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Sample records for liquid hydrogen systems

  1. Slush hydrogen liquid level system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlet, J. F.; Adams, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    A discrete capacitance liquid level system developed is specifically for slush hydrogen, but applicable to LOX, LN2, LH2, and RP1 without modification is described. The signal processing portion of the system is compatible with conventional liquid level sensors. Compatibility with slush hydrogen was achieved by designing the sensor with adequate spacing, while retaining the electrical characteristics of conventional sensors. Tests indicate excellent stability of the system over a temperature range of -20 C to 70 C for the circuit and to cryogenic temperatures of the sensor. The sensor was tested up to 40 g's rms random vibration with no damage to the sensor. Operation with 305 m of cable between the sensor and signal processor was demonstrated. It is concluded that this design is more than adequate for most flight and ground applications.

  2. The HARP liquid hydrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uden, M. A.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bron, M.; Buis, R.; de Groen, P. J. M.; Lefevere, Y.; Nooren, G. J. L.; Postma, H.; van der Steenhoven, G.; Willering, H. W.

    1999-03-01

    A liquid hydrogen system has been developed that serves as a scatterer for the High-Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP). In order to satisfy the conflicting design requirements regarding safety, the volume of the system, the energy loss of the recoiling protons, and the location of the cryogenic unit, a self-supporting thin-walled modular cryogenic system has been developed. The system was successfully operated during two commissioning runs of HARP in a high-luminosity electron scattering environment. The operational parameters of the system have been continuously monitored and are quantitatively understood.

  3. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  4. High Efficient Cryocooler for Liquid Hydrogen System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagome, H.

    2006-04-01

    Conversion into Hydrogen Energy Society is advanced focusing on the application to a fuel cell electric vehicle. As volume and weight density of liquid hydrogen are large, it is the method which was most excellent as the storage method of hydrogen. However, in order to store liquid hydrogen stably over a long period of time, decreasing the loss of energy, development of an efficient small cryocooler becomes important. This paper reports the research about improvement in the refrigeration efficiency of a two-stage GM cryocooler. In order that the GM cryocooler may operate by the Simon expansion, it carries out asymptotic of the COP of the GM cryocooler to the Carnot COP as a compression ratio is lowered. When experimented based on this view, it was checked that refrigeration efficiency rises with reduction in a compression ratio. Furthermore, if the compression ratio is lowered, refrigeration efficiency will fall rapidly. The peak value of the refrigeration efficiency in 20K level attained 28%Carnot. It was verified by optimization of the compression ratio of the GM cryocooler that refrigeration efficiency can be improved significantly. Therefore, sharp reduction of the energy consumption of a liquid hydrogen system will be attained by applying the result of this research.

  5. Lansce liquid hydrogen moderator system hardware-characteristic-operation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, H.; Russell, G.J.; Tucker, E.; Whitaker, R.; Williamson, K.; Edeskuty, F.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, we report the current status of the hardware development and testing program for a liquid hydrogen moderator system currently being fabricated for installation into the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) upgraded target system.

  6. Vapor-liquid equilibria for the systems difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, dichlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorine + hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.

    1998-01-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, dichlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorine + hydrogen fluoride have been measured. The experimental data for the binary systems are correlated with the NRTL equation with the vapor-phase association model for the mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, and the relevant parameters are presented. The binary system difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride forms a homogeneous liquid phase, and the others form minimum boiling heterogeneous azeotropes at the experimental conditions.

  7. A novel liquid organic hydrogen carrier system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Fogler, Eran; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Iron, Mark A; Milstein, David

    2015-04-17

    Hydrogen is an efficient green fuel, but its low energy density when stored under high pressure or cryogenically, and safety issues, presents significant disadvantages; hence finding efficient and safe hydrogen carriers is a major challenge. Of special interest are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), which can be readily loaded and unloaded with considerable amounts of hydrogen. However, disadvantages include high hydrogen pressure requirements, high reaction temperatures for both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, which require different catalysts, and high LOHC cost. Here we present a readily reversible LOHC system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation, using an inexpensive, safe and abundant organic compound with high potential capacity to store and release hydrogen, applying the same catalyst for loading and unloading hydrogen under relatively mild conditions. Mechanistic insight of the catalytic reaction is provided. We believe that these findings may lead to the development of an inexpensive, safe and clean liquid hydrogen carrier system.

  8. A novel liquid organic hydrogen carrier system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng; Fogler, Eran; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Iron, Mark A.; Milstein, David

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is an efficient green fuel, but its low energy density when stored under high pressure or cryogenically, and safety issues, presents significant disadvantages; hence finding efficient and safe hydrogen carriers is a major challenge. Of special interest are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), which can be readily loaded and unloaded with considerable amounts of hydrogen. However, disadvantages include high hydrogen pressure requirements, high reaction temperatures for both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, which require different catalysts, and high LOHC cost. Here we present a readily reversible LOHC system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation, using an inexpensive, safe and abundant organic compound with high potential capacity to store and release hydrogen, applying the same catalyst for loading and unloading hydrogen under relatively mild conditions. Mechanistic insight of the catalytic reaction is provided. We believe that these findings may lead to the development of an inexpensive, safe and clean liquid hydrogen carrier system. PMID:25882348

  9. Liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary power system thruster investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, E. E.; Kusak, L.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and demonstration of a 111 newton (25 lb) thrust, integrated auxiliary propulsion system (IAPS) thruster for use with LH2/LO2 propellants is described. Hydrogen was supplied at a temperature range of 22 to 33 K (40 to 60 R), and oxygen from 89 to 122 K (160 to 220 R). The thruster was designed to operate in both pulse mode and steady-state modes for vehicle attitude control, space maneuvering, and as an abort backup in the event of failure of the main propulsion system. A dual-sleeve, tri-axial injection system was designed that utilizes a primary injector/combustor where 100 percent of the oxygen and 8 percent of the hydrogen is introduced; a secondary injector/combustor where 45 percent of the hydrogen is introduced to mix with the primary combustor gases; and a boundary layer injector that uses the remaining 45 percent of the hydrogen to cool the thrust throat/nozzle design. Hot-fire evaluation of this thruster with a BLC injection distance of 2.79 cm (1.10 in.) indicated that a specific impulse value of 390 sec can be attained using a coated molybdenum thrust chamber. Pulse mode tests indicated that a chamber pressure buildup to 90 percent thrust can be achieved in a time on the order of 48 msec. Some problems were encountered in achieving ignition of each pulse during pulse trains. This was interpreted to indicate that a higher delivered spark energy level ( 100 mJ) would be required to maintain ignition reliability of the plasma torch ignition system under the extra 'cold' conditions resulting during pulsing.

