyan, Simon S; Cloud, Gwendolyn; Landolfi, Nicholas F; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Edmundson, Allen B

    2004-10-01

    Three-dimensional structures were determined for two crystal forms (orthorhombic P2(1)2(1)2(1) and monoclinic C2) of the Fab from the humanized version of a murine monoclonal antibody (AF2) that possesses binding and potent neutralizing activity against human interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). This humanized antibody (HuZAF; USAN name fontolizumab) is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of Crohn's disease. HuZAF exhibits binding and IFN-gamma neutralizing capacities that closely approximate those of the original antibody. It is shown that HuZAF, whose VH domain was designed using a best-sequence-fit approach, is closer structurally to its mouse precursor than is a version whose VH was constructed using a human sequence with lower homology to the original mouse sequence. This work thus offers direct structural evidence in support of the best-sequence-fit approach and adds to previous results of biological and biochemical evaluations of distinctly engineered antibodies that also favored the use of a best-sequence-fit strategy. A second crystal type appeared during attempts to crystallize the Fab-IFN-gamma complex. The antibody-antigen complex that existed in solution dissociated in the crystallization mixture. A conformationally altered but unliganded HuZAF protein crystallized in a different space group (C2), with two Fab molecules in the asymmetric unit. In this crystal lattice, no space was available for accommodating the IFN-gamma antigen. Thus, there are currently three slightly different structures of the HuZAF Fab.

  20. Plasma Interaction with Organic Molecules in Liquid as Fundamental Processes in Plasma Medicine.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Abe, Hiroya; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Investigation of plasma-organic materials interaction in aqueous solution with atmospheric pressure plasmas have been carried out. Degradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution via atmospheric pressure He plasma exposure through gas/liquid interface have been investigated. The optical emission spectrum shows considerable emissions of He lines and the emission of O, OH and N radicals attributed to dissociation of water (H2O) and air has been confirmed. Structure variation of MB in solution treated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma has been measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results obtained from FT-IR analysis show degradation of MB in solution treated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma. The pH effect of MB degradation was investigated using controlled pH solutions by an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and FT-IR. The results show no effect of MB degradation on pH. The results exhibit that the atmospheric pressure plasmas exposure has made it possible to degrade organic materials in solution due to irradiated radicals from plasma through plasma/liquid interface.

  1. Homogeneously aligned liquid crystal molecules on reformed poly(methyl methacrylate) via ion-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae-Chang; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lee, Ju Hwan; Jang, Sang Bok; Oh, Byeong-Yun; Han, Jeong-Min; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrated uniform LC alignment using IB-irradiated poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as an alignment layer. We confirmed the topographical changes on PMMA caused by IB irradiation. Moreover, the wettability and chemical modification of the PMMA surface were investigated as functions of incidence angle. The results show that PMMA irradiated with IB at an incidence angle of 30° had a higher molecular polarity than PMMA irradiated with IB at other incidence angles, resulting in strong van der Waals interactions between the surface and LC molecules. The LC cells containing PMMA irradiated with IB at an incidence angle of 30° exhibited good thermal stability (180°) compared with LC cells containing conventional rubbing PI (150°). In addition, LC molecules on PMMA irradiated with IB at an incidence angle of 30° were observed to switch faster than those on conventional rubbing PI. Therefore, PMMA irradiated with IB under the optimal conditions may allow for PMMA to be applied in advanced LC devices as an alternative alignment layer.

  2. Crowded Star Mesogens: Guest-Controlled Stability of Mesophases from Unconventional Liquid-Crystal Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Matthias; Maier, Philipp; Grüne, Matthias; Hügel, Markus

    2017-01-23

    The molecular design of crowded hexasubstituted star mesogens based on a benzene core and alternating substitution with oligo(phenylenevinylene) arms and aryl units generates free space between the conjugated arm scaffolds. Various arylcarboxy building blocks, decorated with alkoxy chains, have been incorporated in the void by mixing, hydrogen bonding or covalent bonds to the aryl groups. The mesogens assemble in columnar stacks ranging from soft crystals to rectangular and hexagonal columnar liquid crystals, revealed by polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray scattering and modelling. The stability of the mesophases is crucially influenced by the binding mode of the arylcarboxy guest building blocks. The origin of the variation in clearing temperature is unravelled by modelling, cohesive energy density considerations and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The control over the transition temperature is important for the formation of aligned thin films and thus for potential applications.

  3. Temperature-Triggered Chiral Self-Assembly of Achiral Molecules at the Liquid-Solid Interface.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Linxiu; Li, Yibao; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Gong, Zhong-Liang; Fang, Qiaojun; Zhong, Yu-Wu; Tu, Bin; Zeng, Qingdao; Wang, Chen

    2016-11-23

    Temperature triggered chiral nanostructures have been investigated on two-dimensional (2D) surfaces by means of scanning tunneling microscopy. Achiral molecules 1 and 2 tend to self-assemble into strip structures on graphite before heating. However, R and S flower-like structures are observed when heated to certain temperature. The transition temperatures of 1 and 2 systems are 55 and 60 °C, respectively. The density functional theory calculations demonstrate that R and S flower-like structures are more stable than strip structures. The coexistence of flower-like structures and strip structures demonstrates the thermodynamic equilibrium. Further, when chiral solvent is added to the sample with other conditions remaining the same, the racemic phenomenon disappears and homochirality emerges. This is an efficient method to control the chirality of 2D molecular assemblies.

  4. Changes in interactions in complexes of hirudin derivatives and human alpha-thrombin due to different crystal forms.

    PubMed Central

    Priestle, J. P.; Rahuel, J.; Rink, H.; Tones, M.; Grütter, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethyl ketone-inhibited thrombin in complex with Tyr-63-sulfated hirudin (ternary complex) and of thrombin in complex with the bifunctional inhibitor D-Phe-Pro-Arg-Pro-(Gly)4-hirudin (CGP 50,856, binary complex) have been determined by X-ray crystallography in crystal forms different from those described by Skrzypczak-Jankun et al. (Skrzypczak-Jankun, E., Carperos, V.E., Ravichandran, K.G., & Tulinsky, A., 1991, J. Mol. Biol. 221, 1379-1393). In both complexes, the interactions of the C-terminal hirudin segments of the inhibitors binding to the fibrinogen-binding exosite of thrombin are clearly established, including residues 60-64, which are disordered in the earlier crystal form. The interactions of the sulfate group of Tyr-63 in the ternary complex structure explain why natural sulfated hirudin binds with a 10-fold lower K(i) than the desulfated recombinant material. In this new crystal form, the autolysis loop of thrombin (residues 146-150), which is disordered in the earlier crystal form, is ordered due to crystal contacts. Interactions between the C-terminal fragment of hirudin and thrombin are not influenced by crystal contacts in this new crystal form, in contrast to the earlier form. In the bifunctional inhibitor-thrombin complex, the peptide bond between Arg-Pro (P1-P1') seems to be cleaved. PMID:8251938

  5. Molecular structure of cyclic diguanylic acid at 1 A resolution of two crystal forms: self-association, interactions with metal ion/planar dyes and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Guan, Y; Gao, Y G; Liaw, Y C; Robinson, H; Wang, A H

    1993-10-01

    Cyclic ribodiguanylic acid, c-(GpGp), is the endogenous effector regulator of cellulose synthase. Its three dimensional structure from two different crystal forms (tetragonal and trigonal) has been determined by x-ray diffraction analysis at 1 A resolution. Both structures were solved by direct methods and refined by block-matrix least squares refinement to R-factors of 0.112 (tetragonal) and 0.119 (trigonal). In both crystal forms, two independent c-(GpGp) molecules associate with each other to form a self-intercalated dimer. All four c-(GpGp) molecules have very similar backbone conformation. The riboses are in the C3'-endo pucker with pseudorotation angles ranging from -7.2 degrees to 16.5 degrees and the bases have anti glycosyl chi angles (-175.5 degrees to 179.7 degrees). In the tetragonal form, a hydrated cobalt ion is found to coordinate to two N7 atoms of adjacent guanines, forcing these two guanines to destack with a large dihedral angle (33 degrees). This metal coordination mechanism has been noted previously in other Pt- or Co-GMP complexes and may be relevant to the binding of the anticancer drug cisplatin to a GpG sequence in DNA. A model of the adduct between cisplatin and a d(CAATGGATTG) duplex has been constructed in which the induced bending of the DNA helix at the Pt crosslinking site is 33 degrees, consistent with earlier electrophoretic analyses. Moreover, c-(GpGp) exhibits unusual spectral properties not seen in other cyclic dinucleotides. It interacts with planar organic intercalator molecules in ways similar to double helical DNA. We propose a cage-like model consisting of a tetrameric c-(GpGp) aggregate in which a large cavity (host molecule) is generated to afford a binding site for certain planar intercalators (guests molecules). The aggregate likely uses a hydrogen bonding scheme the same as that found in the G-quartet molecules, e.g., telomere DNA. The conformation of c-(GpGp) also suggests that certain nearest-neighbor intercalators

  6. Fast and General Method To Predict the Physicochemical Properties of Druglike Molecules Using the Integral Equation Theory of Molecular Liquids.

    PubMed

    Palmer, David S; Mišin, Maksim; Fedorov, Maxim V; Llinas, Antonio

    2015-09-08

    We report a method to predict physicochemical properties of druglike molecules using a classical statistical mechanics based solvent model combined with machine learning. The RISM-MOL-INF method introduced here provides an accurate technique to characterize solvation and desolvation processes based on solute-solvent correlation functions computed by the 1D reference interaction site model of the integral equation theory of molecular liquids. These functions can be obtained in a matter of minutes for most small organic and druglike molecules using existing software (RISM-MOL) (Sergiievskyi, V. P.; Hackbusch, W.; Fedorov, M. V. J. Comput. Chem. 2011, 32, 1982-1992). Predictions of caco-2 cell permeability and hydration free energy obtained using the RISM-MOL-INF method are shown to be more accurate than the state-of-the-art tools for benchmark data sets. Due to the importance of solvation and desolvation effects in biological systems, it is anticipated that the RISM-MOL-INF approach will find many applications in biophysical and biomedical property prediction.

  7. A triclinic crystal form of Escherichia coli 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase and reassessment of the quaternary structure.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska-Tłuścik, Justyna; Miallau, Linda; Gabrielsen, Mads; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean M; Hunter, William N

    2010-03-01

    4-Diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase (IspE; EC 2.7.1.148) contributes to the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate or mevalonate-independent biosynthetic pathway that produces the isomers isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. These five-carbon compounds are the fundamental building blocks for the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. The mevalonate-independent pathway does not occur in humans, but is present and has been shown to be essential in many dangerous pathogens, i.e. Plasmodium species, which cause malaria, and gram-negative bacteria. Thus, the enzymes involved in this pathway have attracted attention as potential drug targets. IspE produces 4-diphosphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2-phosphate by ATP-dependent phosphorylation of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol. A triclinic crystal structure of the Escherichia coli IspE-ADP complex with two molecules in the asymmetric unit was determined at 2 A resolution and compared with a monoclinic crystal form of a ternary complex of E. coli IspE also with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The molecular packing is different in the two forms. In the asymmetric unit of the triclinic crystal form the substrate-binding sites of IspE are occluded by structural elements of the partner, suggesting that the ;triclinic dimer' is an artefact of the crystal lattice. The surface area of interaction in the triclinic form is almost double that observed in the monoclinic form, implying that the dimeric assembly in the monoclinic form may also be an artifact of crystallization.

  8. The intermolecular hydrogen-hydrogen structure of chain-molecule liquids from neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J. D.; Annis, B. K.; Turner, J. Z.; Soper, A. K.

    1994-11-01

    Neutron diffraction isotopic substitution experiments on liquid n-decane (C10H22) and n-eicosane (C20H42) are described. The intermolecular H-H structure function hHH(Q) and the intermolecular H-H correlation function ginterHH(r) are obtained without recourse to models of the intramolecular structure. The structure of the ginterHH(r) found at 2.5, 5.0, and 7.0 Å corresponds to different shells in the H-H pair correlation function. In addition, ginterHH(r)<1 for a considerable range, due to the screening of intermolecular correlations by intramolecular correlations. This ``correlation hole'' effect is accentuated by extrapolation of the structure functions to the expected infinite wavelength limit, and shows good agreement with values determined from small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data. All of these features are in good agreement with the results of molecular dynamics simulations for the closely related system C13H28.

  9. New crystal forms of Diocleinae lectins in the presence of different dimannosides

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Oliveira, Taianá Maia de; Souza, Emmanuel Prata de; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias da; Benevides, Raquel Guimarães; Delatorre, Plínio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Azevedo, Walter Filgueira Jr de

    2006-11-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL) and C. maritima lectin (CML) complexed with Man(α1-2)Man(α1)OMe, Man(α1-3)Man(α1)OMe and Man(α1-4)Man(α1)OMe in two crystal forms [the complexes with Man(α1-3)Man(α1)OMe and Man(α1-4)Man(α1)OMe crystallized in space group P3{sub 2} and those with Man(α1-2)Man(α1)OMe crystallized in space group I222], which differed from those of the native proteins (P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 for CML and C222 for CGL), are reported. Studying the interactions between lectins and sugars is important in order to explain the differences observed in the biological activities presented by the highly similar proteins of the Diocleinae subtribe. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL) and C. maritima lectin (CML) complexed with Man(α1-2)Man(α1)OMe, Man(α1-3)Man(α1)OMe and Man(α1-4)Man(α1)OMe in two crystal forms [the complexes with Man(α1-3)Man(α1)OMe and Man(α1-4)Man(α1)OMe crystallized in space group P3{sub 2} and those with Man(α1-2)Man(α1)OMe crystallized in space group I222], which differed from those of the native proteins (P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 for CML and C222 for CGL), are reported. The crystal complexes of ConA-like lectins with Man(α1-4)Man(α1)OMe are reported here for the first time.

  10. Varenicline L-tartrate crystal forms: characterization through crystallography, spectroscopy, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brendan J; Huang, Jun; Casteel, Melissa J; Cobani, Ana; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F

    2010-06-01

    This research utilized crystallographic, spectroscopic, and thermal analysis data to assess the thermodynamic stability relationship between the three known crystal forms of Varenicline L-tartrate. Of the two anhydrous forms (Forms A and B), Form B was determined to be the stable form at 0 K based on its calculated true density, hydrogen bonding in the crystal lattice, and application of the IR rule. Form A has a higher melting point and higher solubility at room temperature as compared to Form B, indicating that these forms are enantiotropically related. Application of the eutectic-melting method enabled accurate determination of the transition temperature (63 degrees C), with Form B as the stable anhydrous form at room temperature. The stability relationships between the anhydrous polymorphs and the monohydrate (Form C) were assessed through exposure of the anhydrous forms to a range of water vapor pressures at room temperature. A phase boundary was identified, with the monohydrate being the thermodynamically stable form above critical water activity values of 0.85 and 0.94 for Forms A and B, respectively. These results provide a better understanding of the form stability as it relates to normal manufacturing and storage conditions for the active pharmaceutical ingredient and drug product.

  11. Effects of polymer concentration on the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals formed in polyacrylamide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Taishi; Kawashita, Masakazu; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2013-11-01

    Growing crystals in hydrogels is an attractive method to form inorganic solids with designed morphology under ambient conditions. Precipitation of the inorganic solids in a hydrogel matrix can be regarded as mimicking the process of biomineralization. In the construction of biominerals, an organic template composed of insoluble macromolecules is used to control the crystal growth of the inorganic compounds. The morphological control in biomineralization can be applied to artificial reaction systems. In this study, the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals formed in polymeric hydrogels of various polymer concentrations was investigated. Spherical octacalcium phosphate (OCP) precipitated in the polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels. Fibrous crystals gradually covered the surface of the spherical crystals as the polymer concentration of the gel increased. The morphology of the OCP crystals changed from sea urchin shapes to wool-ball shapes with increasing PAAm concentration. The morphological change is generated by the template effect of the polymer wall, which is made up of stacked PAAm sheets, surrounding the spherical OCP crystals.

  12. Elucidation of crystal form diversity of the HIV protease inhibitor ritonavir by high-throughput crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Morissette, Sherry L.; Soukasene, Stephen; Levinson, Douglas; Cima, Michael J.; Almarsson, Örn

    2003-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds are molecular solids that frequently exhibit polymorphism of crystal form. One high profile case of polymorphism was ritonavir, a peptidomimetic drug used to treat HIV-1 infection and introduced in 1996. In 1998, a lower energy, more stable polymorph (form II) appeared, causing slowed dissolution of the marketed dosage form and compromising the oral bioavailability of the drug. This event forced the removal of the oral capsule formulation from the market. We have carried out high-throughput crystallization experiments to comprehensively explore ritonavir form diversity. A total of five forms were found: both known forms and three previously unknown forms. The novel forms include a metastable polymorph, a hydrate phase, and a formamide solvate. The solvate was converted to form I via the hydrate phase by using a simple washing procedure, providing an unusual route to prepare the form I “disappearing polymorph” [Dunitz, J. D. & Bernstein, J. (1995) Acc. Chem. Res. 28, 193–200]. Crystals of form I prepared by using this method retained the small needle morphology of the solvate and thus offer a potential strategy for particle size and morphology control. PMID:12604798

  13. Packing interface energetics in different crystal forms of the λ Cro dimer.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Logan S; Miyashita, Osamu

    2014-07-01

    Variation among crystal structures of the λ Cro dimer highlights conformational flexibility. The structures range from a wild type closed to a mutant fully open conformation, but it is unclear if each represents a stable solution state or if one may be the result of crystal packing. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to investigate the energetics of crystal packing interfaces and the influence of site-directed mutagenesis on them in order to examine the effect of crystal packing on wild type and mutant Cro dimer conformation. Replica exchange MD of mutant Cro in solution shows that the observed conformational differences between the wild type and mutant protein are not the direct consequence of mutation. Instead, simulation of Cro in different crystal environments reveals that mutation affects the stability of crystal forms. Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area binding energy calculations reveal the detailed energetics of packing interfaces. Packing interfaces can have diverse properties in strength, energetic components, and some are stronger than the biological dimer interface. Further analysis shows that mutation can strengthen packing interfaces by as much as ∼5 kcal/mol in either crystal environment. Thus, in the case of Cro, mutation provides an additional energetic contribution during crystal formation that may stabilize a fully open higher energy state. Moreover, the effect of mutation in the lattice can extend to packing interfaces not involving mutation sites. Our results provide insight into possible models for the effect of crystallization on Cro conformational dynamics and emphasize careful consideration of protein crystal structures.

  14. Dielectric study of the structure of hyperquenched glassy water and its crystallized forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.; Hallbrucker, Andreas; Mayer, Erwin

    1992-10-01

    The dielectric permittivity and loss tangent of hyperquenched glassy water (HGW) have been measured for fixed frequencies of 1 and 10 kHz from 80 K to its crystallization temperature and corresponding measurements have been made of the crystallized forms. The effect of thermal cycling has been investigated. Except for a shoulder at T

  15. Structure and energetics of model amphiphilic molecules at the water liquid-vapor interface - A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Benjamin, Ilan

    1993-01-01

    A molecular dynamics study of adsorption of p-n-pentylphenol at infinite dilution at the water liquid-vapor interface is reported. The calculated free energy of adsorption is -8.8 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol, in good agreement with the experimental value of -7.3 kcal/mol. The transition between the interfacial region and the bulk solution is sharp and well-defined by energetic, conformational, and orientational criteria. At the water surface, the phenol head group is mostly immersed in aqueous solvent. The most frequent orientation of the hydrocarbon tail is parallel to the interface, due to dispersion interactions with the water surface. This arrangement of the phenol ring and the alkyl chain requires that the chain exhibits a kink. As the polar head group is being moved into the solvent, the chain length increases and the tail becomes increasingly aligned toward the surface normal, such that the nonpolar part of the molecule exposed to water is minimized. The same effect was achieved when phenol was replaced by a more polar head group, phenolate.

  16. Fabrication and Control of Two-Dimensional Crystalline Arrays of Protein Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Kuniaki; Takeda, Shigeki; Endo, Shigeru; Yoshimura, Hideyuki

    1995-07-01

    Fabrication methods to produce two-dimensional (2D) crystalline arrays of protein particles are reported. The key innovation in this fabrication is the spreading wetting process which uses the deformable substrate surface such as mercury surface (mercury method) or the air-water interface (subphase method), where protein solution spread to yield a thin liquid film. The thin film of protein solution leaves a monolayer state of protein molecules, for example 2D crystalline films, after the condensation of solute protein molecules by solvent removal by evaporation. The significance of the film fabrication lies in its active natures to harness the directional transport of particles driven by spreading or convective flow of the solution. Wild type and mutant ferritins were employed to spread their solution on substrates and align them to 2D arrays. The control of crystal forms, say hexagonal or tetragonal, has been pursued by changing the interprotein interaction through mutagenic replacements of amino acids at specific sites on the protein surface. With recombinant ferritins, conversion of crystal forms from hexagonal to oblique is observed by eliminating strong interaction of salt bridge kind between adjacent molecules in the crystal.

  17. Adsorption of apolar molecules at the water liquid-vapor interface: A Monte Carlo simulations study of the water-n-octane system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovszky, Pál; Varga, Imre; Gilányi, Tibor

    2003-07-01

    The adsorption of n-octane at the water liquid-vapor interface has been investigated by Monte Carlo computer simulation. For this purpose, simulation of five different water-apolar interfacial systems have been performed, in which the number of n-octane molecules has been varied. The results clearly show that the apolar n-octane molecules are adsorbed from the vapor phase at the interface. The adsorption is driven by the weak attraction due to the dispersion forces acting between the water molecules and the methyl and methylene groups of the octanes. This weak attraction is, however, amplified by the fact that it is added up for the CH2 and CH3 groups belonging to the same molecule. Consistently, the n-octane molecules located closest to the aqueous phase are found to prefer all-trans conformation and parallel alignment with the plane of the interface. On the other hand, entropic effects become more important among the molecules of the outer part of the adsorption layer. Hence, the preferred orientation of these molecules is perpendicular to the interface, as they can be extended toward the less dense region of the apolar phase; and gauche dihedrals appear more frequently here than among the molecules located next to the aqueous phase.

  18. Cluster Composition Distributions of Pure Ethanol: Influence of Water and Ion–Molecule Reactions Revealed by Liquid-Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Fukaya, Haruhiko; Shida, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Studies of clusters in condensed phase at atmospheric pressure are very important for understanding the properties and structures of liquids. Liquid-ionization (LPI) mass spectrometry is useful to study hydrogen-bonded clusters at the liquid surface and in a gas phase. An improved ion source connected to a tandem mass spectrometer provides detailed information about clusters. Mass spectra of pure ethanol (99.5%) observed by the first mass analyzer (Q1) showed neat ethanol cluster ions (C2H5OH)mH+ with m up to 10 and hydrate ions (C2H5OH)m(H2O)nH+ with m larger than 7 and n=1, such as those with m-n=8-1 and 9-1. When the flow rate of ethanol (liquid) was increased, large ethanol cluster ions with m larger than 25 were observed by the second mass analyzer (Q3). It is interesting to note that neat ethanol cluster ions are more abundant than corresponding (with the same m) hydrate ions (n=1), and major hydrate ions contain only one molecule of water. Results indicate that ion–molecule reactions occur between Q1 and Q3, because such mass spectra have never been observed by Q1. Various results indicate that neat ethanol clusters exist at the liquid surface and are ionized to give cluster ions. PMID:24349916

  19. A model of comb-like association with branches of arbitrary lengths: The mean statistical anisotropy of the polarizability tensor of liquid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durov, V. A.; Shilov, I. Yu.

    2008-01-01

    Analytic methods for calculating the mean anisotropy of the polarizability of liquid molecules consisting of chain aggregates of arbitrary lengths and branched comb-like aggregates with branches of arbitrary lengths were developed. The dependences of the mean anisotropy of the polarizability of methanol molecules on the thermodynamic parameters (equilibrium constants) of chain and branched aggregation and the structural characteristics of supramolecular aggregates were calculated. Special attention was paid to the influence of the degree of branching of comb-like aggregates on anisotropic light scattering. The calculation results were compared with the experimental data.

  20. Electro-optic response of the anticlinic, antiferroelectric liquid-crystal phase of a biaxial bent-core molecule with tilt angle near 45∘

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Michi; Chen, Dong; Shao, Renfan; Korblova, Eva; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Walba, David M.; Clark, Noel A.

    2012-03-01

    We describe the unusual electro-optic response of a biaxial bent-core liquid crystal molecule that exhibits an anticlinic, antiferroelectric smectic phase (Sm-CAPA) with a molecular tilt angle close to 45°. In the ground state, the sample shows very low birefringence. A weak applied electric field distorts the antiferroelectric ground state, inducing a small azimuthal reorientation of the molecules on the tilt cone. This results in only a modest increase in the birefringence but an anomalously large (˜40°) analog rotation of the extinction direction. This unusual electro-optic response is shown to be a consequence of the molecular biaxiality.

  1. C3 exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum: structure of a tetragonal crystal form and a reassessment of NAD-induced flexure.

    PubMed

    Evans, Hazel R; Holloway, Daniel E; Sutton, J Mark; Ayriss, Joanne; Shone, Clifford C; Acharya, K Ravi

    2004-08-01

    C3 exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum (C3bot1) ADP-ribosylates and thereby inactivates Rho A, B and C GTPases in mammalian cells. The structure of a tetragonal crystal form has been determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.89 A resolution. It is very similar to the apo structures determined previously from two different monoclinic crystal forms. An objective reassessment of available apo and nucleotide-bound C3bot1 structures indicates that, contrary to a previous report, the protein possesses a rigid core formed largely of beta-strands and that the general flexure that accompanies NAD binding is concentrated in two peripheral lobes. Tetragonal crystals disintegrate in the presence of NAD, most likely because of disruption of essential crystal contacts.

  2. Calculation of the Standard Molal Thermodynamic Properties of Crystalline, Liquid, and Gas Organic Molecules at High Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgeson, Harold C.; Owens, Christine E.; Knox, Annette M.; Richard, Laurent

    1998-03-01

    Calculation of the thermodynamic properties of organic solids, liquids, and gases at high temperatures and pressures is a requisite for characterizing hydrothermal metastable equilibrium states involving these species and quantifying the chemical affinities of irreversible reactions of organic molecules in natural gas, crude oil, kerogen, and coal with minerals and organic, inorganic, and biomolecular aqueous species in interstitial waters in sedimentary basins. To facilitate calculations of this kind, coefficients for the Parameters From Group Contributions (PFGC) equation of state have been compiled for a variety of groups in organic liquids and gases. In addition, molecular weights, critical temperatures and pressures, densities at 25°C and 1 bar, transition, melting, and boiling temperatures ( Tt,Pr, Tm,Pr, and Tv,Pr, respectively) and standard molal enthalpies of transition (Δ H° t,Pr), melting (Δ H° m,Pr), and vaporization (Δ H° v,Pr) of organic species at 1 bar ( Pr) have been tabulated, together with an internally consistent and comprehensive set of standard molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation from the elements in their stable state at 298.15 K ( Tr) and Pr (Δ G° f and Δ H° f, respectively). The critical compilation also includes standard molal entropies ( S°) and volumes ( V°) at Tr and Pr, and standard molal heat capacity power function coefficients to compute the standard molal thermodynamic properties of organic solids, liquids, and gases as a function of temperature at 1 bar. These properties and coefficients have been tabulated for more than 500 crystalline solids, liquids, and gases, and those for many more can be computed from the equations of state group additivity algorithms. The crystalline species correspond to normal alkanes (C nH 2( n+1) ) with carbon numbers ( n, which is equal to the number of moles of carbon atoms in one mole of the species) ranging from 5 to 100, and 23 amino acids including glycine (C 2H 5NO

  3. Two-State or Non-Two-State? An Excess Spectroscopy-based Approach to Differentiate the Existing Forms of Molecules in Liquids Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Sun, Hai-Yuan; Deng, Geng; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Characterization/identification of the clusters/associates in liquids has long been a challenging topic. In this paper, we report a method to identify molecules with two different existing forms in a binary liquid solution. In this so-called two-state situation, the excess infrared spectra of a vibration mode of the respective molecule will show identical band shape if the other component is transparent in the region. More conveniently, the positions of the positive peak, negative peak, and zero-value will be seen to be fixed with varying compositions of the binary system. In the case of non-two-state mixtures, for example the mere solvation of solute by solvent, those positions will be variable. The conclusions are supported/demonstrated by computational simulation and experiments on two binary systems, D2O−H2O and C6F5I−cyclo-C6H12. PMID:26542641

  4. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the catalytic domain of human receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase [gamma] in three different crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, Kevin; McDonnell, Patricia A.; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Metzler, William J.; Langley, David R.; Bryson, James W.; Kiefer, Susan E.; Carpenter, Brian; Kostich, Walter A.; Westphal, Ryan S.; Sheriff, Steven

    2013-03-07

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase {gamma} is a membrane-bound receptor and is designated RPTP{gamma}. RPTP{gamma} and two mutants, RPTP{gamma}(V948I, S970T) and RPTP{gamma}(C858S, S970T), were recombinantly expressed and purified for X-ray crystallographic studies. The purified enzymes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Crystallographic data were obtained from several different crystal forms in the absence and the presence of inhibitor. In this paper, a description is given of how three different crystal forms were obtained that were used with various ligands. An orthorhombic crystal form and a trigonal crystal form were obtained both with and without ligand, and a monoclinic crystal form was only obtained in the presence of a particularly elaborated inhibitor.

  5. Optimization of the GAFF force field to describe liquid crystal molecules: the path to a dramatic improvement in transition temperature predictions.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Nicola Jane; Wilson, Mark R

    2015-10-14

    The physical properties and phase transitions of thermotropic liquid crystals are highly sensitive to small changes in chemical structure. However, these changes are challenging to model, as both the phase diagram and mesophase properties obtained from fully atomistic simulations are strongly dependent on the force field model employed, and the current generation of chemical force fields has not proved accurate enough to provide reliable predictions of transition temperatures for many liquid crystals. This paper presents a strategy for improving the nematic clearing point, TNI, in atomistic simulations, by systematic optimization of the General Amber Force Field (GAFF) for key mesogenic fragments. We show that with careful optimization of the parameters describing a series of liquid crystal fragment molecules, it is possible to transfer these parameters to larger liquid crystal molecules and make accurate predictions for nematic mesophase formation. This new force field, GAFF-LCFF, is used to predict the nematic-isotropic clearing point to within 5 °C for the nematogen 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid,1,3-bis(4-butylphenyl)ester, an improvement of 60 °C over the standard GAFF force field.

  6. Stabilization of He2(A(sup 3)Sigma(sub u)(+)) molecules in liquid helium by optical pumping for vacuum UV laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A technique is disclosed for achieving large populations of metastable spin-aligned He2(a 3 Sigma u +) molecules in superfluid helium to obtain lasing in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength regime around 0.0800 micron m by electronically exciting liquid (superfluid) helium with a comparatively low-current electron beam and spin aligning the metastable molecules by means of optical pumping with a modestly-powered (100mW) circularly-polarized continuous wave laser operating at, for example, 0.9096 or 0.4650 micron m. Once a high concentration of spin-aligned He2 (a 3 Sigma u +) is achieved with lifetimes of a few milliseconds, a strong microwave signal destroys the spin alignment and induces a quick collisional transition of He2 (a 3 Sigma u +) molecules to the a 1 Sigma u + state and thereby a lasing transition to the X 1 Sigma g + state.

  7. Laser performance of Coumarin 540A dye molecules in polymeric host media with different viscosities: From liquid solution to solid polymer matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Costela, A.; Garcia-Moreno, I.; Barroso, J.; Sastre, R.

    1998-01-01

    Photophysical parameters and lasing properties of Coumarin 540A dye molecules are studied in solutions of increasing viscosity, from liquid solutions in 1,4-dioxane to solid solutions in poly(methyl methacrylate). The fluorescence quantum yield and lasing efficiencies decrease as the viscosity of the solution increases, reflecting the strong influence of the rigidity of the medium on the radiative processes. The photodegradation mechanisms acting on the fluorophores are analyzed by following the dependence of laser induced fluorescence and laser output on the number of pump laser pulses. The fluorescence redistribution after pattern photobleaching technique is used, and Fick{close_quote}s second law is applied to study the diffusion of dye molecules in the highly viscous polymer solutions. The diffusion coefficients of the dye molecules as a function of the increased viscosity of the medium are determined. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of haemoglobin from mongoose (Helogale parvula) in two different crystal forms induced by pH variation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Abubakkar, M; Saraboji, K; Ponnuswamy, M N

    2013-02-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) is a respiratory pigment; it is a tetrameric protein that ferries oxygen from the lungs to tissues and transports carbon dioxide on the return journey. The oxygen affinity of haemoglobin is regulated by the concentration of oxygen surrounding it and several efforts have revealed the shapes of Hb in different states and with different functions. However, study of the molecular basis of Hbs from low-oxygen-affinity species is critically needed in order to increase the understanding of the mechanism behind oxygen adaptation. The present study reports the preliminary crystallographic study of low-oxygen-affinity haemoglobin from mongoose, a burrowing mammal. Haemoglobin from mongoose was purified by anion-exchange chromatography, crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data sets were collected from monoclinic (2.3 Å resolution) and orthorhombic (2.9 Å resolution) crystal forms obtained by pH variation. The monoclinic and orthorhombic asymmetric units contained half and a whole biological molecule, respectively.

  9. Continuous Flow Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Connected On-line with HPLC/MS for Spatially Resolved Analysis of Small Molecules and Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: A continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe extracts soluble material from surfaces for direct ionization and detection by MS. Demonstrated here is the on-line coupling of such a probe with HPLC/MS enabling extraction, separation and detection of small molecules and proteins from surfaces in a spatially resolved (~0.5 mm diameter spots) manner. Methods: A continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe was connected to a 6-port, 2-position valve for extract collection and injection to an HPLC column. A QTRAP 5500 hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap equipped with a Turbo V ion source operated in positive ESI mode was used for all experiments. System operation was tested with extraction, separation and detection of propranolol and associated metabolites from drug dosed tissues and proteins from dried sheep blood spots on paper. Results: Confirmed in the tissue were the parent drug and two different hydroxypropranolol glucuronides. The mass spectrometric response for these compounds from different locations in the liver showed an increase with increasing extraction time (5, 20 and 40 s extractions). For on-line separation and detection/identification of extracted proteins from dried sheep blood spots, two major protein peaks dominated the chromatogram and could be correlated with the expected masses for the hemoglobin and chains. Conclusions: Spatially resolved sampling, separation, and detection of small molecules and proteins from surfaces can be accomplished using a continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe coupled on-line with HPLC/MS detection.

  10. Structural Properties, Order–Disorder Phenomena, and Phase Stability of Orotic Acid Crystal Forms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Orotic acid (OTA) is reported to exist in the anhydrous (AH), monohydrate (Hy1), and dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate (SDMSO) forms. In this study we investigate the (de)hydration/desolvation behavior, aiming at an understanding of the elusive structural features of anhydrous OTA by a combination of experimental and computational techniques, namely, thermal analytical methods, gravimetric moisture (de)sorption studies, water activity measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, spectroscopy (vibrational, solid-state NMR), crystal energy landscape, and chemical shift calculations. The Hy1 is a highly stable hydrate, which dissociates above 135 °C and loses only a small part of the water when stored over desiccants (25 °C) for more than one year. In Hy1, orotic acid and water molecules are linked by strong hydrogen bonds in nearly perfectly planar arranged stacked layers. The layers are spaced by 3.1 Å and not linked via hydrogen bonds. Upon dehydration the X-ray powder diffraction and solid-state NMR peaks become broader, indicating some disorder in the anhydrous form. The Hy1 stacking reflection (122) is maintained, suggesting that the OTA molecules are still arranged in stacked layers in the dehydration product. Desolvation of SDMSO, a nonlayer structure, results in the same AH phase as observed upon dehydrating Hy1. Depending on the desolvation conditions, different levels of order–disorder of layers present in anhydrous OTA are observed, which is also suggested by the computed low energy crystal structures. These structures provide models for stacking faults as intergrowth of different layers is possible. The variability in anhydrate crystals is of practical concern as it affects the moisture dependent stability of AH with respect to hydration. PMID:26741914

  11. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominic A.; Mladek, Bianca M.; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed.

