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Sample records for liquid crystals phase

  1. Randomized Grain Boundary Liquid Crystal Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Wang, H.; Li, M.; Glaser, M.; Maclennan, J.; Clark, N.

    2012-02-01

    The formation of macroscopic, chiral domains, in the B4 and dark conglomerate phases, for example, is a feature of bent-core liquid crystals resulting from the interplay of chirality, molecular bend and molecular tilt. We report a new, chiral phase observed in a hockey stick-like liquid crystal molecule. This phase appears below a smectic A phase and cools to a crystal phase. TEM images of the free surface of the chiral phase show hundreds of randomly oriented smectic blocks several hundred nanometers in size, similar to those seen in the twist grain boundary (TGB) phase. However, in contrast to the TGB phase, these blocks are randomly oriented. The characteristic defects in this phase are revealed by freeze-fracture TEM images. We will show how these defects mediate the randomized orientation and discuss the intrinsic mechanism driving the formation of this phase. This work is supported by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR0820579 and NSF Grant DMR0606528.

  2. Diffraction from a liquid crystal phase grating.

    PubMed

    Kashnow, R A; Bigelow, J E

    1973-10-01

    The diffraction of light by a sinusoidal perturbation of the optic axis in a nematic liquid crystal is discussed. This corresponds to experiments at the electrohydrodynamic instability thresholds. An interesting qualitative feature appears: The diffraction pattern exhibits a contribution at half of the expected spatial frequency, corresponding to nonorthogonal traversals of the thick phase grating.

  3. Liquid crystal phase shifters for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehrle, Christopher D.

    Space communication satellites have historically relied heavily on high gain gimbal dish antennas for performing communications. Reflector dish antennas lack flexibility in anti-jamming capabilities, and they tend to have a high risk associated to them given the need for mechanical mechanisms to beam steer. In recent years, a great amount of investment has been made into phased array antenna technologies. Phased arrays offer increased signal flexibility at reduced financial cost and in system risk. The problem with traditional phased arrays is the significant program cost and overall complexity added to the satellite by integrating antenna elements that require many dedicated components to properly perform adaptive beam steering. Several unique methods have been proposed to address the issues that plague traditional phase shifters slated for space applications. Proposed approaches range from complex mechanical switches (MEMS) and ferroelectric devices to more robust molecular changes. Nematic liquid crystals offer adaptive beam steering capabilities that traditional phased arrays have; however, with the added benefit of reduced system cost, complexity, and increased resilience to space environmental factors. The objective of the work presented is to investigate the feasibility of using nematic liquid crystals as a means of phase shifting individual phased array elements slated for space applications. Significant attention is paid to the survivability and performance of liquid crystal and associated materials in the space environment. Performance regarding thermal extremes and interactions with charged particles are the primary factors addressed.

  4. Liquid crystal display for phase shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Mendoza, B.; Granados-Agustín, F. S.; Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Cornejo-Rodríguez, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work arises based on the idea proposed by Millered et al. in 2004, where they show how to get in one shot interferograms with phase shift using a mask with micro-polarizers, in this work we pretend to obtain phase shift in localized areas of an interferogram using the properties of polarization and the pixelated configuration of a liquid crystal display (LCD) for testing optical surfaces. In this work we describes the process of characterization of a liquid crystal display CRL Opto and XGA2P01 model, which is introduced in one arm of a Twyman Green interferometer. Finally we show the experimental interferograms with phase shifts which are caused by different gray levels displayed in the LCD.

  5. Liquid Crystals: The Phase of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondris-Crawford, Renate; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Liquid crystal displays are currently utilized to convey information via graphic displays. Presents experiments and explanations that employ the concept of liquid crystals to learn concepts related to the various states of matter, electric and magnetic forces, refraction of light, and optics. Discusses applications of liquid crystal technology.…

  6. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  7. Frustration of crystallisation by a liquid-crystal phase.

    PubMed

    Syme, Christopher D; Mosses, Joanna; González-Jiménez, Mario; Shebanova, Olga; Walton, Finlay; Wynne, Klaas

    2017-02-17

    Frustration of crystallisation by locally favoured structures is critically important in linking the phenomena of supercooling, glass formation, and liquid-liquid transitions. Here we show that the putative liquid-liquid transition in n-butanol is in fact caused by geometric frustration associated with an isotropic to rippled lamellar liquid-crystal transition. Liquid-crystal phases are generally regarded as being "in between" the liquid and the crystalline state. In contrast, the liquid-crystal phase in supercooled n-butanol is found to inhibit transformation to the crystal. The observed frustrated phase is a template for similar ordering in other liquids and likely to play an important role in supercooling and liquid-liquid transitions in many other molecular liquids.

  8. Phase transitions in liquid crystal + aerosil gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, Mehmet Kerim

    Liquid Crystals (LCs) are found in many different phases, the most well-known, basic ones being Isotropic (I), Nematic (N), and Smectic-A (SmA). LCs show a rich variety of phase transitions between these phases. This makes them very interesting materials in which to study the basics of phase transitions and related topics. In the low symmetry phases, LCs show both positional and directional orders. X-ray scattering is an important tool to study these phase transitions as it probes the instantaneous positional correlations in these phases. Random forces have a nontrivial effect on ordering in nature, and the problem of phase transitions in the presence of a random field is a current and not well-understood topic. It has been found that aerosils posses a quenched randomness in the mixture of LC+aerosil samples, forming a gel random network which destroys long-range order (LRO) in the SmA phase. This can be modeled as a random field problem. In the N to SmA phase transition in 4O.8 LC (butyloxybenzlidene octylaniline), orientational order (N ) is modified by a 1-D density wave describing 2-D fluid layer spacing structure (SmA). Likewise the I to Sm A phase transition in 10CB LC (decylcyanobiphenyl), a transitional ordered phase develops without going through an orientational ordered phase. To study these phase transitions with aerosil dispersion carries the opportunity to probe the effect of induced quenched random disorder on phase transitions, which are 2nd order in the first case and 1st order in the second case. A two-component line-shape analysis is developed to define the phases in all temperature ranges. It consists of the thermal and the static structure factors. The reentered nematic (RN) phase of the [6:8]OCB+aerosil gels ([6:8]OCB is a mixture of hexyloxycyanobiphenyl and octyloxcyanobiphenyl) is another interesting case in which to study the quenched random disorder effects. The weak SmA phase of [6:8]OCB+aerosil gels is followed by a RN phase at low

  9. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  10. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  11. Defects and order in liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shilpa

    This thesis investigates the partial destruction of ordering in liquid crystalline systems due to the influence of defects and thermal fluctuations. The systems under consideration are hexagonal columnar crystals with crystalline order perpendicular to the columns, and two-dimensional smectics with order perpendicular to the layers. We first study the possibility of reentrant melting of a hexagonal columnar crystal of flexible charged polymers at high enough densities. The Lindemann criterion is employed in determining the melting point. Lattice fluctuations are calculated in the Debye model, and an analogy with the Abrikosov vortex lattice in superconductors is exploited in estimating both the elastic constants of the hexagonal lattice, and the appropriate Lindemann constant. We also discuss the unusual functional integral describing the statistical mechanics of a single polymer in an Einstein cage model using the path-integral formulation. A crossover as a function of an external field along the column axis is discussed as well. Next, we study defects in a columnar crystal in the form of vacancy/interstitial loops or strings of vacancies and interstitials bounded by column "heads" and "tails". These defect strings are oriented by the columnar lattice and can change size and shape by movement of the ends and forming kinks along the length. Hence an analysis in terms of directed living polymers is appropriate to study their size and shape distribution, volume fraction, etc. If the entropy of transverse fluctuations overcomes the string line tension in the crystalline phase, a string proliferation transition occurs, leading to a "supersolid" phase with infinitely long vacancy or interstitial strings. We estimate the wandering entropy and examine the behaviour in the transition regime. We also calculate numerically the line tension of various species of vacancies and interstitials in a triangular lattice for power-law potentials as well as for a modified Bessel

  12. Influence of driving voltage of liquid crystal on modulation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongyang; Du, Shengping

    2017-09-01

    Based on the elastic theory and the dynamics equation of liquid crystal, we use Finite-Difference iterative method to calculate the liquid crystal molecules director distributions under the effect of electric field. According to the director distributions, this paper gets the relationship between LCD modulation phase and the driving voltage. The results of simulation proves that with driving voltage varying from 0 to 5v and the crystal modulation phase varies from 0 to 4π.

  13. Monodomain Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Layers for Phase Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oton, E.; Netter, E.; Nakano, T.; D.-Katayama, Y.; Inoue, F.

    2017-03-01

    Liquid crystal “Blue Phases” (BP) have evolved, in the last years, from a scientific curiosity to emerging materials for new photonic and display applications. They possess attractive features over standard nematic liquid crystals, like submillisecond switching times and polarization- independent optical response. However, BPs still present a number of technical issues that prevent their use in practical applications: their phases are only found in limited temperature ranges, thus requiring stabilization of the layers; stabilized BP layers are inhomogeneous and not uniformly oriented, which worsen the optical performance of the devices. It would be essential for practical uses to obtain perfectly aligned and oriented monodomain BP layers, where the alignment and orientation of the cubic lattice are organized in a single 3D structure. In this work we have obtained virtually perfect monodomain BP layers and used them in devices for polarization independent phase modulation. We demonstrate that, under applied voltage, well aligned and oriented layers generate smoother and higher values of the phase shift than inhomogeneous layers, while preserving polarization independency. All BP devices were successfully stabilized in BPI phase, maintaining the layer monodomain homogeneity at room temperature, covering the entire area of the devices with a unique BP phase.

  14. Monodomain Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Layers for Phase Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Oton, E.; Netter, E.; Nakano, T.; D.-Katayama, Y.; Inoue, F.

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal “Blue Phases” (BP) have evolved, in the last years, from a scientific curiosity to emerging materials for new photonic and display applications. They possess attractive features over standard nematic liquid crystals, like submillisecond switching times and polarization- independent optical response. However, BPs still present a number of technical issues that prevent their use in practical applications: their phases are only found in limited temperature ranges, thus requiring stabilization of the layers; stabilized BP layers are inhomogeneous and not uniformly oriented, which worsen the optical performance of the devices. It would be essential for practical uses to obtain perfectly aligned and oriented monodomain BP layers, where the alignment and orientation of the cubic lattice are organized in a single 3D structure. In this work we have obtained virtually perfect monodomain BP layers and used them in devices for polarization independent phase modulation. We demonstrate that, under applied voltage, well aligned and oriented layers generate smoother and higher values of the phase shift than inhomogeneous layers, while preserving polarization independency. All BP devices were successfully stabilized in BPI phase, maintaining the layer monodomain homogeneity at room temperature, covering the entire area of the devices with a unique BP phase. PMID:28281691

  15. Polarization effects in reconfigurable liquid crystal phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarčević, Miloš; Manolis, Ilias G.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Crossland, William A.

    2005-01-01

    An improved configuration for achieving true polarization insensitive reconfigurable phase holograms for optical switches using homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal devices is presented. Previous experimental results have been analyzed and explained using numerical modeling of the nematic liquid crystal orientation and associated optical modulation. Twisting of the liquid crystal optical axis from the optimal 45° orientation from the quarter waveplate is shown to degrade the polarization insensitive performance. The alternative direction of surface alignment perpendicular to the long pixel edge eliminates the twist of the director during switching. True polarization insensitivity is predicted with our model for this mode of operation.

  16. Electro-optic phase modulation by polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicari, L.

    1997-05-01

    We present a mathematical model to describe the optical phase shift induced by polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) on light impinging transversely on the sample. PDLCs are dispersions of liquid crystal microdroplets in a polymeric binder. Droplets appear as optically uniaxial spheres randomly oriented so that the material is optically isotropic. The application of an external electric field results in a reorientation of the liquid crystal and therefore in an electrically controllable optical uniaxicity of the material. The model is discussed by comparison with experimental data and with previous theory [F. Basile, F. Bloisi, L. Vicari, and F. Simoni, Phys. Rev. E 48, 432 (1993)].

  17. Phase behavior and dynamics of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Fragiadakis, D.; Roland, C. M.; Dabrowski, R.; Dziaduszek, J.; Urban, S.

    2014-02-21

    The synthesis, equation of state, phase diagram, and dielectric relaxation properties are reported for a new liquid crystal, 4{sup ′}-butyl-4-(2-methylbutoxy)azoxybenzene (4ABO5*), which exhibits a cholesteric phase at ambient temperature. The steepness of the intermolecular potential was characterized from the thermodynamic potential parameter, Γ = 4.3 ± 0.1 and the dynamic scaling exponent, γ = 3.5 ± 0.2. The difference between them is similar to that seen previously for nematic and smectic liquid crystals, with the near equivalence of Γ and γ consistent with the near constancy of the relaxation time of 4ABO5* at the cholesteric to isotropic phase transition (i.e., the clearing line). Thus, chirality does not cause deviations from the general relationship between thermodynamics and dynamics in the ordered phase of liquid crystals. The ionic conductivity of 4ABO5* shows strong coupling to the reorientational dynamics.

  18. Phase behavior of nanoparticles in a thermotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Da Cruz, Cristina; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2005-08-04

    In this work, we describe the outstanding behavior of a nanocomposite system composed of the thermotropic liquid crystal 5CB doped with nanoparticles of the magnetic iron oxide maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)). We show that the I-N transition is associated with a reversible gathering of nanoparticles inside droplets of the ferronematic phase coexisting with a nonmagnetic nematic host phase.

  19. Nanoparticle microstructures templated by liquid crystal phase-transition dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahinasab, Sheida T.; Elbaradei, Ahmed; Keshavarz, Amir; Stokes, Benjamin J.; Hirst, Linda S.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) phase transition dynamics can be used as a powerful tool to control the assembly of dispersed nanoparticles. Tailored mesogenic ligands can both enhance and tune particle dispersion in the liquid crystal phase to create liquid crystal nano-composites - a novel type of material. Soft nanocomposites have recently risen to prominence for their potential usage in a variety of industrial applications such as photovoltaics, photonic materials, and the liquid crystal laser. Our group has developed a novel phase-transition-templating process for the generation of micron-scale, vesicle-like nanoparticle shells stabilized by mesogenic ligand-ligand interactions. The mesogenic ligand's flexible arm structure enhances ligand alignment with the local LC director, providing control over the dispersion and stabilization of nanoparticles in liquid crystal phases. In this paper we explore the capsule formation process in detail, generating QD-based capsules over a surprisingly wide range of radii. We demonstrate that the initial nanoparticle concentration and cooling rate are important parameters influencing capsule size. By increasing particle concentration of nanoparticles and reducing the cooling rate we developed large shells up to 96+/-19 μm in diameter whereas decreasing concentration and increasing the cooling rate produces shells as small as 4+/-1 μm.

  20. Multiple liquid crystal phases of DNA at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Strzelecka, T E; Davidson, M W; Rill, R L

    1988-02-04

    DNA packaging in vivo is very tight, with volume concentrations approaching 70% w/v in sperm heads, virus capsids and bacterial nucleoids. The packaging mechanisms adopted may be related to the natural tendency of semi-rigid polymers to form liquid crystalline phases in concentrated solutions. We find that DNA forms at least three distinct liquid crystalline phases at concentrations comparable to those in vivo, with phase transitions occurring over relatively narrow ranges of DNA concentration. A weakly birefringent, dynamic, 'precholesteric' mesophase with microscopic textures intermediate between those of a nematic and a true cholesteric phase forms at the lowest concentrations required for phase separation. At slightly higher DNA concentrations, a second mesophase forms which is a strongly birefringent, well-ordered cholesteric phase with a concentration-dependent pitch varying from 2 to 10 micron. At the highest DNA concentrations, a phase forms which is two-dimensionally ordered and resembles smectic phases of thermotropic liquid crystals observed with small molecules.

  1. Diffractive devices based on blue phase liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Huang, Shuaijia; Su, Yikai

    2016-09-01

    Blue phase liquid crystal (BPLC) has been attractive for display and photonic applications for its sub-millisecond response time, no need for surface alignment, and an optically isotropic dark state. Because of these advantages, diffractive devices based on blue phase liquid crystals have great potential for wide applications. In this work, we present several BPLC diffractive devices. The operation principles, fabrication and experimental measurements will be discussed in details for two BPLC gratings realized by holographic method and a BPLC Fresnel lens using a spatial light modulator projector. All of these devices exhibit several attractive features such as sub-millisecond response, relatively high spatial resolution and polarization-independence.

  2. Adaptive optics fundus camera using a liquid crystal phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Naoki; Bessho, Kenichiro; Kitaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Naoyuki; Fujikado, Takashi; Mihashi, Toshifumi

    2008-05-01

    We have developed an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera to obtain high resolution retinal images of eyes. We use a liquid crystal phase modulator to compensate the aberrations of the eye for better resolution and better contrast in the images. The liquid crystal phase modulator has a wider dynamic range to compensate aberrations than most mechanical deformable mirrors and its linear phase generation makes it easy to follow eye movements. The wavefront aberration was measured in real time with a sampling rate of 10 Hz and the closed loop system was operated at around 2 Hz. We developed software tools to align consecutively obtained images. From our experiments with three eyes, the aberrations of normal eyes were reduced to less than 0.1 μm (RMS) in less than three seconds by the liquid crystal phase modulator. We confirmed that this method was adequate for measuring eyes with large aberrations including keratoconic eyes. Finally, using the liquid crystal phase modulator, high resolution images of retinas could be obtained.

  3. Investigation of Dielectric Properties of Liquid Crystals near Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordell, Michael; Lawson, Tracy; Prayaga, Chandra; Ujj, Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Precise capacitance measurement has been performed near the phase transitions of scientifically important liquid crystals such as 8-CB. The details of the measurements to get high precision data on dielectric constant and its temperature dependence will be presented. The results show significant changes of the dielectric properties of the liquid crystal near the smectic-to-nematic and nematic-to-liquid phase transitions attributed to structural changes of the relevant phases. In order to measure the details of the functional dependence near the phase transition, the temperature was varied with milliKelvin precision. The data was obtained using a self-assembled RC circuit with phase sensitive lock-in amplifier detection. Calibration of the device was made by measuring known standard capacitances. In order to get high accuracy the measurement was completely computer controlled. The Method applied here will contribute to the better understanding of thermodynamic behavior of liquid crystals and can be routinely used to characterize novel materials showing phase transitions.

  4. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M D

    2017-02-07

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ∼10(5) times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  5. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ˜105 times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  6. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gomez, Jaritza [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Gujral, Ankit [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Huang, Chengbin [School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 777 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2222, USA; Bishop, Camille [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Yu, Lian [School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 777 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2222, USA; Ediger, Mark [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA

    2017-02-01

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition.Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ~105 times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  7. Common path point diffraction interferometer using liquid crystal phase shifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A common path point diffraction interferometer uses dyed, parallel nematic liquid crystals which surround an optically transparent microsphere. Coherent, collimated and polarized light is focused on the microsphere at a diameter larger than that of the microsphere. A portion of the focused light passes through the microsphere to form a spherical wavefront reference beam and the rest of the light is attenuated by the dyed liquid crystals to form an object beam. The two beams form an interferogram which is imaged by a lens onto an electronic array sensor and into a computer which determines the wavefront of the object beam. The computer phase shifts the interferogram by stepping up an AC voltage applied across the liquid crystals without affecting the reference beam.

  8. Intrinsic response of polymer liquid crystals in photochemical phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Tomiki; Sasaki, Takeo; Kim, Haengboo )

    1991-01-24

    Time-resolved measurements were performed on the photochemically induced isothermal phase transition of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) with mesogenic side chains of phenyl benzoate (PAPB3) and cyanobiphenyl (PACB3) under conditions wherein the photochemical reaction of the doped photoresponsive molecule (4-butyl-4-{prime}-methoxyazobenzene, BMAB) was completed within {approximately} 10 ns, and the subsequent phase transition of the matrix PLC from nematic (N) to isotropic (I) state was followed by time-resolved measurements of the birefringence of the system. Formation of a sufficient amount of the cis isomer of BMAB with a single pulse of a laser lowered the N-I phase transition temperature of the mixture, inducing the N-I phase transition of PLCs isothermally in a time range of {approximately} 200 ms. This time range is comparable to that of low molecular weight liquid crystals, indicating that suppression in mobility of mesogens in PLCs does not affect significantly the thermodynamically controlled process.

  9. Electrically tunable holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zheng-Hong; Chen, Chao-Ping; Zhu, Ji-Liang; Yuan, Ya-Chao; Li, Yan; Hu, Wei; Li, Xiao; Li, Hong-Jing; Lu, Jian-Gang; Su, Yi-Kai

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative approach to fabricating an electrically tunable holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal grating. This grating is obtained by preforming a polymer template comprised of periodic fringes, and then refilling it with a blue phase liquid crystal. Compared with conventional holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal gratings, our grating can remarkably reduce its switching voltage from 200 V to 43 V while maintaining a sub-millisecond response time. The holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal (HPTBPLC) grating is free from electrode patterning, thus leading to a lower cost and more flexible applications. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328804), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61307028), the Funds from the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (Grant Nos. 11JC1405300, 13ZR1420000, and 14ZR1422300), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. XDJK 2011C047).

  10. Possible quantum liquid crystal phases of helium monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S.; Matsui, K.; Matsui, T.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    The second-layer phase diagrams of 4He and 3He adsorbed on graphite are investigated. Intrinsically rounded specific-heat anomalies are observed at 1.4 and 0.9 K, respectively, over extended density regions in between the liquid and incommensurate solid phases. They are identified to anomalies associated with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young type two-dimensional melting. The prospected low temperature phase (C2 phase) is a commensurate phase or a quantum hexatic phase with quasi-bond-orientational order, both containing zero-point defectons. In either case, this would be the first atomic realization of the quantum liquid crystal, a new state of matter. From the large enhancement of the melting temperature over 3He, we propose to assign the observed anomaly of 4He-C 2 phase at 1.4 K to the hypothetical supersolid or superhexatic transition.

  11. Crystal growth in a three-phase system: Diffusion and liquid-liquid phase separation in lysozyme crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijna, M. C. R.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.; Vlieg, E.

    2007-07-01

    In the phase diagram of the protein hen egg-white lysozyme, a region is present in which the lysozyme solution demixes and forms two liquid phases. In situ observations by optical microscopy show that the dense liquid droplets dissolve when crystals grow in this system. During this process the demixed liquid region retracts from the crystal surface. The spatial distribution of the dense phase droplets present special boundary conditions for Fick’s second law for diffusion. In combination with the cylindrical symmetry provided by the kinetically roughened crystals, this system allows for a full numerical analysis. Using experimental data for setting the boundary conditions, a quasi-steady-state solution for the time-dependent concentration profile was shown to be valid. Comparison of kinetically rough growth in a phase separated system and in a nonseparated system shows that the growth kinetics for a three-phase system differs from a two-phase system, in that crystals grow more slowly but the duration of growth is prolonged.

  12. Crystal growth in a three-phase system: diffusion and liquid-liquid phase separation in lysozyme crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Heijna, M C R; van Enckevort, W J P; Vlieg, E

    2007-07-01

    In the phase diagram of the protein hen egg-white lysozyme, a region is present in which the lysozyme solution demixes and forms two liquid phases. In situ observations by optical microscopy show that the dense liquid droplets dissolve when crystals grow in this system. During this process the demixed liquid region retracts from the crystal surface. The spatial distribution of the dense phase droplets present special boundary conditions for Fick's second law for diffusion. In combination with the cylindrical symmetry provided by the kinetically roughened crystals, this system allows for a full numerical analysis. Using experimental data for setting the boundary conditions, a quasi-steady-state solution for the time-dependent concentration profile was shown to be valid. Comparison of kinetically rough growth in a phase separated system and in a nonseparated system shows that the growth kinetics for a three-phase system differs from a two-phase system, in that crystals grow more slowly but the duration of growth is prolonged.

  13. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  14. Three-dimensional colloidal crystals in liquid crystalline blue phases

    PubMed Central

    Ravnik, Miha; Alexander, Gareth P.; Yeomans, Julia M.; Žumer, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Applications for photonic crystals and metamaterials put stringent requirements on the characteristics of advanced optical materials, demanding tunability, high Q factors, applicability in visible range, and large-scale self-assembly. Exploiting the interplay between structural and optical properties, colloidal lattices embedded in liquid crystals (LCs) are promising candidates for such materials. Recently, stable two-dimensional colloidal configurations were demonstrated in nematic LCs. However, the question as to whether stable 3D colloidal structures can exist in an LC had remained unanswered. We show, by means of computer modeling, that colloidal particles can self-assemble into stable, 3D, periodic structures in blue phase LCs. The assembly is based on blue phases providing a 3D template of trapping sites for colloidal particles. The particle configuration is determined by the orientational order of the LC molecules: Specifically, face-centered cubic colloidal crystals form in type-I blue phases, whereas body-centered crystals form in type-II blue phases. For typical particle diameters (approximately 100 nm) the effective binding energy can reach up to a few 100 kBT, implying robustness against mechanical stress and temperature fluctuations. Moreover, the colloidal particles substantially increase the thermal stability range of the blue phases, for a factor of two and more. The LC-supported colloidal structure is one or two orders of magnitude stronger bound than, e.g., water-based colloidal crystals. PMID:21368186

  15. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and

  16. Reversible Nanoparticle Cubic Lattices in Blue Phase Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, Mohamed Amine; Manet, Sabine; Lhermitte, Julien; Brown, Sarah; Milette, Jonathan; Toader, Violeta; Sutton, Mark; Reven, Linda

    2016-03-22

    Blue phases (BPs), a distinct class of liquid crystals (LCs) with 3D periodic ordering of double twist cylinders involving orthogonal helical director twists, have been theoretically studied as potential templates for tunable colloidal crystals. Here, we report the spontaneous formation of thermally reversible, cubic crystal nanoparticle (NP) assemblies in BPs. Gold NPs, functionalized to be highly miscible in cyanobiphenyl-based LCs, were dispersed in BP mixtures and characterized by polarized optical microscopy and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The NPs assemble by selectively migrating to periodic strong trapping sites in the BP disclination lines. The NP lattice, remarkably robust given the small particle size (4.5 nm diameter), is commensurate with that of the BP matrix. At the BP I to BP II phase transition, the NP lattice reversibly switches between two different cubic structures. The simultaneous presence of two different symmetries in a single material presents an interesting opportunity to develop novel dynamic optical materials.

  17. Surface-functionalized ionic liquid crystal-supported ionic liquid phase materials: ionic liquid crystals in mesopores.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Florian T U; Morain, Bruno; Weiss, Alexander; Laurin, Mathias; Libuda, Jörg; Wagner, Valentin; Melcher, Berthold U; Wang, Xinjiao; Meyer, Karsten; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2011-12-23

    The influence of confinement on the ionic liquid crystal (ILC) [C(18)C(1)Im][OTf] is studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscopy (POM), and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The ILC studied is supported on Si-based powders and glasses with pore sizes ranging from 11 to 50 nm. The temperature of the solid-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition seems mostly unaffected by the confinement, whereas the temperature of the liquid-crystalline-to-liquid phase transition is depressed for smaller pore sizes. A contact layer with a thickness in the order of 2 nm is identified. The contact layer exhibits a phase transition at a temperature 30 K lower than the solid-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition observed for the neat ILC. For applications within the "supported ionic liquid phase (SILP)" concept, the experiments show that in pores of diameter 50 nm a pore filling of α>0.4 is sufficient to reproduce the phase transitions of the neat ILC.

  18. Terraces in the cholesteric phase of DNA liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Winkle, David H.; Davidson, Michael W.; Rill, Randolph L.

    1992-10-01

    Near the transition to the columnar phase, the cholesteric liquid crystal phase in an aqueous solution of DNA fragments with contour lengths approximating the persistence length undergoes an unwinding of the cholesteric pitch. Unwinding of the cholesteric with planar alignment of the fragments was studied by polarized light microscopy. Terraces or ``Grandjean planes'' of cholesteric are seen as uniformly birefringent fields of distinct hues (typically blue), bounded by lines which moved as the local concentration of DNA increased. These lines are interpreted as disclination lines, bounding regions of different total twist, which move as the intrinsic pitch of the cholesteric varies with concentration.

  19. Terraces in the cholesteric phase of DNA liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, D.H. ); Davidson, M.W. ); Rill, R.L. )

    1992-10-15

    Near the transition to the columnar phase, the cholesteric liquid crystal phase in an aqueous solution of DNA fragments with contour lengths approximating the persistence length undergoes an unwinding of the cholesteric pitch. Unwinding of the cholesteric with planar alignment of the fragments was studied by polarized light microscopy. Terraces or Grandjean planes'' of cholesteric are seen as uniformly birefringent fields of distinct hues (typically blue), bounded by lines which moved as the local concentration of DNA increased. These lines are interpreted as disclination lines, bounding regions of different total twist, which move as the intrinsic pitch of the cholesteric varies with concentration.

  20. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Interferometers for Microgravity Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Keneth L.

    2002-01-01

    The initial focus of this project was to eliminate both of these problems in the Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer (LCPDI). Progress toward that goal will be described, along with the demonstration of a phase shifting Liquid Crystal Shearing Interferometer (LCSI) that was developed as part of this work. The latest LCPDI, other than a lens to focus the light from a test section onto a diffracting microsphere within the interferometer and a collimated laser for illumination, the pink region contained within the glass plates on the rod-mounted platform is the complete interferometer. The total width is approximately 1.5 inches with 0.25 inches on each side for bonding the electrical leads. It is 1 inch high and there are only four diffracting microspheres within the interferometer. As a result, it is very easy to align, achieving the first goal. The liquid crystal electro-optical response time is a function of layer thickness, with thinner devices switching faster due to a reduction in long-range viscoelastic forces between the LC molecules. The LCPDI has a liquid crystal layer thickness of 10 microns, which is controlled by plastic or glass microspheres embedded in epoxy 'pads' at the corners of the device. The diffracting spheres are composed of polystyrene/divinyl benzene polymer with an initial diameter of 15 microns. The spheres deform slightly when the interferometer is assembled to conform to the spacing produced by the microsphere-filled epoxy spacer pads. While the speed of this interferometer has not yet been tested, previous LCPDIs fabricated at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics switched at a rate of approximately 3.3 Hz, a factor of 10 slower than desired. We anticipate better performance when the speed of these interferometers is tested since they are approximately three times thinner. Phase shifting in these devices is a function of the AC voltage level applied to the liquid crystal. As the voltage increases, the dye in the liquid crystal

  1. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Interferometers for Microgravity Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Keneth L.

    2002-01-01

    The initial focus of this project was to eliminate both of these problems in the Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer (LCPDI). Progress toward that goal will be described, along with the demonstration of a phase shifting Liquid Crystal Shearing Interferometer (LCSI) that was developed as part of this work. The latest LCPDI, other than a lens to focus the light from a test section onto a diffracting microsphere within the interferometer and a collimated laser for illumination, the pink region contained within the glass plates on the rod-mounted platform is the complete interferometer. The total width is approximately 1.5 inches with 0.25 inches on each side for bonding the electrical leads. It is 1 inch high and there are only four diffracting microspheres within the interferometer. As a result, it is very easy to align, achieving the first goal. The liquid crystal electro-optical response time is a function of layer thickness, with thinner devices switching faster due to a reduction in long-range viscoelastic forces between the LC molecules. The LCPDI has a liquid crystal layer thickness of 10 microns, which is controlled by plastic or glass microspheres embedded in epoxy 'pads' at the corners of the device. The diffracting spheres are composed of polystyrene/divinyl benzene polymer with an initial diameter of 15 microns. The spheres deform slightly when the interferometer is assembled to conform to the spacing produced by the microsphere-filled epoxy spacer pads. While the speed of this interferometer has not yet been tested, previous LCPDIs fabricated at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics switched at a rate of approximately 3.3 Hz, a factor of 10 slower than desired. We anticipate better performance when the speed of these interferometers is tested since they are approximately three times thinner. Phase shifting in these devices is a function of the AC voltage level applied to the liquid crystal. As the voltage increases, the dye in the liquid crystal

  2. High-efficiency and fast-response tunable phase grating using a blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Li, Yan; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate a tunable phase grating using a polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal. Because of the electric-field-induced rectangularlike phase profile, a high diffraction efficiency of 40% is achieved. Moreover, this device shows submillisecond response time. The proposed tunable phase grating holds great potential for photonics and display applications.

  3. D2-D1 phase transition of columnar liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. F.; Swift, J.

    1986-04-01

    The D2-D1 phase transition in columnar liquid crystals of the HAT series [e.g., HAT11 (triphenelene hexa-n-dodecanoate)] is discussed within the framework of Landau theory. The order parameters which describe the transition are abstracted from a tensor density function, and are associated with two irreducible representations of the symmetry group of the high-temperature D2 phase. A mechanism for a first-order transition is then suggested in accordance with both theoretical considerations and the experimental result for the D2-D1 transition. Two possible arrangements of the herringbone structure of the D1 phase are obtained, each of which gives six orientational states in the low-temperature D1 phase.

  4. Amphitropic liquid crystal phases from polyhydroxy sugar surfactants: Fundamental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Zied, Osama K.; Hashim, Rauzah; Timimi, B. A.

    2015-03-01

    The self-assembly phenomena on a special class of poly-hydroxy sugar surfactant have been studied extensively. This class of material is classified as amphitropic liquid crystals since they exhibit both thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline properties. Hence the potential applications of these non-ionic surfactants are more versatile than those from the conventional lyotropic liquid crystals including those from thermotropic phases, but the latters are yet to be realized. Unfortunately, due to the lack of interest (or even awareness), fundamental studies in thermotropic glycolipids are scanty to support application development, and any tangible progress is often mired by the complexity of the sugar stereochemistry. However, some applications may be pursued from these materials by taking the advantage of the sugar chirality and the tilted structure of the lipid organization which implies ferroelectric behavior. Here, we present our studies on the stereochemical diversity of the sugar units in glycosides that form the thermotropic/lyotropic phases. The structure to property relationship compares different chain designs and other popular polyhydroxy compounds, such as monooleins and alkylpolyglucosides. Different structural properties of these glycosides are discussed with respect to their self-assembly organization and potential applications, such as delivery systems and membrane mimetic study.

  5. Dynamics of a discotic liquid crystal in the isotropic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Fruchey, Kendall; Fayer, M. D.

    2006-11-01

    Optically heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments are conducted to study the orientational dynamics of a discotic liquid crystal 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakis(pentyloxy)triphenylene (HPT) in the isotropic phase near the columnar-isotropic (C-I) phase transition. The OHD-OKE signal of HPT is characterized by an intermediate power law t-0.76±0.02 at short times (a few picoseconds), a von Schweidler power law t-0.26±0.01 at intermediate times (hundreds of picoseconds), and an exponential decay at long times (tens of nanoseconds). The exponential decay has Arrhenius temperature dependence. The functional form of the total time dependent decay is identical to the one observed previously for a large number of molecular supercooled liquids. The mode coupling theory schematic model based on the Sjögren [Phys. Rev. A 33, 1254 (1986)] model is able to reproduce the HPT data over a wide range of times from <1ps to tens of nanoseconds. The studies indicate that the HPT C-I phase transition is a strong first order transition, and the dynamics in the isotropic phase display a complex time dependent profile that is common to other molecular liquids that lack mesoscopic structure.

  6. Blue phase liquid crystals stabilized by linear photo-polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daming; Yuan, Jiamin; Schadt, Martin; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2014-08-01

    Stabilizing a photopolymer-embedded blue phase liquid crystal precursor with linearly polarized UV light is investigated experimentally. When the UV polarization axis is perpendicular to the stripe electrodes of an in-plane-switching cell, anisotropic polymer networks are formed through the linear photo-polymerization process and the electrostriction effect is suppressed. As a result, the measured hysteresis is dramatically reduced from 6.95% to 0.36% and the response time shortened by ˜2× compared to unpolarized UV exposure. To induce larger anisotropy in polymer networks for mitigating the electrostriction effect, high-intensity linearly polarized UV exposure is preferred.

  7. Large three-dimensional photonic crystals based on monocrystalline liquid crystal blue phases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Hou, Chien-Tsung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ching-Lang; Guo, Duan-Yi; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chiang, Sheng-Ping; Bunning, Timothy J; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-09-28

    Although there have been intense efforts to fabricate large three-dimensional photonic crystals in order to realize their full potential, the technologies developed so far are still beset with various material processing and cost issues. Conventional top-down fabrications are costly and time-consuming, whereas natural self-assembly and bottom-up fabrications often result in high defect density and limited dimensions. Here we report the fabrication of extraordinarily large monocrystalline photonic crystals by controlling the self-assembly processes which occur in unique phases of liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties called liquid-crystal blue phases. In particular, we have developed a gradient-temperature technique that enables three-dimensional photonic crystals to grow to lateral dimensions of ~1 cm (~30,000 of unit cells) and thickness of ~100 μm (~ 300 unit cells). These giant single crystals exhibit extraordinarily sharp photonic bandgaps with high reflectivity, long-range periodicity in all dimensions and well-defined lattice orientation.Conventional fabrication approaches for large-size three-dimensional photonic crystals are problematic. By properly controlling the self-assembly processes, the authors report the fabrication of monocrystalline blue phase liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties.

  8. Asymmetric dynamic phase holographic grating in nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chang-Yu; Shi, Hong-Xin; Ai, Yan-Bao; Yin, Xiang-Bao; Wang, Feng; Ding, Hong-Wei

    2016-09-01

    A new scheme for recording a dynamic phase grating with an asymmetric profile in C60-doped homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) was presented. An oblique incidence beam was used to record the thin asymmetric dynamic phase holographic grating. The diffraction efficiency we achieved is more than 40%, exceeding the theoretical limit for symmetric profile gratings. Both facts can be explained by assuming that a grating with an asymmetric saw-tooth profile is formed in the NLC. Finally, physical mechanism and mathematical model for characterizing the asymmetric phase holographic grating were presented, based on the photo-refractive-like (PR-like) effect. Project supported by the Science and Technology Programs of the Educational Committee of Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. 12541730) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405057).

  9. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2000-01-01

    , the limited spatial resolution and the methods required for data reduction suggest that a more useful instrument needs to be developed. The category of interferometers known as common path interferometers can eliminate much of the vibration sensitivity associated with traditional interferometry as described above. In these devices, division of the amplitude of the wavefront following the test section produces the reference beam. Examples of these instruments include shearing and point diffraction interferometers. In the latter case, shown schematically, a lens focuses light passing through the test section onto a small diffracting object. Such objects are typically either a circle of material on a high quality glass plate or a small sphere in a glass cell. The size of the focused spot is several times larger than the object so that the light not intercepted by the diffracting object forms the test beam while the diffracted light generates a spherical reference beam. While this configuration is mechanically stable, phase shifting one beam with respect to the other is difficult due to the common path. Phase shifting enables extremely accurate measurements of the phase of the interferogram using only gray scale intensity measurements and is the de facto standard of industry. Mercer and Creath 2 demonstrated phase shifting in a point diffraction interferometer using a spherical spacer in a liquid crystal cell as the diffracting object. By changing the voltage across the cell, they were able to shift the phase of the undiffracted beam relative to the reference beam generated by diffraction from the sphere. While they applied this technology to fluid measurements, the device shifted phase so slowly that it was not useful for studying transient phenomena. We have identified several technical problems that precluded operation of the device at video frame rates and intend to solve them to produce a phase-shifting liquid crystal point-diffraction interferometer operating at

  10. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Supersaturated Lysozyme Solutions and Associated Precipitate Formation/Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (wlv) NaCl at pH= 4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  11. Liquid-liquid phase separation in supersaturated lysozyme solutions and associated precipitate formation/crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-08-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (w/v) NaCl at pH=4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  12. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Supersaturated Lysozyme Solutions and Associated Precipitate Formation/Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (wlv) NaCl at pH= 4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  13. Harmonic strain-optical response revealed in the isotropic (liquid) phase of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, P.; Baroni, P.; Noirez, L.

    2015-08-01

    A strong optical birefringence is observed when applying a small amplitude oscillatory strain to the liquid phase of a liquid crystal. This unpredicted birefringence is found to oscillate at the same frequency as the driving frequency, with frequencies down to 0.01 Hz. This birefringence is visible up to 15 °C above the liquid crystal transition. This opto-dynamic property is interpreted as a result of a coupling of the orientational pretransitional fluctuations existing in the isotropic phase and long range elastic interactions recently identified in liquids. The conversion of the mechanical wave in an optical response is shapeable. Two examples of synchronized periodic signals are shown: the sine and the square waves. The optimization of the signal is analyzed using a Heaviside-step shear test. This optical property is immediately exploitable to design low energy on/off switching materials.

  14. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolot'ko, A. S.; Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Shvetsov, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitions are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.

  15. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolot’ko, A. S. Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Shvetsov, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitions are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.

  16. Liquid crystal gratings from nematic to blue phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-qing; Hu, Wei; Lin, Xiao-wen; Srivastava, Abhishek; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2012-10-01

    Some of our recent progress on liquid crystal (LC) gratings, from nematic to blue phase, is reviewed in this invited talk. The first kind of grating is fabricated by periodically adjusting the LC directors to form alternate micro phase retarders and polarization rotators in a cell placed between crossed polarizers. The second one is demonstrated by means of photoalignment technique with alternate orthogonal homogeneously-aligned domains. To improve the response time of the gratings, several approaches are also proposed by using dual-frequency addressed nematic LC, ferroelectric LC and blue phase LC, which shows great performance including high transmittance, polarization independency and submillisecond response. At last, to obtain other controllable LC microstructures rather than simple 1D/2D gratings, we develop a micro-lithography system with a digital micro-mirror device as dynamic mask forms. It may instantly generate arbitrary micro-images on photoalignment layers and further guides the LC molecule orientations. Besides normal phase gratings, more complex patterns such as quasicrystal structures are demonstrated. Some new applications such as tunable multiport optical switching and vector beam generations are expected.

  17. Crystallization and Phase Changes in Paracetamol from the Amorphous Solid to the Liquid Phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For the case of paracetamol, we show how terahertz time-domain spectroscopy can be used to characterize the solid and liquid phase dynamics. Heating of supercooled amorphous paracetamol from 295 K in a covered sample under vacuum leads to its crystallization at 330 K. First, form III is formed followed by the transformation of form III to form II at 375 K, to form I at 405 K, and finally melting is observed around 455 K. We discuss the difference between the featureless spectra of the supercooled liquid and its liquid melt. Lastly, we studied the onset of crystallization from the supercooled liquid in detail and quantified its kinetics based on the Avrami–Erofeev model. We determined an effective rate constant of k = 0.056 min–1 with a corresponding onset of crystallization at T = 329.5 K for a heating rate of 0.4 K min–1. PMID:24579729

  18. Chromatic aberration control with liquid crystal spatial phase modulators.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jose L; Fernandez, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2017-05-01

    The chromatic behavior of diffractive optical elements, exhibiting 2π-wrapped phase profiles, implemented into liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC-SLM) is described. A wrapped phase map is only equivalent to the original continuous profile for the design wavelength while at other wavelengths there are unwanted phase jumps and the profile does not correspond to a pure defocus. For those conditions the wrapped profile behaves as a multiple order lens (multi-focal lens). The optical power dispersion for each order is linearly proportional to the wavelength, while the energy of each order depends on the design wavelength and the material dispersion. For practical purposes, for most of the visible range only first order (main defocus) is relevant but two other orders may also be considered depending on the actual PSF of the system. As an application, we demonstrate that the longitudinal chromatic aberration of the eye can be compensated by the diffractive lens dispersion when the appropriate defocus is programmed into the SLM.

  19. A phase-stepped point diffraction interferometer using liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Creath, Katherine; Rashidnia, Nasser

    1995-01-01

    A new instrument, the liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI), has been developed for the measurement of phase objects. This instrument maintains the compact, robust design of Linnik's point diffraction interferometer (PDI) and adds to it phase stepping capability for quantitative interferogram analysis. The result is a compact, simple to align, environmentally insensitive interferometer capable of accurately measuring optical wavefronts with high data density and with automated data reduction. The design of the LCPDI is briefly discussed. An algorithm is presented for eliminating phase measurement error caused by object beam intensity variation from frame-to-frame. The LCPDI is demonstrated by measuring the temperature distribution across a heated chamber filled with silicone oil. The measured results are compared to independently measured results and show excellent agreement with them. It is expected that this instrument will have application in the fluid sciences as a diagnostic tool, particularly in space based applications where autonomy, robustness, and compactness are desirable qualities. It should also be useful for the testing of optical elements, provided a master is available for comparison.

  20. Microstructure and phase behavior in colloids and liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, Matthew Alan

    This thesis describes our investigation of microstructure and phase behavior in colloids and liquid crystals. The first set of experiments explores the phase behavior of helical packings of thermoresponsive microspheres inside glass capillaries as a function of volume fraction. Stable helical packings are observed with long-range orientational order. Some of these packings evolve abruptly to disordered states as the volume fraction is reduced. We quantify these transitions using correlation functions and susceptibilities of an orientational order parameter. The emergence of coexisting metastable packings, as well as coexisting ordered and disordered states, is also observed. These findings support the notion of phase-transition-like behavior in quasi-one-dimensional systems. The second set of experiments investigates cross-over behavior from glasses with attractive interactions to sparse gel-like states. In particular, the vibrational modes of quasi-two-dimensional disordered colloidal packings of hard colloidal spheres with short-range attractions are measured as a function of packing fraction. A crossover from glassy to sparse gel-like states is indicated by an excess of low-frequency phonon modes. This change in vibrational mode distribution appears to arise from highly localized vibrations that tend to involve individual and/or small clusters of particles with few local bonds. These mode behaviors and corresponding structural insights may serve as a useful signature for glass-gel transitions in wider classes of attractive packings. A third set of experiments explores the director structures of aqueous lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) films created on square lattice cylindrical-micropost substrates. The structures are manipulated by modulating of the concentration-dependent elastic properties of LCLC s via drying. Nematic LCLC films exhibit preferred bistable alignment along the diagonals of the micropost lattice. Columnar LCLC films form two distinct

  1. Non-Fermi liquid phase in metallic Skyrmion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki; Parameswaran, Siddharth; Raghu, Srinivas; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by reports of a non-Fermi liquid state in MnSi, we examine the effect of coupling phonons of an incommensurate skyrmion crystal (SkX) to conduction electrons. We find that non-Fermi liquid behavior emerges in both two and three dimensions over the entire phase, due to an anomalous electron-phonon coupling that is linked to the net skyrmion density. A small parameter, the spiral wave vector in lattice units, allows us to exercise analytic control and ignore Landau damping of phonons over a wide energy range. At the lowest energy scales the problem is similar to electrons coupled to a gauge field. The best prospects for realizing these effects is in short period skyrmion lattice systems such as MnGe or epitaxial MnSi films. We also compare our results with the unusual T 3 / 2 scaling of temperature dependent resistivity seen in high pressure experiments on MnSi. We acknowledge support from the NSF via Grant DMR-0645691, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences via contract DE-AC02-76SF00515, and the Simons, Templeton, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundations.

  2. The Influence of Disorder on Thermotropic Nematic Liquid Crystals Phase Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Nita, Vlad; Gerlič, Ivan; Kralj, Samo

    2009-01-01

    We review the theoretical research on the influence of disorder on structure and phase behavior of condensed matter system exhibiting continuous symmetry breaking focusing on liquid crystal phase transitions. We discuss the main properties of liquid crystals as adequate systems in which several open questions with respect to the impact of disorder on universal phase and structural behavior could be explored. Main advantages of liquid crystalline materials and different experimental realizations of random field-type disorder imposed on liquid crystal phases are described. PMID:19865529

  3. Electro-optical behavior of polymer dispersed blue phase liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemiklioglu, E.; Chien, L.-C.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated a new form of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) electro-optical films comprised of blue phase liquid crystal and polymer prepared by the solvent evaporation method. In this method, polymer dispersed blue phase (PDBP) films, which were laminated between two indium-tin-oxidecoated conductive substrates, demonstrated two switching modes between light scattering and transparent states in response to an applied electric field across the film. The electro-optical properties of PDBP liquid crystals can be altered by changing the concentrations of liquid crystal and polymer. The compositions, film preparations, physical and morphological behaviors, and electro-optical properties of PDBP films are described.

  4. Determination of the liquid crystals phase transition temperatures using optical rotation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiao-ling; Liu, Wei-guo; Liu, Peng; Cai, Chang-long

    2011-11-01

    Using optical rotation effect, a sensitive, simple optical analytical system is developed for determining the phase transition temperatures of liquid crystals (LCs). When a monochromatic polarized light passes through LCs sample and analyzer, the light intensity changes with temperature. Especially, during the phase transition process, the intensity varies greatly due to optical rotation effect. The variation of light intensity versus variation of temperature curve shows the phase transition temperatures of LCs clearly. The phase transition temperatures of three cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) and a nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) were detected by this method, and compared with those of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized light microscope (PLM) methods.

  5. Liquid Crystals of Dendron-Like Pt Complexes Processable Into Nanofilms Dendrimers. Phase 2. Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Glass Platinum Acetylides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Std. Z39.18 Final Report Liquid Crystals of Dendron-Like Pt Complexes Processable Into Nanofilms. Dendrimers Eduardo Arias...to pack and also the presence of a polar group. Figure 4. Summary of phase behavior. DENDRIMERS New Denrimers. The synthesis...purification and some spectral characteristics of the new dendrimers shown in Fig 5 were reported in AFOSR FA9550-11-1-0169, May, 2013. Further

  6. Phase and Topological Behavior of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals in Double Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zoey S.; Jeong, Joonwoo; Tu, Fuquan; Lohr, Matt; Lee, Daeyeon; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, assembled by non-covalent interactions, have fascinating temperature- and concentration-dependent phase behavior. Using water-oil-water double emulsions, we are able control the inner droplet chromonic phase concentration by osmosis through the oil phase. We then study the configurations of the chromonic liquid crystal phases in droplets by varying the oil types, oil soluble surfactants, and inner droplet diameter. We employ polarization microscopy to observe resulting nematic and columnar phases of Sunset Yellow FCF, and we deduce the liquid crystal configuration of both phases within the droplets. Simulations based on Jones matrices confirm droplet appearance, and preliminary observations of chromonic liquid crystal shells in oil-water-oil double emulsions are reported. Supported by UPenn MRSEC DMR 11-20901 and NSF DMR 12-05463

  7. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k =km will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k =0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k =km will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C , but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  8. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k=k(m) will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k=0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k=k(m) will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C, but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  9. Digital phase-shifting interferometer with an electrically addressed liquid-crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Bitou, Youichi

    2003-09-01

    A digital phase-shifting interferometer with a liquid-crystal-display coupled, parallel aligned, nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulator is developed. The optical phase shift in the Michelson-type polarization interferometer is achieved by a digital phase shift of a grating displayed on the spatial light modulator. Accurate experimental results of using the heterodyne system for pi/2 phase steps were demonstrated. A phase-shifting interferometer with no moving parts and no requirement for calibration of the value of the phase shift was achieved.

  10. Liquid-crystal phase grating based on in-plane switching.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, I

    2001-12-01

    A simple phase grating is constructed by insertion of a liquid-crystal layer between two glass plates, upon one of which a pair of transparent interdigitated electrodes is formed. With a bias application, liquid-crystal molecules align themselves along the electric field lines, which are substantially parallel to the glass plates. By controlling the degree of this in-plane switching for the liquid-crystal molecules, one can generate various phase-shift distributions for the light passing through the device. The grating characteristics are altered accordingly. Versatile design and ease of fabrication are potential advantages of this device for some future applications.

  11. Spatially resolved phase imaging of a programmable liquid-crystal grating.

    PubMed

    Friedman, L J; Hobbs, D S; Lieberman, S; Corkum, D L; Nguyen, H Q; Resler, D P; Sharp, R C; Dorschner, T A

    1996-11-01

    Phase imaging is used to compare near-field measurements with the corresponding far-field intensity distribution. A liquid-crystal device serves as a phase object that can be programmed as a variable grating. Real-time phase visualization then provides an avenue for direct optimization of complex phase gratings.

  12. Polymer Stabilization of Liquid-Crystal Blue Phase II toward Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Jo, Seong-Yong; Jeon, Sung-Wook; Kim, Byeong-Cheon; Bae, Jae-Hyun; Araoka, Fumito; Choi, Suk-Won

    2017-03-15

    The temperature ranges where a pure simple-cubic blue phase (BPII) emerges are quite narrow compared to the body-centered-cubic BP (BPI) such that the polymer stabilization of BPII is much more difficult. Hence, a polymer-stabilized BPII possessing a wide temperature range has been scarcely reported. Here, we fabricate a polymer-stabilized BPII over a temperature range of 50 °C including room temperature. The fabricated polymer-stabilized BPII is confirmed via polarized optical microscopy, Bragg reflection, and Kossel diagram observations. Furthermore, we demonstrate reflective BP liquid-crystal devices utilizing the reflectance-voltage performance as a potential application of the polymer-stabilized BPII. Our work demonstrates the possibility of practical application of the polymer-stabilized BPII to photonic crystals.