  10. Integrated gasifier combined cycle polygeneration system to produce liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. K.; Staiger, P. J.; Donovan, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) system which simultaneously produces electricity, process steam, and liquid hydrogen was evaluated and compared to IGCC systems which cogenerate electricity and process steam. A number of IGCC plants, all employing a 15 MWe has turbine and producing from 0 to 20 tons per day of liquid hydrogen and from 0 to 20 MWt of process steam were considered. The annual revenue required to own and operate such plants was estimated to be significantly lower than the potential market value of the products. The results indicate a significant potential economic benefit to configuring IGCC systems to produce a clean fuel in addition to electricity and process steam in relatively small industrial applications.

  11. Study of Hydrogen Recovery Systems for Gas Vented While Refueling Liquid-Hydrogen Fueled Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of capturing and reliquefying the cold hydrogen vapor produced during the fueling of aircraft designed to utilize liquid hydrogen fuel were investigated. An assessment of the most practical, economic, and energy efficient of the hydrogen recovery methods is provided.

  12. Study of liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary propulsion systems for the space tug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Design concepts are considered that permit use of a liquid-liquid (as opposed to gas-gas) oxygen/hydrogen thrust chamber for attitude control and auxiliary propulsion thrusters on the space tug. The best of the auxiliary propulsion system concepts are defined and their principal characteristics, including cost as well as operational capabilities, are established. Design requirements for each of the major components of the systems, including thrusters, are developed at the conceptual level. The competitive concepts considered use both dedicated (separate tanks) and integrated (propellant from main propulsion tanks) propellant supply. The integrated concept is selected as best for the space tug after comparative evaluation against both cryogenic and storable propellant dedicated systems. A preliminary design of the selected system is established and recommendations for supporting research and technology to further the concept are presented.

  13. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, James J.; Grohse, Edward W.; Johnson, John R.; Winsche, deceased, Warren E.

    1988-01-01

    The reversible reaction M+x/2 H.sub.2 .rarw..fwdarw.MH.sub.x, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH.sub.x in the presence of H.sub.2, generally used to store and recall H.sub.2, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H.sub.2, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H.sub.2 through the liquid is dependent upon the H.sub.2 pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H.sub.2 pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particles. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  14. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Johnson, J.R.; Winsche, W.E.

    1985-02-22

    The reversible reaction M + x/2 H/sub 2/ reversible MH/sub x/, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H/sub 2/ pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  15. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the systems 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1997-03-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the three binary systems (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride) have been measured. The experimental data for the binary systems are correlated with the NRTL equation with the vapor-phase association model for the mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, and the relevant parameters are presented. All of the systems form minimum boiling heterogeneous azeotropes.

  16. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-25

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10{sup 5} and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  17. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-01

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 105 and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA).

  18. Investigative techniques used to locate the liquid hydrogen leakage on the Space Shuttle Main Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammock, William R., Jr.; Cota, Phillip E., Jr.; Rosenbaum, Bernard J.; Barrett, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Standard leak detection methods at ambient temperature have been developed in order to prevent excessive leakage from the Space Shuttle liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen Main Propulsion System. Unacceptable hydrogen leakage was encountered on the Columbia and Atlantis flight vehicles in the summer of 1990 after the standard leak check requirements had been satisfied. The leakage was only detectable when the fuel system was exposed to subcooled liquid hydrogen during External Tank loading operations. Special instrumentation and analytical tools were utilized during a series of propellant tanking tests in order to identify the sources of the hydrogen leakage. After the leaks were located and corrected, the physical characteristics of the leak sources were analyzed in an effort to understand how the discrepancies were introduced and why the leakage had evaded the standard leak detection methods. As a result of the post-leak analysis, corrective actions and leak detection improvements have been implemented in order to preclude a similar incident.

  19. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  20. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J. -K; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J.

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  1. A 10,000-gpm liquid hydrogen transfer system for the Saturn/Apollo program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wybranowski, E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Brief description of the design and operation of the liquid hydrogen transfer system used to service the Saturn V launch vehicle. The cryogenic loading of the huge booster begins eight hours before the scheduled liftoff. The first three hours of fueling are spent in cold hydrogen gas conditioning of the fuel tank. The cold hydrogen gas is provided by vaporizing liquid hydrogen from the storage tank and routing the resultant gas through the fill system. Boil-off losses after loading are continuously replaced through control valves which are driven by a computer system. The liquid hydrogen transfer system is made up of a number of subsystems including the 850,000 gal storage tank whose boil-off losses amount to only 200 gal/day, the pressurization system, the burn pond for controlled disposal of hydrogen waste gas, the storage tank fill manifold, and the hazardous gas monitoring system. Some of the subsystems and components are redundant to provide a high degree of reliability.