  12. Structure, Solubility and Stability of Orbifloxacin Crystal Forms: Hemihydrate versus Anhydrate.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olimpia Maria Martins; Freitas, Jennifer Tavares Jacon; Cazedey, Edith Cristina Laignier; de Araújo, Magali Benjamim; Doriguetto, Antonio Carlos

    2016-03-09

    Orbifloxacin (ORBI) is a widely used antimicrobial drug of the fluoroquinolone class. In the official pharmaceutical compendia the existence of polymorphism in this active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is reported. No crystal structure has been reported for this API and as described in the literature, its solubility is very controversial. Considering that different solid forms of the same API may have different physicochemical properties, these different solubilities may have resulted from analyses inadvertently carried out on different polymorphs. The solubility is the most critical property because it can affect the bioavailability and may compromise the quality of a drug product. The crystalline structure of ORBI determined by SCXRD is reported here for the first time. The structural analysis reveals that the ORBI molecule is zwitterionic and hemihydrated. ORBI hemihydrated form was characterized by the following techniques: TG/DTA, FTIR-ATR, and PXRD. A second crystalline ORBI form is also reported: the ORBI anhydrous form was obtained by heating the hemihydrate. These ORBI solid forms were isomorphous, since no significant change in unit cell and space group symmetry were observed. The solid-state phase transformation between these forms is discussed and the equilibrium solubility data were examined in order to check the impact of the differences observed in their crystalline structures.

  13. Halogen bonding interactions between brominated ion pairs and CO2 molecules: implications for design of new and efficient ionic liquids for CO2 absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang; Lu, Yunxiang; Peng, Changjun; Hu, Jun; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying

    2011-04-14

    In recent years, several novel halogenated liquids with characteristics of ionic liquids (ILs) were reported. To explore their performance in the absorption of CO(2), in this work, quantum chemical calculations at DFT level have been carried out to investigate halogen bonding interactions between experimentally available brominated ion pairs and CO(2) molecules. It is shown that, as compared to B3LYP, the functional PBE yields geometrical and energetic data more close to those of MP2 for cation-CO(2) systems. The cation of brominated ILs under study can interact with CO(2) molecules through Br···O interactions, possibly making an important impact on the physical solubility of CO(2) in brominated ILs. The optimized geometries of the complexes of the ion pair with CO(2) molecules are quite similar to those of the corresponding complexes of the cation, especially for the essentially linear C-Br···O contacts. However, much weaker halogen bonds are predicted in the former systems, as indicated by the longer intermolecular distances and the smaller interaction energies. Charges derived from NBO analysis reveal the origin of the different optimized conformations and halogen bonding interactions for the CO(2) molecule. Based on the electrostatic potential results, the substitution of hydrogen atoms with fluorine atoms constituting the cation is then applied to enhance halogen bond strength. The QTAIM analysis further validates the existence of halogen bonding interaction in all complexes. The topological properties at the halogen bond critical points indicate that the Br···O interactions in the complexes are basically electrostatic in nature and belong to conventional weak halogen bonds. This study would be helpful for designing new and effective ILs for CO(2) physical absorption.

  14. On the internal field correction in far-infrared absorption of highly polar molecules in neat liquids and dilute solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vij, J. K.; Kalmykov, Yu P.

    1993-08-01

    Far-infrared absorption spectra for liquid acetone, methylene chloride, acetonitrile, methyl iodide, and their dilute solutions in cyclohexane at 20 °C are measured by molecular laser spectrometer. Measurements of dielectric loss of polar liquids and solutions in the frequency range 2-300 GHz are made using a number of different techniques. These two sets of measurements are combined with those made using a Fourier transform spectrometer in order to cover the frequency range up to 250 cm-1 and total integrated absorption intensities are calculated. It is shown that the discrepancy between experimental integrated absorption and the theoretical results given by Gordon's sum rule with the Polo-Wilson internal field factor can be explained in the context of Bossis' theory. This theory gives a better agreement with the experimental integrated absorption intensity for these liquids.

  15. The Formation of Oxygen-Containing Molecules in Liquid Water Environments on the Surface of Titan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, C.

    2010-12-01

    Saturn’s moon Titan represents a unique locale for studying prebiotic chemistry. Reactions occurring in its thick nitrogen - methane atmosphere produce a wide variety of organic molecules. Observations by the Voyager spacecraft found evidence for six gas-phase hydrocarbons and three nitriles, along with an enveloping haze layer shrouding the surface of the moon (Hanel et al., 1981; Kunde et al., 1981; Maguire et al., 1981). More recently, the INMS instrument on the Cassini spacecraft has found evidence for organic molecules up to its mass limit of 100 Da at altitudes as high as 1200 km (Waite et al., 2005; Vuitton et al. 2007). Laboratory experiments that simulate the reactions occurring in Titan’s atmosphere produce many of the same organic molecules observed by Voyager and Cassini, along with organic precipitates known as tholins. Tholins have the general formula CxHyNz and are spectrally similar to Titan’s haze (Khare et al., 1984). Though interesting from the point of view of organic chemistry, the molecules found in Titan’s atmosphere stop short of addressing questions related to the origins of life. Oxygen - a key element for most known biological molecules - is generally lacking in Titan’s atmosphere. The most abundant oxygenated molecule, CO, is present at only ~50 ppm (de Kok et al., 2007). However, if Titan’s atmospheric organic molecules mix with water found in cryovolcanic lavas or impact melts, they may react to produce oxygen-containing, prebiotic species. In this paper, I will show that reactions between Titan tholins and low temperature aqueous solutions produce a wide variety of oxygen-containing species. These reactions display first-order kinetic behaviour with half-lives between 0.4 to 7 days at 273 K (in water) and between 0.3 and 14 days at 253 K (in 13 wt. % ammonia-water). Tholin hydrolysis is thus very fast compared to the freezing timescales of impact melts and volcanic sites on Titan, which take hundreds to thousands of years

  16. Highly sensitive detection of molecules at the liquid/liquid interface using total internal reflection-optical beam deflection based on photothermal spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinami, Masanori; Murakawa, Hiromi; Sawada, Tsuguo

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a highly sensitive and versatile method based on photothermal spectroscopy has been developed to monitor the molecular density at a liquid/liquid interface. The excitation under the total internal reflection (TIR) condition results in a formation of a thin thermal lens elongated along the interface. In order to measure the thermal lens effects effectively and to reduce the background, the probe beam is irradiated parallel to the interface and its deflection is detected, which is called an TIR-optical beam deflection (TIR-OBD). As a result, the detection limit in TIR-OBD is about 2 orders lower than that of TIR-thermal lens spectroscopy, in which the irradiation of the probe beam is perpendicular to the interface.

  17. THERMALLY STABLE NANOCRYSTALLINE TIO2 PHOTOCATALYSTS SYNTHESIZED VIA SOL-GEL METHODS MODIFIED WITH IONIC LIQUID AND SURFACTANT MOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, sol-gel methods employing ionic liquids (ILs) have shown significant implications for the synthesis of well-defined nanostructured inorganic materials. Herein, we synthesized nanocrystalline TiO2 particles via an alkoxide sol-gel method employing a water-immi...

  18. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P2{sub 1} revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1} with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P2{sub 1} crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family.

  19. Liquid-liquid equilibria for soft-repulsive particles: improved equation of state and methodology for representing molecules of different sizes and chemistry in dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Jamadagni, Sumanth N; Eike, David; Koenig, Peter H; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2015-01-28

    Three developments are presented that significantly expand the applicability of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations for symmetric and non-symmetric mixtures, where the former contain particles with equal repulsive parameter for self-interactions but a different repulsive parameter for cross-interactions, and the latter contain particles with different repulsive parameters also for the self-interactions. Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations for unary phases covering a wide range of repulsive parameters and of densities for single-bead DPD particles point to deficiencies of the Groot and Warren equation of state (GW-EOS) [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 4423 (1997)]. A revised version, called rGW-EOS, is proposed here that is significantly more accurate over a wider range of parameters/densities. The second development is the generalization of the relationship between the Flory-Huggins χ parameter and the repulsive cross-interaction parameter when the two particles involved have different molecular volumes. The third aspect is an investigation of Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation protocols, which demonstrates the importance of volume fluctuations and excess volumes of mixing even for equimolar symmetric mixtures of DPD particles. As an illustrative example, the novel DPD methodology is applied to the prediction of the liquid-liquid equilibria for acetic anhydride/(n-hexane or n-octane) binary mixtures.

  20. Behavior of liquid crystals confined to mesoporous materials as studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy of methyl iodide and methane as probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Tallavaara, Pekka; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2008-01-24

    The behavior of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (LCs) Merck Phase 4 and ZLI 1115 confined to mesoporous controlled pore glass materials was investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of probe molecules methyl iodide and methane. The average pore diameters of the materials varied from 81 to 375 A, and the temperature series measurements were performed on solid, nematic, and isotropic phases of bulk LCs. Chemical shift, intensity, and line shape of the resonance signals in the spectra contain lots of information about the effect of confinement on the state of the LCs. The line shape of the 13C resonances of the CH3I molecules in LCs confined into the pores was observed to be even more sensitive to the LC orientation distribution than, for example, that of 2H spectra of deuterated LCs or 129Xe spectra of dissolved xenon gas. The effect of the magnetic field on the orientation of LC molecules inside the pores was examined in four different magnetic fields varying from 4.70 to 11.74 T. The magnetic field was found to have significant effect on the orientation of LC molecules in the largest pores and close to the nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature. The theoretical model of shielding of noble gases dissolved in LCs based on pairwise additivity approximation was utilized in the analysis of CH4 spectra. For the first time, a first-order nematic-isotropic phase transition was detected to take place inside such restrictive hosts. In the larger pores a few degrees below the nematic-isotropic phase transition of bulk LC the 13C quartet of CH3I changes as a powder pattern. Results are compared to those derived from 129Xe NMR measurements of xenon gas in similar environments.

  1. Electrochemical reduction of an anion for ionic-liquid molecules on a lithium electrode studied by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yasunobu; Kawamura, Yoshiumi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Otani, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    We report ab initio molecular dynamics studies with electric field that reveal chemical stability of room temperature ionic liquid for charge transfer from lithium and nickel electrodes. Bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI) is oxidized on the nickel electrode under a high positive bias condition as expected. However, TFSI is reduced on the lithium electrode under both positive and negative bias conditions, because the lithium electrode acts as a strong reductant. The decomposition of TFSI anion might induce the formation of LiF as a solid electrolyte interphase, which could restrain the TFSI reduction. The stability of an cation under reductant conditions is presented.

  2. A new extended diffusion model for rotational motion of symmetric-top molecules in the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascombe, J.; Besnard, M.; Maraval, P.

    1982-11-01

    In this paper, we present first a model called partially relaxed rotation model (PRR), to treat the reorientation motion of a symmetric top which rotates freely around its molecular axis with a tumbling motion relaxed according to a characteristic time τ 1. We show that this model can easily be extended to develop a 2τ model where both tumbling and spinning motion around the molecular axis are relaxed with a second characteristic time τ 2. As limiting cases one can obtain from the 2τ model, the Gordon-McClung and PRR models. Next, we illustrate the PPR and 2τ models by calculating Raman and infrared rotational spectral densities of liquid cyclopropane at room temperature. We also discuss in the PRR model the influence of the characteristic relaxation time τ 1, on the Raman rotational profile Î21( overlineν) Finally, we emphasize on the example of room-temperature liquid cyclopropane, the advantage of the PRR model to treat a E″ degenerated Raman profile with negligible Coriolis vibrational-rotational interaction. bl

  3. Size-exclusion chromatography of large molecules from coal liquids, petroleum residues, soots, biomass tars and humic substances.

    PubMed

    Herod, Alan A; Zhuo, Yuqun; Kandiyoti, Rafael

    2003-06-30

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) as eluent has been calibrated using various standard polymers and model compounds and applied to the analysis of extracts of coal, petroleum and kerogens, to petroleum vacuum residues, soots, biomass tars and humic substances. Three separate columns of different molecular mass (MM) ranges were used, with detection by UV absorption; an evaporative light scattering detector was used for samples with no UV absorption. Fractionation was useful to separate signal from the less abundant high-mass material, which was normally masked by the strong signal from the more abundant low-mass material in the absence of fractionation. Fractionation methods used to isolate high-mass materials before SEC analysis included planar chromatography, column chromatography and solvent solubility. The apparently large molecules were concentrated into the fractions not soluble in common solvents and were relatively immobile in planar chromatography. All samples and fractions contained some material excluded from the column porosity. Evidence from other techniques suggests that the excluded material is of different structures from that of the resolved material rather than consisting of aggregates of small molecules. We speculate that the excluded material may elute early because the structures of this material are three-dimensional rather than planar or near planar.

  4. Vibrational and thermal analyses of multicomponent crystal forms of the anti-HIV drugs lamivudine and zalcitabine.

    PubMed

    Martins, Felipe T; Guimarães, Freddy Fernandes; Honorato, Sara B; Ayala, Alejandro P; Ellena, Javier

    2015-06-10

    The vibrational and thermal characterizations of four multicomponent molecular crystals of lamivudine, namely, lamivudine hydrochloride anhydrate (1), lamivudine hydrochloride monohydrate (2), lamivudine duplex I (3), with a 8:2:2:1:4 lamivudine:maleic acid:HCl:(CH3)2CHOH:H2O stoichiometry, being all three more soluble in water than the commercial solid form of lamivudine, and lamivudine maleate (4), have been performed here by infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetry (TG). Furthermore, the vibrational spectra of zalcitabine hydrochloride (5), isostructural to 1 but with a methylene moiety in the 3'-position of the five-membered ring instead of sulfur in lamivudine, have also been measured in order to point out the role of this molecular substitution and conformation in the vibrational modes of the salts. In fact, scattering bands at the high frequency range relative to CH stretching modes are not superimposable in the Raman spectra of 1 and 5, even though these crystal forms are assembled with the same molecular conformation and intermolecular packing. At the same time, the structural similarity between 1 and 5 can be reflected in their IR spectra, as in the carbonyl and iminium stretching bands shifted to lower frequencies as consequence of their hydrogen bonding engagement. Furthermore, a scattering band at 3057 cm(-1) is observed only in the Raman spectra of crystal forms present with their 5'-CH2OH moiety in-gauche conformation, namely, 2-4. It is absent in the Raman spectra of 1 and 5 whose 5'-CH2OH moiety adopts (+)gauche conformation. In-gauche conformation, the 5'-OH oxygen is pointed toward one of the two aromatic CH hydrogens. Consequently, there is formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond between them, shifting the aromatic CH stretching band to a lower frequency. The DFT calculations have also revealed in-phase and out-of-phase couplings of the two aromatic CH stretchings in the Raman

  5. Adsorption of R-OH molecules on TiO2 surfaces at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Verónica M; de la Llave, Ezequiel; Scherlis, Damian A

    2011-03-15

    The exploration of TiO2 surface reactivity from first-principles calculations has been almost always limited to the gas phase, even though most of the chemically relevant applications of this interface involve the solid-liquid boundary. The reason for this limitation is the complexity of the solid-liquid interface, which poses a serious challenge to standard ab initio methodologies as density functional theory (DFT). In this work we study the interaction of H2O, CH3OH, H2O2, and HCO2H with anatase (101) and rutile (110) surfaces in aqueous solution, employing a continuum solvation model in a DFT framework in periodic boundary conditions [ J. Chem. Phys. 2009 , 131 , 174108 ]. Different adsorption configurations were analyzed, examining the effect of the first water monolayer explicitly included in the simulation. For water and methanol, molecular adsorption was found to be the most stable in the presence of the solvent, while for hydrogen peroxide the preferred configuration depended on the surface. The explicit inclusion of the first water monolayer turns out to be important since it may play a role in the stabilization of the adsorbates at the interface. In general, the slightly positive adsorption energy values obtained (with respect to water) suggest that CH3OH and H2O2 will poorly adsorb from an aqueous solution at the titania surface. Among the three species investigated other than water, the formic acid was the only one to exhibit a higher affinity for the surface than H2O.

  6. DFT Study of the Reaction Mechanisms of Carbon Dioxide and its Isoelectronic Molecules CS2 and OCS Dissolved in Pyrrolidinium and Imidazolium Acetate Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Danten, Y; Cabaço, M I; Coutinho, J A P; Pinaud, Noël; Besnard, M

    2016-06-16

    The reaction mechanisms of CO2 and its isoelectronic molecules OCS and CS2 dissolved in N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium acetate and in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate were investigated by DFT calculations in "gas phase". The analysis of predicted multistep pathways allowed calculating energies of reaction and energy barriers of the processes. The major role played by the acetate anion in the degradation of the solutes CS2 and OCS as well as in the capture of OCS and CO2 by the imidazolium ring is highlighted. In both ionic liquids, this anion governs the conversion of CS2 into OCS and of OCS into CO2 through interatomic S-O exchanges between the anion and the solutes with formation of thioacetate anions. In imidazolium acetate, the selective capture of CS2 and OCS by the imidazolium ring competes with the S-O exchanges. From the calculated values of the energy barriers a basicity scale of the anions is proposed. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the predicted adducts were calculated and agree well with the experimental observations. It is argued that the scenario issued from the calculated pathways is shown qualitatively to be independent from the functionals and basis set used, constitute a valuable tool in the understanding of chemical reactions taking place in liquid phase.

  7. Versatile, sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry – Implementation of 10 μm OT columns suitable for small molecules, peptides and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vehus, T.; Roberg-Larsen, H.; Waaler, J.; Aslaksen, S.; Krauss, S.; Wilson, S. R.; Lundanes, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed a versatile and sensitive liquid chromatographic (LC) system, featuring a monolithic trap column and a very narrow (10 μm ID) fused silica open tubular liquid chromatography (OTLC) separation column functionalized with C18-groups, for separating a wide range of molecules (from small metabolites to intact proteins). Compared to today’s capillary/nanoLC approaches, our system provides significantly enhanced sensitivity (up to several orders) with matching or improved separation efficiency, and highly repeatable chromatographic performance. The chemical properties of the trap column and the analytical column were fine-tuned to obtain practical sample loading capacities (above 2 μg), an earlier bottleneck of OTLC. Using the OTLC system (combined with Orbitrap mass spectrometry), we could perform targeted metabolomics of sub-μg amounts of exosomes with 25 attogram detection limit of a breast cancer-related hydroxylated cholesterol. With the same set-up, sensitive bottom-up proteomics (targeted and untargeted) was possible, and high-resolving intact protein analysis. In contrast to state-of-the-art packed columns, our platform performs chromatography with very little dilution and is “fit-for-all”, well suited for comprehensive analysis of limited samples, and has potential as a tool for challenges in diagnostics. PMID:27897190

  8. Conformational analysis of bis(methylthio)methane and diethyl sulfide molecules in the liquid phase: reverse Monte Carlo studies using classical interatomic potential functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gereben, Orsolya; Pusztai, László

    2013-11-01

    Series of flexible molecule reverse Monte Carlo calculations, using bonding and non-bonding interatomic potential functions (FMP-RMC), were performed starting from previous molecular dynamics results that had applied the OPLS-AA and EncadS force fields. During RMC modeling, the experimental x-ray total scattering structure factor was approached. The discrepancy between experimental and calculated structure factors, in comparison with the molecular dynamics results, decreased substantially in each case. The room temperature liquid structure of bis(methylthio)methane is excellently described by the FMP-RMC simulation that applied the EncadS force field parameters. The main conformer was found to be AG with 55.2%, followed by 37.2% of G+G+ (G-G-) and 7.6% of AA; the stability of the G+G+ (G-G-) conformer is most probably caused by the anomer effect. The liquid structure of diethyl sulfide can be best described by applying the OPLS-AA force field parameters during FMP-RMC simulation, although in this case the force field parameters were found to be not fully compatible with experimental data. Here, the two main conformers are AG (50.6%) and the AA (40%). In addition to findings on the actual real systems, a fairly detailed comparison between traditional and FMP-RMC methodology is provided.

  9. Phase and orientational ordering of low molecular weight rod molecules in a quenched liquid crystalline polymer matrix with mobile side chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, Lorin; Cao, Jianshu; Swager, Tim M.

    2004-06-01

    We study the phase diagram and orientational ordering of guest liquid crystalline (LC) rods immersed in a quenched host made of a liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) matrix with mobile side chains. The LCP matrix lies below the glass transition of the polymer backbone. The side chains are mobile and can align to the guest rod molecules in a plane normal to the local LCP chain contour. A field theoretic formulation for this system is proposed and the effects of the LCP matrix on LC ordering are determined numerically. We obtain simple analytical equations for the nematic/isotropic phase diagram boundaries. Our calculation show a nematic-nematic (N/N) first order transition from a guest stabilized to a guest-host stabilized region and the possibility of a reentrant transition from a guest stabilized nematic region to a host only stabilized regime separated by an isotropic phase. A detailed study of thermodynamic variables and interactions on orientational ordering and phases is carried out and the relevance of our predictions to experiments and computer simulations is presented.

  10. Initial velocities of positive and negative protein molecule-ions produced in matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption using a liquid matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic Chan, T.-W.; Thomas, Ioan; Colburn, A. W.; Derrick, Peter J.

    1994-06-01

    The initial axial velocities for the positive and negative cytochrome c molecule-ions desorbed from a liquid matrix (3-nitro-benzyl alcohol) using a 17 ns ultraviolet laser (266 nm) have been determined. The method employed was based upon measurement of ion flight times through a field-free path co-axial with the ion optical axis. The possible interferences, such as energy deficits, due to the presence of electric fields were avoided by using a grid-electrode placed at a very short distance from the sample stage. The potential of this electrode was maintained at the same potential as the sample stage, thereby creating a narrow field-free region within which ion generation took place. Systematic variations of the potential at a second grid-electrode caused a gradual shift of the ion flight times, which could be related to the initial ion velocities. The ion velocities were obtained by correlating the measured time-shifts with values from theoretical analysis. The positive and negative molecule-ions were found to have axial velocities of 840±70 and 750±40 ms -1, respectively.

  11. High resolution structures of the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor in two crystal forms: Implications for ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Peter D.; Cutfield, John F.; Cutfield, Sue M. . E-mail: sue.cutfield@otago.ac.nz

    2006-12-29

    BMPRII is a type II TGF-{beta} serine threonine kinase receptor which is integral to the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway. It is known to bind BMP and growth differentiation factor (GDF) ligands, and has overlapping ligand specificity with the activin type II receptor, ActRII. In contrast to activin and TGF-{beta} type ligands, BMPs bind to type II receptors with lower affinity than type I receptors. Crystals of the BMPRII ectodomain were grown in two different forms, both of which diffracted to high resolution. The tetragonal form exhibited some disorder, whereas the entire polypeptide was seen in the orthorhombic form. The two structures retain the basic three-finger toxin fold of other TGF-{beta} receptor ectodomains, and share the main hydrophobic patch used by ActRII to bind various ligands. However, they present different conformations of the A-loop at the periphery of the proposed ligand-binding interface, in conjunction with rearrangement of a disulfide bridge within the loop. This particular disulfide (Cys94-Cys117) is only present in BMPRII and activin receptors, suggesting that it is important for their likely shared mode of binding. Evidence is presented that the two crystal forms represent ligand-bound and free conformations of BMPRII. Comparison with the solved structure of ActRII bound to BMP2 suggests that His87, unique amongst TGF-{beta} receptors, may play a key role in ligand recognition.

  12. An unusual form of crystal-forming chronic interstitial nephritis following long-term exposure to tosufloxacin tosilate.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kotaki, Shuhei; Ikeda, Naofumi; Takane, Hiroshi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Sugahara, Souichi; Ban, Shinichi; Nagata, Makoto; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2004-11-01

    Fluoroquinolones are known to cause acute renal failure because of interstitial nephritis with or without epithelioid granulomas. We report the first case of slowly progressive renal failure caused by crystal-forming chronic interstitial nephritis with non-Langerhans' cell histiocytosis after long-term exposure to a fluoroquinolone, tosufloxacin tosilate. Lesions consisted of spindle- to cuboidal-shaped histiocytes with minimal collagenous matrix and low-level lymphocyte infiltration replacing normal tubulointerstitial structure of the kidney. Histiocytes were positive for CD68, but negative for S-100, suggesting they were derived from macrophages. There were numerous rhomboid- to needle-shaped crystal deposits in the cytoplasm of histiocytes, which showed bright birefringence under polarized light. No immunoglobulin deposits were seen in the kidney, and no evidence of paraproteinemia/lymphoproliferative diseases was identified in this patient. Despite a negative drug lymphocyte-stimulating test result using tosufloxacin tosilate, withdrawal of the drug and treatment with steroids gradually improved renal function. In this report, we describe the clinical course and histopathologic findings of this patient and discuss the possible pathogenesis.

  13. A novel analytical method for pharmaceutical polymorphs by terahertz spectroscopy and the optimization of crystal form at the discovery stage.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yukihiro; Ishihara, Yoko; Moriwaki, Toshiya; Kato, Eiji; Terada, Katsuhide

    2010-01-01

    A novel analytical method for the determination of pharmaceutical polymorphs was developed using terahertz spectroscopy. It was found out that each polymorph of a substance showed a specific terahertz absorption spectrum. In particular, analysis of the second derivative spectrum was enormously beneficial in the discrimination of closely related polymorphs that were difficult to discern by powder X-ray diffractometry. Crystal forms that were obtained by crystallization from various solvents and stored under various conditions were specifically characterized by the second derivative of each terahertz spectrum. Fractional polymorphic transformation for substances stored under stressed conditions was also identified by terahertz spectroscopy during solid-state stability test, but could not be detected by powder X-ray diffractometry. Since polymorphs could be characterized clearly by terahertz spectroscopy, further physicochemical studies could be conducted in a timely manner. The development form of compound examined was determined by the results of comprehensive physicochemical studies that included thermodynamic relationships, as well as chemical and physicochemical stability. In conclusion, terahertz spectroscopy, which has unique power in the elucidation of molecular interaction within a crystal lattice, can play more important role in physicochemical research. Terahertz spectroscopy has a great potential as a tool for polymorphic determination, particularly since the second derivative of the terahertz spectrum possesses high sensitivity for pharmaceutical polymorphs.

  14. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods.

  15. Preliminary X-ray investigations of several crystal forms of the ferripyoverdine FpvA outer membrane receptor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bound to ferripyoverdine

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Christophe; Hoegy, Françoise; Pattus, Franc; Cobessi, David

    2006-05-01

    The crystallization and X-ray data analysis of three crystal forms of the outer membrane pyoverdine transducer FpvA from P. aeruginosa bound to ferripyoverdine are described. The resolution of the crystals ranges from 3.15 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form; all were obtained in the presence of C{sub 8}E{sub 4} detergent. Ferripyoverdine transport across the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the pyoverdine receptor FpvA and the transcriptional regulation of FpvA involve interactions of the FpvA N-terminal TonB box and signalling domain with proteins from the inner membrane. Several crystallization conditions of FpvA–Pvd-Fe solubilized in C{sub 8}E{sub 4} detergent were obtained and X-ray data were collected from three crystal forms. The resolution limits range from 3.15 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form. From preliminary analysis of the electron-density maps, the first full-length structure of an outer membrane receptor including a signalling domain should be determined.

  16. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of a novel small-molecule, anti-cancer drug, Palomid 529, in human and mouse plasma and in mouse tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Sherris, David; Beijnen, Jos H; Van Tellingen, Olaf

    2011-12-15

    Palomid 529 (8-(1-Hydroxy-ethyl)-2-methoxy-3-(4-methoxy-benzyloxy)-benzo[c]chromen-6-one), is a novel non-steroidal small-molecule drug, which inhibits both mTORC1 and mTORC2 assembly, and elicits both anti-angiogenic and direct anti-tumor effects in vivo. We have developed and validated a sensitive and selective method for the quantification of Palomid 529 in human and mouse plasma and in a range of mouse tissue samples. Sample pretreatment involved liquid-liquid extraction with tert-butyl methyl ether yielding a recovery of >75%. Palomid 529 and the internal standard Palomid 545 were separated using a GraceSmart RP18 column (2.1 mm × 150 mm) packed with 5 μm C-18 material and a mobile phase comprised of 50% (v/v) acetonitrile and 50% (v/v) water delivered at a flow rate of 0.2 ml/min, and were detected by UV absorbance at a wavelength of 315 nm. Within the linear range of the calibration curve (10-10,000 ng/ml), acceptable accuracy and precision was achieved for all tested matrices. The validation results show that the method was selective and reproducible. Palomid 529 was stable in plasma upon 3 repeated freeze-thaw cycles and during storage for up to 24h at ambient temperature. However, pre-treated samples waiting for HPLC analyses need to be kept under dimmed light conditions at ambient temperature since a significant degradation of both Palomid 529 and Palomid 545 was observed when exposed to light. A pilot pharmacokinetic study in mice demonstrated the applicability of this method for pharmacokinetic purposes. Even at a low dose of 5.4 mg/kg this assay was still sensitive enough to determine the drug concentration in plasma samples obtained up to 24h after administration.

  17. Preparation of well-controlled three-dimensional skeletal hybrid monoliths via thiol-epoxy click polymerization for highly efficient separation of small molecules in capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Chen, Lianfang; Ou, Junjie; Liu, Zhongshan; Wang, Hongwei; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-10-16

    Two kinds of hybrid monoliths were first prepared via thiol-epoxy click polymerization using a multi-epoxy monomer, octaglycidyldimethylsilyl POSS (POSS-epoxy), and two multi-thiols, trimethylolpropanetris(3-mercaptopropionate) (TPTM) and pentaerythritoltetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PTM), respectively, as the precursors. The resulting two hybrid monoliths (assigned as POSS-epoxy-TPTM and POSS-epoxy-PTM) not only possessed high thermal, mechanical and chemical stabilities, but also exhibited well-controlled 3D skeletal microstructure and high efficiency in capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) separation of small molecules. The highest column efficiency reached 182,700N/m (for butylbenzene) on the monolith POSS-epoxy-PTM at the velocity of 0.75mm/s. Furthermore, the hybrid monolith POSS-epoxy-PTM was successfully applied for cLC separations of various samples, not only standard compounds such as alkylbenzenes, PAHs, phenols and dipeptides, as well as intact proteins, but also complex samples of EPA 610 and BSA digest.

  18. A new anion-exchange/hydrophobic monolith as stationary phase for nano liquid chromatography of small organic molecules and inorganic anions.

    PubMed

    Aydoğan, Cemil

    2015-05-01

    In this study, an anion-exchange/hydrophobic polymethacrylate-based stationary phase was prepared for nano-liquid chromatography of small organic molecules and inorganic anions. The stationary phase was synthesized by in situ polymerization of 3-chloro-2-hydroxypropylmethacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate inside silanized 100 μm i.d. fused silica capillary. The porogen mixture consisted of toluene and dodecanol. The pore size distrubution profiles of the resulting monolith were determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry and the morphology of the prepared monolith was investigated by scanning electron microscope. Good permeability, stability and column efficiency were observed on the monolithic column with nano flow. The produced monolithic column, which contains reactive chloro groups, was then modified by reaction with N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylamine to obtain an anion-exchange/hydrophobic monolithic stationary phase. The functionalized monolith contained ionizable amine groups and hydrophobic groups that are useful of anion-exchange/hydrophobic mixed-mode chromatography. The final monolithic column performance with respect to anion-exchange and hydrophobic interactions was assesed by the separation of alkylbenzene derivatives, phenolic compounds and inorganic anions, respectively. Theoretical plate numbers up to 23,000 plates/m were successfully achieved in the separation of inorganic anions.

  19. Photo-aligned blend films of azobenzene-containing polyimides with and without side-chains for inducing inclined alignment of liquid crystal molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, Kiyoaki; Sakamoto, Kenji

    2011-08-01

    We have succeeded in controlling the pretilt angle of liquid crystal (LC) molecules over the whole range of 0 to 90° by using photo-aligned blend films of two azobenzene-containing polyimides (Azo-PIs) with and without side-chains. The Azo-PIs were synthesized from pyromellitic dianhydride and a mixture of 4,4'-diaminoazobenzene and 4-(4'-propylbi(cyclohexan)-4-yl)phenyl 3,5-diaminobenzoate (PBCP-DABA). PBCP-DABA is a diamine to introduce a side-chain structure into the polyimide. Defect-free uniform LC alignment was obtained in the pretilt angle (θp) ranges of θp ≤ 11° and θp ≥ 78°. Previously, we reported that the pretilt angle can be controlled using pure photo-aligned films of Azo-PIs with different molar fractions of PBCP-DABA. For the pure photo-aligned films, the defect-free pretilt angle ranges were θp < 5° and θp ≥ 85°. These results suggest that the azimuthal anchoring strength of the blend Azo-PI film is stronger than that of the pure films of Azo-PIs with side-chains, at least for the pretilt angle range from 5 to 11°. We found that the defect-free pretilt angle range can be extended by using the blend Azo-PI films instead of the pure Azo-PI films.

  20. Principles for Manipulation of the Lateral Organization of Aqueous-Soluble Surface-Active Molecules at the Liquid Crystal-Aqueous Interface

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jugal K.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    We report an investigation of the lateral organization of water-soluble, surface-active molecules within monolayers formed spontaneously at interfaces between aqueous phases and immiscible, micrometer-thick films of nematic liquid crystals (LCs; 4′-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl and TL205, a mixture of cyclohexanefluorinated biphenyls and fluorinated terphenyls). Using both anionic (sodium dodecylsulfate) and cationic surfactants (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide), we demonstrate that the nematic order of the LCs can direct monolayers of surfactant in dynamic equilibria with bulk aqueous solutions to phase separate and assume lateral organizations at the interfaces of the LCs that are not seen in the absence of the nematic order. The lateral organization of the surfactants is readily evidenced by the patterned orientations assumed by the LCs, and can be manipulated reversibly by changes in the bulk concentrations of the surfactants. Experimental observations of the effects of bulk surfactant concentration, thickness of the film of LC, nematic order, and aqueous electrolyte concentration are placed within the framework of a simple thermodynamic model. The model incorporates the dynamic equilibration of surfactant between the bulk and interface as well as the coupling between the elasticity of nematic LCs and the lateral organization of the water-soluble surfactants within the monolayers. Qualitative agreement is found between the model predictions and experimental observations, thus supporting our conclusion that LCs offer the basis of general and facile methods to direct the lateral organization of interfacial molecular assemblies. PMID:19140731

  1. An accurate density functional theory for the vapor-liquid interface of associating chain molecules based on the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloor, Guy J.; Jackson, George; Blas, Felipe J.; del Río, Elvira Martín; de Miguel, Enrique

    2004-12-01

    A Helmholtz free energy density functional is developed to describe the vapor-liquid interface of associating chain molecules. The functional is based on the statistical associating fluid theory with attractive potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR) for the homogenous fluid [A. Gil-Villegas, A. Galindo, P. J. Whitehead, S. J. Mills, G. Jackson, and A. N. Burgess, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 4168 (1997)]. A standard perturbative density functional theory (DFT) is constructed by partitioning the free energy density into a reference term (which incorporates all of the short-range interactions, and is treated locally) and an attractive perturbation (which incorporates the long-range dispersion interactions). In our previous work [F. J. Blas, E. Martı´n del Rı´o, E. de Miguel, and G. Jackson, Mol. Phys. 99, 1851 (2001); G. J. Gloor, F. J. Blas, E. Martı´n del Rı´o, E. de Miguel, and G. Jackson, Fluid Phase Equil. 194, 521 (2002)] we used a mean-field version of the theory (SAFT-HS) in which the pair correlations were neglected in the attractive term. This provides only a qualitative description of the vapor-liquid interface, due to the inadequate mean-field treatment of the vapor-liquid equilibria. Two different approaches are used to include the correlations in the attractive term: in the first, the free energy of the homogeneous fluid is partitioned such that the effect of correlations are incorporated in the local reference term; in the second, a density averaged correlation function is incorporated into the perturbative term in a similar way to that proposed by Toxvaerd [S. Toxvaerd, J. Chem. Phys. 64, 2863 (1976)]. The latter is found to provide the most accurate description of the vapor-liquid surface tension on comparison with new simulation data for a square-well fluid of variable range. The SAFT-VR DFT is used to examine the effect of molecular chain length and association on the surface tension. Different association schemes (dimerization, straight and

  2. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of two crystal forms of stationary-phase survival E protein from Campylobacter jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Gonçalves, A. M. D.; Rêgo, A. T.; Thomaz, M.; Enguita, F. J.; Carrondo, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with a tetramer in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 80.5, b = 119.0, c = 135.3 Å. The second form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 121.4, b = 47.1, c = 97.8 Å, and contains a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected from these crystal forms to 2.5 and 2.95 Å resolution, respectively.