  13. Morphology and crystal phase evolution of GeO 2 in liquid phase deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chengbin; Sun, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yi; Chu, Junhao

    2012-01-01

    Morphology and crystal phase evolution of GeO 2 in liquid phase deposition (LPD) process is investigated. Rod-like solid phases precipitate out of solution ahead of truncated cube-like phases. SEM, XRD and TEM analyses reveal that the two sorts of solid phases are tetragonal GeO 2 and hexagonal GeO 2, respectively. The tetragonal GeO 2 phases start to experience a re-dissolving process as soon as the hexagonal phases come into being. The prior precipitation of the rod-like phase arises from a relatively low solute saturation of tetragonal GeO 2. Fast growth of a tetragonal GeO 2 phase along [111] direction leads to development of a rod-like shape. The re-dissolving phenomenon does not agree with the classic growth kinetics of crystals but is strongly favored by our calculations based on thermodynamics. The GeO 2 solutes are released in a fluctuant way by germanate ions, which promotes the occurrence of the re-dissolution phenomenon. The current researches open a door for room-temperature LPD growth of not only the hexagonal GeO 2 particles and film but also the one-dimensional tetragonal GeO 2 product.

  14. Dual-period tunable phase grating using polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Xing, Yufei; Li, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Dual-period tunable phase grating using polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal is demonstrated by controlling its driving scheme. High efficiencies of 35.3% for the small-period phase grating and 28.7% for the large-period phase grating have been achieved because of the rectangular-like phase profile which shows good agreement with the simulation results. The diffraction angle can be alternatively tuned, as well as the diffraction efficiency. Moreover, this device also possesses polarization independency and fast response with a rise time of 826 μs and a decay time of 1.143 ms which shows great potential for diffractive optics.

  15. Polarization-independent rapidly responding phase grating based on hybrid blue phase liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Jau, Hung-Chang; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-02-01

    This work demonstrates a polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) liquid crystal phase grating, which is made of hybrid PSBPs with two different Kerr constants. The Kerr constant of a PSBP is related to the morphology of the polymer network which can be controlled by the phase separation temperature. Owing to the non-patterned electrode and the optical isotropy of the PSBP, the diffraction effect can be completely switched off when the voltage is absent. The diffraction intensity increases when a uniform applied electrical field induces the phase difference in the hybrid PSBP. The phase grating is completely independent of the polarization of the incident light. Furthermore, the response time to switching is in the sub-millisecond range.

  16. The liquid protein phase in crystallization: a case study—intact immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; Malkin, Alexander J.; McPherson, Alexander

    2001-11-01

    A common observation by protein chemists has been the appearance, for many proteins in aqueous solutions, of oil like droplets, or in more extreme cases the formation of a second oil like phase. These may accompany the formation of precipitate in "salting out" or "salting in' procedures, but more commonly appear in place of any precipitate. Such phase separations also occur, with even greater frequency, in the presence of polymeric precipitants such as polyethyleneglycol (PEG). In general the appearance of a second liquid phase has been taken as indicative of protein aggregation, though an aggregate state distinctly different from that characteristic of amorphous precipitate. While the latter is thought to be composed of linear and branched assemblies, polymers of a sort, the oil phase suggests a more compact, three-dimensional, but fluid state. An important property of an alternate, fluid phase is that it can mediate transitions between other states, for example, between protein molecules free in solution and protein molecules immobilized in amorphous precipitate or crystals. The "liquid protein" phase can be readily observed in many crystallization experiments either prior to the appearance of visible crystals, or directly participating in the crystal growth process. In some cases the relationship between the liquid phase and developing crystals is intimate. Crystals grow directly from the liquid phase, or appear only after the visible formation of the liquid phase. We describe here our experience with a class of macromolecules, immunoglobulins, and particularly IDEC-151, an IgG specific for CD4 on human lymphocytes. This protein has been crystallized from a Jeffamine-LiSO 4 mother liquor and, its crystallization illustrates many of the features associated with the liquid protein, or protein rich phase.

  17. IMPROVING LIQUID CRYSTAL-BASED BIOSENSING IN AQUEOUS PHASES

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Wilder; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Jákli, Antal

    2012-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biological sensors permit the study of aqueous biological samples without the need for the labeling of biological species with fluorescent dyes (which can be laborious and change the properties of the biological sample under study). To date, studies of LC-based biosensors have explored only a narrow range of the liquid crystal/alignment layer combinations essential to their operation. Here we report a study of the role of LC elastic constants and the surface anchoring energy in determining the sensitivity of LC-based biosensors. By investigating a mixture of rod-shape and bent-shape mesogens, and three different alignment layers, we were able to widen the useful detection range of a LC-based sensor by providing an almost linear mapping of effective birefringence with concentration between 0.05 and 1mM of an anionic surfactant (model target analyte). These studies pave the way for optimization of LC-based biosensors and reveal the importance of the choice of both the LC material and the alignment layer in determining sensor properties. PMID:23157269

  18. Diffraction based phase compensation method for phase-only liquid crystal on silicon devices in operation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zichen; Yang, Haining; Robertson, Brian; Redmond, Maura; Pivnenko, Mike; Collings, Neil; Crossland, William A; Chu, Daping

    2012-06-10

    A method to measure the optical response across the surface of a phase-only liquid crystal on silicon device using binary phase gratings is described together with a procedure to compensate its spatial optical phase variation. As a result, the residual power between zero and the minima of the first diffraction order for a binary grating can be reduced by more than 10 dB, from -15.98 dB to -26.29 dB. This phase compensation method is also shown to be useful in nonbinary cases. A reduction in the worst crosstalk by 5.32 dB can be achieved when quantized blazed gratings are used.

  19. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  20. Liquid Crystal Phase Behaviour of Attractive Disc-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a generalized van der Waals-Onsager perturbation theory to construct a free energy functional capable of describing the thermodynamic properties and orientational order of the isotropic and nematic phases of attractive disc particles. The model mesogen is a hard (purely repulsive) cylindrical disc particle decorated with an anisotropic square-well attractive potential placed at the centre of mass. Even for isotropic attractive interactions, the resulting overall inter-particle potential is anisotropic, due to the orientation-dependent excluded volume of the underlying hard core. An algebraic equation of state for attractive disc particles is developed by adopting the Onsager trial function to characterize the orientational order in the nematic phase. The theory is then used to represent the fluid-phase behaviour (vapour-liquid, isotropic-nematic, and nematic-nematic) of the oblate attractive particles for varying values of the molecular aspect ratio and parameters of the attractive potential. When compared to the phase diagram of their athermal analogues, it is seen that the addition of an attractive interaction facilitates the formation of orientationally-ordered phases. Most interestingly, for certain aspect ratios, a coexistence between two anisotropic nematic phases is exhibited by the attractive disc-like fluids. PMID:23965962

  1. Phase diagrams of mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external field

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2014-11-14

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase behaviors in mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external magnetic or electric field. Taking into account a chiral coupling between a polymer and a liquid crystal under the external field, we examine twist-untwist phase transitions and phase separations in the mixtures. It is found that a cholesteric-nematic phase transition can be induced by not only the external field but also concentration and temperature. Depending on the strength of the external field, we predict cholesteric-paranematic (Ch+pN), nematic-paranematic (N+pN), cholesteric-nematic (Ch+N) phase separations, etc., on the temperature-concentration plane. We also discuss mixtures of a non-chiral nematic liquid crystal and a chiral dopant.

  2. Temperature tuning of lasing emission from dye-doped liquid crystal at intermediate twisted phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kuan-Cheng; Lin, Ja-Hon; Jian, Li-Hao; Chen, Yao-Hui; Wu, Jin-Jei

    2015-07-01

    Temperature tuning of lasing emission from dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) at intermediate twisted phase has been demonstrated in this work. With heavily doping of 42.5% chiral molecules into the nematic liquid crystals, the shifts of photonic bandgap versus temperature is obviously as thermal controlling of the sample below the certain value. By the differential scanning calorimetr measuremet, we demonstrate the phase transition from the CLC to the smectic phase when the temperature is lowered to be about 15°C. Between CLC and smectic phase, the liquid crystal mixtures are operated at intermediate twisted phase that can be used the temperature related refractive mirror. After pump by the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, the lasing emission from this dye doped LC mixtures has been demonstrated whose emission wavelength can be tuned from 566 to 637 nm with 1.4°C variation.

  3. Blue phase liquid crystal: strategies for phase stabilization and device development

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M D Asiqur; Mohd Said, Suhana; Balamurugan, S

    2015-01-01

    The blue phase liquid crystal (BPLC) is a highly ordered liquid crystal (LC) phase found very close to the LC–isotropic transition. The BPLC has demonstrated potential in next-generation display and photonic technology due to its exceptional properties such as sub-millisecond response time and wide viewing angle. However, BPLC is stable in a very small temperature range (0.5–1 °C) and its driving voltage is very high (∼100 V). To overcome these challenges recent research has focused on solutions which incorporate polymers or nanoparticles into the blue phase to widen the temperature range from around few °C to potentially more than 60 °C. In order to reduce the driving voltage, strategies have been attempted by modifying the device structure by introducing protrusion or corrugated electrodes and vertical field switching mechanism has been proposed. In this paper the effectiveness of the proposed solution will be discussed, in order to assess the potential of BPLC in display technology and beyond. PMID:27877782

  4. Observation of polarization conflict caused by geometrical phase in a twisted nematic liquid crystal cell.

    PubMed

    Vasnetsov, M V; Pas'ko, V A; Kasyanyuk, D S

    2011-06-01

    We analyze the optical effects associated with an adiabatic rotation of a plane of polarization in a twisted nematic liquid crystal. The experimental verification was performed with a cell with linear rubbing of a front surface and circular rubbing of a rear surface. The expectations of the liquid crystal's orientation defect origin along the line of the maximum tension and a polarization conflict caused by geometrical phase are confirmed. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  5. Polarization independent blue phase liquid crystal gratings based on periodic polymer slices structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Li, Qing; Hu, Kai

    2013-10-01

    A polarization independent switchable phase grating based on polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal is proposed. A high efficiency of the phase grating has been achieved because of the sharp rectangular phase profile which shows good agreement with the simulation results. The diffraction efficiency of the 1st order is 38%, the response time is in the submillisecond range, and the phase grating is independent of the polarization of the incident light. The voltage-induced hysteresis characteristics are also investigated.

  6. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  7. Liquid crystal optofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasdekis, A. E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-01

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  8. Optical phase conjugation in azo-dye doped chiral liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinski, Pawel; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2012-10-01

    We report on optical phase conjugation phenomenon observed in chiral nematic liquid crystal showing band gap type Bragg reflection. The phase conjugate to the signal beam is observable only in the small temperature interval when the Bragg condition is fulfilled and only for circularly polarized light. The optical phase conjugation signals were observed at low cw laser light intensities (<100 mW/cm2, λ = 532 nm). Estimated value of third order optical susceptibility χ(3) = 2.8 × 10-17 m2/V2 is attributed to enhancement due to photoisomerisation of azo-dye (disperse red 1) inducing molecular reorientation process of liquid crystal molecules.

  9. Setting up a liquid crystal phase screen to simulate atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Michael K.; Seward, Anthony J.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Rha, Jungtae; Jimenez, Ray

    2000-11-01

    Phase screens are often used to simulate atmospheric turbulence in systems designed to test adaptive optics techniques. This paper presents the design and implementation of a dynamic phase screen using a simple and inexpensive twisted nematic liquid crystal display taken from a video projector and placed in a pupil plane. The details of the optical system layout, the system alignment procedure, and the operating parameters of the liquid crystal display are discussed. Examples of turbulence (having strength and statistics similar to measured values of atmospheric turbulence in a variety of scenarios) are written to the phase screen, and the effects of the turbulence on image quality are measured and presented.

  10. Directed self-assembly of liquid crystalline blue-phases into ideal single-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-González, Jose A.; Li, Xiao; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhou, Ye; Zhang, Rui; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-06-01

    Chiral nematic liquid crystals are known to form blue phases--liquid states of matter that exhibit ordered cubic arrangements of topological defects. Blue-phase specimens, however, are generally polycrystalline, consisting of randomly oriented domains that limit their performance in applications. A strategy that relies on nano-patterned substrates is presented here for preparation of stable, macroscopic single-crystal blue-phase materials. Different template designs are conceived to exert control over different planes of the blue-phase lattice orientation with respect to the underlying substrate. Experiments are then used to demonstrate that it is indeed possible to create stable single-crystal blue-phase domains with the desired orientation over large regions. These results provide a potential avenue to fully exploit the electro-optical properties of blue phases, which have been hindered by the existence of grain boundaries.

  11. Light-controllable reflection wavelength of blue phase liquid crystals doped with azobenzene-dimers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingwu; Wang, Ling; Li, Chenyue; Xiao, Jiumei; Ding, Hangjun; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; He, Wanli; Yang, Huai

    2013-10-03

    A new series of azobenzene-dimers were synthesized and doped into the blue phase liquid crystals to broaden the temperature range of BPs. It is found that not only can the reflection wavelength of BPI be reversibly controlled but BPI can also be transformed into the cholesteric phase owing to isomerization of azobenzene induced by light.

  12. A binary phase field crystal study for liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanli; Peng, Yingying; Chen, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    The liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth on predefined crystalline substrate is studied with binary phase field crystal (PFC) model. The purpose of this paper focuses on changes of the morphology of epitaxial films, influences of substrate vicinal angles on epitaxial growth, characteristics of islands growth on both sides of the substrate as well. It is found that the morphology of epitaxial films undergoes the following transitions: layer-by-layer growth, islands formation, mismatch dislocations nucleation and climb towards the film-substrate interface. Meanwhile, the density of steps and islands has obviously direct ratio relations with the vicinal angles. Also, preferential regions are found when islands grow on both sides of the substrate. For thinner substrate, the arrangement of islands is more orderly and the appearance of preferential growth is more obvious than that of thicker substrate. Also, the existing of preferential regions is much more valid for small substrate vicinal angles in contrast for big substrate vicinal angles.

  13. Direct measurement of the propagation of the phase-transition region of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    Many types of active matter, such as biological cells, have liquid-crystalline membranes, which are soft and flexible in their interactions with their surroundings and sometimes allow molecular-structural or -orientational changes to extend for long distances, owing to long-range molecular interactions. Despite the technological and fundamental importance of these long-range changes, there is no good physical property with which to express them for the liquid crystal. Here, we show direct measurements of the propagation of structural or orientational changes due to long-range molecular interactions in liquid crystals. We induced a patterned phase transition in a liquid crystal via illumination with a fringe pattern and observed the propagation of the phase-transition region. We determined that the propagation occurred in a ballistic manner with a velocity of 80–110 m/s and that two types of propagation—side-by-side and head-to-tail molecular interactions—were found.

  14. Directed Self-Assembly of Liquid Crystalline Blue-Phases into Ideal Single-Crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose A.; Li, Xiao; Sadati, Monirosadat; ...

    2017-06-16

    Chiral nematic liquid crystals are known to form blue phases—liquid states of matter that exhibit ordered cubic arrangements of topological defects. Blue-phase specimens, however, are generally polycrystalline, consisting of randomly oriented domains that limit their performance in applications. A strategy that relies on nano-patterned substrates is presented here for preparation of stable, macroscopic single-crystal blue-phase materials. Different template designs are conceived to exert control over different planes of the blue-phase lattice orientation with respect to the underlying substrate. Experiments are then used to demonstrate that it is indeed possible to create stable single-crystal blue-phase domains with the desired orientation overmore » large regions. Lastly, these results provide a potential avenue to fully exploit the electro-optical properties of blue phases, which have been hindered by the existence of grain boundaries.« less

  15. Phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator is introduced. A close-loop phase retrieval method based on Eigen functions of Laplacian is proposed, and its accuracy and efficiency are analyzed through numerical experiments of atmospheric phase retrieval. The results show that the close-loop phase retrieval method has a high accuracy. Moreover, it is stable regardless of modal cross coupling.

  16. Multi-spatial-frequency and phase-shifting profilometry using a liquid crystal phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyung-Il; Park, Chang-Sub; Park, Min-Kyu; Park, Kyung-Woo; Park, Ji-Sub; Seo, Youngmin; Hahn, Joonku; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2012-05-10

    Optical profilometry is widely applied for measuring the morphology of objects by projecting predetermined patterns on them. In this technique, the compact size is one of the interesting issues for practical applications. The generation of pattern by the interference of coherent light sources has a potential to reduce the dimension of the illumination part. Moreover, this method can make fine patterns without projection optics, and the illumination part is free of restriction from the numerical aperture of the projection optics. In this paper, a phase-shifting profilometry is implemented by using a single liquid crystal (LC) cell. The LC phase modulator is designed to generate the interference patterns with several different spatial frequencies by changing selection of the spacing between the micro-pinholes. We manufactured the LC phase modulator and calibrated it by measuring the phase modulation amount depending on an applied voltage. Our optical profilometry using the single LC cell can generate multi-spatial frequency patterns as well as four steps of the phase-shifted patterns. This method can be implemented compactly, and the reconstructed depth profile is obtained without a phase-unwrapping algorithm.

  17. Low voltage and high resolution phase modulator based on blue phase liquid crystals with external compact optical system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Xing, Yufei; Guo, Zhengbo; Li, Qing

    2015-06-15

    Liquid crystal phase modulators are emerging as a new technological advancement, since they can be used for a wide range of applications. To improve their performance, polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal (PS-BPLC) phase modulators with fast response time and accurate phase profile become a necessary. Here, we proposed a facile PS-BPLC phase modulator to achieve particularly low voltage and high resolution. By employing a specific external compact optical system setup, the driving voltage is reduced to 26.09V to obtain 2π phase change at the wavelength of 532 nm. An accurate numerical modeling is also conducted to provide a systematic investigation of the fringing electric field effect to the performance of high resolution PS-BPLC phase modulator. The wavefront distortion caused by the fringing electric field can be automatically compensated to generate accurate phase profile for fast response liquid crystal phase modulator. This work provides a new protocol to realize liquid crystal on silicon based fast response and high resolution phase modulator.

  18. Optically addressed and submillisecond response phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiangjie; Duan, Jiazhu; Zhang, Dayong; Luo, Yongquan

    2014-10-01

    Liquid crystal based phase only spatial light modulator has attracted many research interests since last decades because of its superior advantage. Until now the liquid crystal spatial light modulator has been applied in many fields, but the response speed of nematic LC limited its further application. In this paper, an optically addressed phase only LC spatial light modulator was proposed based on polymer network liquid crystal. Morphology effect on the light scattering of PNLC was studied, which was mainly consisted of fiber and fiber bundles. The morphology nearly determined the light scattering and electro-optical property. Due to the high threshold voltage, to address the PNLC phase modulator was also concerned. Optical addressing method was proposed, in which BSO crystal was selected to replace one of the glass substrate. The response speed of PNLC was so fast that the reorientation of liquid crystal director will follow the change of effective voltage applied on LC layer, which was related with the voltage signal and especially with electron transport of photo-induced carriers due to diffusion and drift. The on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated. Based on this device, beam steering was also achieved by loading 488nm laser strip on the optical addressed phase only spatial light modulator.

  19. Phase behavior of a nematic liquid crystal in contact with a chemically and geometrically structured substrate.

    PubMed

    Harnau, L; Kondrat, S; Poniewierski, A

    2005-07-01

    A nematic liquid crystal in contact with a grating surface possessing an alternating stripe pattern of locally homeotropic and planar anchoring is studied within the Frank-Oseen model. The combination of both chemical and geometrical surface pattern leads to rich phase diagrams, involving a homeotropic, a planar, and a tilted nematic texture. The effect of the groove depth and the anchoring strengths on the location and the order of phase transitions between different nematic textures is studied. A zenithally bistable nematic device is investigated by confining a nematic liquid crystal between the patterned grating surface and a flat substrate with strong homeotropic anchoring.

  20. Field-induced phase transitions in chiral smectic liquid crystals studied by the constant current method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, Dhaouadi; R, Zgueb; O, Riahi; F, Trabelsi; T, Othman

    2016-05-01

    In ferroelectric liquid crystals, phase transitions can be induced by an electric field. The current constant method allows these transition to be quickly localized and thus the (E,T) phase diagram of the studied product can be obtained. In this work, we make a slight modification to the measurement principles based on this method. This modification allows the characteristic parameters of ferroelectric liquid crystal to be quantitatively measured. The use of a current square signal highlights a phenomenon of ferroelectric hysteresis with remnant polarization at null field, which points out an effect of memory in this compound.

  1. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min-1, consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min-1 and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  2. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Dan, K; Roy, M; Datta, A

    2015-09-07

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min(-1), consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min(-1) and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  3. Liquid crystal alignment with a molecular template of imprinted polymer layer during phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak-Rin; Jung, Jong-Wook; Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2006-03-01

    We developed a liquid crystal (LC) alignment method using a molecular template of an imprinted polymer layer during polymerization-induced phase separation. Our results showed that the nematic ordering of LC is transferred to the polymer chain ordering during an anisotropic phase separation, which produces an anisotropic azimuthal surface anchoring. Using in-plane field treatment during phase separation, a twisted nematic cell is demonstrated.

  4. Morphology effect on the light scattering and dynamic response of polymer network liquid crystal phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Xiangjie, Zhao; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Jiancheng, Zeng; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2014-06-16

    Polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was one of the most potential liquid crystal for submillisecond response phase modulation, which was possible to be applied in submillisecond response phase only spatial light modulator. But until now the light scattering when liquid crystal director was reoriented by external electric field limited its phase modulation application. Dynamic response of phase change when high voltage was applied was also not elucidated. The mechanism that determines the light scattering was studied by analyzing the polymer network morphology by SEM method. Samples were prepared by varying the polymerization temperature, UV curing intensity and polymerization time. The morphology effect on the dynamic response of phase change was studied, in which high voltage was usually applied and electro-striction effect was often induced. The experimental results indicate that the polymer network morphology was mainly characterized by cross linked single fibrils, cross linked fibril bundles or even both. Although the formation of fibril bundle usually induced large light scattering, such a polymer network could endure higher voltage. In contrast, although the formation of cross linked single fibrils induced small light scattering, such a polymer network cannot endure higher voltage. There is a tradeoff between the light scattering and high voltage endurance. The electro-optical properties such as threshold voltage and response time were taken to verify our conclusion. For future application, the monomer molecular structure, the liquid crystal solvent and the polymerization conditions should be optimized to generate optimal polymer network morphology.

  5. Development of simultaneous measurement system of birefringence, optical rotational power, and transmission spectra for chiral liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhengyu; Ishikawa, Ken

    2016-05-01

    A novel experimental setup used to measure the important optical properties of liquid crystal materials is proposed. The setup allows us to measure electric-field-induced birefringence, optical rotational power, and transmission spectra consecutively. This system can be widely applied to characterize liquid crystal materials including blue phases, ferroelectric liquid crystals, and other chiral phases. We adopted this system to study the phase transition behavior of a V-shape switching ferroelectric liquid crystal mixture and made an important correction of experimental results previously reported by Sandhya et al. [ Europhys. Lett. 90, 56005 (2010)]. This finding proves the advantage of this system compared with the measurement method using individual systems.

  6. Chiral liquid crystals: the vestigial chiral phases of T, O, I matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissinen, Jaakko; Liu, Ke; Slager, Robert-Jan; Wu, Kai; Zaanen, Jan

    We show how chiral order develops in vestigial isotropic phases of T , O and I liquid crystalline systems in three dimensions. The liquid crystal phases are realized in a lattice model of orientational degrees of freedom with point group symmetries G ⊂ O (3) , represented as O (3) -rotors coupled to G gauge fields. The model incorporates also disclinations via the gauge fields, features an ordered nematic phase with unbroken G rotations at low temperatures and a high temperature isotropic liquid phase. We observe an intermediate phase with spontaneous chirality but isotropic SO (3) symmetry (a liquid) for the gauge groups T, O, and I, the proper symmetry groups of the tetrahedron, cube and icosahedron, respectively. For the other subgroups of SO (3) , Cn <= ∞ and Dn <= ∞, there is generically only a single phase transition from the nematic phase to the isotropic liquid. We discuss the nature of the phase transitions and conditions under which the chiral phase is stabilized by the nematic order parameter fluctuations. The nature of the vestigial chiral phase is reminiscent of the so-called Ising nematic phase in iron based superconductors. Research supported by the Netherlands foundation for Fundamental Research of Matter (FOM).

  7. Viologen-based ionic liquid crystals: induction of a smectic A phase by dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Casella, Girolamo; Causin, Valerio; Rastrelli, Federico; Saielli, Giacomo

    2014-03-21

    The stability of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals is essentially due to micro-phase segregation between the ionic heads and the long alkyl chains. Here we show, using newly synthesized viologen dimers, that the structure of the central core is another key parameter to play with in order to tune the mesomorphic behaviour.

  8. Paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition in achiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pociecha, Damian; Gorecka, Ewa; Čepič, Mojca; Vaupotič, Nataša; Gomola, Kinga; Mieczkowski, Jozef

    2005-12-01

    Critical freezing of molecular rotation in an achiral smectic phase, which leads to polar ordering through the second order paraelectric-antiferroelectric (Sm-A→Sm-APA) phase transition is studied theoretically and experimentally. Strong softening of the polar mode in the Sm-A phase and highly intensive dielectric mode in the Sm-APA phase are observed due to weak antiferroelectric interactions in the system. In the Sm-APA phase the dielectric response behaves critically upon biasing by a dc electric field. Such a behavior is found general for the antiferroelectric smectic phase with significant quadrupolar interlayer coupling.

  9. Near infrared light-driven liquid crystal phase transition enabled by hydrophobic mesogen grafted plasmonic gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Cuevas, Karla G; Wang, Ling; Xue, Chenming; Singh, Gautam; Kumar, Satyendra; Urbas, Augustine; Li, Quan

    2015-06-18

    Light-driven phase transition in liquid crystals is a fascinating endeavour from both scientific and technological points of view. Here we demonstrate the proof-of-principle that the photothermal effect of organo-soluble plasmonic gold nanorods can introduce the phase transition of thermotropic liquid crystals upon near infrared laser irradiation. Interestingly, the reverse process occurs when the laser is switched off.

  10. Analytical performances of two liquid crystals and their mixture as stationary phases in capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bélaïdi, D; Sebih, S; Boudah, S; Guermouche, M H; Bayle, J P

    2005-09-16

    Comparative gas chromatographic applications of two new liquid crystals called LCa and LCb and their equimolar mixture LC(a+b) were investigated. The thermal properties of LCa, LCb and LC(a+b) were established with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarizing microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry of LC(a+b) showed that the melting or clearing temperature was intermediate between the corresponding temperatures of the pure compounds. Polarizing microscopy showed that the liquid crystal phase of A + B was nematic. The chromatographic separation abilities LCa, LCb and LC(a+b) were studied using fused silica capillary columns. Interesting analytical performances were obtained: isomeric separation of aromatics, polyaromatics, phenols.

  11. Dielectric spectroscopy of isotropic liquids and liquid crystal phases with dispersed graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zangana, Shakhawan; Iliut, Maria; Boran, Gökçen; Turner, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Dierking, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) flakes of different sizes were prepared and dispersed in isotropic and nematic (anisotropic) fluid media. The dielectric relaxation behaviour of GO-dispersions was examined for a wide temperature (25–60 oC) and frequency range (100 Hz–2 MHz). The mixtures containing GO flakes exhibited varying dielectric relaxation processes, depending on the size of the flakes and the elastic properties of the dispersant fluid. Relaxation frequencies of the GO doped isotropic media, such as isopropanol IPA, were observed to be much lower than the GO doped thermotropic nematic medium 5CB. It is anticipated that the slow relaxation frequencies (~10 kHz) could be resulting from the relaxation modes of the GO flakes while the fast relaxation frequencies (~100 kHz) could indicate strongly slowed down molecular modes of the nematogenic molecules, which are anchored to the GO flakes via dispersion interactions. The relaxation frequencies decreased as the size of the GO flakes in the isotropic solvent was increased. Polarizing microscopy showed that GO flakes with a mean diameter of 10 μm, dispersed in water, formed a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal phase. This lyotropic nematic exhibited the slowest dielectric relaxation process, with relaxation frequencies in the order of 2 kHz, as compared to the GO-isotropic suspension and the GO-doped 5CB. PMID:27555475

  12. Dielectric spectroscopy of isotropic liquids and liquid crystal phases with dispersed graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Zangana, Shakhawan; Iliut, Maria; Boran, Gökçen; Turner, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Dierking, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) flakes of different sizes were prepared and dispersed in isotropic and nematic (anisotropic) fluid media. The dielectric relaxation behaviour of GO-dispersions was examined for a wide temperature (25-60 oC) and frequency range (100 Hz-2 MHz). The mixtures containing GO flakes exhibited varying dielectric relaxation processes, depending on the size of the flakes and the elastic properties of the dispersant fluid. Relaxation frequencies of the GO doped isotropic media, such as isopropanol IPA, were observed to be much lower than the GO doped thermotropic nematic medium 5CB. It is anticipated that the slow relaxation frequencies (~10 kHz) could be resulting from the relaxation modes of the GO flakes while the fast relaxation frequencies (~100 kHz) could indicate strongly slowed down molecular modes of the nematogenic molecules, which are anchored to the GO flakes via dispersion interactions. The relaxation frequencies decreased as the size of the GO flakes in the isotropic solvent was increased. Polarizing microscopy showed that GO flakes with a mean diameter of 10 μm, dispersed in water, formed a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal phase. This lyotropic nematic exhibited the slowest dielectric relaxation process, with relaxation frequencies in the order of 2 kHz, as compared to the GO-isotropic suspension and the GO-doped 5CB.

  13. Utilizing liquid crystal phases to obtain highly ordered thin films for organic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Mike T.

    Organic electronic materials offer several advantages when compared to inorganic materials, but they suffer from low charge carrier mobility. Two major factors hindering effective charge transport in organic materials are: 1) effective wavefunction overlap in organic crystals and 2) the domain morphology of thin films. Charge transport in organic materials occurs via a hopping mechanism along the conjugated pi system. Often, rigid, aromatic organic materials crystallize in a herringbone, edge-to-face orientation, limiting pi-pi stacking and decreasing charge carrier mobility. Face-to-face orientation of aromatic rings decreases intermolecular pi-pi distances and increases wavefunction overlap. Control of the crystal structure can be achieved to some extent by tuning structural features of the molecule, like increasing the ratio of carbon atoms to hydrogen atoms in the aromatic rings; this is often achieved by introducing heteroatoms like sulfur and oxygen into the aromatic ring structure. Thin films of organic materials often contain many unaligned domains; this is caused by rapid crystallization. Control of the domain morphology of thin films has been shown to increase charge carrier mobility by 6 orders of magnitude for thin films of the same material. Liquid crystal phases allow a slow process of crystallization, whereby the molecules in a thin film can be slowly aligned into a monodomain before crystallization. The crystal-smectic phases, like smectic E, are particularly attractive for this strategy due to their high degree of intermolecular order. This project describes the synthesis and characterization of organic semiconductors designed to exhibit short pi-pi distances and highly ordered crystal-smectic phases to obtain thin films with high charge carrier mobility. The n,2-OBTTT series contains 15 newly designed and synthesized mesogens. The liquid crystal and solid crystal structures of these mesogens are examined and deposition conditions are optimized for

  14. Nematic liquid crystals doped with nanoparticles: Phase behavior and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Mikhail A.; Gorkunov, Maxim V.

    Thermodynamics and dielectric properties of nematic liquid crystals doped with various nanoparticles have been studied in the framework of a molecular mean-field theory. It is shown that spherically isotropic nanoparticles effectively dilute the liquid crystal material and cause a decrease of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature, while anisotropic nanoparticles are aligned by the nematic host and, in turn, may significantly improve the liquid crystal alignment. In the case of strong interaction between spherical nanoparticles and mesogenic molecules, the nanocomposite possesses a number of unexpected properties: The nematic-isotropic co-existence region appears to be very broad, and the system either undergoes a direct transition from the isotropic phase into the phase-separated state, or undergoes first a transition into the homogeneous nematic phase and then phase-separates at a lower temperature. The phase separation does not occur for sufficiently low nanoparticle concentrations, and, in certain cases, the separation takes place only within a finite region of the nanoparticle concentration. For nematics doped with strongly polar nanoparticles, the theory predicts the nanoparticle aggregation in linear chains that make a substantial contribution to the static dielectric anisotropy and optical birefringence of the nematic composite. The theory clarifies the microscopic origin of important phenomena observed in nematic composites including a shift of the isotropic-nematic phase transition and improvement of the nematic order; a considerable softening of the first order nematic-isotropic transition; a complex phase-separation behavior; and a significant increase of the dielectric anisotropy and the birefringence.

  15. Study on the Phase Modulation Characteristics of Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wu, L. Y.; Zhang, J.

    2006-10-01

    A special Twyman-Green interferometer is designed to measure the phase modulation characteristics of liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), namely, the relationship between phase shift and gray value (applied voltage). By measuring a reflective LC-SLM produced by BNS (Boulder Nonlinear Systems), it is indicated that the LC-SLM has linear phase response within a gray value range between 60 and 200, and the RMS deviation between the average phase and the spatially resolved phase measurements increases with the gray value but is always less than λ/10.

  16. Polarization sensitive phase-shifting Mirau interferometry using a liquid crystal variable retarder.

    PubMed

    Bouchal, Petr; Čelechovský, Radek; Bouchal, Zdeněk

    2015-10-01

    We present all-optical motionless arrangement for polarization sensitive phase-shifting (P-S) interferometry, where the phase shifts are accurately implemented by a liquid crystal variable retarder (LCVR). The LCVR is used as a polarization selective device capable of introducing a computer-controlled phase retardance between signal and reference waves with orthogonal linear polarizations. The proposed optical P-S is deployed in a polarization adapted common-path Mirau interferometer. Application of the method to a setup using the Michelson interference objective or Linnik interference module is also outlined. The accuracy of the quantitative phase reconstruction is examined theoretically, and a possibility to reduce the optical path difference error below 1/200 wavelength is demonstrated experimentally. Benefits and application potential of the polarization P-S interferometry supported by versatile liquid crystal devices are also discussed.

  17. A temperature-concentration (T-X) phase diagram calculated using the mean field theory for liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yurtseven, Hamit; Salihoglu, Selami; Karacali, Huseyin

    2013-06-01

    Phase-line equations for smectic-hexatic phase transitions in liquid crystals were derived using the Landau phenomenological theory. In particular, second-order transitions for the smectic-A-smectic-C (SmA-SmC) and hexatic-B-hexatic-F (or HexI) transitions were studied and the tricritical points for these transitions were located. The calculated phase-line equations were fitted (using experimental data for various liquid crystals) to construct a generalized T-X phase diagram. It was shown that the T-X phase diagram calculated from the free energy adequately describes the observed behavior of liquid crystals during smectic-hexatic transitions.

  18. Phase shifting digital holography implemented with a twisted-nematic liquid-crystal display.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Maria-Luisa; Castro, Albertina; Arrizón, Victor

    2009-12-20

    We describe and experimentally demonstrate a phase shifting method based on the lateral displacement of a grating implemented with a twisted-nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. This method allows an accurate implementation of the phase shift without requiring moving parts. The technique is implemented in a Mach-Zehnder digital holography setup in which the field transmitted by the sample object freely propagates to the hologram plane.

  19. Phase Transition and Dynamics in Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid Crystals through a Metastable Highly Ordered Smectic Phase.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Keito; Tomida, Kenji; Taniguchi, Natsumi; Hara, Hironori; Takikawa, Yoshinori; Sadakane, Koichiro; Nakamura, Kenji; Konishi, Takashi; Fukao, Koji

    2016-06-16

    The phase transition behavior and dynamics of ionic liquid crystals, 1-methyl-3-alkylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate with various alkyl chain lengths, were investigated by X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism of their structural and phase changes. A metastable phase was found to appear via a supercooled smectic phase on cooling. In the metastable phase, disorder in the smectic phase is partially frozen; thus, the phase has order higher than that of the smectic phase but lower than that of the crystalline phase. During the subsequent heating process, the frozen disorder activates, and a crystalline phase appears in the supercooled smectic phase before entering the smectic phase. The relationship between the phase behavior and the dynamics of charge carriers such as ions is also discussed.

  20. Photoluminescence at room temperature of liquid-phase crystallized silicon on glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Michael; Schwuchow, Anka; Andrä, Gudrun

    2016-12-01

    The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum due band-to-band recombination in an only 8 μm thick liquid-phase crystallized silicon on glass solar cell absorber is measured over 3 orders of magnitude with a thin 400 μm thick optical fiber directly coupled to the spectrometer. High PL signal is achieved by the possibility to capture the PL spectrum very near to the silicon surface. The spectra measured within microcrystals of the absorber present the same features as spectra of crystalline silicon wafers without showing defect luminescence indicating the high electronic material quality of the liquid-phase multi-crystalline layer after hydrogen plasma treatment.

  1. Balance of optical, structural, and electrical properties of textured liquid phase crystallized Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Preidel, V. Amkreutz, D.; Haschke, J.; Wollgarten, M.; Rech, B.; Becker, C.

    2015-06-14

    Liquid phase crystallized Si thin-film solar cells on nanoimprint textured glass substrates exhibiting two characteristic, but distinct different surface structures are presented. The impact of the substrate texture on light absorption, the structural Si material properties, and the resulting solar cell performance is analyzed. A pronounced periodic substrate texture with a vertical feature size of about 1 μm enables excellent light scattering and light trapping. However, it also gives rise to an enhanced Si crystal defect formation deteriorating the solar cell performance. In contrast, a random pattern with a low surface roughness of 45 nm allows for the growth of Si thin films being comparable to Si layers on planar reference substrates. Amorphous Si/crystalline Si heterojunction solar cells fabricated on the low-roughness texture exhibit a maximum open circuit voltage of 616 mV and internal quantum efficiency peak values exceeding 90%, resulting in an efficiency potential of 13.2%. This demonstrates that high quality crystalline Si thin films can be realized on nanoimprint patterned glass substrates by liquid phase crystallization inspiring the implementation of tailor-made nanophotonic light harvesting concepts into future liquid phase crystallized Si thin film solar cells on glass.

  2. Influence of surfactant on the thermal behavior of marigold oil emulsions with liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Orlando David Henrique; da Rocha-Filho, Pedro Alves

    2007-05-01

    Vegetable oils have been largely consumed owing to the interest of pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries in using natural raw materials. The production of stable emulsions with vegetable oils challenges formulators due to its variability in composition and fatty acids constitution within batches produced. In the present work, it was studied that the influence of the size of carbon chain and the number of ethylene oxide moieties of the surfactant on the thermal behavior of eight emulsions prepared with marigold oil stabilized by liquid crystal phases. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to determine the thermal behavior of the emulsions. The ratio of bound water was calculated, being between 29.0 and 42.0%, confirming the extension of the liquid-crystalline net in the external phase. Changing the lipophilic surfactant from Ceteth-2 to Steareth-2, there was an increase in the temperature of phase transition of the liquid crystal influencing the system stability. Calorimetric study is very useful in understanding the performance of liquid crystals with the increase of temperature and to estimate emulsions stability.

  3. Formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal composites by a surface-controlled anisotropic phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-Hong; Khoo, Iam Choon; Yu, Chang-Jae; Jung, Min-Sik; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2005-01-10

    We report on formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal (PLC) composites using a surface-controlled phase separation method. The binary nature of the PLC phase gratings is produced by employing a single step photo-ablation through an amplitude photomask which precisely controls the interfacial interactions between the LC and the photopolymer on the alignment layer. A subsequent illumination of the ultraviolet light onto the whole PLC promotes an anisotropic phase separation resulting in the formation of distinct binary patterns for the PLC structure. The electrically tunable diffraction properties of the binary phase gratings are presented.

  4. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  5. Low symmetry tetrahedral nematic liquid crystal phases: Ambidextrous chirality and ambidextrous helicity.

    PubMed

    Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R

    2014-02-01

    We discuss the symmetry properties as well as the dynamic behavior of various non-polar nematic liquid crystal phases with tetrahedral order. We concentrate on systems that show biaxial nematic order coexisting with octupolar (tetrahedral) order. Non-polar examples are phases with D2 and S4 symmetries, which can be characterized as biaxial nematics lacking inversion symmetry. It is this combination that allows for new features in the statics and dynamics of these phases. The D2-symmetric phase is chiral, even for achiral molecules, and shows ambidextrous chirality in all three preferred directions. The achiral S4-symmetric phase allows for ambidextrous helicity, similar to the higher-symmetric D2d-symmetric phase. Such phases are candidates for nematic phases made from banana-shaped molecules.

  6. Discovery of a Novel Smectic-C Liquid Crystal Phase with Six Layer Periodicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Pindak, R.; Pan, L.D.; Liu, Z.Q; Nguyen, H.T.; Huang, C.C.

    2010-01-13

    We report the discovery of a new smectic-C* liquid-crystal phase with six-layer periodicity by resonant x-ray diffraction. Upon cooling, the new phase appears between the SmC{sub {alpha}}* phase having a helical structure and the SmC{sub d4}* phase with four-layer periodicity. This SmC{sub d6}* phase was identified in two mixtures which have an unusual reversed SmC{sub d4}*-SmC* phase sequence. The SmC{sub d6}* phase shows a distorted clock structure. Three theoretical models have predicted the existence of a six-layer phase. However, our experimental findings are not consistent with the theories.

  7. Nematic and blue phase liquid crystals for temperature stabilization and active optical tuning of silicon photonic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-10-01

    We describe the underlying theories and experimental demonstrations of passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic devices clad in nematic liquid crystal mixtures, and active optical tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures combined with dye-doped nematic and blue phase liquid crystals. We show how modifications to the resonator device geometry allow for not only enhanced tuning of the resonator response, but also aid in achieving complete athermal operations of silicon photonic circuits. [Ref.: I.C. Khoo, "DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 40, 60-63 (2015); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 39, 5435-5438 (2014); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals," Materials 7(3), 2229-2241 (2014)].

  8. Phase behavior of chromonic liquid crystal mixtures of Sunset Yellow and Disodium Cromoglycate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Smith, Gregory; Yi, Youngwoo; Xu, Charles; Biffi, Silvia; Serra, Francesca; Bellini, Tommaso; Clark, Noel

    2014-03-01

    Chromonic liquid crystals (CLCs) are formed when planar molecules dissolved in water stack into rod-like aggregates that can order as liquid crystals. Isotropic, nematic, and M-phases can be observed depending on the degree of molecular orientational and positional order by variation of the CLC concentration. We focused on mixtures of two well-known CLCs, Sunset Yellow, a food dye, and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), an asthma medication. In order to study the phase behaviors of these mixtures, we observed their textures in glass cells and capillaries using polarized light microscopy. We report here a ternary phase diagram describing the complete phase behavior of the CLC mixtures. We observed a variety of phase behaviors depending on species ratio and concentration. In the isotropic phase, no clear phase separation of the two dyes was observed, while separation did occur in many nematic and M-phase combinations. We will also describe phase observations made using a light spectroscopy and bulk centrifugal partitioning. Grant support: NSF DMR 1207606 and NSF MRSEC DMR-0820579.

  9. Stimulated orientational and thermal scatterings and self-starting optical phase conjugation with nematic liquid crystals

    PubMed

    Khoo; Liang

    2000-11-01

    A quantitative theory and experimental results on self-starting optical phase conjugation, using stimulated orientational and thermal scattering in nematic liquid crystal films, are presented. The coupled wave-material equations for the laser-induced refractive index changes, grating formation, and coherent wave mixing effects are developed. Analytical solutions are obtained for the case of negligible pump depletion, and numerical solutions for various input and generated signals, taking losses into account, are obtained. Experimentally, we demonstrate the feasibility of realizing these stimulated scattering and phase conjugation processes in thin (200 &mgr;m) nematic liquid crystal with a milliwatt-power cw laser. Theoretical estimates for various gain constants and threshold intensities, and their dependence on various physical parameters, are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  10. Polarimetric method for liquid crystal displays characterization in presence of phase fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, C; Karakus, B; Lizana, A; Campos, J

    2013-02-11

    A polarimetry based method able to characterize optical properties of linear Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs), even in presence of time-fluctuations of the phase, is proposed in this work. In particular, mean linear retardance, Liquid Crystal (LC) fast axis orientation and phase fluctuation amplitude of LCDs can be obtained with the proposed alternative technique. This technique enables to achieve these important features of LCDs with a set-up significantly less complicated to build up and with faster measurements than previously proposed techniques, which are based on diffraction or interferometry experiments. The validity of the technique is tested by measuring two different LCDs: one monopixel PA-LC panel working in transmission and a reflective PA-LCoS display. The technique provides similar results than those obtained by using previously proposed methods, confirming the validity of our alternative technique.

  11. Liquid crystal terahertz phase shifters with functional indium-tin-oxide nanostructures for biasing and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chan-Shan; Tang, Tsung-Ta; Pan, Ru-Pin; Yu, Peichen; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-01

    Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowhiskers (NWhs) obliquely evaporated by electron-beam glancing-angle deposition can serve simultaneously as transparent electrodes and alignment layer for liquid crystal (LC) devices in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. To demonstrate, we constructed a THz LC phase shifter with ITO NWhs. Phase shift exceeding π/2 at 1.0 THz was achieved in a ˜517 μm-thick cell. The phase shifter exhibits high transmittance (˜78%). The driving voltage required for quarter-wave operation is as low as 5.66 V (rms), compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and thin-film transistor (TFT) technologies.

  12. Dynamics of a liquid-crystal variable optical prism based on Pancharatnam phase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; McManamon, Paul F; Bryant, Douglas; Zhang, Ke; Bos, Philip J

    2010-02-20

    We consider the dynamics of a variable optical prism based on Pancharatnam phase. The device basics, using liquid crystals (LCs) as the electro-optical material, have been previously proposed. In this paper, we study the dynamics of discrete changes in the phase profile, and also continuous changes in the phase profile through acquired data and numerical modeling. We show that a design based on LCs whose dielectric anisotropy can change sign (as a function of frequency) allows continuous tuning with reasonable response times.

  13. Liquid crystal terahertz phase shifters with functional indium-tin-oxide nanostructures for biasing and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chan-Shan; Tang, Tsung-Ta; Pan, Ru-Pin; Yu, Peichen; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-07

    Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowhiskers (NWhs) obliquely evaporated by electron-beam glancing-angle deposition can serve simultaneously as transparent electrodes and alignment layer for liquid crystal (LC) devices in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. To demonstrate, we constructed a THz LC phase shifter with ITO NWhs. Phase shift exceeding π/2 at 1.0 THz was achieved in a ∼517 μm-thick cell. The phase shifter exhibits high transmittance (∼78%). The driving voltage required for quarter-wave operation is as low as 5.66 V (rms), compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and thin-film transistor (TFT) technologies.

  14. Assessment of a Single-Shot Pixelated Phase-Shifting Interferometer Utilizing a Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A

    2005-10-01

    This article introduces a novel phase shifting pixelated interferometer based on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator and simulates the expected performance. The phase shifted frames are captured simultaneously which reduces the problems arising from vibrations and air turbulence. The liquid crystal spatial light modulator is very flexible and can be configured to provide a large number of phase shift levels and geometries to reduce the measurement error.

  15. Direct measurement of the propagation of the phase-transition region of liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Many types of active matter, such as biological cells, have liquid-crystalline membranes, which are soft and flexible in their interactions with their surroundings and sometimes allow molecular-structural or -orientational changes to extend for long distances, owing to long-range molecular interactions. Despite the technological and fundamental importance of these long-range changes, there is no good physical property with which to express them for the liquid crystal. Here, we show direct measurements of the propagation of structural or orientational changes due to long-range molecular interactions in liquid crystals. We induced a patterned phase transition in a liquid crystal via illumination with a fringe pattern and observed the propagation of the phase-transition region. We determined that the propagation occurred in a ballistic manner with a velocity of 80–110 m/s and that two types of propagation—side-by-side and head-to-tail molecular interactions—were found. PMID:28317939

  16. Initial High-Power-CW-Laser Testing of Liquid-Crystal Optical Phased Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2010-1043 INITIAL HIGH-POWER-CW-LASER TESTING OF LIQUID-CRYSTAL OPTICAL PHASED ARRAYS Bert Whitaker OptiMetrics, Inc...Bert Whitaker (OptiMetrics, Inc.) Scott Harris (Flatiron Research, LLC) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2003 5e. TASK NUMBER 11 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...to a Carl Zeiss petrographic microscope. The crossed polarizers in this microscope highlighted the presence of LC material due to its birefringence

  17. Experimental research on beam steering characteristics of liquid crystal optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Cai, Jun; Xu, Hong; Wang, Xiangru; Wu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Beam steering characteristics of transmission liquid crystal optical phased array(LC-OPA) were measured using ultra precision electronic autocollimator. A continuous beam steering with a constant angular resolution in the order of 20 μrad is obtained experimentally from 0° to 6° based on the method of variable period grating (VPG).Meanwhile, the angular repeatability of less than 4 μrad (RMS) has been achieved.

  18. Substrate-induced orientational order in the isotropic phase of liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauger, A.; Zribi, G.; Mills, D. L.; Toner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Nematic order induced near a solid boundary in an otherwise isotropic liquid crystal is studied theoretically, at temperatures just above the bulk nematic-isotropic phase transition. Three distinct regimes are found, depending on the strength of orientational torques at the boundary: (1) strong orientational order, (2) strong orientational order followed by a first-order transition to a state of weak orientational order as temperature is raised, and (3) a state of weak orientational order.

  19. Surface modes in "photonic cholesteric liquid crystal-phase plate-metal" structure.

    PubMed

    Vetrov, S Ya; Pyatnov, M V; Timofeev, I V

    2014-05-01

    The light transmission spectrum has been calculated for a "cholesteric liquid crystal-phase plate-metal" structure. It is shown that the system can have an isolated waveguide surface mode with characteristics efficiently controllable by external fields acting on the cholesteric. The degree of localization of surface modes and the transmission coefficients have been found to differ considerably for the light of different polarizations.

  20. Pattern phase transitions of self-propelled particles: gases, crystals, liquids, and mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhao; Chen, Zhiyong; Vicsek, Tamás; Chen, Duxin; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2016-10-01

    To understand the collective behaviors of biological swarms, flocks, and colonies, we investigated the non-equilibrium dynamic patterns of self-propelled particle systems using statistical mechanics methods and H-stability analysis of Hamiltonian systems. By varying the individual vision range, we observed phase transitions between four phases, i.e., gas, crystal, liquid, and mill-liquid coexistence patterns. In addition, by varying the inter-particle force, we detected three distinct milling sub-phases, i.e., ring, annulus, and disk. Based on the coherent analysis for collective motions, one may predict the stability and adjust the morphology of the phases of self-propelled particles, which has promising potential applications in natural self-propelled particles and artificial multi-agent systems.

  1. Effect of Enantiomeric Excess on the Phase Behavior of Antiferroelectric Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    L Pan; B McCoy; S Wang; Z Liu; S Wang; R Pindak; C Huang

    2011-12-31

    Null transmission ellipsometry and resonant x-ray diffraction are employed to study the effect of enantiomeric excess (EE) on the phase behavior of antiferroelectric liquid crystal 10OTBBB1M7. Phase sequence, layer spacing, and pitch of the helical structures of the smectic-C*{sub {alpha}} and smectic-C* phases are studied as a function of temperature and EE. Upon reducing EE, a liquid-gas-type critical point of the smectic-C*{sub {alpha}} to smectic-C* transition is observed, as well as the disappearance of the smectic-C*{sub d4} and the smectic-C*{sub d3} phases. Results are analyzed in a mean-field model.

  2. Pattern Polymerization-Induced Phase Separation in a Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyu, Thein

    2002-03-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)/polymer composite films have gained attention increasingly due to their applications in flat panel displays and shutters. Photopolymerization is a preferred method to produce LC/polymer composite films from mixtures of reactive monomers and LCs. On the basis of the combined Flory-Huggins free energy for isotropic mixing and Maier-Saupe free energy for nematic ordering along with the elastic free energy of the network, phase diagrams have been established by solving self-consistently. A theoretical simulation has been modeled by incorporating the kinetics of crosslinking reaction into the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL-model C) equations to elucidate the emergence of nematic domains during photopolymerization induced phase separation in electrically switchable holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (H-PDLC). The simulated morphological patterns in the concentration and orientation order parameter fields show discrete layers of liquid crystal droplets alternating periodically with polymer network-rich layers. Furthermore, we recognized the potential for producing electrically tunable microlens from PDLC systems through pattern-photopolymerization-induced phase separation by means of the interference of two horizontal waves and two vertical waves. Our simulation revealed that the emerged LC microlens are of the order of a few hundred nanometers. These LC microlens are not only uniformed in size, but also form in regular arrays, reminiscence of the compound eyes found in flies, ants, and wasps. Supported by ALCOM, NSF DMR 99-03519, and OBR.

  3. Theoretical model and experimental verification on the PID tracking method using liquid crystal optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangru; Xu, Jianhua; Huang, Ziqiang; Wu, Liang; Zhang, Tianyi; Wu, Shuanghong; Qiu, Qi

    2017-02-01

    Liquid crystal optical phased array (LC-OPA) has been considered with great potential on the non-mechanical laser deflector because it is fabricated using photolithographic patterning technology which has been well advanced by the electronics and display industry. As a vital application of LC-OPA, free space laser communication has demonstrated its merits on communication bandwidth. Before data communication, ATP (acquisition, tracking and pointing) process costs relatively long time to result in a bottle-neck of free space laser communication. Meanwhile, dynamic real time accurate tracking is sensitive to keep a stable communication link. The electro-optic medium liquid crystal with low driving voltage can be used as the laser beam deflector. This paper presents a fast-track method using liquid crystal optical phased array as the beam deflector, CCD as a beacon light detector. PID (Proportion Integration Differentiation) loop algorithm is introduced as the controlling algorithm to generate the corresponding steering angle. To achieve the goal of fast and accurate tracking, theoretical analysis and experimental verification are demonstrated that PID closed-loop system can suppress the attitude random vibration. Meanwhile, theoretical analysis shows that tracking accuracy can be less than 6.5μrad, with a relative agreement with experimental results which is obtained after 10 adjustments that the tracking accuracy is less than12.6μrad.