  2. Performance Tests of a Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Densification Ground System for the X33/RLV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1997-01-01

    A concept for improving the performance of propulsion systems in expendable and single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicles much like the X33/RLV has been identified. The approach is to utilize densified cryogenic liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellants to fuel the propulsion stage. The primary benefit for using this relatively high specific impulse densified propellant mixture is the subsequent reduction of the launch vehicle gross lift-off weight. Production of densified propellants however requires specialized equipment to actively subcool both the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen to temperatures below their normal boiling point. A propellant densification unit based on an external thermodynamic vent principle which operates at subatmospheric pressure and supercold temperatures provides a means for the LH2 and LOX densification process to occur. To demonstrate the production concept for the densification of the liquid hydrogen propellant, a system comprised of a multistage gaseous hydrogen compressor, LH2 recirculation pumps and a cryogenic LH2 heat exchanger was designed, built and tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This paper presents the design configuration of the LH2 propellant densification production hardware, analytical details and results of performance testing conducted with the hydrogen densifier Ground Support Equipment (GSE).

  3. A Low Cost, Self Acting, Liquid Hydrogen Boil-Off Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelfrey, Joy W.; Sharp, Kirk V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a prototype liquid hydrogen boll-off recovery system. Perform analyses to finalize recovery system cycle, design detail components, fabricate hardware, and conduct sub-component, component, and system level tests leading to the delivery of a prototype system. The design point and off-design analyses identified cycle improvements to increase the robustness of the system by adding a by-pass heat exchanger. Based on the design, analysis, and testing conducted, the recovery system will liquefy 31% of the gaseous boil off from a liquid hydrogen storage tank. All components, including a high speed, miniature turbocompressor, were designed and manufacturing drawings were created. All hardware was fabricated and tests were conducted in air, helium, and hydrogen. Testing validated the design, except for the turbocompressor. A rotor-to-stator clearance issue was discovered as a result of a concentricity tolerance stack-up.

  4. Evaluation of industrially applied heat-transfer fluids as liquid organic hydrogen carrier systems.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Nicole; Obesser, Katharina; Bösmann, Andreas; Teichmann, Daniel; Arlt, Wolfgang; Dungs, Jennifer; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems offer a very attractive method for the decentralized storage of renewable excess energy. In this contribution, industrially well-established heat-transfer oils (typically sold under trade names, e.g., Marlotherm) are proposed as a new class of LOHC systems. It is demonstrated that the liquid mixture of isomeric dibenzyltoluenes (m.p. -39 to -34 °C, b.p. 390 °C) can be readily hydrogenated to the corresponding mixture of perhydrogenated analogues by binding 6.2 wt% of H2. The liquid H2 -rich form can be stored and transported similarly to diesel fuel. It readily undergoes catalytic dehydrogenation at temperatures above 260 °C, which proves its applicability as a reversible H2 carrier. The presented LOHC systems are further characterized by their excellent technical availability at comparably low prices, full registration of the H2 -lean forms, and excellent thermal stabilities. PMID:23956191

  5. Evaluation of industrially applied heat-transfer fluids as liquid organic hydrogen carrier systems.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Nicole; Obesser, Katharina; Bösmann, Andreas; Teichmann, Daniel; Arlt, Wolfgang; Dungs, Jennifer; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems offer a very attractive method for the decentralized storage of renewable excess energy. In this contribution, industrially well-established heat-transfer oils (typically sold under trade names, e.g., Marlotherm) are proposed as a new class of LOHC systems. It is demonstrated that the liquid mixture of isomeric dibenzyltoluenes (m.p. -39 to -34 °C, b.p. 390 °C) can be readily hydrogenated to the corresponding mixture of perhydrogenated analogues by binding 6.2 wt% of H2. The liquid H2 -rich form can be stored and transported similarly to diesel fuel. It readily undergoes catalytic dehydrogenation at temperatures above 260 °C, which proves its applicability as a reversible H2 carrier. The presented LOHC systems are further characterized by their excellent technical availability at comparably low prices, full registration of the H2 -lean forms, and excellent thermal stabilities.

  6. Design study of the cooling scheme for SMES system in ASPCS by using liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makida, Yasuhiro; Shintomi, Takakazu; Asami, Takuya; Suzuki, Goro; Takao, Tomoaki; Hamajima, Takataro; Tsuda, Makoto; Miyagi, Daisuke; Munakata, Kouhei; Kajiwara, Masataka

    2013-11-01

    From the point of view of environment and energy problems, the renewable energies have been attracting attention. However, fluctuating power generation by the renewable energies affects the stability of the power network. Thus, we propose a new electric power storage and stabilization system, Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), in which a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and a hydrogen-energy-storage converge on a liquid hydrogen station for fuel cell vehicles. The ASPCS proposes that the SMES coils wound with MgB2 conductor are indirectly cooled by thermo-siphon circulation of liquid hydrogen to use its cooling capability. The conceptual design of cooling scheme of the ASPCS is presented.

  7. Reference Gauging System for a Small-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Siegwarth, James D.

    2003-01-01

    A system to accurately weigh the fluid contents of a small-scale liquid hydrogen test tank has been experimentally verified. It is intended for use as a reference or benchmark system when testing lowgravity liquid quantity gauging concepts in the terrestrial environment. The reference gauging system has shown a repeatable measurement accuracy of better than 0.5 percent of the full tank liquid weight. With further refinement, the system accuracy can be improved to within 0.10 percent of full scale. This report describes the weighing system design, calibration, and operational results. Suggestions are given for further refinement of the system. An example is given to illustrate additional sources of uncertainty when mass measurements are converted to volume equivalents. Specifications of the companion test tank and its multi-layer insulation system are provided.

  8. Liquid Hydrogen: Target, Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Harigel, G.G.

    2004-06-23

    In 1952 D. Glaser demonstrated that a radioactive source's radiation could boil 135 deg. C superheated-diethyl ether in a 3-mm O glass vessel and recorded bubble track growth on high-speed film in a 2-cm3 chamber. This Bubble Chamber (BC) promised improved particle track time and spatial resolution and cycling rate. Hildebrand and Nagle, U of Chicago, reported Liquid Hydrogen minimum ionizing particle boiling in August 1953. John Wood created the 3.7-cm O Liquid Hydrogen BC at LBL in January 1954. By 1959 the Lawrence Berkley Laboratory (LBL) Alvarez group's '72-inch' BC had tracks in liquid hydrogen. Within 10 years bubble chamber volumes increased by a factor of a million and spread to every laboratory with a substantial high-energy physics program. The BC, particle accelerators and special separated particle beams created a new era of High Energy Physics (HEP) experimentation. The BC became the largest most complex cryogenic installation at the world's HEP laboratories for decades. The invention and worldwide development, deployment and characteristics of these cryogenic dynamic target/detectors and related hydrogen targets are described.