  3. Quantitative structure-retention relationships models for prediction of high performance liquid chromatography retention time of small molecules: endogenous metabolites and banned compounds.

    PubMed

    Goryński, Krzysztof; Bojko, Barbara; Nowaczyk, Alicja; Buciński, Adam; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Kaliszan, Roman

    2013-10-03

    Quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) is a technique capable of improving the identification of analytes by predicting their retention time on a liquid chromatography column (LC) and/or their properties. This approach is particularly useful when LC is coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) platform. The main aim of the present study was to develop and describe appropriate QSRR models that provide usable predictive capability, allowing false positive identification to be removed during the interpretation of metabolomics data, while additionally increasing confidence of experimental results in doping control area. For this purpose, a dataset consisting of 146 drugs, metabolites and banned compounds from World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) lists, was used. A QSRR study was carried out separately on high quality retention data determined by reversed-phase (RP-LC-HRMS) and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC-LC-HRMS) systems, employing a single protocol for each system. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was applied to construct the linear QSRR models based on a variety of theoretical molecular descriptors. The regression equations included a set of three descriptors for each model: ALogP, BELe6, R2p and ALogP(2), FDI, BLTA96, were used in the analysis of reversed-phase and HILIC column models, respectively. Statistically significant QSRR models (squared correlation coefficient for model fitting, R(2)=0.95 for RP and R(2)=0.84 for HILIC) indicate a strong correlation between retention time and the molecular descriptors. An evaluation of the best correlation models, performed by validation of each model using three tests (leave-one-out, leave-many-out, external tests), demonstrated the reliability of the models. This paper provides a practical and effective method for analytical chemists working with LC/HRMS platforms to improve predictive confidence of studies that seek to identify small molecules.

  4. An MCBJ case study: The influence of π-conjugation on the single-molecule conductance at a solid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wenjing; Valkenier, Hennie; Mészáros, Gábor; Manrique, David Zsolt; Mishchenko, Artem; Putz, Alexander; García, Pavel Moreno; Lambert, Colin J; Hummelen, Jan C; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    π-Conjugation plays an important role in charge transport through single molecular junctions. We describe in this paper the construction of a mechanically controlled break-junction setup (MCBJ) equipped with a highly sensitive log I-V converter in order to measure ultralow conductances of molecular rods trapped between two gold leads. The current resolution of the setup reaches down to 10 fA. We report single-molecule conductance measurements of an anthracene-based linearly conjugated molecule (AC), of an anthraquinone-based cross-conjugated molecule (AQ), and of a dihydroanthracene-based molecule (AH) with a broken conjugation. The quantitative analysis of complementary current-distance and current-voltage measurements revealed details of the influence of π-conjugation on the single-molecule conductance.

  5. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  6. Single molecule diffraction.

    PubMed

    Spence, J C H; Doak, R B

    2004-05-14

    For solving the atomic structure of organic molecules such as small proteins which are difficult to crystallize, the use of a jet of doped liquid helium droplets traversing a continuous high energy electron beam is proposed as a means of obtaining electron diffraction patterns (serial crystallography). Organic molecules (such as small proteins) within the droplet (and within a vitreous ice jacket) may be aligned by use of a polarized laser beam. Iterative methods for solving the phase problem are indicated. Comparisons with a related plan for pulsed x-ray diffraction from single proteins in a molecular beam are provided.

  7. Critical lines for an unequal size of molecules in a binary gas-liquid mixture around the van Laar point using the combination of the Tompa model and the van der Waals equation.

    PubMed

    Gençaslan, Mustafa; Keskin, Mustafa

    2012-02-14

    We combine the modified Tompa model with the van der Waals equation to study critical lines for an unequal size of molecules in a binary gas-liquid mixture around the van Laar point. The van Laar point is coined by Meijer and it is the only point at which the mathematical double point curve is stable. It is the intersection of the tricritical point and the double critical end point. We calculate the critical lines as a function of χ(1) and χ(2), the density of type I molecules and the density of type II molecules for various values of the system parameters; hence the global phase diagrams are presented and discussed in the density-density plane. We also investigate the connectivity of critical lines at the van Laar point and its vicinity and discuss these connections according to the Scott and van Konynenburg classifications. It is also found that the critical lines and phase behavior are extremely sensitive to small modifications in the system parameters.

  8. Enhancing and reducing chirality by opposite circularly-polarized light irradiation on crystalline chiral domains consisting of nonchiral photoresponsive W-shaped liquid crystal molecules.

    PubMed

    Choi, Suk-Won; Takezoe, Hideo

    2016-09-28

    We found possible chirality enhancement and reduction in chiral domains formed by photoresponsive W-shaped molecules by irradiation with circularly polarized light (CPL). The W-shaped molecules exhibit a unique smectic phase with spontaneously segregated chiral domains, although the molecules are nonchiral. The chirality control was generated in the crystalline phase, which shows chiral segregation as in the upper smectic phase, and the result appeared to be as follows: for a certain chiral domain, right-CPL stimuli enhanced the chirality, while left-CPL stimuli reduced the chirality, and vice versa for another chiral domain. Interestingly, no domain-size change could be observed after CPL irradiation, suggesting some changes in the causes of chirality. In this way, the present system can recognize the handedness of the applied chiral stimuli. In other words, the present material can be used as a sensitive chiral-stimuli-recognizing material and should find invaluable applications, including in chiroptical switches, sensors, and memories as well as in chiral recognition.

  9. Fabrication and evaluation of an organic monolithic column based upon the polymerisation of hexyl methacrylate with 1,6-hexanediol ethoxylate diacrylate for the separation of small molecules by capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Alshitari, Wael; Quigley, Cristina Legido; Smith, Norman

    2015-08-15

    This paper describes the fabrication of a new porous monolith, prepared in 100μm i.d. capillaries by the co-polymerisation of hexyl methacrylate with 1,6-hexanediol ethoxylate diacrylate, poly (HMA-co-1,6 HEDA), in the presence of azobisisobutyronitrile, 1, 4-butanediol and 1-propanol were used as porogens for the monoliths; the monoliths were then used as a stationary phase for capillary liquid chromatography. Two cross linkers namely 1,6 HEDA and EDMA were utilised in order to investigate the effects of cross linker length on the separation efficiency of small molecules, and it was found that the efficiency of the separation improved tenfold when using the longer cross linker, 1,6 HEDA. This improvement is associated with the increase in number of methylene groups which resulted in an increased number of mesopores, less than 50nm. The 1,6 HEDA based monolith showed a high porosity (90%) and no evidence of swelling or shrinking with the use of organic solvents. Moreover, the 1,6 HEDA monolith demonstrated high reproducibility for the separation of the retained compounds anisole and naphthalene; these showed retention time RSDs of 1.79% and 2.74% respectively. The fabricated monolith also demonstrated high selectivity for neutral non-polar molecules, weak acids, and basic molecules. The asymmetry factors for basic molecules (nortriptyline and amitriptyline) were 1.5 and 1.3 respectively, indicating slight tailing, which is often noticeable on silica based phases due to secondary interactions between basic moieties and the hydroxyl groups of the silica.

  10. A novel polymeric monolith prepared with multi-acrylate crosslinker for retention-independent efficient separation of small molecules in capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Ou, Junjie; Wei, Yinmao; Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Zhongshan; Chen, Lianfang; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-07-09

    Low column efficiency for small molecules in reversed-phase chromatography is a major problem commonly encountered in polymer-based monoliths. Herein, a novel highly crosslinked porous polymeric monolith was in situ prepared by using a multi-acrylate monomer, dipentaerythritol penta-/hexa-acrylate (DPEPA), as crosslinker, which copolymerized with lauryl methacrylate (LMA) as functional monomer in a UV-transparent fused-silica capillary via photo-initiated free-radical polymerization within 5 min. The mechanical stability and permeability of the resulting poly(LMA-co-DPEPA) monolith were characterized in detail. One series of highly crosslinked poly(LMA-co-DPEPA) columns were prepared with relatively higher content of crosslinker (63.3%) in the precursor. Although they exhibited lower permeability, high column efficiency for alkylbenzenes was acquired in cLC, and the minimum plate height (column B) was in the range of 6.04-9.00 μm, corresponding to 111,000-165,000 N m(-1). Meanwhile, another series of poly(LMA-co-DPEPA) columns prepared with relatively lower content of crosslinker (52.7%) in the precursor exhibited higher permeability, but the minimum plate height (column E) was relatively low in the range of 10.75-20.04 μm for alkylbenzenes, corresponding to 50,000-93,000 N m(-1). Compared with common poly(LMA-co-EDMA) columns previously reported, the highly crosslinked poly(LMA-co-DPEPA) columns using a multi-acrylate monomer as crosslinker possessed remarkably high column efficiency for small molecules in cLC. By plotting of plate height (H) of alkylbenzenes versus the linear velocity (u) of mobile phase, the results revealed a retention-independent efficient performance of small molecules in the isocratic elution, indicating that the use of multi-functional crosslinker possibly prevents the generation of gel-like micropores in the poly(LMA-co-DPEPA) monolith, reducing the mass transfer resistance (C-term).

  11. Chiroptical detection during liquid chromatography 7. The rotation angle/absorbance ratio of chiral molecules. Its possible use for on-line analysis during preparative separations of enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Brandl, F; Pustet, N; Mannschreck, A

    2001-02-16

    The rotation angle/absorbance ratios C+ = alpha+/A+ and C- = a-/A-, determined via detection by a polarimeter and a photometer, were checked for the first time with reference to their use for on-line analysis during preparative separations. For this purpose, (+)-, (-)- and (+/-)-carvones were investigated by liquid chromatography (LC) on microcrystalline tribenzoylcellulose. It turned out that the ratios C+ and C- depend only slightly upon concentration (Table 1). Overlapped peaks of enantiomers were successfully submitted to computer deconvolution (e.g. Fig. 2, bottom). A procedure for on-line analysis during preparative LC is proposed.

  12. Preparation and characterization of poly(triallyl isocyanurate-co-trimethylolpropane triacrylate) monolith and its applications in the separation of small molecules by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Hao, Mengbei; Li, Ruo; Bai, Ligai; Yang, Gengliang

    2014-03-14

    A new polymeric monolith was prepared in stainless-steel column and fused-silica capillary, respectively, by atom transfer radical polymerization technique. In the polymerization, triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) was used as the functional monomer; trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) as the crosslinking agent; polyethylene glycol 200 and 1,2-propanediol as the co-porogens; carbon tetrachloride as the initiator and ferrous chloride as the catalyst. The conditions of polymerization were optimized. Morphology of the prepared poly(TAIC-co-TMPTA) monolith was investigated by scanning electron microscopy; pore properties were assayed by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. The characterization indicated that the prepared reversed-phase monolith possessed uniform structure, good permeability and mechanical stability. The column was used as the stationary phase of reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) to separate the mixture of aromatic compounds. The new column performed around 125,000 theoretical plates per meter. The column showed good reproducibility: the relative standard deviation values of the retention factor values for aromatic compounds were less than 1.52% (n=7, column-to-column).

  13. Preparation and evaluation of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic columns for separating polar small molecules by capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wu, Yu-Ru; Lin, Tzuen-Yeuan; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2015-04-29

    In this study, methacrylic acid (MAA) was incorporated with alkyl methacrylates to increase the hydrophilicity of the synthesized ethylene dimethacrylate-based (EDMA-based) monoliths for separating polar small molecules by capillary LC analysis. Different alkyl methacrylate-MAA ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% alkyl methacrylate-MAA-EDMA monoliths in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The porosity, permeability, and column efficiency of the synthesized MAA-incorporated monolithic columns were characterized. A mixture of phenol derivatives is employed to evaluate the applicability of using the prepared monolithic columns for separating small molecules. Fast separation of six phenol derivatives was achieved in 5 min with gradient elution using the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. In addition, the effect of acetonitrile content in mobile phase on retention factor and plate height as well as the plate height-flow velocity curves were also investigated to further examine the performance of the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column. Moreover, the applicability of prepared polymer-based monolithic column for potential food safety applications was also demonstrated by analyzing five aflatoxins and three phenicol antibiotics using the selected poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-MAA-co-EDMA) monolithic column.

  14. Self-powdering and nonlinear optical domain structures in ferroelastic β‧-Gd2(MoO4)3 crystals formed in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Y.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T.

    2009-08-01

    Ferroelastic β'-Gd 2(MoO 4) 3, (GMO), crystals are formed through the crystallization of 21.25Gd 2O 3-63.75MoO 3-15B 2O 3 glass (mol%), and two scientific curious phenomena are observed. (1) GMO crystals formed in the crystallization break into small pieces with a triangular prism or pyramid shape having a length of 50-500 μm spontaneously during the crystallizations in the inside of an electric furnace, not during the cooling in air after the crystallization. This phenomenon is called "self-powdering phenomenon during crystallization" in this paper. (2) Each self-powdered GMO crystal grain shows a periodic domain structure with different refractive indices, and a spatially periodic second harmonic generation (SHG) depending on the domain structure is observed. It is proposed from polarized micro-Raman scattering spectra and the azimuthal dependence of second harmonic intensities that GMO crystals are oriented in each crystal grain and the orientation of (MoO 4) 2- tetrahedra in GMO crystals changes periodically due to spontaneous strains in ferroelastic GMO crystals.

  15. Effect of TiO2-Crystal Forms on the Photo-Degradation of EVA/PLA Blend Under Accelerated Weather Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cong, Do; Trang, Nguyen Thi Thu; Giang, Nguyen Vu; Lam, Tran Dai; Hoang, Thai

    2016-05-01

    Photo-degradation of poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA)/poly (lactic acid) (PLA) blend and EVA/PLA/TiO2 nanocomposites was carried out under accelerated weather testing conditions by alternating cycles of ultraviolet (UV) light and moisture at controlled and elevated temperatures. The characters, properties, and morphology of these materials before and after accelerated weather testing were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, colour changes, viscosity, tensile test, thermogravimetric analysis, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The increases in the content of oxygen-containing groups, colour changes; the decreases in viscosity, tensile properties, and thermal stability of these materials after accelerated weather testing are the evidence for the photo-degradation of the blend and nanocomposites. After accelerated weather testing, the appearance of many micro-holes and micro-pores on the surface of the collected samples was observed. The photo-degradation degree of the nanocomposites depended on the TiO2-crystal form. Rutile TiO2 do not enhance the degradation, but anatase and mixed crystals TiO2 nanoparticles promoted the degradation of the nanocomposites. Particularly, the mixed crystals TiO2 nanoparticles showed the highest photo-catalytic activity of the nanocomposites.

  16. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  17. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  18. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  19. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  20. Retrospective screening of relevant pesticide metabolites in food using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry and accurate-mass databases of parent molecules and diagnostic fragment ions.

    PubMed

    Polgár, László; García-Reyes, Juan F; Fodor, Péter; Gyepes, Attila; Dernovics, Mihály; Abrankó, László; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2012-08-03

    In recent years, the detection and characterization of relevant pesticide metabolites in food is an important task in order to evaluate their formation, kinetics, stability, and toxicity. In this article, a methodology for the systematic screening of pesticides and their main metabolites in fruit and vegetable samples is described, using LC-HRMS and accurate-mass database search of parent compounds and their diagnostic fragment ions. The approach is based on (i) search for parent pesticide molecules; (ii) search for their metabolites in the positive samples, assuming common fragmentation pathways between the metabolites and parent pesticide molecules; and (iii) search for pesticide conjugates using the data from both parent species and diagnostic fragment ions. An accurate-mass database was constructed consisting of 1396 compounds (850 parent compounds, 447 fragment ions and 99 metabolites). The screening process was performed by the software in an automated fashion. The proposed methodology was evaluated with 29 incurred samples and the output obtained was compared to standard pesticide testing methods (targeted LC-MS/MS). Examples on the application of the proposed approach are shown, including the detection of several pesticide glycosides derivatives, which were found with significantly relevant intensities. Glucose-conjugated forms of parent compounds (e.g., fenhexamid-O-glucoside) and those of metabolites (e.g., despropyl-iprodione-N-glycoside) were detected. Facing the lack of standards for glycosylated pesticides, the study was completed with the synthesis of fenhexamid-O-glucoside for quantification purposes. In some cases the pesticide derivatives were found in a relatively high ratio, drawing the attention to these kinds of metabolites and showing that they should not be neglected in multi-residue methods. The global coverage obtained on the 29 analyzed samples showed the usefulness and benefits of the proposed approach and highlights the practical

  1. Probing the interplay between electrostatic and dispersion interactions in the solvation of nonpolar nonaromatic solute molecules in ionic liquids: An OKE spectroscopic study of CS2/[CnC1im][NTf2] mixtures (n = 1-4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lianjie; Tamas, George; Gurung, Eshan; Quitevis, Edward L.

    2014-04-01

    The intermolecular dynamics of dilute solutions of CS2 in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethane)sulfonyl]amide ([CnC1im][NTf2] for n = 1-4) were studied at 295 K using femtosecond optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectroscopy. The OKE spectra of the CS2/ionic liquid (IL) mixtures were analyzed using an additivity model to obtain the CS2 contribution to the OKE spectrum from which information about the intermolecular modes of CS2 in these mixtures was gleaned. The intermolecular spectrum of CS2 in these mixtures is lower in frequency and narrower than that of neat CS2, as found previously for CS2 in [C5C1im][NTf2]. Moreover, a dependence of the spectra on alkyl chain length is observed that is attributed to the interplay between electrostatic and dispersion interactions. The surprising result in this study is the solubility of CS2 in [C1C1im][NTf2], which involves the interaction of a nonpolar nonaromatic molecular solute and only the charged groups of the IL. We propose that the solubility of CS2 in [C1C1im][NTf2] is determined by three favorable factors - (1) large polarizability of the solute molecule; (2) small size of the solute molecule; and (3) low cohesive energy in the high-charge density regions of the IL.

  2. Liquid-diet with alcohol alters maternal, fetal and placental weights and the expression of molecules involved in integrin signaling in the fetal cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Rout, Ujjwal K; Dhossche, Julie M

    2010-11-01

    Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy causes wide range of behavioral and structural deficits in children, commonly known as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). Children with FAS may suffer behavioral deficits in the absence of obvious malformations. In rodents, the exposure to alcohol during gestation changes brain structures and weights of offspring. The mechanism of FAS is not completely understood. In the present study, an established rat (Long-Evans) model of FAS was used. The litter size and the weights of mothers, fetuses and placentas were examined on gestation days 18 or 20. On gestation day 18, the effects of chronic alcohol on the expression levels of integrin receptor subunits, phospholipase-Cγ and N-cadherin were examined in the fetal cerebral cortices. Presence of alcohol in the liquid-diet reduced the consumption and decreased weights of mothers and fetuses but increased the placental weights. Expression levels of β(1) and α(3) integrin subunits and phospholipase-Cγ(2) were significantly altered in the fetal cerebral cortices of mothers on alcohol containing diet. Results show that alcohol consumption during pregnancy even with protein, mineral and vitamin enriched diet may affect maternal and fetal health, and alter integrin receptor signaling pathways in the fetal cerebral cortex disturbing the development of fetal brains.

  3. High-performance liquid chromatography separation of small molecules on a porous poly (trimethylol propane triacrylate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Bai, Xiaomei; Wei, Dan; Yang, Gengliang

    2014-01-10

    A porous monolith was prepared by in situ free-radical polymerization using N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) as functional monomers, ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as crosslinking agent. The chemical group of the monolith was assayed by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) method and the morphology of optimized monolithic column was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical strength and permeability have been studied in detail as well. The run-to-run and column-to-column reproducibility of the retention times were less than 0.9% and 3.0%, respectively. Furthermore, the influence of temperature and mobile phase composition on the separation of aromatic compounds was investigated. The results indicated that poly (trimethylol propane triacrylate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-ethylenedimethacrylate) (TMPTA-co-NIPAAm-co-EDMA) monolithic column not only had high porosity and strong rigidity, but also was a promising tool for analyzing small molecule compounds with a short analysis time by controlling the column temperature.

  4. Analyzing complex mixtures of drug-like molecules: Ion mobility as an adjunct to existing liquid chromatography-(tandem) mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Boschmans, Jasper; Lemière, Filip; Sobott, Frank

    2017-03-24

    The use of traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) is evaluated in conjunction with, and as a possible alternative to, conventional LC-MS(/MS) methods for the separation and characterization of drug-like compounds and metabolites. As a model system we use an in vitro incubation mixture of the chemotherapeutic agent melphalan, which results in more than ten closely related hydrolysis products and chain-like oligomers. Ion mobility as a filtering tool results in the separation of ions of interest from interfering ions, based on charge state and shape/size. Different classes of chemical compounds often display different mobilities even if they show the same LC behavior - thereby providing an orthogonal separation dimension. Small molecules with identical or similar m/z that only differ in shape/size (e.g. isomers and isobars, monomers/dimers) can also be distinguished using ion mobility. Similar to retention times and mass-to-charge ratios, drift times are analyte-dependent and can be used as an additional identifier. We find that the compound melphalan shows two different drift times due to the formation of gas-phase charge isomers (protomers). The occurrence of protomers has important implications for ion mobility characterization of such analytes, and also for the interpretation of their fragmentation behavior (CID) in the gas phase.

  5. Self-powdering and nonlinear optical domain structures in ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals formed in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukada, Y.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T.

    2009-08-15

    Ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3}, (GMO), crystals are formed through the crystallization of 21.25Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-63.75MoO{sub 3}-15B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass (mol%), and two scientific curious phenomena are observed. (1) GMO crystals formed in the crystallization break into small pieces with a triangular prism or pyramid shape having a length of 50-500 {mu}m spontaneously during the crystallizations in the inside of an electric furnace, not during the cooling in air after the crystallization. This phenomenon is called 'self-powdering phenomenon during crystallization' in this paper. (2) Each self-powdered GMO crystal grain shows a periodic domain structure with different refractive indices, and a spatially periodic second harmonic generation (SHG) depending on the domain structure is observed. It is proposed from polarized micro-Raman scattering spectra and the azimuthal dependence of second harmonic intensities that GMO crystals are oriented in each crystal grain and the orientation of (MoO{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra in GMO crystals changes periodically due to spontaneous strains in ferroelastic GMO crystals. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the polarized optical photograph at room temperature for a particle (piece) obtained by a heat treatment of the glass at 590 deg. C for 2 h in an electric furnace in air. This particle was obtained through the self-powdering behavior in the crystallization of glass. The periodic domain structure is observed. Ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals are formed in the particle, and second harmonic generations are detected, depending on the domain structure.

  6. Impact of Water-Dilution on the Solvation Properties of the Ionic Liquid 1-Methyltriethoxy-3-ethylimidazolium Acetate for Model Biomass Molecules.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Timothy C; Hegde, Govind A; Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Johns, Adam J; Maupin, C Mark

    2017-02-02

    Many studies have suggested that the processing of lignocellulosic biomass could provide a renewable feedstock to supplant much of the current demand on petroleum sources. Currently, alkyl imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) have shown considerable promise in the pretreatment, solvation, and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials although their high cost and unfavorable viscosity has limited their widespread use. Functionalizing these ILs with an oligo(ethoxy) tail has previously been shown through experiment to decrease the IL's viscosity resulting in enhanced mass transport characteristics, in addition to other favorable traits including decreased inhibition of some enzymes. Additionally, the use of cosolvents to mitigate the cost and unfavorable traits of ILs is an area of growing interest with particular attention on water as the presence of water in biomass processes is inevitable. Through the use of biased and unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, this study provides a molecular-level perspective of the various solvent-solvent and solvent-solute interactions in binary mixtures of water and 1-methyltriethoxy-3-ethylimidazolium acetate ([Me-(OEt)3-Et-IM(+)] [OAc(-)]) in the presence of model cellulose compounds (i.e., glucose and cellobiose). It is observed that at ∼75% w/w IL and water a transition in the nanostructure of the solvent occurs between water-like and IL-like solvation characteristics. It is shown that H-bonding interactions between the anion and water are a major driving force that significantly impacts the solvent properties of the IL as well as conformational preferences of the cellulosic model compound. In addition, it is found that the oligo(ethoxy) cation tail is responsible for the reduction in the propensity for tail aggregation as compared to alkyl tails of similar length, which, combined with increased ionic shielding, results in increased diffusion and enhanced water-like solvation characteristics.

  7. Determination of creatinine-related molecules in saliva by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and the evaluation of hemodialysis in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mayu; Furuhashi, Mitsuyoshi; Sesoko, Shogo; Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Toshio; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-03-10

    The serum concentrations of creatinine (Cre) and urea are used for the determination of the renal function. However, the use of blood is not always suitable due to the invasive, hygienic and infection problems during its sample collection and handling. In contrast, saliva is relatively clean and the samples can be quickly and noninvasively collected and easily stored. Therefore, the simultaneous determination of Arginine (Arg), creatine (Cr) and Cre in the saliva of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients was performed by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS together with the saliva of healthy volunteers. The evaluation of hemodialysis of CKD patients was also carried out by the determinations before and after the dialysis. An HS-F5 column was used for the simultaneous determination of Arg, Cr and Cre in the saliva. These molecules were rapidly separated within 4 min and sensitively determined by the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of the precursor ion [M+H](+) → product ions (m/z 175.1 → 70.1 for Arg; m/z 132.0 → 44.1 for Cr; m/z 114.0 → 44.1 for Cre). The concentration of Cre in the CKD patients was higher than that in the healthy persons. The concentrations of Cre in the saliva of the patients before hemodialysis were moderately correlated with the serum Cre concentrations (R(2) = 0.661). Furthermore, the concentration in the saliva obviously decreased after hemodialysis (before 0.73 mg/dL, after 0.25 mg/dL; p < 0.02). Thus, the proposed detection method using saliva by UPLC-MS/MS is useful for the evaluation of the renal function in CKD patients. The present method offers a new option for monitoring the hemodialysis of CKD patients.

  8. Ionic-content dependence of viscoelasticity of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal sunset yellow.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Cervenka, Adam J; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2014-10-01

    A lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) is an orientationally ordered system made by self-assembled aggregates of charged organic molecules in water, bound by weak noncovalent attractive forces and stabilized by electrostatic repulsions. We determine how the ionic content of the LCLC, namely, the presence of mono- and divalent salts and pH enhancing agent, alter the viscoelastic properties of the LCLC. Aqueous solutions of the dye sunset yellow with a uniaxial nematic order are used as an example. By applying a magnetic field to impose orientational deformations, we measure the splay K1, twist K2, and bend K3 elastic constants and rotation viscosity γ1 as a function of concentration of additives. The data indicate that the viscoelastic parameters are influenced by ionic content in dramatic and versatile ways. For example, the monovalent salt NaCl decreases K3 and K2 and increases γ1, while an elevated pH decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals formed by covalently bound units of fixed length.

  9. Ionic-content dependence of viscoelasticity of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal sunset yellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang; Cervenka, Adam J.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2014-10-01

    A lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) is an orientationally ordered system made by self-assembled aggregates of charged organic molecules in water, bound by weak noncovalent attractive forces and stabilized by electrostatic repulsions. We determine how the ionic content of the LCLC, namely, the presence of mono- and divalent salts and p H enhancing agent, alter the viscoelastic properties of the LCLC. Aqueous solutions of the dye sunset yellow with a uniaxial nematic order are used as an example. By applying a magnetic field to impose orientational deformations, we measure the splay K1, twist K2, and bend K3 elastic constants and rotation viscosity γ1 as a function of concentration of additives. The data indicate that the viscoelastic parameters are influenced by ionic content in dramatic and versatile ways. For example, the monovalent salt NaCl decreases K3 and K2 and increases γ1, while an elevated p H decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals formed by covalently bound units of fixed length.

  10. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  11. Nanoconstructions Based on Spatially Ordered Nucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    Different strategies for the design of nanoconstructions whose building blocks are both linear molecules of double-stranded nucleic acids and nucleic acid molecules fixed in the spatial structure of particles of liquid-crystalline dispersions are described.

  12. The fabrication of monolithic capillary column based on poly (bisphenol A epoxy vinyl ester resin-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and its applications for the separation of small molecules in high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenjing; Wang, Lijuan; Bai, Ligai; Yang, Gengliang

    2013-07-05

    A new polymeric monolith was synthesized in fused-silica capillary by in situ polymerization technique. In the polymerization, bisphenol A epoxy vinyl ester resin (VER) was used as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as the crosslinking monomer, 1,4-butanediol, 1-propanol and water as the co-porogens, and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. The conditions of polymerization have been optimized. Morphology of the prepared poly (VER-co-EDMA) monolith was investigated by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM); pore properties were assayed by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. The optimized poly (VER-co-EDMA) monolith showed a uniform structure, good permeability and mechanical stability. Then, the column was used as the stationary phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate the mixture of benzene derivatives. The best column efficiency achieved for phenol was 235790 theoretical plates per meter. Baseline separations of benzene derivatives and halogenated benzene compounds under optimized isocratic mode conditions were achieved with high column efficiency. The column showed good reproducibility: the relative standard deviation (RSD) values based on the retention times (n=3) for run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch were less than 0.98, 1.68, 5.48%, respectively. Compared with poly (BMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column, the proposed monolith exhibited more efficiency in the separation of small molecules.

  13. PREFACE: Functionalized Liquid Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Hubert; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Monroe, Charles W.; Urbakh, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Most natural processes take place at interfaces. For this reason, surface science has been a focal point of modern research. At solid-liquid interfaces one can induce various species to adsorb or react, and thus may study interactions between the substrate and adsorbates, kinetic processes, optical properties, etc. Liquid-liquid interfaces, formed by immiscible liquids such as water and oil, have a number of distinctive features. Both sides of the interface are amenable to detailed physical and chemical analysis. By chemical or electrochemical means, metal or semiconductor nanoparticles can be formed or localised at the interface. Surfactants can be used to tailor surface properties, and also to place organic molecular or supermolecular constructions at the boundary between the liquids. Electric fields can be used to drive ions from one fluid to another, or even change the shape of the interface itself. In many cases, both liquids are optically transparent, making functionalized liquid-liquid interfaces promising for various optical applications based on the transmission or reflection of light. An advantage common to most of these systems is self-assembly; because a liquid-liquid interface is not mechanically constrained like a solid-liquid interface, it can easily access its most stable state, even after it has been driven far from equilibrium. This special issue focuses on four modes of liquid-liquid interfacial functionalization: the controlled adsorption of molecules or nanoparticles, the formation of adlayers or films, electrowetting, and ion transfer or interface-localized reactions. Interfacial adsorption can be driven electrically, chemically, or mechanically. The liquid-liquid interface can be used to study how anisotropic particles orient at a surface under the influence of a field, how surfactants interact with other adsorbates, and how nanoparticles aggregate; the transparency of the interface also makes the chirality of organic adsorbates amenable to

  14. Phototriggers for liquid crystal-based optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Kikue Sugiyama

    liquid crystal-forming material) formed a cholesteric phase directly observed by optical microscopy. Irradiation with unpolarized light reversed this process. These experiments are the first direct measurement of the reversible transfer of chirality from CPL to a bulk material property.

  15. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  16. Enhancing proton conduction via doping of supramolecular liquid crystals (4-alkoxybenzoic acids) with imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ting; Wu, Yong; Tan, Shuai; Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Bingzhuo

    2015-09-01

    Enhancing proton conduction via doping was first achieved in hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals consisting of benzoic acids. Supramolecular liquid crystals formed by pure 4-alkoxybenzoic acids (nAOBA, n = 8, 10, 12) exhibited the maximum proton conductivity of 5.0 × 10-8 S cm-1. Doping of nAOBA with 25 mol% imidazole (Im0.25) had little impact on mesomorphism but increased proton conductivities by at least 3 orders of magnitude. The liquid crystals formed by nAOBA-Im0.25 exhibited the maximum proton conductivity of 1.9 × 10-4 S cm-1. It was proposed that structure diffusion of imidazole bridged interdimer proton transfer to form continuous conducting pathways in mesomorphic nAOBA-Im0.25.

  17. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  18. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  19. Size-Controlled 3D Colloidal Crystals Formed in an Aqueous Suspension of Polystyrene/Polyglycidol Microspheres with Covalently Bound l-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Gosecka, Monika; Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Basinska, Teresa; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2016-12-06

    Stable three-dimensional colloidal crystals were fabricated in an aqueous suspension of Tris buffer at pH > 8. The basic building blocks of the crystals were submicron-sized polystyrene-polyglycidol core-shell particles (Dn(SEM) = 270 ± 18 nm) with covalently bound 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA). The growth of the crystals was triggered by a thermodynamically favorable arrangement of particles leading to their close packing and by the formation of covalent cross-links between the individual particles. Under alkaline conditions, molecules of l-DOPA are oxidized, which allows their participation in cross-linking, necessary for the stabilization of the formed colloidal crystals. The average size of the fabricated colloidal crystals is determined by their weight, density of the suspending medium, and the energy of their Brownian motion. Crystals generated during the suspension of particles fall down after reaching the critical weight. Therefore, crystals of similar dimensions are deposited at the bottom of the vessel. The described system is the first example of the formation of stable colloidal crystals in a suspension.

  20. Spiral and target patterns in bivalve nacre manifest a natural excitable medium from layer growth of a biological liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Checa, Antonio G; Escribano, Bruno; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio

    2009-06-30

    Nacre is an exquisitely structured biocomposite of the calcium carbonate mineral aragonite with small amounts of proteins and the polysaccharide chitin. For many years, it has been the subject of research, not just because of its beauty, but also to discover how nature can produce such a superior product with excellent mechanical properties from such relatively weak raw materials. Four decades ago, Wada [Wada K (1966) Spiral growth of nacre. Nature 211:1427] proposed that the spiral patterns in nacre could be explained by using the theory Frank [Frank F (1949) The influence of dislocations on crystal growth. Discuss Faraday Soc 5:48-54] had put forward of the growth of crystals by means of screw dislocations. Frank's mechanism of crystal growth has been amply confirmed by experimental observations of screw dislocations in crystals, but it is a growth mechanism for a single crystal, with growth fronts of molecules. However, the growth fronts composed of many tablets of crystalline aragonite visible in micrographs of nacre are not a molecular-scale but a mesoscale phenomenon, so it has not been evident how the Frank mechanism might be of relevance. Here, we demonstrate that nacre growth is organized around a liquid-crystal core of chitin crystallites, a skeleton that the other components of nacre subsequently flesh out in a process of hierarchical self-assembly. We establish that spiral and target patterns can arise in a liquid crystal formed layer by layer through the Burton-Cabrera-Frank [Burton W, Cabrera N, Frank F (1951) The growth of crystals and the equilibrium structure of their surfaces. Philos Trans R Soc London Ser A 243:299-358] dynamics, and furthermore that this layer growth mechanism is an instance of an important class of physical systems termed excitable media. Artificial liquid crystals grown in this way may have many technological applications.