  4. Thick strings, the liquid crystal blue phase, and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model based on the liquid crystal blue phase is proposed as a model for a late-time cosmological phase transition. Topological defects, in particular thick strings and/or domain walls, are presented as seeds for structure formation. It is shown that the observed large-scale structure, including quasi-periodic wall structure, can be well fitted in the model without violating the microwave background isotropy bound or the limits from induced gravitational waves and the millisecond pulsar timing. Furthermore, such late-time transitions can produce objects such as quasars at high redshifts. The model appears to work with either cold or hot dark matter.

  5. Polarization-independent and high-diffraction-efficiency Fresnel lenses based on blue phase liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Huang; Wang, Yu-Yin; Hsieh, Cheng-Wei

    2011-02-15

    A polarization-independent and high-diffraction-efficiency Fresnel lens is developed based on blue phase liquid crystals (BPLCs). The optically isotropic characteristic of BPLCs is used to produce a polarization-independent Fresnel lens. The small optical phase shift of BPLCs that is induced by the Kerr effect is sufficient for the BPLC Fresnel lens to have high theoretical and experimental diffraction efficiencies of 41% and ∼34%, respectively. An electrically erasable memory effect in the focusing diffraction at an electric field E>4.44 V/μm is observed. The electro-optical properties of the BPLC Fresnel lens are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Continuous Beam Steering From a Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Charles M.; Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  7. Manipulating terahertz wave by a magnetically tunable liquid crystal phase grating.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Jen; Li, Yu-Tai; Hsieh, Cho-Fan; Pan, Ru-Pin; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2008-03-03

    This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of a magnetically tunable liquid crystal phase grating for the terahertz wave. The phase grating can be used as a beam splitter. The ratio of the zeroth and first-order diffracted THz-beams (0.3 THz) polarized in a direction perpendicular to that of the grooves of the grating can be tuned from 4:1 to 1:2. When the THz wave is polarized in any other direction, this device can be operated as a polarizing beam splitter.

  8. Polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal grating cured with interfered visible light.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yachao; Li, Yan; Chen, Chao Ping; Liu, Shuxin; Rong, Na; Li, Weihuan; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Pengcheng; Lu, Jiangang; Liu, Ruili; Su, Yikai

    2015-07-27

    In this paper, we demonstrate a holographic polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal grating fabricated using a visible laser. As blue phase is stabilized by the interfered light, polymer-concentration gradient is achieved simultaneously. With the application of a uniform vertical electric field, periodic index distribution is obtained due to polymer-concentration gradient. The grating exhibits several attractive features such as polarization-independency, a broad temperature range, sub-millisecond response, simple fabrication, and low cost, thus holding great potential for photonics applications.

  9. Berry Phase of Light under Bragg Reflection by Chiral Liquid-Crystal Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Raouf; Bortolozzo, Umberto; Clerc, Marcel G.; Residori, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    A Berry phase is revealed for circularly polarized light when it is Bragg reflected by a chiral liquid-crystal medium of the same handedness. By using a chiral nematic layer we demonstrate that if the input plane of the layer is rotated with respect to a fixed reference frame, a geometric phase effect occurs for the circularly polarized light reflected by the periodic helical structure of the medium. Theory and numerical simulations are supported by an experimental observation, disclosing novel applications in the field of optical manipulation and fundamental optical phenomena.

  10. Berry Phase of Light under Bragg Reflection by Chiral Liquid-Crystal Media.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Raouf; Bortolozzo, Umberto; Clerc, Marcel G; Residori, Stefania

    2016-07-29

    A Berry phase is revealed for circularly polarized light when it is Bragg reflected by a chiral liquid-crystal medium of the same handedness. By using a chiral nematic layer we demonstrate that if the input plane of the layer is rotated with respect to a fixed reference frame, a geometric phase effect occurs for the circularly polarized light reflected by the periodic helical structure of the medium. Theory and numerical simulations are supported by an experimental observation, disclosing novel applications in the field of optical manipulation and fundamental optical phenomena.

  11. Thick strings, the liquid crystal blue phase, and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model based on the liquid crystal blue phase is proposed as a model for a late-time cosmological phase transition. Topological defects, in particular thick strings and/or domain walls, are presented as seeds for structure formation. It is shown that the observed large-scale structure, including quasi-periodic wall structure, can be well fitted in the model without violating the microwave background isotropy bound or the limits from induced gravitational waves and the millisecond pulsar timing. Furthermore, such late-time transitions can produce objects such as quasars at high redshifts. The model appears to work with either cold or hot dark matter.

  12. Continuous Beam Steering From A Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Titus, Charles M.; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  13. Liquid crystal spatial light modulator with very large phase modulation operating in high harmonic orders.

    PubMed

    Calero, Venancio; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Albero, Jorge; Sánchez-López, María M; Moreno, Ignacio

    2013-11-15

    Unusually large phase modulation in a commercial liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) is reported. Such a situation is obtained by illuminating with visible light a device designed to operate in the infrared range. The phase modulation range reaches 6π radians in the red region of the visible spectrum and 10π radians in the blue region. Excellent diffraction efficiency in high harmonic orders is demonstrated despite a concomitant and non-negligible Fabry-Perot interference effect. This type of SLM opens the possibility to implement diffractive elements with reduced chromatic dispersion or chromatic control.

  14. Liquid-crystal-anchoring transitions at surfaces created by polymerization-induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundson, Karl R.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    1998-08-01

    A surface anchoring transition of a nematic at polymer surfaces created by polymerization-induced phase separation is presented. This transition is unusual in that it occurs far from bulk nematic phase transitions and it is tunable across nearly the entire nematic temperature range by modification of the polymer side group. Anchoring behavior is qualitatively understood by considerating enthalpic and entropic contributions to surface energy. Interesting behavior of some polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal films is explained, and observations provide a pathway to control properties.

  15. Continuous Beam Steering From A Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Titus, Charles M.; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  16. Colloidal liquid crystals in square confinement: isotropic, nematic and smectic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Louis B. G.; Gao, Yongxiang; Dullens, Roel P. A.; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the confinement of colloidal liquid crystals in three dimensional chambers with a square footprint. To this end we use colloidal silica rods and exploit their relatively large density difference with respect to the dispersing solvent to study isotropic, nematic and smectic phases confined into a single chamber. Combining laser scanning confocal microscopy and soft-lithography techniques enables us to characterize the configurations down to the single particle level. We will focus on the smectic phase and compare to recent theories and simulations.

  17. θ-2θ diffractometry of anisotropic holographic gratings composed of liquid crystal and polymer phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Ogiwara, Akifumi

    2013-03-01

    We studied highly anisotropic periodic structure formed by liquid crystal and polymer phase separation, or holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC), by θ-2θ optical diffractometry particularly employing the high order Bragg diffractions. Then, we revealed the relationship between microscopic structure and diffraction properties of the HPDLCs prepared at several different conditions with regard to the compositional ratio of the raw materials and the exposure temperature. The high order Bragg diffractions are closely connected to periodic boundaries between LC droplets and polymer, and is potentially able to be designed by HPDLC fabrication processes. The analysis with the information from the higher order Bragg diffraction is expected to allow you to observe more detailed and quantitative HPDLC internal structure.

  18. Direct Measurement of Electric-Field-Induced Birefringence in a Polymer-Stabilized Blue-Phase Liquid Crystal Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Wu, “Low voltage and high transmittance blue-phase liquid crystal displays with corrugated electrodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 96(1), 011102 (2010). 7. K...Cloud, Optical Methods of Engineering Analysis (Cambridge, New York, 1998). 1.Introduction Polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal (PS-BPLC...with a large induced birefringence for lowering the operation voltage of display devices. 2. Experiment and theoretical analysis The PS-BPLC employed

  19. Metastable liquid-liquid phase transition in a single-component system with only one crystal phase and no density anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, G.; Malescio, G.; Skibinsky, A.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-11-01

    We investigate the phase behavior of a single-component system in three dimensions with spherically-symmetric, pairwise-additive, soft-core interactions with an attractive well at a long distance, a repulsive soft-core shoulder at an intermediate distance, and a hard-core repulsion at a short distance, similar to potentials used to describe liquid systems such as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. We showed [Nature (London) 409, 692 (2001)] that, even with no evidence of the density anomaly, the phase diagram has two first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions, one ending in a gas-low-density-liquid (LDL) critical point, and the other in a gas-high-density-liquid (HDL) critical point, with a LDL-HDL phase transition at low temperatures. Here we use integral equation calculations to explore the three-parameter space of the soft-core potential and perform molecular dynamics simulations in the interesting region of parameters. For the equilibrium phase diagram, we analyze the structure of the crystal phase and find that, within the considered range of densities, the structure is independent of the density. Then, we analyze in detail the fluid metastable phases and, by explicit thermodynamic calculation in the supercooled phase, we show the absence of the density anomaly. We suggest that this absence is related to the presence of only one stable crystal structure.

  20. Smectic-A and Hexatic-B Liquid Crystal Phases of Sanidic Alkyl-Substituted Dibenzo[fg,op]naphthacenes.

    PubMed

    Repasky, Paul J; Agra-Kooijman, Deña M; Kumar, Satyendra; Hartley, C Scott

    2016-03-17

    Despite longstanding interest in liquid crystalline compounds with simple rod- or disc-like shapes (calamitics or discotics), very few examples of the analogous board-shaped, or "sanidic", liquid crystals exist. A new series of alkyl-substituted dibenzo[fg,op]naphthacenes have been prepared by planarization of o-phenylene precursors through dehydrohalogenation. Their photophysical properties have been studied in dichloromethane. Liquid crystal phase behavior was characterized by polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. All of the compounds exhibit monotropic liquid crystal phases on cooling from the isotropic phase. The compounds with shorter alkyl (pentyl and heptyl) chains exhibit the uniaxial smectic-A phase analogous to that of simple calamitic mesogens. The compounds with longer alkyl (nonyl, undecyl, and tridecyl) chains exhibit a new smectic liquid crystal phase featuring short-range positional order with an apparent rectangular lattice in the smectic layers, that is, an orthogonal biaxial hexatic-B. The molecular arrangement in this phase likely corresponds to a distorted herringbone packing of the board-shaped structures. Further, the compound with nonyl chains exhibits an underlying smectic-B phase. DFT calculations show that the cores of the mesogens are twisted into C2-symmetric saddle-shaped geometries because of steric interactions along their rims. The liquid crystal phases and their structures are discussed in the context of the compounds' board-like shapes and intercore interactions.

  1. Direct evidence of the molecular interaction propagation in the phase transition of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Kenji; Sato, Takahiro; Kuwahara, Shota

    2016-09-01

    The molecular interaction sometimes propagates in a collective manner, reaching for a long distance on the order of millimeters. Such interactions have been well known in the field of strongly-correlated electron systems in a beautiful crystal interleaved by donor and acceptor layers, induced by photo-stimulus. The other examples can be found in liquid crystals (LCs), which could be found in many places in nature such as bio-membrane. Different from crystals, LCs features "softness", which enables it to be a curved structure such as a cell. In LCs, even a small molecular change would trigger the overall structural change by the propagation of the molecular interaction. Here we will show, for the first time, how long and how fast the molecular interaction propagates in LCs. The patterned phase transition was induced in a LC, causing the phase transition propagation in a controlled way and the propagation was measured with an time-resolved optical technique, called the transient grating. A LC sample doped with azobenzene was put into a thermally controlled LC cell. A grating pattern of a pulse light with 355 nm was impinged to the LC cell, and the light was absorbed by the dyes, releasing heat or photomechanical motion. We could observe the fringe spacing dependence on the phase transition response, which indicates that phase transition was delayed as the fringe spacing due to the delay by the phase transition propagation. This is the first direct evidence of the molecular interaction propagation of the LC molecules.

  2. Control of protein crystal nucleation around the metastable liquid–liquid phase boundary

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, Oleg; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2000-01-01

    The capability to enhance or suppress the nucleation of protein crystals opens opportunities in various fundamental and applied areas, including protein crystallography, production of protein crystalline pharmaceuticals, protein separation, and treatment of protein condensation diseases. Herein, we show that the rate of homogeneous nucleation of lysozyme crystals passes through a maximum in the vicinity of the liquid–liquid phase boundary hidden below the liquidus (solubility) line in the phase diagram of the protein solution. We found that glycerol and polyethylene glycol (which do not specifically bind to proteins) shift this phase boundary and significantly suppress or enhance the crystal nucleation rates, although no simple correlation exists between the action of polyethylene glycol on the phase diagram and the nucleation kinetics. The control mechanism does not require changes in the protein concentration, acidity, and ionicity of the solution. The effects of the two additives on the phase diagram strongly depend on their concentration, which provides opportunities for further tuning of nucleation rates. PMID:10823898

  3. Blue-phase liquid crystal cored optical fiber array with photonic bandgaps and nonlinear transmission properties.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Iam Choon; Hong, Kuan Lung; Zhao, Shuo; Ma, Ding; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-02-25

    Blue-phase liquid crystal (BPLC) is introduced into the pores of capillary arrays to fabricate fiber arrays. Owing to the photonic-crystals like properties of BPLC, these fiber arrays exhibit temperature dependent photonic bandgaps in the visible spectrum. With the cores maintained in isotropic as well as the Blue phases, the fiber arrays allow high quality image transmission when inserted in the focal plane of a 1x telescope. Nonlinear transmission and optical limiting action on a cw white-light continuum laser is also observed and is attributed to laser induced self-defocusing and propagation modes changing effects caused by some finite absorption of the broadband laser at the short wavelength regime. These nonlinear and other known electro-optical properties of BPLC, in conjunction with their fabrication ease make these fiber arrays highly promising for imaging, electro-optical or all-optical modulation, switching and passive optical limiting applications.

  4. Isotropic-to-nematic phase transition of liquid crystals confined in nanoemulsion droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, S.; Takanishi, Y.; Yamamoto, J.

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated liquid crystalline nanoemulsions (LCNEs) by introducing low molecular weight liquid crystals (LMWLCs) into the core of nanoemulsions, and investigated the phase transition behavior of LMWLCs in the core part with the various weight ratios of LMWLCs to surfactants. The polarized dynamic light scattering measurement was performed to estimate the radii of LCNEs, and it is found that their radii can be controlled by the weight ratio of LMLCs to surfactant polymers. In the depolarized light scattering, it was revealed that the order of the isotropic-nematic phase transition behavior changes from the first order to biased second order with decreasing radius of LCNEs because of the three-dimensional confinement effect surrounded by an anchoring surface.

  5. Pyrrolidinium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Nockemann, Peter; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Driesen, Kris; Görller-Walrand, Christiane; Binnemans, Koen; Cardinaels, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium cations have been used for the design of ionic liquid crystals, including a new type of uranium-containing metallomesogen. Pyrrolidinium salts with bromide, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, thiocyanate, tetrakis(2- thenoyltrifluoroacetonato)europate(III) and tetrabromouranyl counteranions were prepared. For the bromide salts and tetrabromouranyl compounds, the chain length of the alkyl group C(n)H(2n+1) was varied from eight to twenty carbon atoms (n = 8, 10-20). The compounds show rich mesomorphic behaviour: highly ordered smectic phases (the crystal smectic E phase and the uncommon crystal smectic T phase), smectic A phases, and hexagonal columnar phases were observed, depending on chain length and anion. This work gives better insight into the nature and formation of the crystal smectic T phase, and the molecular requirements for the appearance of this highly ordered phase. This uncommon tetragonal mesophase is thoroughly discussed on the basis of detailed powder X-ray diffraction experiments and in relation to the existing literature. Structural models are proposed for self-assembly of the molecules within the smectic layers. In addition, the photophysical properties of the compounds containing a metal complex anion were investigated. For the uranium-containing mesogens, luminescence can be induced by dissolving them in an ionic liquid matrix. The europium-containing compound shows intense red photoluminescence with high colour purity.

  6. Equilibrium Liquid Crystal Phase Diagrams and Detection of Kinetic Arrest in Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorato Rios, Camila; Kuhnhold, Anja; Bruckner, Johanna; Dannert, Rick; Schilling, Tanja; Lagerwall, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The cholesteric liquid crystal self-assembly of water-suspended cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) into a helical arrangement was observed already more than 20 years ago and the phenomenon was used to produce iridescent solid films by evaporating the solvent or via sol-gel processing. Yet it remains challenging to produce optically uniform films and to control the pitch reproducibly, reflecting the complexity of the three-stage drying process that is followed in preparing the films. An equilibrium liquid crystal phase formation stage is followed by a non-equilibrium kinetic arrest, which in turn is followed by structural collapse as the remaining solvent is evaporated. Here we focus on the first of these stages, combining a set of systematic rheology and polarizing optics experiments with computer simulations to establish a detailed phase diagram of aqueous CNC suspensions with two different values of the surface charge, up to the concentration where kinetic arrest sets in. We also study the effect of varying ionic strength of the solvent. Within the cholesteric phase regime, we measure the equilibrium helical pitch as a function of the same parameters. We report a hitherto unnoticed change in character of the isotropic-cholesteric transition at increasing ionic strength, with a continuous weakening of the first-order character up to the point where phase coexistence is difficult to detect macroscopically due to substantial critical fluctuations.

  7. Ferroelectric order in liquid crystal phases of polar disk-shaped ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Tushar Kanti; Saha, Jayashree

    2014-05-01

    The demonstration of a spontaneous macroscopic ferroelectric order in liquid phases in the absence of any long range positional order is considered an outstanding problem of both fundamental and technological interest. Recently, we reported that a system of polar achiral disklike ellipsoids can spontaneously exhibit a long searched ferroelectric nematic phase and a ferroelectric columnar phase with strong axial polarization. The major role is played by the dipolar interactions. The model system of interest consists of attractive-repulsive Gay-Berne oblate ellipsoids embedded with two parallel point dipoles positioned symmetrically on the equatorial plane of the ellipsoids. In the present work, we investigate in detail the profound effects of changing the separation between the two symmetrically placed dipoles and the strength of the dipoles upon the existence of different ferroelectric discotic liquid crystal phases via extensive off-lattice N-P-T Monte Carlo simulations. Ferroelectric biaxial phases are exhibited in addition to the uniaxial ferroelectric fluids where the phase biaxiality results from the dipolar interactions. The structures of all the ferroelectric configurations of interest are presented in detail. Simple phase diagrams are determined which include different polar and apolar discotic fluids generated by the system.

  8. Photonic band-gap modulation of blue phase liquid crystal (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2015-10-01

    Blue phase liquid crystals (BPLCs) are self-assembled 3D photonic crystals exhibiting high susceptibility to external stimuli. Two methods for the photonic bandgap tuning of BPs were demonstrated in this work. Introducing a chiral azobenzene into a cholesteric liquid crystal could formulate a photoresponsive BPLC. Under violet irradiation, the azo dye experiences trans-cis isomerization, which leads to lattice swelling as well as phase transition in different stages of the process. Ultrawide reversible tuning of the BP photonic bandgap from ultraviolet to near infrared has been achieved. The tuning is reversible and nonvolatile. We will then demonstract the electric field-induced bandgap tuning in polymer-stabilized BPLCs. Under different BPLCs material preparation conditions, both red-shift and broadening of the photonic bandgaps have been achieved respectively. The stop band can be shifted over 100 nm. The bandwidth can be expanded from ~ 30 nm to ~ 250 nm covering nearly the full visible range. It is believed that the developed approaches could strongly promote the use of BPLC in photonic applications.

  9. Effects of Kinetic Roughening and Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition on Lysozyme Crystal Growth Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Konnert, John; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We measured the growth velocities of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme, V (centimeters per second), at four different concentrations, c (milligrams per milliliter), as the solution temperature, T (Centigrade), was reduced. For a broad range of T dependent on c, we find that the growth velocities increased as the solution temperature was reduced. The initial increase in V is well characterized by the 2D nucleation model for crystal growth, yielding the magnitude of an effective barrier for growth, gamma(sub s) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Below certain temperatures, T(sub cr), dependent on c, however, a kinetic roughening hypothesis that considers the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface better describes the observed growth velocities. The application of the continuous growth model, up to the solution cloud-point temperatures, T(sub cl), enabled the determinations of the crossover concentration, c(sub r), from estimated values of T(sub cr). For all conditions presented, we find that the crossover from growth by 2D nucleation to continuous addition occurs at a supersaturation, sigma (sub c), = 2.0 plus or minus 0.1. Moreover, we find the energy barrier for the continuous addition, E(sub c), within the temperature range T(sub cl) less than T less than T less than T (sub cr), to be 6 plus or minus 1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Further reduction of T below approximately 2-3 C of T(sub cl), also revealed a rapid slowing of crystal growth velocities. From quasi-elastic light scattering investigations, we find that the rapid diminishment of crystal growth velocities can be accounted for by the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions. Namely, we find the reversible formation of dense fluid proto-droplets comprised of lysozyme molecules to occur below approximately 0.3 C of T(sub cl). Hence, the rapid slowing of growth velocities may occur as a result of the sudden depletion of "mobile" molecules within crystal growth

  10. Effects of Kinetic Roughening and Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition on Lysozyme Crystal Growth Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Konnert, John; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We measured the growth velocities of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme, V (centimeters per second), at four different concentrations, c (milligrams per milliliter), as the solution temperature, T (Centigrade), was reduced. For a broad range of T dependent on c, we find that the growth velocities increased as the solution temperature was reduced. The initial increase in V is well characterized by the 2D nucleation model for crystal growth, yielding the magnitude of an effective barrier for growth, gamma(sub s) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Below certain temperatures, T(sub cr), dependent on c, however, a kinetic roughening hypothesis that considers the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface better describes the observed growth velocities. The application of the continuous growth model, up to the solution cloud-point temperatures, T(sub cl), enabled the determinations of the crossover concentration, c(sub r), from estimated values of T(sub cr). For all conditions presented, we find that the crossover from growth by 2D nucleation to continuous addition occurs at a supersaturation, sigma (sub c), = 2.0 plus or minus 0.1. Moreover, we find the energy barrier for the continuous addition, E(sub c), within the temperature range T(sub cl) less than T less than T less than T (sub cr), to be 6 plus or minus 1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Further reduction of T below approximately 2-3 C of T(sub cl), also revealed a rapid slowing of crystal growth velocities. From quasi-elastic light scattering investigations, we find that the rapid diminishment of crystal growth velocities can be accounted for by the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions. Namely, we find the reversible formation of dense fluid proto-droplets comprised of lysozyme molecules to occur below approximately 0.3 C of T(sub cl). Hence, the rapid slowing of growth velocities may occur as a result of the sudden depletion of "mobile" molecules within crystal growth

  11. Polymerizable ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Jazkewitsch, Olga; Ritter, Helmut

    2009-09-17

    Polymerizable vinylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) that contain mesogenic coumarin and biphenyl units, respectively, have been synthesized. The N-alkylation of N-vinylimidazole with bromoalkylated mesogenic units 7-(6-bromohexyloxy)coumarin (1) and 4,4'-bis(6-bromohexyloxy)biphenyl (2) was then carried out. The thermal behavior of the obtained ILs 3 and 4 was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. These measurements showed that the attached mesogenic units induce the self-assembly of ILs and, therefore, the occurrence of liquid crystalline phases. Subsequently, the ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) 3 and 4 were polymerized by a free-radical mechanism.

  12. Phase synchronization of the hydrodynamic and orientational modes during electroconvection in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyrshin, E. S.; Krekhov, A. P.; Skaldin, O. A.; Delev, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of oscillating electroconvective structures appearing in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) under the combined action of applied alternating (ac) and direct (dc) electric voltages has been experimentally studied. It is established that an increase in the dc component of the applied voltage leads to synchronization of the hydrodynamic mode with the orientational twist mode of the NLC director. The synchronization parameter and the phase shift of the modes are determined as function of the applied dc voltage. The results confirm the flexoelectric mechanism of synchronization.

  13. Gelator-doped liquid-crystal phase grating with multistable and dynamic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hui-Chi; Yang, Meng-Ru; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Yan, Shih-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a gelator-doped nematic liquid-crystal (LC) phase grating, which can be operated in both the multistable mode and the dynamic mode. Thermoreversible association and dissociation of the gelator molecules can vary and fix the multistable diffraction efficiencies of the gratings. A voltage (V) can also be applied to modulate dynamically the diffraction efficiencies of the grating, which behaves as a conventional LC grating. Experimental results show that the variations of the diffraction efficiencies in the multistable and dynamic modes are similar. The maximum diffraction efficiency is approximately 30% at V = 2 V.

  14. Gelator-doped liquid-crystal phase grating with multistable and dynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui-Chi Yang, Meng-Ru; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Yan, Shih-Chiang

    2014-01-06

    We demonstrate a gelator-doped nematic liquid-crystal (LC) phase grating, which can be operated in both the multistable mode and the dynamic mode. Thermoreversible association and dissociation of the gelator molecules can vary and fix the multistable diffraction efficiencies of the gratings. A voltage (V) can also be applied to modulate dynamically the diffraction efficiencies of the grating, which behaves as a conventional LC grating. Experimental results show that the variations of the diffraction efficiencies in the multistable and dynamic modes are similar. The maximum diffraction efficiency is approximately 30% at V = 2 V.

  15. Data association multiple target tracking using a phase-mostly liquid crystal television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Eddy C.; Yu, Francis T. S.; Tanone, Aris; Gregory, Don A.; Juday, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a technique of using data association target tracking in a motion sequence via an adaptive joint transform correlator. The massive data in the field of view can be reduced to a few correlation peaks. The average velocity of a target during the tracking cycle is then determined from the location of the correlation peak. A data association algorithm is used for the analysis of these correlation signals, with which multiple targets can be tracked. A phase-mostly liquid-crystal TV is used in the hybrid joint transform correlation system, and simultaneous tracking of three targets is demonstrated.

  16. Data association multiple target tracking using a phase-mostly liquid crystal television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Eddy C.; Yu, Francis T. S.; Tanone, Aris; Gregory, Don A.; Juday, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a technique of using data association target tracking in a motion sequence via an adaptive joint transform correlator. The massive data in the field of view can be reduced to a few correlation peaks. The average velocity of a target during the tracking cycle is then determined from the location of the correlation peak. A data association algorithm is used for the analysis of these correlation signals, with which multiple targets can be tracked. A phase-mostly liquid-crystal TV is used in the hybrid joint transform correlation system, and simultaneous tracking of three targets is demonstrated.

  17. Theoretical modeling on the laser induced effect of liquid crystal optical phased beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoxian; Wang, Xiangru; Wu, Liang; Tan, Qinggui; Li, Man; Shang, Jiyang; Wu, Shuanghong; Huang, Ziqiang

    2017-01-01

    Non-mechanical laser beam steering has been reported previously in liquid crystal array devices. To be one of the most promising candidates to be practical non-mechanical laser deflector, its laser induced effect still has few theoretical model. In this paper, we propose a theoretical model to analyze this laser induced effect of LC-OPA to evaluate the deterioration on phased beam steering. The model has three parts: laser induced thermal distribution; temperature dependence of material parameters and beam steering deterioration. After these three steps, the far field of laser beam is obtained to demonstrate the steering performance with the respect to the incident laser beam power and beam waist.

  18. Method to measure the phase modulation characteristics of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunlong; Nie, Jinsong; Shao, Li

    2016-11-01

    The universal liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) is widely used in many aspects of optical studies. The working principles and applications of LC-SLM were introduced briefly. The traditional Twyman-Green interference method, which was used to measure the phase modulation characteristics of a liquid spatial light modulator, had some obvious disadvantages in practice. To avoid these issues, the traditional Twyman-Green interference method was improved. Also, a new method to process interference fringes and measure the shift distances and cycles automatically by computers was proposed. The phase modulation characteristics of P512-1064 LC-SLM produced by the Meadowlark Company were measured to verify the validity of the newly proposed method. In addition, in order to compensate and correct the nonlinear characteristics of the phase modulation curve, three universal inverse interpolation methods were utilized. The root mean squared error and residual sum of squares between the calibrated phase modulation curve and the ideal phase modulation curve were reduced obviously by taking advantage of the inverse interpolation methods. Subsequently, the method of shape-preserving subsection cubic interpolation had acquired the best performance with high computation efficiency. Experiments have been performed to verify the validity of the interpolation method. The experimental results showed that the phase modulation characteristics of LC-LSM could be acquired and calibrated automatically with convenience and high efficiency by utilizing the newly proposed processing method.

  19. Characterization of the phase behaviour of a novel polymerizable lyotropic ionic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Nicolas; Forsyth, Maria; Dumée, Ludovic F; Bryant, Gary; Byrne, Nolene

    2015-09-21

    The development of new polymerizable lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) utilizing charged amphiphilic molecules such as those based on long chain imidazolium compounds, is a relatively new design direction for producing robust membranes with controllable nano-structures. Here we have developed a novel polymerizable ionic liquid based LLC, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium acrylate (C16mimAcr), where the acrylate anion acts as the polymerizable moiety. The phase behaviour of the C16mimAcr upon the addition of water was characterized using small and wide angle X-ray scatterings, differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy. We compare the phase behaviour of this new polymerizable LLC to that of the well known LLC chloride analogue, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16mimCl). We find that the C16mimAcr system has a more complex phase behaviour compared to the C16mimCl system. Additional lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases such as hexagonal phase (H1) and discontinuous cubic phase (I1) are observed at 20 °C for the acrylate system at 50 and 65 wt% water respectively. The appearance of the hexagonal phase (H1) and discontinuous cubic phase (I1) for the acrylate system is likely due to the strong hydrating nature of the acrylate anion, which increases the head group area. The formation of these additional mesophases seen for the acrylate system, especially the hexagonal phase (H1), coupled with the polymerization functionality offers great potential in the design of advanced membrane materials with selective and anisotropic transport properties.

  20. Preparation and Optical Properties of Spherical Inverse Opals by Liquid Phase Deposition Using Spherical Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, Y.; Tominaga, T.

    2013-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) inverse opals in spherical shape were prepared by liquid phase deposition (LPD) using spherical colloidal crystals as templates. Spherical colloidal crystals were produced by ink-jet drying technique. Aqueous emulsion droplets that contain polystyrene latex particles were ejected into air and dried. Closely packed colloidal crystals with spherical shape were obtained. The obtained spherical colloidal crystals were used as templates for the LPD. The templates were dispersed in the deposition solution of the LPD, i.e. a mixed solution of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid and reacted for 4 h at 30 °C. After the LPD process, the interstitial spaces of the spherical colloidal crystals were completely filled with titanium oxide. Subsequent heat treatment resulted in removal of templates and spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals. The spherical shape of the template was retained. SEM observations indicated that the periodic ordered voids were surrounded by titanium dioxide. The optical reflectance spectra indicated that the optical properties of the spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals were due to Bragg diffractions from the ordered structure. Filling in the voids of the inverse opals with different solvents caused remarkable changes in the reflectance peak.

  1. Molecular theory of phase separation in nematic liquid crystals doped with spherical nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Mikhail A; Gorkunov, Maxim V

    2014-05-19

    A molecular-statistical theory is developed, which enables one to describe the nematic-isotropic phase transition in liquid crystals doped with spherical nanoparticles taking into account the effects of phase separation. It has been shown that in the case of strong interaction between nanoparticles and mesogenic molecules the nematic nanocomposite possesses a number of unexpected properties. In particular, the nematic-isotropic co-existence region appears to be very broad, and the system either undergoes a direct transition from the isotropic phase into the phase-separated state, or undergoes the transition into the homogeneous nematic phase first and then phase-separates at a lower temperature. Phase separation does not occur at all if the concentration of the nanoparticles is sufficiently low, and in some cases it takes place only within a finite region of nanoparticle concentration. A number of temperature-concentration phase diagrams is presented and the molar fractions of nanoparticles in the co-existing isotropic and nematic phases are calculated numerically as functions of temperature. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Acousto-optic liquid-crystal analog beam former for phased-array antennas.

    PubMed

    Riza, N A

    1994-06-10

    A compact phased-array antenna acousto-optic beam former with element-level analog phase (0-2π) and amplitude control using nematic-liquid-crystal display-type technology is experimentally demonstrated. Measurements indicate > 6-bit phase control and 52.6 dB of amplitude-attenuation control. High-quality error calibration and antenna sidelobe-level control is possible with this low-control-power analog beam former. Optical system options using rf Bragg cells or wideband Bragg cells are discussed, with the rf design being the current preferred approach. Transmit-receive beam forming based on frequency upconversion-downconversion by electronic mixing is introduced for the rf Bragg-cell beam former, and comparisons with digital beam forming are highlighted. A millimeter-wave signal generation and control optical architecture is described.

  3. Crystallization of belite–melilite clinker minerals in the presence of liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hideto; Fukuda, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization of belite–melilite clinker minerals was studied from the view point of a high temperature equilibrium. Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}–Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7} and Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}–Ca{sub 2}AlFeSiO{sub 7} clinkers were synthesized at 1330 °C–1650 °C. The constituent phases were determined by X-ray powder diffractometry and optical microscopy. Chemical compositions of the individual clinker minerals were determined using an electron probe microanalyzer. We established the two types of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-bearing pseudobinary phase diagrams in the systems Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}–Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7} at 1505 °C–1650 °C and Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}–Ca{sub 2}(Al,Fe){sub 2}SiO{sub 7} at 1330 °C–1550 °C. In the latter system, the liquid phase appeared at 1390 °C, which is approximately 150 °C lower than the temperature of liquid formation in the former system. The melilite phenocrysts larger than 50 μm were observed not only in the slowly cooled Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}–Ca{sub 2}(Al,Fe){sub 2}SiO{sub 7} clinker but also in commercial belite–melilite clinkers. These crystals would be nucleated and grown from a liquid phase which was formed at relatively low temperatures.

  4. The existence region and composition of a polymer-induced liquid precursor phase for DL-glutamic acid crystals.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan; Gower, Laurie; Volkmer, Dirk; Cölfen, Helmut

    2012-01-14

    The existence region of a polymer-induced liquid precursor (PILP) phase for crystals of an organic compound (DL-glutamic acid, Glu) was determined for the first time in the phase diagram of the Glu-polyethyleneimine-water-ethanol system. The existence region and the amount of PILP phase relative to the thermodynamically stable crystal phase were very small. Other phases detected in the phase diagram were coacervates, homogenous mixtures, and crystals obtained via a clear solution. The PILP phase is rich in the polymeric additive, which helps to explain the long induction period of PILP before crystallization occurs. Volume measurements indicated that its amount is <1 vol%, showing that this precursor phase is only a minor component.

  5. Phase Behavior and Physical Properties of New Biobased Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Toledo Hijo, Ariel Antonio Campos; Maximo, Guilherme José; Costa, Mariana Conceição; Cunha, Rosiane Lopes; Pereira, Jorge Fernando Brandão; Kurnia, Kiki Adi; Batista, Eduardo A Caldas; Meirelles, Antonio J A

    2017-03-23

    Protic ionic liquids (PILs) have emerged as promising compounds and attracted the interest of the industry and the academy community, due to their easy preparation and unique properties. In the context of green chemistry, the use of biocompounds, such as fatty acids for their synthesis could disclose a possible alternative way to produce ILs with low or non-toxic effect and consequently, expanding their applicability in bio-based processes or in the development of bioproducts. This work addressed efforts to a better comprehension of the complex Solid-Liquid-Crystal-Liquid thermodynamic equilibrium of twenty new PILs synthesized by using fatty acids commonly found in vegetable oils, as well as their rheological profile and self-assembling ability. The work revealed that their phase equilibrium and physical properties are significantly impacted by the structure of the ions used for their synthesis. The use of unsaturated fatty acids and bis(2-hydroxy ethyl)ammonium for the synthesis of these biobased ILs led to a drastic decreasing of their melting temperatures. Also, the longest alkyl chain fatty acids promoted higher self-assembling and more stable mesophases. Besides their sustainable appeal, the marked high viscosity, non-Newtonian profile and very low critical micellar concentration values of the PIL crystals here disclosed make them interesting renewable compounds with potential applications as emulsifiers, stabilizers, thickeners or biolubricants.

  6. Detecting, visualizing, and measuring gold nanoparticle chirality using helical pitch measurements in nematic liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshul; Mori, Taizo; Lee, Huey-Charn; Worden, Matthew; Bidwell, Eric; Hegmann, Torsten

    2014-12-23

    Chirality at the nanoscale, or more precisely, the chirality or chiroptical effects of chiral ligand-capped metal nanoparticles (NPs) is an intriguing and rapidly evolving field in nanomaterial research with promising applications in catalysis, metamaterials, and chiral sensing. The aim of this work was to seek out a system that not only allows the detection and understanding of NP chirality but also permits visualization of the extent of chirality transfer to a surrounding medium. The nematic liquid crystal phase is an ideal candidate, displaying characteristic defect texture changes upon doping with chiral additives. To test this, we synthesized chiral cholesterol-capped gold NPs and prepared well-dispersed mixtures in two nematic liquid crystal hosts. Induced circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and polarized light optical microscopy revealed that all three gold NPs induce chiral nematic phases, and that those synthesized in the presence of a chiral bias (disulfide) are more powerful chiral inducers than those where the NP was formed in the absence of a chiral bias (prepared by conjugation of a chiral silane to preformed NPs). Helical pitch data here visually show a clear dependence on the NP size and the number of chiral ligands bound to the NP surface, thereby supporting earlier experimental and theoretical data that smaller metal NPs made in the presence of a chiral bias are stronger chiral inducers.

  7. Optical diffractometry of highly anisotropic holographic gratings formed by liquid crystal and polymer phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Ogiwara, Akifumi

    2012-12-01

    Optical diffractometry is proposed as a practical method of quantitatively analyzing the microscopic structural origins of a wide range of highly efficient and linearly polarized optical diffraction grating produced from holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal. The structure is organized by a spatially periodical distribution of submicrometer-scale liquid crystal (LC) droplets in a polymer matrix. Six independent Bragg diffraction spectra were obtained at two orthogonal polarization states at temperatures below, at, and above the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition point. These spectra were simultaneously analyzed by employing anisotropic diffraction theory under the restraint of a simple and widely useful structural model constructed on the basis of the previously reported microscopic observations. The refractive indices of spatially periodic LC- and polymer-rich phases were analyzed using Cauchy's equation as a function of optical wavelength. The present diffractometry was demonstrated for a variety of holographic structures, and the structural parameters were discussed such as the filling ratio of LC droplets to polymer matrix, the orientational order in the droplets, and the thermo-optic properties in the LC droplets. Furthermore, the higher order Bragg diffractions were measured and discussed. The proposed method was examined in consistency by comparisons with polarizing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Optical diffractometry of highly anisotropic holographic gratings formed by liquid crystal and polymer phase separation.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Ogiwara, Akifumi

    2012-12-01

    Optical diffractometry is proposed as a practical method of quantitatively analyzing the microscopic structural origins of a wide range of highly efficient and linearly polarized optical diffraction grating produced from holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal. The structure is organized by a spatially periodical distribution of submicrometer-scale liquid crystal (LC) droplets in a polymer matrix. Six independent Bragg diffraction spectra were obtained at two orthogonal polarization states at temperatures below, at, and above the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition point. These spectra were simultaneously analyzed by employing anisotropic diffraction theory under the restraint of a simple and widely useful structural model constructed on the basis of the previously reported microscopic observations. The refractive indices of spatially periodic LC- and polymer-rich phases were analyzed using Cauchy's equation as a function of optical wavelength. The present diffractometry was demonstrated for a variety of holographic structures, and the structural parameters were discussed such as the filling ratio of LC droplets to polymer matrix, the orientational order in the droplets, and the thermo-optic properties in the LC droplets. Furthermore, the higher order Bragg diffractions were measured and discussed. The proposed method was examined in consistency by comparisons with polarizing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Liquid crystalline phase as a probe for crystal engineering of lactose: carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sharvil S; Mahadik, Kakasaheb R; Paradkar, Anant R

    2015-02-20

    The current work was undertaken to assess suitability of liquid crystalline phase for engineering of lactose crystals and their utility as a carrier in dry powder inhalation formulations. Saturated lactose solution was poured in molten glyceryl monooleate which subsequently transformed into gel. The gel microstructure was analyzed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Lactose particles recovered from gels after 48 h were analyzed for polymorphism using techniques such as FTIR, XRD, DSC and TGA. Particle size, morphology and aerosolisation properties of prepared lactose were analyzed using Anderson cascade impactor. In situ seeding followed by growth of lactose crystals took place in gels with cubic microstructure as revealed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Elongated (size ∼ 71 μm) lactose particles with smooth surface containing mixture of α and β-lactose was recovered from gel, however percentage of α-lactose was more as compared to β-lactose. The aerosolisation parameters such as RD, ED, %FPF and % recovery of lactose recovered from gel (LPL) were found to be comparable to Respitose® ML001. Thus LC phase (cubic) can be used for engineering of lactose crystals so as to obtain particles with smooth surface, high elongation ratio and further they can be used as carrier in DPI formulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Polymer Wall Formation Using Liquid-Crystal/Polymer Phase Separation Induced on Patterned Polyimide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    We could form lattice-shaped polymer walls in a liquid crystal (LC) layer through the thermal phase separation of an LC/polystyrene solution between substrates with polyimide films etched by short-wavelength ultraviolet irradiation using a photomask. The LC wetting difference between the polyimide and substrate surfaces caused the coalescence of growing LC droplets on patterned polyimide films with the progress of phase separation. Consequently, polymer walls were formed on substrate surface areas without polyimide films. The shape of the polymer wall formed became sharp with the use of rubbed polyimide films because the nucleation of growing LC droplets concentrated on the patterned polyimide films. It is thought that the increase in the alignment order of LC molecules in the solution near the rubbed polyimide films promotes the formation of LC molecular aggregation, which becomes the growth nuclei of LC droplets.

  11. Light Diffraction of Aligned Polymer Fibers Periodically Dispersed by Phase Separation of Liquid Crystal and Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    We have confirmed light diffraction of aligned polymer fibers obtained by a phase separation of an anisotropic-phase solution of liquid crystal and polymer. He—Ne laser light passing through the polymer fibers was scattered in the axis vertical to the fibers, and had two peaks of light intensity symmetrical to the center of the transmitting laser spot. The two peaks were found to be caused by light diffraction due to the periodic polymer-fiber dispersion because the peaks corresponded to values calculated by intervals between the fibers. The periodical fiber networks are considered to be formed by anisotropic spinodal decomposition. This effect can be used to measure the dispersion order of the polymer fibers.

  12. Grating lobes analysis based on blazed grating theory for liquid crystal optical-phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Cui, Guolong; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2013-09-01

    The grating lobes of the liquid crystal optical-phased array (LCOPA) based on blazed grating theory is studied. Using the Fraunhofer propagation principle, the analytical expressions of the far-field intensity distribution are derived. Subsequently, we can obtain both the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes. The derived analytical functions that provide an insight into single-slit diffraction and multislit interference effect on the grating lobes are discussed. Utilizing the conventional microwave-phased array technique, the intensities of the grating lobes and the main lobe are almost the same. Different from this, the derived analytical functions demonstrate that the intensities of the grating lobes are less than that of the main lobe. The computer simulations and experiments show that the proposed method can correctly estimate the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes for a LCOPA simultaneously.

  13. Laser-directed hierarchical assembly of liquid crystal defects and control of optical phase singularities

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Paul J.; Qi, Zhiyuan; Lin, Yiheng; Twombly, Christopher W.; Laviada, Mauricio J.; Lansac, Yves; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2012-01-01

    Topological defect lines are ubiquitous and important in a wide variety of fascinating phenomena and theories in many fields ranging from materials science to early-universe cosmology, and to engineering of laser beams. However, they are typically hard to control in a reliable manner. Here we describe facile erasable “optical drawing” of self-assembled defect clusters in liquid crystals. These quadrupolar defect clusters, stabilized by the medium's chirality and the tendency to form twisted configurations, are shaped into arbitrary two-dimensional patterns, including reconfigurable phase gratings capable of generating and controlling optical phase singularities in laser beams. Our findings bridge the studies of defects in condensed matter physics and optics and may enable applications in data storage, singular optics, displays, electro-optic devices, diffraction gratings, as well as in both optically- and electrically-addressed pixel-free spatial light modulators. PMID:22679553

  14. Light-melt adhesive based on dynamic carbon frameworks in a columnar liquid-crystal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shohei; Nobusue, Shunpei; Tsuzaka, Eri; Yuan, Chunxue; Mori, Chigusa; Hara, Mitsuo; Seki, Takahiro; Camacho, Cristopher; Irle, Stephan; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-07-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) provides a suitable platform to exploit structural motions of molecules in a condensed phase. Amplification of the structural changes enables a variety of technologies not only in LC displays but also in other applications. Until very recently, however, a practical use of LCs for removable adhesives has not been explored, although a spontaneous disorganization of LC materials can be easily triggered by light-induced isomerization of photoactive components. The difficulty of such application derives from the requirements for simultaneous implementation of sufficient bonding strength and its rapid disappearance by photoirradiation. Here we report a dynamic molecular LC material that meets these requirements. Columnar-stacked V-shaped carbon frameworks display sufficient bonding strength even during heating conditions, while its bonding ability is immediately lost by a light-induced self-melting function. The light-melt adhesive is reusable and its fluorescence colour reversibly changes during the cycle, visualizing the bonding/nonbonding phases of the adhesive.

  15. Light-melt adhesive based on dynamic carbon frameworks in a columnar liquid-crystal phase.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shohei; Nobusue, Shunpei; Tsuzaka, Eri; Yuan, Chunxue; Mori, Chigusa; Hara, Mitsuo; Seki, Takahiro; Camacho, Cristopher; Irle, Stephan; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-07-04

    Liquid crystal (LC) provides a suitable platform to exploit structural motions of molecules in a condensed phase. Amplification of the structural changes enables a variety of technologies not only in LC displays but also in other applications. Until very recently, however, a practical use of LCs for removable adhesives has not been explored, although a spontaneous disorganization of LC materials can be easily triggered by light-induced isomerization of photoactive components. The difficulty of such application derives from the requirements for simultaneous implementation of sufficient bonding strength and its rapid disappearance by photoirradiation. Here we report a dynamic molecular LC material that meets these requirements. Columnar-stacked V-shaped carbon frameworks display sufficient bonding strength even during heating conditions, while its bonding ability is immediately lost by a light-induced self-melting function. The light-melt adhesive is reusable and its fluorescence colour reversibly changes during the cycle, visualizing the bonding/nonbonding phases of the adhesive.

  16. Liquid Crystal Phase Transition driven three-dimensional Quantum Dot Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodarte, Andrea L.; Pandolfi, R. J.; Ghosh, S.; Hirst, L. S.

    2013-03-01

    We use a nematic liquid crystal (LC) to create organized assemblies of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs). At the isotropic-nematic LC phase transition, ordered domains of nematic LC expel the majority of dispersed QDs into the isotropic domains. The final LC phase produces a series of three dimensional columnar QD assemblies that are situated at defect points in the LC volume. Within each assembly the QD emission is spectrally-red-shifted due to resonant energy transfer. We use this spectral shift as a measure of the inter-dot separation and find that the QDs are packed uniformly in these assemblies over distances of microns between the glass plates of a standard LC cell. In addition, because the QD clusters form at defects, we can deterministically control the location of the assemblies by seeding the LC cell with defect nucleation points. Funding provided by NSF, UC MERI and UC MEXUS.

  17. Waterlike features, liquid-crystal phase and self-assembly in Janus dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, José Rafael

    2016-10-01

    We explore the phase diagram of Janus nanoparticles using Molecular Dynamics simulations. Each monomer in the dimer has distinct characteristics. One type of monomer interacts by a Lennard Jones potential, while the other type interacts through a two length scale potential. Previous studies for the monomeric system using this specific two length scale potential do not indicate the presence of waterlike anomalies. However, our results show that the combination of two length scales potential and LJ potential in the Janus nanoparticle will lead to thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. The self-assembly properties were also explored. We observe distinct kinds of self-assembled structures and a liquid-crystal phase. This result indicates that it is possible to create Janus nanoparticles with waterlike features using monomers without anomalous behavior. The anomalies and structures are explained with the two length scale potential characteristics.

  18. Achiral flexible liquid crystal trimers exhibiting gyroid-like surfaces in chiral conglomerate phases.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Haruna; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun; Yoshizawa, Atsushi

    2017-09-12

    Chiral conglomerate phases have attracted much attention not only for the spontaneous mirror symmetry breaking but also for their nanostructures. We investigated both surface and bulk structures of a homologues series of an achiral liquid crystal trimer I-(n,m) exhibiting soft crystalline chiral conglomerate phases by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The trimers were found to form bicontinuous networks. In particular, trimer I-(9,9) exhibited a single gyroid-like surface accompanying periodic distribution of dimples with a size of about 100 nm. It showed a sponge-like structure in the bulk of the material. The twist conformation of the flexible trimer I-(n,m) can cause layer deformation, which produces bicontinuous networks exhibiting optical activity.

  19. Evaluation of phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator for phase modulation performance using a Twyman Green interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Liying

    2007-06-01

    In order to evaluate the phase modulation performance of a 256 × 256 pixel reflecting liquid crystal spatial light modulator purchased from the US Boulder Nonlinear Systems, we identify the linear range of phase shift and evaluate the spatial nonuniformity of the modulator by measuring both phase and intensity with a Twyman-Green interferometer. Experimental results show that the 50-210 grey scales linear ranges of the phase shift established by phase and intensity measurements are in good agreement with each other, which proves that more accurate phase modulation can be achieved. The inherent backplane curvature of the modulator is less than λ/3 and the root-mean-square value of the phase nonuniformity across the modulator aperture is less than λ/10, so the backplane curvature of the modulator is the main contributor to phase distortion due to the modulator. Analysing the deviation of the root-mean-square value of the phase nonuniformity indicates that the stability of the modulator decreases with increasing grey scales. It is therefore concluded that the modulator calibrated using a single interferometer can be used for beam steering, wave-front correction and transformation.

  20. A flux induced crystal phase transition in the vapor-liquid-solid growth of indium-tin oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Meng, Gang; Yanagida, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hideto; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kanai, Masaki; Zhuge, Fuwei; He, Yong; Klamchuen, Annop; Rahong, Sakon; Fang, Xiaodong; Takeda, Seiji; Kawai, Tomoji

    2014-06-21

    Single crystalline metal oxide nanowires formed via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) route provide a platform not only for studying fundamental nanoscale properties but also for exploring novel device applications. Although the crystal phase variation of metal oxides, which exhibits a variety of physical properties, is an interesting feature compared with conventional semiconductors, it has been difficult to control the crystal phase of metal oxides during the VLS nanowire growth. Here we show that a material flux critically determines the crystal phase of indium-tin oxide nanowires grown via the VLS route, although thermodynamical parameters, such as temperature and pressure, were previously believed to determine the crystal phase. The crystal phases of indium-tin oxide nanowires varied from the rutile structures (SnO2), the metastable fluorite structures (InxSnyO3.5) and the bixbyite structures (Sn-doped In2O3) when only the material flux was varied within an order of magnitude. This trend can be interpreted in terms of the material flux dependence of crystal phases (rutile SnO2 and bixbyite In2O3) on the critical nucleation at the liquid-solid (LS) interface. Thus, precisely controlling the material flux, which has been underestimated for VLS nanowire growths, allows us to design the crystal phase and properties in the VLS nanowire growth of multicomponent metal oxides.

  1. Generation of dark hollow femtosecond pulsed beam by phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yongming; Ma, Haotong; Li, Xiujian; Hu, Wenhua; Yang, Jiankun

    2011-07-20

    Based on the refractive laser beam shaping system, the dark hollow femtosecond pulse beam shaping technique with a phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) is demonstrated. The phase distribution of the LC-SLM is derived by the energy conservation and constant optical path principle. The effects of the shaping system on the temporal properties, including spectral phase distribution and bandwidth of the femtosecond pulse, are analyzed in detail. Experimental results show that the hollow intensity distribution of the output pulsed beam can be maintained much at more than 1200 mm. The spectral phase of the pulse is changed, and the pulse width is expanded from 199 to 230 fs, which is caused by the spatial-temporal coupling effect. The coupling effect mainly depends on the phase-only LC-SLM itself, not on its loaded phase distribution. The experimental results indicate that the proposed shaping setup can generate a dark hollow femtosecond pulsed beam effectively, because the temporal Gaussian waveform is unchanged.