  9. Thermal Performance Comparison of Glass Microsphere and Perlite Insulation Systems for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, J. P.; Fesmire, J. E.; Nagy, Z. F.; Sojourner, S. J.; Morris, D. L.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2008-03-01

    A technology demonstration test project was conducted by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide comparative thermal performance data for glass microspheres, referred to as bubbles, and perlite insulation for liquid hydrogen tank applications. Two identical 1/15th scale versions of the 3,200,000 liter spherical liquid hydrogen tanks at Launch Complex 39 at KSC were custom designed and built to serve as test articles for this test project. Evaporative (boil-off) calorimeter test protocols, including liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, were established to provide tank test conditions characteristic of the large storage tanks that support the Space Shuttle launch operations. This paper provides comparative thermal performance test results for bubbles and perlite for a wide range of conditions. Thermal performance as a function of cryogenic commodity (nitrogen and hydrogen), vacuum pressure, insulation fill level, tank liquid level, and thermal cycles will be presented.

  10. Vehicle-scale investigation of a fluorine jet-pump liquid hydrogen tank pressurization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental program was performed to evaluate the performance of a fluorine-hydrogen jet-pump injector for main tank injection (MTI) pressurization of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank. The injector performance during pressurization and LH2 expulsion was determined by a series of seven tests of a full-scale injector and MTI pressure control system in a 28.3 cu m (1000 cu ft) flight-weight LH2 tank. Although the injector did not effectively jet-pump LH2 continuously, it showed improved pressurization performance compared to straight-pipe injectors tested under the same conditions in a previous program. The MTI computer code was modified to allow performance prediction for the jet-pump injector.

  11. Reduction of liquid hydrogen boiloff: Optimal reliquefaction system design and cost study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary design and economic analysis of candidate hydrogen reliquefaction systems was performed. All candidate systems are of the same general type; differences and size, compressor arrangement, and amount of hydrogen venting. The potential application of the hydrogen reliquefaction will be to reduce the boil-off from the 850,000 gallon storage dewars at LC-39.

  12. Testing the Effects of Helium Pressurant on Thermodynamic Vent System Performance with Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.; Tucker, S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the development of a zero gravity pressure control capability for liquid hydrogen, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the effects of helium pressurant on the performance of a spray bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). Fourteen days of testing was performed in August - September 2005, with an ambient heat leak of about 70-80 watts and tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. The TVS successfully controlled the tank pressure within a +/- 3.45 kPa (+/- 0.5 psi) band with various helium concentration levels in the ullage. Relative to pressure control with an "all hydrogen" ullage, the helium presence resulted in 10 to 30 per cent longer pressure reduction durations, depending on the fill level, during the mixing/venting phase of the control cycle. Additionally, the automated control cycle was based on mixing alone for pressure reduction until the pressure versus time slope became positive, at which time the Joule-Thomson vent was opened. Testing was also conducted to evaluate thermodynamic venting without the mixer operating, first with liquid then with vapor at the recirculation line inlet. Although ullage stratification was present, the ullage pressure was successfully controlled without the mixer operating. Thus, if vapor surrounded the pump inlet in a reduced gravity situation, the ullage pressure can still be controlled by venting through the TVS Joule Thomson valve and heat exchanger. It was evident that the spray bar configuration, which extends almost the entire length of the tank, enabled significant thermal energy removal from the ullage even without the mixer operating. Details regarding the test setup and procedures are presented in the paper. 1

  13. A new vapor-liquid equilibrium apparatus for hydrogen fluoride containing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jongcheon Lee; Hwayong Kim; Jong Sung Lim; Jae-Duck Kim; Youn Yong Lee

    1996-12-31

    A new circulating type apparatus has been constructed to obtain reliable equilibrium PTxy data for hydrogen fluoride (HF) containing system. Equilibrium cell with Pyrex windows protected by Teflon PFA sheets to prevent the corrosion was used. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a) + HF system at 288.23 and 298.35 K were obtained, and compared with PTx measurement results. Experimental data were correlated using Lencka and Anderko equation of state for HF with the Wong-Sandler mixing rule as well as the van der Waals one fluid mixing rule. The Wong-Sandler mixing rule gives better results. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  15. Spray Bar Zero-Gravity Vent System for On-Orbit Liquid Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Martin, J. J.; Hedayat, A.; Fazah, M.; Lak, T.; Nguyen, H.; Bailey, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    During zero-gravity orbital cryogenic propulsion operations, a thermodynamic vent system (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure control without propellant resettling. In this case, a longitudinal spray bar mixer system, coupled with a Joule-Thompson (J-T) valve and heat exchanger, was evaluated in a series of TVS tests using the 18 cu m multipurpose hydrogen test bed. Tests performed at fill levels of 90, 50, and 25 percent, coupled with heat tank leaks of about 20 and 50 W, successfully demonstrated tank pressure control within a 7-kPa band. Based on limited testing, the presence of helium constrained the energy exchange between the gaseous and liquid hydrogen (LH2) during the mixing cycles. A transient analytical model, formulated to characterize TVS performance, was used to correlate the test data. During self-pressurization cycles following tank lockup, the model predicted faster pressure rise rates than were measured; however, once the system entered the cyclic self-pressurization/mixing/venting operational mode, the modeled and measured data were quite similar. During a special test at the 25-percent fill level, the J-T valve was allowed to remain open and successfully reduced the bulk LH2 saturation pressure from 133 to 70 kPa in 188 min.