  1. Spiral and target patterns in bivalve nacre manifest a natural excitable medium from layer growth of a biological liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Checa, Antonio G.; Escribano, Bruno; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    Nacre is an exquisitely structured biocomposite of the calcium carbonate mineral aragonite with small amounts of proteins and the polysaccharide chitin. For many years, it has been the subject of research, not just because of its beauty, but also to discover how nature can produce such a superior product with excellent mechanical properties from such relatively weak raw materials. Four decades ago, Wada [Wada K (1966) Spiral growth of nacre. Nature 211:1427] proposed that the spiral patterns in nacre could be explained by using the theory Frank [Frank F (1949) The influence of dislocations on crystal growth. Discuss Faraday Soc 5:48–54] had put forward of the growth of crystals by means of screw dislocations. Frank's mechanism of crystal growth has been amply confirmed by experimental observations of screw dislocations in crystals, but it is a growth mechanism for a single crystal, with growth fronts of molecules. However, the growth fronts composed of many tablets of crystalline aragonite visible in micrographs of nacre are not a molecular-scale but a mesoscale phenomenon, so it has not been evident how the Frank mechanism might be of relevance. Here, we demonstrate that nacre growth is organized around a liquid-crystal core of chitin crystallites, a skeleton that the other components of nacre subsequently flesh out in a process of hierarchical self-assembly. We establish that spiral and target patterns can arise in a liquid crystal formed layer by layer through the Burton–Cabrera–Frank [Burton W, Cabrera N, Frank F (1951) The growth of crystals and the equilibrium structure of their surfaces. Philos Trans R Soc London Ser A 243:299–358] dynamics, and furthermore that this layer growth mechanism is an instance of an important class of physical systems termed excitable media. Artificial liquid crystals grown in this way may have many technological applications. PMID:19528636

  2. Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals: From viscoelastic properties to living liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) represents a broad range of molecules, from organic dyes and drugs to DNA, that self-assemble into linear aggregates in water through face-to-face stacking. These linear aggregates of high aspect ratio are capable of orientational order, forming, for example nematic phase. Since the microscopic properties (such as length) of the chromonic aggregates are results of subtle balance between energy and entropy, the macroscopic viscoelastic properties of the nematic media are sensitive to change of external factors. In the first part of this thesis, by using dynamic light scattering and magnetic Frederiks transition techniques, we study the Frank elastic moduli and viscosity coefficients of LCLC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and sunset yellow (SSY) as functions of concentration c , temperature T and ionic contents. The elastic moduli of splay (K1) and bend (K3) are in the order of 10pN, about 10 times larger than the twist modulus (K2). The splay modulus K1 and the ratio K1/K3 both increase substantially as T decreases or c increases, which we attribute to the elongation of linear aggregates at lower T or higher c . The bend viscosity is comparable to that of thermotropic liquid crystals, while the splay and twist viscosities are several orders of magnitude larger, changing exponentially with T . Additional ionic additives into the system influence the viscoelastic properties of these systems in a dramatic and versatile way. For example, monovalent salt NaCl decreases bend modulus K3 and increases twist viscosity, while an elevated pH decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals form by covalently bound units of fixed length. The second part of the thesis studies a new active bio-mechanical hybrid system called living liquid crystal

  3. A new crystal form of human histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (hHINT1) in complex with adenosine 5′-monophosphate at 1.38 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dolot, Rafał; Ozga, Magdalena; Włodarczyk, Artur; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) represents the most ancient and widespread branch of the histidine triad protein superfamily. HINT1 plays an important role in various biological processes and has been found in many species. Here, the structure of the human HINT1–adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) complex at 1.38 Å resolution obtained from a new monoclinic crystal form is reported. The final structure has R cryst = 0.1207 (R free = 0.1615) and the model exhibits good stereochemical quality. Detailed analysis of the high-resolution data allowed the details of the protein structure to be updated in comparison to the previously published data. PMID:22869114

  4. A new crystal form of human histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (hHINT1) in complex with adenosine 5'-monophosphate at 1.38 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Dolot, Rafał; Ozga, Magdalena; Włodarczyk, Artur; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) represents the most ancient and widespread branch of the histidine triad protein superfamily. HINT1 plays an important role in various biological processes and has been found in many species. Here, the structure of the human HINT1-adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) complex at 1.38 Å resolution obtained from a new monoclinic crystal form is reported. The final structure has R(cryst) = 0.1207 (R(free) = 0.1615) and the model exhibits good stereochemical quality. Detailed analysis of the high-resolution data allowed the details of the protein structure to be updated in comparison to the previously published data.

  5. The Fe-rich clay microsystems in basalt-komatiite lavas: importance of Fe-smectites for pre-biotic molecule catalysis during the Hadean eon.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Alain; Petit, Sabine; Cockell, Charles S; El Albani, Abderrazzak; Beaufort, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    During the Hadean to early Archean period (4.5-3.5 Ga), the surface of the Earth's crust was predominantly composed of basalt and komatiite lavas. The conditions imposed by the chemical composition of these rocks favoured the crystallization of Fe-Mg clays rather than that of Al-rich ones (montmorillonite). Fe-Mg clays were formed inside chemical microsystems through sea weathering or hydrothermal alteration, and for the most part, through post-magmatic processes. Indeed, at the end of the cooling stage, Fe-Mg clays precipitated directly from the residual liquid which concentrated in the voids remaining in the crystal framework of the mafic-ultramafic lavas. Nontronite-celadonite and chlorite-saponite covered all the solid surfaces (crystals, glass) and are associated with tiny pyroxene and apatite crystals forming the so-called "mesostasis". The mesostasis was scattered in the lava body as micro-settings tens of micrometres wide. Thus, every square metre of basalt or komatiite rocks was punctuated by myriads of clay-rich patches, each of them potentially behaving as a single chemical reactor which could concentrate the organics diluted in the ocean water. Considering the high catalytic potentiality of clays, and particularly those of the Fe-rich ones (electron exchangers), it is probable that large parts of the surface of the young Earth participated in the synthesis of prebiotic molecules during the Hadean to early Archean period through innumerable clay-rich micro-settings in the massive parts and the altered surfaces of komatiite and basaltic lavas. This leads us to suggest that Fe,Mg-clays should be preferred to Al-rich ones (montmorillonite) to conduct experiments for the synthesis and the polymerisation of prebiotic molecules.

  6. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  7. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  8. Doped liquid nitrobenzene is ferroelectric.

    PubMed

    Shelton, David P; Quine, Zachary

    2007-11-28

    The high resolution hyper-Rayleigh light scattering spectrum for liquid nitrobenzene doped with triflic acid (CF(3)SO(3)H) shows a narrow spike at zero frequency shift which has the polarization signature of a polar longitudinal collective mode. This spectral spike disappears for pure nitrobenzene. The spectral spike is interpreted as due to ferroelectric domains in the liquid. The dopant molecules appear to induce ferroelectric organization of the nitrobenzene molecules which is otherwise absent in the pure liquid. Estimated domain size is 34 nm and relaxation time is 50 ns.

  9. The Molecules of the Cell Membrane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretscher, Mark S.

    1985-01-01

    Cell membrane molecules form a simple, two-dimensional liquid controlling what enters and leaves the cell. Discusses cell membrane molecular architecture, plasma membranes, epithelial cells, cycles of endocytosis and exocytosis, and other topics. Indicates that some cells internalize, then recycle, membrane area equivalent to their entire surface…

  10. Mechanistic Liquid State Thermochemical Decomposition of Neat 1,3,5,5-Tetranitrohexahydropyrimidine (DNNC) and Its DNNC-d2, DNNC-d4, DNNC-d6 Structural Isotopomers: Entering the DNNC Molecule (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-09

    From - To) 09-01-2007 Journal Article 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mechanistic Liquid State Thermochemical Decomposition of Neat...controlling bond rupture as previously reported.4 Acknowledgements. We gratefully acknowledge the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR...Heasley, and Dr. Dale F. Shellhamer, Department of Chemistry, Pt. Loma Nazarene University, San Diego, CA contributed helpful scientific discussions

  11. Liquid State Thermochemical Decomposition of Neat 1,3,5,5-Tetranitrohexahydropyrimidine (DNNC) and Its DNNC-d2, DNNC-d4, DNNC-d6 Structural Isotopomers: Mechanistic Entrance into the DNNC Molecule (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Liquid State Thermochemical Decomposition of Neat 1,3,5,5...different rate-controlling bond rupture as previously reported [2]. Acknowledgements We gratefully acknowledge the Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  12. Crystal Polymorphism and Multiple Crystal Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Dario; Grepioni, Fabrizia; Maini, Lucia; Polito, Marco

    This chapter discusses the phenomenon of polymorphism in organic and organometallic compounds. Polymorphism is first introduced and then, to give the work some context, background information is given concerning properties and techniques for characterizing the solid phases. In particular, desolvation and interconverstion are examined, and the gas-solid reactions are presented as a successful route to obtaining new crystalline phases. Co-crystal definition is then described and the problem in distinguishing co-crystals and salts is evaluated.

  13. Crystallisation and crystal forms of carbohydrate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Lorna

    This thesis is focused on the synthesis and solid state analysis of carbohydrate derivatives, including many novel compounds. Although the synthetic chemistry surrounding carbohydrates is well established in the literature, the crystal chemistry of carbohydrates is less well studied. Therefore this research aims to improve understanding of the solid state properties of carbohydrate derivatives through gaining more information on their supramolecular bonding. Chapter One focuses on an introduction to the solid state of organic compounds, with a background to crystallisation, including issues that can arise during crystal growth. Chapter Two is based on glucopyranuronate derivatives which are understudied in terms of their solid state forms. This chapter reports on the formation of novel glucuronamides and utilising the functionality of the amide bond for crystallisation. TEMPO oxidation was completed to form glucopyranuronates by oxidation of the primary alcohol groups of glucosides to the carboxylic acid derivatives, to increase functionality for enhanced crystal growth. Chapter Three reports on the synthesis of glucopyranoside derivatives by O-glycosylation reactions and displays crystal structures, including a number of previously unsolved acetate protected and deprotected crystal structures. More complex glycoside derivatives were also researched in an aim to study the resultant supramolecular motifs. Chapter Four contains the synthesis of aryl cellobioside derivatives including the novel crystal structures that were solved for the acetate protected and deprotected compounds. Research was carried out to determine if 1-deoxycellodextrins could act as putative isostructures for cellulose. Our research displays the presence of isostructural references with 1-deoxycellotriose shown to be similar to cellulose III11, 1-deoxycellotetraose correlates with cellulose IV11 and 1-deoxycellopentose shows isostructurality similar to that of cellulose II. Chapter Five contains the full experimental details and spectral characterisation of all novel compounds synthesised in this project and relevant crystallographic information.

  14. Solid-state 13C NMR study of banana liquid crystals - 3: Alkyl-tail-group packing environments of an acute-angle bent-core molecule in the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Hiromichi; Endo, Yumi; Kimura, Saori; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Harada, Motoi; Lee, Eun-Woo; Sone, Masato; Watanabe, Junji; Kang, Sungmin

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed on the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases of an acute-angle banana-shaped molecule, N(1,7)-S30. In the hexagonal columnar phase, three peaks appear at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that the two alkyl tails have different packing structures, and one of the tails has two different conformations within a single molecule. Combined cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning and pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurements show that one of the alkyl chains is located inside and the other is located outside the columnar structure. In the cubic phase, pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurement shows that only one peak appears at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that both of the alkyl chains are located outside the cubic structure.

  15. Liquid State Thermochemical Decomposition of Neat 1,3,5,5-Tetranitrohexahydropyrimidine (DNNC) and its DNNC-d2, DNNC-d4, DNNC-d6 Structural Isotopomers: Mechanistic Entrance into the DNNC Molecule

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-25

    From - To) 29-05-2007 Journal Article 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Liquid State Thermochemical Decomposition of Neat 1,3,5,5...Unclassified Unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 This article was published in an Elsevier journal. The attached copy...personal, institutional or third party websites are prohibited. In most cases authors are permitted to post their version of the article (e.g. in Word or

  16. Liquid State Thermochemical Decomposition of Neat 1,3,5,5-Tetranitrohexahydropyrimidine (DNNC) and its DNNC-d2, DNNC-d4, DNNC-d6 Structural Isotopomers: Mechanistic Entrance into the DNNC Molecule (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-29

    From - To) 29-05-2007 Journal Article 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Liquid State Thermochemical Decomposition of Neat 1,3,5,5...We gratefully acknowledge the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) for funding this research study. The authors thank Dr. John L...E. Heasley, and Dr. Dale F. Shellhamer, Department of Chemistry, Pt. Loma Nazarene University, San Diego, CA contributed helpful scientific

  17. Microfluidics for biological measurements with single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Streets, Aaron M; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-02-01

    Single-molecule approaches in biology have been critical in studies ranging from the examination of physical properties of biological macromolecules to the extraction of genetic information from DNA. The variation intrinsic to many biological processes necessitates measurements with single-molecule resolution in order to accurately recapitulate population distributions. Microfluidic technology has proven to be useful in the facilitation and even enhancement of single-molecule studies because of the precise liquid handling, small volume manipulation, and high throughput capabilities of microfluidic devices. In this review we survey the microfluidic "toolbox" available to the single-molecule specialist and summarize some recent biological applications of single-molecule detection on chip.

  18. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  19. Cyclic diguanylic acid behaves as a host molecule for planar intercalators.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Y C; Gao, Y G; Robinson, H; Sheldrick, G M; Sliedregt, L A; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Wang, A H

    1990-05-21

    Cyclic ribodiguanylic acid, c-(GpGp), is the endogenous effector regulator of cellulose synthase. Its three-dimensional structure from two different crystal forms (tetragonal and trigonal) has been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis at 1 A resolution. In both crystal forms, two independent c-(GpGp) molecules associate with each other to form a self-intercalated dimer. A hydrated cobalt ion is found to coordinate to two N7 atoms of adjacent guanines, forcing these two guanines to destack with a large dihedral angle (32 degrees), in the dimer of the tetragonal form. This metal coordination mechanism may be relevant to that of the anticancer drug cisplatin. Moreover, c-(GpGp) exhibits unusual spectral properties not seen in any other cyclic dinucleotide. It interacts with planar organic intercalator molecules in ways similar to double helical DNA. We propose a cage-like model consisting of a tetrameric c-(GpGp) aggregate in which a large cavity ('host') is generated to afford a binding site for certain planar intercalators ('guests').

  20. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis

    2004-08-31

    Disclosed herein is a photonic silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls selectively bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and determine the concentration of bound target.

  1. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia E.; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis; Hart, Bradley R.

    2006-12-26

    Disclosed herein is a porous silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and calculate the concentration of bound target.

  2. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Robin

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  3. Classical interaction model for the water molecule.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, András; Bartók, Albert

    2007-05-14

    The authors propose a new classical model for the water molecule. The geometry of the molecule is built on the rigid TIP5P model and has the experimental gas phase dipole moment of water created by four equal point charges. The model preserves its rigidity but the size of the charges increases or decreases following the electric field created by the rest of the molecules. The polarization is expressed by an electric field dependent nonlinear polarization function. The increasing dipole of the molecule slightly increases the size of the water molecule expressed by the oxygen-centered sigma parameter of the Lennard-Jones interaction. After refining the adjustable parameters, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to check the ability of the new model in the ice, liquid, and gas phases. They determined the density and internal energy of several ice polymorphs, liquid water, and gaseous water and calculated the heat capacity, the isothermal compressibility, the isobar heat expansion coefficients, and the dielectric constant of ambient water. They also determined the pair-correlation functions of ambient water and calculated the energy of the water dimer. The accuracy of theirs results was satisfactory.

  4. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  5. Energy conversion at liquid/liquid interfaces: artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Gugeshashvili, M. I.; Deamer, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter focuses on multielectron reactions in organized assemblies of molecules at the liquid/liquid interface. We describe the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such reactions, including the structure of the reaction centers, charge movement along the electron transfer pathways, and the role of electric double layers in artificial photosynthesis. Some examples of artificial photosynthesis at the oil/water interface are considered, including water photooxidation to the molecular oxygen, oxygen photoreduction, photosynthesis of amphiphilic compounds and proton evolution by photochemical processes.

  6. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  7. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  8. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-07-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  9. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  10. Porous organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, James R.; Trewin, Abbie; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2010-11-01

    Most synthetic materials that show molecular-scale porosity consist of one-, two- or three-dimensional networks. Porous metal-organic frameworks in particular have attracted a lot of recent attention. By contrast, discrete molecules tend to pack efficiently in the solid state, leaving as little empty space as possible, which leads to non-porous materials. This Perspective discusses recent developments with discrete organic molecules that are porous in the solid state. Such molecules, which may be either crystalline or amorphous, can be categorized as either intrinsically porous (containing permanent covalent cavities) or extrinsically porous (inefficiently packed). We focus on the possible advantages of organic molecules over inorganic or hybrid systems in terms of molecular solubility, choice of components and functionalities, and structural mobility and responsiveness in non-covalent extended solids. We also highlight the potential for 'undiscovered' porous systems among the large number of cage-like organic molecules that are already known.

  11. Interactions of biomacromolecules with reverse hexagonal liquid crystals: drug delivery and crystallization applications.

    PubMed

    Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-04-15

    Recently, self-assembled lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) of lipids and water have attracted the attention of both scientific and applied research communities, due to their remarkable structural complexity and practical potential in diverse applications. The phase behavior of mixtures of glycerol monooleate (monoolein, GMO) was particularly well studied due to the potential utilization of these systems in drug delivery systems, food products, and encapsulation and crystallization of proteins. Among the studied lyotropic mesophases, reverse hexagonal LLC (H(II)) of monoolein/water were not widely subjected to practical applications since these were stable only at elevated temperatures. Lately, we obtained stable H(II) mesophases at room temperature by incorporating triacylglycerol (TAG) molecules into the GMO/water mixtures and explored the physical properties of these structures. The present feature article summarizes recent systematic efforts in our laboratory to utilize the H(II) mesophases for solubilization, and potential release and crystallization of biomacromolecules. Such a concept was demonstrated in the case of two therapeutic peptides-cyclosporin A (CSA) and desmopressin, as well as RALA peptide, which is a model skin penetration enhancer, and eventually a larger macromolecule-lysozyme (LSZ). In the course of the study we tried to elucidate relationships between the different levels of organization of LLCs (from the microstructural level, through mesoscale, to macroscopic level) and find feasible correlations between them. Since the structural properties of the mesophase systems are a key factor in drug release applications, we investigated the effects of these guest molecules on their conformations and the way these molecules partition within the domains of the mesophases. The examined H(II) mesophases exhibited great potential as transdermal delivery vehicles for bioactive peptides, enabling tuning the release properties according to their chemical

  12. Nanosecond liquid crystalline optical modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Borshch, Volodymyr; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2016-07-26

    An optical modulator includes a liquid crystal cell containing liquid crystal material having liquid crystal molecules oriented along a quiescent director direction in the unbiased state, and a voltage source configured to apply an electric field to the liquid crystal material wherein the direction of the applied electric field does not cause the quiescent director direction to change. An optical source is arranged to transmit light through or reflect light off the liquid crystal cell with the light passing through the liquid crystal material at an angle effective to undergo phase retardation in response to the voltage source applying the electric field. The liquid crystal material may have negative dielectric anisotropy, and the voltage source configured to apply an electric field to the liquid crystal material whose electric field vector is transverse to the quiescent director direction. Alternatively, the liquid crystal material may have positive dielectric anisotropy and the voltage source configured to apply an electric field to the liquid crystal material whose electric field vector is parallel with the quiescent director direction.

  13. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, Amy S.

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  14. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  15. Nonlinear ultrasonic nature of organic liquid and organic liquid mixture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-gang; Zhang, Yang; Dong, Yan-wu

    2006-12-22

    Based on Jacobson's molecular free length theory in liquids and the relationship between ultrasonic velocity and the molecular free length in organic liquids, this paper deduces the equations for pressure coefficient and temperature coefficient of ultrasonic velocity and nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A in both of organic liquid and organic liquid binary mixtures. These nonlinear acoustic parameters are evaluated against the measured results and data from other sources. The equations reveal the connections between the nonlinear acoustic parameters and some internal structural of the medium or mixtures e.g. the sizes of molecule, several thermodynamic physical parameters and outside status e.g. condition of pressure and temperature of the liquid or liquid mixture. With the equations the nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A of organic liquid binary mixtures, which is impossible to know without the nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A of the tow components before, can be calculated based on the structural and physical parameters of organic liquid and organic liquid binary mixtures.

  16. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  17. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  18. Decomposition of Chemical Chain Molecules with Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansli, Murat; Tasal, Erol

    2016-10-01

    Chemical chain molecules' decomposition is an interesting subject area for the atmospheric pressure plasma applications. The effects of the atmospheric pressure argon plasma on 4-((2-methoxyphenyl)Diazenyl)Benzene-1,3,-Diol molecule at room temperature are investigated. This molecule is one of the industrial dye molecules used widely. When considering the ecological life, this molecule will be very harmful and danger. We suggest a different, easy and useful decomposing method for such molecules. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet was principally treated for this decomposing of the molecule. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) was used to characterization of the molecule after the plasma application to molecule in liquid phase with ethanol and methanol solvents. The atmospheric-pressure plasma jet of argon (Ar) as non-equilibrium has been formed by ac-power generator with frequency - 24 kHz and voltage - 12 kV. Characterizations for solutions prepared with ethanol and methanol solvents of molecule have been examined after applying (duration: 3 minutes) the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The molecule was broken at 6C-7N =8N-9C stretching peak after the plasma treatment. The new plasma photo-products for ethanol and methanol solutions were produced as 6C-7N-8N =9C (strong, varying) and 12C =17O (strong, wide) stretching peaks.

  19. Positronium ions and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies on positronium ions and molecules are discussed. A positronium ion is a three particle system consisting of two electrons in singlet spin state, and a positron. Recent studies include calculations of its binding energy, positron annihilation rate, and investigations of its doubly excited resonant states. A positronium molecule is a four body system consisting of two positrons and two electrons in an overall singlet spin state. The recent calculations of its binding energy against the dissociation into two positronium atoms, and studies of auto-detaching states in positronium molecules are discussed. These auto-dissociating states, which are believed to be part of the Rydberg series as a result of a positron attaching to a negatively charged positronium ion, Ps-, would appear as resonances in Ps-Ps scattering.

  20. Single-Molecule Bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Lemay, Serge G.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental techniques which interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. Here we review several technologies which can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  1. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  2. Polarization of deuterium molecules

    SciTech Connect

    J. F. J. van den Brand; H. J. Bulten; M. Ferro-Luzzi; Z.-L. Zhou; Ricardo Alarcon; T. Botto; M. Bouwhuis; Rolf Ent; Peter Heimberg; Douglas W. Higinbotham; Kees de Jager; J. Lang; D. J. de Lange; I. Passchier; H. R. Poolman; J. J. M. Steijger; O. Unal; H. de Vries

    1997-08-01

    For molecular systems, spin relaxation is expected to be suppressed compared to the case of atoms, since the paired electrons in a hydrogen or deuterium molecule are chemically stable, and only weakly interact with the spin of the nucleus. Such systems would be largely insensitive to polarization losses due to spin-exchange collisions, to the interaction of the electron spins with external fields (e.g. the RF-field of a bunched charged-particle beam), and/or to the presence of container walls. Here, we discuss the results of a recent experiment where we obtained evidence that nuclear polarization is maintained, when polarized atoms recombine to molecules on a copper surface (in a magnetic field of 23 mT and at a density of about 10{sup 12} molecules {center_dot} cm{sup -3}).

  3. Enzyme molecules as nanomotors.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Samudra; Dey, Krishna K; Muddana, Hari S; Tabouillot, Tristan; Ibele, Michael E; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-01-30

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the diffusive movements of catalase enzyme molecules increase in the presence of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration-dependent manner. Employing a microfluidic device to generate a substrate concentration gradient, we show that both catalase and urease enzyme molecules spread toward areas of higher substrate concentration, a form of chemotaxis at the molecular scale. Using glucose oxidase and glucose to generate a hydrogen peroxide gradient, we induce the migration of catalase toward glucose oxidase, thereby showing that chemically interconnected enzymes can be drawn together.

  4. Measuring the optical chirality of molecular aggregates at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Watarai, Hitoshi; Adachi, Kenta

    2009-10-01

    Some new experimental methods for measuring the optical chirality of molecular aggregates formed at liquid-liquid interfaces have been reviewed. Chirality measurements of interfacial aggregates are highly important not only in analytical spectroscopy but also in biochemistry and surface nanochemistry. Among these methods, a centrifugal liquid membrane method was shown to be a highly versatile method for measuring the optical chirality of the liquid-liquid interface when used in combination with a commercially available circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimeter, provided that the interfacial aggregate exhibited a large molar absorptivity. Therefore, porphyrin and phthalocyanine were used as chromophoric probes of the chirality of itself or guest molecules at the interface. A microscopic CD method was also demonstrated for the measurement of a small region of a film or a sheet sample. In addition, second-harmonic generation and Raman scattering methods were reviewed as promising methods for detecting interfacial optical molecules and measuring bond distortions of chiral molecules, respectively.

  5. Comparison of calculated cross sections for secondary electron emission from a water molecule and clusters of water molecules by protons

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.A.; Paretzke, H.G. )

    1991-07-15

    Double-differential cross sections for the emission of secondary electrons, as a function of emission angle and energy, from a water molecule, a cluster of water molecules, and liquid water due to proton impact have been calculated using the dielectric response function of the target material and a method which uses an integral formulation of the density-functional theory. From these double-differential cross sections, single-differential and total cross sections, and the energy loss per unit path length, have been calculated by successive integration. The results have been compared to available experimental results and, in the case of single-differential cross sections, also to empirical models. A comparison has been made between the results for the molecule and the central molecule of the cluster in order to obtain insight into how the cross sections might change in the condensed phase, namely in liquid water.

  6. Contacting organic molecules by soft methods: towards molecule-based electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Haick, Hossam; Cahen, David

    2008-03-01

    Can we put organic molecules to use as electronic components? The answer to this question is to no small degree limited by the ability to contact them electrically without damaging the molecules. In this Account, we present some of the methods for contacting molecules that do not or minimally damage them and that allow formation of electronic junctions that can become compatible with electronics from the submicrometer to the macroscale. In "Linnaean" fashion, we have grouped contacting methods according to the following main criteria: (a) is a chemical bond is required between contact and molecule, and (b) is the contact "ready-made", that is, preformed, or prepared in situ? Contacting methods that, so far, seem to require a chemical bond include spin-coating a conductive polymer and transfer printing. In the latter, a metallic pattern on an elastomeric polymer is mechanically transferred to molecules with an exposed terminal group that can react chemically with the metal. These methods allow one to define structures from several tens of nanometers size upwards and to fabricate devices on flexible substrates, which is very difficult by conventional techniques. However, the requirement for bifunctionality severely restricts the type of molecules that can be used and can complicate their self-assembly into monolayers. Methods that rely on prior formation of the contact pad are represented by two approaches: (a) use of a liquid metal as electrode (e.g., Hg, Ga, various alloys), where molecules can be adsorbed on the liquid metal and the molecularly modified drop is brought into contact with the second electrode, the molecules can be adsorbed on the second electrode and then the liquid metal brought into contact with them, or bilayers are used, with a layer on both the metal and the second electrode and (b) use of preformed metal pads from a solid substrate and subsequent pad deposition on the molecules with the help of a liquid. These methods allow formation of

  7. Sweeping molecules with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutzler, Nicholas R.

    2017-03-01

    Many areas of physics—precision measurements, quantum information, and physical chemistry, to name a few—are starting to benefit from the enormous advantages offered by cold and ultracold polar molecules. Molecules have more states, more interactions, and more chemical properties compared to atoms, which make them exciting to study but difficult to tame. In particular, the powerful techniques of atomic laser cooling cannot be naïvely applied to molecules due to their complicated structure. Developments over the past few years have made directly laser cooled and trapped molecules a reality, and now much effort is focused on making these samples larger, denser, and colder—an important step to realizing many of their exciting applications. A careful experimental and numerical study by Truppe et al (2017 New J. Phys. 19 022001) demonstrates a significant improvement and advance in understanding of one of the most limiting steps in laser cooling and trapping of molecules—slowing them from a molecular beam to a near-standstill, with small enough kinetic energy that they can be loaded into a trap.

  8. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  9. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  10. Mighty Molecule Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Rushton, Greg; Bencomo, Marie

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SMATHematics Project: The Wonder of Science, The Power of Mathematics--a collaborative partnership between Kennesaw State University and two local school districts, fifth graders had the opportunity to puzzle out chemical formulas of propane, methanol, and other important molecules. In addition, they explored properties that…

  11. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  12. Single molecules: Thermodynamic limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liphardt, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Technologies aimed at single-molecule resolution of non-equilibrium systems increasingly require sophisticated new ways of thinking about thermodynamics. An elegant extension to standard fluctuation theory grants access to the kinetic intermediate states of these systems -- as DNA-pulling experiments now demonstrate.

  13. Disentangling DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  14. Three new 'nonterrestrial' molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaddeus, P.; Guelin, M.; Linke, R. A.

    1981-05-01

    Eight new interstellar lines have been detected from three molecules not previously observed spectroscopically in space or in the laboratory. One is a linear or nearly linear molecule with microwave constants B0 equals 21,337.15 plus or minus 0.06 MHz, D0 equals 21.4 plus or minus 1.5 kHz. This is the thioformyl ion HCS(plus), first identified because B0 and D0 are close to those calculated, and now confirmed by laboratory detection of one of the present lines (Gudeman et al.). The second molecule, also linear or nearly so, has microwave constants B0 equals 10,691,406 plus or minus 0.043 MHz, D0 equals 1.84 plus or minus 0.91 kHz close to those expected for the isoelectronic systems HOCO(plus) and HOCN; a choice between the two cannot be made on the basis of the available astronomical data. The existence of a third molecule is deduced from an unidentified line at 85,338 MHz that has been found in many sources, is fairly intense in several, and may be self-absorbed in Sgr B2.

  15. Behavior of atypical amphiphilic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, John

    1997-08-01

    The physical behavior of several atypical amphiphilic molecules was studied in various environments including micelles, model bilayer membranes, and emulsions. The molecules under investigation were nor-chenodeoxycholic acid (nor-CDCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), sphingosine (Sp), sphingosine hydrochloride (SpċHCl), and tetrahydrolipstatin (THL). The bile acids, nor-CDCA and UDCA, were studied using 13C-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ([13C) -NMR) in micelles of taurocholate and in bilayers of phosphatidylcholine. The pK a values of the bile acids in each environment were determined by [13C) -NMR and are as follows: 6.08 ±.03 for nor-CDCA and 6.27 ±.01 for UDCA in micelles, and 7.04 ± 12 for nor-CDCA and 6.89 ±.05 for UDCA in vesicles. Using line shape analysis, the transbilayer movement rate at 36oC for nor-CDCA and UDCA was calculated to be 580 sec--1 and 409 sec-1, respectively. [13C) -NMR titration of Sp gave pK a values of 9.09 ±.02 in micelles and 9.69 ±.21 in bilayers. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction were used to establish the Spċwater and SpċHClċwater phase diagrams. Anhydrous and hydrated samples ranging from 5- 90% water were analyzed. The DSC thermograms traced out the transition temperatures of each molecule while the X- ray diffraction patterns revealed their chain and crystalline lattice packing structures. In general, sphingosine exists as a hydrated crystal with β packing phase below 43oC and melts into an Lα phase. Sphingosine hydrochloride, however, exists as a gel phase (L_beta or /beta/sp') below 42oC that swells to 61% hydration. At low water concentrations (0-64%), a lamellar liquid crystal phase (L_alpha) is formed above the chain melting transition of 42oC. At medium concentration (65%), a Hexagonal I phase is present, and at high water concentrations (66-90%), a micellar phase is present. THL, a specific inhibitor of lipases, was analyzed with [ 13C) -NMR to study its behavior in various environments

  16. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  17. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  18. Water: The Strangest Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Anders

    2009-02-24

    Water, H2O, is familiar to everyone - it shapes our bodies and our planet. But despite its abundance, water has remained a mystery, exhibiting many strange properties that are still not understood. Why does the liquid have an unusually large capacity to store heat? And why is it denser than ice? Now, using the intense X-ray beams from particle accelerators, investigations into water are leading to fundamental discoveries about the structure and arrangement of water molecules. This lecture will elucidate the many mysteries of water and discuss current studies that are revolutionizing the way we see and understand one of the most fundamental substances of life.

  19. Liquids with permanent porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G.; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L.; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F. Costa; Cooper, Andrew I.; James, Stuart L.

    2015-11-01

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble ‘scrambled’ porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities.

  20. Exciton coupling model for the emergence of second harmonic generation from assemblies of centrosymmetric molecules.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Gregory R; Chowdhury, Azhad U; Simpson, Garth J

    2014-06-19

    A simple model is presented for interpreting the presence of substantial second harmonic generation (SHG) activity from assemblies of centrosymmetric molecular building blocks. Using butadiene as a computationally tractable centrosymmetric model system, time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations of the nonlinear polarizability of butadiene dimer were well-described through exciton coupling arguments based on the electronic structure of the monomer and the relative orientation between the monomers within the dimer. Experimental studies of the centrosymmetric molecule 2,6-di-tert-butylanthraquinone suggest the formation of a combination of SHG-active and SHG-inactive crystal forms. The structure for the centrosymmetric form is known, serving as a negative control for the model, while the presence of an additional SHG-active metastable form is consistent with predictions of the model for alternative molecular packing configurations.

  1. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the point of

  2. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Diagnostics for sparse molecules

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Sudipta; Haupts, Ulrich; Webb, Watt W.

    1997-01-01

    The robust glow of molecular fluorescence renders even sparse molecules detectable and susceptible to analysis for concentration, mobility, chemistry, and photophysics. Correlation spectroscopy, a statistical-physics-based tool, gleans quantitative information from the spontaneously fluctuating fluorescence signals obtained from small molecular ensembles. This analytical power is available for studying molecules present at minuscule concentrations in liquid solutions (less than one nanomolar), or even on the surfaces of living cells at less than one macromolecule per square micrometer. Indeed, routines are becoming common to detect, locate, and examine individual molecules under favorable conditions. PMID:9342306

  3. Alkaloid-derived molecules in low rank Argonne premium coals.

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R. E.; Tomczyk, N. A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2000-11-30

    Molecules that are probably derived from alkaloids have been found in the extracts of the subbituminous and lignite Argonne Premium Coals. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) have been used to characterize pyridine and supercritical extracts. The supercritical extraction used an approach that has been successful for extracting alkaloids from natural products. The first indication that there might be these natural products in coals was the large number of molecules found containing multiple nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms. These molecules are much less abundant in bituminous coals and absent in the higher rank coals.