  2. Resonant X-ray Scattering Studies of Smectic and Columnar Bent-Core Liquid Crystal Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindak, Ronald; Barois, Philippe; Ponsinet, Virginie; Folcia, Cesar; Ortega, Josu; Pan, Lidong; Wang, Shun; Wang, Suntao; Huang, Cheng-Cher

    2012-02-01

    Resonant X-ray scattering provides a direct probe of orientational structures in liquid crystals with periodicities that range from molecular dimensions (0.1 nm) to dimensions that can be observed with visible light (1.0 micron). We have recently applied this technique to study the orientational ordering of bent-core molecules in the smectic B2 phase and the columnar B1 phase. Using resonant scattering ``forbidden'' reflections due to glide or screw symmetry elements can be measured and an analysis of their polarization state enabled us to identify a chiral anticlinic antiferroelecrtic B2 phase (Smectic CAPA) coexisting with an achiral synclinic antiferroelectric B2 phase (Smectic CSPA) [1]. We were also able to determine the structure of a columnar B1 phase and study the transition mechanism between the B1 and B2 phases [2]. [4pt] [1] V. Ponsinet, et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 011706 (2011).[0pt] [2] C. Folcia, et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 010701R (2011).

  3. Three-dimensional profilometry of microlenses by phase shifting interferometery using nematic liquid crystal material filled cell as a phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Inam, M; Srivastava, V; Mehta, D S

    2015-02-10

    In this paper, we report the use of a nematic liquid crystal material filled cell in transmission mode as a voltage controlled phase modulator for the characterization of microlenses. In one arm of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a nematic liquid crystal filled cell with DC voltage connection was placed, and in another arm of the interferometer microlenses with a 4-F imaging system were placed. Interference takes place between the light beams coming from the two arms of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, one after passing through the nematic liquid crystal cell and another after passing through microlenses. Interference patterns were recorded by a CCD camera. By applying DC voltage to the nematic liquid crystal filled cell, various phase shifted interferograms were recorded, and from phase shifted interferograms, the shape and size of microlenses were determined. The results of the reconstructed profile of the microlenses are compared with white-light profilometry.

  4. Efficient Light-Induced Phase Transitions in Halogen-Bonded Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a new family of light-responsive, fluorinated supramolecular liquid crystals (LCs) showing efficient and reversible light-induced LC-to-isotropic phase transitions. Our materials design is based on fluorinated azobenzenes, where the fluorination serves to strengthen the noncovalent interaction with bond-accepting stilbazole molecules, and increase the lifetime of the cis-form of the azobenzene units. The halogen-bonded LCs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, hot-stage polarized optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Simultaneous analysis of light-induced changes in birefringence, absorption, and optical scattering allowed us to estimate that <4% of the mesogenic units in the cis-form suffices to trigger the full LC-to-isotropic phase transition. We also report a light-induced and reversible crystal-to-isotropic phase transition, which has not been previously observed in supramolecular complexes. In addition to fundamental understanding of light-responsive supramolecular complexes, we foresee this study to be important in the development of bistable photonic devices and supramolecular actuators. PMID:27917024

  5. Polarization independent electro-optical waveguides with liquid crystals in isotropic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costache, Florenta; Blasl, Martin; Bornhorst, Kirstin

    2015-02-01

    Electro-optically induced waveguides can be used in fiber optic networks for optical power control and the distribution of optical signals transmitted over optical fibers. Reliable operation is ensured with this type of waveguides due to their non-mechanical principle of operation. Their polarization dependent behavior caused by field-induced birefringence effects may limit however their practical applications. We report on a method to reduce the polarization dependent loss in electro-optically induced waveguides with a core made of liquid crystals in isotropic phase. The concept design enables a controlled adjustment of the electric field distribution, which is responsible for inducing and shaping the optical mode, by employing an optimized electrode arrangement. In this new waveguide structure, the TM and TE modes coexist spatially and are guided in a similar way. In order to demonstrate this concept, straight and bending waveguides in 1×1 and 1×2 light input to output configurations have been designed and fabricated. The electrode arrangement and single mode waveguide geometry were optimized using FEM simulations. Bulk silicon micromachining was used to fabricate these waveguides. In particular, the manufactured device consisted of two processed silicon substrates with a liquid crystal layer enclosed in between. Devices tested with varying driving voltage have revealed comparable transmitted power for both TE and TM modes. Very low polarization dependent losses over a more than 20 dB wide dynamic attenuation range have been obtained.

  6. Label-free protein sensing by employing blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mon-Juan; Chang, Chung-Huan; Lee, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Blue phases (BPs) are mesophases existing between the isotropic and chiral nematic phases of liquid crystals (LCs). In recent years, blue phase LCs (BPLCs) have been extensively studied in the field of LC science and display technology. However, the application of BPLCs in biosensing has not been explored. In this study, a BPLC-based biosensing technology was developed for the detection and quantitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The sensing platform was constructed by assembling an empty cell with two glass slides coated with homeotropic alignment layers and with immobilized BSA atop. The LC cells were heated to isotropic phase and then allowed to cool down to and maintained at distinct BP temperatures for spectral measurements and texture observations. At BSA concentrations below 10(-6) g/ml, we observed that the Bragg reflection wavelength blue-shifted with increasing concentration of BSA, suggesting that the BP is a potentially sensitive medium in the detection and quantitation of biomolecules. By using the BPLC at 37 °C and the same polymorphic material in the smectic A phase at 20 °C, two linear correlations were established for logarithmic BSA concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) g/ml and from 10(-6) to 10(-3) g/ml. Our results demonstrate the potential of BPLCs in biosensing and quantitative analysis of biomolecules.

  7. Characterization of submillisecond response optical addressing phase modulator based on low light scattering polymer network liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangjie, Zhao E-mail: zxjdouble@gmail.com; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2015-01-07

    Optically addressed conventional nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator has attracted wide research interests. But the slow response speed limited its further application. In this paper, polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was proposed to replace the conventional nematic liquid crystal to enhance the response time to the order of submillisecond. The maximum light scattering of the employed PNLC was suppressed to be less than 2% at 1.064 μm by optimizing polymerization conditions and selecting large viscosity liquid crystal as solvent. The occurrence of phase ripple phenomenon due to electron diffusion and drift in photoconductor was found to deteriorate the phase modulation effect of the optical addressed PNLC phase modulator. The wavelength effect and AC voltage frequency effect on the on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated by experimental methods. These effects were interpreted by electron diffusion and drift theory based on the assumption that free electron was inhomogeneously distributed in accordance with the writing beam intensity distribution along the incident direction. The experimental results indicated that the phase ripple could be suppressed by optimizing the wavelength of the writing beam and the driving AC voltage frequency when varying the writing beam intensity to generate phase change in 2π range. The modulation transfer function was also measured.

  8. Relaxation processes in the ferrielectric and alpha phases of antiferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibonne, F.; Parneix, J. P.; Nguyen, H. T.

    1998-09-01

    Dielectric measurements of a new antiferroelectric liquid crystal series exhibiting different phase sequences have been carried out as a function of frequency from 10 Hz to 10 MHz. Structural properties of S_{C_{α}^{*}} and ferrielectric S_{C_{FI}^{*}} phases were discussed on the basis of the experimental results of temperature and dc bias field dependencies of the dielectric modes. Besides the soft mode observed around the SA-S_{C_{α}^{*}} phase transition, a Goldstone mode was detected in the S_{C_{α}^{*}} phase indicating a helicoidal structure with small pitch values. In agreement with a bilayer ordering model, the dielectric absorption in the S_{C_{FI}^{*}} phase was splitted up into two contributions: one related to a Goldstone mode and the other to an azimuthal antiphase mode. Les mesures diélectriques d'une nouvelle série de cristaux liquides antiferroélectriques présentant diverses séquences de phases sont effectuées dans la gamme de fréquence 10 Hz 10 MHz. Les propriétés structurales des phases S_{C_{α}^{*}} et ferriélectrique S_{C_{FI}^{*}} sont discutées sur la base des résultats expérimentaux des modes diélectriques en fonction de la température et du champ continu. En supplément du mode mou observé autour de la transition de phase SA-S_{C_{α}^{*}}, un mode de Goldstone est détecté dans la phase S_{C_{α}^{*}}, indiquant ainsi une structure hélicoïdale avec un pas d'hélice très faible. En accord avec un modèle d'arrangement bicouche, l'absorption diélectrique dans la phase S_{C_{FI}^{*}} se décompose en deux contributions : une liée au mode de Goldstone et l'autre à un mode azimutal antiphase.

  9. Kerr effect in the isotropic phase of a side-chain polymeric liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reys, V.; Dormoy, Y.; Collin, D.; Keller, P.; Martinoty, P.

    1992-02-01

    The birefringence induced by a pulsed electrical field was used to study the pretransitional effects associated with the isotropic phase of a side-chain polysiloxane. The results obtained show that these effects are characterised by a conventional value of the static exponent and an abnormal value of the dynamic exponent, which shows that the dynamic theory of low molecular weight liquid crystals does not apply. The results also reveal competition between the dipolar moments induced by the electrical field and the permanent moments of the mesogenic molecules. La biréfringence induite par un champ électrique impulsionnel a été utilisée pour étudier les effets prétransitionnels associés à la phase isotrope d'un polysiloxane à chaînes latérales. Les résultats obtenus montrent que ces effets sont caractérisés par une valeur classique de l'exposant statique et une valeur anormale de l'exposant dynamique. Ce dernier résultat montre que la théorie dynamique des cristaux liquides de bas poids moléculaire n'est pas applicable au cas présent. Les expériences mettent également en évidence une compétition entre les moments dipolaires induits par le champ électrique et les moments permanents des molécules mésogènes.

  10. Cholesteric Thermo-reversible Liquid-Crystal Gels: Phase Behaviour and Electro-optical Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Rob H. C.; Teunissen, Jean-Pierre; Picken, Stephen J.; Bastiaansen, Cees W. M.; Broer, Dirk J.; Tervoort, Theo A.; Smith, Paul

    2001-04-01

    Thermo-reversible gels of a chiral nematic liquid-crystal (LC) with 12-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid (HOA) were cast in a light-reflecting planar configuration by choosing a processing temperature higher than the sol-gel temperature but lower than the onset-temperature for the chiral nematic-isotropic transition in the gel. The choice of processing temperature is dictated by the quasi-ternary phase diagram of the system, which displays a 3-phase region at which an isotropic liquid is in equilibrium with a fibrillar solid and a chiral nematic mesophase. Planar configurations of the gels produced show a significant broadening of the reflection band with respect to the neat LC-material indicating a distribution of the cholesteric pitch within the gel. Visco-elasticity, electro-optical activity and zero electric field bistability of gelled films has been utilized in building a reflective bistable chiral nematic cell with improved shock-resistance that holds the promise of being produced via a continuous processing route.

  11. Resonant x-ray scattering study of the antiferroelectric and ferrielectric phases in liquid crystal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Matkin, L. S.; Watson, S. J.; Gleeson, H. F.; Pindak, R.; Pitney, J.; Johnson, P. M.; Huang, C. C.; Barois, P.; Levelut, A.-M.; Srajer, G.

    2001-08-01

    Resonant x-ray scattering has been used to investigate the interlayer ordering of the antiferroelectric and ferrielectric smectic C{sup *} subphases in a device geometry. The liquid crystalline materials studied contain a selenium atom and the experiments were carried out at the selenium K edge allowing x-ray transmission through glass. The resonant scattering peaks associated with the antiferroelectric phase were observed in two devices containing different materials. It was observed that the electric-field-induced antiferroelectric to ferroelectric transition coincides with the chevron to bookshelf transition in one of the devices. Observation of the splitting of the antiferroelectric resonant peaks as a function of applied field also confirmed that no helical unwinding occurs at fields lower than the chevron to bookshelf threshold. Resonant features associated with the four-layer ferrielectric liquid crystal phase were observed in a device geometry. Monitoring the electric field dependence of these ferrielectric resonant peaks showed that the chevron to bookshelf transition occurs at a lower applied field than the ferrielectric to ferroelectric switching transition.

  12. Optical diffraction in nonuniform cholesteric liquid crystals: phase-grating mode.

    PubMed

    Giridhar, M S; Suresh, K A; Ranganath, G S

    2002-01-01

    We have worked out the diffraction pattern in the phase-grating mode of a cholesteric liquid crystal (cholesteric) with a pitch gradient. The pitch gradients considered are symmetric and asymmetric with respect to the sample center. For a uniform input beam, the intensity profile of each diffraction order becomes broad. Further, in the symmetric gradient, the profile of each order is irregular, while in the asymmetric gradient it is nearly flat. For a Gaussian input beam, for the symmetrically deformed structure the profile for each order is asymmetric, while for the asymmetrically deformed structure, the profiles just becomes broad. We find that even a 5% nonuniformity in the pitch can drastically alter the diffraction profiles.

  13. Mean-Field Limit and Phase Transitions for Nematic Liquid Crystals in the Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sven; Genoud, François

    2017-08-01

    We discuss thermotropic nematic liquid crystals in the mean-field regime. In the first part of this article, we rigorously carry out the mean-field limit of a system of N rod-like particles as N→ ∞, which yields an effective `one-body' free energy functional. In the second part, we focus on spatially homogeneous systems, for which we study the associated Euler-Lagrange equation, with a focus on phase transitions for general axisymmetric potentials. We prove that the system is isotropic at high temperature, while anisotropic distributions appear through a transcritical bifurcation as the temperature is lowered. Finally, as the temperature goes to zero we also prove, in the concrete case of the Maier-Saupe potential, that the system converges to perfect nematic order.

  14. Chiral beam splitters based on cholesteric blue phase liquid crystals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Masanori; Anucha, Konkanok; Kawata, Yuto; Tanaka, Shu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    A chiral beamsplitter is an optical component that can split left- and right-handed circularly polarized light into orthogonal direction. Unlike a widely used linearly-polarized beamsplitter, realization of chiral beamsplitter by laser fabricated-gyroid crystal is just recently reported. However, due to its low circular dichroism ratio and limitation of applicable light wavelength which couldn't be reduced further below microwave region, chiral beamsplitter is still far from real application. Here we approach differently by using liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases (BPs) which possess self-alignment 3D chiral structures. Our chiral beam splitters based on BPs achieved high circular dichroism extinction ratio and could become a useful component for developing integrated circuit especially in visible wavelength and UV region. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations were also performed along with experiments to support our hypothesis.

  15. Experimental analysis of beam pointing system based on liquid crystal optical phase array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yubin; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate an elementary non-mechanical beam aiming and steering system with a single liquid crystal optical phase array (LC-OPA) and charge-coupled device (CCD). With the conventional method of beam steering control, the LC-OPA device can realize one dimensional beam steering continuously. An improved beam steering strategy is applied to realize two dimensional beam steering with a single LC-OPA. The whole beam aiming and steering system, including an LC-OPA and a retroreflective target, is controlled by the monitor. We test the feasibility of beam steering strategy both in one dimension and in two dimension at first, then the whole system is build up based on the improved strategy. The experimental results show that the max experimental pointing error is 56 μrad, and the average pointing error of the system is 19 μrad.

  16. A fast response variable optical attenuator based on blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ge; Wei, Bing-yan; Shi, Liang-yu; Lin, Xiao-wen; Hu, Wei; Huang, Zhang-di; Lu, Yan-qing

    2013-03-11

    Blue phase liquid crystals (BPLCs) are promising candidates for next generation display thanks to their fast response and quasi-isotropic optical properties. By taking these advantages, we propose to introduce the material into fiber-optic applications. As an example, a BPLC based variable optical attenuator (VOA) is demonstrated with a polarization independent design. The device shows normally-off feature when no field is applied. Response time down to submillisecond scale is achieved in switching between two arbitrary attenuation states. The attenuation range is also measured from 1480 to 1550 nm, which cover the whole telecomm S-band and part of the C-band. The overall performances reach the requirements for practical use; while still have room for further improvement. Through this example, the applicability of BPLC in fiber-optic devices is presented, which may impel the development of many other photonic applications from infrared to even microwave regions.

  17. Using Three-Phase Flow of Immiscible Liquids to Prevent Coalescence of Droplets in Microfluidic Channels: Criteria to Identify theThird Liquid and Validation with Protein Crystallizations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Li, L; Reyes, S; Adamson, D; Ismagilov, R

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript describes the effect of interfacial tensions on three-phase liquid-liquid-liquid flow in microfluidic channels and the use of this flow to prevent microfluidic plugs from coalescing. One problem in using microfluidic plugs as microreactors is the coalescence of adjacent plugs caused by the relative motion of plugs during flow. Here, coalescence of reagent plugs was eliminated by using plugs of a third immiscible liquid as spacers to separate adjacent reagent plugs. This work tested the requirements of interfacial tensions for plugs of a third liquid to be effective spacers. Two candidates satisfying the requirements were identified, and one of these liquids was used in the crystallization of protein human Tdp1 to demonstrate its compatibility with protein crystallization in plugs. This method for identifying immiscible liquids for use as a spacer will also be useful for applications involving manipulation of large arrays of droplets in microfluidic channels.

  18. Drying, phase separation, and deposition in droplets of sunset yellow chromonic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Adam; Davidson, Zoey S.; Huang, Yongyang; Still, Tim; Zhou, Chao; Yodh, A. G.

    We investigate the drying process and the final deposition patterns of multi-phase sessile droplets containing aqueous lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LC). The experiments employ a variety of optical techniques including profilometry, polarization optical microscopy and optical coherence microscopy. An unusual hierarchical LC assembly is observed during drying; in particular, LC mesogens are first formed at the start of drying and then compartments of isotropic, nematic and columnar phases arise. Nonuniform evaporation creates concentration gradients in droplets such that LC phases emerge from the outer edge of the drop and advance to the center over the course of drying. Distinct outward flows associated with the ``coffee-ring effect'' are seen initially, but the assembly of the mesogens creates viscosity, density, and surface tension gradients that effectively introduce new convective flows and complex LC phase boundaries within the drop. Finally, we show that the final deposit shape of chromonic materials changes with rate of evaporation. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through NSF DMR12-05463, MRSEC DMR11-20901, NASA NNX08AO0G, and NSF DBI-1455613.

  19. Interaction between a disclination and a uniaxial-isotropic phase interface in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Fried, Eliot

    2008-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a disclination line of strength +/-1/2 and an interface between the uniaxial and isotropic phases of a nematic liquid crystal. We apply a recently developed set of interface conditions including a configurational force balance which generalizes the Gibbs-Thomson equation to account for the curvature elasticity of the uniaxial phase and the orientation dependence of the interfacial free-energy density. We consider a rectangular vessel containing both phases and a disclination. We formulate a relevant free-boundary problem and use numerical methods to determine equilibrium shapes of the interface. When the interfacial free-energy is constant, the shape of the interface is insensitive to whether the strength of the defect is +1/2 or -1/2 and to rotations of the director field consistent with the boundary conditions. Accounting for the dependence of the interfacial free-energy density on the angle between the interfacial unit normal field and the director field eliminates these degeneracies. In particular, when such dependence is taken into account, different solution branches are found, indicating the presence of a bifurcation. We find also that, depending on the magnitude of the anisotropic contribution to the interfacial free-energy density, the interaction between the disclination and the interface may be repulsive or attractive. When the interaction is repulsive, the disclination line positions itself at an energetically optimal distance adjacent to the interface. Otherwise, the uniaxial phase expels the disclination to the interface where a cusp forms.

  20. The study on measurement methods of phase modulation characteristics for universal liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun-long; Nie, Jin-song; Shao, Li; Sun, Xiao-quan

    2016-10-01

    The universal liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) was widely used in many aspects of optical study. The working principles and application of LC-SLM were introduced briefly. The traditional Twyman-Green interference method which was used to measure the phase modulation characteristics of universal liquid spatial light modulator had some obvious disadvantages in the practical use, such as high environmental requirement and difficult interference fringes acquisition. The disadvantages of traditional Twyman-Green interference method gained the difficulty of carrying out corresponding optical measurement experiments. To avoid this, the traditional Twyman-Green interference method was improved in the paper. The experimental light path was designed anew. Distinct and stable interference fringes could be acquired by controlling the optical path difference (OPD) dynamically. To verify the validity of the newly proposed measurement method, the phase modulation characteristics of P512-1064 LC-SLM produced by Meadowlark Company were measured by utilizing the improved Twyman-Green interference method at the wavelength of 632.8 nm which was beyond the working wavelengths of the LC-SLM. A series of gray images covering the gray degree from 1 to 256 which were generated by computer were used in the experiment. An extra lens was added in front of a reflector in the optical path to control the OPD dynamically. 256 interference images were acquired after loading the gray image into the LC-SLM in order. After that, the acquired interference images should be pre-processed by several digital image processing methods for easier measurement later. Specifically, the method of gray filtering and morphological processing were adopted to make the interference fringes clearer and thinner in the corresponding processing. Then, the phase modulation curve of the LC-SLM was acquired through numerical computation of the cycles of the interference fringes. In general, the phase

  1. The study of diffractive lenses displayed in a phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Si-jin; Panezai, Spozmai; Wang, Da-yong; Wang, Yun-xin; Rong, Lu

    2013-08-01

    Phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) is a kind of device based on electrically controlled birefringence effect to realize phase modulation. Due to its low cost, programmable, high resolution, fast response time, LCOS has been widely used in multi-channel imaging, adaptive optics, diffraction optical elements (DOEs), dynamic holographic, optical tweezers and other fields. It is necessary to numerically evaluate the modulation characterization of LCOS before application. Firstly, the phase modulation characterization of the LCOS (PLUTO HED6010XXX by Holoeye Company) was measured based on the Twyman-Green interferometer, and the curves of both phase shift and normalized intensity as grey level functions were obtained. Experimental results indicated that phase modulation of the LCOS could be achieved to 3.99π, and the root-mean-square value (RMS) of normalized intensity was less than 0.01, which demonstrated that LCOS could be regarded as a phase-only modulation device. This method is also suitable for the evaluation of modulation characterization of other LCOS devices. Secondly, a phase pattern of thin lens written onto LCOS was demonstrated. Because of the pixel structure of LCOS, the theory of discretization of lenses was studied. Both simulation and experimental results were obtained. The experimental results proved that the convergence character of the lens written onto LCOS was similar to optical lenses. In the experiment, the measured focal length was in a good agreement to the theoretical deduction, and the relative error (RE) of which was below 1%. Both simulation and experimental results showed that LCOS could be used as lens to converge the plane wave, and replace the optical lens successfully.

  2. Chromonic liquid crystalline nematic phase exhibited in binary mixture of two liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaiah, T. N. Sreepad, H. R.; Sridhar, K. N.; Sridhara, G. R.; Nagaraja, N.

    2015-06-24

    A binary mixture of abietic acid and orthophosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) exhibits co-existence of biphasic region of Nematic+Isotropic (N+I), lyotropic Nematic (ND) and Smectic-G (SmG) phases. The mixture exhibits N+I, N and SmG phases at different concentrations and at different temperatures. Mixtures with all concentrations of abietic acid exhibit I→N+I→N→SmG phases sequentially when the specimen is cooled from its isotropic melt. These phases have been characterized by using differential scanning calorimetric, X-ray diffraction, and optical texture studies.

  3. First Examples of de Vries-like Smectic A to Smectic C Phase Transitions in Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kapernaum, Nadia; Müller, Carsten; Moors, Svenja; Schlick, M Christian; Wuckert, Eugen; Laschat, Sabine; Giesselmann, Frank

    2016-12-15

    In ionic liquid crystals, the orthogonal smectic A phase is the most common phase whereas the tilted smectic C phase is rather rare. We present a new study with five novel ionic liquid crystals exhibiting both a smectic A as well as the rare smectic C phase. Two of them have a phenylpyrimidine core whereas the other three are imidazolium azobenzenes. Their phase sequences and tilt angles were studied by polarizing microscopy and their temperature-dependent layer spacing as well as their translational and orientational order parameters were studied by X-ray diffraction. The X-ray tilt angles derived from X-ray studies of the layer contraction and the optically measured tilt angles of the five ionic liquid crystals were compared to obtain their de Vries character. Four of our five mesogens turned out to show de Vries-like behavior with a layer shrinkage that is far less than that expected for conventional materials. These materials can thus be considered as the first de Vries-type materials among ionic liquid crystals.

  4. Density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations of the phase behavior of a simple model liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giura, Stefano; Schoen, Martin

    2014-08-01

    We consider the phase behavior of a simple model of a liquid crystal by means of modified mean-field density-functional theory (MMF DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble (GCEMC). The pairwise additive interactions between liquid-crystal molecules are modeled via a Lennard-Jones potential in which the attractive contribution depends on the orientation of the molecules. We derive the form of this orientation dependence through an expansion in terms of rotational invariants. Our MMF DFT predicts two topologically different phase diagrams. At weak to intermediate coupling of the orientation dependent attraction, there is a discontinuous isotropic-nematic liquid-liquid phase transition in addition to the gas-isotropic liquid one. In the limit of strong coupling, the gas-isotropic liquid critical point is suppressed in favor of a fluid- (gas- or isotropic-) nematic phase transition which is always discontinuous. By considering three representative isotherms in parallel GCEMC simulations, we confirm the general topology of the phase diagram predicted by MMF DFT at intermediate coupling strength. From the combined MMF DFT-GCEMC approach, we conclude that the isotropic-nematic phase transition is very weakly first order, thus confirming earlier computer simulation results for the same model [see M. Greschek and M. Schoen, Phys. Rev. E 83, 011704 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.011704].

  5. Density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations of the phase behavior of a simple model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Giura, Stefano; Schoen, Martin

    2014-08-01

    We consider the phase behavior of a simple model of a liquid crystal by means of modified mean-field density-functional theory (MMF DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble (GCEMC). The pairwise additive interactions between liquid-crystal molecules are modeled via a Lennard-Jones potential in which the attractive contribution depends on the orientation of the molecules. We derive the form of this orientation dependence through an expansion in terms of rotational invariants. Our MMF DFT predicts two topologically different phase diagrams. At weak to intermediate coupling of the orientation dependent attraction, there is a discontinuous isotropic-nematic liquid-liquid phase transition in addition to the gas-isotropic liquid one. In the limit of strong coupling, the gas-isotropic liquid critical point is suppressed in favor of a fluid- (gas- or isotropic-) nematic phase transition which is always discontinuous. By considering three representative isotherms in parallel GCEMC simulations, we confirm the general topology of the phase diagram predicted by MMF DFT at intermediate coupling strength. From the combined MMF DFT-GCEMC approach, we conclude that the isotropic-nematic phase transition is very weakly first order, thus confirming earlier computer simulation results for the same model [see M. Greschek and M. Schoen, Phys. Rev. E 83, 011704 (2011)].

  6. Phase selection during crystallization of undercooled liquid eutectic lead-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fecht, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    During rapid solidification substantial amounts of undercooling are in general required for formation of metastable phases. Crystallization at varying levels of undercooling and melting of metastable phases were studied during slow cooling and heating of emulsified PB-Sn alloys. Besides the experimental demonstration of the reversibility of metastable phase equilibra, two different principal solidification paths have been identified and compared with the established metastable phase diagram and predictions from classical nucleation theory. The results suggest that the most probable solidification path is described by the 'step rule' resulting in the formation of metastable phases at low undercooling, whereas the stable eutectic phase mixture crystallizes without metastable phase formation at high undercooling.

  7. Phase selection during crystallization of undercooled liquid eutectic lead-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fecht, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    During rapid solidification substantial amounts of undercooling are in general required for formation of metastable phases. Crystallization at varying levels of undercooling and melting of metastable phases were studied during slow cooling and heating of emulsified PB-Sn alloys. Besides the experimental demonstration of the reversibility of metastable phase equilibra, two different principal solidification paths have been identified and compared with the established metastable phase diagram and predictions from classical nucleation theory. The results suggest that the most probable solidification path is described by the 'step rule' resulting in the formation of metastable phases at low undercooling, whereas the stable eutectic phase mixture crystallizes without metastable phase formation at high undercooling.

  8. Optical Simulation and Fabrication of Pancharatnam (Geometric) Phase Devices from Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kun

    Pancharatnam made clear the concept of a phase-only device based on changes in the polarization state of light. A device of this type is sometimes called a circular polarization grating because of the polarization states of interfering light beams used to fabricate it by polarization holography. Here, we will call it a Pancharatnam (geometric) phase device to emphasize the fact that the phase of diffracted light does not have a discontinuous periodic profile but changes continuously. In this dissertation, using simulations and experiments, we have successfully demonstrated a 90% diffraction efficiency based on the Pancharatnam phase deflector (PPD) with the dual-twist structure. Unlike the conventional Pancharatnam phase deflector (c-PPD) limited to small diffraction angles, our work demonstrates that a device with a structural periodicity near the wavelength of light is highly efficient at deflecting light to large angles. Also, from a similar fabrication procedure, we have made an ultra-compact non-mechanical zoom lens system based on the Pancharatnam phase lens (PPL) with a low f-number and high efficiency. The wavelength dependence on the image quality is evaluated and shown to be satisfactory from red light to near-infrared machine vision systems. A demonstration device is shown with a 4x zoom ratio at a 633 nm wavelength. The unique characteristic of these devices is made possible through the use of azo-dye photoalignment materials to align a liquid crystal polymer (reactive mesogens). Furthermore, the proposed dual-twist design and fabrication opens the possibility for making a high-efficiency beam-steering device, a lens with an f-number less than 1.0, as well as a wide range of other potential applications in the optical and display industry. The details of simulation, fabrication, and characterization of these devices are shown in this dissertation.

  9. Tilt orientationally disordered hexagonal columnar phase of phthalocyanine discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneya, Makoto; Makabe, Takayoshi; Miyamoto, Ayano; Shimizu, Yo; Miyake, Yasuo; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    The structures of the discotic liquid crystalline (LC) phase of metal-free octa-substituted phthalocyanine (Pc) derivatives were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Special attention was paid to the LC phase structure of the non-peripheral octa-hexyl substituted Pc-derivatives that were recently found to show very high carrier mobilities for the discotic LCs. We obtained spontaneous transition to the columnar hexagonal (Colh) LC phase in a melting simulation from the crystal structure obtained using an x-ray diffraction study. In this simulated Colh structure, the Pc-core normal vectors were tilted 47∘ from the column axis in parallel within each column, but the tilting directions are disordered between columns. We also found that the inter-core distance was not as large as previously suggested (0.4-0.5 nm) but similar to the common value (0.36 nm). This may resolve the contradiction between the high carrier mobility of the non-peripheral substituted Pcs, because larger inter-core separations degrade the mobilities.

  10. Liquid crystal alignment at macroscopically isotropic polymer surfaces: Effect of an isotropic-nematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryasova, Natalie; Reznikov, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of an isotropic-nematic (I -N ) phase transition on the liquid crystal alignment at untreated polymer surfaces. We demonstrate that the pattern at the untreated substrate in the planar cell where the other substrate is uniformly rubbed strongly depends on the temperature gradient across the cell during the I -N phase transition, being macroscopically isotropic if the untreated substrate is cooled faster, but becoming almost homogeneous along the rubbing direction in the opposite temperature gradient. We interpret the observed effect using complementary models of heat transfer and nematic elasticity. Based on the heat transfer model we show that the asymmetric temperature conditions in our experiments provide unidirectional propagation of the I -N interface during the phase transition and determine the initial director orientation pattern at the test's untreated surface. Using the Frank-Oseen model of nematic elasticity, we represent the three-dimensional director field in the nematic cell as a two-dimensional (2D) pattern at the untreated surface and perform 2D numeric simulations. The simulations explain the experimental results: Different initial director orientations at the untreated surface evolve into different stationary patterns.

  11. The effect of liquid-liquid phase separation of glass on the properties and crystallization behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, J. Z.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical discussion is given of the phase separation mechanism of amorphous materials. This includes nucleus growth, spinoidal decomposition, and nuclei agglomeration and coarsening. Various types of glass are analyzed.

  12. Colloidal Material Box: In-situ Observations of Colloidal Self-Assembly and Liquid Crystal Phase Transitions in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, WeiBin; Lan, Ding; Sun, ZhiBin; Geng, BaoMing; Wang, XiaoQing; Tian, WeiQian; Zhai, GuangJie; Wang, YuRen

    2016-05-01

    To study the self-assembly behavior of colloidal spheres in the solid/liquid interface and elucidate the mechanism of liquid crystal phase transition under microgravity, a Colloidal Material Box (CMB) was designed which consists of three modules: (i) colloidal evaporation experimental module, made up of a sample management unit, an injection management unit and an optical observation unit; (ii) liquid crystal phase transition experimental module, including a sample management unit and an optical observation unit; (iii) electronic control module. The following two experimental plans will be performed inside the CMB aboard the SJ-10 satellite in space. (i) Self-assembly of colloidal spheres (with and without Au shell) induced by droplet evaporation, allowing observation of the dynamic process of the colloidal spheres within the droplet and the change of the droplet outer profile during evaporation; (ii) Phase behavior of Mg2Al LDHs suspensions in microgravity. The experimental results will be the first experimental observations of depositing ordered colloidal crystals and their self-assembly behavior under microgravity, and will illustrate the influence of gravity on liquid crystal phase transition.

  13. Liquid crystal-templated conducting organic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Hulvat, James F.

    2004-01-20

    A method of preparing a conductive polymeric film, includes providing a liquid crystal phase comprising a plurality of hydrophobic cores, the phase on a substrate, introducing a hydrophobic component to the phase, the component a conductive polymer precursor, and applying an electric potential across the liquid crystal phase, the potential sufficient to polymerize the said precursor.

  14. Wave front generation using a phase-only modulating liquid-crystal-based micro-display with HDTV resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermerschmidt, Andreas; Osten, Stefan; Krüger, Sven; Blümel, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Liquid-crystal (LC) based micro-displays can be used to modulate incoming light waves with respect to amplitude, phase and polarization. Twisted-nematic LC displays produce a combined phase-polarization modulation so that it is difficult to achieve pure phase modulation without amplitude modulation. We present a new phase-only modulating LCOS (Liquid Crystal On Silicon) spatial light modulator (SLM) based on an electrically controlled birefringence (ECB) liquid crystal mode. The device has a HDTV (1920x1080) resolution and a small pixel pitch of only 8μm (87% fill factor) on a digital silicon back plane. The LC molecules are aligned parallel to the electrodes and an applied electric field forces them to tilt towards the direction of the field. This leads to a pure phase modulation with a phase retardation of 2π for wavelengths between 420 and 1064nm, with negligible polarization change (<1%) if the light is linearly polarized parallel to the director axis of the LC molecules. The shape of the back-plane of the LCOS micro-display was investigated using a Twyman-Green interferometer and the observed deviation from a plane surface was compensated by addressing the inverse spatially resolved phase retardation function. The interferometer was then used to measure wave fronts that were generated with the micro-display, representing optical elements like e.g. single lenses, lens arrays and tilted mirrors.

  15. Phase transition behavior of hydrogen bonded liquid crystal (6BA)2-(BPy) x as studied by 2H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Tabota, K.; Oigawa, T.; Miyatou, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.

    2016-12-01

    The thermal properties and the orientational order of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals (6BA)2-(BPy)0.4 and (6BA)2-(BPy)0.3 (6BA: 4- n-hexylbenzoicacid, BPy: 4,4'-bipyridine) were investigated by DSC and 2H NMR. On cooling, isotropic liquid - liquid crystal phase transition temperatures were T C= 409 and 405 K for (6BA)2-(BPy)0.4 and (6BA)2-(BPy)0.3, respectively. Thermal anomalies in the liquid crystal phase were observed at T LC1= 402 and T LC2= 375 K for (6BA)2-(BPy)0.4 and at T LC1= 398 and T LC2= 375 K for (6BA)2-(BPy)0.3. For (6BA)2-(BPy)0.4, only the smectic component was created above T LC1. In addition, the nematic component was created below T LC1. The nematic component gradually changed to the smectic component with decreasing temperature and only the smectic component was observed below T LC2. For (6BA)2-(BPy)0.3, only the nematic component was created above T LC2. The phase transition from the nematic phase to the smectic phase took place at around T LC2.

  16. Frequency-shift vs phase-shift characterization of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance applications

    SciTech Connect

    Montagut, Y. J.; Garcia, J. V.; Jimenez, Y.; Arnau, A.; March, C.; Montoya, A.

    2011-06-15

    The improvement of sensitivity in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) applications has been addressed in the last decades by increasing the sensor fundamental frequency, following the increment of the frequency/mass sensitivity with the square of frequency predicted by Sauerbrey. However, this sensitivity improvement has not been completely transferred in terms of resolution. The decrease of frequency stability due to the increase of the phase noise, particularly in oscillators, made impossible to reach the expected resolution. A new concept of sensor characterization at constant frequency has been recently proposed. The validation of the new concept is presented in this work. An immunosensor application for the detection of a low molecular weight contaminant, the insecticide carbaryl, has been chosen for the validation. An, in principle, improved version of a balanced-bridge oscillator is validated for its use in liquids, and applied for the frequency shift characterization of the QCM immunosensor application. The classical frequency shift characterization is compared with the new phase-shift characterization concept and system proposed.

  17. A Low Voltage Liquid Crystal Phase Grating with Switchable Diffraction Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiwei; Tan, Guanjun; Huang, Yuge; Weng, Yishi; Choi, Tae-Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple yet high performance phase grating with switchable diffraction angles using a fringe field switching (FFS) liquid crystal (LC) cell. The LC rubbing angle is parallel to the FFS electrodes (i.e. α = 0°), leading to symmetric LC director distribution in a voltage-on state. Such a grating exhibits three unique features: 1) Two grating periods can be formed by controlling the applied voltage, resulting in switchable diffraction angles. In our design, the 1st diffraction order occurs at 4.3°, while the 2nd order appears at 8.6°. 2) The required voltage to achieve peak diffraction efficiency (η~32%) for the 1st order is only 4.4 V at λ = 633 nm as compared to 70 V for a conventional FFS-based phase grating in which α ≈ 7°, while the 2nd order (η~27%) is 15 V. 3). The measured rise and decay time for the 1st order is 7.62 ms and 6.75 ms, and for the 2nd order is 0.75 ms and 3.87 ms, respectively. To understand the physical mechanisms, we also perform device simulations. Good agreement between experiment and simulation is obtained.

  18. Studies of the underlying mechanisms for optical nonlinearities of blue phase liquid crystals (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Khoo, Iam Choon; Zhao, Shuo; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Ho, Tsung-Jui

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms responsible for nonlinear optical processes occurring in azobenzene-doped blue phase liquid crystals (BPLC), which exhibit two thermodynamically stable BPs: BPI and BPII. In coherent two wave-mixing experiments, a slow (minutes) and a fast (few milliseconds) side diffractions are observed. The underlying mechanisms were disclosed by monitoring the dynamics of grating formation and relaxation as well as by some supplementary experiments. We found the photothermal indexing and dye/LC intermolecular torque leading to lattice distortion to be the dominant mechanisms for the observed nonlinear response in BPLC. Moreover, the response time of the nonlinear optical process varied with operating phase. The rise time of the thermal indexing process was in good agreement with our findings on the temperature dependence of BP refractive index: τ(ISO) > τ(BPI) > τ(BPII). The relaxation time of the torque-induced lattice distortion was analogue to its electrostriction counterpart: τ'(BPI) > τ'(BPII). In a separate experiment, lattice swelling with selective reflection of <110> direction changed from green to red was also observed. This was attributable to the isomerization-induced change in cholesteric pitch, which directly affects the lattice spacing. The phenomenon was confirmed by measuring the optical rotatory power of the BPLC.

  19. A Low Voltage Liquid Crystal Phase Grating with Switchable Diffraction Angles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiwei; Tan, Guanjun; Huang, Yuge; Weng, Yishi; Choi, Tae-Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2017-01-05

    We demonstrate a simple yet high performance phase grating with switchable diffraction angles using a fringe field switching (FFS) liquid crystal (LC) cell. The LC rubbing angle is parallel to the FFS electrodes (i.e. α = 0°), leading to symmetric LC director distribution in a voltage-on state. Such a grating exhibits three unique features: 1) Two grating periods can be formed by controlling the applied voltage, resulting in switchable diffraction angles. In our design, the 1(st) diffraction order occurs at 4.3°, while the 2(nd) order appears at 8.6°. 2) The required voltage to achieve peak diffraction efficiency (η~32%) for the 1(st) order is only 4.4 V at λ = 633 nm as compared to 70 V for a conventional FFS-based phase grating in which α ≈ 7°, while the 2(nd) order (η~27%) is 15 V. 3). The measured rise and decay time for the 1(st) order is 7.62 ms and 6.75 ms, and for the 2(nd) order is 0.75 ms and 3.87 ms, respectively. To understand the physical mechanisms, we also perform device simulations. Good agreement between experiment and simulation is obtained.

  20. Aggregation Properties and Liquid Crystal Phase of a Dye Based on Naphthalenetetracarboxylic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasik, Michelle; Collings, Peter

    2007-03-01

    R003 is a dye produced for thin film optical components by Optiva, Inc.^1 made from the sulfonation of the dibenzimidazole derivative of naphthalenetetracarboxylic acid. Its molecular structure is very different from the aggregating food dye previously investigated in our laboratory^2 and R003 forms a liquid crystal phase at significantly lower concentrations. We have performed polarizing microscopy, absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction experiments in order to determine the phase diagram and aggregate structure. In addition, we have included both translational and orientational entropy in the theoretical analysis of the aggregation process, and have used a more realistic lineshape in analyzing the absorption data. Our results indicate that the ``bond energy'' for molecules in an aggregate is even larger than for the previously studied dye and that the aggregate structure has a cross-sectional area equal to two or three molecular areas rather than one.^1Lazarev, P., N. Ovchinnikova, M. Paukshto, SID Int. Symp. Digest of Tech. Papers, San Jose, California, June XXXII, 571 (2001).^2V. R. Horowitz, L. A. Janowitz, A. L. Modic, P. A. Heiney, and P. J. Collings, Phys. Rev. E 72, 041710 (2005).

  1. Polarization properties of cubic blue phases of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Kamil; Sierakowski, Marek W.; Sala-Tefelska, Marzena; Joshi, Pankaj; Woliński, Tomasz R.; De Smet, Herbert

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally investigated polarization properties of the blue phase of a cholesteric liquid crystal in polycrystalline cells with different alignment layers. Experiments were carried out by various temperatures and wavelengths within the spectral range covering Bragg reflection. It was conclusively demonstrated that the change of polarization state of transmitted light through polycrystalline BP-cell is mainly due to Bragg reflection, while optical activity is relatively small. Besides, the linear birefringence was not observed, as expected. It was shown that the ellipticity of the outgoing polarization state can change from almost linear (1.33%) to elliptic (7.33%), depending on sample orientation, with negligible changing of optical rotatory power (for BP I at 470 nm). The results indicate that also polycrystalline BPLC structure, although locally anisotropic, is macroscopically isotropic showing non-negligible optical activity only for resonant wavelengths, although being much lower than that in a typical cholesteric phase. It was also shown that different alignment layers in BP-cell may shift Bragg reflection spectral range, so influencing the outgoing polarization state for particular wavelength.

  2. Light-melt adhesive based on dynamic carbon frameworks in a columnar liquid-crystal phase

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Shohei; Nobusue, Shunpei; Tsuzaka, Eri; Yuan, Chunxue; Mori, Chigusa; Hara, Mitsuo; Seki, Takahiro; Camacho, Cristopher; Irle, Stephan; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) provides a suitable platform to exploit structural motions of molecules in a condensed phase. Amplification of the structural changes enables a variety of technologies not only in LC displays but also in other applications. Until very recently, however, a practical use of LCs for removable adhesives has not been explored, although a spontaneous disorganization of LC materials can be easily triggered by light-induced isomerization of photoactive components. The difficulty of such application derives from the requirements for simultaneous implementation of sufficient bonding strength and its rapid disappearance by photoirradiation. Here we report a dynamic molecular LC material that meets these requirements. Columnar-stacked V-shaped carbon frameworks display sufficient bonding strength even during heating conditions, while its bonding ability is immediately lost by a light-induced self-melting function. The light-melt adhesive is reusable and its fluorescence colour reversibly changes during the cycle, visualizing the bonding/nonbonding phases of the adhesive. PMID:27373592

  3. Speeding up liquid crystal SLMs using overdrive with phase change reduction.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Gregor; Bowman, Richard W; Love, Gordon D; Padgett, Miles J; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2013-01-28

    Nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLMs) with fast switching times and high diffraction efficiency are important to various applications ranging from optical beam steering and adaptive optics to optical tweezers. Here we demonstrate the great benefits that can be derived in terms of speed enhancement without loss of diffraction efficiency from two mutually compatible approaches. The first technique involves the idea of overdrive, that is the calculation of intermediate patterns to speed up the transition to the target phase pattern. The second concerns optimization of the target pattern to reduce the required phase change applied to each pixel, which in addition leads to a substantial reduction of variations in the intensity of the diffracted light during the transition. When these methods are applied together, we observe transition times for the diffracted light fields of about 1 ms, which represents up to a tenfold improvement over current approaches. We experimentally demonstrate the improvements of the approach for applications such as holographic image projection, beam steering and switching, and real-time control loops.

  4. A Low Voltage Liquid Crystal Phase Grating with Switchable Diffraction Angles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiwei; Tan, Guanjun; Huang, Yuge; Weng, Yishi; Choi, Tae-Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple yet high performance phase grating with switchable diffraction angles using a fringe field switching (FFS) liquid crystal (LC) cell. The LC rubbing angle is parallel to the FFS electrodes (i.e. α = 0°), leading to symmetric LC director distribution in a voltage-on state. Such a grating exhibits three unique features: 1) Two grating periods can be formed by controlling the applied voltage, resulting in switchable diffraction angles. In our design, the 1st diffraction order occurs at 4.3°, while the 2nd order appears at 8.6°. 2) The required voltage to achieve peak diffraction efficiency (η~32%) for the 1st order is only 4.4 V at λ = 633 nm as compared to 70 V for a conventional FFS-based phase grating in which α ≈ 7°, while the 2nd order (η~27%) is 15 V. 3). The measured rise and decay time for the 1st order is 7.62 ms and 6.75 ms, and for the 2nd order is 0.75 ms and 3.87 ms, respectively. To understand the physical mechanisms, we also perform device simulations. Good agreement between experiment and simulation is obtained. PMID:28054592

  5. Study of the modulation characterization of phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator by digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panezai, Spozmai; Wang, Dayong; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Yunxin

    2012-10-01

    The liquid crystal spatial light modulator is becoming a more and more important device due to its wide applications. During its characterization, the phase modulation is the most important one. In this paper, the modulation characterization of a PLUTO phase-only spatial light modulator based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) is studied by applying the lensless Fourier transform digital holography. In the digital holography, the LCOS is used as a reflected sample which modulates the phase of the incident wavefront with respect to the addressed gray level and gives the information of entire active region. This result is then compared with the result obtained by using conventional Michelson Interferometric method and both results are in good accordance with each other. At last the same holographic set up is used for the imaging of phase grating as a reflected object which is addressed to the LCOS and the clear profilometry of the grating is achieved.

  6. Numerical simulation and experimental study of transient liquid phase bonding of single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, Adam

    The primary goals of the research in this dissertation are to perform a systematic study to identify and understand the fundamental cause of prolonged processing time during transient liquid phase bonding of difficult-to-bond single crystal Ni-base materials, and use the acquired knowledge to develop an effective way to reduce the isothermal solidification time without sacrificing the single crystalline nature of the base materials. To achieve these objectives, a multi-scale numerical modeling approach, that involves the use of a 2-D fully implicit moving-mesh Finite Element method and a Cellular Automata method, was developed to theoretically investigate the cause of long isothermal solidification times and determine a viable way to minimize the problem. Subsequently, the predictions of the theoretical models are experimentally validated. Contrary to previous suggestions, numerical calculations and experimental verifications have shown that enhanced intergranular diffusivity has a negligible effect on solidification time in cast superalloys and that another important factor must be responsible. In addition, it was found that the concept of competition between solute diffusivity and solubility as predicted by standard analytical TLP bonding models and reported in the literature as a possible cause of long solidification times is not suitable to explain salient experimental observations. In contrast, however, this study shows that the problem of long solidification times, which anomalously increase with temperature is fundamentally caused by departure from diffusion controlled parabolic migration of the liquid-solid interface with holding time during bonding due to a significant reduction in the solute concentration gradient in the base material. Theoretical analyses showed it is possible to minimize the solidification time and prevent formation of stray-grains in joints between single crystal substrates by using a composite powder mixture of brazing alloy and base

  7. Electrically Controlled Phase Gratings for Terahertz Radiation Based on Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, D.; Tabiryan, N.; Margaryan, H.; Abrahamyan, V.; Hakobyan, N.

    2014-03-01

    A mathematical model of a new type of liquid crystal (LC) based diffraction grating for the terahertz frequency range is proposed. Numerical time-integration by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method of Maxwell-equation systems, describing the proposed structure, has been performed. The partial differential equation, describing the electro-optical induced orientation of the LC molecule in the external electric field, is calculated by the method of lines (MOL). The dependence of induced birefringence vs. external control voltage is obtained for 6CB nematic liquid crystal (NLC).

  8. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Axenov, Kirill V.; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    The last five years’ achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed. PMID:28879986

  9. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: II. Nucleation in the metastable liquid immiscibility region.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    In the second part of our paper, we address crystal nucleation in the metastable liquid miscibility region of eutectic systems that is always present, though experimentally often inaccessible. While this situation resembles the one seen in single component crystal nucleation in the presence of a metastable vapor-liquid critical point addressed in previous works, it is more complex because of the fact that here two crystal phases of significantly different compositions may nucleate. Accordingly, at a fixed temperature below the critical point, six different types of nuclei may form: two liquid-liquid nuclei: two solid-liquid nuclei; and two types of composite nuclei, in which the crystalline core has a liquid "skirt," whose composition falls in between the compositions of the solid and the initial liquid phases, in addition to nuclei with concentric alternating composition shells of prohibitively high free energy. We discuss crystalline phase selection via exploring/identifying the possible pathways for crystal nucleation.

  10. Statistical mechanics of bend flexoelectricity and the twist-bend phase in bent-core liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Shamid, Shaikh M; Dhakal, Subas; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2013-05-01

    We develop a Landau theory for bend flexoelectricity in liquid crystals of bent-core molecules. In the nematic phase of the model, the bend flexoelectric coefficient increases as we reduce the temperature toward the nematic to polar phase transition. At this critical point, there is a second-order transition from high-temperature uniform nematic phase to low-temperature nonuniform polar phase composed of twist-bend or splay-bend deformations. To test the predictions of Landau theory, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to find the director and polarization configurations as functions of temperature, applied electric field, and interaction parameters.

  11. Soft-core particles freezing to form a quasicrystal and a crystal-liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Archer, A J; Rucklidge, A M; Knobloch, E

    2015-07-01

    Systems of soft-core particles interacting via a two-scale potential are studied. The potential is responsible for peaks in the structure factor of the liquid state at two different but comparable length scales and a similar bimodal structure is evident in the dispersion relation. Dynamical density functional theory in two dimensions is used to identify two unusual states of this system: a crystal-liquid state, in which the majority of the particles are located on lattice sites but a minority remains free and so behaves like a liquid, and a 12-fold quasicrystalline state. Both are present even for deeply quenched liquids and are found in a regime in which the liquid is unstable with respect to modulations on the smaller scale only. As a result, the system initially evolves towards a small-scale crystal state; this state is not a minimum of the free energy, however, and so the system subsequently attempts to reorganize to generate the lower-energy larger-scale crystals. This dynamical process generates a disordered state with quasicrystalline domains and takes place even when this large scale is linearly stable, i.e., it is a nonlinear process. With controlled initial conditions, a perfect quasicrystal can form. The results are corroborated using Brownian dynamics simulations.

  12. Optical studies of the nematic phase of an oxazole-derived bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, J. A.; Stojadinovic, S.; Dingemans, T.; Sprunt, S.; Jákli, A.

    2003-10-01

    Various optical and dynamic light scattering studies have been conducted on the nematic phase of an oxazole-derived bent-core liquid crystal. At optical length scales and in the absence of applied fields, homogeneously aligned samples of this material, which has an oxazole heterocyclic ring in the central core, are found to behave more like a conventional straight-core nematic than a previously investigated ester-based class of bent-core molecules that have a benzene ring as the core linkage between the two arms of the bow-shaped molecule. In particular, the nematic refractive indices of the oxazole compound combine in the standard way [i.e., ((2n2o+n2e)/3)] to match the isotropic value throughout the nematic range, and the observed director fluctuation modes have relaxation rates comparable to those of the usual thermotropics. However, polarized light scattering data reveal evidence of weak biaxial fluctuations, and indications of electric-field-induced biaxiality are observed in the refractive index measurements.

  13. Brillouin scattering study of the swollen Lyotropic Lamellar Liquid Crystal phases

    SciTech Connect

    Mangalampalli, S.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the elastic Properties of the Lyotropic Lamellar Liquid-Crystal phase of material composed of water, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), dodecane, and pentanol are made using Brillouin Scattering technique. These studies are made as a function of the layer repeat distance d. For each value of d under investigation the longitudinal phonon velocity is measured as a function of scattering vector orientation with respect to the lamellar layer plane. Also, for the particular value of d the elastic constants C[sub 11] and C[sub 33] are determined. The data indicates that the bilayers made up of water, SDS and pentanol behave like flat sheets stacked one on top of the other; separated by layers of dodecane. At GHz frequencies the bending modulus of the bilayers is found to be [approximately]10[sup 3] times larger than that measured at low frequencies using x-ray and quasielastic light scattering. The phonon line widths are also determined for the given values of d and the scattering vector orientation. The data shows that the line widths are constants with respect to these parameters.