  16. Investigation of parameters of interaction of hydrogen isotopes with liquid lithium and lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazhibayeva, I. L.; Kulsartov, T. V.; Gordienko, Yu. N.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Ponkratov, Yu. V.; Barsukov, N. I.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Baklanov, V. V.; Gnyrya, V. S.; Kenzhin, Ye. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effect of reactor irradiation on the processes of interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) is considered. The experiments are carried out by the gas-absorption method with use of a specially designed ampoule device. The results of investigation of the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium CPS under conditions of reactor irradiation are described; namely, these are the temperature dependences of the rate constant for the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium at different reactor powers, the activation energies of the processes, and the pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius dependence. The effect of increasing absorption of hydrogen by the samples under investigation as a result of the reactor irradiation is fixed. The effect can be explained by increasing mobility of hydrogen in liquid lithium due to hot spots in lithium bulk and the interaction of helium and tritium ions (formed as a result of the nuclear reaction of 6Li with neutron) with a surface hydride film.

  17. Investigation of parameters of interaction of hydrogen isotopes with liquid lithium and lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tazhibayeva, I. L. Kulsartov, T. V.; Gordienko, Yu. N.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Ponkratov, Yu. V.; Barsukov, N. I.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Baklanov, V. V.; Gnyrya, V. S.; Kenzhin, Ye. A.

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the effect of reactor irradiation on the processes of interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) is considered. The experiments are carried out by the gas-absorption method with use of a specially designed ampoule device. The results of investigation of the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium CPS under conditions of reactor irradiation are described; namely, these are the temperature dependences of the rate constant for the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium at different reactor powers, the activation energies of the processes, and the pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius dependence. The effect of increasing absorption of hydrogen by the samples under investigation as a result of the reactor irradiation is fixed. The effect can be explained by increasing mobility of hydrogen in liquid lithium due to hot spots in lithium bulk and the interaction of helium and tritium ions (formed as a result of the nuclear reaction of {sup 6}Li with neutron) with a surface hydride film.

  18. Thermal Analysis on Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen Tank on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Harpster, George; Hunter, James

    2007-01-01

    Thermal analyses are performed on the liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank designed for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) powered by solar arrays and a regenerative proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. A 14-day cruise mission at a 65,000 ft altitude is considered. Thermal analysis provides the thermal loads on the tank system and the boiling-off rates of LH2. Different approaches are being considered to minimize the boiling-off rates of the LH2. It includes an evacuated multilayer insulation (MLI) versus aerogel insulation on the LH2 tank and aluminum versus stainless steel spacer rings between the inner and outer tank. The resulting boil-off rates of LH2 provided by the one-dimensional model and three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) on the tank system are presented and compared to validate the results of the three-dimensional FEA. It concludes that heat flux through penetrations by conduction is as significant as that through insulation around the tank. The tank system with MLI insulation and stainless steel spacer rings result in the lowest boiling-off rate of LH2.

  19. Calibrating the Helium Pressurization System for the Space Shuttle Liquid-Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the results from the STS-114 tanking tests and subsequent launch called into question existing thermal and mass models of helium pressurization of the liquid hydrogen tank. This hydrogen tank, which makes up the bottom two-thirds of the External Tank, is pressurized prior to launch to avoid cavitation in the Shuttle Main Engine pumps. At about 2 minutes prior to launch, the main vent valve is closed, and pressurized helium flows into the tank ullage space to achieve set point pressure. As the helium gas cools, its pressure drops, calling for additional helium. Subsequent helium flows are provided in short, timed pulses. The number of pulses is taken as a rough leak indicator. An analysis of thermal models by Marshall Space Flight Center showed considerable uncertainty in the pressure-versus-time behavior of the helium ullage space and the ability to predict the number of pulses normally expected. Kennedy Space Center proposed to calibrate the dime-sized orifice, which together with valves, controls the helium flow quantity (Figure 1). Pressure and temperature sensors were installed to provide upstream and downstream measurements necessary to compute flow rate based on the orifice discharge coefficient. An assessment of flow testing with helium indicated an extremely costly use of this critical resource. In order to reduce costs, we proposed removing the orifices from each Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) and asking Colorado Engineering Experiment Station Inc. (CEESI) to calibrate the flow. CEESI has a high-pressure air flow system with traceable flow meters capable of handling the large flow rates. However, literature research indicated that square-edged orifices of small diameters often exhibit significant hysteresis and nonrepeatability in the vicinity of choked or sonic flow. Fortunately, the MLP orifices behaved relatively well in testing (Figure 2). Using curve fitting of the air-flow data, in conjunction with ASME orifice modeling equations, a

  20. Large-capacity pump vaporizer for liquid hydrogen and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, J. A.

    1970-01-01

    Pump vaporizer system delivers 500 standard cubic feet per minute of hydrogen or nitrogen, one system delivers both gases. Vacuum-jacketed pump discharges liquid hydrogen or liquid nitrogen into vaporizing system heated by ambient air. Principal characteristics of the flow and discharge system, pump, and vaporizer are given.

  1. Crash test of a liquid hydrogen automobile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finegold, J. G.; Van Vorst, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Details of the conversion of a U.S. Postal Service mail truck to hydrogen-fueled operation are given. Specific reference is made to design safety considerations. A traffic accident is described that caused the mail truck (mounted on a trailer) to turn on its side at approximately 20 mph and to finally slide to a stop and turn upside down. No one was injured, and there was essentially no damage to the liquid hydrogen fuel system. The mail truck was driven away from the scene of the accident. Suggestions to insure the safety of hydrogen-fueled experimental vehicles are made.