  4. A Guided Inquiry Liquid/Liquid Extractions Laboratory for Introductory Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raydo, Margaret L.; Church, Megan S.; Taylor, Zane W.; Taylor, Christopher E.; Danowitz, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    A guided inquiry laboratory experiment for teaching liquid/liquid extractions to first semester undergraduate organic chemistry students is described. This laboratory is particularly useful for introductory students as the analytes that are separated are highly colored dye molecules. This allows students to track into which phase each analyte…

  5. Single-molecule detection sensitivity using planar integrated optics on a chip.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dongliang; Deamer, David W; Schmidt, Holger; Barber, John P; Hawkins, Aaron R

    2006-07-15

    We present a fully planar integrated optical approach to single-molecule detection based on microfabricated planar networks of intersecting solid and liquid-core waveguides. We study fluorescence from dye molecules in liquid-core antiresonant reflecting optical waveguides, and demonstrate subpicoliter excitation volumes, parallel excitation through multiple pump waveguides, and single-molecule detection sensitivity. Integrated silicon photonics combined with single-molecule detection in solution create a compact, robust, and sensitive platform that has applications in numerous fields ranging from atomic physics to the life sciences.

  6. Configurations of the amphiphilic molecules in micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.A.

    1982-04-29

    Several theoretic models aim to account for the properties of micelles in terms of the configurations of the constituent amphiphilic chain molecules. Recent /sup 13/C NMR measurement of one property of the configuration distribution of the the hydrocarbon chain segments allows critical evaluation of these theories. It is concluded that the interphase and singly-bent chain theories, which fully account for chain continuity and for intermolecular constraints imposed by hydrophobic and steric forces, give a more satisfactory description of micellar molecular organization than models in which chains are ordered and radially aligned, or in which they have the complete disorder characteristic of an amorphous hydrocarbon liquid.

  7. Self-organization of disc-like molecules: chemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2006-01-01

    The hierarchical self-assembly of disc-shaped molecules leads to the formation of discotic liquid crystals. These materials are of fundamental importance not only as models for the study of energy and charge migration in self-organized systems but also as functional materials for device applications such as, one-dimensional conductors, photoconductors, light emitting diodes, photovoltaic solar cells, field-effect transistors and gas sensors. The negative birefringence films formed by polymerized nematic discotic liquid crystals have been commercialized as compensation foils to enlarge the viewing angle of commonly used twisted nematic liquid crystal displays. To date the number of discotic liquid crystals derived from more than 50 different cores comes to about 3000. This critical review describes, after an in-depth introduction, recent advances in basic design principles and synthetic approaches towards the preparation of most frequently encountered discotic liquid crystals.

  8. Impact of ionic liquid-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the crystallization behavior of poly(vinylidene fluoride).

    PubMed

    Xing, Chenyang; Zhao, Liping; You, Jichun; Dong, Wenyong; Cao, Xiaojun; Li, Yongjin

    2012-07-19

    The impact of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), an ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF6], and the ionic liquid-modified MWCNTs (IL-MWCNTs) on the crystallization behavior of melt-crystallized poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) has been investigated. Pristine MWCNTs accelerate crystallization of PVDF as an efficient nucleation agent, while the formed crystals are mainly nonpolar α crystal form with few polar β crystals. Incorporation of only ionic liquid results in depression of the PVDF melt crystallization rate due to the miscibility of IL with PVDF but leads to a higher content of polar crystals (β and γ forms) than MWCNTs. The ionic liquid and MWCNTs show significant synergetic effects on both the nucleation and the formation of polar crystals for PVDF by melt crystallization. Addition of IL-MWCNTs not only improves the MWCNTs dispersion in PVDF matrix but also increases the overall crystallization rate of PVDF drastically. More important, the melt-crystallized PVDF nanocomposites with IL-MWCNTs show 100% polar polymorphs but no α crystal forms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the achievements of full polar crystal form in the melt-crystallized PVDF without mechanical deformation or electric field. The IL to MWCNTs ratio and the IL-MWCNTs loading content effects on the crystallization behavior of PVDF in the nanocomposites were also studied. It is considered that the specific interactions between >CF2 with the planar cationic imidazolium ring wrapped on the MWCNTs surface lead to the full zigzag conformations of PVDF; thus, nucleation in polar crystals (β and γ forms) lattice is achieved and full polar crystals are obtained by subsequent crystal growth from the nuclei.

  9. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  10. Strange skyrmion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-01

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  11. Strange skyrmion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-20

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  12. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Gas Storage in Porous Liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Yang, Fengchang; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2016-07-28

    The recent synthesis of organic molecular liquids with permanent porosity opens up exciting new avenues for gas capture, storage, and separation. Using molecular simulations, we study the thermodynamics and kinetics for the storage of CH4, CO2, and N2 molecules in porous liquids consisting of crown-ether-substituted cage molecules in a 15-crown-5 solvent. It is found that the intrinsic gas storage capacity per cage molecule follows the order CH4 > CO2 > N2, which does not correlate simply with the size of gas molecules. Different gas molecules are stored inside the cage differently; e.g., CO2 molecules prefer the cage's core whereas CH4 molecules favor both the core and the branch regions. All gas molecules considered can enter the cage essentially without energy barriers and leave the cage on a nanosecond time scale by overcoming a modest energy penalty. The molecular mechanisms of these observations are clarified.

  13. Topologically Required Defects in Nematic Liquid Films over Microposts or in contact with Anisotropic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharbi, Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    In this work we present an experimental investigation of topological defects in nematic liquid crystals formed over micropost array with a LC-air interface pinning to the pillar edges or containing washer-shaped microparticles in suspension. For nematic-LC covered microposts with homeotropic anchoring conditions on all boundaries, including the LC-air and LC-substrate interfaces, disclination lines form that bear the signature of the micropost and satisfy global topological constraints of the system. When washer particles with different anchoring conditions are dispersed in homeotropic liquid crystal cells, new topological configurations are observed. In each case, defects are described from both a geometric and topological perspective. Finally, we demonstrate that topological defects created by microposts and washers can generate elastic interactions with dispersed microparticles in nematic liquid crystals. We believe this is a promising route to controlling colloidal self-assembly in complex media.

  14. Sodium dimers on the surface of liquid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Ancilotto, F.; DeToffol, G.; Toigo, F.

    1995-12-01

    We have studied the structure of a sodium dimer interacting with liquid {sup 4}He. We calculated the equilibrium configuration and binding energy of a Na{sub 2} molecule solvated in a bulk liquid {sup 4}He ``bubble`` and near the liquid-vapor interface ``dimple`` by using a density-functional approach. We find that the solvated molecule is a metastable state, while the the lowest energy bound state occurs when the molecule lies flat on the surface of the liquid. The binding energy for the ``erect`` dimer is only {similar_to}1 K higher than the flat dimer, with no potential energy barrier between the two orientations, implying relatively free rotations of the molecule on the surface. The small effects of the liquid environment on the vibrational properties of the dimer are investigated.

  15. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed.

  16. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  17. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  18. Studies of the dynamics of biological macromolecules using Au nanoparticle-DNA artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Smith, Jessica M; Rasool, Haider I; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of graphene liquid cells, a nanoscale version of liquid bubble wrap, is a breakthrough for in situ liquid phase electron microscopy (EM). Using ultrathin graphene sheets as the liquid sample container, graphene liquid cells have allowed the unprecedented atomic resolution observation of solution phase growth and dynamics of nanocrystals. Here we explore the potential of this technique to probe nanoscale structure and dynamics of biomolecules in situ, using artificial Au nanoparticle-DNA artificial molecules as model systems. The interactions of electrons with both the artificial molecules and the liquid environment have been demonstrated and discussed, revealing both the opportunities and challenges of using graphene liquid cell EM as a new method of bio-imaging.

  19. Molecular-dynamic study of liquid ethylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabaev, N. K.; Kraevskii, S. V.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.

    2016-10-01

    Models of liquid ethylenediamine (ED) are built using the molecular dynamics approach at temperatures of 293-363 K and a size of 1000 molecules in a basic cell as a cuboid. The structural and dynamic characteristics of liquid ED versus temperature are derived. The gauche conformation of the ED molecule that is characteristic of the gas phase is shown to transition easily into the trans conformation of the molecules in the liquid. NH···N hydrogen bonds are analyzed in liquid ED. The number of H-bonds per ED molecule is found to vary from 5.02 at 293 K to 3.86 at 363 K. The lifetimes in the range of the temperatures and dissociation activation energy for several H-bonds in liquid ED are found to range from 0.574 to 4.524 ps at 293 K; the activation energies are 8.8 kJ/mol for 50% of the H-bonds and 16.3 kJ/mol for 6.25% of them. A weaker and more mobile spatial grid of H-bonds in liquid ED is observed, compared to data calculated earlier for monoethanolamine.

  20. Branched quaternary ammonium amphiphiles: nematic ionic liquid crystals near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Jing; Li, Bao; Zhang, Mingliang; Wu, Lixin

    2009-09-21

    Branched quaternary ammonium molecules were synthesized and characterized by calorimetric, optical and X-ray diffraction studies; two of the molecules exhibited interesting nematic liquid crystalline behavior close to room temperature.

  1. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies. PMID:7428744

  2. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-06-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies.

  3. Redox chemistry at liquid/liquid interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Deamer, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    The interface between two immiscible liquids with immobilized photosynthetic pigments can serve as the simplest model of a biological membrane convenient for the investigation of photoprocesses accompanied by spatial separation of charges. As it follows from thermodynamics, if the resolvation energies of substrates and products are very different, the interface between two immiscible liquids may act as a catalyst. Theoretical aspects of charge transfer reactions at oil/water interfaces are discussed. Conditions under which the free energy of activation of the interfacial reaction of electron transfer decreases are established. The activation energy of electron transfer depends on the charges of the reactants and dielectric permittivity of the non-aqueous phase. This can be useful when choosing a pair of immiscible solvents to decrease the activation energy of the reaction in question or to inhibit an undesired process. Experimental interfacial catalytic systems are discussed. Amphiphilic molecules such as chlorophyll or porphyrins were studied as catalysts of electron transfer reactions at the oil/water interface.

  4. Molecular structure of the coalescence of liquid interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    When two bodies of liquid merge, their interfaces must also rupture and rearrange into one. Virtually no information is available concerning the small-scale dynamics of this process. Molecular dynamics simulations of coalescence in systems of about 10,000 Lennard-Jones particles have been performed, arranged so as to mimic laboratory experiments on dense liquids. The coalescence event begins when molecules near the boundary of one liquid body thermally fluctuate into the range of attraction of the other, forming a string of mutually attracting molecules. These molecules gradually thicken into a tendril, which continues to thicken as the bodies smoothly combine in a zipper-like merger.

  5. Water: a responsive small molecule.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Vu, Tuan Hoang; Meyer, Bryce; Bisson, Patrick

    2012-01-17

    Unique among small molecules, water forms a nearly tetrahedral yet flexible hydrogen-bond network. In addition to its flexibility, this network is dynamic: bonds are formed or broken on a picosecond time scale. These unique features make probing the local structure of water challenging. Despite the challenges, there is intense interest in developing a picture of the local water structure due to water's fundamental importance in many fields of chemistry. Understanding changes in the local network structure of water near solutes likely holds the key to unlock problems from analyzing parameters that determine the three dimensional structure of proteins to modeling the fate of volatile materials released into the atmosphere. Pictures of the local structure of water are heavily influenced by what is known about the structure of ice. In hexagonal I(h) ice, the most stable form of solid water under ordinary conditions, water has an equal number of donor and acceptor bonds; a kind of symmetry. This symmetric tetrahedral coordination is only approximately preserved in the liquid. The most obvious manifestation of this altered tetrahedral bonding is the greater density in the liquid compared with the solid. Formation of an interface or addition of solutes further modifies the local bonding in water. Because the O-H stretching frequency is sensitive to the environment, vibrational spectroscopy provides an excellent probe for the hydrogen-bond structure in water. In this Account, we examine both local interactions between water and small solutes and longer range interactions at the aqueous surface. Locally, the results suggest that water is not a symmetric donor or acceptor, but rather has a propensity to act as an acceptor. In interactions with hydrocarbons, action is centered at the water oxygen. For soluble inorganic salts, interaction is greater with the cation than the anion. The vibrational spectrum of the surface of salt solutions is altered compared with that of neat

  6. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  7. Two-dimensional microrheology of freely suspended liquid crystal films.

    PubMed

    Eremin, A; Baumgarten, S; Harth, K; Stannarius, R; Nguyen, Z H; Goldfain, A; Park, C S; Maclennan, J E; Glaser, M A; Clark, N A

    2011-12-23

    Smectic liquid crystals form freely-suspended, fluid films of highly uniform structure and thickness, making them ideal systems for studies of hydrodynamics in two dimensions. We have measured particle mobility and shear viscosity by direct observation of the gravitational drift of silica spheres and smectic islands included in these fluid membranes. In thick films, we observe a hydrodynamic regime dominated by lateral confinement effects, with the mobility of the inclusion determined predominantly by coupling of the fluid flow to the fixed boundaries of the film. In thin films, the mobility of inclusions is governed primarily by coupling of the fluid to the surrounding air, as predicted by Saffman-Delbrück theory.

  8. Molecules in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  9. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  10. Simulation of self-organization processes in crystal-forming systems: Supramolecular cyclic R6 cluster precursors and self-assembly of TeO2- TEL ( Tellurite) and TeO2- PAR ( Paratellurite) structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, G. D.

    2014-11-01

    The supramolecular chemistry of oxides of sp elements (SO2, SeO2, and TeO2) is considered. The self-assembly of TeO2- TEL ( Tellurite) and TeO2- PAR ( Paratellurite) crystal structures is simulated. Methods of combinatorial and topological analysis (TOPOS program package) are applied which are based on constructing a basis 3D network of the structure in the form of a graph, the sites of which correspond to the positions of centroids of TeO2 molecules and the edges characterize bonds between them. The topological type of the basis 2D network in the TeO2- TEL structure corresponds to graphite (C- GRA), while in the TeO2- PAR structure the basis network corresponds to the 3D diamond network (C- DIA). A nanocluster precursor of cyclic type ( R6) composed of six covalently bound TeO2 molecules (chair conformation) is established for both structures. The desymmetrization of the cyclic structure of the R6 cluster in TeO2- PAR is related to the formation of Te-Te bonds with lengths of 3.824 and 4.062 Å. The symmetry and topology code of the processes of self-assembly of 3D structures from nanocluster precursors is completely reconstructed into the form "primary chain → microlayer → microframework." In both structures R6 clusters form 2D packings with a coordination number of 6. The cluster self-assembly model explains the specific features of the morphogenesis of TeO2- TEL and TeO2- PAR (phases with low and high crystallization temperatures, respectively): platelike shape, perfect cleavage in the (110) plane, and preferred growth in the primar-chain direction [100] in the former case and growth in the direction of the primary [001] axis with the preferred formation of tetragonal prism faces (110) in the latter case.

  11. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  12. Static heterogeneities in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of water seems to be closely related to static heterogeneities. These static heterogeneities are related to the local structure of water molecules, and when properly characterized, may offer an economical explanation of thermodynamic data. The key feature of liquid water is not so much that the existence of hydrogen bonds, first pointed out by Linus Pauling, but rather the local geometry of the liquid molecules is not spherical or oblong but tetrahedral. In the consideration of static heterogeneities, this local geometry is critical. Recent experiments suggested more than one phase of amorphous solid water, while simulations suggest that one of these phases is metastable with respect to another, so that in fact there are only two stable phases.

  13. Covalent Chemistry beyond Molecules.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juncong; Zhao, Yingbo; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-03-16

    Linking molecular building units by covalent bonds to make crystalline extended structures has given rise to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), thus bringing the precision and versatility of covalent chemistry beyond discrete molecules to extended structures. The key advance in this regard has been the development of strategies to overcome the "crystallization problem", which is usually encountered when attempting to link molecular building units into covalent solids. Currently, numerous MOFs and COFs are made as crystalline materials in which the large size of the constituent units provides for open frameworks. The molecular units thus reticulated become part of a new environment where they have (a) lower degrees of freedom because they are fixed into position within the framework; (b) well-defined spatial arrangements where their properties are influenced by the intricacies of the pores; and (c) ordered patterns onto which functional groups can be covalently attached to produce chemical complexity. The notion of covalent chemistry beyond molecules is further strengthened by the fact that covalent reactions can be carried out on such frameworks, with full retention of their crystallinity and porosity. MOFs are exemplars of how this chemistry has led to porosity with designed metrics and functionality, chemically-rich sequences of information within their frameworks, and well-defined mesoscopic constructs in which nanoMOFs enclose inorganic nanocrystals and give them new levels of spatial definition, stability, and functionality.

  14. Dihydrino molecule identification

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, R.L.; Good, W.R. ); Shaubach, R.M. )

    1994-01-01

    Three sets of heat production and [open quotes]ash[close quotes] identification data are presented. An exothermic reaction is reported wherein the electrons of hydrogen and deuterium atoms are stimulated to relax to quantized potential energy levels below that of the [open quotes]ground state[close quotes] via electrochemical reactants K[sup +] and K[sup +]; Pd[sup 2+] and Li[sup +]; or Pd and O[sub 2] of redox energy resonant with the energy hole that stimulates this transition. Calorimetry of pulsed current and continuous electrolysis of aqueous potassium carbonate (K[sup +]/K[sup +] electrocatalytic couple) at a nickel cathode were performed. The excess output power of 41 W exceeded by a factor >8 the total input power given by the product of the electrolysis voltage and current. The product of the exothermic reaction is atoms having electrons of energy below the ground state, which are predicted to form molecules. The predicted molecules were identified by their lack of reactivity with oxygen, by separation from molecular deuterium by cryofiltration, and by mass spectroscopic analysis. 15 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  16. Electrically rotating suspended films of polar liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsavar, R.; Amjadi, A.; Tonddast-Navaei, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2011-02-01

    Controlled rotation of a suspended soap water film, simply generated by applying an electric field, has been reported recently. The film rotates when the applied electric field exceeds a certain threshold. In this study, we investigate the phenomenon in films made of a number of other liquids with various physical and chemical properties. Our measurements show that the intrinsic electrical dipole moments of the liquid molecules seems to be vital for the corresponding film rotation. All the investigated rotating liquids have a molecular electric dipole moment of above 1 Debye, while weakly polar liquids do not rotate. However, the liquids investigated here cover a wide range of physical parameters (e.g. viscosity, density, conductivity, etc.). So far, no significant correlation has been observed between the electric field thresholds and macroscopic properties of the liquids.

  17. Local lateral environment of the molecules at the surface of DMSO-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fábián, Balázs; Idrissi, Abdenacer; Marekha, Bogdan; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2016-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid-vapour interface of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO)-water mixtures of 11 different compositions, including two neat systems are performed on the canonical (N, V, T) ensemble at 298 K. The molecules constituting the surface layer of these systems are selected by means of the identification of the truly interfacial molecules (ITIM) method, and their local lateral environment at the liquid surface is investigated by performing Voronoi analysis. The obtained results reveal that both molecules prefer to be in a mixed local environment, consisting of both kinds of molecules, at the liquid surface, and this preference is even stronger here than in the bulk liquid phase. Neat-like patches, in which a molecule is surrounded by like neighbours, are not found. However, vacancies that are surrounded solely by water molecules are observed at the liquid surface. Our results show that strongly hydrogen bonded DMSO·H2O complexes, known to exist in the bulk phase of these mixtures, are absent from the liquid surface.

  18. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  19. Quantum theory of cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issaenko, Sergei A.

    A long standing and central problem in cholesteric liquid crystals is to relate the macroscopic pitch to the underlying microscopic interactions. These interactions are of two types which we call quantum (dispersion) and classical. Here we show that, contrary to common belief, intermolecular biaxial correlations usually play an important role for dispersion forces. To understand the microscopic picture of cholesteric liquid crystal we first analyze the effective chiral interaction between molecules arising front long-range quantum interactions between fluctuating charge moments in terms of a simple model of a chiral molecule. This model is based on the approximations that (a) the dominant excited states of a molecule form a band whose width is small compared to the average energy of excitation above the ground state and (b) biaxial orientational correlation between adjacent molecules can be neglected. We consider a system consisted of elongated molecules and, although we invoke the expansion in terms of coordinates transverse to the long axis of constituent molecules, we treat the longitudinal coordinate exactly. We identify two distinct physical limits depending on whether one or both of the interacting molecules are excited in the virtual state. The two-molecule interaction can be interpreted in terms of a superposition of pairwise interactions between individual atoms (or local chiral centers) on a chiral molecule and centers of anisotropic part of polarizability on the other molecule, while the one-molecule term involves three-body interactions between two local dipole moments of a chiral molecule and centers of anisotropic part of polarizability on the other, possibly nonchiral molecule. The numerical estimates of the pitch appeared from the above mechanism even without the Taylor expansion of the potential turns out to be considerably larger than experimental results and so it appears that the mean field treatment of these interactions can be used only in

  20. Structure and dynamics of water molecules confined in triglyceride oils.

    PubMed

    Groot, Carien C M; Velikov, Krassimir P; Bakker, Huib J

    2016-10-26

    Though it is commonly known that a small amount of water can be present in triglyceride oil, a molecular picture of how water molecules organize in the oil phase is lacking. We investigate the hydrogen-bond configuration and dynamics of water in triacetin, tributyrin and trioctanoin using linear infrared and time-resolved two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy of the water hydroxyl stretch vibration. We identify water molecules with a single strong hydrogen bond to the triglyceride, water molecules with two weaker hydrogen bonds to the triglycerides, and water clusters. These species do not interconvert on the 20 ps timescale of the experiment, as evidenced by the absence of cross-peaks in the 2DIR spectrum. The vibrational response of water molecules with a single strong hydrogen bond to the triglyceride depends strongly on the excitation frequency, revealing the presence of different subspecies of singly-bound water molecules that correspond to different hydrogen-bond locations. In contrast, the water molecules with two weaker hydrogen bonds to the triglyceride correspond to a single, specific hydrogen-bond configuration; these molecules likely bridge the carbonyl groups of adjacent triglyceride molecules, which can have considerable influence on liquid triglyceride properties.

  1. Crystal structure of the hydrated strontium salt of methotrexate: two independent molecules with different conformations.

    PubMed

    Mastropaolo, D; Camerman, A; Camerman, N

    2001-01-18

    The crystal and molecular structure of methotrexate has been determined by X-ray diffraction from a highly hydrated triclinic crystal form in which the asymmetric unit contains two independent methotrexate molecules with their glutamate carboxyl groups coordinated to two strontium ions. The two methotrexates exhibit differing conformations: They are almost related to one another by a pseudocenter of symmetry. This places the C(9)-N(10) bond vectors on opposite sides of the planes of the pteridine rings. The 2,4-diaminopteridines form 2-fold symmetry-related hydrogen-bonded dimers as well as hydrogen bonds to benzoyl carbonyl oxygens and lattice water molecules. This structure provides experimental proof of the existence of pteridine conformers through rotation about the C(6)-C(9) bond. Comparison of these conformers with other free and enzyme-bound methotrexate conformations shows them all to be different and illustrates the ability of the molecule to adapt to its chemical environment. The results from this crystal structure determination are experimental proof that methotrexate has not one preferred molecular conformation but may freely rotate about several bonds. They also suggest that the dihydrofolate reductase-bound methotrexate conformation is greatly influenced by the specific binding site environment of the enzyme.

  2. Macromolecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Safinya, C.R.; Safran, S.A. ); Pincus, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Liquids include a broad range of material systems which are of high scientific and technological interest. Generally speaking, these are partially ordered or disordered phases where the individual molecular species have organized themselves on length scales which are larger than simple fluids, typically between 10 Angstroms and several microns. The specific systems reported on in this book include membranes, microemulsions, micelles, liquid crystals, colloidal suspensions, and polymers. They have a major impact on a broad spectrum of technological industries such as displays, plastics, soap and detergents, chemicals and petroleum, and pharmaceuticals.

  3. Dispersion properties of transverse anisotropic liquid crystal core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    The dispersion properties of liquid crystal core photonic crystal fibers for different core diameters have been calculated by a full vectorial finite difference method. In calculations, air holes are assumed to be arranged in a regular hexagonal array in fused silica and a central hole is filled with liquid crystal to create a core. In this study, three types of transverse anisotropic configurations, where liquid crystal molecules are oriented in a transverse plane, and a planar configuration, where liquid crystal molecules are oriented in a propagation direction, are considered. The large changes of the dispersion properties are found when the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules is changed from a planar configuration to a uniform configuration, where all molecules are oriented in the same direction in a transverse plane. Since the orientation of liquid crystal molecules may be controlled by applying an electric field, it could be utilized for various applications including the spectral control of supercontinuum generation.

  4. Liquid-crystalline physical gels.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takashi; Hirai, Yuki; Nakaso, Suguru; Moriyama, Masaya

    2007-12-01

    Liquid-crystalline (LC) physical gels are a new class of dynamically functional materials consisting of liquid crystals and fibrous aggregates of molecules that are called "gelators". Liquid-crystalline physical gels, which are macroscopically soft solids, exhibit induced or enhanced electro-optical, photochemical, electronic properties due to the combination of two components that form phase-separated structures. In this tutorial review, we describe the materials design and structure-property relationships of the LC physical gels. The introduction of self-assembled fibers into nematic liquid crystals leads to faster responses in twisted nematic (TN) mode and high contrast switching in light scattering mode. Furthermore, the LC physical gels can be exploited as a new type of materials for electro-optical memory. This function is achieved by the control of reversible aggregation processes of gelators under electric fields in nematic liquid crystals. Electronic properties such as hole mobilities are improved by the introduction of fibrous aggregates into triphenylene-based columnar liquid crystals. The incorporation of photochromic azobenzenes or electroactive tetrathiafulvalenes into the chemical structures of gelators leads to the preparation of ordered functional materials.

  5. Biochips - Can molecules compute?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, J. B.

    1984-02-01

    In recent years the possibility has been considered to build 'biochip' computers, in which the silicon transistors of present machines would be replaced by large organic molecules or genetically engineered proteins. Two major advantages of such biochips over current devices would be related to vastly increased densities of computing elements, and entirely new styles of data processing, suited to such high-level tasks as pattern recognition and context-dependent analysis. The limitations of the semiconductor chip with respect to the density of elementary units due to size considerations and heat development could be overcome by making use of molecular switches. Attention is given to soliton switching, soliton logic, bulk molecular devices, analog biochips, 'intelligent' switches based on the employment of enzymes, robot vision, questions of biochip fabrication, protein engineering, and a strategy for the development of biochips.

  6. Molecules in the Spotlight

    SciTech Connect

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  7. Rotational isomerism of molecules in condensed phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Iwasaki, Matae; Ogata, Yukio

    1991-08-01

    A statistical mechanical model is developed for the description of the conformational distribution of organic molecules in the liquid and solid phases. In the model, they are assumed to have one internal freedom of rotation. The molecules are fixed to lattice sites and have two types of ordering, conformational and distributional. The latter is supposed to represent an ordering typical of solid state. The model is compared with the experimental results of the rotational-isomeric ratio of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane, in the temperature range from 77 to 300 K. It explains successfully the experimental results, especially the behavior near the melting point. From the point of view of melting, the present model is an extension of the Lennard-Jones and Devonshire model, because, when the distinctions between the two conformers are neglected, the parameter representing the distributional ordering of the molecules results in the same equation as that derived from the Lennard-Jones and Devonshire model.

  8. Fiber-mesh photonic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Subodha; Satpathy, Sashi

    2008-03-01

    Analogous to the photonic crystal, we introduce the concept of a fiber-mesh photonic molecule made up of optical fibers and study its transmission characteristics. We consider a specific example of a photonic molecule, inspired by the well-known C60 molecule, with the arms of the molecule formed out of single-moded optical fibers. The transmittance consists of sharp peaks determined by the pole structure of the scattering matrix in the complex energy plane. A molecule can be designed to control the positions and the widths of the transmission peaks, opening up the possibility of building new photonic devices such as high quality band-pass filters.

  9. A mechanism for supercooling in organic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, P.E.

    1996-12-31

    In this investigation, a mechanism for supercooling inorganic liquids is formulated. By comparing the melting temperature and spontaneous freezing temperature of the chemicals evaluated with their molecular characteristics, the factors promoting supercooling are developed. The results obtained indicate that the following molecular characteristics promote supercooling in organic liquids: an unequal sharing of electrons between the atoms of a molecule; a three-dimensional chemical structure; a permanent, three-dimensional, and partially charged pocket within the chemical structure; a partially charged projection having a charge opposite that of the pocket and located on the side of the molecule opposite that of the pocket.

  10. Structure of the catalytic chain of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase in a hexagonal crystal form: Insights into the path of carbamoyl phosphate to the active site of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali J.; Soares A.; Singh, A. K.; Colaneri, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Crystals of the catalytic chain of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) grew in the presence of the regulatory chain in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}22, with one monomer per asymmetric unit. This is the first time that crystals with only one monomer in the asymmetric unit have been obtained; all known structures of the catalytic subunit contain several crystallographically independent monomers. The symmetry-related chains form the staggered dimer of trimers observed in the other known structures of the catalytic subunit. The central channel of the catalytic subunit contains a sulfate ion and a K{sup +} ion as well as a glycerol molecule at its entrance. It is possible that it is involved in channeling carbamoyl phosphate (CP) to the active site of the enzyme. A second sulfate ion near Arg164 is near the second CP position in the wild-type Escherichia coli ATCase structure complexed with CP. It is suggested that this position may also be in the path that CP takes when binding to the active site in a partial diffusion process at 310 K. Additional biochemical studies of carbamoylation and the molecular organization of this enzyme in M. jannaschii will provide further insight into these points.

  11. Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1988-01-01

    In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

  12. Quantum Behavior of Water Molecules Confined to Nanocavities in Gemstones.

    PubMed

    Gorshunov, Boris P; Zhukova, Elena S; Torgashev, Victor I; Lebedev, Vladimir V; Shakurov, Gil'man S; Kremer, Reinhard K; Pestrjakov, Efim V; Thomas, Victor G; Fursenko, Dimitry A; Dressel, Martin

    2013-06-20

    When water is confined to nanocavities, its quantum mechanical behavior can be revealed by terahertz spectroscopy. We place H2O molecules in the nanopores of a beryl crystal lattice and observe a rich and highly anisotropic set of absorption lines in the terahertz spectral range. Two bands can be identified, which originate from translational and librational motions of the water molecule isolated within the cage; they correspond to the analogous broad bands in liquid water and ice. In the present case of well-defined and highly symmetric nanocavities, the observed fine structure can be explained by macroscopic tunneling of the H2O molecules within a six-fold potential caused by the interaction of the molecule with the cavity walls.

  13. Liquid ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Suman; Paswan, Anil; Prakas, S.

    2014-01-01

    Human have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids like fish. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. It is well-known that respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit. During the past few years several new modalities of treatment have been introduced. One of them and probably the most fascinating, is of LV. Partial LV, on which much of the existing research has concentrated, requires partial filling of lungs with perfluorocarbons (PFC's) and ventilation with gas tidal volumes using conventional mechanical ventilators. Various physico-chemical properties of PFC's make them the ideal media. It results in a dramatic improvement in lung compliance and oxygenation and decline in mean airway pressure and oxygen requirements. No long-term side-effect reported. PMID:25886321

  14. Anisotropic ionic conductivities in lyotropic supramolecular liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youju; Cong, Yuanhua; Li, Junjun; Wang, Daoliang; Zhang, Jingtuo; Xu, Lu; Li, Weili; Li, Liangbin; Pan, Guoqiang; Yang, Chuanlu

    2009-12-28

    The designed aromatic amide discotic molecule with sulfonic acid groups at its periphery exhibits a hexagonal supramolecular columnar liquid crystalline phase, which leads to the achievement of anisotropic ionic conductivity through macroscopically aligning the ionic channels.

  15. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  16. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  17. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were foundmore » to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.« less

  19. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1987-10-07

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photons are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions. 3 figs.

  20. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  1. Atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Spacelab investigation entitled Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) is designed to obtain fundamental information related to the chemistry and physics of the Earth's upper atmosphere using the techniques of infrared absorption spectroscopy. There are two principal objectives to be met. The first is the determination, on a global scale, of the compositional structure of the upper atmosphere and its spatial variability. The establishment of this variability represents the first step toward determining the characteristic residence times for the upper atmospheric constituents; the magnitudes of their sources and sinks; and, ultimately, an understanding of their effects on the stability of the stratosphere. The second objective is to provide the high-resolution, calibrated spectral information which is essential for the detailed design of advanced instrumentation for subsequent global monitoring of specific species found to be critical to atmospheric stability. This information will be disseminated in the form of a three dimensional atlas of solar absorption spectra obtained over a range of latitudes, longitudes, and altitudes.

  2. Vaporisation of a dicationic ionic liquid revisited.

    PubMed

    Vitorino, Joana; Leal, João P; Licence, Peter; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Gooden, Peter N; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E; Shimizu, Karina; Rebelo, Luís P N; Canongia Lopes, José N

    2010-12-03

    The vaporization of a dicationic ionic liquid at moderate temperatures and under reduced pressures--recently studied by line-of-sight mass spectrometry--was further analyzed using an ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectroscopy technique that allows the monitoring of the different species present in the gas phase through the implementation of controlled ion-molecule reactions. The results support the view that the vapour phase of an aprotic dicationic ionic liquid is composed of neutral ion triplets (one dication attached to two anions). Molecular dynamics simulations were also performed in order to explain the magnitude of the vaporization enthalpies of dicationic ionic liquids vis-à-vis their monocationic counterparts.

  3. Relaxational dynamics of water molecules at protein surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellerue, S.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    2000-08-01

    Relaxational dynamics of water molecules at the surface of a C-phycocyanin protein is studied by high resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The neutron quasi-elastic spectra are well described by the α-relaxation process of mode coupling theory of supercooled liquids. The relaxation times of interfacial water exhibit a power law dependence on the wave vector Q. The average diffusion coefficient is 10 times lower than that of bulk water. This confirms that there is a retardation of water molecules at the protein surface which is in good agreement with the results of water at the surface of hydrophilic model systems.

  4. Comparison of generic force fields for packing of concave molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Regno, Annalaura; Siperstein, Flor R.

    2014-09-01

    Organic molecules of intrinsic microporosity (OMIMs) are a new class of highly concave molecules, designed to pack inefficiently and create microporous materials. In this work, OMIM-1 was described with full atomistic models using Dreiding, optimised potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) and Universal force fields to recognise the features enhanced by each force field and assess their ability in representing the structural properties of this new class of materials. In addition, argon adsorption isotherms were modelled to determine the features observed in the isotherm generated by each force field, for future comparison with experimental data.

  5. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  6. Liquid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, J.; Mizuhashi, M.; Kamimori, T.

    1990-12-31

    In contrast to lithium batteries, the electrochromic windows are used under the sunlight, which requires the stability against UV-light, in addition to the usual electrochemical and thermal stabilities. Thus, the selection of the electrode materials and the combination with the electrolytes should be carefully performed in terms of stability requirements. Recently many reports in relation to those subjects were published. Therefore only fundamental properties of liquid electrolytes required for the electrochromic research are reviewed in this chapter.

  7. Vibrational autoionization in polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Pratt, S T

    2005-01-01

    The vibrationally autoionizing Rydberg states of small polyatomic molecules provide a fascinating laboratory in which to study fundamental nonadiabatic processes. In this review, recent results on the vibrational mode dependence of vibrational autoionization are discussed. In general, autoionization rates depend strongly on the character of the normal mode driving the process and on the electronic character of the Rydberg electron. Although quantitative calculations based on multichannel quantum defect theory are available for some polyatomic molecules, including H3, only qualitative information exists for most molecules. This review shows how qualitative information, such as Walsh diagrams along different normal coordinates of the molecule, can provide insight into the vibrational autoionization rates.