  14. Formation of smectic phases in binary liquid crystal mixtures with a huge length ratio

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Friederike; Hartley, C Scott; Roberts, Jeffrey C; Lemieux, Robert P; Giesselmann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Summary A system of two liquid-crystalline phenylpyrimidines differing strongly in molecular length was studied. The phase diagram of these two chemically similar mesogens, with a length ratio of 2, was investigated, and detailed X-ray diffraction and electrooptical measurements were performed. The phase diagram revealed a destabilization of the nematic phase, which is present in the pure short compound, while the smectic state was stabilized. The short compound forms smectic A and smectic C phases, whereas the longer compound forms a broad smectic C phase and a narrow higher-ordered smectic phase. Nevertheless, in the mixtures, the smectic C phase is destabilized and disappears rapidly, whereas smectic A is the only stable phase observed over a broad concentration range. In addition, the smectic translational order parameters as well as the tilt angles of the mixtures are reduced. The higher-ordered smectic phase of the longer mesogen was identified as a smectic F phase. PMID:23019439

  15. Computer Modeling of Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Rauzah

    This chapter outlines the methodologies and models which are commonly used in the simulation of liquid crystals. The approach in the simulation of liquid crystals has always been to understand the nature of the phase and to relate this to fundamental molecular features such as geometry and intermolecular forces, before important properties related to certain applications are elucidated. Hence, preceding the description of the main "molecular-based" models for liquid crystals, a general but brief outline of the nature of liquid crystals and their historical development is given. Three main model classes, namely the coarse-grained single-site lattice and Gay-Berne models and the full atomistic model will be described here where for each a brief review will be given followed by assessment of its application in describing the phase phenomena with an emphasis on understanding the molecular organization in liquid crystal phases and the prediction of their bulk properties. Variants and hybrid models derived from these classes and their applications are given.

  16. Ferroelectric C* phase induced in a nematic liquid crystal matrix by a chiral non-mesogenic dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhidaev, E. P.; Torgova, S. I.; Barbashov, V. A.; Minchenko, M. V.; Sulyanov, S. N.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Ostrovskii, B. I.; Strigazzi, A.

    2015-02-01

    We report on a ferroelectric chiral smectic C (C*) phase obtained in a mixture of a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) and a chiral nonmesogenic dopant. The existence of C* phase was proven by calorimetric, dielectric and optical measurements, and also by X-rays analysis. The smectic C* which is obtained in such a way can flow, allowing to restore the ferroelectric liquid crystal layer structure in the electro-optical cells after action of the mechanical stress, as it happens with the cells filled with NLC. The proposed method of obtaining smectic C* material allows us to create innovative electro-optical cell combining the advantages of NLC (mechanical resilience) and smectic C* (high switching speed).

  17. Acoustical and optical investigations of the size effect in nematic-isotropic phase transition in liquid crystal microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimochkin, G. I.; Pasechnik, S. V.; Lukin, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The absorption of ultrasound (at a frequency of 2.7 MHz) and the depolarized light transmission and scattering (at a wavelength of 630 nm) in liquid crystal (LC) emulsions have been studied during the nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition in LC droplets with radii ranging from 150 to 2300 nm. The obtained acoustical and optical data are used to determine the influence of the droplet size on characteristics of the N-I phase transition. It is shown that the acoustical and optical characteristics of LC emulsions have good prospects to be used for the investigation of phase transitions in submicron samples.

  18. Ionic Switch Induced by a Rectangular-Hexagonal Phase Transition in Benzenammonium Columnar Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Soberats, Bartolome; Yoshio, Masafumi; Ichikawa, Takahiro; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Ungar, Goran; Kato, Takashi

    2015-10-21

    We demonstrate switching of ionic conductivities in wedge-shaped liquid-crystalline (LC) ammonium salts. A thermoreversible phase transition between the rectangular columnar (Colr) and hexagonal columnar (Colh) phases is used for the switch. The ionic conductivities in the Colh phase are about four orders of magnitude higher than those in the Colr phase. The switching behavior of conductivity can be ascribed to the structural change of assembled ionic channels. X-ray experiments reveal a highly ordered packing of the ions in the Colr phase, which prevents the ion transport.

  19. Liquid crystal devices with continuous phase variation based on high-permittivity thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willekens, Oliver; Neyts, Kristiaan; Beeckman, Jeroen

    2016-03-01

    Most liquid crystal devices use transparent conductive electrodes such as indium tin oxide (ITO) to apply a potential difference in order to achieve electro-optic switching. As an alternative, we study a device with narrow metallic electrodes in combination with dielectric layers with large dielectric permittivity. In this approach the applied voltage can be a continuous function of the lateral distance from the electrode line. Simulations for a one-dimensional beam-steering device show that the switching of the liquid crystal (LC) director depends indeed on the distance from the addressing electrodes and on the value of the relative permittivity. We show that in a device with electrodes spaced 60 µm apart, the LC director halfway between the electrodes shows a considerable reorientation, when a dielectric layer with permittivity of Epsilonr = 550 is used, whereas no reorientation is observed for the uncoated reference sample at the same voltage. An added advantage is that the proposed configuration only contains dielectric materials, without resistive losses, which means that almost no heat is dissipated. This indicates that this technology could be used in low-power LC devices. The results show that using dielectric thin films with high relative permittivity in liquid crystal devices could form a cost-efficient and low-power alternative to many LC technologies where a gradient electric field is desirable.

  20. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    81/2X 11- 10 -9 .8 display using a large advertising alphanimeric ( TCI ) has been added to the front of the optical box used in the F-4 aircraft for HUD...properties over a wide range of tempera - tures, including normal room temperature. What are Liquid Crystals? Liquid crystals have been classified in three...natic fanctions and to present data needed for the semi- automatic and manual control of system functions. Existing aircraft using CRT display

  1. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    * Effect of Thickness * Impact of Order Parameter * Impact of the Host * Impact of Polarizer * Colour Applications * Multiplexing * QUARTER WAVE PLATE DICHROIC DISPLAYS * Operational Principle and Display Configuration11-13 * Electro-Optical Performance * DYE-DOPED TN DISPLAYS * Threshold Characteristic, Contrast Ratio and Switching Speed * PHASE CHANGE EFFECT DICHROIC LCDs * Theoretical Background * Threshold Characteristic and Molecular Orientation * MOLECULAR ORIENTATION DURING FIELD-INDUCED PHASE TRANSITION WITH HOMOGENEOUS WALL ALIGNMENT * MOLECULAR ORIENTATION DURING FIELD-INDUCED PHASE TRANSITION WITH HOMEOTROPIC WALL ALIGNMENT * Contrast Ratio, Transmission, Brightness and Switching Speed3,7,10,198-214 * Memory or Reminiscent Contrast * Electro-optical Performance vs. Temperature * Multiplexing Phase Change Dichroic LCDs * DOUBLE CELL DICHROIC LCDs3,9,14-17,232-234 * Double Cell Nematic Dichroic LCD3,8,9,14,15,233 * Double Cell One Pitch Cholesteric LCD16,17 * Double Cell Phase Change Dichroic LCD214,232 * POSITIVE MODE DICHROIC LCDS3,8,9 * Positive Mode Heilmeier Cells3,8,9,43,77,78,235-238 * USING PLEOCHROIC DYES3,8,9,43,235-238 * USING NEGATIVE DICHROIC DYES3,8,9,63,77,78156 * DUAL FREQUENCY ADDRESSED DICHROIC DISPLAYS75,238 * Positive Mode Dichroic LCDs Using λ/4 Plate * Positive Mode Double Cell Dichroic LCD * Positive Mode Dichroic LCDs Using Special Electrode patterns7,8,239-241 * Positive Mode Phase Change Dichroic LCDs3,8,9,230,243-248 * Dichroic LCDs Using an Admixture of Pleochroic and Negative Dichroic Dyes78,118 * SUPERTWIST DICHROIC EFFECT (SDE) DISPLAYS21-23 * FERROELECTRIC DICHROIC LCDs24-27 * Devices Using A Single Polarizer * Devices Using No Polarizer24-27 * POLYMER DISPERSED DICHROIC LCDs28-30,252-259 * DICHROIC POLYMER LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAYS * Heilmeier Type Displays * Guest-Host Cell Using an Admixture Of L.C. Polymer and Low Molecular Weight Liquid Crysta As Host * Polymeric Ferroelectric Dichroic LCDs * SMECTIC A DICHROIC LCDs * Laser

  2. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  3. Phase Diagram and Dynamics of the Liquid Crystal Isopentylcyanobiphenyl (5*CB)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-03

    hf) are plotted versus reciprocal T in Figure 9, for the 0.1 MPa isobar and as a function of P for the four isotherms in Figure 10. The VFTH equation...CB. Themetastable cholesteric phase could be attained by an isobaric decrease of temperature or an isothermal increase of pressure. In the available...glass, cholesteric, and crystalline), and we show that the phase boundaries differ from previous reports, reflecting the slow crystallization kinetics of

  4. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) invented to combine flexible control of liquid-crystal phase-shifts with robustness of point-diffraction interferometers. Produces interferograms indicative of shapes of wavefronts of laser beams having passed through or reflected from objects of interest. Interferograms combined in computers to produce phase maps describing wavefronts.

  5. Electric-field-induced transport of microspheres in the isotropic and chiral nematic phase of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jiyoung; Gleeson, Helen F.; Dierking, Ingo

    2017-02-01

    The application of an electric field to microspheres suspended in a liquid crystal causes particle translation in a plane perpendicular to the applied field direction. Depending on applied electric field amplitude and frequency, a wealth of different motion modes may be observed above a threshold, which can lead to linear, circular, or random particle trajectories. We present the stability diagram for these different translational modes of particles suspended in the isotropic and the chiral nematic phase of a liquid crystal and investigate the angular velocity, circular diameter, and linear velocity as a function of electric field amplitude and frequency. In the isotropic phase a narrow field amplitude-frequency regime is observed to exhibit circular particle motion whose angular velocity increases with applied electric field amplitude but is independent of applied frequency. The diameter of the circular trajectory decreases with field amplitude as well as frequency. In the cholesteric phase linear as well as circular particle motion is observed. The former exhibits an increasing velocity with field amplitude, while decreasing with frequency. For the latter, the angular velocity exhibits an increase with field amplitude and frequency. The rotational sense of the particles on a circular trajectory in the chiral nematic phase is independent of the helicity of the liquid crystalline structure, as is demonstrated by employing a cholesteric twist inversion compound.

  6. Electric-field-induced transport of microspheres in the isotropic and chiral nematic phase of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jiyoung; Gleeson, Helen F; Dierking, Ingo

    2017-02-01

    The application of an electric field to microspheres suspended in a liquid crystal causes particle translation in a plane perpendicular to the applied field direction. Depending on applied electric field amplitude and frequency, a wealth of different motion modes may be observed above a threshold, which can lead to linear, circular, or random particle trajectories. We present the stability diagram for these different translational modes of particles suspended in the isotropic and the chiral nematic phase of a liquid crystal and investigate the angular velocity, circular diameter, and linear velocity as a function of electric field amplitude and frequency. In the isotropic phase a narrow field amplitude-frequency regime is observed to exhibit circular particle motion whose angular velocity increases with applied electric field amplitude but is independent of applied frequency. The diameter of the circular trajectory decreases with field amplitude as well as frequency. In the cholesteric phase linear as well as circular particle motion is observed. The former exhibits an increasing velocity with field amplitude, while decreasing with frequency. For the latter, the angular velocity exhibits an increase with field amplitude and frequency. The rotational sense of the particles on a circular trajectory in the chiral nematic phase is independent of the helicity of the liquid crystalline structure, as is demonstrated by employing a cholesteric twist inversion compound.

  7. High-resolution liquid-crystal phase grating formed by fringing fields from interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, R G; Kulick, J H; Nordin, G P; Jarem, J M; Kowel, S T; Friends, M; Leslie, T M

    1994-05-01

    We report the formation of thin anisotropic phase gratings in a nematic liquid-crystalline film by use of lateral (fringing) electric fields induced by transparent interdigitated electrodes. These gratings yield high diffraction efficiency (>30%) with a strong dependence on the readout beam incidence angle. In addition, the formation of a defect wall is observed that has a significant effect on the diffraction properties of the phase grating.

  8. Structural characterization on the gel to liquid-crystal phase transition of fully hydrated DSPC and DSPE bilayers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shan-Shan; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Yu, Yang-Xin

    2009-06-11

    The structural properties of fully hydrated distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) and distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) bilayers near the main phase transition were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations on the basis of a united-atom model. Although largely similar in their molecular structures, the two lipids were found with different molecular packing modes at temperatures below the phase transition. For DSPC, three packing modes, namely, cross-tilt, partially interdigitated, and "mixed" gel phases, were observed, while, for DSPE, the lipid tails were almost perpendicular to the lipid surface. Above the main transition temperature, both lipid bilayers transformed into a disordered liquid-crystal phase with marked greater area per lipid and gauche % of the acyl chains and smaller bilayer thickness and order parameter, in comparison with the gel phase. The transformation process of liquid-crystal to gel phase was proved to experience the nucleation and growth stages in a hexagonal manner. The electron density profiles of some major components of both lipid bilayers at various temperatures have been calculated, and the results reveal that both lipid bilayers have less interdigitation around the main transition temperature.

  9. Induced stabilization of columnar phases in binary mixtures of discotic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Cienega-Cacerez, Octavio; García-Alcántara, Consuelo; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Sambriski, Edward John

    2016-01-28

    Three discotic liquid-crystalline binary mixtures, characterized by their extent of bidispersity in molecular thickness, were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. Each equimolar mixture contained A-type (thin) and B-type (thick) discogens. The temperature-dependence of the orientational order parameter reveals that A-type liquid samples produce ordered phases more readily, with the (hexagonal) columnar phase being the most structured variant. Moderately and strongly bidisperse mixtures produce globally-segregated samples for temperatures corresponding to ordered phases; the weakly bidisperse mixture displays microheterogeneities. Ordered phases in the B-type liquid are induced partially by the presence of the A-type fluid. In the moderately bidisperse mixture, order is induced through orientational frustration: a mixed prenematic-like phase precedes global segregation to yield nematic and columnar mesophases upon further cooling. In the strongly bidisperse mixture, order is induced less efficiently through a paranematic-like mechanism: a highly-ordered A-type fluid imparts order to B-type discogens found at the interface of a fully-segregated sample. This ordering effect permeates into the disordered B-type domain until nematic and columnar phases emerge upon further cooling. At sufficiently low temperatures, all samples investigated exhibit the (hexagonal) columnar mesophase.

  10. Improved high order grating method to realize wide angle beam steering on liquid crystal optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang; Wang, Xiangru; Xiong, Caidong; Huang, Ziqiang; Du, Jing; Tan, Qinggui; Li, Man; Wu, Shuanghong; Qiu, Qi

    2015-11-01

    To achieve a wider scanning range of liquid crystal optical phased array (LC-OPA), in this paper, a novel method of improved high order grating (i-HOG) is proposed in one device without introducing any other devices. The method of i-HOG breaks through the traditional ideas of modulo 𝟐𝛑 phase and takes the fringe effect into account to have a multi order extension. Subsequently, the method is verified by numerical simulation showing that it realizes a scanning range of wider than 20 degrees and even wider.

  11. Note: Phase-locked loop with a voltage controlled oscillator based on a liquid crystal cell as variable capacitance.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Carlos; Sánchez-Pena, José M; Torres, Juan C; Pérez, Isabel; Urruchi, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    A phase-locked loop is demonstrated using a twisted-nematic liquid crystal cell as a capacitance that can be varied as a function of applied voltage. The system is formed by a phase detector, a low-pass filter, as well as a voltage controlled oscillator including such variable capacitance. A theoretical study is proposed and experimentally validated. Capture and locked ranges of hundreds of kHz have been obtained for the configuration used in this circuit. An application as frequency demodulator using a practical implementation of this circuit has been demonstrated.

  12. Effects of nanoparticle doping on the phase transitional behaviour of ferroelectric liquid crystal Langmuir-Blodgett composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett films of ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) doped with a low concentration of functionalized Al: ZnO (AZO) nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. Pressure-area isotherms show that the nanoparticles as well as FLC composite systems have the capability to form stable monolayers at the air-water interface. The molecular interaction between nanoparticles and FLC molecules increased during barrier compression, which resulted in increased surface pressure. We observed various phases in isotherms with increasing concentration of nanoparticles in the FLC matrix. An X-ray diffraction profile at a low angle confirmed that FLCs retain their layer structure at a low concentration doping of AZO nanoparticles in the FLC matrix. Atomic force microscopy images indicate that low wt% composites are uniformly deposited without disturbing the translation behaviour of SmC* liquid crystals.

  13. High pressure effect on the main transition from the ripple gel P'beta phase to the liquid crystal (Lalpha) phase in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. Microcalorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Potekhin, S A; Senin, A A; Abdurakhmanov, N N; Khusainova, R S

    2008-11-01

    Scanning microcalorimetry has been used to study the high pressure effect on the main transition from the ripple gel P'(beta) phase to the liquid crystal (L(alpha)) phase in DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine). It has been demonstrated that an increase of the pressure by 200 MPa shifts the transition to higher temperatures by 36.4 degrees. The pressure increase does not affect the cooperativity of transition but reduces noticeably its enthalpy. The changes of the molar partial volume, isothermal compressibility as well as volume thermal expansibility during transition in DPPC suspension have been estimated. It has been shown that monovalent ions (Na(+), Cl(-)) in solution slightly affect the main thermodynamic parameters of the transition. Calcium ions significantly decrease distinction in compressibility and thermal expansibility between liquid-crystal and ripple gel phases of lipid suspension, which in its turn reflects less difference in their volume fluctuations.

  14. Time fluctuations of the phase modulation in a liquid crystal on silicon display: characterization and effects in diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Moreno, I; Lizana, A; Márquez, A; Iemmi, C; Fernández, E; Campos, J; Yzuel, M J

    2008-10-13

    In this paper we provide evidence of the temporal fluctuations of the phase modulation property of a liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) display, and we analyze its effect when the device is used for displaying a diffractive optical element. We use a commercial twisted nematic LCoS display configured to produce a phase-only modulation, and we provide time resolved measurements of the diffraction efficiency that show rapid fluctuations of the phase modulation, in the millisecond order. We analyze how these fluctuations have to be considered in two typical methods for the characterization of the phase modulation: two beam interference and diffraction from a binary grating. We finally provide experimental results on the use of this device for displaying a computer generated hologram. A reduction of the modulation diffraction efficiency results from the phase modulation fluctuation.

  15. Synthesis and mesomorphic behaviour of achiral four-ring unsymmetrical bent-core liquid crystals: Nematic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoj Kumar; Kalita, Gayatri; Laskar, Atiqur Rahman; Debnath, Somen; Gude, Venkatesh; Sarkar, Dipika Debnath; Mohiuddin, Golam; Varshney, Sanjay Kumar; Nandiraju Rao, V. S.

    2013-10-01

    Achiral four ring unsymmetrical bent-core liquid crystals derived from 3-amino-2-methylbenzoic acid have been designed and synthesized with an imine, ester and photochromic azo linking moieties. These hockey-stick shape resembling bent molecules possess an alkoxy chain at one end of the molecule and methyl or methoxy group at the other end. The synthesis, phase transition temperatures and characterization of phase behaviour are discussed. The molecular structure characterization is consistent with data from elemental and spectroscopic analysis. The materials thermal behaviour and phase characterization have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. All these compounds exhibit enantiotropic nematic phase over wide temperature range. Stable supercooling of nematic phase has been observed in methoxy homologues. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to obtain the stable molecular conformation, polarizability, dipole moment, Highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), Lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and bending angle of the compound.

  16. Pseudonematic order fluctuations of the director in the smectic phase of thermotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Acosta, R H; Pusiol, D J

    1999-08-01

    The NMR spin-lattice proton relaxation dispersion in the smectic mesophase of two liquid crystals, 4cyano-4'-8-alkylbiphenyl and 4,4'-bis-heptyloxyazoxybenzene, are studied over several decades of Larmor frequencies. The results show that the order fluctuation of the local smectic director contribution to T1(nu(L)) undergoes a transition between two power regimes: from T1(nu(L)) proportional, variantnu(1)(L) to nu(1/2)(L) on going from low to high Larmor frequencies. We explain this behavior by assuming, in the smectic mesophases, short coherence length nematiclike cooperative molecular reorientations.

  17. Structures and Phase Transitions in Thin Free Standing Films of an Antiferroelectric Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradi, M.; Čepič, M.; Čopič, M.; Muševič, I.

    2004-11-01

    The premises of a discrete mean-field model for polar smectic liquid crystals are tested by analyzing the ellipsometric experiments on two, three, and four-layer freestanding films of MHPOBC. The measured temperature dependences of the ellipsometric parameters in a weak dc external field are compared to the predictions of a simple clock model. A very good quantitative agreement is found indicating an odd-even effect: XY structures are stable for odd and Ising-like structures for an even number of layers.

  18. Temperature measurement near the triple line during phase change using thermochromic liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffone, C.; Sefiane, K.

    2005-07-01

    The temperature generated by the evaporation of a volatile liquid in a confined space (tube ∅=1,630 μm) was mapped onto the tube surface with the use of unsealed thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs). The strong evaporative cooling effect located near the meniscus triple line generates a temperature dip. Despite the thermal diffusion through the tube’s thickness and its geometry, the TLC thickness and the inherent difficulties of working with unsealed TLCs, the present technique has revealed to be a suitable tool for accurate temperature measurement at the microscale size. The evaporation flux is deduced from the profile of temperature and comparison with the experimental measurement shows a very good agreement. The role of the nature and thickness of the tube wall material on the diffusion of the temperature profile from the inside to the outside is also investigated.

  19. Refusing to Twist: Demonstration of a Line Hexatic Phase in DNA Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strey, H. H.; Wang, J.; Podgornik, R.; Rupprecht, A.; Yu, L.; Parsegian, V. A.; Sirota, E. B.

    2000-04-01

    We report conclusive high resolution small angle x-ray scattering evidence that long DNA fragments form an untwisted line hexatic phase between the cholesteric and the crystalline phases. The line hexatic phase is a liquid-crystalline phase with long-range hexagonal bond-orientational order, long-range nematic order, but liquidlike, i.e., short-range, positional order. So far, it has not been seen in any other three dimensional system. By line-shape analysis of x-ray scattering data we found that positional order decreases when the line hexatic phase is compressed. We suggest that such anomalous behavior is a result of the chiral nature of DNA molecules.

  20. Semiconductor liquid crystal composition and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Li, Liang-shi

    2005-04-26

    Semiconductor liquid crystal compositions and methods for making such compositions are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention is directed to a liquid crystal composition including a solvent and semiconductor particles in the solvent. The solvent and the semiconductor particles are in an effective amount in the liquid crystal composition to form a liquid crystal phase.

  1. High figure-of-merit compact phase shifters based on liquid crystal material for 1-10 GHz applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Longzhu; Xu, Huan; Li, Jinfeng; Chu, Daping

    2017-01-01

    A liquid crystal (LC) based tunable microstrip line (ML) phase shifter featuring high performance is presented. The experimental results show an electrically tunable differential phase up to 360° at 10 GHz with an overall insertion loss <8.5 dB. The device possesses a high figure-of-merit (FoM) of 64°/dB at 9.8 GHz and 60°/dB between 7-10 GHz. This is achieved by simultaneously considering both of the LC tuned phase and overall loss in the design. The proposed device utilizes the inverted meander ML technology to minimize its size. Taking into account the real fabrication procedure, a novel impedance matching structure is applied, and the measured return loss is considerably improved. The FoM and phase tuning property of the fabricated device as optimized are compared with the state-of-art results published recently and show better performance for both of them.

  2. Investigation and characterization of liquid two-phase systems for the separation of crystal mixtures by interfacial partitioning.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Martijn A; van Hee, Pim; van der Lans, Rob G J M; Kwant, Gerard; van der Wielen, Luuk A M

    2006-03-05

    The interfacial partitioning behavior of ampicillin and phenylglycine crystals in different two-phase systems has been investigated. The two-phase systems employed are water/dodecane, water/1-butanol, and water/pentane/methanol. By means of partition experiments and microscopic imaging, it has been shown that the mechanism of separation strongly depends on the choice of the two-phase system. While water/dodecane features a mechanism of sheer competitive adsorption at the interface, separation in water/1-butanol is mainly due to partitioning into both liquid phases, leading to a higher degree of separation. Experiments with water/pentane/methanol have illustrated the large potential of three-component systems, as slight variations in the composition can have large effects on the separation.

  3. Mechanical and chemical protection of a wired enzyme oxygen cathode by a cubic phase lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Rowinski, Pawel; Kang, Chan; Shin, Hyosul; Heller, Adam

    2007-02-01

    When implanted in animals, enzyme-containing battery electrodes, biofuel cell electrodes, and biosensors are often damaged by components of the biological environment. An O2 cathode, superior to the classical platinum cathode, which would be implanted, as part of a caseless physiological pH miniature Zn-O2 battery or as part of a caseless and membraneless miniature glucose-O2 biofuel cell, is rapidly damaged by serum urate at its operating potential. The cathode is made by electrically connecting, or wiring, reaction centers of bilirubin oxidase to carbon with an electron-conducting redox hydrogel. In the physiological pH 7.3 electrolyte battery or biofuel cell, the O2 cathode should operate at, or positive of, 0.3 V (Ag/AgCl), where the urate anion, a common serum component, is electrooxidized. Because an unidentified urate electrooxidation intermediate, formed in the presence of O2, damages the wired bilirubin oxidase electrocatalyst, urate must be excluded from the cathode. Unlike O2, which permeates through both the lipid and the aqueous interconnected networks of cubic-phase lyotropic liquid crystals, urate permeates only through their continuous three-dimensional aqueous channel networks. The aqueous channels have well-defined diameters of approximately 5 nm in the monoolein/water cubic-phase liquid crystal. Through tailoring the wall charge of the aqueous channels, the anion/cation permeability ratio can be modulated. Thus, doping the monoolein of the monoolein/water liquid crystal with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate makes the aqueous channel walls anionic and reduces the urate permeation in the liquid crystal. As a result, the ratio of the urate electrooxidation current to the O2 electroreduction current is reduced from 1:3 to 1:100 for 5-mm O2 cathodes rotating at 1000 rpm. Doping with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate also increases the shear strength of the cubic-phase monoolein/water lyotropic liquid crystal. While the undoped liquid crystal is

  4. Evaluations of liquid crystal panel as a random phase modulator for optical encryption systems based on the double random phase encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yasuhiro; Fukuyama, Shingo

    2010-02-01

    A use of liquid crystal panels (LCPs) as a random phase modulator in the optical encryption system based on the double random phase coding (DRPC) [Optics Letters, Vol.20, 767(1995)] is considered in the present paper. Required phase modulation property of LCPs as random phase modulators in the DRPC are investigated by computer simulations. It is found from simulation results that the required number of independent patches for phase modulations must be greater than 128 × 128 pixels for LCPs with the maximum phase modulation of 1.55π radians. It is also found that the required maximum phase modulation can be reduced to 1.25π radians by increasing the number of independent patches to 1024 × 1024 pixles. Experimental study using a commercially available LCP (EPSON, HTPS LCP, L3P14Y-55G00) verified partially these simulation results.

  5. Sixfold bond orientational properties of a model liquid crystal in the dimensional crossover of B phases: A computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaetani, Luca; Tani, Alessandro

    2007-02-01

    A wide range of NPT simulations of a bead necklace liquid crystal model in the crystal B, smectic B, smectic A, and nematic phases have been performed. Systems with up to 21600molecules have been studied to observe the behavior of slowly decaying spatial correlation functions. The pair correlation function and its in-plane restriction are consistent with a crystalline phase made of independent two-dimensional crystalline layers. Smectic B phase is studied by the bond orientational pair correlation functions g6 and its extension g6ext. The first reaches a constant value, which seems to rule out a classical hexatic phase. The latter shows a power-law decay within the layers: its typical decay exponent (η6ext) is evaluated. Relationships between multiple harmonics of the C6n order parameter have been evaluated through the whole range of existence of B phases (crystalline and smectic): the extension to the crystalline phase holds and provides an excellent fit of the simulation data.

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of a viscous nematic liquid crystal: Evidence counter to a second-order phase change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shutt, W. E.; Gelerinter, E.; Fryburg, G. C.; Sheley, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    The ordering in a viscous, nematic, liquid crystal was studied using vanadyl acetyl acetonate and several nitroxides as paramagnetic probes. The ordering curve for VAAC at both K-band and X-band shows a slope discontinuity at a reduced temperature of 0.85. This discontinuity is caused by the tumbling time of the VAAC becoming comparable with the hyperfine splitting. The slope discontinuity is not present in the ordering curves of the nitroxides. The results are taken as evidence counter to the presence of a second-order phase transition.

  7. Research on the effect of coherent beam combination based on array of liquid crystal optical phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenming; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Chen, Jian

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of Coherent Beam Combination(CBC) based on Array of Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Arrays(LCOPA array), two major contributions are made in this article. Firstly, grating lobes and side lobes of combined beam are analyzed. Furthermore, according to interference theory the methods to suppress grating lobes and side lobes are put forward. Secondly, a new beam quality factor Q(θ0) is proposed to evaluate the beam quality of combined beam and several influence factors are discussed. These analysis results help to obtain combined beam with better beam quality.

  8. DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Iam Choon

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of enhanced nonlinear optical responses of methyl-red-doped blue-phase liquid crystals by application of a DC field. We have observed strong multi-order nonlinear grating diffractions characterized by a nonlinear index coefficient n(2)∼0.5  cm(2)/W using unfocused CW laser power of ∼1  mW and a DC field of a few V/μm. The underlying mechanisms are crystalline lattice and director axis reorientations by torques exerted by the DC field and photo-excited dye molecules.

  9. Interpretation of unusual textures in the B2 phase of a liquid crystal composed of bent-core molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J.; Folcia, C.; Etxebarria, J.; Gimeno, N.; Ros, M.

    2003-07-01

    A liquid crystal material of bent-core molecules is investigated by means of optical texture observations, x-ray measurements, and miscibility studies. While the x-ray and miscibility data point towards a B2 phase, the texture is however unusual, showing optical isotropy and segregation in two domains with opposite gyrations. It is shown that the texture can be interpreted successfully in terms of a smectic-CAPA structure in small domains with random orientations. The optical activity data are also explained semiquantitatively.

  10. Phototropic liquid crystals comprising one component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewska, Anna; Zawada, Joanna; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Galewski, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    Phototropic liquid crystals (PtLC), in which the phase transition can be controlled by the light, are a new class of liquid crystal materials possessing number of potential applications, especially in photonic devices. So far a significant majority of PtLC materials has been realized by the doping a classical liquid crystal with a photochromic dye. Here we report PtLCs comprising a single compound. Liquid-crystalline and photochromic properties have been accomplished in alkylo-alkoxy derivatives of azobenzene. Such compounds show a rich polymorphism which can be controlled by the light. The phenomenon of the photochemical phase transition has been investigated by means of holographic grating recording.

  11. Miniature Compressive Ultra-spectral Imaging System Utilizing a Single Liquid Crystal Phase Retarder

    PubMed Central

    August, Isaac; Oiknine, Yaniv; AbuLeil, Marwan; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Stern, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic imaging has been proved to be an effective tool for many applications in a variety of fields, such as biology, medicine, agriculture, remote sensing and industrial process inspection. However, due to the demand for high spectral and spatial resolution it became extremely challenging to design and implement such systems in a miniaturized and cost effective manner. Using a Compressive Sensing (CS) setup based on a single variable Liquid Crystal (LC) retarder and a sensor array, we present an innovative Miniature Ultra-Spectral Imaging (MUSI) system. The LC retarder acts as a compact wide band spectral modulator. Within the framework of CS, a sequence of spectrally modulated images is used to recover ultra-spectral image cubes. Using the presented compressive MUSI system, we demonstrate the reconstruction of gigapixel spatio-spectral image cubes from spectral scanning shots numbering an order of magnitude less than would be required using conventional systems. PMID:27004447

  12. Miniature Compressive Ultra-spectral Imaging System Utilizing a Single Liquid Crystal Phase Retarder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    August, Isaac; Oiknine, Yaniv; Abuleil, Marwan; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Stern, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopic imaging has been proved to be an effective tool for many applications in a variety of fields, such as biology, medicine, agriculture, remote sensing and industrial process inspection. However, due to the demand for high spectral and spatial resolution it became extremely challenging to design and implement such systems in a miniaturized and cost effective manner. Using a Compressive Sensing (CS) setup based on a single variable Liquid Crystal (LC) retarder and a sensor array, we present an innovative Miniature Ultra-Spectral Imaging (MUSI) system. The LC retarder acts as a compact wide band spectral modulator. Within the framework of CS, a sequence of spectrally modulated images is used to recover ultra-spectral image cubes. Using the presented compressive MUSI system, we demonstrate the reconstruction of gigapixel spatio-spectral image cubes from spectral scanning shots numbering an order of magnitude less than would be required using conventional systems.

  13. Thermoelectricity in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Said, Suhana; Nordin, Abdul Rahman; Abdullah, Norbani; Balamurugan, S.

    2015-09-01

    The thermoelectric effect, also known as the Seebeck effect, describes the conversion of a temperature gradient into electricity. A Figure of Merit (ZT) is used to describe the thermoelectric ability of a material. It is directly dependent on its Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, and inversely dependent on its thermal conductivity. There is usually a compromise between these parameters, which limit the performance of thermoelectric materials. The current achievement for ZT~2.2 falls short of the expected threshold of ZT=3 to allow its viability in commercial applications. In recent times, advances in organic thermoelectrics been significant, improving by over 3 orders of magnitude over a period of about 10 years. Liquid crystals are newly investigated as candidate thermoelectric materials, given their low thermal conductivity, inherent ordering, and in some cases, reasonable electrical conductivity. In this work the thermoelectric behaviour of a discotic liquid crystal, is discussed. The DLC was filled into cells coated with a charge injector, and an alignment of the columnar axis perpendicular to the substrate was allowed to form. This thermoelectric behavior can be correlated to the order-disorder transition. A reasonable thermoelectric power in the liquid crystal temperature regime was noted. In summary, thermoelectric liquid crystals may have the potential to be utilised in flexible devices, as a standalone power source.

  14. Ferroelectric liquid crystal display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Paul K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A ferroelectric liquid crystal display device employs capacitance spoiling layers to minimize unneeded capacitances created by crossovers of X and Y address lines and to accurately define desired capacitances. The spoiler layers comprise low dielectric constant layers which space electrodes from the ferroelectric at crossover points where capacitance is not needed for device operation.

  15. Influence of Substrate Surfaces on Thermal Behavior of Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation of Liquid Crystal and Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Ikehata, Seiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2003-01-01

    We studied photopolymerization-induced phase separation (P-PIPS) of polymer fibers and liquid crystal (LC) formed at various thicknesses between glass substrates using a differential scanning calorimeter to find the influence of substrates on the P-PIPS phenomenon. In this case, the energy of ultraviolet light adsorbed by the solution film of the LC and monomer was kept constant in a unit area even when the solution thickness was changed. As an experimental result, the thermal phase-transition sequence behavior of the LC component in the formed composite film of smaller thickness approached that of the original pure LC. The total reaction heat for the polymerization in any thickness solutions did not make meaningful difference. These indicate that the phase separation can be promoted by decreasing the distance between the substrates even under constant polymerization degree, which depends on the polymerization reaction.

  16. Tunable diffraction grating using ultraviolet-light-induced spatial phase modulation in dual-frequency liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.-T.; Liang Xiao; Ren Hongwen; Wu, S.-T.

    2004-08-16

    An electrically tunable diffraction phase grating using ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced spatial dielectric modulation of a dual-frequency liquid crystal (DFLC) cell is demonstrated. A photomask with transparent and opaque stripes was used for fabricating the grating. In the UV-exposed stripes, the negative dielectric anisotropy ({delta}{epsilon}) tolane compound of the DFLC mixture is partially polymerized resulting in a decreased threshold voltage as compared to that of the unexposed region. Upon applying a constant voltage, the phase difference between the adjacent pixels is produced. The first-order diffraction efficiency reaches {approx}60% which agrees well with the simulation results. Due to the dual-frequency addressing at 30 V{sub rms}, the response time of the DFLC phase grating was measured to be {approx}1 ms at room temperature.

  17. Optical properties of light-sensitive liquid-crystal elastomers in the vicinity of the nematic-paranematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorc, Marko; Li, Hui; Domenici, Valentina; Ambrožič, Gabriela; Čopič, Martin; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena

    2013-02-01

    We investigate light-induced patterning of a monodomain side-chain liquid crystal elastomer (SC-LCE) doped with light-sensitive azobenzene moiety in the temperature region close to the nematic-paranematic phase transition. We show that a strongly nonlinear relationship between the concentration of the cis isomers of the azomesogens and the refractive index modification of the material, which is characteristic for the phase transition region, results in nonmonotonous time dependence of the diffraction efficiency of a probe beam. From this effect we determine the sensitivity of the nematic transition temperature on the molar fraction of the cis isomers. The relation between the cis isomer molar fraction and nematic order also provides a possibility for recording hidden holograms, which can be made visible by cooling the sample from the paranematic to the nematic phase.

  18. Investigation of fringing electric field effect on high-resolution blue phase liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Guo, Zhengbo; Xing, Yufei; Li, Qing

    2015-08-20

    The fringing electric field effect which determines the performance of a high-resolution blue phase liquid crystal spatial light modulator (BPLC-SLM) is investigated by numerical modeling. The BPLC-SLM is polarization-dependent due to the transverse electric field component. The physical mechanism of the phase profile properties for different polarization states is analyzed. General design issues related to the BPLC-SLM configuration and phase profile properties are discussed. Notably, the material parameters and cell gap thickness are both optimized to obtain a low operation voltage (V=26.07  V). This work provides fundamental understanding for the feasibility of low operation voltage and high spatial resolution BPLC-SLM.

  19. The role of hydrogen bonding in the phase behaviour of supramolecular liquid crystal dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Felipe, Alfonso; Imrie, Corrie T.

    2015-11-01

    The phase behaviour of equimolar mixtures of 4-octyloxybenzoic acid, OOBA, and either 1-(4-butylazobenzene-4‧-oxy)-6-(4-oxypyridine)pentane, BuABO5OPyr, or 1-(4-butylazobenzene-4‧-oxy)-6-(4-oxypyridine)hexane, BuABO6OPyr, is reported. OOBA exhibits enantiotropic smectic C and nematic phases, whereas BuABO5OPyr and BuABO6OPyr are not liquid crystalline. Both the OOBA/BuABO5OPyr and OOBA/BuABO6OPyr equimolar mixtures show an enantiotropic smectic A phase identified using X-ray diffraction and polarised light microscopy. The liquid crystallinty of the mixtures is attributed, in part, to the formation of a 1:1 hydrogen-bonded complex between OOBA and either BuABO5OPyr or BuABO6OPyr. Differences in the transitional properties of the mixtures are accounted for in terms of the average shapes of these 1:1 complexes. Temperature dependent FTIR spectroscopy shows, however, that the formation of the complex is not quantitative in the mixtures but instead a complex mixture exists over the complete temperature range studied, involving the 1:1 complex, both cyclic and open acid dimers, free acid and hence, free BuABOnOPyr molecules.

  20. Hierarchy of orientational phases and axial anisotropies in the gauge theoretical description of generalized nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Nissinen, Jaakko; de Boer, Josko; Slager, Robert-Jan; Zaanen, Jan

    2017-02-01

    The paradigm of spontaneous symmetry breaking encompasses the breaking of the rotational symmetries O(3 ) of isotropic space to a discrete subgroup, i.e., a three-dimensional point group. The subgroups form a rich hierarchy and allow for many different phases of matter with orientational order. Such spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in nematic liquid crystals, and a highlight of such anisotropic liquids is the uniaxial and biaxial nematics. Generalizing the familiar uniaxial and biaxial nematics to phases characterized by an arbitrary point-group symmetry, referred to as generalized nematics, leads to a large hierarchy of phases and possible orientational phase transitions. We discuss how a particular class of nematic phase transitions related to axial point groups can be efficiently captured within a recently proposed gauge theoretical formulation of generalized nematics [K. Liu, J. Nissinen, R.-J. Slager, K. Wu, and J. Zaanen, Phys. Rev. X 6, 041025 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.041025]. These transitions can be introduced in the model by considering anisotropic couplings that do not break any additional symmetries. By and large this generalizes the well-known uniaxial-biaxial nematic phase transition to any arbitrary axial point group in three dimensions. We find in particular that the generalized axial transitions are distinguished by two types of phase diagrams with intermediate vestigial orientational phases and that the window of the vestigial phase is intimately related to the amount of symmetry of the defining point group due to inherently growing fluctuations of the order parameter. This might explain the stability of the observed uniaxial-biaxial phases as compared to the yet to be observed other possible forms of generalized nematic order with higher point-group symmetries.

  1. Hierarchy of orientational phases and axial anisotropies in the gauge theoretical description of generalized nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Nissinen, Jaakko; de Boer, Josko; Slager, Robert-Jan; Zaanen, Jan

    2017-02-01

    The paradigm of spontaneous symmetry breaking encompasses the breaking of the rotational symmetries O(3) of isotropic space to a discrete subgroup, i.e., a three-dimensional point group. The subgroups form a rich hierarchy and allow for many different phases of matter with orientational order. Such spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in nematic liquid crystals, and a highlight of such anisotropic liquids is the uniaxial and biaxial nematics. Generalizing the familiar uniaxial and biaxial nematics to phases characterized by an arbitrary point-group symmetry, referred to as generalized nematics, leads to a large hierarchy of phases and possible orientational phase transitions. We discuss how a particular class of nematic phase transitions related to axial point groups can be efficiently captured within a recently proposed gauge theoretical formulation of generalized nematics [K. Liu, J. Nissinen, R.-J. Slager, K. Wu, and J. Zaanen, Phys. Rev. X 6, 041025 (2016)2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.6.041025]. These transitions can be introduced in the model by considering anisotropic couplings that do not break any additional symmetries. By and large this generalizes the well-known uniaxial-biaxial nematic phase transition to any arbitrary axial point group in three dimensions. We find in particular that the generalized axial transitions are distinguished by two types of phase diagrams with intermediate vestigial orientational phases and that the window of the vestigial phase is intimately related to the amount of symmetry of the defining point group due to inherently growing fluctuations of the order parameter. This might explain the stability of the observed uniaxial-biaxial phases as compared to the yet to be observed other possible forms of generalized nematic order with higher point-group symmetries.

  2. Liquid crystals in tribology.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-09-18

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered.

  3. Phase modulation of thermotropic liquid crystals of tetra-n-alkylammonium polyoxometalate ionic complexes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunxia; Liu, Shuxia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Lixin

    2013-06-07

    A series of composition analogous polyoxometalate-based ionic complexes are synthesized and studied, with a focus on the correlation between their mesomorphic behavior and their chemical structure. Generally, these polarizable rigid polyoxoanion clusters decorated with hydrophobic flexible alkyl chains have demonstrated a propensity to form thermotropic liquid-crystalline (LC) phases. Characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscopy (PM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), two of the four investigated complexes tend to form thermodynamically stable mesophases. Longer alkyl chains have been found to form mesophases, and the alkyl chain length of the quaternary ammonium cations influences both the occurrence and type of mesophase exhibited.

  4. Liquid crystals in nondestructive testing.

    PubMed

    Fergason, J L

    1968-09-01

    The cholesteric phase is associated with scattering effects that give rise to iridescent colors, the dominant wavelength being influenced by very small changes in temperature, which can be as large as 1000 A shift per degree. This unusually high temperature sensitivity has given rise to the use of the cholesteric phase as a sensitive thermometer and thermal mapping media. This paper reviews the optical effects in the cholesteric phase with some new additions that are particularly relevant to thermal mapping. An attempt has been made to give a complete picture of the cholesteric liquid crystal as applied to nondestructive testing, rather than to review the work actually being done in this field.

  5. Visible light high-resolution imaging system for large aperture telescope by liquid crystal adaptive optics with phase diversity technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zihao; Yang, Chengliang; Zhang, Peiguang; Zhang, Xingyun; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Sun, Qiang; Xuan, Li

    2017-08-30

    There are more than eight large aperture telescopes (larger than eight meters) equipped with adaptive optics system in the world until now. Due to the limitations such as the difficulties of increasing actuator number of deformable mirror, most of them work in the infrared waveband. A novel two-step high-resolution optical imaging approach is proposed by applying phase diversity (PD) technique to the open-loop liquid crystal adaptive optics system (LC AOS) for visible light high-resolution adaptive imaging. Considering the traditional PD is not suitable for LC AOS, the novel PD strategy is proposed which can reduce the wavefront estimating error caused by non-modulated light generated by liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC SLM) and make the residual distortions after open-loop correction to be smaller. Moreover, the LC SLM can introduce any aberration which realizes the free selection of phase diversity. The estimating errors are greatly reduced in both simulations and experiments. The resolution of the reconstructed image is greatly improved on both subjective visual effect and the highest discernible space resolution. Such technique can be widely used in large aperture telescopes for astronomical observations such as terrestrial planets, quasars and also can be used in other applications related to wavefront correction.

  6. Optical studies of blue phase III, twist-bend and bent-core nematic liquid crystals in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Pavan Kumar

    This dissertation is mainly divided into three parts. First, the dynamic light scattering measurements on both calamitic and bent-core nematic liquid crystals, carried out in the new split-helix resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee is discussed. In a nematic liquid crystal the molecules tend to be aligned along a constant direction, labeled by a unit vector (or "director") n. However, there are fluctuations from this average configuration. These fluctuations are very large for long wavelengths and give rise to a strong scattering of light. The magnetic field reduces the fluctuations of liquid crystal director n. Scattered light was detected at each scattering angle ranging from 0° to 40°. The relaxation rate and inverse scattered intensity of director fluctuations exhibit a linear dependence on field-squared up to 25 Tesla. We also observe evidence of field dependence of certain nematic material parameters. In the second part of the dissertation, magneto-optical measurements on two liquid crystals that exhibit a wide temperature-range amorphous blue phase (BPIII) are discussed. Blue phase III is one of the phases that occur between chiral nematic and isotropic liquid phases. Samples were illuminated with light from blue laser; the incident polarization direction of the light was parallel to the magnetic field. The transmitted light was passed through another polarizer oriented at 90° with respect to the first polarizer and was detected by a photo-detector. Magnetic fields up to 25Tesla are found to suppress the onset of BPIII in both materials by almost 1 degree celcius. This effect appears to increase non-linearly with the field strength. The effect of high fields on established BPIII's is also discussed, in which we find significant hysteresis and very slow dynamics. Possible explanations of these results are discussed. In the third part of the dissertation, magneto-optic measurements on two odd-numbered dimer molecules

  7. Novel phases in a square-lattice frustrated ferromagnet : 1/3 -magnetization plateau, helicoidal spin liquid, and vortex crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabra, Luis; Sindzingre, Philippe; Momoi, Tsutomu; Shannon, Nic

    2016-02-01

    A large part of the interest in magnets with frustrated antiferromagnetic interactions comes from the many new phases found in applied magnetic field. In this article, we explore some of the new phases which arise in a model with frustrated ferromagnetic interactions, the J1-J2-J3 Heisenberg model on a square lattice. Using a combination of classical Monte Carlo simulation and spin-wave theory, we uncover behavior reminiscent of some widely studied frustrated antiferromagnets, but with a number of new twists. We first demonstrate that, for a suitable choice of parameters, the phase diagram as a function of magnetic field and temperature is nearly identical to that of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice, including the celebrated 1 /3 -magnetization plateau. We then examine how this phase diagram changes when the model is tuned to a point where the classical ground state is highly degenerate. In this case, two new phases emerge: a classical, finite-temperature spin liquid, characterized by a "ring" in the spin structure factor S (q ) ; and a vortex crystal, a multiple-Q state with finite magnetization, which can be viewed as an ordered lattice of magnetic vortices. All of these new phases persist for a wide range of magnetic fields. We discuss the relationship between these results and published studies of frustrated antiferromagnets, together with some of the materials where these new phases might be observed in experiment.

  8. Lipid-Based Liquid Crystals As Carriers for Antimicrobial Peptides: Phase Behavior and Antimicrobial Effect.

    PubMed

    Boge, Lukas; Bysell, Helena; Ringstad, Lovisa; Wennman, David; Umerska, Anita; Cassisa, Viviane; Eriksson, Jonny; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Edwards, Katarina; Andersson, Martin

    2016-05-03

    The number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is increasing worldwide, and the demand for novel antimicrobials is constantly growing. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could be an important part of future treatment strategies of various bacterial infection diseases. However, AMPs have relatively low stability, because of proteolytic and chemical degradation. As a consequence, carrier systems protecting the AMPs are greatly needed, to achieve efficient treatments. In addition, the carrier system also must administrate the peptide in a controlled manner to match the therapeutic dose window. In this work, lyotropic liquid crystalline (LC) structures consisting of cubic glycerol monooleate/water and hexagonal glycerol monooleate/oleic acid/water have been examined as carriers for AMPs. These LC structures have the capability of solubilizing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, as well as being biocompatible and biodegradable. Both bulk gels and discrete dispersed structures (i.e., cubosomes and hexosomes) have been studied. Three AMPs have been investigated with respect to phase stability of the LC structures and antimicrobial effect: AP114, DPK-060, and LL-37. Characterization of the LC structures was performed using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and peptide loading efficacy by ultra performance liquid chromatography. The antimicrobial effect of the LCNPs was investigated in vitro using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and time-kill assay. The most hydrophobic peptide (AP114) was shown to induce an increase in negative curvature of the cubic LC system. The most polar peptide (DPK-060) induced a decrease in negative curvature while LL-37 did not change the LC phase at all. The hexagonal LC phase was not affected by any of the AMPs. Moreover, cubosomes loaded with peptides AP114 and DPK-060 showed preserved antimicrobial activity, whereas particles loaded

  9. Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation Process of Thin Composite Films of Liquid Crystal and Polymer Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Ikehata, Seiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2003-11-01

    It was clarified that a thin composite film of a liquid crystal (LC) and polymer fiber networks can be obtained through two phase separation processes: spinodal decomposition, and nucleation and growth. The phase separation phenomenon was observed using a polarizing microscope under ultraviolet irradiation. Results showed that spinodal decomposition initially occurred in the LC/polymer solution under photopolymerization of a monomer. The polymer fibers were then grown on a surface of solid materials (such as substrates and spacer particles) by the nucleation and growth process in the polymer-rich solution induced by the spinodal decomposition. It was found that the spatially noncyclic morphology of the polymer fibers dispersed in the LC was obtained by the intervention of the nucleation and growth process after the spinodal decomposition process.

  10. Phase-field-crystal modeling of glass-forming liquids: spanning time scales during vitrification, aging, and deformation.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joel; Grant, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Two essential elements required to generate a glass transition within phase-field-crystal (PFC) models are outlined based on observed freezing behaviors in various models of this class. The central dynamic features of glass formation in simple binary liquids are qualitatively reproduced across 12 orders of magnitude in time by applying a physically motivated time scaling to previous PFC simulation results. New aspects of the equilibrium phase behavior of the same binary model system are also outlined, aging behavior is explored in the moderate and deeply supercooled regimes, and aging exponents are extracted. General features of the elastic and plastic responses of amorphous and crystalline PFC solids under deformation are also compared and contrasted.

  11. Phase separation and liquid crystallization of complementary sequences in mixtures of nanoDNA oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Zanchetta, Giuliano; Nakata, Michi; Buscaglia, Marco; Bellini, Tommaso; Clark, Noel A.

    2008-01-01

    Using optical microscopy, we have studied the phase behavior of mixtures of 12- to 22-bp-long nanoDNA oligomers. The mixtures are chosen such that only a fraction of the sample is composed of mutually complementary sequences, and hence the solutions are effectively mixtures of single-stranded and double-stranded (duplex) oligomers. When the concentrations are large enough, such mixtures phase-separate via the nucleation of duplex-rich liquid crystalline domains from an isotropic background rich in single strands. We find that the phase separation is approximately complete, thus corresponding to a spontaneous purification of duplexes from the single-strand oligos. We interpret this behavior as the combined result of the energy gain from the end-to-end stacking of duplexes and of depletion-type attractive interactions favoring the segregation of the more rigid duplexes from the flexible single strands. This form of spontaneous partitioning of complementary nDNA offers a route to purification of short duplex oligomers and, if in the presence of ligation, could provide a mode of positive feedback for the preferential synthesis of longer complementary oligomers, a mechanism of possible relevance in prebiotic environments. PMID:18212117

  12. Faraday waves on nematic liquid crystals: effect of Marangoni flow and thermal phase transition.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Contreras, M

    2013-12-01

    The parametric instability in nematic liquid crystal layers has been studied using linear stability theory. Using material parameters of typical nematics, the neutral stability curve and dispersion relation of a system that presents critical subharmonic waves is obtained. The critical acceleration and wave number of the unstable stationary waves are discontinuous at the nematic-isotropic transition temperature and conform to similar sharp changes experienced by the viscosities and surface tension as a function of temperature. Due to Marangoni flow the curve of the critical acceleration as a function of excitation frequency exhibits a minimum. If the Marangoni flow is neglected and the dynamical viscosity is increased, a monotonously increasing dependence of the acceleration in terms of oscillation frequency is observed. A bicritical instability is reached for a layer thickness of a few millimeters. A well-defined subharmonic wave is attained when the thickness of the layer is further increased. The dispersion relation of these waves displays a discontinuous shift at high frequencies due to alternating secondary thresholds of Faraday waves. At negligible external forcing we determined the dispersion relationship of thermal surface waves.