  2. Thermal Analysis of Cryogenic Hydrogen Liquid Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congiardo, Jared F.; Fortier, Craig R. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    During launch for the new Space Launch System (SLS) liquid hydrogen is bleed through the engines during replenish, pre-press, and extended pre-press to condition the engines prior to launch. The predicted bleed flow rates are larger than for the shuttle program. A consequence of the increased flow rates is having liquif hydrogen in the vent system, which the facilities was never designed to handle. To remedy the problem a liquid separator is being designed in the system to accumulated the liquid propellant and protect the facility flare stack (which can only handle gas). The attached document is a presentation of the current thermalfluid analysis performed for the separator and will be presented at the Thermal and Fluid Analysis Workshop (NASA workshop) next week in Cleveland, Ohio.

  3. Study of Systems and Technology for Liquid Hydrogen Production Independent of Fossil Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprafka, R. J.; Escher, W. J. D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Shingleton, J.; Moore, J. S.; Baker, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Based on Kennedy Space Center siting and logistics requirements and the nonfossil energy resources at the Center, a number of applicable technologies and system candidates for hydrogen production were identified and characterized. A two stage screening of these technologies in the light of specific criteria identified two leading candidates as nonfossil system approaches. Conceptual design and costing of two solar-operated, stand alone systems, one photovoltaic based on and the other involving the power tower approach reveals their technical feasibility as sited as KSC, and the potential for product cost competitiveness with conventional supply approaches in the 1990 to 1210 time period. Conventional water hydrolysis and hydrogen liquefaction subsystems are integrated with the solar subsystems.

  4. Thermal performance of a liquid hydrogen tank multilayer insulation system at warm boundary temperatures of 630, 530, and 152 R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, Robert J.; Knoll, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of a study conducted to obtain experimental heat transfer data on a liquid hydrogen tank insulated with 34 layers of MLI (multilayer insulation) for warm side boundary temperatures of 630, 530, and 150 R. The MLI system consisted of two blankets, each blanket made up of alternate layers of double silk net (16 layers) and double aluminized Mylar radiation shields (15 layers) contained between two cover sheets of Dacron scrim reinforced Mylar. The insulation system was designed for and installed on a 87.6 in diameter liquid hydrogen tank. Nominal layer density of the insulation blankets is 45 layers/in. The insulation system contained penetrations for structural support, plumbing, and electrical wiring that would be representative of a cryogenic spacecraft. The total steady state heat transfer rates into the test tank for shroud temperatures of 630, 530, 152 R were 164.4, 95.8, and 15.9 BTU/hr respectively. The noninsulation heat leaks into the tank (12 fiberglass support struts, tank plumbing, and instrumentation lines) represent between 13 to 17 pct. of the total heat input. The heat input values would translate to liquid H2 losses of 2.3, 1.3, and 0.2 pct/day, with the tank held at atmospheric pressure.

  5. Thermal performance of a liquid hydrogen tank multilayer insulation system at warm boundary temperatures of 630, 530, and 152 R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, Robert J.; Knoll, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of a study conducted to obtain experimental heat transfer data on a liquid hydrogen tank insulated with 34 layers of MLI (multilayer insulation) for warm side boundary temperatures of 630, 530, and 150 R. The MLI system consisted of two blankets, each blanket made up of alternate layers of double silk net (16 layers) and double aluminized Mylar radiation shields (15 layers) contained between two cover sheets of Dacron scrim reinforced Mylar. The insulation system was designed for and installed on an 87.6 in. diameter liquid hydrogen tank. Nominal layer density of the insulation blankets is 45 layers/in. The insulation system contained penetrations for structural support, plumbing, and electrical wiring that would be representative of a cryogenic spacecraft. The total steady state heat transfer rates into the test tank for shroud temperatures of 630, 530, 152 R were 164.4, 95.8, and 15.9 BTU/hr, respectively. The noninsulation heat leaks into the tank (12 fiberglass support struts, tank plumbing, and instrumentation lines) represent between 13 to 17 pct. of the total heat input. The heat input values would translate to liquid H2 losses of 2.3, 1.3, and 0.2 pct/day, with the tank held at atmospheric pressure.

  6. Test Data Analysis of a Spray Bar Zero-Gravity Liquid Hydrogen Vent System for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Bailey, J. W.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.

    2003-01-01

    To support development of a zero-gravity pressure control capability for liquid hydrogen (LH2), a series of thermodynamic venting system (TVS) tests was conducted in 1996 and 1998 using the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB). These tests were performed with ambient heat leaks =20 and 50 W for tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. TVS performance testing revealed that the spray bar was highly effective in providing tank pressure control within a 7-kPa band (131-138 Wa), and complete destratification of the liquid and the ullage was achieved with all test conditions. Seven of the MHTB tests were correlated with the TVS performance analytical model. The tests were selected to encompass the range of tank fill levels, ambient heat leaks, operational modes, and ullage pressurants. The TVS model predicted ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature obtained from the TVS model were compared with the test data. During extended self-pressurization periods, following tank lockup, the model predicted faster pressure rise rates than were measured. However, once the system entered the cyclic mixing/venting operational mode, the modeled and measured data were quite similar.

  7. Characterization of Pump-Induced Acoustics in Space Launch System Main Propulsion System Liquid Hydrogen Feedline Using Airflow Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhart, C. J.; Snellgrove, L. M.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity acoustic edgetones located upstream of the RS-25 Low Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (LPFTP) were previously observed during Space Launch System (STS) airflow testing of a model Main Propulsion System (MPS) liquid hydrogen (LH2) feedline mated to a modified LPFTP. MPS hardware has been adapted to mitigate the problematic edgetones as part of the Space Launch System (SLS) program. A follow-on airflow test campaign has subjected the adapted hardware to tests mimicking STS-era airflow conditions, and this manuscript describes acoustic environment identification and characterization born from the latest test results. Fluid dynamics responsible for driving discrete excitations were well reproduced using legacy hardware. The modified design was found insensitive to high intensity edgetone-like discretes over the bandwidth of interest to SLS MPS unsteady environments. Rather, the natural acoustics of the test article were observed to respond in a narrowband-random/mixed discrete manner to broadband noise thought generated by the flow field. The intensity of these responses were several orders of magnitude reduced from those driven by edgetones.