  8. Electrical Transport through Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. N.; Chang, Shun-Chi; Williams, Stan

    2003-03-01

    We investigate electrical transport properties of single organic molecules using electromigration break junctions[1]. A self-assembled monolayer of various organic molecules such as 1,4-di(phenylethynyl-4'-methanethiol)benzene was grown on narrow metal wires, and single or a few molecules were incorporated into the junctions which were created by applying a large voltage and breaking the wires. The transport properties of these molecules were then measured at low temperatures. Latest experimental results will be discussed. [1] Park, J. et al, Nature, 417, 722 (2002); Liang W. et al, Nature, 417, 725 (2002).

  9. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  10. Dual-pharmacology muscarinic antagonist and β₂ agonist molecules for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adam D; Jones, Lyn H

    2011-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of death in the world today. Bronchodilators, particularly muscarinic antagonists and β(2) agonists, are recommended for patients with moderate to severe COPD. Dual-pharmacology muscarinic antagonist- β(2) agonist (MABA) molecules present an exciting new approach to the treatment of COPD by combining muscarinic antagonism and β(2) agonism in a single entity. They have the potential to demonstrate additive or synergistic bronchodilation over either pharmacology alone. Due to this enticing prospect, several companies have now reported MABA discovery efforts through a conjugated/linked strategy with one candidate (GSK-961081) demonstrating clinical proof of concept. Several MABA crystal forms have been identified, satisfying the requirements for inhaled dosing devices. There are significant challenges in designing MABAs, but the potential to achieve enhanced bronchoprotection in patients and facilitate 'triple therapy' makes this an extremely important and exciting area of pharmaceutical research.

  11. Electroviscoelasticity of liquid/liquid interfaces: fractional-order model.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Lazarevic, Mihailo P

    2005-02-01

    A number of theories that describe the behavior of liquid-liquid interfaces have been developed and applied to various dispersed systems, e.g., Stokes, Reiner-Rivelin, Ericksen, Einstein, Smoluchowski, and Kinch. A new theory of electroviscoelasticity describes the behavior of electrified liquid-liquid interfaces in fine dispersed systems and is based on a new constitutive model of liquids. According to this model liquid-liquid droplet or droplet-film structure (collective of particles) is considered as a macroscopic system with internal structure determined by the way the molecules (ions) are tuned (structured) into the primary components of a cluster configuration. How the tuning/structuring occurs depends on the physical fields involved, both potential (elastic forces) and nonpotential (resistance forces). All these microelements of the primary structure can be considered as electromechanical oscillators assembled into groups, so that excitation by an external physical field may cause oscillations at the resonant/characteristic frequency of the system itself (coupling at the characteristic frequency). Up to now, three possible mathematical formalisms have been discussed related to the theory of electroviscoelasticity. The first is the tension tensor model, where the normal and tangential forces are considered, only in mathematical formalism, regardless of their origin (mechanical and/or electrical). The second is the Van der Pol derivative model, presented by linear and nonlinear differential equations. Finally, the third model presents an effort to generalize the previous Van der Pol equation: the ordinary time derivative and integral are now replaced with the corresponding fractional-order time derivative and integral of order p<1.

  12. Neutron Scattering of Aromatic and Aliphatic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Marta; Bowron, Daniel T.; Manyar, Haresh G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Organic solvents, such as cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene, are widely used as both reagents and solvents in industrial processes. Despite the ubiquity of these liquids, the local structures that govern the chemical properties have not been studied extensively. Herein, we report neutron diffraction measurements on liquid cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene at 298 K to obtain a detailed description of the local structure in these compounds. The radial distribution functions of the centres of the molecules, as well as the partial distribution functions for the double bond for cyclohexene and methyl group for methylcyclohexane and toluene have been calculated. Additionally, probability density functions and angular radial distribution functions were extracted to provide a full description of the local structure within the chosen liquids. Structural motifs are discussed and compared for all liquids, referring specifically to the functional group and aromaticity present in the different liquids. PMID:26990367

  13. Architecture, Assembly, and Emerging Applications of Branched Functional Polyelectrolytes and Poly(ionic liquid)s.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weinan; Ledin, Petr A; Shevchenko, Valery V; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2015-06-17

    Branched polyelectrolytes with cylindrical brush, dendritic, hyperbranched, grafted, and star architectures bearing ionizable functional groups possess complex and unique assembly behavior in solution at surfaces and interfaces as compared to their linear counterparts. This review summarizes the recent developments in the introduction of various architectures and understanding of the assembly behavior of branched polyelectrolytes with a focus on functional polyelectrolytes and poly(ionic liquid)s with responsive properties. The branched polyelectrolytes and poly(ionic liquid)s interact electrostatically with small molecules, linear polyelectrolytes, or other branched polyelectrolytes to form assemblies of hybrid nanoparticles, multilayer thin films, responsive microcapsules, and ion-conductive membranes. The branched structures lead to unconventional assemblies and complex hierarchical structures with responsive properties as summarized in this review. Finally, we discuss prospectives for emerging applications of branched polyelectrolytes and poly(ionic liquid)s for energy harvesting and storage, controlled delivery, chemical microreactors, adaptive surfaces, and ion-exchange membranes.

  14. Demonstrations of Some Optical Properties of Liquid Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Anthony J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses several properties of liquid crystal displays. Includes instructions for demonstrating liquid crystalline phase, ordering of the long axes of molecules along one direction, and electro-optic effects. The latter is accomplished with the use of an overhead projector following preparation of a sandwich cell. (JN)

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of two smectic A liquid crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Gelerinter, E.; Fishel, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the molecular ordering in two smectic A liquid crystals using vanadyl acetylacetonate as a paramagnetic probe. The average hyperfine splitting of the spectrum in the smectic A mesophase is measured as a function of the orientation relative to the dc magnetic field of the spectrometer after alignment of the molecules of the liquid crystal.

  16. Time-programmed helix inversion in phototunable liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Asshoff, Sarah J; Iamsaard, Supitchaya; Bosco, Alessandro; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Feringa, Ben L; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2013-05-14

    Doping cholesteric liquid crystals with photo-responsive molecules enables controlling the colour and polarisation of the light they reflect. However, accelerating the rate of relaxation of these photo-controllable liquid crystals remains challenging. Here we show that the relaxation rate of the cholesteric helix is fully determined by helix inversion of the molecular dopants.

  17. Pyrrolidinium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Nockemann, Peter; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Driesen, Kris; Görller-Walrand, Christiane; Binnemans, Koen; Cardinaels, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium cations have been used for the design of ionic liquid crystals, including a new type of uranium-containing metallomesogen. Pyrrolidinium salts with bromide, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, thiocyanate, tetrakis(2- thenoyltrifluoroacetonato)europate(III) and tetrabromouranyl counteranions were prepared. For the bromide salts and tetrabromouranyl compounds, the chain length of the alkyl group C(n)H(2n+1) was varied from eight to twenty carbon atoms (n = 8, 10-20). The compounds show rich mesomorphic behaviour: highly ordered smectic phases (the crystal smectic E phase and the uncommon crystal smectic T phase), smectic A phases, and hexagonal columnar phases were observed, depending on chain length and anion. This work gives better insight into the nature and formation of the crystal smectic T phase, and the molecular requirements for the appearance of this highly ordered phase. This uncommon tetragonal mesophase is thoroughly discussed on the basis of detailed powder X-ray diffraction experiments and in relation to the existing literature. Structural models are proposed for self-assembly of the molecules within the smectic layers. In addition, the photophysical properties of the compounds containing a metal complex anion were investigated. For the uranium-containing mesogens, luminescence can be induced by dissolving them in an ionic liquid matrix. The europium-containing compound shows intense red photoluminescence with high colour purity.

  18. Chemical and biological sensing using liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Rebecca J.; Hunter, Jacob T.; Miller, Daniel S.; Abbasi, Reza; Mushenheim, Peter C.; Tan, Lie Na; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    The liquid crystalline state of matter arises from orientation-dependent, non-covalent interaction between molecules within condensed phases. Because the balance of intermolecular forces that underlies formation of liquid crystals is delicate, this state of matter can, in general, be easily perturbed by external stimuli (such as an electric field in a display). In this review, we present an overview of recent efforts that have focused on exploiting the responsiveness of liquid crystals as the basis of chemical and biological sensors. In this application of liquid crystals, the challenge is to design liquid crystalline systems that undergo changes in organization when perturbed by targeted chemical and biological species of interest. The approaches described below revolve around the design of interfaces that selectively bind targeted species, thus leading to surface-driven changes in the organization of the liquid crystals. Because liquid crystals possess anisotropic optical and dielectric properties, a range of different methods can be used to read out the changes in organization of liquid crystals that are caused by targeted chemical and biological species. This review focuses on principles for liquid crystal-based sensors that provide an optical output. PMID:24795857

  19. Atom-Molecule Coherence in a One-Dimensional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, R.; Orignac, E.

    2005-09-01

    We study a model of one-dimensional fermionic atoms with a narrow Feshbach resonance that allows them to bind in pairs to form bosonic molecules. We show that at low energy, a coherence develops between the molecule and fermion Luttinger liquids. At the same time, a gap opens in the spin excitation spectrum. The coherence implies that the order parameters for the molecular Bose-Einstein condensation and the atomic BCS pairing become identical. Moreover, both bosonic and fermionic charge density wave correlations decay exponentially, in contrast with a usual Luttinger liquid. We exhibit a Luther-Emery point where the systems can be described in terms of noninteracting pseudofermions. At this point we discuss the threshold behavior of density-density response functions.

  20. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  1. Featured Molecules: Sucrose and Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-04-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for April relate to the sense of taste. Apple Fool, the JCE Classroom Activity, mentions sucrose and vanillin and their use as flavorings. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  2. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  3. THE EFFECT OF LIQUID STRUCTURE ON CONTACT ANGLE HYSTERESIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contact angle hysteresis was measured for a variety of liquids on condensed monolayers of 17-(perfluoroheptyl)-heptadecanoic acid adsorbed on...into the porous monolayer. However, contact angle hysteresis was negligible when the average diameter of the liquid molecules was larger than the...monolayers by contact angle hysteresis measurements on a series of liquids having gradations in molecular volume. The results of this investigation

  4. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  5. An optical conveyor for molecules.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Franz M; Braun, Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Trapping single ions under vacuum allows for precise spectroscopy in atomic physics. The confinement of biological molecules in bulk water is hindered by the lack of comparably strong forces. Molecules have been immobilized to surfaces, however often with detrimental effects on their function. Here, we optically trap molecules by creating the microscale analogue of a conveyor belt: a bidirectional flow is combined with a perpendicular thermophoretic molecule drift. Arranged in a toroidal geometry, the conveyor accumulates a hundredfold excess of 5-base DNA within seconds. The concentrations of the trapped DNA scale exponentially with length, reaching trapping potential depths of 14 kT for 50 bases. The mechanism does not require microfluidics, electrodes, or surface modifications. As a result, the trap can be dynamically relocated. The optical conveyor can be used to enhance diffusion-limited surface reactions, redirect cellular signaling, observe individual biomolecules over a prolonged time, or approach single-molecule chemistry in bulk water.

  6. Hydrogen and Carbon Vapour Pressure Isotope Effects in Liquid Fluoroform Studied by Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Takao; Mitome, Ryota; Yanase, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    H/D and 12C/13C vapour pressure isotope effects (VPIEs) in liquid fluoroform (CHF3) were studied at the MPW1PW91/6-31 ++ G(d) level of theory. The CHF3 monomer and CHF3 molecules surrounded by other CHF3 molecules in every direction in CHF3 clusters were used as model molecules of vapour and liquid CHF3. Although experimental results in which the vapour pressure of liquid 12CHF3 is higher than that of liquid 12CDF3 and the vapour pressure of liquid 13CHF3 is higher than that of liquid 12CHF3 between 125 and 212 K were qualitatively reproduced, the present calculations overestimated the H/D VPIE and underestimated the 12C/13C VPIE. Temperature-dependent intermolecular interactions between hydrogen and fluorine atoms of neighbouring molecules were required to explain the temperature dependences of both H/D and 12C/13C VPIEs.

  7. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  8. Liquid crystalline order in mucus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viney, C.; Huber, A. E.; Verdugo, P.

    1993-01-01

    Mucus plays an exceptionally wide range of important biological roles. It operates as a protective, exchange, and transport medium in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems of humans and other vertebrates. Mucus is a polymer hydrogel. It is secreted as discrete packages (secretory granules) by specialized secretory cells. Mucus hydrogel is stored in a condensed state inside the secretory granules. Depending upon the architecture of their constituent macromolecules and on the composition of the solvent, polymer gels can form liquid crystalline microstructures, with orientational order being exhibited over optically resolvable distances. Individual mucin molecules consist of alternating rigid segments (heavily glycosylated; hydrophilic) and flexible segments (nonglycosylated; hydrophobic). Polymer molecules consisting of rigid units linked by flexible spacers are frequently associated with liquid crystalline behavior, which again raises the possibility that mucus could form anisotropic fluid phases. Suggestions that mucins may be self-associating in dilute solution have previously been challenged on the basis of sedimentation-equilibrium studies performed on mucus in which potential sites of association were competitively blocked with inhibitors. However, the formation of stable liquid crystalline phases does not depend on the existence of inter- or intramolecular associations; these phases can form on the basis of steric considerations alone.

  9. Optical Properties of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Samriti; Lal, Suman; Tripathi, S. K.; Sood, Nitin; Singh, Darshan

    2011-12-01

    The linking of liquid crystals polymer chains together into gel network fixes their topology, and melt becomes an elastic solid. These materials are called liquid crystals elastomers. Liquid crystal elastomers possess properties of soft elasticity and spontaneous shape change. The constituent molecules of LCEs are orientationally ordered and there exist a strong coupling between the orientational order and mechanical strain. In LCEs the molecules start elongate when their component rods orient and reversibly contract when the order is lost (typically by heating). So there is a change of average molecular shape from spherical to spheroidal. These unique properties make these materials suitable for future biological applications. Various research groups have studied different properties of LCEs in which optical properties are predominant. LCE has been synthesized in our laboratory. In this paper, we report on the optical behavior of this material.

  10. A liquid crystalline chirality balance for vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzono, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Fukuda, Jun-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    Chiral discrimination of vapours plays an important role in olfactory perception of biological systems and its realization by artificial sensors has been an intriguing challenge. Here, we report a simple method that tangibly visualizes the chirality of a diverse variety of molecules dissolved from vapours with high sensitivity, by making use of a structural change in a periodic microstructure of a nematic liquid crystal confined in open microchannels. This microstructure is accompanied by a topological line defect of a zigzag form with equal lengths of ‘zig’ and ‘zag.’ We find that a tiny amount of vapour of chiral molecules injected onto the liquid crystal induces the imbalance of ‘zig’ and ‘zag’ depending on its enantiomeric excess within a few seconds. Our liquid-crystal-based ‘chirality balance’ offers a simple, quick and versatile chirality-sensing/-screening method for gas-phase analysis (for example, for odours, environmental chemicals or drugs).

  11. A liquid crystalline chirality balance for vapours.

    PubMed

    Ohzono, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-30

    Chiral discrimination of vapours plays an important role in olfactory perception of biological systems and its realization by artificial sensors has been an intriguing challenge. Here, we report a simple method that tangibly visualizes the chirality of a diverse variety of molecules dissolved from vapours with high sensitivity, by making use of a structural change in a periodic microstructure of a nematic liquid crystal confined in open microchannels. This microstructure is accompanied by a topological line defect of a zigzag form with equal lengths of 'zig' and 'zag.' We find that a tiny amount of vapour of chiral molecules injected onto the liquid crystal induces the imbalance of 'zig' and 'zag' depending on its enantiomeric excess within a few seconds. Our liquid-crystal-based 'chirality balance' offers a simple, quick and versatile chirality-sensing/-screening method for gas-phase analysis (for example, for odours, environmental chemicals or drugs).

  12. Molecular thermodiffusion (thermophoresis) in liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Semen N; Schimpf, Martin E

    2005-10-01

    Thermodiffusion (thermophoresis) in liquid mixtures is theoretically examined using a hydrodynamic approach. Thermodiffusion is related to the local temperature-induced pressure gradient in the liquid layer surrounding the selected molecule and to the secondary macroscopic pressure gradient established in the system. The local pressure gradient is produced by excess pressure due to the asymmetry of interactions with surrounding molecules in a nonuniform temperature field. The secondary pressure gradient is considered an independent parameter related to the concentration gradient formed by volume forces, calculated from the generalized equations for mass transfer. Values of Soret coefficients for mixtures of toluene and -hexane are calculated using parameters in the literature. When the molecules are assumed to be similar in shape, the calculated Soret coefficients are lower than the empirical values found in the literature. However, by introducing an asymmetry parameter, which is calculated from independent measurements of component diffusion in the literature, very good agreement is obtained.

  13. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C.; Gramlich, B.; Wagner, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  14. Statistics of single molecule rotation driven by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Charles

    2013-03-01

    In stark contrast to nature, current manmade devices, with the exception of liquid crystals, make no use of nanoscale molecular motion. In order for molecules to be used as components in molecular machines, methods are required to couple individual molecules to external energy sources and to selectively excite motion in a given direction. Recently a new, stable and robust system of molecular rotors consisting of thioether molecules bound to metal surfaces has offered a method with which to study the rotation of individual molecules as a function of temperature, molecular chemistry, proximity of neighboring molecules, and surface structure. Arrhenius plots for the rotation of dibutyl sulfide yielded a rotational barrier of 1.2 kJ per mol. While these results reveal that small amounts of thermal energy are capable of inducing rotation, thermodynamics dictates that thermal energy alone cannot be used to perform useful work in the absence of a temperature gradient. Electrical excitation of individual thioether molecular rotors is performed using with electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Experimental data for the electrically excited motion of asymmetric thioether molecules is presented and the statistics of and mechanism for directed motion is discussed.

  15. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  16. Formulating liquid ethers for microtubular SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Kevin; Slinn, Matthew; Preece, John

    One of the key problems of applying solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in transportation is that conventional fuels like kerosene and diesel do not operate directly in SOFCs without prereforming to hydrogen and carbon monoxide which can be handled by the nickel cermet anode. SOFCs can internally reform certain hydrocarbon molecules such as methanol and methane. However, other liquid fuels usable in petrol or diesel internal combustion engines (ICEs) have not easily been reformable directly on the anode. This paper describes a search for liquid fuels which can be mixed with petrol or diesel and also injected directly into an SOFC without destroying the nickel anode. When fuel molecules such as octane are injected onto the conventional nickel/yttria stabilised zirconia (Ni/YSZ) SOFC fuel electrode, the anode rapidly becomes blocked by carbon deposition and the cell power drops to near zero in minutes. This degeneration of the anode can be inhibited by injection of air or water into the anode or by some upstream reforming just before entry to the SOFC. Some smaller molecules such as methane, methanol and methanoic acid produce a slight tendency to carbon deposition but not sufficient to prevent long term operation. In this project we have investigated a large number of molecules and now found that some liquid ethers do not significantly damage the anode when directly injected. These molecules and formulations with other components have been evaluated in this study. The theory put forward in this paper is that carbon-carbon bonds in the fuel are the main reason for anode damage. By testing a number of fuels without such bonds, particularly liquid ethers such as methyl formate and dimethoxy methane, it has been shown that SOFCs can run without substantial carbon formation. The proposal is that conventional fuels can be doped with these molecules to allow hybrid operation of an ICE/SOFC device.

  17. Ultrastable Liquid-Liquid Interface as Viable Route for Controlled Deposition of Biodegradable Polymer Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Raffaele; Iaccarino, Giulia; Bianchini, Paolo; Marotta, Roberto; D'autilia, Francesca; Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Diaspro, Alberto; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-01

    Liquid-liquid interfaces are highly dynamic and characterized by an elevated interfacial tension as compared to solid-liquid interfaces. Therefore, they are gaining an increasing interest as viable templates for ordered assembly of molecules and nanoparticles. However, liquid-liquid interfaces are more difficult to handle compared to solid-liquid interfaces; their intrinsic instability may affect the assembly process, especially in the case of multiple deposition. Indeed, some attempts have been made in the deposition of polymer multilayers at liquid-liquid interfaces, but with limited control over size and stability. This study reports on the preparation of an ultrastable liquid-liquid interface based on an O/W secondary miniemulsion and its possible use as a template for the self-assembly of polymeric multilayer nanocapsules. Such polymer nanocapsules are made of entirely biodegradable materials, with highly controlled size-well under 200 nm-and multi-compartment and multifunctional features enriching their field of application in drug delivery, as well as in other bionanotechnology fields.

  18. Adhesion molecules in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrar, A.; Geboes, K.; Al-Kharashi, S.; Tabbara, K.; Missotten, L.; Desmet, V.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Adhesion molecules play a key role in the selective recruitment of different leucocyte population to inflammatory sites. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of adhesion molecules in the conjunctiva of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC).
METHODS—The presence and distribution of adhesion molecules were studied in 14 conjunctival biopsy specimens from seven patients with active VKC and in four normal conjunctival biopsy specimens. We used a panel of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3), lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), very late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1). In addition, a panel of mAbs were used to characterise the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate.
RESULTS—In the normal conjunctiva, ICAM-1 was expressed on the vascular endothelium only, LFA-1 and ICAM-3 on epithelial and stromal mononuclear cells , and VLA-4 on stromal mononuclear cells. The expression of VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was absent. The number of cells expressing adhesion molecules was found to be markedly increased in all VKC specimens. This was concurrent with a heavy inflammatory infiltrate. Strong ICAM-1 expression was induced on the basal epithelial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, ICAM-1 was expressed on stromal mononuclear cells. LFA-1 and ICAM-3 were expressed on the majority of epithelial and stromal infiltrating mononuclear cells. VLA-4 expression was noted on stromal mononuclear cells. Compared with controls, VKC specimens showed significantly more ICAM-3+, LFA-1+, and VLA-4+ cells. VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 were induced on the vascular endothelial cells.
CONCLUSIONS—Increased expression of adhesion molecules may play an important role in the pathogenesis of VKC.

 PMID

  19. Chiral analysis and mixtures of cold, large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibenberger, Sandra; Drayna, Garrett K.; Wang, Kenneth; Hallas, Christian; Doyle, John M.; Patterson, David

    2016-05-01

    We show new avenues for ultra-specific chemical analysis of buffer-gas cooled molecules via microwave spectroscopy. Buffer gas cooling provides a continuous, mixture compatible, solution compatible source, where the cold environment is controllable and the cooling process is separate from the production of the gas phase molecules. We demonstrate the analysis of complex molecular mixtures by introducing a new liquid injection source with microwave spectroscopy in a cryogenic buffer gas environment. Chirality plays a fundamental role in the activity of many biological molecules and in broad classes of chemical reactions. Recently, we have demonstrated species and enantiomer sensitive microwave spectroscopic methods. We seek to apply these methods not just to the analysis of chemical mixtures, but also to the manipulation of mixtures.

  20. Control of Thin Liquid Film Morphology During Solvent-Assisted Film Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Evmenenko, G.; Stripe, B; Dutta, P

    2010-01-01

    Liquid films of different silicate esters were deposited from volatile solvents on hydroxylated and hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces. We show that adsorption of silicate ester molecules and the resulting structural morphology of the liquid films not only are determined by attractive van der Waals forces with contributions from electrostatic interactions between the silicone ester moieties and oxide surface sites but also can be tuned by modifying the substrate surface or by changing the liquid-solvent interactions. Our results also show the importance of the conformational properties of liquid molecules and their rearrangements at the liquid/solid interface for controlled solvent-assisted film deposition.

  1. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT. PMID:27221947

  2. Relative Sizes of Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This computer graphic depicts the relative complexity of crystallizing large proteins in order to study their structures through x-ray crystallography. Insulin is a vital protein whose structure has several subtle points that scientists are still trying to determine. Large molecules such as insuline are complex with structures that are comparatively difficult to understand. For comparison, a sugar molecule (which many people have grown as hard crystals in science glass) and a water molecule are shown. These images were produced with the Macmolecule program. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  3. Visualizing DNA Nanoparticle Motion under Graphene Liquid Cell TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Smith, Jessica; Park, Jungwon; Lee, Somin; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, Paul

    2013-03-01

    We think of a simple colloidal nanocrystal as one type of artificial atoms. They mutually interact, cluster into artificial molecules, and further arrange into macroscopically functional artificial solids. The ``atomic'' resolution dynamics of this bottom-up strategy in materials design is studied here in a system of artificial molecules composed of DNA and nanoparticle. The observation of dynamics in their liquid environment is recently enabled by graphene liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In comparison to conventional TEM, wherein the assembled 3D artificial structures are dried out during sample preparation and thus are collapsed, this graphene liquid cell introduces a special local liquid structure that retains the conformations as well as the dynamics of the assemblies. In situ imaging of correlated motions of DNA and nanoparticle provides insights into the design principles of artificial nanocrystal molecules and solids linked by DNA.

  4. What Is a Simple Liquid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2012-01-01

    different ways: (1) chemically by the fact that the liquid’s properties are fully determined by interactions from the molecules within the FCS, (2) physically by the fact that there are isomorphs in the phase diagram, i.e., curves along which several properties like excess entropy, structure, and dynamics, are invariant in reduced units, and (3) mathematically by the fact that throughout the phase diagram the reduced-coordinate constant-potential-energy hypersurfaces define a one-parameter family of compact Riemannian manifolds. No proof is given that the chemical characterization follows from the strong correlation property, but we show that this FCS characterization is consistent with the existence of isomorphs in strongly correlating liquids’ phase diagram. Finally, we note that the FCS characterization of simple liquids calls into question the physical basis of standard perturbation theory, according to which the repulsive and attractive forces play fundamentally different roles for the physics of liquids.

  5. Morphology-induced low temperature conductivity in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbas, Aykut; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Olvera de la Cruz Team

    Ionic liquids exhibit nano-scale liquid crystalline order depending on the polymeric details of salt molecules. The resulting morphology and temperature behavior are key factors in determining the room temperature conductivity of ionic liquids. Here we discuss the phase behavior and related ionic conductivities of dry ionic liquids with volume fractions close to unity by using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Temperature dependence, effective persistence length of tails, and excluded volume symmetry of amphiphilic ionic liquid molecules are investigated in large scale systems with short and long-range electrostatics. Our results suggest that by adjusting stiffness of the amphiphilic molecules and excluded volume interactions, lamellar or interconnected 3D phases can be obtained. Resulting phases have significant effects on the conductive properties. If there is no excluded volume asymmetry along the molecules, mostly lamellar phases with anisotropic conductivities emerge. If the excluded volume interactions become asymmetric, lamellar phases are replaced by interconnected phases consist of charged groups. Within temperature ranges that morphological phases are observed, conductivities exhibit low-temperature maxima in accord with experiments of ionic liquid-based liquid Center of Bio-inspried Energy Center (CBES).

  6. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M D

    2017-02-07

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ∼10(5) times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  7. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ˜105 times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  8. Quantum Transport Through Heterocyclic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    We explore electron transport properties in molecular wires made of heterocyclic molecules (pyrrole, furan and thiophene) by using the Green's function technique. Parametric calculations are given based on the tight-binding model to describe the electron transport in these wires. It is observed that the transport properties are significantly influenced by (a) the heteroatoms in the heterocyclic molecules and (b) the molecule-to-electrodes coupling strength. Conductance (g) shows sharp resonance peaks associated with the molecular energy levels in the limit of weak molecular coupling, while they get broadened in the strong molecular coupling limit. These resonances get shifted with the change of the heteroatoms in these heterocyclic molecules. All the essential features of the electron transfer through these molecular wires become much more clearly visible from the study of our current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, and they provide several key information in the study of molecular transport.

  9. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A.; Branton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule’s outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  10. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  11. Moving Molecules and Mothball Madness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, John

    1993-01-01

    Describes concrete demonstrations on the states of matter. In the first demonstration, students represent molecules; and, in the second demonstration, moth balls are heated to produce a change of state. (PR)

  12. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  13. [Adhesion molecules and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Hopps, E; Caimi, G

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a significant role in leukocyte migration across the endothelium and are also involved in regulating immune system. It is shown that diabetic patients have an increase of soluble adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sICAM-2, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, sL-selectin, sP-selectin) considered an integral part of inflammatory state. This inflammation is responsible for the increased cardiovascular risk of these patients. There is a close link between hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, coagulopathy and inflammation and between these factors and the vascular damage. Various studies have showed the potential role of adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of diabetic vasculopathy. They promote leukocyte recruitment, which is one of the initial steps in the genesis of atherosclerotic plaque. Adhesion molecules are also involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 1; sICAM-1 would have a particular immunomodulatory role in the process of destroying beta-cells and could be used as a subclinical marker of insulitis. Plasma levels of soluble adhesion molecules correlate with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity; they are associated with the development of nephropathy, retinopathy, myocardial infarction, stroke and obliterant peripheral arterial disease in diabetic type 1 and 2. Given the role of these molecules in endothelial dysfunction genesis and tissue damage associated with diabetes, they could constitute a therapeutic target for the prevention of genesis and progression of chronic complications of diabetic disease.

  14. Diffusion behavior in a liquid-liquid interfacial crystallization by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Kadota, Kazunori; Shimosaka, Atsuko; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Hidaka, Jusuke

    2009-11-01

    Interfacial crystallization, such as surface crystallization in solution (solid-liquid) and liquid-liquid crystallization, gives us an asymmetric reaction field and is a technique for morphology control of crystals. In the liquid-liquid crystallization, the concentration distribution of solute ions and solvent molecules at the liquid-liquid interface directly relates to nucleation, crystal growth, and crystal morphology. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed at interfaces in NaCl solution/1-butanol and KCl solution/1-butanol system in order to clarify diffusion behavior of solute ions and solvent molecules. As simulation results, the hydrated solute ions were dehydrated with the diffusion of water from solution phase into 1-butanol phase. The different dehydration behaviors between NaCl and KCl solution can be also obtained from MD simulation results. Aggregated ions or clusters were formed by the dehydration near the solution/1-butanol interface. By comparison on the normalized number of total solute ions, the size and number of generated cluster in KCl solution/1-butanol interface are larger than those in the NaCl system. This originates in the difference hydration structures in the each solute ion.

  15. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  16. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  17. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-05-16

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material?

  18. Liquid crystal on subwavelength metal gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Artemov, V. V.; Shtykov, N. M.; Geivandov, A. R.; Yudin, S. G.; Gorkunov, M. V.

    2015-06-14

    Optical and electrooptical properties of a system consisting of subwavelength metal gratings and nematic liquid crystal layer are studied. Aluminium gratings that also act as interdigitated electrodes are produced by focused ion beam lithography. It is found that a liquid crystal layer strongly influences both the resonance and light polarization properties characteristic of the gratings. Enhanced transmittance is observed not only for the TM-polarized light in the near infrared spectral range but also for the TE-polarized light in the visible range. Although the electrodes are separated by nanosized slits, and the electric field is strongly localized near the surface, a pronounced electrooptical effect is registered. The effect is explained in terms of local reorientation of liquid crystal molecules at the grating surface and propagation of the orientational deformation from the surface into the bulk of the liquid crystal layer.

  19. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material? PMID:27196890

  20. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  1. Self-assembly of a surfactin nanolayer at solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Nasser, M S; Al-Lagtah, Nasir M A

    2016-05-01

    Surfactin, a sustainable and environmentally friendly surface active agent, is used as a model to study the adsorption of biosurfactants at hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid-liquid interfaces as well as the air-liquid interface. Surfactin adsorption was monitored as a function of time and concentration using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique in the case of the solid-liquid interfaces or the drop shape analysis (DSA) technique in the case of the air-liquid interface. The results obtained in this study showed that surfactin adsorption at the "hard" hydrophobic (functionalized with octadecanethiol) solid-liquid and the "soft" air-liquid interface were 1.12 ± 0.01 mg m(-2) (area per molecule of 157 ± 2 Å(2)) and 1.11 ± 0.05 mg m(-2) (area per molecule of 159 ± 7 Å(2)), respectively, demonstrating the negligible effect of the interface "hardness" on surfactin adsorption. The adsorption of surfactin at the hydrophilic (functionalized with β-mercaptoethanol) solid-liquid interface was about threefold lower than its adsorption at the hydrophobic-liquid interfaces, revealing the importance of hydrophobic interaction in surfactin adsorption process. The affinity constant of surfactin for the investigated interfaces follows the following order: air > octadecanethiol > β-mercaptoethanol. Biosurfactants, such as surfactin, are expected to replace the conventional fossil-based surfactants in several applications, and therefore the current study is a contribution towards the fundamental understanding of biosurfactant behavior, on a molecular level, at hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid-liquid interfaces in addition to the air-liquid interface. Such understanding might aid further optimization of the utilization of surfactin in a number of industrial applications such as enhanced oil recovery, bioremediation, and detergency.

  2. Isotropization of nematic liquid crystals by TMDSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Dadmun, M.; Zhang, Ge; Boller, A.; Wunderlich, B. |

    1997-12-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and traditional DSC are used to study the transition between the nematic liquid crystalline state and the isotropic liquid for two small molecules [4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole and N,N`-bis(4-n-octyloxybenzal)-1,4-phenylenediamine] and one macromolecule (4,4{prime}-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene copolymerized with a 1:1 molar mixture of 1,7-dibromoheptane and 1,9-dibromononane). The DSC measurements with 4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole were used for temperature calibration with varying heating and cooling rates. Quasi-isothermal TMDSC with small temperature amplitude and standard TMDSC with underlying heating and cooling rates were utilized to analyze the breadth of the transitions. It could be verified that the isotropization transition of a nematic liquid crystal is, indeed, reversible for all three molecules. The nature of the transition changes, however, from relatively sharp, for small, rigid molecules, to about three kelvins wide for the small molecule with flexible ends, to as broad as 20 K for the macromolecule. It was also demonstrated that quantitative heats of fusion of sharp transitions can be extracted from TMDSC, but only from the time-domain heat-flow signal.

  3. Structure of initial crystals formed during human amelogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Voegel, J. C.; Yacaman, J.; Frank, R. M.

    1992-02-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis revealed only the existence of carbonated hydroxyapatite (c.HA) during amelogenesis, whereas conventional transmission electron microscopy investigations showed that developing enamel crystals have a ribbon-like habit. The described compositional changes could be an indication for the presence of minerals different from c.HA. However, the absence of identification of such a mineral shows the need of studies by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) of initial formed human enamel crystals. We demonstrate the existence of two crystal families involved in the early stages of biomineralization: (a) nanometer-size particles which appeared as a precursor phase; (b) ribbon-like crystals, with a structure closely related to c.HA, which by a progressive thickening process tend to attain the mature enamel crystal habit.

  4. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-09

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules.

  5. Why charged molecules move across a temperature gradient: the role of electric fields.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Maren; Herzog, Mario; Götz, Alexandra; Braun, Dieter

    2014-05-16

    Methods to move solvated molecules are rare. Apart from electric fields, only thermal gradients are effective enough to move molecules inside a fluid. This effect is termed thermophoresis, and the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Nevertheless, it is successfully used to quantify biomolecule binding in complex liquids. Here we show experiments that reveal that thermophoresis in water is dominated by two electric fields, both established by the salt ions of the solution. A local field around the molecule drives molecules along an energy gradient, whereas a global field moves the molecules by a combined thermoelectrophoresis mechanism known as the Seebeck effect. Both mechanisms combined predict the thermophoresis of DNA and RNA polymers for a wide range of experimental parameters. For example, we correctly predict a complex, nonlinear size transition, a salt-species-dependent offset, a maximum of thermophoresis over temperature, and the dependence of thermophoresis on the molecule concentration.

  6. Liquid annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, Hans

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the specific impulse varies with the square root of the temperature and inversely with the square root of the molecular weight of the propellant. Typical values for specific impulse corresponding to various rocket concepts are shown. The Liquid Annulus core concept consists of a fuel element which will be arranged in a moderator block. The advantages as seen for the system are: high specific impulse; structural material will all run at low temperature; and lower fission product inventory because of evaporation. It is felt that this concept is worth at least a first look because of the promise of very high specific impulse. Because of the low thrust, one would probably need a cluster of engines. This is not necessarily bad because there would be some redundancy, but because of the low thrust one might have to refuel while running. Depending on the fuel vaporization, material can be included in the uranium that is injected as one is running along.