  13. Multi-angle static and dynamic light scattering investigation of lysozyme association: From crystallization to liquid liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Kazuo; Kanzaki, Noriko

    2007-06-01

    The association of hen egg white lysozyme was observed using time-resolved multi-angle static and dynamic light scattering. In solutions containing 1.2 M of NaCl with a pH of 4.6 buffered by 50 mM of NaAc, and maintained at 20C, the apparent molecular weight Mw, and gyration radius Rg, of lysozyme aggregates were measured at 0.3-5-s intervals for various lysozyme concentrations from 8 to 32 mg/mL using static light scattering. At 32 mg/mL, liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) occurred. The (Kc/ΔR(q)) vs. q2 plot had a non-linear shape with a maximum at a particular q2, indicating that the aggregate size distribution was within a narrow range. This had not been observed in our previous studies of high-molecular-weight proteins. The dynamic light scattering data were consistent with those of static light scattering; i.e., CONTIN analysis showed clear bimodal (monomer and aggregate) distributions. Fractal dimension analysis of the aggregates with the protein concentration showed that the inner structure of the scatterer formed during LLPS was rigid in the final stage, which supports a two-step nucleation model.

  14. Bragg reflection band width and optical rotatory dispersion of cubic blue-phase liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Anucha, Konkanok; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kawata, Yuto; Ozaki, Masanori; Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Kikuchi, Hirotsugu

    2016-10-01

    The Bragg reflection band width and optical rotatory dispersion of liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases (BPs) I and II are compared by numerical simulations. Attention is paid to the wavelength regions for which the reflection bands with lowest photon energies appear, i.e., the [110 ] direction for BP I and the [100 ] direction for BP II. Finite difference time domain and 4 ×4 matrix calculations performed on the theoretical director tensor distribution of BPs with the same material parameters show that BP II, which has simple cubic symmetry, has a wider photonic band gap than BP I, which has body centered cubic symmetry, possibly due to the fact that the density of the double-twist cylinders in BP II are twice that in BP I. The theoretical results on the Bragg reflection band width are supported by reflectance measurements performed on BPs I and II for light incident along the [110 ] and [100 ] directions, respectively.

  15. Impact of ferroelectric and superparaelectric nanoparticles on phase transitions and dynamics in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starzonek, Szymon; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Drozd-Rzoska, Aleksandra; Czupryński, Krzysztof; Kralj, Samo

    2017-08-01

    Results of broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) studies of pure liquid crystalline (4-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonitryle) 5OCB and its nanocolloids with BaTiO3 nanoparticles (NPs) under varying pressure and temperature are presented. The notable impact of NPs on phase transitions and dynamics was found. Particularly strong impact on pretransitional behavior was observed for relatively low concentrations of NPs, which can be related to the NPs-induced disorder. There are also notable differences between pressure and temperature paths of studies for nanocomposites, absent for the pure LC compound. For instance, tests focused on the translational orientational decoupling via the fractional Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation yielded S =0.71 and S =0.3 for the temperature and pressure paths, respectively: S =1 is for the complete coupling. The possible theoretical frame of observed phenomena is also proposed.

  16. Bragg reflection band width and optical rotatory dispersion of cubic blue-phase liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Anucha, Konkanok; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kawata, Yuto; Ozaki, Masanori; Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Kikuchi, Hirotsugu

    2016-10-01

    The Bragg reflection band width and optical rotatory dispersion of liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases (BPs) I and II are compared by numerical simulations. Attention is paid to the wavelength regions for which the reflection bands with lowest photon energies appear, i.e., the [110] direction for BP I and the [100] direction for BP II. Finite difference time domain and 4×4 matrix calculations performed on the theoretical director tensor distribution of BPs with the same material parameters show that BP II, which has simple cubic symmetry, has a wider photonic band gap than BP I, which has body centered cubic symmetry, possibly due to the fact that the density of the double-twist cylinders in BP II are twice that in BP I. The theoretical results on the Bragg reflection band width are supported by reflectance measurements performed on BPs I and II for light incident along the [110] and [100] directions, respectively.

  17. Nematic liquid crystal bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Susannah; Ellis, Perry; Vallamkondu, Jayalakshmi; Danemiller, Edward; Vernon, Mark; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We study the effects of confining a nematic liquid crystal between two parallel glass plates with homeotropic boundary conditions for the director at all bounding surfaces. We find that the free surface of the nematic bridge is a surface of constant mean curvature. In addition, by changing the distance between the plates and the contact angle with the glass plates, we transition between loops and hedgehogs that can be either radial or hyperbolic.

  18. Oblique incidence effect on steering efficiency of liquid crystal polarization gratings used for optical phased array beam steering amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiangjie, Zhao; Jiazhu, Duan; Dayong, Zhang; Cangli, Liu; Yongquan, Luo

    2016-10-01

    A liquid crystal polarization grating (LCPG) is proposed that amplifies the steering angle of a liquid crystal optical phased array for non-mechanical beam steering, taking advantage of its high steering efficiency under normal incidence. However, oblique incidence may play an important role in the overall steering efficiency. The effect of oblique incidence on steering efficiency of a LCPG was analyzed by numerically solving the extended Jones matrix and considering propagation crosstalk. The results indicate that the outgoing laser beam is amplitude-modulated under the effect of oblique incidence and behaves as a sinusoidal-modulated amplitude grating, which diffracts certain energies to non-blazed orders. Over-oblique incidence may even eliminate the steering effect of the incident beam. The modulation depth of the induced amplitude grating was found to be proportional to the product of sinusoidal value of oblique incidence angle and the LC layer thickness, and inversely proportional to the periodic pitch length of the LCPG. Both in-plane incidence and out-of-plane incidence behave similarly to influence the steering efficiency. Finally, the overall steering efficiency for cascaded LCPGs was analyzed and a difference of up to 11 % steering efficiency can be induced between different LCPG configurations, even without considering the over-oblique incidence effect. Both the modulation depth and final steering efficiency can be optimized by varying the LC birefringence and layer thickness.

  19. Imaging the oxidation effects of the Fenton reaction on phospholipids at the interface between aqueous phase and thermotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The lipid peroxidation process has attracted much attention because of the growing evidence of its involvement in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases. Herein, we report a simple, label-free method to study the oxidation of phospholipids by the Fenton reaction at the interface between an aqueous phase and immiscible liquid crystals (LCs). The different images produced by the orientation of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) corresponded to the presence or absence of oxidized 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DOPG). The oxidation effects of the Fenton reaction on DOPG were evaluated by monitoring the orientational response of liquid crystals upon contact with the oxidized DOPG solutions. DOPG was oxidized into chain-changed products containing hydroxy, carbonyl, or aldehyde groups, resulting in the rearrangement of the phospholipid layer. This induced the orientational transition of LCs from homeotropic to planar states; therefore, a dark to bright optical shift was observed. This shift was due to the Fenton reaction preventing DOPG to induce the orientational alignment of LCs at the aqueous/LC interface. We also used an ultraviolet spectrophotometer to confirm the effects of oxidation on phospholipids by the Fenton reaction. Using this simple method, a new approach for investigating phospholipid oxidation was established with high resolution and easy accessibility.

  20. Phase transitions and reentrant phenomena in liquid crystals having both rigid and flexible intramolecular joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyżuk, W.; Górecka, E.; Mieczkowski, J.; Przedmojski, J.

    1992-07-01

    Two series of liquid-crystalline compounds having three phenyl rings separated by flexible spacer —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO— and by rigid azo and azoxy group, were studied by DSC, optical and X-ray methods. For esters of dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)-phenylbutyric acid with 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phenylazo-phenol-4 having dodecyloxy or longer terminal chains, as well as for related azoxy compounds, a narrow (even below 5 K) reentrant or inverted nematic phase appearing between partly bilayer and monolayer smectics A was observed. For higher homologues of the azoxy series additional smectic phases appear, leading to the occurrence of new multicritical points, e.g. the critical end point Ad Cd N^re. On each of the lines, which separate nematic from smectic A phases, transitions are of weakly first or second-order and more than one tricritical point can occur. On the A{1} N/A{1} N^re line, a simple N A{1} tricritical point is observed at T_NI/T_AN = 0.834. The presence of further critical points depends on the components of the binary system involved. Four of the azoxy compounds studied undergo a second order phase transition between partly bilayer smectics, Ad and Cd. Such a transition is accompanied by a jumb in the specific heat, varying linearly with the length of the molecular tails. Various temperature dependences of the layer spacing in the Ad phase are observed for subsequent homologues from the azoxy series. Plusieurs cristaux liquides composés de trois groupements phényl séparés par un groupement —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO—, ainsi que par des groupements azo et azoxy, ont été examinés par AED, méthodes optiques et par rayons X. Pour des esters de l'acide dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)phénylbutyrique et de 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phénylazo-phénol-4 ayant comme terminaison une chaîne dodecyloxy ou bien plus longue, ainsi que pour des composés azoxy relatif, on observe (même au-dessous de 5 K) une étroite phase nématique réentrante ou inverse entre les phases smectiques

  1. Improvement of the performance of the twisted-nematic liquid-crystal display as a phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baiheng; Yao, Baoli; Li, Ze; Ye, Tong

    2011-06-10

    A twisted-nematic liquid-crystal display (TN-LCD) placed between two linear polarizers (P) generally produces coupled intensity and phase modulations. For the purpose of phase-only modulation, quarter-wave plates (QWPs) are often used in front of or behind the LCD. In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the QWPs' effect on the modulation properties of the TN-LCD based on the general Jones matrix descriptions for all the devices, which circumvents the inconvenience of the traditional method on the basis of the TN-LCD's internal parameters. We prove that the phase modulation depth of the TN-LCD can be further increased in the configuration of P1-QWP1-LCD-QWP2-P2 with each component properly oriented, provided that the mean intensity transmission is decreased to a lower level. By observing the diffracted patterns of the Ronchi phase grating or blazed grating addressed onto the TN-LCD, we verify the validity of the proposed method. Improved reconstructed image quality from the kinoform loaded on the TN-LCD is obtained in this configuration. This approach is valuable when the TN-LCD is employed as a phase modulator, especially for the modern, thinner TN-LCD.

  2. Optimized flexoelectric response in a chiral liquid-crystal phase device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, B. J.; Clarke, M. J.; Blatch, A. E.; Coles, H. J.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, a device type is presented in which the conventional geometry for the flexoelectro-optic effect is rotated, utilizing planar-aligned short-pitch chiral nematic and in-plane electric fields. The cell is optically neutral at zero applied field due to having its helix axis lie in the direction of light propagation, and at optical communication wavelengths (1550nm) polarization rotation is insignificant due to the helical pitch of the material being shorter than the illuminating wavelength. An electric field, applied in the plane of the cell, has been found to induce a birefringence via a combination of dielectric helix unwinding and flexoelectric deformation of the director helix. The magnitude of the birefringence and direction of the induced optic axis in the plane of the cell are dependent on the amplitude and direction of the applied electric field, providing potential for use in a fast endlessly rotatable polarization controller. Herein, the chiral nematic materials utilized in the cell are bimesogenic liquid crystals designed to optimize the contribution from the flexoelectro-optic effect, and eliminate dielectric helix unwinding. The materials are also polymer network stabilized to preserve the texture against degradation in the applied fields. The results presented show a progression from a combined dielectric and flexoelectrically induced birefringence of 0.016 at field strengths up to 6.8V/μm, to a purely flexoelectric-induced birefringence of 0.0135, sufficient for a quarter wave plate in a 29-μm-thick cell. Response times are of the order of hundreds of microseconds for both reaction to an applied field and relaxation upon removal.

  3. Liquid crystal device and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Gu, Mingxia; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2012-10-23

    The invention provides a liquid crystal device and method thereof. Subsequent to applying a first electrical voltage on a liquid crystal to induce a reorientation of the liquid crystal, a second electrical voltage with proper polarity is applied on the liquid crystal to assist the relaxation of the reorientation that was induced by the first electrical voltage. The "switch-off" phase of the liquid crystal can therefore be accelerated or temporally shortened, and the device can exhibit better performance such as fast response to on/off signals. The invention can be widely used LCD, LC shutter, LC lens, spatial light modulator, telecommunication device, tunable filter, beam steering device, and electrically driven LC device, among others.

  4. Relationship of Polymer Molecular Weight and Cure Temperature in Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation of Liquid Crystal and Polymer Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Ikehata, Seiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2002-10-01

    We studied the dependence of polymer molecular weight on cure temperature in the photopolymerization-induced phase separation of liquid crystal and polymer fiber networks, using gel permeation chromatography. As the experimental result, it was found for the first time that the molecular weight of the polymer, which is segregated and aggregated in the solution of monomer and the liquid crystal, increases with decreasing the temperature. We considered that the spatial concentration of growing polymer density, which is induced by the phase separation with the temperature decrease, accelerates the chemical bonding of polymer molecules.

  5. Solid-phase laser-induced forward transfer of variable shapes using a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, R.; Jansink, M.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Huis in `t Veld, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer is a promising method for 3D printing of various materials, including metals. The ejection mechanism is complex and depends strongly on the experimental parameters, such as laser fluence and donor layer thickness. However, the process can be categorized by the physical condition of the ejected material, i.e., the donor layer is transferred in liquid phase or the material is transferred as a `pellet' in solid phase. Currently, solid-phase transfer faces several problems. Large shearing forces, occurring at the pellet perimeter during transfer, limit the similarity between the desired pellet shape and the deposited pellet shape. Furthermore, the deposited pellet may be surrounded by debris particles formed by undesired transferred donor material. This work introduces a novel approach for laser-induced forward transfer of variable shaped solid-phase pellets. A liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) is used to apply grayscale intensity modulation to an incident laser beam to shape the intensity profile. Optimized beams consist of a high fluence perimeter around an interior characterized by a lower fluence level. These beams are used successfully to transfer solid-phase pellets out of a 100-nm Au donor layer using a single laser pulse. The flexibility of the SLM allows a variable desired pellet shape. The shapes of the resulting deposited pellets show a high degree of similarity to the desired shapes. Debris-free deposited pellets are achieved by pre-machining the donor layer, prior to the transfer, using a double-pulse process.

  6. Phase winding of a nematic liquid crystal by dynamic localized reorientation of an azo-based self-assembled monolayer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yue; Fang, Guanjiu; Glaser, Matthew A; Maclennan, Joseph E; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M; Clark, Noel A

    2014-08-12

    Azobenzene-based molecules forming a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) tethered to a glass surface are highly photosensitive and readily reorient liquid crystals in contact with them when illuminated with polarized actinic light. We probe the coupling of such monolayers to nematic liquid crystal in a hybrid cell by studying the dynamics of liquid crystal reorientation in response to local orientational changes of the monolayer induced by a focused actinic laser with a rotating polarization. The steady increase in the azimuth of the mean molecular orientation of the SAM around the laser beam locally reorients the nematic, winding up an extended set of nested rings of splay-bend nematic director reorientation until the cumulative elastic torque exceeds that of the surface coupling within the beam, after which the nematic director starts to slip. Quantitative analyses of the ring dynamics allow measurements of the anchoring strength of the azo-SAM and its interaction with the nematic liquid crystal.

  7. Liquid Crystals in Tribology

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered. PMID:19865534

  8. Optical studies of a binary liquid crystal mixture exhibiting induced smectic A phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingujam, Kiranmala; Bhattacharjee, Ayon; Choudhury, Basana; Sarkar, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    A binary liquid crystalline mixture of a monotropic polar compound 4-cyanophenyl 4'- n-pentyl benzoate (CPPB) and an enantiotropic non-polar compound 4- n-hexyl phenyl 4- n'-pentyloxy benzoate (ME5O.6) shows the presence of an induced smectic A phase in the region 0.1 ≤ x CPPB ≤ 0.82, where x CPPB is the mole fraction of CPPB. The results of texture study, density study and refractive index measurements of the eutectic mixture along with those of the pure samples are reported in this paper. The density values of the eutectic mixture are found to be much higher than that of the pure samples. The determination of order parameters of the pure samples and eutectic mixture has been carried out. In order to determine the order parameters of the samples, we have used different methods, Vuks', Neugebauer's, modified Vuks' and direct extrapolation method. The results of order parameters obtained from the different approaches are compared and analysed in detail.

  9. Calculating the role of composition in the anisotropy of solid-liquid interface energy using phase-field-crystal theory.

    PubMed

    Jugdutt, Bernadine A; Ofori-Opoku, Nana; Provatas, Nikolas

    2015-10-01

    This work uses Ginzburg-Landau theory derived from a recent structural phase-field-crystal model of binary alloys developed by the authors to study the roles of concentration, temperature, and pressure on the interfacial energy anisotropy of a solid-liquid front. It is found that the main contribution to the change in anisotropy with concentration arises from a change in preferred crystallographic orientation controlled by solute-dependent changes in the two-point density correlation function of a binary alloy, a mechanism that leads to such phenomena as solute-induced elastic strain and dislocation-assisted solute clustering. Our results are consistent with experimental observations in recent studies by Rappaz et al. [J. Fife, P. Di Napoli, and M. Rappaz, Metall. Mater. Trans. A 44, 5522 (2013)]. This is the first PFC work, to our knowledge, to incorporate temperature, pressure, and density into the thermodynamic description of alloys.

  10. Phase transitions in nanocomposites of hydrogen-bonded dimeric liquid crystals with mesogenic and non-mesogenic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katranchev, Boyko; Petrov, Minko

    2016-02-01

    Microtextural polarization, phase transitions, and electro-optical effects are studied in a series of nanocomposites, grown by mixing alkyloxybenzoic acids (nOBAs), displaying hydrogen-bonded dimeric liquid crystal (LC) state, with non-mesogens (single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), perfluorooctanoic acid) or mesogens (bent-core LC compound D14F3). Each of the studied nanocomposites, in which the nOBA serves as a matrix, forms complexes with bent-shaped dimeric, caused by the interaction between the dopant structural units and the dimer rings. This feature, coordinated with the surface anchoring, bulk and electrical effects, leads to drastic reduction of the LC system symmetry. As a result, transitions from achiral (characteristic for the pristine nOBA) to chiral states (including ferroelectric smectic C with C2 symmetry and ferroelectric smectic CG with the lowest C1 triclinic one) take place. The functionalization of the SWCNTs causes drastic increase of the ferroelectricity.

  11. Dynamical studies of the mechanisms for optical nonlinearities of methyl-red dye doped blue phase liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Khoo, Iam Choon

    2015-08-24

    Dynamical grating diffraction experiments and reflection/transmission polarization spectroscopy have been conducted on azo-dye doped Blue-Phase Liquid Crystal (BPLC) to investigate the mechanisms responsible for laser induced refractive index changes. The underlying mechanisms for the transient grating diffraction components are attributed to thermal indexing and lattice distortion, whereas the persistent component is due to lattice distortion/expansion caused by laser excited dye molecule isomerization. These mechanisms were distinguishable by their response dynamics and gave rise to the observed reflection spectra and photonic bandgap shift, polarization dependency and optical activity. Some preliminary studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using these mechanisms for coherent holographic and direct image writing operations.

  12. Near-diffraction-limited annular flattop beam shaping with dual phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haotong; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Yanxing; Xi, Fengjie; Xu, Xiaojun; Liu, Zejin

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate the annular flattop beam shaping technique with dual phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC-SLM) based on the refractive laser beam shaping systems. One LC-SLM redistributes the intensity distribution, and the other restores the initial underlying wave front. Differing from the conventional annular beam shaping technique, the wave front of the output beam can be maintained. The influences of deviations of beam waist and beam shape on the output beam profile are discussed in detail. Experimental results show that approximate 71% of the power is enclosed in a region with less than 7% rms intensity variation. The 4.1mm diameter near-diffraction-limited beam retains an annular flattop intensity distribution without significant diffraction peaks for a working distance of more than 24cm in the near field.

  13. Quantitative analysis of the x-ray diffraction intensities of undulated smectic phases in bent-core liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Folcia, C. L.; Etxebarria, J.; Ortega, J.

    2007-07-15

    X-ray diffraction diagrams of undulated smectic phases in bent-core liquid crystals have been theoretically studied. The intensities of the reflections have been obtained for different layer modulations, and a general expression has been deduced for orthogonal cells in terms of the different harmonics of the distortion. The case of sinusoidal modulation is especially simple and has been studied also in oblique cells. High-quality x-ray measurements of three compounds reported in the literature have been analyzed as examples. In all cases it has been deduced that the modulation is sinusoidal and its amplitude has been easily obtained by fitting the experimental intensities. Equatorial (h0) reflections have been also considered to obtain information about the structure of defects at the maxima and minima of the undulation.

  14. Chemical and biological sensing using liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Rebecca J.; Hunter, Jacob T.; Miller, Daniel S.; Abbasi, Reza; Mushenheim, Peter C.; Tan, Lie Na; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    The liquid crystalline state of matter arises from orientation-dependent, non-covalent interaction between molecules within condensed phases. Because the balance of intermolecular forces that underlies formation of liquid crystals is delicate, this state of matter can, in general, be easily perturbed by external stimuli (such as an electric field in a display). In this review, we present an overview of recent efforts that have focused on exploiting the responsiveness of liquid crystals as the basis of chemical and biological sensors. In this application of liquid crystals, the challenge is to design liquid crystalline systems that undergo changes in organization when perturbed by targeted chemical and biological species of interest. The approaches described below revolve around the design of interfaces that selectively bind targeted species, thus leading to surface-driven changes in the organization of the liquid crystals. Because liquid crystals possess anisotropic optical and dielectric properties, a range of different methods can be used to read out the changes in organization of liquid crystals that are caused by targeted chemical and biological species. This review focuses on principles for liquid crystal-based sensors that provide an optical output. PMID:24795857

  15. Small angle neutron scattering experiments in smectic A and smectic B phases of diluted liquid crystal copolysiloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecommandoux, S.; Noirez, L.; Mauzac, M.; Hardouin, F.

    1994-12-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering experiments were carried out on liquid crystal “side-end fixed” polysiloxanes : we observe that the polymer backbone keeps an oblate shape in the smectic A phase when the proportion of mesogens is reduced. This behavior is different from “side-on fixed” polymers since their anisotropic conformation vanishes at low mesogenic rate. Finally, we show for the first time an oblate anisotropic conformation in the smectic B phase. Par diffusion des neutrons aux petits angles, nous observons que la chaîne de polysiloxanes “en peigne” conserve une conformation de type oblate en phase smectique A lorsqu'on diminue le nombre de mésogènes par unité répétée. Ce comportement est différent de celui des polymères “en haltère” puisqu'à taux de mésogènes équivalent, ces derniers perdent toute anisotropie. Enfin, nous montrons pour la première fois l'existence d'une anisotropie de type oblate en phase smectique B.

  16. Interferometric method for phase calibration in liquid crystal spatial light modulators using a self-generated diffraction-grating.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, José Luis Martínez; Fernández, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2016-06-27

    An auto-referenced interferometric method for calibrating phase modulation of parallel-aligned liquid crystal (PAL) spatial light modulators (SLM) is described. The method is experimentally straightforward, robust, and requires solely of a collimated beam, with no need of additional optics. This method uses the SLM itself to create a tilted plane wave and a reference wave which mutually interfere. These waves are codified by means of a binary diffraction grating and a uniformly distributed gray level area (piston) into the SLM surface. Phase shift for each gray level addressed to the piston section can then be evaluated. Phase modulation on the SLM can also be retrieved with the proposed method over spatially resolved portions of the surface. Phase information obtained with this novel method is compared to other well established calibration procedures, requiring extra elements and more elaborated optical set-ups. The results show a good agreement with previous methods. The advantages of the new method include high mechanical stability, faster performance, and a significantly easier practical implementation.

  17. Phase transition analysis of V-shaped liquid crystal: Combined temperature-dependent FTIR and density functional theory approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swapnil; Singh, Harshita; Karthick, T; Tandon, Poonam; Prasad, Veena

    2018-01-05

    Temperature-dependent Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) combined with density functional theory (DFT) is employed to study the mechanism of phase transitions of V-shaped bent-core liquid crystal. Since it has a large number of flexible bonds, one-dimensional potential energy scan (PES) was performed on the flexible bonds and predicted the most stable conformer I. A detailed analysis of vibrational normal modes of conformer I have been done on the basis of potential energy distribution. The good agreement between the calculated spectrum of conformer I and observed FTIR spectrum at room temperature validates our theoretical structure model. Furthermore, the prominent changes observed in the stretching vibrational bands of CH3/CH2, CO, ring CC, ring CO, ring CH in-plane bending, and ring CH out-of-plane bending at Iso→nematic phase transition (at 155°C) have been illustrated. However, the minor changes in the spectral features observed for the other phase transitions might be due to the shape or bulkiness of molecules. Combined FTIR and PES study beautifully explained the dynamics of the molecules, molecular realignment, H-bonding, and conformational changes at the phase transitions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Uniaxial and Biaxial Phases of Thermotropic Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-04-29

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  19. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Thermotropic Uniaxial and Biaxial Nematic Liquid Crystal Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-08-27

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  20. Formation and characterization of phospholipid monolayers spontaneously assembled at interfaces between aqueous phases and thermotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brake, Jeffrey M; Daschner, Maren K; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2005-03-15

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of the self-assembly of phospholipids (l-alpha-phosphatidylcholine-beta-oleoyl-gamma-palmitoyl (l-POPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and l-alpha-dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (l-DLPC)) at interfaces between aqueous phases and the nematic liquid crystal (LC) 4'-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl. Stable planar interfaces between the aqueous phases and LCs were created by hosting the LCs within gold grids (square pores with widths of 283 microm and depths of 20 microm). At these interfaces, the presence and lateral organization of the phospholipids leads to interface-driven orientational transitions within the LC. By doping the phospholipids with a fluorescently labeled lipid (Texas Red-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (TR-DPPE)), quantitative epifluorescence microscopy revealed the saturation coverage of phospholipid at the interface to be that of a monolayer with an areal density of approximately 49 +/- 8% relative to hydrated lipid bilayers. By adsorbing phospholipids to the aqueous-LC interface from either vesicles or mixed micelles of dodecyltrimethylammonium and phospholipid, control of the areal density of phospholipid from 42 +/- 10 to 102 +/-18% of saturation monolayer coverage was demonstrated. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments performed by using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) revealed the lateral mobility of fluorescently labeled DPPE in l-DLPC assembled at the interface with the liquid crystal to be (6 +/- 1) x 10(-12) m(2)/s for densely packed monolayers. Variation of the surface coverage and composition of phospholipid led to changes in lateral diffusivity between (0.2 +/- 0.1) x 10(-12) and (15 +/- 2) x 10(-12) m(2)/s. We also observed the phospholipid-laden interface to be compartmentalized by the gold grid, thus allowing for the creation of patterned arrays of phospholipids at the LC-aqueous interface.

  1. Living Liquid Crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-28

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic par­ticles, often termed •active fluid,• has attracted enormous atten­tion in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here,we introduce a class of active matter-living liquid crystals (UCs}­ that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingre­dients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena. caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence­ enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers­ thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications.

  2. Liquid-crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Harry; Morris, Stephen

    2010-10-01

    Liquid-crystal lasers are a burgeoning area in the field of soft-matter photonics that may herald a new era of ultrathin, highly versatile laser sources. Such lasers encompass a multitude of remarkable features, including wideband tunability, large coherence area and, in some cases, multidirectional emission. They have the potential to combine large output powers with miniature cavity dimensions - two properties that have traditionally been incompatible. Their potential applications are diverse, ranging from miniature medical diagnostic tools to large-area holographic laser displays. Here we discuss the scientific origins of this technology and give a brief synopsis of the cutting-edge research currently being carried out worldwide.

  3. Adaptive liquid crystal iris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zuowei; Ren, Hongwen; Nah, Changwoon

    2014-09-01

    We report an adaptive iris using a twisted nematic liquid crystal (TNLC) and a hole-patterned electrode. When an external voltage is applied to the TNLC, the directors of the LC near the edge of the hole are unwound first. Increasing the voltage can continuously unwind the LC toward the center. When the TNLC is sandwiched between two polarizers, it exhibits an iris-like character. Either a normal mode or a reverse mode can be obtained depending on the orientations of the transmission axes of the two polarizers. In contrast to liquid irises, the aperture of the LC iris can be closed completely. Moreover, it has the advantages of large variability of the aperture diameter, good stability, and low power consumption. Applications of the device for controlling the laser energy and correcting optical aberration are foreseeable.

  4. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Extreme Nonlinear Optics With Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-31

    Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals,” Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 446: 233...Mallouk, “ Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals,” Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst...Williams, B. Lewis and T. Mallouk, “Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic

  6. Liquid crystals for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniewicz, A.; Gniewek, A.; Parka, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe application of liquid crystals in optical imaging and processing. Electrically and optically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulators are key elements in real-time holographic devices. Their implementation for beam steering and hologram formation is briefly discussed. The Joint Fourier transform optical correlator for pattern recognition is presented as well as the use of liquid crystals for the adaptive optics purposes is discussed.

  7. Photorefractive effect in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takeo; Naka, Yumiko

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we review recent progress of research on the photorefractive effect of ferroelectric liquid crystals. The photorefractive effect is a phenomenon that forms a dynamic hologram in a material. The interference of two laser beams in a photorefractive material establishes a refractive index grating. This phenomenon is applicable to a wide range of devices related to diffraction optics including 3D displays, optical amplification, optical tomography, novelty filters, and phase conjugate wave generators. Ferroelectric liquid crystals are considered as a candidate for practical photorefractive materials. A refractive index grating formation time of 8-10 ms and a large gain coefficient are easily obtained in photorefractive ferroelectric liquid crystals.

  8. Presmectic wetting and supercritical-like phase behavior of octylcyanobiphenyl liquid crystal confined to controlled-pore glass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Cordoyiannis, George; Zidanšek, Aleksander; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Amenitsch, Heinz; Žumer, Slobodan; Kutnjak, Zdravko

    2007-10-01

    The influence of controlled-pore glass (CPG) confinement on the phase behavior of octylcyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC) is studied by means of x-ray scattering and high precision calorimetry. For CPG samples with pore diameter 2R>24nm, the smectic order parameter temperature dependence η(T ) reveals apparent presmectic ordering far above the bulk smectic A-nematic (SmA-N) phase transition for both nontreated and silane-treated CPG matrices. The behavior of η(T ) is qualitatively similar in all samples, well obeying the mean field approach (MFA) in which the surface wetting tendency plays the dominant role. In contrast, the critical fluctuations remain important in the specific heat data, which cannot be described within the MFA. We show experimentally that randomness and surface wetting become dominant over finite-size effects for 2R≲10nm, in agreement with theoretical analysis. In nontreated samples, the noncritical character of the static disorder and the interfacial LC-CPG coupling almost completely suppress the quasi-SmA-N and nematic-isotropic phase transitions at 2R˜15.1 and ˜7.5nm, respectively.

  9. Stimuli-responsive photoluminescent liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Shogo; Tanabe, Kana; Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Kato, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    We describe mechanochromic and thermochromic photoluminescent liquid crystals. In particular, mechanochromic photoluminescent liquid crystals found recently, which are new stimuli-responsive materials are reported. For example, photoluminescent liquid crystals having bulky dendritic moieties with long alkyl chains change their photoluminescent colors by mechanical stimuli associated with isothermal phase transitions. The photoluminescent properties of molecular assemblies depend on their assembled structures. Therefore, controlling the structures of molecular assemblies with external stimuli leads to the development of stimuli-responsive luminescent materials. Mechanochromic photoluminescent properties are also observed for a photoluminescent metallomesogen and a liquid-crystalline polymer. We also show thermochromic photoluminescent liquid crystals based on origo-(p-phenylenevinylene) and anthracene moieties and a thermochromic photoluminescent metallocomplex.

  10. Spreading of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulard, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    A cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal drop in the nematic phase should spread on a silicon wafer. In fact, the drop hardly spreads due to the strong antagonist anchoring on the substrate and at the free surface. In a humidity controlled box at high RH and on a hydrophilic substrate, the friction is considerably reduced and the drop spreads easily. A well defined instability develops at the contact line, with two characteristic wavelengths, associated with a modulation of the drop thickness. A theoretical analysis, made by M. Ben Amar and L. Cummings, allows to understand one of the wavelength by an elastic approach and gives a wavelength proportionnal to the local drop's thickness.

  11. Investigations into complex liquid crystal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Jennifer

    Liquid crystal phases exhibit physical characteristics that lie between those of liquid and crystal phases. The many liquid crystal sub-phases are defined based on the degree of positional and orientational ordering the molecules have and the materials that make up these liquid crystal phases. This thesis presents a study of the molecular packing and physical properties of complex liquid crystal phases using dopants to better examine the stability and packing mechanisms of these phases. It also looks at the dispersion of quantum dots in liquid crystal materials, examining the electro-optical properties of the mixtures. The main goal of this thesis is to examine the effects of dopants on the properties of liquid crystal phases using optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, electro-optical measurements, and X-ray scattering. For those mixtures with quantum dots fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence measurements were also conducted. Rod-like liquid crystals are commonly used in display applications when the material is in a nematic liquid crystal phase, which is the least ordered phase exhibiting no positional ordering. The more complicated chiral smectic liquid crystal phases, which have a one dimensional layer structure, show potential for faster and tri-stable switching. A chiral rod-like liquid crystal material is doped with both chiral and achiral rod-like liquid crystals to examine the stability of one of the chiral smectic sub-phase, the SmC* FI1 phase. This phase consists of tilted molecules rotating about the cone defined by the tilt angle with a periodicity of three layers and an overall helical structure. The SmC*FI1 phase is stabilized by the competition between antiferroelectric and ferroelectric interactions, and small amounts of the achiral dopant broadens the range of this phase by almost 5°C. Higher dopant concentrations of the achiral material result in the destabilization of not just the SmC*FI1 phase but all tilted sub-phases

  12. Phase equilibria, fluid structure, and diffusivity of a discotic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Cienega-Cacerez, Octavio; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Sambriski, Edward John

    2014-05-14

    Molecular Dynamics simulations were performed for the Gay-Berne discotic fluid parameterized by GB(0.345, 0.2, 1.0, 2.0). The volumetric phase diagram exhibits isotropic (IL), nematic (ND), and two columnar phases characterized by radial distribution functions: the transversal fluid structure varies between a hexagonal columnar (CD) phase (at higher temperatures and pressures) and a rectangular columnar (CO) phase (at lower temperatures and pressures). The slab-wise analysis of fluid dynamics suggests the formation of grain-boundary defects in the CO phase. Longitudinal fluid structure is highly periodic with narrow peaks for the CO phase, suggestive of a near-crystalline (yet diffusive) system, but is only short-ranged for the CD phase. The IL phase does not exhibit anisotropic diffusion. Transversal diffusion is more favorable in the ND phase at all times, but only favorable at short times for the columnar phases. In the columnar phases, a crossover occurs where longitudinal diffusion is favored over transversal diffusion at intermediate-to-long timescales. The anomalous diffusivity is pronounced in both columnar phases, with three identifiable contributions: (a) the rattling of discogens within a transient "interdigitation" cage, (b) the hopping of discogens across columns, and (c) the drifting motion of discogens along the orientation of the director.

  13. A novel IMSL tunable phase shifter for HMSIW-LWA-fed rectangular patches based on nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, JiaHui; Raheem, Odai H.

    2017-07-01

    A novel IMSL tunable phase shifter for HMSIW-LWA-fed rectangular patches based on liquid crystal technology is proposed. Rectangular patches are used as radiators for the opening sidewall of the waveguide and matched section part for a unit cell. The transition structure is added for enhancing the efficiency of HMSIW-LWA due to converting most input power to the leaky mode. The novel IMSL phase shifter is used for investigating the tunable dielectric characteristics of N-LC by applying an electric field to the LC cell, which is controlled by the orientation angle of the LC molecules. Theoretically, the orientation angle is derived and solved numerically with the accurate method. As a result, the HMSIW-LWA can be tuned up to ± 25° for a fixed frequency by tuning the nematic LC with applied voltage from 0 to 20 V. In addition, the realized gain changed from 6 to 9.4 dB for a fixed tuned frequency, and 46° steerable for rest main beams range of the HMSIW-LWA in both forward and backward directions.

  14. Encapsulated liquid crystals as probes for remote thermometry.

    PubMed

    Franklin, K J; Buist, R J; den Hartog, J; McRae, G A; Spencer, D P

    1992-01-01

    A temperature probe based on the magnetic resonance properties of an encapsulated liquid crystal has been investigated. Large changes in magnetic resonance signals occur as the liquid crystal undergoes a phase transition from an anisotropic (nematic) state to the isotropic liquid. The low latent heat of such phase transitions allows for rapid phase changes during a hyperthermia treatment. Transition temperatures can be tailored by adding suitable compounds such as analogues of the liquid crystal or various solvents. Encapsulation is required to maintain the integrity of the liquid crystal, particularly for applications in vivo. Results of preliminary studies designed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the concept are presented.

  15. A decoupled energy stable scheme for a hydrodynamic phase-field model of mixtures of nematic liquid crystals and viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jia; Yang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Jie; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    We develop a linear, first-order, decoupled, energy-stable scheme for a binary hydrodynamic phase field model of mixtures of nematic liquid crystals and viscous fluids that satisfies an energy dissipation law. We show that the semi-discrete scheme in time satisfies an analogous, semi-discrete energy-dissipation law for any time-step and is therefore unconditionally stable. We then discretize the spatial operators in the scheme by a finite-difference method and implement the fully discrete scheme in a simplified version using CUDA on GPUs in 3 dimensions in space and time. Two numerical examples for rupture of nematic liquid crystal filaments immersed in a viscous fluid matrix are given, illustrating the effectiveness of this new scheme in resolving complex interfacial phenomena in free surface flows of nematic liquid crystals.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of alinement induced by magnetic fields in two smectic-A liquid crystals not exhibiting nematic phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Gelerinter, E.

    1972-01-01

    Using vanadyl acetylacetonate (VAAC) as a paramagnetic probe, the molecular ordering in two smectic-A liquid crystals that do not display nematic phases were studied. Reproducible alinement was attained by slow cooling throughout the isotropic smectic-A transition in dc magnetic fields of 1.1 and 2.15 teslas. The degree of order attained is small for a smectic-A liquid crystal. Measurements were made of the variation of the average hyperfine splitting of the alined samples as a function of orientation relative to the dc magnetic field of the spectrometer. This functional dependence is in agreement with the theoretical prediction except where the viscosity of the liquid crystal becomes large enough to slow the tumbling of the VAAC, as indicated by asymmetry in the end lines of the spectrum.

  17. Multi-phase modulation for nematic liquid crystal on silicon backplane spatial light modulators using pulse-width modulation driving scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongmin; Gourlay, James; Hossack, William J.; Underwood, Ian; Walton, Anthony J.

    2004-06-01

    In phase modulating diffractive optical devices multi-phase modulation provides improved performance over binary modulation. Multi-phase modulation can be achieved by using nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulators (NLCSLM) with pulse-width modulation driven from a binary CMOS backplane. This paper presents the characteristics and the driving scheme of the 512 × 512 Si-backplane SLM for the implementation of the multi-phase modulation while comparing the binary and four-level phase holograms. Diffraction efficiency of 39.7% for binary grating and 72.9% for four-level blazed grating were obtained at the spatial frequency 1.56 lines/mm.

  18. Transitions between paraelectric and ferroelectric phases of bent-core smectic liquid crystals in the bulk and in thin freely suspended films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Alexey; Floegel, Martin; Kornek, Ulrike; Stern, Stephan; Stannarius, Ralf; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang; Zhu, Chenhui; Shen, Yongqiang; Park, Cheol Soo; Maclennan, Joseph; Clark, Noel

    2012-11-01

    We report on the contrasting phase behavior of a bent-core liquid crystal with a large opening angle between the mesogenic units in the bulk and in freely suspended films. Second-harmonic generation experiments and direct observation of director inversion walls in films in an applied electric field reveal that the nonpolar smectic C phase observed in bulk samples becomes a ferroelectric “banana” phase in films, showing that a mesogen with a small steric moment can give a phase with polar order in freely suspended films even when the corresponding bulk phase is paraelectric.

  19. Using Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulators for Closed Loop Tracking and Beam Steering With Phase Holograpy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Functional block diagram of iterative phase retreval algorithm 18 3.1. Twyman Green Interferometer used for SLM Calibration . . . . 22 3.2...Calibration fringes created from Twyman Green Interferometer 24 3.3. Phase Delay vs Gray Values for 7µm pitch SLM . . . . . . . . 25 3.4. Phase Delay vs Gray...LabVIEW Available Yes No 21 Figure 3.1: Twyman Green Interferometer used for SLM Calibration to run the SLM does not support continuous downloads of

  20. Rarely Observed Phase Transitions in a Novel Lyotropic Liquid Crystal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaras, J.; Donaberger, R. L.; Swainson, I. P.; Tennant, D. C.; Tun, Z.; Vold, R. R.; Prosser, R. S.

    1997-02-01

    This Letter presents neutron diffraction data from a novel, biologically relevant, lyotropic membrane system which is highly alignable ( <=1.0° mosaic) in a magnetic field and gives rise to a number of well-defined Bragg reflections. The system, composed of two different phosphorylcholine lipids, undergoes a rare nematic --> smectic phase transition upon doping the system with paramagnetic ions (e.g., 2.7 wt % Tm3+). In addition, the isotropic phase occurs at a lower temperature than the smectic phase, in contrast to other lyotropic systems and in contrast to the phase behavior predicted by the McMillan model [Phys. Rev. A 4, 1238 (1971)] of smectic ordering.

  1. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  2. Computational Model for Liquid Phase Electro-Epitaxial Crystal Growth on Partially Masked Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenner, Mikhail; Braun, Richard J.

    2003-03-01

    A computational model for semiconductor crystal growth on a partially masked substrate under simplified LPEE conditions is developed. The model assumes isothermal diffusional growth from molten metal solution, which is enhanced by applied DC current through crystal/melt interface. Finite-difference, front-tracking method is used to numerically evolve the interface according to the set of governing partial differential equations and boundary conditions. Computed examples show strong influence of the electromigration on growth rates in vertical and lateral directions and the dependence of growth on electrical conductivities of substrate and mask materials as well as on wetting contact angle. The study presented is the first attempt to model LPEE growth on patterned substrates commonly employed in semiconductor industry.

  3. Thermal and structural study of the crystal phases and mesophases in the lithium and thallium(i) propanoates and pentanoates binary systems: formation of mixed salts and stabilization of the ionic liquid crystal phase.

    PubMed

    Martínez Casado, F J; Ramos Riesco, M; da Silva, I; Labrador, A; Redondo, M I; García Pérez, M V; López-Andrés, S; Rodríguez Cheda, J A

    2010-08-12

    The temperature and enthalpy vs composition phase diagrams of the binary systems [xC(2)H(5)CO(2)Li + (1 - x)C(2)H(5)CO(2)Tl], and [x(n-C(4)H(9)CO(2)Li) + (1 - x)n-C(4)H(9)CO(2)Tl], where x is the mole fraction, were determined by DSC. Both binary systems display the formation of one 2:1 mixed salt each (at x = 0.667) that appear as a peritectic (incongruent melting) at T(fus) = 512.0 K, and T(fus) = 461.1 K, with Delta(fus)H(m) = 13.76 and 8.08 kJ.mol(-1) for Li-Tl (I) propanoates, and n-pentanoate mixed salts, respectively. The thermotropic liquid crystal of the thallium(I) n-pentanoate transforms into a more stable liquid-crystal phase, which appears in the phase diagram between 380 and 488 K and for x = 0 up to x = 0.56. The crystal structure of thallium(I) propanoate and of the two mixed salts were obtained via X-ray synchrotron radiation diffraction measurements. These compounds present a bilayered structure similar to the two pure lithium salts previously found by our group.

  4. Large-angle and high-efficiency tunable phase grating using fringe field switching liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Daming; Tan, Guanjun; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-05-04

    We propose a switchable phase grating using fringe field switching (FFS) cells. The FFS phase grating possesses several attractive features: large diffraction angle, high diffraction efficiency, fast response time, and high contrast ratio. It can diffract >32% light to ± 2nd orders with a large diffraction angle of 12.1°. Meanwhile, its response time remains relatively fast even at -40°C. A simulation model is developed to explain the experimental results and good agreement is obtained. We also demonstrate a blazed phase grating to achieve tunable beam steering between 0th, 1st and 2nd orders.

  5. On the nature of the de Vries smectic-A liquid crystal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclennan, Joseph; Zhu, Chenhui; Shen, Yongqiang; Shao, Renfan; Glaser, Matthew; Clark, Noel; Walba, David; Korblova, Eva; Moran, Mark; Yang, Hong; Wang, Lixing; Pindak, Ron; Lemieux, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Recently a new model for the de Vries SmA (``sugar cone' model) has been proposed.footnotetextS. T. Lagerwall, P. Rudquist, F. Giesselmann, ``The orientational order in so-called de Vries materials'', Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 510, 1282 (2009). We present results from three different x-ray diffraction experiments designed to explore the nature of the de Vries smectic-A phase: (1) comparison of the first- and second-order smectic Bragg reflections across the smectic-A-smectic-C phase transition; (2) resonant scattering to probe anticlinic correlations in the de Vries smectic-A phase, and (3) measurements of the variation of layer spacing in the de Vries SmA and SmC phases with applied electric field. These experiments may help distinguish the well-known ``hollow cone'' modelfootnotetextA. de Vries, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 41, 27 (1977). from the ``sugar cone'' model.

  6. Optimize the modulation response of twisted-nematic liquid crystal displays as pure phase spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Baiheng; Peng, Fei; Kang, Mingwu; Zhou, Jiawu

    2014-11-01

    Twisted-nematic liquid crystal displays (TN-LCD) are widely used in numerous research fields of optics working as spatial light modulators. Approaches to obtaining desired intensity or phase modulation by TN-LCD have been extensively studied based on the knowledge of TN-LCD's internal structure parameters, e.g., the orientation of LC molecules at the surfaces, the twist angle, the thickness of the LC layer, and the birefringence of the material. Generally TN-LCD placed between two linear polarizers (P) produces coupled intensity and phase modulation. To obtain the commonly used pure phase modulation, quarter wave plates (QWP) are often used in front of and/or behind the LCD. In this paper, we present a method to optimize the optical modulation properties of the TN-LCD to obtain pure phase modulation in the configuration of P-QWP-LCD-QWP-P each with proper orientation. Firstly an improved method for determining the Jones matrix of the TN-LCD without knowing its internal parameters is presented, which is based on the macroscopical Jones matrix descriptions for TN-LCD, linear polarizer and QWP. Only three sets of intensity measurements are needed for the complete determination of the TN-LCD's Jones matrix for a single wavelength. Then Jones matrix calculations are carried out to determine the orientations of the polarizers and QWPs for pure phase modulation response. In addition, we prove that the phase modulation depth (PMD) of the TN-LCD can be further increased provided that the mean intensity transmission is decreased to a lower level, which is very useful when the TN-LCD is used as a phase modulator and the ratio between the intensities of the desired diffracted order relative to the other diffracted orders is required higher. Experimental results coincide well with the optical modulation properties of the TN-LCD predicted by our determined Jones matrix. In contrast to the traditional method which requires knowledge of the TN-LCD's internal structure parameters

  7. Charge transfer reactions in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. |; Galili, T.; Levanon, H.

    1998-07-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption studies of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination were carried out on a molecule consisting of a 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide donor (PNI) covalently attached to a pyromellitimide acceptor (PI) dissolved in the liquid crystal 4{prime}-(n-pentyl)-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The temperature dependencies of the charge separation and recombination rates were obtained at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of 5CB, where ordered microdomains exist and scattering of visible light by these domains is absent. The authors show that excited state charge separation is dominated by molecular reorientation of 5CB perpendicular to the director within the liquid crystal microdomains. They also show that charge recombination is adiabatic and is controlled by the comparatively slow collective reorientation of the liquid crystal microdomains relative to the orientation of PNI{sup +}-PI{sup {minus}}. They also report the results of time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) studies of photoinduced charge separation in a series of supramolecular compounds dissolved in oriented liquid crystal solvents. These studies permit the determination of the radical pair energy levels as the solvent reorganization energy increases from the low temperature crystalline phase, through the soft glass phase, to the nematic phase of the liquid crystal.

  8. The Effect of Length on the Phase Behavior of Colloidal Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraden, Seth

    2003-03-01

    We have genetically engineered the filamentous virus fd to create a homologous series of rod-like particles that vary in contour length (L) from 0.4 to 1.4 microns. All particles have the same diameter (D) and because the protein virus coat is identical for each mutant we assume the persistence length (P = 2.2 microns) is constant. Thus we have a system in which we vary P/L and L/D. We observe the following phase sequence as a function of increasing concentration: Isotropic, Cholesteric, and Smectic A. We have measured the phase diagram as a function of ionic strength for each mutant and have compared our measurements with theories of each of these phases. While good agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the isotropic - cholesteric phase transtion, there are descrepancies between experiment and theory for the smectic phase as a function of P/L and for the length dependence of the pitch of the cholesteric phase.

  9. Sliding Luttinger liquid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Kane, C. L.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2001-07-01

    We study systems of coupled spin-gapped and gapless Luttinger liquids. First, we establish the existence of a sliding Luttinger liquid phase for a system of weakly coupled parallel quantum wires, with and without disorder. It is shown that the coupling can stabilize a Luttinger liquid phase in the presence of disorder. We then extend our analysis to a system of crossed Luttinger liquids and establish the stability of a non-Fermi-liquid state: the crossed sliding Luttinger liquid phase. In this phase the system exhibits a finite-temperature, long-wavelength, isotropic electric conductivity that diverges as a power law in temperature T as T-->0. This two-dimensional system has many properties of a true isotropic Luttinger liquid, though at zero temperature it becomes anisotropic. An extension of this model to a three-dimensional stack exhibits a much higher in-plane conductivity than the conductivity in a perpendicular direction.

  10. Gravitational symmetry breaking leads to a polar liquid crystal phase of microtubules in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, J A; Sataric, M V; Portet, S; Dixon, J M

    2005-12-01

    Recent space-flight experiments performed by Tabony's team provided further evidence that a microgravity environment strongly affects the spatio-temporal organization of microtubule assemblies. Characteristic time and length scales were found that govern the organization of oriented bundles under Earth's gravitational field (GF). No such organization has been observed in a microgravity environment. This paper discusses physical mechanisms resulting in pattern formation under gravity and its disappearance in microgravity. The subtle interplay between chemical kinetics, diffusion, gravitational drift, thermal fluctuations, electrostatic interactions and liquid crystalline characteristics provides a plausible scenario.

  11. Nanostructuring lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Tod L.

    Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals (LCLCs) are an interesting and little known family of liquid crystals. Although materials such as Disodium Cromoglycate have been studied in depth for their phase behavior for use as antiasthmatic drugs, practical applications had yet to emerge. The focus of this work was to provide new applications for LCLC materials. The three most important results are: the uniform alignment of dried LCLC films, a new type of Langmuir Blodgett molecular monolayer or stack of molecular monolayers with long-range in-plane orientational order, and the use of LCLCs as an amplifying medium of antibody-antigen binding for the purpose of biodetection. To uniformly align LCLC materials, a diblock copolymer additive was used to reduce or eliminate tiger-stripe defects in the films. Uniformly aligned LCLC films can be useful as polarizing, compensating, or alignment layers in liquid crystal displays. In-plane oriented molecular monolayers were created using the method electrostatic self assembled monolayers and allowed for interesting experiments such as imaging individual LCLC aggregates via Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Controlling the in-plane long-range ordering one monolayer at a time allows for the creation of novel integrated optical systems. Finally, LCLCs are biocompatible and can be used to detect specific antibody-antigen binding events through the formation of immune complexes. Once the immune complex becomes larger than a critical size (determined by the elastic and surface properties of the LCLC-immune complex), the LCLC becomes distorted around the complex and can be optically detected.

  12. Geometrical aspects of the frustration in the cubic phases of lyotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D M; Gruner, S M; Leibler, S

    1988-01-01

    Bicontinuous cubic phases, composed of bilayers arranged in the geometries of periodic minimal surfaces, are found in a variety of different lipid/water systems. It has been suggested recently that these cubic structures arrive as the result of competition between two free-energy terms: the curvature energy of each monolayer and the stretching energy of the lipid chains. This scenario, closely analogous to the one that explains the origin of the hexagonal phases, is investigated here by means of simple geometrical calculations. It is first assumed that the lipid bilayer is of constant thickness and the distribution of the (local) mean curvature of the phospholipid-water interfaces is calculated. Then, assuming the mean curvature of these interfaces is constant, the distribution of the bilayer's thickness is calculated. Both calculations quantify the fact that the two energy terms are frustrated and cannot be satisfied simultaneously. However, the amount of the frustration can be smaller for the cubic phase than for the lamellar and hexagonal structures. Therefore, this phase can appear in the phase diagram between the other two, as observed in many recent experiments. PMID:3399497

  13. Models for a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Giovambattista, N.; Malescio, G.; Sadr-Lahijany, M. R.; Scala, A.; Skibinsky, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study two- and three-dimensional models with the isotropic double-step potential which in addition to the hard core has a repulsive soft core of larger radius. Our results indicate that the presence of two characteristic repulsive distances (hard core and soft core) is sufficient to explain liquid anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition, but these two phenomena may occur independently. Thus liquid-liquid transitions may exist in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly. For 2D, we propose a model with a specific set of hard core and soft core parameters, that qualitatively reproduces the phase diagram and anomalies of liquid water. We identify two solid phases: a square crystal (high density phase), and a triangular crystal (low density phase) and discuss the relation between the anomalies of liquid and the polymorphism of the solid. Similarly to real water, our 2D system may have the second critical point in the metastable liquid phase beyond the freezing line. In 3D, we find several sets of parameters for which two fluid-fluid phase transition lines exist: the first line between gas and liquid and the second line between high-density liquid (HDL) and low-density liquid (LDL). In all cases, the LDL phase shows no density anomaly in 3D. We relate the absence of the density anomaly with the positive slope of the LDL-HDL phase transition line.