  8. Development and validation of purged thermal protection systems for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, R. D.; Colt, J. Z.

    1977-01-01

    An economical, lightweight, safe, efficient, reliable, and reusable insulation system was developed for hypersonic cruise vehicle hydrogen fuel tanks. Results indicate that, a nitrogen purged, layered insulation system with nonpermeable closed-cell insulation next to the cryogenic tank and a high service temperature fibrous insulation surrounding it, is potentially an attractive solution to the insulation problem. For the postulated hypersonic flight the average unit weight of the purged insulation system (including insulation, condensate and fuel boil off) is 6.31 kg/sq m (1.29 psf). Limited cyclic tests of large specimens of closed cell polymethacrylimide foam indicate it will withstand the expected thermal cycle.

  9. Liquid Hydrogen Sensor Considerations for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2006-01-01

    The on-orbit management of liquid hydrogen planned for the return to the moon will introduce new considerations not encountered in previous missions. This paper identifies critical liquid hydrogen sensing needs from the perspective of reliable on-orbit cryogenic fluid management, and contrasts the fundamental differences in fluid and thermodynamic behavior for ground-based versus on-orbit conditions. Opportunities for advanced sensor development and implementation are explored in the context of critical Exploration Architecture operations such as on-orbit storage, docking, and trans-lunar injection burn. Key sensing needs relative to these operations are also examined, including: liquid/vapor detection, thermodynamic condition monitoring, mass gauging, and leak detection. Finally, operational aspects of an integrated system health management approach are discussed to highlight the potential impact on mission success.

  10. Nonaqueous System of Iron-Based Ionic Liquid and DMF for the Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide and Regeneration by Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhihui; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Tiantian; Du, Jun; Jia, Bing; Gao, Shujing; Yu, Jiang

    2015-05-01

    To improve the hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency with the application of an iron-based imidazolium chloride ionic liquid (Fe(III)-IL) as desulfurizer, Fe(II) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) are introduced to Fe(III)-IL to construct a new nonaqueous desulfurization system (Fe(III/II)-IL/DMF). Following desulfurization, the system can be regenerated using the controlled-potential electrolysis method. The addition of Fe(II) in Fe(III)-IL is beneficial for the hydrogen sulfide removal and the electrochemical regeneration of the desulfurizer. The addition of DMF in Fe(III/II)-IL does not change the structure of Fe(III/II)-IL but clearly decreases the acidity, increases the electrolytic current, and decreases the stability of the Fe-Cl bond in Fe(III/II)-IL. Fe(III/II)-IL/DMF can remove hydrogen sulfide and can be regenerated through an electrochemical method more efficiently than can Fe(III/II)-IL. After six cycles, the desulfurization efficiency remains higher than 98%, and the average conversion rate of Fe(II) is essentially unchanged. No sulfur peroxidation occurs, and the system remains stable. Therefore, this new nonaqueous system has considerable potential for removing H2S in pollution control applications.

  11. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the heat transfer problems associatedwith a liquid hydrogen absorber for the MICE experiment. This reportdescribes a technique for modeling heat transfer from the outside world,to the abosrber case and in its vacuum vessel, to the hydrogen and theninto helium gas at 14 K. Also presented are the equation for freeconvection cooling of the liquid hydrogen in the absorber.

  12. Integral equation study of liquid hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, C.; Lombardero, M.; Anta, J. A.; Lomba, E.

    2001-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a well-known hydrogen bonded substance, in many aspects related to liquid water, and for which a wide variety of interaction models have recently been proposed. We have studied two of these models by means of a reference hypernetted chain equation in order to assess the ability of this latter approach to describe the properties of this highly associative system. Our calculations, when compared with molecular dynamic results, show that the integral equation reproduces quantitatively both the structure and the thermodynamics of liquid hydrogen fluoride over a wide range of thermodynamic states. However, the integral equation approach is apparently unable to produce estimates for the phase diagram since the low-density (gas phase) side of the binodal curve lies inside the nonsolution region of the equation. This failure can be understood as the result of the inability of standard integral equation theories to account for the behavior of low density strongly associative systems like highly charged electrolytes or, in this case, the gaseous phase of hydrogen fluoride.

  13. Liquid composition having ammonia borane and decomposing to form hydrogen and liquid reaction product

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D

    2014-04-01

    Liquid compositions of ammonia borane and a suitably chosen amine borane material were prepared and subjected to conditions suitable for their thermal decomposition in a closed system that resulted in hydrogen and a liquid reaction product.

  14. Damping criteria for thermal acoustic oscillations in slush and liquid hydrogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. F.; Timmerhaus, K. D.

    Techniques for damping thermal acoustic oscillations in cryogenic systems are analyzed with emphasis on a number of the damping criteria. Theoretically, thermal acoustic oscillations can be damped by either reducing or increasing the radius of the tube, i.e., by increasing either the viscous or inertial resistance in the oscillation. It is found that increasing the tube radius will only provide the desired damping if the temperature ratio for the system is lower than the asymptotic value of the right-hand stability curve. Thermal acoustic oscillations may be damped by changing the temperature ratio along the tube. A minimum temperature ratio for initiating thermal acoustic oscillations in both normal boiling point and triple-point parahydrogen systems is about 5 when the open end of the tube is located above the liquid surface. Changing the length ratio of the warm section to the cold section is another option for damping thermal acoustic oscillations.

  15. Liquid hydrogen flow problems in Kiwi reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    The Kiwi series of reactors were the first ones tested in the US Rover Program in the development of nuclear rocket engines for space propulsion. The early experiments with liquid hydrogen showed that parallel flow systems were prone to uneven flow distributions and violent fluctuations in pressure and flow that were capable of destroying a reactor core. Kiwi flow distribution problems were solved by using multiple feed lines into the nozzle cooling system and carefully balancing impedance among them. The violent pressure and flow fluctuations were eliminated after their cause was identified as resonance phenomena driven by the response to flow disturbances of heat transfer through a superheated hydrogen layer. Smooth flow operations were assured by rapidly bringing operating pressures beyond several times the critical pressure of hydrogen. After this initial rough start, solid core nuclear rocket engines successfully passed milestones of achievements during the remainder of the Rover program.