  7. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, S.D.; Marshall, K.L.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1991-10-08

    Composite optical devices are disclosed using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device. 7 figures.

  8. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Cerqua, Kathleen A.

    1991-01-01

    Composite optical devices using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device.

  9. Hydrogen bonding in liquid methanol, methylamine, and methanethiol studied by molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztolányi, T.; Bakó, I.; Pálinkás, G.

    2003-03-01

    Molecular-dynamics computer simulations have been carried out on liquid methanol, methylamine, and methanethiol. The local structure of the liquids was studied based on radial distribution functions and the density projections of the neighboring molecules obtained on the basis of simulated molecular configurations. The extent of hydrogen bonding was investigated by direct analysis of the connectivity of molecules forming hydrogen-bonded clusters in these liquids. By this analysis, the methanol molecules were found to form linear chainlike structures. The local structure of hydrogen-bonded molecules of methylamine proved to be rather space filling due to the great extent of chain branching. Methanethiol molecules also proved to form hydrogen bonds forming small compact clusters. No evidence was found, however, for the clustering of hydrophobic methyl groups in any of the liquids. The quality of simulations was checked by derivation of neutron total and composite radial distribution functions and by comparison of those with available experimental data.

  10. Electrical conduction through DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, S

    2011-09-01

    Several disorder parameters, inside the DNA molecule, lead to localization of charge carriers inside potential wells in the lowest unoccupied and highest occupied molecular orbits (LUMO and HOMO) which affects drastically the electrical conduction through the molecule, and demonstrates that the band carriers play an essential role in the conduction mechanism. So, a model is presented to shed light on the role of electrons of the LUMO in the electrical conduction through the DNA molecule. DC-, AC-conductivity and dielectric permittivity experimental data are well fitted with the presented model giving evidence that the free carriers in the LUMO and HOMO are responsible to make the DNA molecule conductor, insulator or semiconductor. The obtained results show that the localized charge carriers in the DNA molecule are characterized by four different types of relaxation phenomena which are thermally activated by corresponding four activation energies at 0.56 eV, 0.33 eV, 0.24 eV, and 0.05 eV respectively. Moreover, the calculations after the model, at room temperature, show that the time of the relaxation times of the current carriers are in the order of 5 × 10(-2)s, 1.74 × 10(-4)s, 5 × 10(-7)s, and 1.6 × 10(-10)s, respectively.

  11. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  12. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride.

  13. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  14. Small Molecule CXCR3 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Stephen P; Cox, Rhona J

    2016-04-14

    Chemokines and their receptors are known to play important roles in disease. More than 40 chemokine ligands and 20 chemokine receptors have been identified, but, to date, only two small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists have been approved by the FDA. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 was identified in 1996, and nearly 20 years later, new areas of CXCR3 disease biology continue to emerge. Several classes of small molecule CXCR3 antagonists have been developed, and two have shown efficacy in preclinical models of inflammatory disease. However, only one CXCR3 antagonist has been evaluated in clinical trials, and there remain many opportunities to further investigate known classes of CXCR3 antagonists and to identify new chemotypes. This Perspective reviews the known CXCR3 antagonists and considers future opportunities for the development of small molecules for clinical evaluation.

  15. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jia-Lun; Chen, Jin-Quan

    1997-03-01

    It is shown that any Hamiltonian involving only one- and two-bond interactions for a molecule withnbonds and having a point groupPas its symmetry group may have theSn⊃Ppartial dynamical symmetry, i.e., the Hamiltonian can be solved analytically for a part of the states, called the unique states. For example, theXY6molecule has theS6⊃Ohpartial dynamical symmetry. The model of Iachello and Oss forncoupled anharmonic oscillators is revisited in terms of the partial dynamical symmetry. The energies are obtained analytically for the nine unique levels of theXY6molecule and the structures of the eigenstates are disclosed for the first time, while for non-unique states they are obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in theS6⊃Ohsymmetry adapted basis with greatly reduced dimension.

  16. Statistical mechanical theory of liquid entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, D.C.

    1993-07-01

    The multiparticle correlation expansion for the entropy of a classical monatomic liquid is presented. This entropy expresses the physical picture in which there is no free particle motion, but rather, each atom moves within a cage formed by its neighbors. The liquid expansion, including only pair correlations, gives an excellent account of the experimental entropy of most liquid metals, of liquid argon, and the hard sphere liquid. The pair correlation entropy is well approximated by a universal function of temperature. Higher order correlation entropy, due to n-particle irreducible correlations for n{ge}3, is significant in only a few liquid metals, and its occurrence suggests the presence of n-body forces. When the liquid theory is applied to the study of melting, the author discovers the important classification of normal and anomalous melting, according to whether there is not or is a significant change in the electronic structure upon melting, and he discovers the universal disordering entropy for melting of a monatomic crystal. Interesting directions for future research are: extension to include orientational correlations of molecules, theoretical calculation of the entropy of water, application to the entropy of the amorphous state, and correlational entropy of compressed argon. The author clarifies the relation among different entropy expansions in the recent literature.

  17. Separations method for polar molecules

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Bonhomme, Francois R.

    2004-07-27

    A method for separating at least one compound from a liquid mixture containing different compounds where anew crystalline manganese phosphate composition with the formula Mn.sub.3 (PO.sub.4).sub.4.2(H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N.6(H.sub.2 O) is dispersed in the liquid mixture, selectively intercalating one or more compounds into the crystalline structure of the Mn.sub.3 (PO.sub.4).sub.4.2(H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N.6(H.sub.2 O).

  18. Autonomous DNA-Molecule Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Ken; Rose, John A.; Yamamura, Masayuki

    DNA molecules autonomously change their forms from the single strand to the double helix by specific binding between complementary sequences according to the Watson-Crick base pairing rule. This paring rule allows us to control connections among molecules and to construct various structures by sequence design. Further, the motion of constructed structures can also be designed by considering sequential bindings. Recently, the feasibility to utilize the programmed DNA structural change for information processing was studied. In the present paper, we report an efficient synthetic chain reaction based on autonomous binding of DNA to realize a computing system, which enable us to implement computational intelligence in vitro.

  19. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π–π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  20. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-15

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  1. From single molecule to single tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chin-Lin

    2012-02-01

    Biological systems often make decisions upon conformational changes and assembly of single molecules. In vivo, epithelial cells (such as the mammary gland cells) can respond to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, type I collagen (COL), and switch their morphology from a lobular lumen (100-200 micron) to a tubular lumen (1mm-1cm). However, how cells make such a morphogenetic decision through interactions with each other and with COL is unclear. Using a temporal control of cell-ECM interaction, we find that epithelial cells, in response to a fine-tuned percentage of type I collagen (COL) in ECM, develop various linear patterns. Remarkably, these patterns allow cells to self-assemble into a tubule of length ˜ 1cm and diameter ˜ 400 micron in the liquid phase (i.e., scaffold-free conditions). In contrast with conventional thought, the linear patterns arise through bi-directional transmission of traction force, but not through diffusible biochemical factors secreted by cells. In turn, the transmission of force evokes a long-range (˜ 600 micron) intercellular mechanical interaction. A feedback effect is encountered when the mechanical interaction modifies cell positioning and COL alignment. Micro-patterning experiments further reveal that such a feedback is a novel cell-number-dependent, rich-get-richer process, which allows cells to integrate mechanical interactions into long-range (> 1mm) linear coordination. Our results suggest a mechanism cells can use to form and coordinate long-range tubular patterns, independent of those controlled by diffusible biochemical factors, and provide a new strategy to engineer/regenerate epithelial organs using scaffold-free self-assembly methods.

  2. Thermodynamics and kinetics of gas storage in porous liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Fei; Yang, Fengchang; Huang, Jingsong; ...

    2016-07-05

    The recent synthesis of organic molecular liquids with permanent porosity (Giri et al., Nature, 2015, 527, 216) opens up exciting new avenues for gas capture, storage, and separation. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the thermodynamics and kinetics for the storage of CH4, CO2, and N2 molecules in porous liquids consisting of crown-ether substituted cage molecules in a 15-crown-5 solvent. It is found that the gas storage capacity per cage molecule follows the order of CH4 > CO2 > N2, which does not correlate simply with the size of gas molecules. Different gas molecules are stored inside the cage differently,more » e.g., CO2 molecules prefer the cage s core while CH4 molecules favor both the core and the branch regions. All gas molecules considered can enter the cage essentially without energy barriers, and their dynamics inside the cage are only slightly hindered by the nanoscale confinement. In addition, all gas molecules can leave the cage on nanosecond time scale by overcoming a modest energy penalty. The molecular mechanisms of these observations are clarified.« less

  3. Thermodynamics and kinetics of gas storage in porous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fei; Yang, Fengchang; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Qiao, Rui

    2016-07-05

    The recent synthesis of organic molecular liquids with permanent porosity (Giri et al., Nature, 2015, 527, 216) opens up exciting new avenues for gas capture, storage, and separation. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the thermodynamics and kinetics for the storage of CH4, CO2, and N2 molecules in porous liquids consisting of crown-ether substituted cage molecules in a 15-crown-5 solvent. It is found that the gas storage capacity per cage molecule follows the order of CH4 > CO2 > N2, which does not correlate simply with the size of gas molecules. Different gas molecules are stored inside the cage differently, e.g., CO2 molecules prefer the cage s core while CH4 molecules favor both the core and the branch regions. All gas molecules considered can enter the cage essentially without energy barriers, and their dynamics inside the cage are only slightly hindered by the nanoscale confinement. In addition, all gas molecules can leave the cage on nanosecond time scale by overcoming a modest energy penalty. The molecular mechanisms of these observations are clarified.

  4. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  5. Fast Method for Computing Chemical Potentials and Liquid-Liquid Phase Equilibria of Macromolecular Solutions.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-08-25

    Chemical potential is a fundamental property for determining thermodynamic equilibria involving exchange of molecules, such as between two phases of molecular systems. Previously, we developed the fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based method for Modeling Atomistic Protein-crowder interactions (FMAP) to calculate excess chemical potentials according to the Widom insertion. Intermolecular interaction energies were expressed as correlation functions and evaluated via FFT. Here, we extend this method to calculate liquid-liquid phase equilibria of macromolecular solutions. Chemical potentials are calculated by FMAP over a wide range of molecular densities, and the condition for coexistence of low- and high-density phases is determined by the Maxwell equal-area rule. When benchmarked on Lennard-Jones fluids, our method produces an accurate phase diagram at 18% of the computational cost of the current best method. Importantly, the gain in computational speed increases dramatically as the molecules become more complex, leading to many orders of magnitude in speed up for atomistically represented proteins. We demonstrate the power of FMAP by reporting the first results for the liquid-liquid coexistence curve of γII-crystallin represented at the all-atom level. Our method may thus open the door to accurate determination of phase equilibria for macromolecular mixtures such as protein-protein mixtures and protein-RNA mixtures, that are known to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation, both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. High Average Power Laser Gain Medium With Low Optical Distortion Using A Transverse Flowing Liquid Host

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Ault, Earl R.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    2005-07-05

    A high average power, low optical distortion laser gain media is based on a flowing liquid media. A diode laser pumping device with tailored irradiance excites the laser active atom, ion or molecule within the liquid media. A laser active component of the liquid media exhibits energy storage times longer than or comparable to the thermal optical response time of the liquid. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for mixing and circulating the lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump, a diffuser, and a heat exchanger. A liquid flow gain cell includes flow straighteners and flow channel compression.

  7. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  8. Small Molecules Target Carcinogenic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2009-03-01

    An ingenious cellular mechanism of effecting protein localization is prenylation: the covalent attachment of a hydrophobic prenyl group to a protein that facilitates protein association with cell membranes. Fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate whether the oncogenic Stat3 protein can undergo artificial prenylation via high-affinity prenylated small-molecule binding agents and thus be rendered inactive by localization at the plasma membrane instead of nucleus. The measurements were performed on a home-built instrument capable of recording simultaneously several optical parameters (lifetime, polarization, color, etc) and with single-molecule sensitivity. A pH-invariant fluorescein derivative with double moiety was designed to bridge a prenyl group and a small peptide that binds Stat3 with high affinity. Confocal fluorescence images show effective localization of the ligand to the membrane of liposomes. Stat3 predominantly localizes at the membrane only in the presence of the prenylated ligand. Single-molecule FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) between donor-labeled prenylated agents and acceptor-labeled, surface tethered Stat3 protein is used to determine the dynamic heterogeneity of the protein-ligand interaction and follow individual binding-unbinding events in real time. The data indicates that molecules can effect protein localization, validating a therapeutic design that influences protein activity via induced localization.

  9. Nanodevices for Single Molecule Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craighead, H. G.; Stavis, S. M.; Samiee, K. T.

    During the last two decades, biotechnology research has resulted in progress in fields as diverse as the life sciences, agriculture and healthcare. While existing technology enables the analysis of a variety of biological systems, new tools are needed for increasing the efficiency of current methods, and for developing new ones altogether. Interest has grown in single molecule analysis for these reasons.

  10. Eckart frames for planar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hua

    2003-04-01

    Explicit analytic expressions of Eckart frames for planar molecules in Radau, Jacobi and bond coordinates have been presented. The orientation of the frame axis system with respect to the molecular plane at equilibrium is specified by an angle θ1e.

  11. Low Temperature STM Manipulation and Spectroscopy of Chlorophyll-a Single Molecules from Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Jessica J.; Iancu, Violeta; Deshpande, Aparna; Hla, Saw-Wai

    2004-04-01

    We interrogate single chlorophyll-a, a molecule produced from Spinach, on Cu(111) surface to check its mechanical stability and electronic properties using an ultra-high-vacuum low-temperature scanning-tunneling-microscope (UHV-LT-STM) at liquid helium temperatures. The measured results of isolated single chlorophyll-a molecules are then compared with that of self-assembled molecular layer. The tunneling I/V and dI/dV spectroscopy techniques are used to probe the electronic properties of the chlorophyll-a molecule with atomic precision (1). These spectroscopic investigations elucidate properties of the single molecule such as the band gap and additional molecular orbital states. Mechanical stability of the chlorophyll-a molecule is examined using lateral manipulation techniques with the STM tip (2). In this procedure, the STM tip is placed in close proximity to the molecule (just a few angstrom separation) to increase the tip-molecule interaction. Then the tip is laterally moved across the surface, which results in pulling of the chlorophyll-a molecule to relocate to the specific surface sites. The detailed molecule movement during this manipulation is directly monitored through the corresponding STM-tip height signals. Our results highlight that the Spinach molecule is a promising candidate for environmental friendly nano-electronic device applications. (1) F. Moresco et al, Phy. Rev. Lett. 86, 672-675, (2001) (2) S-W. Hla, K-H. Rieder, Ann. Phy. Chem. 54, 307-330, (2003)

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis of ion irradiation effects on plasma-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Yudai; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasmas are used in a wide range of fields because the high-density plasma can be easily irradiated to various substances such as solid, liquid, biological object and so on. On the other hand, the mechanisms of physical and chemical phenomena at the plasma-liquid interface are not well understood yet. To investigate the effects of ion impact from plasma on water surface, we analyzed behavior of liquid water by classical molecular dynamics simulation. Simulation system consists of an irradiation particle in gas phase and 2000 water molecules in liquid phase. O+ ion with 10 eV or 100 eV was impinged on the water surface. Ion impact induced increasing water temperature and ejection of water molecules. The averaged number of evaporated water molecules by ion impact is 0.6 molecules at 10 eV and 7.0 molecules at 100 eV. The maximum ion penetration depth was 1.14 nm at 10 eV and 2.75 nm at 100 eV. Ion entering into water disturbs the stable hydrogen bonding configurations between water molecules and gives energy to water molecules. Some water molecules rotated and moved by ion interaction impact on other water molecules one after another. When the water molecule near the surface received strongly repulsive force, it released into gas phase. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovation Areas (No21110007) from MEXT, Japan.

  13. Snapshots of the fluctuating hydrogen bond network in liquid water on the sub-femtosecond timescale with vibrational resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Pietzsch, A; Hennies, F; Miedema, P S; Kennedy, B; Schlappa, J; Schmitt, T; Strocov, V N; Föhlisch, A

    2015-02-27

    Liquid water molecules interact strongly with each other, forming a fluctuating hydrogen bond network and thereby giving rise to the anomalous phase diagram of liquid water. Consequently, symmetric and asymmetric water molecules have been found in the picosecond time average with IR and optical Raman spectroscopy. With subnatural linewidth resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at vibrational resolution, we take sub-femtosecond snapshots of the electronic and structural properties of water molecules in the hydrogen bond network. We derive a strong dominance of nonsymmetric molecules in liquid water in contrast to the gas phase on the sub-femtosecond timescale of RIXS and determine the fraction of highly asymmetrically distorted molecules.

  14. Snapshots of the Fluctuating Hydrogen Bond Network in Liquid Water on the Sub-Femtosecond Timescale with Vibrational Resonant Inelastic x-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzsch, A.; Hennies, F.; Miedema, P. S.; Kennedy, B.; Schlappa, J.; Schmitt, T.; Strocov, V. N.; Föhlisch, A.

    2015-02-01

    Liquid water molecules interact strongly with each other, forming a fluctuating hydrogen bond network and thereby giving rise to the anomalous phase diagram of liquid water. Consequently, symmetric and asymmetric water molecules have been found in the picosecond time average with IR and optical Raman spectroscopy. With subnatural linewidth resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at vibrational resolution, we take sub-femtosecond snapshots of the electronic and structural properties of water molecules in the hydrogen bond network. We derive a strong dominance of nonsymmetric molecules in liquid water in contrast to the gas phase on the sub-femtosecond timescale of RIXS and determine the fraction of highly asymmetrically distorted molecules.

  15. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  16. Properties of Water Confined in Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Saihara, Koji; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Ohta, Soichi; Shimizu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The varying states of water confined in the nano-domain structures of typical room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by 1H NMR and by measurements of self-diffusion coefficients while systematically varying the IL cations and anions. The NMR peaks for water in BF4-based ILs were clearly split, indicating the presence of two discrete states of confined water (H2O and HOD). Proton and/or deuterium exchange rate among the water molecules was very slowly in the water-pocket. Notably, no significant changes were observed in the chemical shifts of the ILs. Self-diffusion coefficient results showed that water molecules exhibit a similar degree of mobility, although their diffusion rate is one order of magnitude faster than that of the IL cations and anions. These findings provide information on a completely new type of confinement, that of liquid water in soft matter. PMID:26024339

  17. Micro-polarimeter for high performance liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward E.; Steenhoek, Larry E.; Woodruff, Steven D.; Kuo, Jeng-Chung

    1985-01-01

    A micro-polarimeter interfaced with a system for high performance liquid chromatography, for quantitatively analyzing micro and trace amounts of optically active organic molecules, particularly carbohydrates. A flow cell with a narrow bore is connected to a high performance liquid chromatography system. Thin, low birefringence cell windows cover opposite ends of the bore. A focused and polarized laser beam is directed along the longitudinal axis of the bore as an eluent containing the organic molecules is pumped through the cell. The beam is modulated by air gap Faraday rotators for phase sensitive detection to enhance the signal to noise ratio. An analyzer records the beams's direction of polarization after it passes through the cell. Calibration of the liquid chromatography system allows determination of the quantity of organic molecules present from a determination of the degree to which the polarized beam is rotated when it passes through the eluent.

  18. Light controlled drug delivery containers based on spiropyran doped liquid crystal micro spheres

    PubMed Central

    Petriashvili, Gia; Devadze, Lali; Zurabishvili, Tsisana; Sepashvili, Nino; Chubinidze, Ketevan

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a novel, light activated drug delivery containers, based on spiropyran doped liquid crystal micro spheres. Upon exposure to UV/violet light, the spiropyran molecules entrapped inside the nematic liquid crystal micro spheres, interconvert from the hydrophobic, oil soluble form, to the hydrophilic, water soluble merocyanine one, which stimulates the translocation of the merocyanine molecules across the nematic liquid crystal-water barrier and results their homogeneous distribution throughout in an aqueous environment. Light controllable switching property and extremely high solubility of spiropyran in the nematic liquid crystal, promise to elaborate a novel and reliable vehicles for the drug delivery systems. PMID:26977353

  19. Laser-induced separation of hydrogen isotopes in the liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Beattie, Willard H.; Holland, Redus F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation is achieved by either (a) dissolving a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound in a liquid solvent, or (b) liquefying a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound, the liquid phase thus resulting being kept at a temperature at which spectral features of the feedstock relating to a particular hydrogen isotope are resolved, i.e., a clear-cut isotope shift is delineated, irradiating the liquid phase with monochromatic radiation of a wavelength which at least preferentially excites those molecules of the feedstock containing a first hydrogen isotope, inducing photochemical reaction in the excited molecules, and separating the reaction product containing the first isotope from the liquid phase.

  20. Low Energy Ion-Molecule Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Farrar

    2004-05-01

    This objective of this project is to study the dynamics of the interactions of low energy ions important in combustion with small molecules in the gas phase and with liquid hydrocarbon surfaces. The first of these topics is a long-standing project in our laboratory devoted to probing the key features of potential energy surfaces that control chemical reactivity. The project provides detailed information on the utilization of specific forms of incident energy, the role of preferred reagent geometries, and the disposal of total reaction energy into product degrees of freedom. We employ crossed molecular beam methods under single collision conditions, at collision energies from below one eV to several eV, to probe potential surfaces over a broad range of distances and interaction energies. These studies allow us to test and validate dynamical models describing chemical reactivity. Measurements of energy and angular distributions of the reaction products with vibrational state resolution provide the key data for these studies. We employ the crossed beam low energy mass spectrometry methods that we have developed over the last several years.

  1. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peer; Hache, François

    2005-10-01

    We review nonlinear optical processes that are specific to chiral molecules in solution and on surfaces. In contrast to conventional natural optical activity phenomena, which depend linearly on the electric field strength of the optical field, we discuss how optical processes that are nonlinear (quadratic, cubic, and quartic) functions of the electromagnetic field strength may probe optically active centers and chiral vibrations. We show that nonlinear techniques open entirely new ways of exploring chirality in chemical and biological systems: The cubic processes give rise to nonlinear circular dichroism and nonlinear optical rotation and make it possible to observe dynamic chiral processes at ultrafast time scales. The quadratic second-harmonic and sum-frequency-generation phenomena and the quartic processes may arise entirely in the electric-dipole approximation and do not require the use of circularly polarized light to detect chirality. They provide surface selectivity and their observables can be relatively much larger than in linear optical activity. These processes also give rise to the generation of light at a new color, and in liquids this frequency conversion only occurs if the solution is optically active. We survey recent chiral nonlinear optical experiments and give examples of their application to problems of biophysical interest.

  2. NMR quantum computation with optically polarized molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, Anne; Yannoni, Constantino; Sherwood, Mark; Pomerantz, Drew; Vandersypen, Lieven; Chuang, Isaac

    2000-03-01

    Current methods for bulk NMR quantum computation rely on nuclear spin polarization present at high temperature equilibrium. This presents a challenging obstacle as the probability to find a spin in a specific state decreases exponentially in the number of spins used as qubits, causing a corresponding decrease in the signal to noise ratio of the desired NMR signal. One way to address this problem is to provide an artificial source of high polarization, such as optically pumped ^129Xe. For comparison, thermal equilibrium polarizations are only about 10-3% for ^1H in a typical NMR experiment at room temperature and in a 10 Tesla magnetic field, but with ^129Xe polarizations as high as 18% have been achieved [Happer et. al., Chem.Phys.Lett., 284, p.87-92, Feb 1998]. Using this technique, we prepare hyperpolarized liquid Xe and use it as a solvent for chloroform molecules (CHCl_3). Cross polarization (SPINOE) between ^129Xe and ^1H results in measured enhancements of the proton signal of over 300%, and evidence of transfer to ^13C. These results provide hope for the scalability of quantum computation.

  3. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, C. Gupta, Adbhut Joshi, Aditya Manjuladevi, V. Gupta, Raj Kumar; Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  4. Wall Effects induced by Ceramic in Quiescent Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirez, L.; Baroni, P.

    2017-01-01

    At the liquid-solid interface, the energy of the liquid is different from the bulk resulting from surface tension due to the balance between the attraction between molecules to each other (cohesion) and the attraction to the surface (wetting). While capillary effects are well known and described at the air/liquid/solid interfaces, much less is known on the effects induced in the bulk close to the wall. The present experimental study reveals that non-negligible interfacial effects can be revealed in the bulk of the liquid using the high wetting power of ceramics. Close to the wall, thermal measurements reveal a progressive temperature drop in the liquid (about 0.15°C). This zone extends up to several millimeters, creates a non-equilibrium/equilibrium interface within the liquid and is balanced at larger distances by a temperature increase. This localized effect is highlighted with strong wetting metal oxide surfaces as ceramics.

  5. Behavior of liquid hydrogen inside an ICF target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Mok, L.; Bernat, T.

    1982-01-01

    The configuration of liquid hydrogen inside spherical glass shell ICF target was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Because of the zero contact angle between the .D2 liquid and glass substrate and the limited wetting surface that is continuous, the liquid hydrogen completely covers the interior of the glass shell, resulting in the formation of a void at the center. For this reason, the present problem distinguishes itself from that for a sessile drop sitting on a flat surface. A theory was formulated to calculate the liquid hydrogen configuration by including the London-dispersion force between the liquid and the substrate molecules. The net result is an augmented Bashforth-Adams equation appropriate to a spherical substrate, which is considered to be the major contribution of the present work. Preliminary calculations indicate that this equation accurately models the liquid hydrogen behavior inside a spherical microshell.

  6. Supramolecular gelators based on benzenetricarboxamides for ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ishioka, Yumi; Minakuchi, Nami; Mizuhata, Minoru; Maruyama, Tatsuo

    2014-02-21

    Supramolecular gelators comprising 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acids and amino acid methyl esters (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-methionine, and L-phenylalanine) for ionic liquids were developed. Ten types of ionic liquids were gelated using the above-mentioned gelators at relatively low concentrations. Field emission-scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses revealed that these gelators self-assembled into an entangled fibrous structure in ionic liquids, leading to the gelation of the ionic liquids. Comparison studies, involving compounds analogous to the gelators, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements suggested that hydrogen bonding played a key role in the self-assembly of the gelator molecules. The ionogels displayed reversible thermal transition characteristics and viscoelastic properties typical of a gel. The gelation of the ionic liquids studied under a wide range of gelator concentrations did not affect the intrinsic conductivity of the ionic liquids.

  7. Probing characteristics of collagen molecules on various surfaces via atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao-Wei; Ho, Mon-Shu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2012-06-01

    We examine, herein, specific dynamic responses of collagen molecules (i.e., observations of self-assembly and nanometric adhesion force measurements of type-I collagen molecules) as they interact with either a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic surface at two distinct temperatures, using a liquid-type atomic force microscope. We conclude that, regardless of surface hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, assembled microfibrils eventually distribute homogeneously in accordance with changes in surface-related mechanical properties of collagen molecules at different self-assembly stages.

  8. [Progress in sample preparation and analytical methods for trace polar small molecules in complex samples].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianchun; Luo, Xialin; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Small polar molecules such as nucleosides, amines, amino acids are important analytes in biological, food, environmental, and other fields. It is necessary to develop efficient sample preparation and sensitive analytical methods for rapid analysis of these polar small molecules in complex matrices. Some typical materials in sample preparation, including silica, polymer, carbon, boric acid and so on, are introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the applications and developments of analytical methods of polar small molecules, such as reversed-phase liquid chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, etc., are also reviewed.

  9. Photorefractivity in liquid crystalline composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1997-09-01

    We report recent improvements in the photorefractive of liquid crystalline thin film composites containing electron donor and acceptor molecules. The improvements primarily result from optimization of the exothermicity of the intermolecular charge transfer reaction and improvement of the diffusion characteristics of the photogenerated ions. Intramolecular charge transfer dopants produce greater photorefractivity and a 10-fold decrease in the concentration of absorbing chromophores. The mechanism for the generation of mobile ions is discussed.

  10. Long DNA Molecules at Liuid-Solid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young-Soo; Samuilov, Vladimir; Sokolov, John; Rafailovich, Miriam; Chu, Ben

    2003-03-01

    The electrical transport of long DNA molecules was studied using a newly developed method of electrophoresis on flat surfaces [1]. We have shown that a flat silicon substrate, without any surface features, can be used to fractionate DNA on a liquid-solid interface. We determine that the ability of a flat surface to separate DNA molecules results from the local friction between the surface and the adsorbed DNA segments. The mobility of lambda- DNA molecules on this surface was found to scale as the persistent length with the ionic strength of the buffer. This experimental result indicates that at high buffer concentration the separation mechanism of solid-liquid interface electrophoresis is expected to be due to surface friction rather than biased reptation [2]. At low buffer concentrations the adsorbed DNA move in the electrical field parallel to the surface, and also due the electroosmotic convection that drags the DNA chains and they are stretched . The electric double layer is responsible for a velocity profile of the electroosmotic flow. The net electrophoretic mobility of longer DNA, being trapped closer to the surface, is higher than of the shorter ones in the electric field, oriented along the surface. [1]. N. Pernodet, V. Samuilov, K. Shin, J. Sokolov, M.H. Rafailovich, D. Gersappe, B. Chu. DNA Electrophoresis on a Flat Surface, Physical Review Letters, 85 (2000) 5651-5654. [2] Y.-S. Seo, V.A. Samuilov, J. Sokolov, M. Rafailovich, B. Tinland, J. Kim, B. Chu. DNA separation at a liquid-solid interface, Electrophoresis, 23 (2002) 2618-2625.

  11. Quasiparticle Approach to Molecules Interacting with Quantum Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the behavior of molecules interacting with superfluid helium represents a formidable challenge and, in general, requires approaches relying on large-scale numerical simulations. Here, we demonstrate that experimental data collected over the last 20 years provide evidence that molecules immersed in superfluid helium form recently predicted angulon quasiparticles [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 203001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.203001]. Most important, casting the many-body problem in terms of angulons amounts to a drastic simplification and yields effective molecular moments of inertia as straightforward analytic solutions of a simple microscopic Hamiltonian. The outcome of the angulon theory is in good agreement with experiment for a broad range of molecular impurities, from heavy to medium-mass to light species. These results pave the way to understanding molecular rotation in liquid and crystalline phases in terms of the angulon quasiparticle.

  12. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    2009-11-01

    Cold atom experiments have observed atom-molecule mixtures by tuning the interactions between particles.footnotetextM.L. Olsen, J. D. Perreault, T. D. Cumby, and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. A 80, 030701(R) (2009) We study many particle interactions by examaning a simple model that describes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. A set of functional Renomalization Group equationsfootnotetextR. Shankar, Rev. Mod. Phys., Vol 66 No. 1, January 1994^,footnotetextS.W. Tsai, A.H. Castro Neto, R. Shankar, D.K. Campbell, Phys. Rev. B 72, 054531 (2005) describing these processes are set up and solved numerically. The Self Energy of the fermions are attained as a function of frequency and we search for frequency dependent instabilities that could denote a transition from a disordered liquid to a BCS phase. (Financial support from NSF DMR-084781 and UC-Lab Fees Research Program.)

  13. Quasiparticle Approach to Molecules Interacting with Quantum Solvents.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2017-03-03

    Understanding the behavior of molecules interacting with superfluid helium represents a formidable challenge and, in general, requires approaches relying on large-scale numerical simulations. Here, we demonstrate that experimental data collected over the last 20 years provide evidence that molecules immersed in superfluid helium form recently predicted angulon quasiparticles [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 203001 (2015)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.114.203001]. Most important, casting the many-body problem in terms of angulons amounts to a drastic simplification and yields effective molecular moments of inertia as straightforward analytic solutions of a simple microscopic Hamiltonian. The outcome of the angulon theory is in good agreement with experiment for a broad range of molecular impurities, from heavy to medium-mass to light species. These results pave the way to understanding molecular rotation in liquid and crystalline phases in terms of the angulon quasiparticle.

  14. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  15. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOEpatents

    Barkey, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid embrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selected for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  16. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOEpatents

    Barkey, Dale P.

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid membrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selective for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  17. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    Nicolas Lopez (University of California, Riverside, USA) Chi-Yong Lin (National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan) Shan-Wen Tsai (University of California, Riverside, USA) Cold atom experiments have realized a variety of multicomponent quantum mixtures, including Bose-Fermi atomic mixtures. Mixtures of fermionic atoms and diatomic molecules, which are boson, have also been obtained by tuning of the interactions with external fields. We study many-body correlations in such a system where the molecules are weakly bound and therefore pairs of fermionic atoms easily convert into and dissociate from the bound molecule state and this exchange mediates a long-range interaction between the fermions. We consider a simple many-body Hamiltonian that includes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. We employ a functional renomalization-group approach and calculate the renormalized frequency-dependent interaction vertices and fermion self-energies. We find an instability from the disordered quantum liquid phase to a BCS phase and calculate the energy scale for the transition. The unusual frequency-dependence of this mediated interaction leads to strong renormalization of the self-energy, and also affects the couplings in the BCS channel.

  18. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Valdez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Lin, Chi-Yong

    2010-03-01

    Cold atom experiments have realized a variety of multicomponent quantum mixtures, including Bose-Fermi atomic mixtures. Mixtures of fermionic atoms and diatomic molecules, which are boson, have also been obtained by tuning of the interactions with external fields [1]. We study many-body correlations in such a system where the molecules are weakly bound and therefore pairs of fermionic atoms easily convert into and dissociate from the bound molecule state. This exchange mediates a long-range interaction between the fermions. We consider a simple many-body Hamiltonian that includes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa [2]. We employ a functional renomalization-group approach and calculate the renormalized frequency-dependent interaction vertices and fermion self-energies. We find an instability from the disordered quantum liquid phase to a BCS phase and calculate the energy scale for the transition. The unusual frequency-dependence of this mediated interaction leads to strong renormalization of the self-energy, and also affects the couplings in the BCS channel. [1] M. Greiner, C. A. Regal, J. T. Stewart, and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 110401 (2005) [2] E. Timmermans, K. Furuya, P. W. Milonni, and A. K. Kerman, Phys. Lett. A 285, 228 (2001)

  19. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Timmermans, Eddy; Lin, Chi-Yong

    2011-05-01

    Cold atom experiments have realized a variety of multicomponent quantum mixtures, including Bose-Fermi atomic mixtures. Mixtures of fermionic atoms and diatomic molecules, which are boson, have also been obtained by tuning of the interactions with external fields. We study many-body correlations in such a system where the molecules are weakly bound and therefore pairs of fermionic atoms easily convert into and dissociate from the bound molecule state and this exchange mediates a long-range interaction between the fermions. We consider a simple many-body Hamiltonian that includes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. We employ a functional renomalization-group approach and calculate the renormalized frequency-dependent interaction vertices and fermion self-energies. We find an instability from the disordered quantum liquid phase to a BCS phase and calculate the energy scale for the transition. The unusual frequency-dependence of this mediated interaction leads to strong renormalization of the self-energy, and also affects the couplings in the BCS channel.

  20. Translocation of Small Interfering RNA and Cholesterol Molecules in Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalia, Rajiv

    2013-03-01

    This presentation will focus on all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of (1) structural and mechanical barriers to translocation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) across a phospholipid bilayer, and (2) flip-flop dynamics of cholesterol (CHOL) molecules across a phospholipid bilayer. In the first case, we find that the siRNA induces a liquid-to-gel phase transformation. In the gel phase we find large compressive lateral stresses in the hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA passage across the bilayer. In the second case, we study spontaneous CHOL inter-leaflet transport (flip-flop), the effect of this process on mechanical stresses across the bilayer, and the role of CHOL in inducing molecular order in bilayer leaflets. The simulation was run for 15 microseconds and we found 24 CHOL flip-flop events over that duration. On average, a CHOL molecule migrates across the lipid bilayer in about 73 ns after a flip-flop event is triggered. We have calculated diffusion maps and determined free energy surfaces and flip-flop mechanisms for CHOL molecules. Work supported by NSF-OCI-0749360 and NSF-IOS-125317.