  14. Vortex beam generation and other advanced optics experiments reproduced with a twisted-nematic liquid-crystal display with limited phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofré, Aaron; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Vargas, Asticio; Moreno, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    In this work we propose the use of twisted-nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulators (TN-LC-SLM) as a useful tool for training students in the manipulation of light beams with phase-only masks. In particular, we focus the work on the realization of phase-only gratings and phase-only spiral phases for the generation of vortex beams, beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). Despite the extensive activity in this field, its experimental implementation for educational purposes is limited because it requires the use of very expensive high-resolution liquid-crystal on silicon (LCOS) SLMs. Here, we show that a low-cost experimental implementation can be done with older TNLC technology. However, these devices, intended for display applications, exhibit rather limited optical phase modulation properties in comparison with modern LCOS devices, such as a very low range of phase modulation and a general coupled intensity modulation. However, we show that a precise characterization of their retardance parameters permits their operation in useful modulation configurations. As examples, we include one continuous phase-only configuration useful for reproducing the optimal triplicator phase grating, and a binary π-phase modulation. We include experiments with the realization of different phase diffraction gratings, and their combination with spiral phase patterns and lens functions to generate a variety of vortex beams.

  15. Ab-initio atomic level stresses in Cu-Zr crystal, liquid and glass phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Madhusudan; Nicholson, Don M.; Egami, Takeshi

    2013-03-01

    The Cu-Zr system provides interesting playground for the study of glass structure, stability, and formability and liquid dynamics. Glasses form over a wide range of concentrations while they compete against various intermetallic compounds. We have calculated from first-principles the atomic level stresses, a new tool to characterize materials, within the local approximation to Density Functional Theory (DFT) for Cu-Zr glasses and compounds from low temperature to 4500K. Comparisons between ordered crystalline compounds and liquids and glasses allow us to relate atomic level stress to relaxation of chemical short-range order and structural relaxation. The results are counter-intuitive at times; a smaller atom is under higher compressive pressure, whereas geometrically they should be under tension. Ab-initio calculations were done using Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) and Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) codes. The work at the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National laboratory was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  16. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-06-07

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency.

  17. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency.

  18. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency. PMID:24907992

  19. Smooth anti-reflective three-dimensional textures for liquid phase crystallized silicon thin-film solar cells on glass.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, David; Köppel, Grit; Jäger, Klaus; Chen, Duote; Shargaieva, Oleksandra; Sonntag, Paul; Amkreutz, Daniel; Rech, Bernd; Becker, Christiane

    2017-06-01

    Recently, liquid phase crystallization of thin silicon films has emerged as a candidate for thin-film photovoltaics. On 10 μm thin absorbers, wafer-equivalent morphologies and open-circuit voltages were reached, leading to 13.2% record efficiency. However, short-circuit current densities are still limited, mainly due to optical losses at the glass-silicon interface. While nano-structures at this interface have been shown to efficiently reduce reflection, up to now these textures caused a deterioration of electronic silicon material quality. Therefore, optical gains were mitigated due to recombination losses. Here, the SMooth Anti-Reflective Three-dimensional (SMART) texture is introduced to overcome this trade-off. By smoothing nanoimprinted SiO x nano-pillar arrays with spin-coated TiO x layers, light in-coupling into laser-crystallized silicon solar cells is significantly improved as successfully demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations and in experiment. At the same time, electronic silicon material quality is equivalent to that of planar references, allowing to reach V oc values above 630 mV. Furthermore, the short-circuit current density could be increased from 21.0 mA cm(-2) for planar reference cells to 24.5 mA cm(-2) on SMART textures, a relative increase of 18%. External quantum efficiency measurements yield an increase for wavelengths up to 700 nm compared to a state-of-the-art solar cell with 11.9% efficiency, corresponding to a j sc, EQE gain of 2.8 mA cm(-2).

  20. A model for the Pockels effect in distorted liquid crystal blue phases

    SciTech Connect

    Castles, F.

    2015-09-07

    Recent experiments have found that a mechanically distorted blue phase can exhibit a primary linear electro-optic (Pockels) effect [F. Castles et al., Nat. Mater. 13, 817 (2014)]. Here, it is shown that flexoelectricity can account for the experimental results and a model, which is based on continuum theory but takes into account the sub-unit-cell structure, is proposed. The model provides a quantitative description of the effect accurate to the nearest order of magnitude and predicts that the Pockels coefficient(s) in an optimally distorted blue phase may be two orders of magnitude larger than in lithium niobate.

  1. Optical simulation of in-plane-switching blue phase liquid crystal display using the finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hu; Ma, Hongmei; Sun, Yu-Bao

    2016-09-01

    The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the optical characteristics of an in-plane switching blue phase liquid crystal display. Compared with the matrix optic methods and the refractive method, the finite-difference time-domain method, which is used to directly solve Maxwell’s equations, can consider the lateral variation of the refractive index and obtain an accurate convergence effect. The simulation results show that e-rays and o-rays bend in different directions when the in-plane switching blue phase liquid crystal display is driven by the operating voltage. The finite-difference time-domain method should be used when the distribution of the liquid crystal in the liquid crystal display has a large lateral change. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304074, 61475042, and 11274088), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2015202320 and GCC2014048), and the Key Subject Construction Project of Hebei Province University, China.

  2. Pretransitional behavior above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of an auxetic trimer liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Kang, D; Mahajan, M P; Zhang, S; Petschek, R G; Rosenblatt, C; He, C; Liu, P; Griffin, A C

    1999-10-01

    Static light scattering and electric field-induced Kerr measurements were performed above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of a terminal-lateral-lateral-terminal negative Poisson ratio trimer. For both measurements the inverse susceptibility was observed to be nearly linear with temperature, a result inconsistent with our previously reported Kerr data [Phys. Rev. E 58, 2041 (1998)].

  3. Charge ordering induces a smectic phase in oblate ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Ganzenmüller, G C; Patey, G N

    2010-09-24

    We report a computer simulation study of an electroneutral mixture of oppositely charged oblate ellipsoids of revolution with aspect ratio A=1/3. In contrast with hard or soft repulsive ellipsoids, which are purely nematic, this system exhibits a smectic-A phase in which charges of equal sign are counterintuitively packed in layers perpendicular to the nematic director.

  4. A Dual Modulated Homochiral Helical Nanofilament Phase with Local Columnar Ordering Formed by Bent Core Liquid Crystals: Effects of Molecular Chirality.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Jákli, Antal; Hegmann, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    Helical nanofilament (HNF) phases form as a result of an intralayer mismatch between top and bottom molecular halves in bent-core liquid crystals (BC-LCs) that is relieved by local saddle-splay geometry. HNFs are immensely attractive for photovoltaic and chiral separation applications and as templates for the chiral spatial assembly of guest molecules. Here, the synthesis and characterization of two unichiral BC-LCs and one racemic mixture with tris-biphenyl-diester cores featuring chiral (R,R) and (S,S) or racemic 2-octyloxy aliphatic side chains are presented. In comparison to the achiral compound with linear side chains forming an intralayer modulated HNF phase (HNFmod ), synchrotron small angle X-ray diffraction indicates that the unichiral derivatives form a dual modulated HNF phase with intra- as well as interlayer modulations (HNFmod2 ) suggesting a columnar local structure of the nanofilaments. Transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry confirm that the unichiral materials exclusively form homochiral HNFs with a twist sense-matching secondary twist. A contact preparation provides the first example of two identical chiral liquid crystal phases only differing in their handedness that do not mix and form an achiral liquid crystal phase with an entirely different structure in the contact zone. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Induced Smectic X Phase Through Intermolecular Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystals Formed Between Citric Acid and p- n-(Octyloxy)Benzoic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, S.; Subhasri, P.; Rajasekaran, T. R.; Jayaprakasam, R.; Senthil, T. S.; Vijayakumar, V. N.

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (HBLC) is synthesized from citric acid (CA) and 4-(octyloxy)benzoic acid (8OBA) with different mole ratios. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirms the presence of hydrogen bond between CA and 8OBA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies validate the intermolecular complementary, cyclic type of hydrogen bond, and molecular environment in the designed HBLC complex. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the monoclinic nature of liquid crystal complex in solid phase. Liquid crystal parameters such as phase transition temperature and enthalpy values for the corresponding mesogenic phases are investigated using a polarizing optical microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is observed that the change in chain length and steric hindrance while increasing the mole ratio in HBLC complex induces a new smectic X (Sm X) along with higher-order smectic G (Sm G) phases by quenching of smectic C (Sm C). From the experimental observations, induced Sm X phase has been identified as a finger print texture. Also, Sm G is a multi-colored mosaic texture in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 mol ratios. The optical tilt angle, thermal stability factor, and enhanced thermal span width of CA + 8OBA complex are discussed.

  6. Pressure sensor using liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A pressure sensor includes a liquid crystal positioned between transparent, electrically conductive films (18 and 20), that are biased by a voltage (V) which induces an electric field (E) that causes the liquid crystal to assume a first state of orientation. Application of pressure (P) to a flexible, transparent film (24) causes the conductive film (20) to move closer to or farther from the conductive film (18), thereby causing a change in the electric field (E'(P)) which causes the liquid crystal to assume a second state of orientation. Polarized light (P.sub.1) is directed into the liquid crystal and transmitted or reflected to an analyzer (A or 30). Changes in the state of orientation of the liquid crystal induced by applied pressure (P) result in a different light intensity being detected at the analyzer (A or 30) as a function of the applied pressure (P). In particular embodiments, the liquid crystal is present as droplets (10) in a polymer matrix (12) or in cells (14) in a polymeric or dielectric grid (16) material in the form of a layer (13) between the electrically conductive films (18 and 20). The liquid crystal fills the open wells in the polymer matrix (12) or grid (16) only partially.

  7. Observation of photorefractive effects in blue-phase liquid crystal containing fullerene-C60.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Iam Choon; Chen, Chun-Wei; Ho, Tsung-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Photorefractive effects manifested in two beam coupling and side diffractions are observed in fullerene-C60 doped blue-phase liquid crystals (BPLC-C60) upon application of a DC bias field. The mechanism at work here is attributed to BPLC lattice distortion by the combined DC (Edc)+ photorefractive space-charge (Ephoto) fields, in addition to the DC + optical field induced effects reported in previous studies of dye-doped system. The first order diffraction efficiency of ∼2×10-3 and beam coupling gain of over 2% are observed in a 55 μm thick sample with input laser beam power of 5 mW at an applied DC voltage of 160 V. The effective nonlinear index coefficient n2 of BPLC-C60 is measured to be on the order of 10-2  cm2/W, which is slightly lower than their NLC counterparts. Owing to the isotropy of BPLC optical properties, these effects can be observed with more relaxed requirements on the laser polarizations, directions of incidence, and sample orientations.

  8. Polarization independent Fabry-Pérot filter based on polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals with fast response time.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Han; Wang, Chun-Ta; Yu, Chin-Ping; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2011-12-05

    This work demonstrates a polarization-independent electrically tunable Fabry-Pérot (FP) filter that is based on polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals (PSBPLCs). An external vertical electric field can be applied to modulate the effective refractive index of the PSBPLCs along the optical axis. Therefore, the wavelength-tuning property of the FP filter is completely independent of the polarization state of the incident light. The change in the birefringence in PSBPLCs is governed by Kerr effect-induced isotropic-to-anisotropic transition, and so the PSBPLCs based FP filter has a short response time. The measured tunability and free spectral range of the FP filter are 0.092 nm/ V and 16nm in the visible region, and 0.12nm/ V and 97nm in the NIR region, respectively, and the response time is in sub-millisecond range. The fast-responding polarization-independent electrically tunable FP filter has substantial potential for practical applications.

  9. Bichromatic coherent random lasing from dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals controlled by pump light polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mingchao; Shi, Li-Jie; Deng, Luogen; Yang, Huai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the bichromatic coherent random lasing actions from the dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals. Two groups of lasing peaks, of which the full widith at half maximum is about 0.3 nm, are clearly observed. The shorter- and longer-wavelength modes are associated with the excitation of the single laser dye (DCM) monomers and dimers respectively. The experimental results show that the competition between the two groups of the lasing peaks can be controlled by varying the polarization of the pump light. When the polarization of the pump light is rotated from 0° to 90°, the intensity of the shorter-wavelength lasing peak group reduces while the intensity of the longer-wavelength lasing peak group increases. In addition, a red shift of the longer-wavelength modes is also observed and the physical mechanisms behind the red-shift phenomenon are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474021 and 51333001), the Key Program for International S&T Cooperation Projects of China (Grant No. 2013DFB50340), the Issues of Priority Development Areas of the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120001130005), and the Key (Key Grant) Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 313002).

  10. Development of optical biosensor based on photonic crystal made of TiO2 using liquid phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Keigo; Aki, Shoma; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Endo, Tatsuro

    2016-08-01

    We fabricated a titanium dioxide (TiO2)-based photonic crystal (PhC) using liquid phase deposition (LPD) to develop highly sensitive optical biosensors. The optical characteristics of the PhCs in the visible region were sensitive to the change in the refractive index of the surrounding medium due to an antigen-antibody reaction; thus, applications using the optical biosensor are expected to be highly sensitive. However, a base material with a high refractive index is indispensable for the fabrication of the PhC. Here, TiO2, which has optical transparency in the visible region, was selected as the high refractive index base material. The present LPD method allowed fabrication using low-cost apparatus. Furthermore, the mild conditions of the LPD method led to formation of TiO2-based PhC with fewer crack structures. Finally, the anti-neuron-specific enolase antibody was immobilized onto the TiO2-based PhC surface, and 1-1000 ng/mL of the neuron-specific enolase antigen was successfully detected.

  11. Synthesis, structural and electrochemical characterization of benzimidazole compounds exhibiting a smectic C liquid crystal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bingzhuo; Tan, Shuai; Liang, Ting; Cao, Siyu; Wu, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Mesomorphic benzimidazole compounds were prepared from a biphenyl benzoate based precursor by substitution reaction of alkyl bromide with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole. Molecular structures of the benzimidazole compounds were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements and polarizing optical microscopic (POM) observations revealed that the benzimidazole compounds exhibited a thermotropic smectic C (SC) phase. Temperature dependent X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns suggested a tilted bilayer smectic structure in which intermolecular hydrogen bonds between benzimidazole moieties formed lamellar arrangement. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) characterization suggested that the SC phase favored anhydrous proton conduction of the benzimidazole compounds and the proton conductivities showed an Arrhenius temperature dependence.

  12. Dynamic Theory of Polydomain Liquid Crystal Elastomers.

    PubMed

    Duzgun, Ayhan; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2015-10-30

    When liquid crystal elastomers are prepared without any alignment, disordered polydomain structures emerge as the materials are cooled into the nematic phase. These polydomain structures are often attributed to quenched disorder in the cross-linked polymer network. As an alternative explanation, we develop a theory for the dynamics of the isotropic-nematic transition in liquid crystal elastomers, and show that the dynamics can induce a polydomain structure with a characteristic length scale, through a mechanism analogous to the Cahn-Hilliard equation for phase separation.

  13. Helical phase of chiral nematic liquid crystals as the Bianchi VII0 group manifold.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, G W; Warnick, C M

    2011-09-01

    We show that the optical structure of the helical phase of a chiral nematic is naturally associated with the Bianchi VII(0) group manifold, of which we give a full account. The Joets-Ribotta metric governing propagation of the extraordinary rays is invariant under the simply transitive action of the universal cover E(2) of the three-dimensional Euclidean group of two dimensions. Thus extraordinary light rays are geodesics of a left-invariant metric on this Bianchi type VII(0) group. We are able to solve, by separation of variables, both the wave equation and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for this metric. The former reduces to Mathieu's equation, and the latter to the quadrantal pendulum equation. We discuss Maxwell's equations for uniaxial optical materials where the configuration is invariant under a group action and develop a formalism to take advantage of these symmetries. The material is not assumed to be impedance matched, thus going beyond the usual scope of transformation optics. We show that for a chiral nematic in its helical phase Maxwell's equations reduce to a generalized Mathieu equation. Our results may also be relevant to helical phases of some magnetic materials and to light propagation in certain cosmological models.

  14. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  15. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  16. Biological liquid crystal elastomers.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, David P; Vollrath, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) have recently been described as a new class of matter. Here we review the evidence for the novel conclusion that the fibrillar collagens and the dragline silks of orb web spiders belong to this remarkable class of materials. Unlike conventional rubbers, LCEs are ordered, rather than disordered, at rest. The identification of these biopolymers as LCEs may have a predictive value. It may explain how collagens and spider dragline silks are assembled. It may provide a detailed explanation for their mechanical properties, accounting for the variation between different members of the collagen family and between the draglines in different spider species. It may provide a basis for the design of biomimetic collagen and dragline silk analogues by genetic engineering, peptide- or classical polymer synthesis. Biological LCEs may exhibit a range of exotic properties already identified in other members of this remarkable class of materials. In this paper, the possibility that other transversely banded fibrillar proteins are also LCEs is discussed. PMID:11911772

  17. Electric-field-induced switchable dark conglomerate phases in a bent-core liquid crystal exhibiting reverse columnar phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, G. B.; Radhika, S.; Sadashiva, B. K.; Pratibha, R.

    2013-06-01

    Electric-field-induced transitions into switchable dark conglomerate (DC) phases from two types of reverse columnar mesophases have been observed in the bent-core (BC) compound 2,7-naphthylene bis[4-(3-methyl-4-n-tetradecyloxybenzoyloxy)] benzoate. Optical and x-ray studies show that the higher temperature columnar phase corresponds to the orthogonal B1rev phase, whereas the lower temperature columnar phase is a variant of the B1revtilt phase. As the layer fragments in this phase are modulated in order to relieve the steric hindrance caused by an anticlinic tilting in adjacent blocks, it has been named B1revtiltM. The shape of the chiral domains are different in the DC phases viz. DC-B1rev and DC-B1revtiltM obtained by applying the electric field in the B1rev and B1revtiltM phases, respectively. While the chiral domains in the DC-B1rev phase appear similar to those observed in other DC phases, the shape of the domains in the DC-B1revtiltM phase appear to have some similarity to the domains in the banana leaf texture in the B1revtiltM phase implying that the detailed structure in this DC phase may be different. Optical observations, electro-optics, and dielectric studies show that the DC-B1rev and DC-B1revtiltM phases are both switchable and possess a local SmCSPF type of structure. As the temperature is decreased the switching behavior changes from ferroelectric to antiferroelectric. The temperature at which this changeover starts occurring coincides with the temperature at which the layer modulation occurs to overcome anticlinic tilt and the B1rev to B1revtiltM phase transition takes place without the application of the electric field. The change in switching behavior is attributed to a transformation into flat layers with the SmCAPA type of structure as also evidenced by the nucleation of bright regions alongside the chiral domains.

  18. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: I. Transitions in the one-phase liquid region.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    The phase field theory (PFT) has been applied to predict equilibrium interfacial properties and nucleation barrier in the binary eutectic system Ag-Cu using double well and interpolation functions deduced from a Ginzburg-Landau expansion that considers fcc (face centered cubic) crystal symmetries. The temperature and composition dependent free energies of the liquid and solid phases are taken from CALculation of PHAse Diagrams-type calculations. The model parameters of PFT are fixed so as to recover an interface thickness of approximately 1 nm from molecular dynamics simulations and the interfacial free energies from the experimental dihedral angles available for the pure components. A nontrivial temperature and composition dependence for the equilibrium interfacial free energy is observed. Mapping the possible nucleation pathways, we find that the Ag and Cu rich critical fluctuations compete against each other in the neighborhood of the eutectic composition. The Tolman length is positive and shows a maximum as a function of undercooling. The PFT predictions for the critical undercooling are found to be consistent with experimental results. These results support the view that heterogeneous nucleation took place in the undercooling experiments available at present. We also present calculations using the classical droplet model [classical nucleation theory (CNT)] and a phenomenological diffuse interface theory (DIT). While the predictions of the CNT with a purely entropic interfacial free energy underestimate the critical undercooling, the DIT results appear to be in a reasonable agreement with the PFT predictions.

  19. Solid microparticles in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muševič, Igor

    A brief historic overview of colloidal experiments in the 1990's is given in the introduction. These experiments have later inspired research on nematic colloids, after the technique of laser tweezers manipulation of particles was introduced to this field. Basic topological properties of colloidal inclusions in the nematic liquid crystals are discussed and the nematic-mediated forces between dipolar and quadrupolar colloidal particles in bulk nematic are explained. Structural and topological properties of 2D and 3D colloidal crystals and superstructures made of colloidal particles of different size and symmetry in bulk nematic liquid crystal are described. Laser-tweezer manipulation and rewiring of topological defect loops around colloidal particles is introduced. This results in the colloidal entanglement, as well as knotting and linking of defect loops of the order parameter field. Shape and size-dependent colloidal interactions in the nematic liquid crystals are reviewed. The chapter concludes with the discussion of bulk chiral nematic and blue phase colloids.

  20. Microfluidic flow of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Oliver; Marenduzzo, Davide; Henrich, Oliver

    2016-11-16

    We explore the rheology and flow-induced morphological changes of cholesteric liquid crystal patterns subject to Poiseuille flow within a slab geometry, and under different anchoring conditions at the wall. Our focus is particularly on the behaviour of "Cholesteric Fingers of the first kind" and of Blue Phase II. Depending on the applied pressure gradient, we observe a number of dynamic regimes with different rheological properties. Our results provide the first insight into the flow response of cholesteric phases with fully two- or three-dimensional director field patterns and normal and planar degenerate anchoring conditions as commonly realised in experiments. They are also of high relevance for a fundamental understanding of complex liquid crystals in confinement and an important step towards future microfluidic applications that are based on cholesteric liquid crystals.

  1. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-05-16

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material?

  2. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material? PMID:27196890

  3. Macroscopic description of the isotropic to antiferroelectric B2 phase transition in banana-shaped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prabir K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a mean-field description of the phase transitions, which are obtained when cooling from the isotropic liquid to the first liquid crystalline phase in compounds composed of achiral banana-shaped molecules. We put special emphasis on the isotropic to antiferroelectric B2 phase transition. The free energy is written in terms of the coupled order parameters including the antiferroelectric polarization. We present a detailed analysis of the different phases that can occur and analyze the question under which conditions a direct isotropic to antiferroelectric B2 phase transition is possible when compared with other phase transitions. The theoretical results are found to be in qualitative agreement with all published experimental results.

  4. Nanotube networks in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, Martin; Lagerwall, Jan Peter F.; Scalia, Giusy

    2016-03-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are very attractive hosts for the organization of anisotropic nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because of the macroscopic organization resulting in properties of nanoparticles manifest at a macroscopic scale. Different types of LCs have demonstrated the ability to organize nanotubes, showing the generality of the approach, i.e., that the liquid crystallinity per se is the driving factor for the organization. Compared to standard nanotube composites (e.g. with disordered polymer hosts) the introduction of carbon nanotubes into an LC allows not only the transfer of the outstanding CNT properties to the macroscopic phase, providing strength and conductivity, but these properties also become anisotropic, following the transfer of the orientational order from the LC to the CNTs. The LC molecular structure plays an important even if ancillary role since it enters in the surface interactions, fulfilling a mediating action between the particle and the bulk of the LC. Isolated nanotubes can be obtained by optimized dispersions at lower concentrations and this process requires the use or development of tailored strategies like using solvents or even another LC for pre-dispersing CNTs. Aggregates or networks can be observed in poor dispersions and at higher nanoparticle concentrations. In those, due to surface interactions, the LC behaviour can be strongly affected with changes in phase sequences or transition temperatures and the effect is expected to be more pronounced as the concentration of nanotubes increases. We present preliminary investigations and observations on nanotube - LC systems based on a smectic LC host.

  5. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of

  6. Liquid Crystals for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Mary; Kelly, Stephen M.

    As discussed in Chaps. 2 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-0_2), 3 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-3), 5 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-5) and 6 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-6), columnar, smectic and, more recently, nematic liquid crystals are widely recognized as very promising charge-transporting organic semiconductors due to their ability to spontaneously self-assemble into highly ordered domains in uniform thin films over large areas. This and their broad absorption spectra make them suitable as active materials for organic photovoltaic devices. In this chapter, we discuss the use of liquid crystals in such devices. Firstly, we examine the principle of power generation via the photovoltaic effect in organic materials and the various device configurations that can optimise efficiency. Then we discuss photovoltaic devices incorporating columnar liquid crystals combined with electron accepting materials based on either perylene or fullerene. The use of nematic and sanditic liquid crystals in photovoltaics is investigated as well as a novel solar cell concentrator incorporating liquid crystals. Finally, we analyse the benefits and limitations of liquid-crystal-based photovoltaics in the context of the state-of-the-art for organics photovoltaics.

  7. Tactoids of chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio-Betancur, Viviana; Villada-Gil, Stiven; Zhou, Ye; Armas-Pérez, Julio C.; de Pablo, Juan José; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan Pablo

    The phase diagram of chiral liquid crystals confined in ellipsoids is obtained, by following a theoretically informed Monte Carlo relaxation of the tensor alignment field Q. The free energy of the system is described by a functional in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. This study also includes the effect of anchoring strength, curvature, and chirality of the system. In the low chirality region of the phase diagram we found the twist bipolar (BS) phase and some cholesteric phases such as the radial spherical structure (RSS), twist cylinder (TC) and double twist cylinder (DTC) whose axis of rotation is not necessarily aligned with the major axis of the geometry. For high chirality scenarios, the disclination lines are twisted or bent near the surface preventing the formation of symmetric networks of defects, although an hexagonal pattern is formed on the surface which might serve as open sites for collocation of colloids. By analyzing the free energies of isochoric systems, prolate geometries tend to be more favorable for high chirality and low anchoring conditions. Universidad Nacional de Colombia Ph.D. grant and COLCIENCIAS under the Contract No. 110-165-843-748. CONACYT for Postdoctoral Fellowships Nos. 186166 and 203840.

  8. Effect of Molecular Flexibility on the Nematic-to-Isotropic Phase Transition for Highly Biaxial Molecular Non-Symmetric Liquid Crystal Dimers.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Nerea; López, David Orencio; Diez-Berart, Sergio; de la Fuente, María Rosario; Salud, Josep; Pérez-Jubindo, Miguel Angel; Ros, María Blanca

    2011-09-27

    In this work, a study of the nematic (N)-isotropic (I) phase transition has been made in a series of odd non-symmetric liquid crystal dimers, the α-(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yloxy)-ω-(1-pyrenimine-benzylidene-4'-oxy) alkanes, by means of accurate calorimetric and dielectric measurements. These materials are potential candidates to present the elusive biaxial nematic (NB) phase, as they exhibit both molecular biaxiality and flexibility. According to the theory, the uniaxial nematic (NU)-isotropic (I) phase transition is first-order in nature, whereas the NB-I phase transition is second-order. Thus, a fine analysis of the critical behavior of the N-I phase transition would allow us to determine the presence or not of the biaxial nematic phase and understand how the molecular biaxiality and flexibility of these compounds influences the critical behavior of the N-I phase transition.

  9. Effect of Molecular Flexibility on the Nematic-to-Isotropic Phase Transition for Highly Biaxial Molecular Non-Symmetric Liquid Crystal Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián, Nerea; López, David Orencio; Diez-Berart, Sergio; de la Fuente, María Rosario; Salud, Josep; Pérez-Jubindo, Miguel Angel; Ros, María Blanca

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a study of the nematic (N)–isotropic (I) phase transition has been made in a series of odd non-symmetric liquid crystal dimers, the α-(4-cyanobiphenyl-4’-yloxy)-ω-(1-pyrenimine-benzylidene-4’-oxy) alkanes, by means of accurate calorimetric and dielectric measurements. These materials are potential candidates to present the elusive biaxial nematic (NB) phase, as they exhibit both molecular biaxiality and flexibility. According to the theory, the uniaxial nematic (NU)–isotropic (I) phase transition is first-order in nature, whereas the NB–I phase transition is second-order. Thus, a fine analysis of the critical behavior of the N–I phase transition would allow us to determine the presence or not of the biaxial nematic phase and understand how the molecular biaxiality and flexibility of these compounds influences the critical behavior of the N–I phase transition. PMID:28824100

  10. Tetrahedral Order in Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R.

    2016-10-01

    We review the impact of tetrahedral order on the macroscopic dynamics of bent-core liquid crystals. We discuss tetrahedral order comparing with other types of orientational order, like nematic, polar nematic, polar smectic, and active polar order. In particular, we present hydrodynamic equations for phases, where only tetrahedral order exists or tetrahedral order is combined with nematic order. Among the latter, we discriminate between three cases, where the nematic director (a) orients along a fourfold, (b) along a threefold symmetry axis of the tetrahedral structure, or (c) is homogeneously uncorrelated with the tetrahedron. For the optically isotropic T d phase, which only has tetrahedral order, we focus on the coupling of flow with, e.g., temperature gradients and on the specific orientation behavior in external electric fields. For the transition to the nematic phase, electric fields lead to a temperature shift that is linear in the field strength. Electric fields induce nematic order, again linear in the field strength. If strong enough, electric fields can change the tetrahedral structure and symmetry leading to a polar phase. We briefly deal with the T phase that arises when tetrahedral order occurs in a system of chiral molecules. To case (a), defined above, belong (i) the non-polar, achiral, optically uniaxial D2d phase with ambidextrous helicity (due to a linear gradient free energy contribution) and with orientational frustration in external fields, (ii) the non-polar tetragonal S4 phase, (iii) the non-polar, orthorhombic D2 phase that is structurally chiral featuring ambidextrous chirality, (iv) the polar orthorhombic C2v phase, and (v) the polar, structurally chiral, monoclinic C2 phase. Case (b) results in a trigonal C3v phase that behaves like a biaxial polar nematic phase. An example for case (c) is a splay bend phase, where the ground state is inhomogeneous due to a linear gradient free energy contribution. Finally, we discuss some experiments

  11. Electronic liquid-crystal phases, symmetry breaking and Fermi-surface reconstruction in YBa2Cu3O6+x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkov, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    The physics of underdoped cuprates is governed by strong correlations and phase competition, and its understanding remains one of the challenges of condensed-matter research. Here we will discuss our systematic doping- and temperature-dependent neutron-scattering investigation of the spin correlations in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) in the context of various proposed symmetry-breaking phases. In YBCO6.45 (Tc=35 K), we observe the spontaneous onset of a one-dimensional, incommensurate (IC) modulation of the low-energy (<10 meV) spin excitations below T˜150 K, Hinkov et al., Science 319, 597 (2008). We interpret our finding as the occurrence of an electronic liquid-crystal phase breaking C4-symmetry, as predicted by Kivelson et al., Nature 393, 550 (1998). Below T˜30 K, we observe the onset of quasi-static spin-correlations with the same IC geometry as the low-energy spin excitations. Their intensity is doubled by the application of a magnetic field of 15 T. First of all, this resolves a long-standing discrepancy with the La2-x(Sr,Ba)xCuO4 family where field-dependent, IC quasi-static spin correlations were reported before (Lake et al., Nature 415, 299 (2002)). More importantly, our results show how the recently reported quantum oscillations in high magnetic fields in YBa2Cu3O6.5 (Doiron-Leyraud et al., Nature 447, 565 (2007)) can be understood in terms of a Fermi-surface reconstruction induced by IC spin modulations. In the lack of experimental evidence for such IC modulations, this mechanism has not been pursued in the past, although it was discussed as a straightforward explanation for Fermi-surface reconstruction. Finally, we will discuss YBCO with a Tc of 10 K. Compared to the previous example, there is an enhancement of the quasi-static spin-correlations. In addition, there is indication for incipient commensurate AF order in reminiscence of the AF parent compound.

  12. Tailoring liquid crystals to become fast and efficient terahertz devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickwell-MacPherson, E.; Parrott, E. P. J.; Park, H.; Fan, F.; Chigrinov, V. G.

    2012-10-01

    Liquid crystals have been employed for several decades in devices such as phase shifters, Fabry-Perot filters, polarizers, phase gratings, and Bragg switches at optical frequencies. However it is only recently that such devices have been demonstrated at terahertz frequencies. This is because of several fundamental frequency dependent relationships between device properties and frequency of operation. When designing liquid crystal devices, we need to find liquid crystals with high birefringence, low viscosity and low absorption at terahertz frequencies. In this paper we will present some measurements and simulations of potentially suitable liquid crystal mixtures.

  13. Frustration of crystallisation by a liquid–crystal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syme, Christopher D.; Mosses, Joanna; González-Jiménez, Mario; Shebanova, Olga; Walton, Finlay; Wynne, Klaas

    2017-02-01

    Frustration of crystallisation by locally favoured structures is critically important in linking the phenomena of supercooling, glass formation, and liquid-liquid transitions. Here we show that the putative liquid-liquid transition in n-butanol is in fact caused by geometric frustration associated with an isotropic to rippled lamellar liquid-crystal transition. Liquid-crystal phases are generally regarded as being “in between” the liquid and the crystalline state. In contrast, the liquid-crystal phase in supercooled n-butanol is found to inhibit transformation to the crystal. The observed frustrated phase is a template for similar ordering in other liquids and likely to play an important role in supercooling and liquid-liquid transitions in many other molecular liquids.

  14. Frustration of crystallisation by a liquid–crystal phase

    PubMed Central

    Syme, Christopher D.; Mosses, Joanna; González-Jiménez, Mario; Shebanova, Olga; Walton, Finlay; Wynne, Klaas

    2017-01-01

    Frustration of crystallisation by locally favoured structures is critically important in linking the phenomena of supercooling, glass formation, and liquid-liquid transitions. Here we show that the putative liquid-liquid transition in n-butanol is in fact caused by geometric frustration associated with an isotropic to rippled lamellar liquid-crystal transition. Liquid-crystal phases are generally regarded as being “in between” the liquid and the crystalline state. In contrast, the liquid-crystal phase in supercooled n-butanol is found to inhibit transformation to the crystal. The observed frustrated phase is a template for similar ordering in other liquids and likely to play an important role in supercooling and liquid-liquid transitions in many other molecular liquids. PMID:28209972

  15. Characterising laser beams with liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Angela; Naidoo, Darryl; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    We show how one can determine the various properties of light, from the modal content of laser beams to decoding the information stored in optical fields carrying orbital angular momentum, by performing a modal decomposition. Although the modal decomposition of light has been known for a long time, applied mostly to pattern recognition, we illustrate how this technique can be implemented with the use of liquid-crystal displays. We show experimentally how liquid crystal displays can be used to infer the intensity, phase, wavefront, Poynting vector, and orbital angular momentum density of unknown optical fields. This measurement technique makes use of a single spatial light modulator (liquid crystal display), a Fourier transforming lens and detector (CCD or photo-diode). Such a diagnostic tool is extremely relevant to the real-time analysis of solid-state and fibre laser systems as well as mode division multiplexing as an emerging technology in optical communication.

  16. Hierarchical organization in liquid crystal-in-liquid crystal emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mushenheim, Peter C; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2014-11-21

    We report the formation and characterization of hierarchical ordering in systems comprised of micrometer-sized droplets of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (LCs) dispersed in continuous nematic phases of a lyotropic chromonic LC (disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)). Significantly, we find the orientations of the two LC phases to be coupled, with nematic droplets of 4'-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) exhibiting a bipolar configuration with an axis of symmetry aligned orthogonal to the far-field director of the DSCG phase. We determine that this coupling of orientations does not result from either anisometric LC droplet shape or interfacial ionic phenomena but rather is consistent with the influence of van der Waals interactions that arise from the anisotropic polarizabilities of nematic 5CB (Δn = +0.18) and DSCG (Δn = -0.02) phases. We also find that it is possible to rotate and uniformly align the nematic droplets by using a weak magnetic field (B ∼ 0.3 T). An analysis of the dynamics of relaxation of the orientations of the 5CB droplets following removal of the magnetic field reveals the DSCG and 5CB droplets to be coupled by energies of ∼10(4) kT, consistent with a simple theoretical estimate of the influence of anisotropic van der Waals interactions. We also observed the nematic 5CB droplets to form dimers and larger assemblies mediated by the elasticity of the nematic DSCG. Overall, these results reveal that LC-in-LC emulsions define a new class of hierarchically ordered soft matter in which both thermotropic and lyotropic LCs are coupled in their ordering.

  17. Hierarchical Organization in Liquid Crystal-in-Liquid Crystal Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Mushenheim, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of hierarchical ordering in systems comprised of micrometer-sized droplets of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (LCs) dispersed in continuous nematic phases of a lyotropic chromonic LC (disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)). Significantly, we find the orientations of the two LC phases to be coupled, with nematic droplets of 4′-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) exhibiting a bipolar configuration with an axis of symmetry aligned orthogonal to the far-field director of the DSCG phase. We determine that this coupling of orientations does not result from either anisometric LC droplet shape or interfacial ionic phenomena but rather is consistent with the influence of van der Waals interactions that arise from the anisotropic polarizabilities of nematic 5CB (Δn = + 0.18) and DSCG (Δn = − 0.02) phases. We also find that it is possible to rotate and uniformly align the nematic droplets by using a weak magnetic field (B ∼ 0.3 T). An analysis of the dynamics of relaxation of the orientations of the 5CB droplets following removal of the magnetic field reveals the DSCG and 5CB droplets to be coupled by energies of ∼104kT, consistent with a simple theoretical estimate of the influence of anisotropic van der Waals interactions. We also observed the nematic 5CB droplets to form dimers and larger assemblies mediated by the elasticity of the nematic DSCG. Overall, these results reveal that LC-in-LC emulsions define a new class of hierarchically ordered soft matter in which both thermotropic and lyotropic LCs are coupled in their ordering. PMID:25278032

  18. The effect of liquid phase chemistry on growth of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single crystals by seeded polycrystal conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzkowski, Edward P., III

    The effect that liquid phase content and chemistry has on single crystal growth was investigated in this study. This was accomplished by determining the single crystal growth mechanism as well as studying the effect of hot pressing environment. Characterization techniques played a large role in deciphering the relevance of each effect. One such technique was used because x-ray absorption of oxygen is significant in thin specimens of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3 )O3-35 mol% PbTiO3 [PMN-35PT] due to the presence of Pb and Nb. Using only XEDS data, the zeta-factor method provides absorption corrected compositional information, which was helpful to fully characterize the liquid phase. It was shown that the compositional data were in very good agreement with the nominal values for PMN-35 PT, whereas the uncorrected data underestimated the oxygen content by 300%. This technique linked the swelling of samples to changes in the oxygen to lead ratio of the excess PbO due to hot-pressing in air. This observation corroborates the microstructural and x-ray diffraction data that was obtained. The influence of excess PbO on {001} single crystal growth was studied in the range of 0-10 vol% PbO. It was found that up to 1.5 vol% PbO, the amount of single crystal and grain growth increased with increasing PbO additions. At higher PbO contents, however, the growth becomes independent of liquid fraction for all annealing times. In addition since the matrix grains were faceted and the growth best fit parabolic kinetics, interface reaction control was deemed the most likely growth mechanism. It was also shown that the chemistry of the liquid phase was dynamic as characterized in an Analytical Electron Microscope. In fact, MgO was found to precipitate out of the system due the saturation of MgO in the liquid, which in turn altered the liquid/solid surface energy. By changing the energy of the system, the matrix grains become more faceted, i.e. the frequency of {100} surfaces increases. This reduces the

  19. Pretransitional effects near the smectic-A-smectic-C* phase transition of hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil networks dispersed in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoyiannis, George; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Kutnjak, Zdravko; Zumer, Slobodan

    2007-02-15

    A detailed x-ray scattering and high-resolution ac calorimetric study has been carried out near the smectic-A to chiral smectic-C phase transition of liquid-crystal compounds 4-(2-methyl butyl) phenyl 4-n-octylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate (CE8) and p-(n-decyloxy) benzylidene-p-amino-(2-methylbutyl) cinnamate (DOBAMBC) confined in hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil nanoparticle networks. The character of the transition, which is mean field near a tricritical point in bulk, is changed dramatically with an increase of aerosil-induced disorder. X-ray measurements revealed pretransitional behavior and compression of the smectic layers, phenomena that are strongly pronounced in high aerosil concentrations. A theoretical model that takes into account the interplay of relevant mechanisms is proposed to explain the observed phenomena. The effect of chirality on the interaction of liquid crystals with aerosils is discussed.

  20. Hexatic and blue phases in a chiral liquid crystal: optical polarizing microscopy, synchrotron radiation and dielectric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Debashis; Debnath, Asim; Mandal, Pradip Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Phase behavior, structure and molecular dynamics of a chiral liquid crystalline compound, which exhibits SmG*, SmJ*, SmF*, SmI*, SmC*, SmA*, N* and BP*, have been investigated. Observed optical textures, synchrotron radiation diffraction data and frequency dependent dielectric spectroscopic study clearly depict the temperature evolution of the different hexatic smectic phases along with cholesteric and blue phase in a single compound. In hexatic phases dielectric absorption spectra show one low frequency relaxation process, related to the phase fluctuation of the bond orientational order, and one high frequency process related to amplitude fluctuation of the bond orientational order coupled with the polarization and tilt of the molecules. Goldstone and soft mode relaxation processes are detected, respectively, in SmC* and SmA* phases.

  1. Crystallization of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Takashi; Shikuya, Yuuna

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the crystallization process on the basis of the free energy landscape (FEL) approach to non-equilibrium systems. In this approach, the crystallization time is given by the first passage time of the representative point arriving at the crystalline basin in the FEL. We devise an efficient method to obtain the first passage time exploiting a specific boundary condition. Applying this formalism to a model system, we show that the first passage time is determined by two competing effects; one is the difference in the free energy of the initial and the final basins, and the other is the slow relaxation. As the temperature is reduced, the former accelerates the crystallization and the latter retards it. We show that these competing effects give rise to the typical nose-shape form of the time-temperature transformation curve and that the retardation of the crystallization is related to the mean waiting time of the jump motion.

  2. Enhanced dual-frequency operation of a polymerized liquid crystal microplate by liquid crystal infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Takayuki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2017-04-01

    The electric-field-induced switching behavior of a polymer microplate is investigated. A microplate fabricated with a photopolymerizable dual-frequency liquid crystal was surrounded by an unpolymerized photopolymerizable dual-frequency liquid crystal in the isotropic phase. As an electric field was applied along the plane of the microplate, the microplate switched to set its interior molecular orientation to be either parallel or perpendicular to the field, depending on the frequency. Analysis of the rotational behavior, as well as numerical calculations, showed that the surrounding unpolymerized photopolymerizable dual-frequency liquid crystal infiltrated into the microplate, which enhanced the dielectric properties of the microplate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an enhanced dual-frequency dielectric response of a polymer microplate induced by liquid crystal infiltration.

  3. Electrically Tilted Liquid Crystal Display Mode for High Speed Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwag, Jin Seog; Kim, Jae Chang; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2006-09-01

    To develop liquid crystal displays suitable for moving picture, a liquid crystal display mode having an electrically tilted phase is proposed. This is realized by initially having a tilted liquid crystal with low bias voltage. We found that its measured response time is in good agreement with numerical calculation obtained using the Erickson-Leslie equation. The falling times were smaller than 10 ms with conventional driving and 6 ms with overdriving.

  4. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  5. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  6. Liquid crystal formation in supercoiled DNA solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Svetlana S; Jesse, Wim; Backendorf, Claude; van der Maarel, Johan R C

    2002-01-01

    The critical concentrations pertaining to the liquid crystal formation of pUC18 plasmid in saline solutions were obtained from (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance, polarized light microscopy, and phase equilibrium experiments. The transition is strongly first order with a broad gap between the isotropic and anisotropic phase. The critical boundaries are strongly and reversibly dependent on temperature and weakly dependent on ionic strength. With polarized light microscopy on magnetically oriented samples, the liquid crystalline phase is assigned cholesteric with a pitch on the order of 4 microm. Preliminary results show that at higher concentrations a true crystal is formed. The isotropic-cholesteric transition is interpreted with lyotropic liquid crystal theory including the effects of charge, orientation entropy, and excluded volume effects. It was found that the molecular free energy associated with the topology of the superhelix is of paramount importance in controlling the width of the phase gap. The theoretical results compare favorably with the critical boundary pertaining to the disappearance of the isotropic phase, but they fail to predict the low concentration at which the anisotropic phase first appears. PMID:12124291

  7. Orientational transitions in antiferromagnetic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Petrov, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The orientational phases in an antiferromagnetic liquid crystal (ferronematic) based on the nematic liquid crystal with the negative anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility are studied in the framework of the continuum theory. The ferronematic was assumed to be compensated; i.e., in zero field, impurity ferroparticles with the magnetic moments directed parallel and antiparallel to the director are equiprobably distributed in it. It is established that under the action of a magnetic field the ferronematic undergoes orientational transitions compensated (antiferromagnetic) phase-non-uniform phase-saturation (ferrimagnetic) phase. The analytical expressions for threshold fields of the transitions as functions of material parameters are obtained. It is shown that with increasing magnetic impurity segregation parameter, the threshold fields of the transitions significantly decrease. The bifurcation diagram of the ferronematic orientational phases is built in terms of the energy of anchoring of magnetic particles with the liquid-crystal matrix and magnetic field. It is established that the Freedericksz transition is the second-order phase transition, while the transition to the saturation state can be second- or first-order. In the latter case, the suspension exhibits orientational bistability. The orientational and magnetooptical properties of the ferronematic in different applied magnetic fields are studied.

  8. Fabrication of tensile-strained single-crystalline GeSn on transparent substrate by nucleation-controlled liquid-phase crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hiroshi; Amamoto, Takashi; Koyama, Masahiro; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeru; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2017-01-01

    We developed a method of forming single-crystalline germanium-tin (GeSn) alloy on transparent substrates that is based on liquid-phase crystallization. By controlling and designing nucleation during the melting growth process, a highly tensile-strained single-crystalline GeSn layer was grown on a quartz substrate without using any crystal-seeds or catalysts. The peak field-effect hole mobility of 423 cm2/V s was obtained for a top-gate single-crystalline GeSn MOSFET on a quartz substrate with a Sn content of 2.6%, indicating excellent crystal quality and mobility enhancement due to Sn incorporation and tensile strain.

  9. Piperidinium, piperazinium and morpholinium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lava, Kathleen; Binnemans, Koen; Cardinaels, Thomas

    2009-07-16

    Piperidinium, piperazinium and morpholinium cations have been used for the design of ionic liquid crystals. These cations were combined with several types of anions, namely bromide, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, dodecylsulfate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, dioctylsulfosuccinate, dicyclohexylsulfosuccinate, and dihexylsulfosuccinate. For the bromide salts of piperidinium containing one alkyl chain, the chain length was varied, ranging from 8 to 18 carbon atoms (n = 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18). The compounds show a rich mesomorphic behavior. High-ordered smectic phases (crystal smectic E and T phases), smectic A phases, and hexagonal columnar phases were observed, depending on the type of cation and anion. The morpholinium compounds with sulfosuccinate anions showed hexagonal columnar phases at room temperature and a structural model for the self-assembly of these morpholinium compounds into hexagonal columnar phases is proposed.

  10. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  11. Liquid crystal thermometry during anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lacoumenta, S; Hall, G M

    1984-01-01

    The use of cutaneous liquid crystal thermometry (EZ Temp) as an estimate of core temperature during routine surgery was investigated in 20 patients. Seventeen per cent of the recordings made with the EZ Temp were more than 1 degree C different from oesophageal temperature. There was a poor correlation between EZ Temp values and both oesophageal and aural temperatures (r = 0.54 for both sites). We conclude that liquid crystal thermometry of the forehead is not sufficiently accurate to be used as an indicator of core temperature during routine surgery.

  12. A liquid crystal adaptive lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Cleverly, D.

    1981-01-01

    Creation of an electronically controlled liquid crystal lens for use as a focusing mechanism in a multi-element lens system or as an adaptive optical element is analyzed. Varying the index of refraction is shown to be equivalent to the shaping of a solid refracting material. Basic characteristics of liquid crystals, essential for the creation of a lens, are reviewed. The required variation of index of refraction is provided by choosing appropriate electrode voltages. The configuration required for any incoming polarization is given and its theoretical performance in terms of modulation transfer function derived.

  13. Ionic Liquid Crystals: Versatile Materials.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Bielawski, Christopher W; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-04-27

    This Review covers the recent developments (2005-2015) in the design, synthesis, characterization, and application of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. It was designed to give a comprehensive overview of the "state-of-the-art" in the field. The discussion is focused on low molar mass and dendrimeric thermotropic ionic mesogens, as well as selected metal-containing compounds (metallomesogens), but some references to polymeric and/or lyotropic ionic liquid crystals and particularly to ionic liquids will also be provided. Although zwitterionic and mesoionic mesogens are also treated to some extent, emphasis will be directed toward liquid-crystalline materials consisting of organic cations and organic/inorganic anions that are not covalently bound but interact via electrostatic and other noncovalent interactions.

  14. Bistable liquid crystal device fabricated via microscale liquid crystal alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michinori; Toyoshima, Wataru; Nose, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Bistable liquid crystal (LC) molecular orientation properties in micropatterned LC cells were investigated experimentally and theoretically. When an LC cell was heated to the phase-transition temperature and then cooled, an LC orientation with ±π/2-twist domains (±π/2-twist mode) was obtained. Furthermore, a different LC orientation with ±π-twist domains (±π-twist mode) was observed when a 10-V potential was applied across a sample LC cell. Both orientation states were stably retained over a long period. Herein, cross-sectional LC orientation models in the ±π/2- and ±π-twist modes are proposed to explain the generation and behavior of two different disclination lines. The total energies within one period in the ±π/2- and ±π-twist modes (F±π/2 and F±π, respectively) were estimated theoretically. These energies were found to depend on the LC layer thickness and to cross over at a certain thickness; this indicates that F±π is equal to F±π/2 at this equilibrium thickness. The best temporal stability is likely attained at this equilibrium thickness. We demonstrated a bistable color-switching device by combining a full-wave plate and crossed polarizers. When these optical components were configured properly, stable bistable switching between two colors was achieved.

  15. M3B2 and M5B3 Formation in Diffusion-Affected Zone During Transient Liquid Phase Bonding Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Naicheng; Hu, Xiaobing; Liu, Jide; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2015-04-01

    Precipitates in the diffusion-affected zone (DAZ) during transient liquid phase bonding (TLP) single-crystal superalloys were observed and investigated. Small size and dendritic-shaped precipitates were identified to be M3B2 borides and intergrowth of M3B2/M5B3 borides. The orientation relationships among M3B2, M5B3, and matrix were determined using transmission electron microscope (TEM). Composition characteristics of these borides were also analyzed by TEM energy-dispersive spectrometer. Because this precipitating phenomenon deviates from the traditional parabolic transient liquid phase bonding model which assumed a precipitates free DAZ during TLP bonding, some correlations between the deviation of the isothermal solidification kinetics and these newly observed precipitating behaviors were discussed and rationalized when bonding the interlayer containing the high diffusivity melting point depressant elements and substrates of low solubility.

  16. Liquid-crystal blazed grating with azimuthally distributed liquid-crystal directors.

    PubMed

    Honma, Michinori; Nose, Toshiaki

    2004-09-20

    We propose a novel formation method of arbitrary phase profiles of circular light by controlling azimuthal angles of liquid-crystal directors; its principle is described theoretically. A new liquid-crystal blazed grating is demonstrated by use of the proposed method. It is revealed that the first-order diffraction efficiency reaches the maximum value (theoretically 100%, experimentally approximately 90%) at an optimum applied voltage when the phase difference between the extraordinary and ordinary rays agrees with one-half the wavelength. Furthermore, the polarization states of the diffracted light beams are analyzed by Stokes parameter measurements, and unique polarization-splitting properties are revealed.

  17. Phase Behavior of Liquid Crystals Formed in [C12mim]CI/H2O and [C12mim]CI/Alcohols Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Mei-shan; Wu, Zhi-yan; Wang, Lu-yan; Wu, Xin-zhou; Tao, Xu-tang

    2009-10-01

    Phase behaviors of different binary systems involving 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C12mim]Cl) and H2O, [C12mim]Cl and different alcohols (1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol and 1-octanol) are investigated at 25 °C. Hexagonal liquid crystal phase (H1) is identified in [C12mim]Cl/H2O system, and lamellar liquid-crystalline (Lα) phase is found in [C12mim]Cl/alcohols systems by using polarized optical microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. The formation of such phases is considered as a synergetic result of the solvatophobic force and the hydrogen-bonded network comprising an imidazolium ring, chloride ion and water (or alcohols), which can be confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. It is noticeable that in [C12mim]Cl/1-octanol system, the lattice spacings of lamellar phase increase with increasing C12mimCl concentration, which is opposite to the results of [C12mim]Cl/H2O system. This may result mainly from stronger static repulsion among hydrophilic headgroups of imidazolium salts arranged in the bilayers of lamellar structures. Further measurements by differential scanning calorimetry indicate that the lamellar phase is stable within a wide temperature range above room temperature. However, the lattice spacings decrease with the increase of temperature, which may be due to the softening of the hydrocarbon chain of [C12mim]Cl molecules. In different alcohols systems, it is found that the lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal structure is easier to be formed when the carbon chain length becomes longer.

  18. Detection of a new 'nematic-like' phase in liquid crystal-amphiphile mixture by differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Kaustabh Roy, Madhusudan Datta, Alokmay

    2014-04-24

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) studies on phase transitions of the pure liquid crystalline material N-4-methoxybenzylidene-4-butylaniline (MBBA) and mixtures of MBBA and the amphiphile Stearic Acid (StA) show significant changes in the behavior of mixture from pure MBBA, as regards the nematic-isotropic (N-I) transition temperature (T{sub c}) and other thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy, specific heat and activation energy with concentration of StA. In particular, the convexity of the Arrhenius plot in pure MBBA vanishes with StA concentration pointing to the formation of a new, perhaps 'nematic-like', phase in the mixtures.

  19. Photoinduced crystal-to-liquid phase transitions of azobenzene derivatives and their application in photolithography processes through a solid-liquid patterning.

    PubMed

    Norikane, Yasuo; Uchida, Emi; Tanaka, Satoko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Koyama, Emiko; Azumi, Reiko; Akiyama, Haruhisa; Kihara, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2014-10-03

    The direct and reversible transformation of matter between the solid and liquid phases by light at constant temperature is of great interest because of its potential applications in various manufacturing settings. We report a simple molecular design strategy for the phase transitions: azobenzenes having para-dialkoxy groups with a methyl group at the meta-position. The photolithography processes were demonstrated using the azobenzene as a photoresist in a single process combining development and etching of a copper substrate.

  20. Synthesis and Phase Behaviors of Supramolecular Liquid Crystals Based on 4-Octyldecyloxybenzoic Acid and 4-Hexadecyloxy Benzoic Acid in Binary Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin-Jiang; Chen, Shao-Jun; Ban, Jian-Feng

    2016-05-01

    A series of supramolecular liquid crystals, named mOOBA-HOBA (m, which is the molar ratio of OOBA to HOBA) were successfully synthesized via mixing different molar ratio of 4-Octyldecyloxybenzoic acid (OOBA) and 4-hexadecyloxy benzoic acid (HOBA). The chemical and phase structures were investigated by the combination of techniques, including FT-IR, DSC, X-ray and POM. The experimental results revealed that the LC phase structures of the original symmetrical dimmers in OOBA and HOBA were both dissociated while a new asymmetrical dimmer was formed between OOBA with HOBA through hydrogen bonding in the binary mixture. DSC results show that the phase transition for entering into LC phase shifts to lower temperature, and the nematic-isotropic phase transition also shifts to lower temperature. These different phase transition behaviors should be ascribed to the asymmetrical dimmers between OOBA with HOBA. POM demonstrated that these OOBA-HOBA binary mixtures tend to show a lower liquid crystalline phase temperature and broad temperature range.

  1. Experiments with Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergason, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes laboratory experiments designed to demonstrate (1) the properties of cholesteric liquid crystals, (2) thermal mapping, (3) thermal diffusivity, (4) adiabatic expansion of rubber, and (5) measurement of radiated energy by a point source. Contains all of the information on materials and apparatus needed to perform the experiments.…

  2. Copper sulfate: Liquid or crystals?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two separate experiments were conducted to evaluate copper toxicity to channel catfish and free-swimming Ichthyophthirius multifiliis or Ich (the stage of Ich that can be treated); the compounds we used were CuSO4 crystals and a non-chelated liquid CuSO4 product. In 96 hr tests conducted in aquaria...

  3. Liquid-Crystal Optical Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1989-01-01

    Optical correlator uses commercially-available liquid-crystal television (LCTV) screen as spatial light modulator. Correlations with this device done at video frame rates, making such operations as bar-code recognition possible at reasonable cost. With further development, such correlator useful in automation, robotic vision, and optical image processing.

  4. Experiments with Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergason, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes laboratory experiments designed to demonstrate (1) the properties of cholesteric liquid crystals, (2) thermal mapping, (3) thermal diffusivity, (4) adiabatic expansion of rubber, and (5) measurement of radiated energy by a point source. Contains all of the information on materials and apparatus needed to perform the experiments.…

  5. Crystals, liquid crystals and superfluid helium on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    In this thesis we study the ground state of ordered phases grown as thin layers on substrates with smooth spatially varying Gaussian curvature. The Gaussian curvature acts as a source for a one body potential of purely geometrical origin that controls the equilibrium distribution of the defects in liquid crystal layers, thin films of He4 and two dimensional crystals on a frozen curved surface. For superfluids, all defects are repelled (attracted) by regions of positive (negative) Gaussian curvature. For liquid crystals, charges between 0 and 4pi are attracted by regions of positive curvature while all other charges are repelled. As the thickness of the liquid crystal film increases, transitions between two and three dimensional defect structures are triggered in the ground state of the system. Thin spherical shells of nematic molecules with planar anchoring possess four short 12 disclination lines but, as the thickness increases, a three dimensional escaped configuration composed of two pairs of half-hedgehogs becomes energetically favorable. Finally, we examine the static and dynamical properties that distinguish two dimensional crystals constrained to lie on a curved substrate from their flat space counterparts. A generic mechanism of dislocation unbinding in the presence of varying Gaussian curvature is presented. We explore how the geometric potential affects the energetics and dynamics of dislocations and point defects such as vacancies and interstitials.

  6. Effects of the vertically switching electric field on the photoelectric properties of polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal cells using the director model.

    PubMed

    Chi, Cheng-Yu; Qiu, Shi-Hao; Lin, Guan-Jhong; Chen, Tien-Jung; Yang, Yin-Jay; Wu, Jin-Jei

    2017-03-20

    This study uses the director model to analyze the optoelectronic properties of polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal (PS-BPLC). The director model revealed a linear relationship of refractive index change and the cosine squared of the angle between the LCs and the direction of the electric field. Moreover, we employed simulations based on the Kerr effect and compared the results with those of the director model. The simulation results also show high consistency with real circumstances. Consequently, it can be of great help to design BPLC displays that can be applied to adopting better strategies for developing next-generation LCD devices.

  7. Effect of alignment on the nematic to isotropic phase transition of bulk octylcyanobiphenyl brings possible solutions to liquid crystal display drawback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dipti

    2009-03-01

    The effect of alignment on the nematic to isotropic phase transition of bulk octylcyanobiphenyl reveals a reduced time and temperature lag with possible solutions to the time response and backlight bleed drawbacks of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). The aligned octylcyanobiphenyl shows a quicker and early occurrence of the nematic transition with less deviation from thermal rates than the unaligned octylcyanobiphenyl using calorimetry technique. Smaller enthalpy of activation indicates less energy requirement and makes the aligned octylcyanobiphenyl suitable for LCDs. The results are discussed in terms of the formation of aligned domains of octylcyanobiphenyl molecules under the force of magnetic field.

  8. Electrically Tunable Microlens via Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation of Liquid Crystal/Monomer Mixtures Based on Four-Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyu, Thein; Nwabunma, Domasius

    2001-03-01

    We introduce a new method of fabricating electrically tunable liquid crystal (LC) microlens via photopolymerization-induced phase separation of LC/monomer mixtures using four-wave mixing technique, i.e., interference of two horizontal and two vertical waves. The microlens forming process was simulated based on a spatially modulated photopolymerization reaction coupled with the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) Model C equations, which incorporate free energy densities due to isotropic mixing, LC ordering, and polymer network elasticity. Our simulation revealed that the calculated LC microlens are similar to the compound eyes found in the eyes of insects such as flies, ants, and wasps.

  9. Electro-optic response of the anticlinic, antiferroelectric liquid-crystal phase of a biaxial bent-core molecule with tilt angle near 45∘

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Michi; Chen, Dong; Shao, Renfan; Korblova, Eva; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Walba, David M.; Clark, Noel A.

    2012-03-01

    We describe the unusual electro-optic response of a biaxial bent-core liquid crystal molecule that exhibits an anticlinic, antiferroelectric smectic phase (Sm-CAPA) with a molecular tilt angle close to 45°. In the ground state, the sample shows very low birefringence. A weak applied electric field distorts the antiferroelectric ground state, inducing a small azimuthal reorientation of the molecules on the tilt cone. This results in only a modest increase in the birefringence but an anomalously large (˜40°) analog rotation of the extinction direction. This unusual electro-optic response is shown to be a consequence of the molecular biaxiality.

  10. Controllable light diffraction in woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chih-Hua; Zeng, Hao; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Maigyte, Lina; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-01-12

    An approach to switching between different patterns of light beams transmitted through the woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystals is proposed. The phase transition between the nematic and isotropic liquid crystal states leads to an observable variation of the spatial pattern transmitted through the photonic structure. The transmission profiles in the nematic phase also show polarization sensibility due to refractive index dependence on the field polarization. The experimental results are consistent with a numerical calculation by Finite Difference Time Domain method.

  11. Orientational relaxation in a discotic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Jana, Biman; Bagchi, Biman

    2007-06-01

    We investigate orientational relaxation of a model discotic liquid crystal, consisting of disclike molecules, by molecular dynamics simulations along two isobars starting from the high temperature isotropic phase. The two isobars have been so chosen that (a) the phase sequence isotropic- (I-) nematic- (N-) columnar (C) appears upon cooling along one of them and (b) the sequence isotropic- (I-) columnar- (C) along the other. While the orientational relaxation in the isotropic phase near the I-N phase transition in system (a) shows a power law decay at short to intermediate times, such power law relaxation is not observed in the isotropic phase near the I-C phase boundary in system (b). In order to understand this difference (the existence or the absence of the power law decay), we calculated the growth of the orientational pair distribution functions (OPDFs) near the I-N phase boundary and also near the I-C phase boundary. We find that the OPDF shows a marked growth in long range correlation as the I-N phase boundary is approached in the I-N-C system (a), but such a growth is absent in the I-C system, which appears to be consistent with the result that I-N phase transition in the former is weakly first order while the I-C phase transition in the latter is not weak. As the system settles into the nematic phase, the decay of the single-particle second-rank orientational time correlation function follows a pattern that is similar to what is observed with calamitic liquid crystals and supercooled molecular liquids.

  12. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    DOEpatents

    Benicewicz, Brian C.; Hoyt, Andrea E.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides (1) curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 where R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are radicals selected from the group consisting of maleimide, substituted maleimide, nadimide, substituted naimide, ethynyl, and (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 where R.sup.3 is hydrogen with the proviso that the two carbon atoms of (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 are bound on the aromatic ring of A.sup.1 or A.sup.3 to adjacent carbon atoms, A.sup.1 and A.sup.3 are 1,4-phenylene and the same where said group contains one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, or propyl, alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, A.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of 1,4-phenylene, 4,4'-biphenyl, 2,6-naphthylene and the same where said groups contain one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro, lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, and propyl, lower alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl or fluoroalkoxy, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, and B.sup.1 and B.sup.2 are selected from the group consisting of --C(O)--O-- and --O--C(O)--, (2) thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions comprised of heat-cured segments derived from monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 as described above, (3) curable blends of at least two of the polyester monomers and (4) processes of preparing the curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers.

  13. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    PubMed Central

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe studies on neurofilaments (NFs), the intermediate filaments of neurons, which form open network nematic liquid crystal hydrogels in axons. Synchrotron small-angle-x-ray scattering studies of NF-protein dilution experiments and NF hydrogels subjected to osmotic stress show that neurofilament networks are stabilized by competing long-range repulsion and attractions mediated by the neurofilament's polyampholytic sidearms. The attractions are present both at very large interfilament spacings, in the weak sidearm-interpenetrating regime, and at smaller interfilament spacings, in the strong sidearm-interpenetrating regime. A second series of experiments will describe the structure and properties of cationic liposomes (CLs) complexed with nucleic acids (NAs). CL-NA complexes form liquid crystalline phases, which interact in a structure-dependent manner with cellular membranes enabling the design of complexes for efficient delivery of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA) in therapeutic applications. PMID:24558293

  14. Phase behaviors of binary mixtures composed of electron-rich and electron-poor triphenylene discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lingling; Jing, Min; Xiao, Bo; Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zeng, Qing-Dao; Zhao, Ke-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Disk-like liquid crystals (DLCs) can self-assemble to ordered columnar mesophases and are intriguing one-dimensional organic semiconductors with high charge carrier mobility. To improve their applicable property of mesomorphic temperature ranges, we exploit the binary mixtures of electronic donor-acceptor DLC materials. The electron-rich 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakis(alkoxy)triphenylenes (C4, C6, C8, C10, C12) and an electron-deficient tetrapentyl triphenylene-2,3,6,10-tetracarboxylate have been prepared and their binary mixtures have been investigated. The mesomorphism of the 1:1 (molar ratio) mixtures has been characterized by polarizing optical microscopy (POM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and small angel x-ray scattering (SAXS). The self-assembled monolayer structure of a discogen on a solid-liquid interface has been imaged by the high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The match of peripheral chain length has important influence on the mesomorphism of the binary mixtures. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51273133 and 51443004).

  15. Nanoparticle guests in lyotropic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölle, Sarah; Park, Ji Hyun; Schymura, Stefan; Jo, Hyeran; Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    In this chapter we discuss the benefits, peculiarities and main challenges related to nanoparticle templating in lyotropic liquid crystals. We first give a brief bird's-eye view of the field, discussing different nanoparticles as well as different lyotropic hosts that have been explored, but then quickly focus on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in surfactant-based lyotropic nematic phases. We discuss in some detail how the transfer of orientational order from liquid crystal host to nanoparticle guest can be verified and which degree of ordering can be expected, as well as the importance of choosing the right surfactant and its concentration for the stability of the nanoparticle suspension. We introduce a method for dispersing nanoparticles with an absolute minimum of stabilizing surfactant, based on dispersion below the Krafft temperature, and we discuss the peculiar phenomenon of filament formation in lyotropic nematic phases with a sufficient concentration of well-dispersed carbon nanotubes. Finally, we describe how the total surfactant concentration in micellar nematics can be greatly reduced by combining cat- and anionic surfactants, and we discuss how nanotubes can help in inducing the liquid crystal phase close to the isotropic-nematic boundary.

  16. Nanoparticles and networks created within liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shin-Wong; Kundu, Sudarshan

    We report the in situ creation of growing polymer nanoparticles and resulting polymer networks formed in liquid crystals. Depending on the concentration of monomer, polymerization-induced phase separation proceeds in two distinct regimes. For a high monomer concentration with a good miscibility, phase separation is initiated through the nucleation and growth mechanism in the binodal decomposition regime and rapidly crosses over to the spinodal decomposition process, consequently resulting in interpenetrating polymer networks. For a dilute system, however, the phase separation mainly proceeds and completes in the binodal decomposition regime. The system resembles the aggregation process of colloidal particles. For a dilute system, the reaction kinetics is limited by the reaction between in situ created polymer aggregates and hence the network morphologies are greatly inuenced by the diffusion of reactive growing polymer particles. The thin polymer layers localized at the surface of substrate are frequently observed and can be comprehended by the interfacial adsorption and further cross-linking reaction of in situ created polymer aggregates at the interface. This process provides a direct perception on understanding polymer stabilized liquid crystals accomplished by the interfacial polymer layer formed by polymerization of dilute reactive monomers in liquid crystal (LC) host.

  17. Evidence from infrared dichroism, x-ray diffraction, and atomistic computer simulation for a ``zigzag'' molecular shape in tilted smectic liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, W. G.; Glaser, M. A.; Park, C. S.; Kim, K. H.; Lansac, Y.; Clark, N. A.

    2001-11-01

    Infrared dichroism (IR) and atomistic computer simulation are employed to probe molecular shape in smectic liquid crystal phases where the optic axis is tilted relative to the layer normal. Polar plots of absorption profiles due to core (phenyl, C-C) and tail (alkyl or methylene, CH2) vibrations in the tilted synclinic (smectic-C) phase of a variety of materials show the phenyl (core) IR absorbance symmetry axes to be consistently tilted at larger angle from the layer normal than the alkyl or methylene (tail). This suggests that, on average, the tails are less tilted than the cores. Furthermore, we find that optic axis tilt angle is close to the core tilt angle measured by IR dichroism, as expected, since liquid crystal birefringence arises primarily from the cores. These results are in accord with the ``zigzag'' model of Bartolino, Doucet, and Durand. However, we find that only a small fraction of the tail, the part nearest the core, is tilted, and only this part contributes significantly to layer contraction upon molecular tilt.

  18. Function Spaces for Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    We consider the relationship between three continuum liquid crystal theories: Oseen-Frank, Ericksen and Landau-de Gennes. It is known that the function space is an important part of the mathematical model and by considering various function space choices for the order parameters s, n, and Q, we establish connections between the variational formulations of these theories. We use these results to justify a version of the Oseen-Frank theory using special functions of bounded variation. This proposed model can describe both orientable and non-orientable defects. Finally we study a number of frustrated nematic and cholesteric liquid crystal systems and show that the model predicts the existence of point and surface discontinuities in the director.

  19. Liquid crystal light valve structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koda, N. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved photosensor film and liquid crystal light valves embodying said film is provided. The photosensor film and liquid crystal light valve is characterized by a significant lower image retention time while maintaining acceptable photosensitivity. The photosensor film is produced by sputter depositing CdS onto an ITO substrate in an atmosphere of argon/H2S gas while maintaining the substrate at a temperature in the range of about 130 C to about 200 C and while introducing nitrogen gas into the system to the extent of not more than about 1% of plasma mixture. Following sputter deposition of the CdS, the film is annealed in an inert gas at temperatures ranging from about 300 C to about 425 C.

  20. Microwave modulation characteristics of twisted liquid crystals with chiral dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Rui; Xing, Hongyu; Ye, Wenjiang

    2017-01-01

    Adding a chiral dopant in twisted nematic (TN) liquid crystal cell can stabilize the orientation of liquid crystal molecules, particularly in high TN (HTN) or super TN (STN) liquid crystal cells. The difference in pitches in liquid crystal is induced by the chiral dopant, and these different pitches affect the orientation of liquid crystal director under an external applied voltage and influence the characteristics of microwave modulation. To illustrate this point, the microwave phase shift per unit length (MPSL) versus voltage is calculated on the basis of the elastic theory of liquid crystal and the finite-difference iterative method. Enhancing the pitch induced by the chiral dopant in liquid crystal increases the MPSLs, but the stability of the twisted structures is decreased. Thus, appropriate pitches of 100d, 4d, and 2d can be applied in TN, HTN, and STN cells with cell gap d to enhance the characteristics of microwave modulation and stabilize the structures in twisted cell. This method can improve the characteristics of liquid crystal microwave modulators such that the operating voltage and the size of such phase shifters can be decreased.

  1. Spectro polarimetry with liquid crystals .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, J.-M.; Roudier, Th.; Moity, J.; Mein, P.; Arnaud, J.; Muller, R.

    We report spectro polarimetric observations made with the spectrograph of the Lunette Jean Rösch at Pic du Midi, France. We have tested Ferroelectric (FLC) and Nematic (NLC) Liquid Crystals. The instrument setup is briefly decribed, together with first observations of magnetic fields obtained with the Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass (MSDP). Polarization analysis of various spectral lines performed with the single pass (SP) spectrograph in active regions or at the limb is also presented.

  2. Critical behavior at the isotropic to nematic, nematic to smectic-A and smectic-A to smectic-C phase transitions in a pyrimidine liquid crystal compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Anish; Chakraborty, Susanta; Kumar Das, Malay

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution optical birefringence (∆n) measurement of a pyrimidine liquid crystal compound having nematic, smectic-A and smectic-C phases are reported. The high-resolution ∆n data are rather successful in assessing the critical anomaly at different phase transitions in the investigated compound with a reasonably good accuracy. The critical exponent β, describing the limiting behavior of the nematic order parameter close to the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase transition, is found to be in good agreement with the tricritical hypothesis. The critical behavior at the nematic-smectic-A (N-Sm-A) and the smectic-A-smectic-C (Sm-A-Sm-C) phase transitions has been explored with the aid of a differential quotient extracted from the ∆n values. The yielded effective critical exponent α‧ is appeared to be nearly tricritical in nature for the N-Sm-A phase transition. For the Sm-A-Sm-C phase transition, α‧ exhibits a weak dependence on the fit range and assumes tricritical value for large temperature range considered, which again is found to be diminished slightly with reduction in the temperature range. Related critical amplitude quotient and corrections-to-scaling quotient are found to display deviations from the theoretical models. Such behavior signals the appearance of a non-Landau character for the orthogonal to tilted smectic phase transition in the investigated compound.

  3. Coherent beam amplification with a photorefractive liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Khoo, I C; Guenther, B D; Wood, M V; Chen, P; Shih, M Y

    1997-08-15

    Coherent amplification of a signal beam by a strong pump beam is observed in thin films of fullerene-doped nematic liquid crystal. Exponential gain constants as high as 2890 cm(-1) with no phase cross talk are achieved at low applied dc bias voltage and pump beam intensity. The underlying mechanism is the electro-optically induced spatially reorientation of the liquid-crystal axis and the resultant phase-shifted index grating required for two-beam coupling.

  4. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Sun, K; Yin, W-G; Wu, L; Xin, H; Wen, J G; Luo, W; Pennycook, S J; Tranquada, J M; Zhu, Y

    2016-11-22

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.

  5. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W.-G.; Wu, L.; Xin, H.; Wen, J. G.; Luo, W.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-11-01

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.

  6. Transient Liquid Phase Bonding of Nickel-Base Single Crystal Alloy with a Novel Ni-Cr-Co-Mo-W-Ta-Re-B Amorphous Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Haiyan; Jia, Qiang; Peng, Peng; Zhu, Ying

    2017-07-01

    A novel Ni-Cr-Co-W-Mo-Ta-Re-B alloy consisting of plate γ and M23B6 phases was prepared as interlayer for the transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of Rene' N5 nickel-base single crystal superalloy. The molten Ni-Cr-Co-W-Mo-Ta-Re-B alloy exhibited an excellent wettability on the nickel-base superalloy. The TLP bonding experiment has been carried out in vacuum furnace at 1,240 ° for 12 h and followed by post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1,305 ° for 4 h. PWHT eliminated the intermetallic compounds and promoted the formation of γ´ precipitates in the bonding region. A more uniform microhardness profile of TLP joint was found after PWHT. The shear strength of the joint after PWHT significantly increased to 533.4 MPa compared with the value of 437.2 MPa without PWHT.

  7. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    PubMed Central

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W.-G.; Wu, L.; Xin, H.; Wen, J. G.; Luo, W.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations. PMID:27874069

  8. Characterization of a chiral phase in an achiral bent-core liquid crystal by polarization studies of resonant x-ray forbidden reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsinet, V.; Barois, P.; Pan, Lidong; Wang, Shun; Huang, C. C.; Wang, S. T.; Pindak, R.; Baumeister, U.; Weissflog, W.

    2011-07-01

    The chiral antiferroelectric structure of an achiral bent-core liquid crystal is characterized by resonant x-ray scattering at chlorine K edge. The “forbidden” reflections resulting from the glide or screw symmetry elements are restored by the anisotropy of the tensor structure factor, which we calculate for two possible structural models. A careful analysis of the polarization states of the restored “forbidden” reflections enables an unambiguous identification of a chiral structure (i.e., the so-called anticlinic, antiferroelectric smectic-C or Sm-CAPA) coexisting with the achiral synclinic antiferroelectric smectic-C or Sm-CSPA. The method proves to be quite powerful as it identifies the chiral structure within coexisting phases despite an imperfect orientation of the sample. The volume fraction of the chiral phase and the distribution of alignment are extracted from the data.

  9. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    DOE PAGES

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W. -G.; ...

    2016-11-22

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here, we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Furthermore,more » our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.« less

  10. 1,10-Phenanthrolinium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Cardinaels, Thomas; Lava, Kathleen; Goossens, Karel; Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Binnemans, Koen

    2011-03-01

    The 1,10-phenanthrolinium cation is introduced as a new building block for the design of ionic liquid crystals. 1,10-Phenanthroline, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline, 5-chloro-1,10-phenanthroline, and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline were quaternized by reaction with 1,3-dibromopropane or 1,2-dibromoethane. The resulting cations were combined with dodecyl sulfate or dioctyl sulfosuccinate anions. The influence of both the cation and anion type on the thermal behavior was investigated. Several of the complexes exhibit mesomorphic behavior, with smectic E phases for the dodecyl sulfate salts and smectic A phases for the dioctyl sulfosuccinate salts. Structural models for the packing of the 1,10-phenanthrolinium and anionic moieties in the liquid-crystalline phases are presented. The ionic compounds show fluorescence in the solid state and in solution.

  11. Second harmonic light scattering induced by defects in the twist-bend nematic phase of liquid crystal dimers.

    PubMed

    Pardaev, Shokir A; Shamid, S M; Tamba, M G; Welch, C; Mehl, G H; Gleeson, J T; Allender, D W; Selinger, J V; Ellman, B; Jakli, A; Sprunt, S

    2016-05-11

    The nematic twist-bend (NTB) phase, exhibited by certain thermotropic liquid crystalline (LC) dimers, represents a new orientationally ordered mesophase - the first distinct nematic variant discovered in many years. The NTB phase is distinguished by a heliconical winding of the average molecular long axis (director) with a remarkably short (nanoscale) pitch and, in systems of achiral dimers, with an equal probability to form right- and left-handed domains. The NTB structure thus provides another fascinating example of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in nature. The order parameter driving the formation of the heliconical state has been theoretically conjectured to be a polarization field, deriving from the bent conformation of the dimers, that rotates helically with the same nanoscale pitch as the director field. It therefore presents a significant challenge for experimental detection. Here we report a second harmonic light scattering (SHLS) study on two achiral, NTB-forming LCs, which is sensitive to the polarization field due to micron-scale distortion of the helical structure associated with naturally-occurring textural defects. These defects are parabolic focal conics of smectic-like "pseudo-layers", defined by planes of equivalent phase in a coarse-grained description of the NTB state. Our SHLS data are explained by a coarse-grained free energy density that combines a Landau-deGennes expansion of the polarization field, the elastic energy of a nematic, and a linear coupling between the two.

  12. Structures of cyano-biphenyl liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Yuan-Chao; Tsang, Tung; Rahimzadeh, E.; Yin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of p-alkyl- p'-cyano- bicyclohexanes, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H10)(C6H10) CN (n-CCH), and p-alkyl- p'-cyano- biphenyls, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H4)(C6H4) CN (n-CBP), were studied. It is convenient to use an x ray image intensification device to search for symmetric x ray diffraction patterns. Despite the similarities in molecular structures of these compounds, very different crystal structures were found. For the smectic phase of 2CCH, the structure is close to rhombohedral with threefold symmetry. In contrast, the structure is close to hexagonal close-packed with two molecules per unit cell for 4CCH. Since intermolecular forces may be quite weak for these liquid crystals systems, it appears that crystal structures change considerably when the alkyl chain length is slightly altered. Different structures were also found in the crystalline phase of n-CBP for n = 6 to 9. For n = 7 to 9, the structures are close to monclinic. The structures are reminiscent of the smectic-A liquid crystal structures with the linear molecules slightly tilted away from the c-axis. In contrast, the structure is quite different for n = 6 with the molecules nearly perpendicular to the c-axis.

  13. Experimental Study of Gravitation Effects on Liquid Crystal Phase Transitions in Polydisperse Aqueous Suspensions of Mg 2Al Layered Double Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Sun, Dejun; Sun, Zhiwei; Xu, Shenghua

    2016-05-01

    Effects of gravity on liquid crystal phase transitions (LCPT) in polydisperse aqueous suspensions of Mg 2Al layered double hydroxide (LDHs) were studied under normal gravity condition. Samples with different suspension concentration (SC) were tested for 15 days and the relevant changes in samples were observed through crossed polarizers. Our results showed: (a) the samples were still isotropic (I) when SC < 23 wt%; (b) when 23 wt% < SC < 30 wt%, a shear-induced birefringence appeared after preparation, and finally coexistence of four phases was reached, including an opaque isotropic top phase, a birefringent middle phase, a faint birefringence phase and a sediment layer of larger platelets resulting from the high polydispersity; (c) when SC > 30 wt%, the suspensions were in a gel state, and the gel network slowed down the LCPT. The above different behavior of phase transitions is apparently due to the concentration gradient and fractionation caused by gravity. This study provides guidance on how to select samples of LDHs suspensions for LCPT used in the upcoming experiment in the space program SJ-10 satellite.

  14. Graphene chiral liquid crystals and macroscopic assembled fibres

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2011-01-01

    Chirality and liquid crystals are both widely expressed in nature and biology. Helical assembly of mesophasic molecules and colloids may produce intriguing chiral liquid crystals. To date, chiral liquid crystals of 2D colloids have not been explored. As a typical 2D colloid, graphene is now receiving unprecedented attention. However, making macroscopic graphene fibres is hindered by the poor dispersibility of graphene and by the lack of an assembly method. Here we report that soluble, chemically oxidized graphene or graphene oxide sheets can form chiral liquid crystals in a twist-grain-boundary phase-like model with simultaneous lamellar ordering and long-range helical frustrations. Aqueous graphene oxide liquid crystals were continuously spun into metres of macroscopic graphene oxide fibres; subsequent chemical reduction gave the first macroscopic neat graphene fibres with high conductivity and good mechanical performance. The flexible, strong graphene fibres were knitted into designed patterns and into directionally conductive textiles. PMID:22146390

  15. Ice-Crystal Fallstreaks from Supercooled Liquid Water Parent Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; O'C. Starr, David; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ferrare, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    On 31 December 2001, ice-crystal fallstreaks (e.g., cirrus uncinus, or colloquially "Mare's Tails") from supercooled liquid water parent clouds were observed by ground-based lidars pointed vertically from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The incidence of liquid phase cloud with apparent ice-phase precipitation is investigated. Scenarios for mixed-phase particle nucleation, and fallstreak formation and sustenance are discussed. The observations are unique in the context of the historical reverence given to the commonly observed c h s uncinus fallstreak (wholly ice) versus this seemingly contradictory coincidence of liquid water begetting ice-crystal streaks.

  16. Phototropic liquid crystal materials containing naphthopyran dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumi, Mariacristina; Cazzell, Seth; Kosa, Tamas; Sukhomlinova, Ludmila; Taheri, Bahman; Bunning, Timothy; White, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Dopant molecules dispersed in a liquid crystalline material usually affects the order of the system and the transition temperature between various phases. If the dopants undergo photoisomerization between conformers with different shapes, the interactions with the liquid crystal molecules can be different for the material in the dark and during exposure to light of appropriate wavelength. This can be used to achieve isothermal photoinduced phase transitions (phototropism). With proper selection of materials components, both order-to-disorder and disorder-to-order photoinduced transition have been demonstrated. Isothermal order-increasing transitions have been observed recently using naphthopyran derivatives as dopants. We are investigating the changes in order parameter and transition temperature of liquid crystal mixtures containing naphthopyrans and how they are related to exposure conditions and to the concentration and molecular structure of the dopants. We are also studying the nature of the photoinduced phase transitions, and comparing the behavior with that of azobenzene-doped mixtures, in which exposure to light leads to a decrease, instead of an increase, in the order of the system.

  17. Free energy of the bcc-liquid interface and the Wulff shape as predicted by the phase-field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podmaniczky, Frigyes; Tóth, Gyula I.; Pusztai, Tamás; Gránásy, László

    2014-01-01

    The Euler-Lagrange equation of the phase-field crystal (PFC) model has been solved under appropriate boundary conditions to obtain the equilibrium free energy of the body centered cubic crystal-liquid interface for 18 orientations at various reduced temperatures in the range ɛ∈[0,0.5]. While the maximum free energy corresponds to the {100} orientation for all ɛ values, the minimum is realized by the {111} direction for smaller ɛ(<0.13), and by the {211} orientation for higher ɛ. The predicted dependence on the reduced temperature is consistent with the respective mean field critical exponent. The results are fitted with an eight-term Kubic harmonic series, and are used to create stereographic plots displaying the anisotropy of the interface free energy. We have also derived the corresponding Wulff shapes that vary with increasing ɛ from sphere to a polyhedral form that differs from the rhombo-dodecahedron obtained previously by growing a bcc seed until reaching equilibrium with the remaining liquid.

  18. `Guest-host' effect in liquid crystal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchodolska, B.; Rudzki, A.; Ossowska-Chruściel, M. D.; Zalewski, S.; Chruściel, J.

    2015-01-01

    The most important goal of our research is to show the influence of the 'guest' (bent-core mesogen, 1,3-phenyldicarboxylatebis{4-[(4-octylbenzoyl)sulphanyl]phenyl} [IFOS8], banana-shaped liquid crystal [BLC]) on the 'host' (calamitic liquid crystal [CLC], (S)-(+)-1-methylheptyloxybiphenyl-(4-n-octylphenyl)thiobenzoate [MHOBS8]), on the stability and the destabilization of the antiferroelectric B2 and the ferroelectric smectic C* (SmC*) phases, and change of the temperature ranges of other phases in the binary liquid crystal mixtures. This work is focused on polymorphism of three new binary liquid crystal mixtures, exhibiting a 'guest-host' (guest liquid crystal-host liquid crystal [GH-LC]) effect. MHOBS8 has, among others, a ferroelectric SmC* phase, and IFOS8 assumes the B2 phase with antiferroelectric properties. The observed properties of the mixtures, such as variation of the phase transition temperatures, spontaneous polarization, tilt angle and switching time, are characteristic of a 'guest-host' mixture. The influence of BLC on the character of the interactions within the CLC host is discussed, with particular attention paid to electro-optical properties of the GH-LC mixtures.

  19. Passive Sensor Materials Based on Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-12

    Program, National Cancer Institute, Cambridge, MA, October, 2008. Abbott, N.L., “Amplification of Biomolecular Interactions Based on Liquid Crystals...of Liquid Crystals" Columbia University, February, 2010, "Novel Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems" CBD Conference

  20. Phase behavior and characterization of heptamethyltrisiloxane-based de Vries smectic liquid crystal by electro-optics, x rays, and dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenilayam, S. P.; Agra-Kooijman, D. M.; Panov, V. P.; Swaminathan, V.; Vij, J. K.; Panarin, Yu. P.; Kocot, A.; Panov, A.; Rodriguez-Lojo, D.; Stevenson, P. J.; Fisch, Michael R.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2017-03-01

    A heptamethyltrisiloxane liquid crystal (LC) exhibiting I -Sm A*-Sm C* phases has been characterized by calorimetry, polarizing microscopy, x-ray diffraction, electro-optics, and dielectric spectroscopy. Observations of a large electroclinic effect, a large increase in the birefringence (Δ n ) with electric field, a low shrinkage in the layer thickness (˜1.75%) at 20 °C below the Sm A*-Sm C* transition, and low values of the reduction factor (˜0.40) suggest that the Sm A* phase in this material is of the de Vries type. The reduction factor is a measure of the layer shrinkage in the Sm C* phase and it should be zero for an ideal de Vries. Moreover, a decrease in the magnitude of Δ n with decreasing temperature indicates the presence of the temperature-dependent tilt angle in the Sm A* phase. The electro-optic behavior is explained by the generalized Langevin-Debye model as given by Shen et al. [Y. Shen et al., Phys. Rev. E 88, 062504 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.062504]. The soft-mode dielectric relaxation strength shows a critical behavior when the system goes from the Sm A* to the Sm C* phase.

  1. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  2. Solvent-free Liquid Crystals and Liquids from DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Shuai, Min; Chen, Dong; Tuchband, Michael; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y; Su, Juanjuan; Liu, Qing; Zajaczkowski, Wojciech; Pisula, Wojciech; Müllen, Klaus; Clark, Noel A; Herrmann, Andreas

    2015-03-23

    As DNA exhibits persistent structures with dimensions that exceed the range of their intermolecular forces, solid-state DNA undergoes thermal degradation at elevated temperatures. Therefore, the realization of solvent-free DNA fluids, including liquid crystals and liquids, still remains a significant challenge. To address this intriguing issue, we demonstrate that combining DNA with suitable cationic surfactants, followed by dehydration, can be a simple generic scheme for producing these solvent-free DNA fluid systems. In the anhydrous smectic liquid crystalline phase, DNA sublayers are intercalated between aliphatic hydrocarbon sublayers. The lengths of the DNA and surfactant are found to be extremely important in tuning the physical properties of the fluids. Stable liquid-crystalline and liquid phases are obtained in the -20 °C to 200 °C temperature range without thermal degradation of the DNA. Thus, a new type of DNA-based soft biomaterial has been achieved, which will promote the study and application of DNA in a much broader context. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Perspectives in active liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Apala; Cristina, Marchetti M; Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-11-28

    Active soft matter is a young, growing field, with potential applications to a wide variety of systems. This Theme Issue explores this emerging new field by highlighting active liquid crystals. The collected contributions bridge theory to experiment, mathematical theories of passive and active nematics, spontaneous flows to defect dynamics, microscopic to continuum levels of description, spontaneous activity to biological activation. While the perspectives offered here only span a small part of this rapidly evolving field, we trust that they might provide the interested reader with a taste for this new class of non-equilibrium systems and their rich behaviour.

  4. The effect of quasispherical and chainlike solutes on the nematic to isotropic phase transition in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oweimreen, G. A.; Martire, D. E.

    1980-02-01

    The effects of solute molecular structure (size, shape and flexibility) and solvent molecular structure (length-to-breadth ratio and end-chain flexibility) on nematic phase stability in dilute binary mixtures of nonmesomorphic solutes and nematogenic solvents are examined through experiment and theory. Addition of the perturbing solute to the liquid-crystalline solvent leads to depression of the nematic-isotropic (NI) transition temperature and formation of a two-phase region. Directly determined moduli of the slopes, βn and βi, of the nematic and isotropic phase boundary lines in the reduced NI transition temperature (T*) vs solute mole fraction (x2) diagrams are reported for quasispherical and chainlike solutes with two nematogenic solvents. The systems studied are the quasispheres Et4C (tetraethylmethane) and R4Sn (R = CH3, C2H5, n-C3H7 and n-C4H9) and the chains n-C8H18 through n-C14H30, mixed with p-methoxybenzylidine-p'-n-butylaniline (MBBA) and p-n-pentyl-p'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). Also reported are indirectly determined β∞n and β∞i values (limit as x2→0), using a novel approach combining differential scanning calorimetry (for the pure solvent contribution) and gas-liquid chromatography (for the solution contribution), for Et4C and n-C5H12 through n-C11H24, with MBBA, 5CB, p-azoxyanisole (PAA), and p,p'-di-n-hexyloxyazoxybenzene (DHAB). For the systems in common, the average difference between the directly and indirectly determined β values is approximately 10% and, qualitatively consistent with lattice model predictions, the comparison suggests slight curvature of the phase boundary lines. The experimental β values, as a function of increasing solute size, are found to double (roughly) for the quasispheres and increase only slightly for the chains, reflecting the concurrent behavior of the solution contribution to β. The thermodynamic results for the quasispherical solutes are compared in some detail with predicted values from statistical

  5. Influence of finite size and wetting on nematic and smectic phase behavior of liquid crystal confined to controlled-pore matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnjak, Zdravko; Kralj, Samo; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Žumer, Slobodan

    2004-11-01

    The high-resolution calorimetric study was carried out on octylcyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC) confined to various controlled-pore glass (CPG) matrices with silane-treated surface. The diameter of the voids cross section ranged between 23.7 and 395nm . The results are compared to those obtained previously on CPG voids nontreated with silane. We found a striking similarity between the shifts in the isotropic to nematic and nematic to smectic- A phase transition temperatures as a function of the void radius in which order parameter variations at the LC-void interface play the dominant role. Weaker temperature shifts are observed in silane-treated samples, where surface ordering tendency is larger. In nontreated samples, a finite-size scaling law in the maximum value of the heat capacity at the nematic to smectic- A transition was observed for void diameters larger than 20nm . In silane-treated samples, this behavior is considerably changed by surface wetting interactions.

  6. Optically switchable liquid crystal photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Urbas, Augustine; Tondiglia, Vincent; Natarajan, Lalgudi; Sutherland, Richard; Yu, Haiping; Li, J-H; Bunning, Timothy

    2004-10-27

    Photo-optic materials offer the possibility of light controlled photonic devices, intelligent and environmentally adaptive optical materials. One strategy for creating these materials is the combination of structure formation through holographic photopolymerization and the variable optical properties of liquid crystals. Holographically patterned, polymer stabilized liquid crystals (HPSLCs) have proven to be useful optical materials. By incorporating photo-optic, azobenzene-derived liquid crystal blends into such material systems, we have generated practical photoresponsive optical materials.

  7. Positron lifetime measurements in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, Devendra S.

    1991-01-01

    Positron lifetimes in the isotropic phases of chiral nematic liquid crystal formulations and their mixtures up to the racemic level were measured. The lifetime spectra for all liquid crystal systems were analyzed into three components. Although the individual spectra in the left- and right-handed components are identical, their racemic mixtures exhibit much larger orthopositronium lifetimes; these larger lifetimes indicate the presence of larger microvoids. This result is consistent with the reportedly higher thermodynamic stability and color play range in the racemic mixtures of chiral nematic liquid crystals.

  8. Influence of chemical moieties and the flexible chain for the tilted smectic phases in linear hydrogen bonded liquid crystals with Schiff based pyridene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniprasad, M.; Srinivasulu, M.; Chalapathi, P. V.; Potukuchi, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    A novel series of hydrogen bonded liquid crystals (HBLC's) prepared from non-mesogenic 4-pyridine carboxaldehyde, p-n-tetradecyl aniline and mesogenic 4-n-alkoxy benzoic acids (nOBA's) are isolated by a condensation reaction followed by an HB complexation. Formation of HB complex and purity of product is confirmed by 1H NMR and IR spectroscopic techniques. The phase variance exhibited by the present HBLC series of compounds viz., Py14BA:nOBA's (for n = 3-5, 7-9 and 12) is found to be AB in lower homologues and CF in higher homologues. Odd-even effect is exhibited by the series at I-SmA, I-SmC and LC to Solid transitions. Iso-SmA, Iso-SmC, SmA-SmB and SmC-SmF transitions are found to be of 1st order nature. The even higher homologues (for n = 8 and 12) exhibit a paramorphotic textural transition of 2nd order nature in their SmC phase. The influence of HB (soft-covalent) interaction and the inductomeric effect contributed by the end chains for the enhancement of transverse dipole moment μt, the stability of tilted LC phases (SmC and SmF) are discussed. An ACF Multi-Critical Point is predicted in the phase diagram for Py14BA:nOBA series of HBLC's in the vicinity of n = 5.

  9. Molecular orientation behavior of chiral nematic liquid crystals based on the presence of blue phases using polarized microscopic FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Masanori; Katayama, Norihisa

    2016-07-01

    Study on molecular orientation behavior of highly twisted chiral nematic liquid crystals (N∗LCs) expressing blue phases (BPs) is important for developing new devices. This study examines the change of molecular orientation of N∗LCs due to the presence of BPs. Polarized microscopic FT-IR spectroscopy was used to study the in- and out-of-plane molecular orientations of N∗LCs that undergo a phase transition involving BPs. The band intensity ratio of CN to CH2 stretching modes (CN/CH2) in the IR spectra was used to determine the orientation of N∗LC molecules. The measured spectra indicated that the helical axis of N∗LC molecules was perpendicular to the substrate before heating and inclined on the substrate after cooling the sample which has phase transition from BP I to chiral nematic (N∗). The N∗LC molecule in the cell of rubbed orientation film exhibited the in-plane anisotropy after a heating-cooling ramp only in samples that passed through BP I. These results indicate that the changes of molecular orientation of N∗LC by phase transition are affected by BP I.

  10. Orthoconic liquid crystals--a case study.

    PubMed

    Lagerwall, Sven T

    2014-06-01

    Since the early investigations on liquid crystals it was realized how the confining surfaces often determine the textures and even properties of the material. This influence is particularly complex and important for chiral materials. When we come to chiral smectics the surfaces may have dramatic effects. These are illustrated on the ferroelectric liquid crystals; they then again increase in importance for the antiferroelectric liquid crystals where the most recent example is given by the orthoconic liquid crystals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanoscopic Manipulation and Imaging of Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, Charles S.

    2014-02-04

    This is the final project report. The project’s goals centered on nanoscopic imaging and control of liquid crystals and surfaces. We developed and refined techniques to control liquid crystal orientation at surfaces with resolution as small as 25 nm, we developed an optical imaging technique that we call Optical Nanotomography that allows us to obtain images inside liquid crystal films with resolution of 60 x 60 x 1 nm, and we opened new thrust areas related to chirality and to liquid crystal/colloid composites.

  12. Polarization properties of the variable-grating-mode liquid-crystal device.

    PubMed

    Tanguay, A R; Chavel, P; Strand, T C; Wu, C S; Soffer, B H

    1984-05-01

    The principal features of the liquid-crystal molecular orientation within the variable-grating-mode liquid-crystal device have been determined as a function of the applied voltage across the cell by measurement of the polarization properties of light diffracted by the liquid-crystal birefringent phase grating.

  13. Investigating the orientational order in smectic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shun

    This thesis is composed of two projects. The first one is the investigation of a reversed phase sequence, which subsequently leads to the discovery of a novel Smectic-C liquid crystal phase. The 10OHFBBB1M7 (10OHF) compound shows a reversed phase sequence with the SmC*d4 phase occurring at a higher temperature than the SmC* phase. This phase sequence is stabilized by moderate doping of 9OTBBB1M7 (C9) or 11OTBBB1M7 (C11). To further study this unique phase sequence, the mixtures of 10OHFBBB1M7 and its homologs have been characterized by optical techniques. In order to perform the resonant X-ray diffraction experiment, we have added C9 and C11 compounds to the binary mixtures and pure 10OHF. In two of the studied mixtures, a new smectic-C* liquid crystal phase with six-layer periodicity has been discovered. Upon cooling, the new phase appears between the SmC*a phase having a helical structure and the SmC*d4 phase with four-layer periodicity. The SmC*d6 phase shows a distorted clock structure. Three theoretical models have predicted the existence of a six-layer phase. However, our experimental findings are not consistent with the theories. The second project involves the mixtures of liquid crystals with different shapes. The role of different interactions in stabilizing the antiferroelectric smectic liquid crystal phases have been a long-standing questions in the community. By mixing the antiferroelectric smectic liquid crystal with achiral liquid crystal molecules with rod and hockey-stick shapes, distinct different behaviors are obtained. In the case of the mixtures of chiral smectic liquid crystals with rod-like molecules, all the smectic-C* variant phases vanish with a small amount of doping. However, the hockey-stick molecule is much less destructive compared to the rod-like molecule. This suggests that the antiferroelectric smectic liquid crystal molecules may have a shape closer to a hockey-stick rather than a rod.

  14. Handbook of Liquid Crystals, Handbook of Liquid Crystals: Four Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demus, Dietrich; Goodby, John W.; Gray, George W.; Spiess, Hans W.; Vill, Volkmar

    1998-06-01

    The Handbook of Liquid Crystals is a unique compendium of knowledge on all aspects of liquid crystals. In over 2000 pages the Handbook provides detailed information on the basic principles of both low- and high-molecular weight materials, as well as the synthesis, characterization, modification, and applications (such as in computer displays or as structural materials) of all types of liquid crystals. The five editors of the Handbook are internationally renowned experts from both industry and academia and have drawn together over 70 leading figures in the field as authors. The four volumes of the Handbook are designed both to be used together or as stand-alone reference sources. Some users will require the whole set, others will be best served with a selection of the volumes. Volume 1 deals with the basic physical and chemical principles of liquid crystals, including structure-property relationships, nomenclature, phase behavior, characterization methods, and general synthesis and application strategies. As such this volume provides an excellent introduction to the field and a powerful learning and teaching tool for graduate students and above. Volume 2 concentrates on low-molecular weight materials, for example those typically used in display technology. A high quality survey of the literature is provided along with full details of molecular design strategies, phase characterization and control, and applications development. This volume is therefore by far the most detailed reference source on these industrially very important materials, ideally suited for professionals in the field. Volume 3 concentrates on high-molecular weight, or polymeric, liquid crystals, some of which are found in structural applications and others occur as natural products of living systems. A high-quality literature survey is complemented by full detail of the synthesis, processing, analysis, and applications of all important materials classes. This volume is the most comprehensive

  15. Demonstrations of Some Optical Properties of Liquid Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Anthony J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses several properties of liquid crystal displays. Includes instructions for demonstrating liquid crystalline phase, ordering of the long axes of molecules along one direction, and electro-optic effects. The latter is accomplished with the use of an overhead projector following preparation of a sandwich cell. (JN)

  16. Demonstrations of Some Optical Properties of Liquid Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Anthony J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses several properties of liquid crystal displays. Includes instructions for demonstrating liquid crystalline phase, ordering of the long axes of molecules along one direction, and electro-optic effects. The latter is accomplished with the use of an overhead projector following preparation of a sandwich cell. (JN)

  17. Electrical property and structural analysis of amphoteric impurity Ge doped GaSe crystal grown by liquid phase growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Zhao, S.; Maeda, K.; Tanabe, T.; Oyama, Y.

    2017-06-01

    In order to improve conversion efficiency of THz wave generation, Germanium (Ge)-doped gallium selenide (GaSe) single crystals have been grown by Temperature Difference Method under Controlled Vapor Pressure (TDM-CVP). In this article, electrical property and lattice constant of Ge doped GaSe (GaSe:Ge) crystal are compared with that of not-intentionally doped GaSe crystal. Compared with non-doped GaSe crystal, carrier concentration p was decreased by Ge-doping (not-intentionally doped GaSe p = 3.2 ×1015 cm-3 at 255 K, GaSe:Ge p = 4.9 ×1014 cm-3 at 255 K). In addition, it has been confirmed that lattice constant of GaSe crystal increased with doping Ge concentration increased.

  18. Optical vortices from liquid crystal droplets.

    PubMed

    Brasselet, Etienne; Murazawa, Naoki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2009-09-04

    We report on the generation of mono- and polychromatic optical phase singularities from micron-sized birefringent droplets. This is done experimentally by using liquid crystal droplets whose three dimensional architecture of the optical axis is controlled within the bulk by surfactant agents. Because of its microscopic size these optical vortex generators are optically trapped and manipulated at will, thus realizing a robust self-aligned micro-optical device for orbital angular momentum conversion. Experimental observations are supported by a simple model of optical spin-orbit coupling in uniaxial dielectrics that emphasizes the prominent role of the transverse optical anisotropy with respect to the beam propagation direction.

  19. Stochastic rotation dynamics for nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang-Wu Mazza, Marco G.

    2015-04-28

    We introduce a new mesoscopic model for nematic liquid crystals (LCs). We extend the particle-based stochastic rotation dynamics method, which reproduces the Navier-Stokes equation, to anisotropic fluids by including a simplified Ericksen-Leslie formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the applicability of this hybrid model by studying the equilibrium isotropic-nematic phase transition and nonequilibrium problems, such as the dynamics of topological defects and the rheology of sheared LCs. Our simulation results show that this hybrid model captures many essential aspects of LC physics at the mesoscopic scale, while preserving microscopic thermal fluctuations.

  20. Polymer Crystallization at Curved Liquid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda

    Liquid/liquid interface, either flat or curved, is a unique template for studying self-assembly of a variety of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles and nanorods. The resultant monolayer films can be ordered or disordered depending on the regularity of the nanomaterials. Integration of nanoparticles into two-dimensional structure leads to intriguing collective properties of the nanoparticles. Crystallization can also be guided by liquid/liquid interface. Due to the particular shape of the interface, crystallization can happen in a different manner comparing to the normal solution crystallization. In this dissertation, liquid/liquid interface is employed to guide the crystallization of polymers, mainly focusing on using curved liquid/liquid interface. Due to the unique shape of the interface and feasibility to control the curvature, polymer crystallization can take place in different manner and lead to the formation of curved or vesicular crystals. Curved liquid/liquid interface is typically created through o/w emulsions. With the presence of surfactant, the emulsions are controlled to be stable at least for the polymer crystallization periods. The difference to normal solution crystallization is: the nuclei will diffuse to the curved interface due to the Pickering effect and guide the crystallization along the curved liquid/liquid interface. If the supercooling can be controlled to be very small, crystal growth in the bulk droplets can be avoided. The advantages of this strategy are: 1) the formation process of vesicular type crystals can be monitored by controlling the polymer supply; 2) curved crystals, bowl-like structures and enclosed capsules can be easily obtained comparing to the self-assembly method for vesicle formation; 3) the obtained vesicles will be made of polymer crystals, which will possess the extraordinary mechanical properties. Based on the nucleation type, this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part is focused on the self