  1. Nano trap for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, R.

    2012-07-01

    A new ac/dc monopole trap for neutral polar particles, introduced and explored by Blümel (2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 045402 and 2011 Eur. Phys. J. D 64 85-101), is significantly advanced in several directions. (1) Previously shown to work only for polar classical particles and polar macro-molecules, the trap is shown to work for polar diatomic molecules. (2) A homogeneous electric field, optionally switched on for improved stability in the angular direction, leads to stable trapping in higher order stability regions of the Mathieu equation. (3) Based on the Floquet formalism, analytical and numerical calculations are presented that show that the trap is quantum mechanically stable. (4) Definition and derivation of a quantum pseudo-potential allow a qualitative understanding of the quantum trapping mechanism. (5) It is shown that the proposed ac/dc trap may be realized experimentally using currently available scanning tunnelling microscopy technology.

  2. Molecular self-assemblies might discriminate the diffusion of chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Galstian, Tigran; Allahverdyan, Karen

    2015-06-07

    Biological tissue has many self-aligned anisotropic molecular organizations, which are able to undergo reversible orientational deformations and spatially transfer them. At the same time, the majority of drugs and many biologically important molecules contain chiral centers. It is therefore important to understand the factors affecting the diffusion of chiral molecules in such elastic environments. We experimentally study the diffusion of chiral molecules in a nematic liquid crystal host representing the model of biological tissue. The analogy of Cano's quantization effect is observed (due to the gradient of the chiral dopant) and used to estimate the corresponding diffusion coefficients. It is shown that thanks to the collective orientational correlation of host molecules the diffusion of chiral dopants is noticeably reduced (by a factor of ≈1.6) for the case of rigid alignment of host molecules compared to the case when the same matrix is free to adjust that alignment.

  3. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  4. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  5. Racemic fluids of hard molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatamanu, J.; Cann, N. M.

    2001-05-01

    The structure in four racemic fluids is explored using two integral equation theories: the reference interaction site method (RISM) [D. Chandler and H. C. Andersen, J. Chem. Phys. 57, 1930 (1972)] and the diagrammatically correct theory of Chandler, Silbey, and Ladanyi (CSL) [D. Chandler, R. Silbey, and B. M. Ladanyi, Mol. Phys. 46, 1335 (1982)]. Discrimination is measured by comparison of site pair distributions for sites on identical molecules with the corresponding distributions for sites on mirror-image molecules. We find that discrimination is largest for distributions between the smallest sites in the molecules. Between racemates, those consisting of more asymmetrical chiral molecules (i.e., with a bigger range of site sizes and bond lengths) show the largest discrimination. The indirect correlation function is shown to be nondiscriminating in racemates. Further, exact relationships between like-like and like-unlike differences in the other pair functions have been obtained. From these, the importance of the bridge functions in discrimination is evident. The CSL theory always satisfies the exact relationships, even with approximate bridge diagrams. RISM theory cannot satisfy these exact limits regardless of density and closure relation. We have found that RISM theory predicts qualitatively incorrect pair distributions at low densities, but that the difference in the distributions is more accurate. All bridge diagrams which contribute to O(ρo) have been enumerated and evaluated. Inclusion of these diagrams into the CSL theory leads to exact results at low density. However, we find that the inclusion of the ρo diagrams has dramatically improved the quality of the CSL theory at all densities.

  6. Metagenomic small molecule discovery methods

    PubMed Central

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Brady, Sean F.

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches to natural product discovery provide the means of harvesting bioactive small molecules synthesized by environmental bacteria without the requirement of first culturing these organisms. Advances in sequencing technologies and general metagenomic methods are beginning to provide the tools necessary to unlock the unexplored biosynthetic potential encoded by the genomes of uncultured environmental bacteria. Here, we highlight recent advances in sequence- and functional- based metagenomic approaches that promise to facilitate antibiotic discovery from diverse environmental microbiomes. PMID:25000402

  7. Intensity calculations of HCN molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Kausar

    2006-10-01

    Accurate spectroscopic data of HCN are required for many astronomical calculations and modeling. HCN molecules are present in the atmosphere of carbon stars and in galactic centers. Ro-vibrational energy levels and intensity calculations were carried out using the full coupled cluster model and radau coordinates. Accurate ab initio calculated potential energy surface^1 and dipole moment surface^2 were used for computation. The computed values were compared with Hitran^99.^

  8. Electron interactions with polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a number of the features of discrete and continuous spectra of electrons interacting with polar molecules. Attention is focused on the extent to which theoretical predictions concerning cross sections, resonances, and bound states are strongly influenced by the various approximations that are so ubiquitous in the treatment of such problems. Similarly, threshold scattering and photodetachment processes are examined for the case of weakly bound dipole states whose higher members overlap the continuum.

  9. Small Molecules-Big Data.

    PubMed

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter

    2016-11-17

    Quantum mechanics builds large-scale graphs (networks): the vertices are the discrete energy levels the quantum system possesses, and the edges are the (quantum-mechanically allowed) transitions. Parts of the complete quantum mechanical networks can be probed experimentally via high-resolution, energy-resolved spectroscopic techniques. The complete rovibronic line list information for a given molecule can only be obtained through sophisticated quantum-chemical computations. Experiments as well as computations yield what we call spectroscopic networks (SN). First-principles SNs of even small, three to five atomic molecules can be huge, qualifying for the big data description. Besides helping to interpret high-resolution spectra, the network-theoretical view offers several ideas for improving the accuracy and robustness of the increasingly important information systems containing line-by-line spectroscopic data. For example, the smallest number of measurements necessary to perform to obtain the complete list of energy levels is given by the minimum-weight spanning tree of the SN and network clustering studies may call attention to "weakest links" of a spectroscopic database. A present-day application of spectroscopic networks is within the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) approach, whereby the transitions information on a measured SN is turned into experimental energy levels via a weighted linear least-squares refinement. MARVEL has been used successfully for 15 molecules and allowed to validate most of the transitions measured and come up with energy levels with well-defined and realistic uncertainties. Accurate knowledge of the energy levels with computed transition intensities allows the realistic prediction of spectra under many different circumstances, e.g., for widely different temperatures. Detailed knowledge of the energy level structure of a molecule coming from a MARVEL analysis is important for a considerable number of modeling

  10. Quantum simulation with cold molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-03-01

    Recent experimental developments on cooling, trapping, manipulating and loading ultra-cold ground state molecules in an optical lattice have opened the door for the exploration of quantum magnetism and the observation of complex quantum dynamics. In this talk I will discuss recent developments towards the implementation of controllable spin lattice models in polar molecules with the spin degrees of freedom encoded in rotational states. The spin-spin couplings are generated by direct dipolar interactions and can be fully controlled by dc electromagnetic fields and microwaves. The spin models realized in this way are long range, anisotropic and can even feature direction-dependent spin interactions. They can emulate Hamiltonians ranging from the Heisenberg spin model, to Hamiltonians with symmetry protected topological phases to Hamiltonians without solid state counterpart. At JILA we have been able to realize for the first time a lattice spin model with fermionic KRb molecules pinned in a 3D lattice. We observe clear manifestation of dipolar exchange interactions in Ramsey spectroscopy even at substantially less than unit lattice filling. I will describe the new theoretical methods that we developed to model the spin dynamics and show that those reproduce the experimental observations. Even though so far the spin dynamics has been restricted to pinned molecules, in part to prevent chemical reactions, I will finish by presenting theoretical calculations supported by experimental measurement at JILA that demonstrate that the continuous quantum Zeno mechanism can actually suppress loss in this highly reactive system. This finding opens the exciting possibility of observing itinerant quantum magnetism in near term experiments. This work is supported by ARO, ARO-DARPA-OLE, NSF-PFC and NSF-PIF

  11. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  12. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, Albert P.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  13. A single-molecule diode

    PubMed Central

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current–voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur–gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current–voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current–voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. PMID:15956208

  14. A single-molecule diode.

    PubMed

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-06-21

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic pi -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current-voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur-gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current-voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical pi-systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current-voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode.

  15. Simple molecules as complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H216O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an “ultra-small-world” property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  16. Homophilic Adhesion Mechanism of Neurofascin, a Member of the L1 Family of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; He, Xiaolin

    2012-02-13

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular {beta}-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC {beta}-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular {beta}-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function.

  17. Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela J; Vlug, Wessel S; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-01-28

    A facile and flexible synthesis for colloidal molecules with well-controlled shape and tunable patchiness is presented. Cross-linked polystyrene spheres with a liquid protrusion were found to assemble into colloidal molecules by coalescence of the liquid protrusions. Similarly, cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) particles carrying a wetting layer assembled into colloidal molecules by coalescence of the wetting layer. Driven by surface energy, a liquid droplet on which the solid spheres are attached is formed. Subsequent polymerization of the liquid yields a wide variety of colloidal molecules as well as colloidosomes with tunable patchiness. Precise control over the topology of the particles has been achieved by changing the amount and nature of the swelling monomer as well as the wetting angle between the liquid and the seed particles. The overall cluster size can be controlled by the seed size as well as the swelling ratio. Use of different swelling monomers and/or particles allows for chemical diversity of the patches and the center. For low swelling ratios assemblies of small numbers of seeds resemble clusters that minimize the second moment of the mass distribution. Assemblies comprised of a large number of colloids are similar to colloidosomes exhibiting elastic strain relief by scar formation.

  18. Morphology-enhanced conductivity in dry ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Aykut; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2016-03-07

    Ionic liquids exhibit fascinating nanoscale morphological phases and are promising materials for energy storage applications. Liquid crystalline order emerges in ionic liquids with specific chemical structures. Here, we investigate the phase behaviour and related ionic conductivities of dry ionic liquids, using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Temperature dependence, properties of polymeric tail and excluded volume symmetry of the amphiphilic ionic liquid molecules are investigated in large scale systems with both short and long-range Coulomb interactions. Our results suggest that by adjusting stiffness and steric interactions of the amphiphilic molecules, lamellar or 3D continuous phases result in these molecular salts. The resulting phases are composed of ion rich and ion pure domains. In 3D phases, ion rich clusters form ionic channels and have significant effects on the conductive properties of the observed nano-phases. If there is no excluded-volume asymmetry along the molecules, mostly lamellar phases with anisotropic conductivities emerge. If the steric interactions become asymmetric, lamellar phases are replaced by complex 3D continuous phases. Within the temperature ranges for which morphological phases are observed, conductivities exhibit low-temperature maxima in accord with experiments on ionic liquid crystals. Stiffer molecules increase the high-conductivity interval and strengthen temperature-resistance of morphological phases. Increasing the steric interactions of cation leads to higher conductivities. Moreover, at low monomeric volume fractions and at low temperatures, cavities are observed in the nano-phases of flexible ionic liquids. We also demonstrate that, in the absence of electrostatic interactions, the morphology is distorted. Our findings inspire new design principles for room temperature ionic liquids and help explain previously-reported experimental data.

  19. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Ken-ichi Takahashi, Ohgi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ{sub DS}) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ{sub DS}. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  20. Monitoring patterned enzymatic polymerization on DNA origami at single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Okholm, A H; Aslan, H; Besenbacher, F; Dong, M; Kjems, J

    2015-07-07

    DNA origami has been used to orchestrate reactions with nano-precision using a variety of biomolecules. Here, the dynamics of albumin-assisted, localized single-molecule DNA polymerization by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase on a 2D DNA origami are monitored using AFM in liquid. Direct visualization of the surface activity revealed the mechanics of growth.

  1. Nanoconstructions on the base of double-stranded DNA molecules and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuridin, S. G.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.; Chulkov, D. P.; Gusev, V. M.; Kompanets, O. N.; Vereschagin, F. V.

    2016-12-01

    Experimental results have been presented on studying optical properties of nanoconstructions formed of orientationally ordered neighbouring double-stranded DNA molecules in the structure of their liquid-crystalline phases and dispersion particles of these phases including ones cured with intercalators.

  2. Biomimetic air sampling for detection of low concentrations of molecules and bioagents : LDRD 52744 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Robert Clark

    2003-12-01

    Present methods of air sampling for low concentrations of chemicals like explosives and bioagents involve noisy and power hungry collectors with mechanical parts for moving large volumes of air. However there are biological systems that are capable of detecting very low concentrations of molecules with no mechanical moving parts. An example is the silkworm moth antenna which is a highly branched structure where each of 100 branches contains about 200 sensory 'hairs' which have dimensions of 2 microns wide by 100 microns long. The hairs contain about 3000 pores which is where the gas phase molecules enter the aqueous (lymph) phase for detection. Simulations of diffusion of molecules indicate that this 'forest' of hairs is 'designed' to maximize the extraction of the vapor phase molecules. Since typical molecules lose about 4 decades in diffusion constant upon entering the liquid phase, it is important to allow air diffusion to bring the molecule as close to the 'sensor' as possible. The moth acts on concentrations as low as 1000 molecules per cubic cm. (one part in 1e16). A 3-D collection system of these dimensions could be fabricated by micromachining techniques available at Sandia. This LDRD addresses the issues involved with extracting molecules from air onto micromachined structures and then delivering those molecules to microsensors for detection.

  3. Dynamic Mass Transfer of Hemoglobin at the Aqueous/Ionic-Liquid Interface Monitored with Liquid Core Optical Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuwei; Yang, Xu; Zeng, Wanying; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-08-04

    Protein transfer from aqueous medium into ionic liquid is an important approach for the isolation of proteins of interest from complex biological samples. We hereby report a solid-cladding/liquid-core/liquid-cladding sandwich optical waveguide system for the purpose of monitoring the dynamic mass-transfer behaviors of hemoglobin (Hb) at the aqueous/ionic liquid interface. The optical waveguide system is fabricated by using a hydrophobic IL (1,3-dibutylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, BBimPF6) as the core, and protein solution as one of the cladding layer. UV-vis spectra are recorded with a CCD spectrophotometer via optical fibers. The recorded spectra suggest that the mass transfer of Hb molecules between the aqueous and ionic liquid media involve accumulation of Hb on the aqueous/IL interface followed by dynamic extraction/transfer of Hb into the ionic liquid phase. A part of Hb molecules remain at the interface even after the accomplishment of the extraction/transfer process. Further investigations indicate that the mass transfer of Hb from aqueous medium into the ionic liquid phase is mainly driven by the coordination interaction between heme group of Hb and the cationic moiety of ionic liquid, for example, imidazolium cation in this particular case. In addition, hydrophobic interactions also contribute to the transfer of Hb.

  4. Doped ionic liquid crystals as effective weakly alignment media for polar solutes.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Celebre, Giorgio; De Luca, Giuseppina

    2016-06-01

    The ionic liquid crystal 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate slightly doped with water is presented as a promising NMR alignment medium for the measurement of residual dipolar couplings for polar molecules dissolved therein.

  5. Doped ionic liquid crystals as effective weakly alignment media for polar solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Celebre, Giorgio; De Luca, Giuseppina

    2016-06-01

    The ionic liquid crystal 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate slightly doped with water is presented as a promising NMR alignment medium for the measurement of residual dipolar couplings for polar molecules dissolved therein.

  6. Dynamics of liquid-liquid displacement.

    PubMed

    Fetzer, Renate; Ramiasa, Melanie; Ralston, John

    2009-07-21

    Capillary driven liquid-liquid displacement in a system with two immiscible liquids of comparable viscosity was investigated by means of optical high speed video microscopy. For the first time, the impact of substrate wettability on contact line dynamics in liquid-liquid systems was studied. On all substrates, qualitatively different dynamics, in two distinct velocity regimes, were found. Hydrodynamic models apply to the fast stage of initial spreading, while nonhydrodynamic dissipation dominates contact line motion in a final stage at low speed, where the molecular kinetic theory (MKT) successfully captured the dynamics. The MKT model parameter values showed no systematic dependence on substrate wettability. This unexpected result is interpreted in terms of local contact line pinning.

  7. The collapsing bubble in a liquid by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Heyes, D. M.; Powles, J. G.

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been made of a collapsing bubble or cavity in a simple liquid. Simulations of a Lennard-Jones liquid reveal that the collapsing process takes place in a series of stages. First, the 'hottest' molecules from the high kinetic energy tail in the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution diffuse into the empty cavity. This is followed by a gradual filling in of the cavity until the density in the centre is a little lower than that of the bulk liquid. The system eventually reaches a final new equilibrium liquid state through a subsequent slower equilibration phase. The bubble fills in an oscillatory manner, by partly filling in, and then partially emptying, and so on, with ever decreasing amplitude towards the final uniform liquid state. These density oscillations are more obvious in systems with a larger bubble. Similar oscillations are observed in the kinetic energy of the molecules at selected radii from the centre of the initial bubble. The maximum temperature occurs typically at the end of the initial fillingin stage during which the density of the core undergoes a vapour-to-liquid phase transition, the released latent heat probably contributing to the temperatures achieved in this region. The average maximum temperature found in the smallest system examined is about nine times the critical temperature, which is about 6000K for water, thus suggesting a simple mechanism for producing molecules with the sorts of kinetic energies and lifetimes required for sonoluminescence.

  8. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  9. Liquid medication administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily. Oral syringes have some advantages for giving liquid medicines. They are accurate. They are easy to ... cups are also a handy way to give liquid medicines. However, dosing errors have occurred with them. ...

  10. Mechanobiology of Short DNA Molecules: A Single Molecule Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Krishnan

    Mechanical properties of DNA are known to play a significant role in several biological processes like wrapping of DNA around histones and looping. Most of these cellular events occur on a DNA length scale of a few hundred basepairs. Single molecule methods have been highly successful in directly investigating heterogeneity in different biomolecular systems and serve as ideal tools to study the mechanical properties of DNA. However, their use in studying DNA of contour lengths less than a kilobase are fraught with experimental difficulties. The research presented in this thesis explores the behavior of short stretches of DNA (≤ 500bp) using existing and novel single molecule methods. We have quantified the variation in persistence lengths between sequences having different elasticity using a constant force axial optical tweezers. Our experiments have also revealed that this difference in persistence lengths manifests itself as a difference in looping lifetimes of lac repressor, in sequences having the aforementioned constructs as the intervening sequence between the operator sites. We have also developed a system to probe DNA dynamics in vivo. We have found that the active processes in the cell have distinct effects on dynamics of DNA and eliminating the active processes causes a 'phase transition' like behavior in the inside the cell. We are currently extending this technique to understand DNA dynamics inside bacterial systems. Our results provide vital insights into mechanical properties of DNA and the effect of athermal fluctuations on DNA dynamics.

  11. Liquid level sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid level sensing device comprising a load cell supporting a column or stack of segments freely resting on one another. The density of each element is substantially identical to that of the surrounding liquid. The elements are freely guided within a surrounding tube. As each element is exposed above the liquid level, its weight will be impressed through the column to the load cell, thereby providing a signal at the load cell directly proportional to the liquid level elevation.

  12. Cluster Monte Carlo and numerical mean field analysis for the water liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Marco G.; Stokely, Kevin; Strekalova, Elena G.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2009-04-01

    Using Wolff's cluster Monte Carlo simulations and numerical minimization within a mean field approach, we study the low temperature phase diagram of water, adopting a cell model that reproduces the known properties of water in its fluid phases. Both methods allow us to study the thermodynamic behavior of water at temperatures, where other numerical approaches - both Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics - are seriously hampered by the large increase of the correlation times. The cluster algorithm also allows us to emphasize that the liquid-liquid phase transition corresponds to the percolation transition of tetrahedrally ordered water molecules.

  13. Autothermal Processing of Renewable Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Jacob Scott

    The vast majority of petrochemicals are synthesized from just six building block molecules, but current feedstocks are an unsustainable resource with negative externalities. Biomass represents a potentially sustainable feedstock, but needs densification, preferably to a liquid form, to be a suitable replacement. Fermentation to butanol and pyrolysis to bio-oil are two promising liquid intermediates. Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of the liquid intermediates over noble metal catalysts, which converts the liquids primarily into syngas and light olefins, is a promising technique for processing densified biomass. The study of liquids at high temperatures requires consideration of a range of complex phenomena, including boiling behavior on hot surfaces, reactions of the feed molecules at high temperatures and on catalyst surfaces, and interactions of impurities in the liquid with the catalyst. Chapter 2 deals with the behavior of the transient liquid that forms when cellulose, a major constituent of biomass, is pyrolized. Fast photography experiments and numerical simulations are performed to show that the aerosols formed in the boiling of this liquid are capable of transporting nonvolatile fragments of biomass intact into the gas phase. These nonvolatile fragments have significant implications in the storage and downstream processing of bio-oil. Some of the behavior of bio-oil at high temperature may also be explained by the variety of molecules in the liquid. Many different functional groups are present, each with its own set of chemical reactions in combustion, pyrolysis, and partial oxidation on a metal catalyst. Chapters 3 and 4 investigate these reactions through a survey of two-carbon surrogates of the functional group classes found in bio-oil. Chapter 3 examines reactions occuring in the complete CPO system over Pt and Rh catalysts, and in the complete system absent O 2. The selectivity data from each molecule and the surface science literature of each

  14. Renewable liquid reflection grating

    DOEpatents

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2003-10-07

    A renewable liquid reflection grating. Electrodes are operatively connected to a conducting liquid in an arrangement that produces a reflection grating and driven by a current with a resonance frequency. In another embodiment, the electrodes create the grating by a resonant electrostatic force acting on a dielectric liquid.

  15. Liquid detection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Regan, Thomas O.

    1987-01-01

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  16. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  17. Liquid/liquid/solid contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borocco, Marine; Pellet, Charlotte; Authelin, Jean-René; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Compagnie des Interfaces Team

    2016-11-01

    Many studies have investigated solid/liquid/air interfaces and their corresponding wetting properties. We discuss what happens in less-studied liquid/liquid/solid systems, and focus on questions of dynamical wetting in a tube, having in mind applications in detergency. We use a capillary tube filled with water and containing a slug of silicone oil (or vice-versa), and present a series of experiments to determine static and dynamic wetting properties corresponding to this situation. We also discuss interfacial aging of such systems.

  18. Propagation of a liquid-liquid explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Harlow, F.H.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1981-08-01

    Direct contact between two liquids, one cold and the other hot, may be precluded by the presence of a vapor film. Bridging of this film by one or both fluids results in rapid local boiling, which may initiate a propagating liquid-liquid explosion. A mechanism is discussed for the propagation that involves implosion of the film, rapid mixing of the fluids, heat exchange to warm the cold fluid above the temperature for spontaneous nucleation, and the explosive generation of vapor, which in turn continues to sustain the film implosion. Plausibility for the model is demonstrated by means of numerical studies by high-speed computer.

  19. Molecules in Studio v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, La Tonya; Malczynski, Leonard

    2016-04-22

    A Powersim Studio implementation of the system dynamics’ ‘Molecules of Structure’. The original implementation was in Ventana’s Vensim language by James Hines. The molecules are fundamental constructs of the system dynamics simulation methodology.

  20. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E.; Bolton, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  1. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  2. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gençaǧa, Deniz; Carbon, Duane F.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  3. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the principal computational approaches and their accuracy for the study of electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules. We include a number of examples from our work that illustrate the range of application. We show how full configuration interaction benchmark calculations were instrumental in improving the understanding of the computational requirements for obtaining accurate results for diatomic spectroscopy. With this understanding it is now possible to compute radiative lifetimes accurate to within 10% for systems involving first- and second-row atoms. We consider the determination of the infrared vibrational transition probabilities for the ground states of SiO and NO, based on a globally accurate dipole moment function. We show how we were able to assign the a(sup "5)II state of CO as the upper state in the recently observed emission bands of CO in an Ar matrix. We next discuss the assignment of the photoelectron detachment spectra of NO and the alkali oxide negative ions. We then present several examples illustrating the state-of-the-art in determining radiative lifetimes for valence-valence and valence-Rydberg transitions. We next compare the molecular spectroscopy of the valence isoelectronic B2, Al2, and AlB molecules. The final examples consider systems involving transition metal atoms, which illustrate the difficulty in describing states with different numbers of d electrons.

  4. Organic Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Erika; Horne, David; Shenoy, Sachindev; Blake, Daniel; van Brunt, Kari; Brittain, Sean; Rettig, Terrence

    2008-08-01

    We propose to use NIRSPEC to search for organic molecules in circumstellar disks toward nearly edge-on T Tauri stars. The feasibility of this study has been recently illustrated by the NIRSPEC detection of HCN toward two edge-on T Tauri stars, GV Tau (Gibb et al. 2007) and IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006), and Spitzer detections of C_2H_2, HCN, and CO_2 toward IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006) and AA Tau (Carr & Najita 2008). We have selected 10 molecules that are predicted to be abundant based on chemical models, observations of high and low mass star forming regions, and comet comae. We will investigate compositional variations among the T Tauri population and compare that to comets and chemical models of disk chemistry. Through this, we can explore the chemistry occurring in the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks and investigate the evolution of organic volatiles, which can help establish the mechanism and timescale for planet formation.

  5. Exotic negative molecules in AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golser, Robin; Gnaser, Hubert; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Wallner, Anton

    2007-06-01

    "The techniques and equipment developed for AMS studies are well suited for identifying exotic negative ions". With this sentence begins a pioneering paper by Roy Middleton and Jeff Klein (M&K) on small doubly-charged negative carbon clusters [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 123 (1997) 532]. M&K were the first to utilize Accelerator Mass Spectrometry to prove the existence of these clusters and a number of other exotic molecules. We review M&K's efforts and show how their work is being continued at other laboratories. The latest developments are: (1) the discovery of long-lived molecular hydrogen anions H2-,D2-and (2) the unambiguous identification of the smallest doubly-charged negative molecule (LiF3)2-. In particular we show new experimental data for D3-, and for (LiF3)2-, and we try to answer the question why M&K's search for this di-anion was unsuccessful.

  6. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-11-06

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  7. Is JPC = 3-+ molecule possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Yan-Rui; Yao, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The confirmation of charged charmonium-like states indicates that heavy quark molecules should exist. Here we discuss the possibility of a molecule state with JPC = 3-+. In a one-boson-exchange model investigation for the S wave C = + D*D¯2* states, one finds that the strongest attraction is in the case J = 3 and I = 0 for both π and σ exchanges. Numerical analysis indicates that this hadronic bound state might exist if a phenomenological cutoff parameter around 2.3 GeV (1.5 GeV) is reasonable with a dipole (monopole) type form factor in the one-pion-exchange model. The cutoff for binding solutions may be reduced to a smaller value once the σ exchange contribution is included. If a state around the D*D¯2* threshold (≈4472 MeV) in the channel J/ψω (P wave) is observed, the heavy quark spin symmetry implies that it is not a cc¯ meson and the JPC are likely to be 3-+. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275115), Shandong Province Natural Science Foundation (ZR2010AM023), SRF for ROCS, SEM, and Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University

  8. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  9. Single-molecule chemical reaction reveals molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Song, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Ruan, Mingbo; Xu, Weilin

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the microscopic elementary process of chemical reactions, especially in condensed phase, is highly desirable for improvement of efficiencies in industrial chemical processes. Here we show an approach to gaining new insights into elementary reactions in condensed phase by combining quantum chemical calculations with a single-molecule analysis. Elementary chemical reactions in liquid-phase, revealed from quantum chemical calculations, are studied by tracking the fluorescence of single dye molecules undergoing a reversible redox process. Statistical analyses of single-molecule trajectories reveal molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics of elementary reactions. The reactivity dynamic fluctuations of single molecules are evidenced and probably arise from either or both of the low-frequency approach of the molecule to the internal surface of the SiO2 nanosphere or the molecule diffusion-induced memory effect. This new approach could be applied to other chemical reactions in liquid phase to gain more insight into their molecular reaction kinetics and the dynamics of elementary steps.

  10. The Large Quadrupole of Water Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Shuqiang; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshhiko

    2011-04-07

    Many quantum mechanical calculations indicate water molecules in the gas and liquid phase have much larger quadrupole moments than any of the common site models of water for computer simulations. Here, comparisons of multipoles from quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ level on a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVQZ level geometry of a waterlike cluster and from various site models show that the increased square planar quadrupole can be attributed to the p-orbital character perpendicular to the molecular plane of the highest occupied molecular orbital as well as a slight shift of negative charge toward the hydrogens. The common site models do not account for the p-orbital type electron density and fitting partial charges of TIP4P- or TIP5P-type models to the QM/MM dipole and quadrupole give unreasonable higher moments. Furthermore, six partial charge sites are necessary to account reasonably for the large quadrupole, and polarizable site models will not remedy the problem unless they account for the p-orbital in the gas phase since the QM calculations show it is present there too. On the other hand, multipole models by definition can use the correct multipoles and the electrostatic potential from the QM/MM multipoles is much closer than that from the site models to the potential from the QM/MM electron density. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations show that increasing the quadrupole in the soft-sticky dipole-quadrupole-octupole multipole model gives radial distribution functions that are in good agreement with experiment

  11. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  12. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  13. Nanofluidic transport governed by the liquid/vapour interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongho; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2014-04-01

    Liquid/vapour interfaces govern the behaviour of a wide range of systems but remain poorly understood, leaving ample margin for the exploitation of intriguing functionalities for applications. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid/vapour interfaces in the transport of water across apposing liquid menisci in osmosis membranes comprising short hydrophobic nanopores that separate two fluid reservoirs. We show experimentally that mass transport is limited by molecular reflection from the liquid/vapour interface below a certain length scale, which depends on the transmission probability of water molecules across the nanopores and on the condensation probability of a water molecule incident on the liquid surface. This fundamental yet elusive condensation property of water is measured under near-equilibrium conditions and found to decrease from 0.36 ± 0.21 at 30 °C to 0.18 ± 0.09 at 60 °C. These findings define the regime in which liquid/vapour interfaces govern nanofluidic transport and have implications for understanding mass transport in nanofluidic devices, droplets and bubbles, biological components and porous media involving liquid/vapour interfaces.

  14. Investigations into complex liquid crystal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Jennifer

    Liquid crystal phases exhibit physical characteristics that lie between those of liquid and crystal phases. The many liquid crystal sub-phases are defined based on the degree of positional and orientational ordering the molecules have and the materials that make up these liquid crystal phases. This thesis presents a study of the molecular packing and physical properties of complex liquid crystal phases using dopants to better examine the stability and packing mechanisms of these phases. It also looks at the dispersion of quantum dots in liquid crystal materials, examining the electro-optical properties of the mixtures. The main goal of this thesis is to examine the effects of dopants on the properties of liquid crystal phases using optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, electro-optical measurements, and X-ray scattering. For those mixtures with quantum dots fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence measurements were also conducted. Rod-like liquid crystals are commonly used in display applications when the material is in a nematic liquid crystal phase, which is the least ordered phase exhibiting no positional ordering. The more complicated chiral smectic liquid crystal phases, which have a one dimensional layer structure, show potential for faster and tri-stable switching. A chiral rod-like liquid crystal material is doped with both chiral and achiral rod-like liquid crystals to examine the stability of one of the chiral smectic sub-phase, the SmC* FI1 phase. This phase consists of tilted molecules rotating about the cone defined by the tilt angle with a periodicity of three layers and an overall helical structure. The SmC*FI1 phase is stabilized by the competition between antiferroelectric and ferroelectric interactions, and small amounts of the achiral dopant broadens the range of this phase by almost 5°C. Higher dopant concentrations of the achiral material result in the destabilization of not just the SmC*FI1 phase but all tilted sub

  15. Solvent Extraction: Structure of the Liquid-Liquid Interface Containing a Diamide Ligand.

    PubMed

    Scoppola, Ernesto; Watkins, Erik B; Campbell, Richard A; Konovalov, Oleg; Girard, Luc; Dufrêche, Jean-Francois; Ferru, Geoffroy; Fragneto, Giovanna; Diat, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of the (supra)molecular structure of an interface that contains amphiphilic ligand molecules is necessary for a full understanding of ion transfer during solvent extraction. Even if molecular dynamics already yield some insight in the molecular configurations in solution, hardly any experimental data giving access to distributions of both extractant molecules and ions at the liquid-liquid interface exist. Here, the combined application of X-ray and neutron reflectivity measurements represents a key milestone in the deduction of the interfacial structure and potential with respect to two different lipophilic ligands. Indeed, we show for the first time that hard trivalent cations can be repelled or attracted by the extractant-enriched interface according to the nature of the ligand.

  16. Sliding Luttinger liquid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Kane, C. L.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2001-07-01

    We study systems of coupled spin-gapped and gapless Luttinger liquids. First, we establish the existence of a sliding Luttinger liquid phase for a system of weakly coupled parallel quantum wires, with and without disorder. It is shown that the coupling can stabilize a Luttinger liquid phase in the presence of disorder. We then extend our analysis to a system of crossed Luttinger liquids and establish the stability of a non-Fermi-liquid state: the crossed sliding Luttinger liquid phase. In this phase the system exhibits a finite-temperature, long-wavelength, isotropic electric conductivity that diverges as a power law in temperature T as T-->0. This two-dimensional system has many properties of a true isotropic Luttinger liquid, though at zero temperature it becomes anisotropic. An extension of this model to a three-dimensional stack exhibits a much higher in-plane conductivity than the conductivity in a perpendicular direction.

  17. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  18. Visualization of large elongated DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lee, Seonghyun; Jo, Kyubong

    2015-09-01

    Long and linear DNA molecules are the mainstream single-molecule analytes for a variety of biochemical analysis within microfluidic devices, including functionalized surfaces and nanostructures. However, for biochemical analysis, large DNA molecules have to be unraveled, elongated, and visualized to obtain biochemical and genomic information. To date, elongated DNA molecules have been exploited in the development of a number of genome analysis systems as well as for the study of polymer physics due to the advantage of direct visualization of single DNA molecule. Moreover, each single DNA molecule provides individual information, which makes it useful for stochastic event analysis. Therefore, numerous studies of enzymatic random motions have been performed on a large elongated DNA molecule. In this review, we introduce mechanisms to elongate DNA molecules using microfluidics and nanostructures in the beginning. Secondly, we discuss how elongated DNA molecules have been utilized to obtain biochemical and genomic information by direct visualization of DNA molecules. Finally, we reviewed the approaches used to study the interaction of proteins and large DNA molecules. Although DNA-protein interactions have been investigated for many decades, it is noticeable that there have been significant achievements for the last five years. Therefore, we focus mainly on recent developments for monitoring enzymatic activity on large elongated DNA molecules.

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  20. Interactions between water and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeeva, Tatiana A.; Husson, Pascale; DeVine, Jessalyn A.; Costa Gomes, Margarida F.; Greenbaum, Steven G.; Castner, Edward W.

    2015-08-01

    We report experimental results on the diffusivity of water in two ionic liquids obtained using the pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR method. Both ionic liquids have the same cation, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium, but different trifluoromethyl-containing anions. One has a strongly hydrophobic anion, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, while the second has a hydrophilic anion, trifluoromethylsulfonate. Transport of water in these ionic liquids is much faster than would be predicted from hydrodynamic laws, indicating that the neutral water molecules experience a very different friction than the anions and cations at the molecular level. Temperature-dependent viscosities, conductivities, and densities are reported as a function of water concentration to further analyze the properties of the ionic liquid-water mixtures. These results on the properties of water in ionic liquids should be of interest to researchers in diverse areas ranging from separations, solubilizing biomass and energy technologies.