  16. Analysis and optimization of thermal stratification and self-pressurization effects in liquid hydrogen storage systems -- Part 2: Model results and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Gursu, S.; Veziroglu, T.N. . Clean Energy Research Inst.); Sherif, S.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Sheffield, J.W. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics)

    1993-09-01

    Three models capable of predicting the phenomena of thermal stratification and self-pressurization in liquid hydrogen storage systems were presented in Part 1 of this paper. In order to be able to evaluate the performance of the different pressure rise models, the results are compared with experimental data obtained from different tests. The set of experimental data obtained from the Plum Brook B-2 test, in the NASA-Lewis Research Center, represents a very accurately instrumented and closely controlled experimental work performed on the liquid hydrogen storage tank. Another set of data is taken from the experimental study conducted again in the NASA-Lewis Research Center to obtain a correlating parameter which relates the rate of pressure rise to the volume of spherical liquid hydrogen tank. In this paper model results are presented and discussed and general conclusions are reached.

  17. Compressibility of liquid-metallic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, A. H.

    1983-05-01

    An expression for the compressibility κ of liquid-metallic hydrogen, derived within adiabatic and linear screening approximations, is presented. Terms in the expression for κ have been associated with Landau parameters of the two-component Fermi liquid. The compressibility found for the liquid state is much larger than the compressibility which would be expected in the solid state.

  18. Thermal Gaussian molecular dynamics for quantum dynamics simulations of many-body systems: application to liquid para-hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Ionut; Deckman, Jason; Fredrickson, Laura J; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2011-05-01

    A new method, here called thermal Gaussian molecular dynamics (TGMD), for simulating the dynamics of quantum many-body systems has recently been introduced [I. Georgescu and V. A. Mandelshtam, Phys. Rev. B 82, 094305 (2010)]. As in the centroid molecular dynamics (CMD), in TGMD the N-body quantum system is mapped to an N-body classical system. The associated both effective Hamiltonian and effective force are computed within the variational Gaussian wave-packet approximation. The TGMD is exact for the high-temperature limit, accurate for short times, and preserves the quantum canonical distribution. For a harmonic potential and any form of operator Â, it provides exact time correlation functions C(AB)(t) at least for the case of B, a linear combination of the position, x, and momentum, p, operators. While conceptually similar to CMD and other quantum molecular dynamics approaches, the great advantage of TGMD is its computational efficiency. We introduce the many-body implementation and demonstrate it on the benchmark problem of calculating the velocity time auto-correlation function for liquid para-hydrogen, using a system of up to N = 2592 particles. PMID:21548675

  19. Screen Channel Liquid Acquisition Device Outflow Tests in Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; Chato, David J.; McQuillen, J. B.; Vera, J.; Kudlac, M. T.; Quinn, F. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental design and test results of the recently concluded 1-g inverted vertical outflow testing of two 325x2300 full scale liquid acquisition device (LAD) channels in liquid hydrogen (LH2). One of the channels had a perforated plate and internal cooling from a thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to enhance performance. The LADs were mounted in a tank to simulate 1-g outflow over a wide range of LH2 temperatures (20.3 - 24.2 K), pressures (100 - 350 kPa), and flow rates (0.010 - 0.055 kg/s). Results indicate that the breakdown point is dominated by liquid temperature, with a second order dependence on mass flow rate through the LAD. The best performance is always achieved in the coldest liquid states for both channels, consistent with bubble point theory. Higher flow rates cause the standard channel to break down relatively earlier than the TVS cooled channel. Both the internal TVS heat exchanger and subcooling the liquid in the propellant tank are shown to significantly improve LAD performance.

  20. Hydrogen evolution at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hatay, Imren; Su, Bin; Li, Fei; Partovi-Nia, Raheleh; Vrubel, Heron; Hu, Xile; Ersoz, Mustafa; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-01-01

    Blowing bubbles: Hydrogen evolution by proton reduction with [(C(5)Me(5))(2)Fe] occurs at a soft interface between water and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE). The reaction proceeds by proton transfer assisted by [(C(5)Me(5))(2)Fe] across the water-DCE interface with subsequent proton reduction in DCE. The interface essentially acts as a proton pump, allowing hydrogen evolution by directly using the aqueous proton.

  1. Pad B Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Felicia

    2007-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is home to two liquid hydrogen storage tanks, one at each launch pad of Launch Complex 39. The liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad B has a significantly higher boil off rate that the liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad A. This research looks at various calculations concerning the at Launch Pad B in an attempt to develop a solution to the excess boil off rate. We will look at Perlite levels inside the tank, Boil off rates, conductive heat transfer, and radiant heat transfer through the tank. As a conclusion to the research, we will model the effects of placing an external insulation to the tank in order to reduce the boil off rate and increase the economic efficiency of the liquid hydrogen storage tanks.

  2. Controlling the Formation of Ionic-Liquid-based Aqueous Biphasic Systems by Changing the Hydrogen-Bonding Ability of Polyethylene Glycol End Groups.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jorge F B; Kurnia, Kiki A; Freire, Mara G; Coutinho, João A P; Rogers, Robin D

    2015-07-20

    The formation of aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) when mixing aqueous solutions of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and an ionic liquid (IL) can be controlled by modifying the hydrogen-bond-donating/-accepting ability of the polymer end groups. It is shown that the miscibility/immiscibility in these systems stems from both the solvation of the ether groups in the oxygen chain and the ability of the PEG terminal groups to preferably hydrogen bond with water or the anion of the salt. The removal of even one hydrogen bond in PEG can noticeably affect the phase behavior, especially in the region of the phase diagram in which all the ethylene oxide (EO) units of the polymeric chain are completely solvated. In this region, removing or weakening the hydrogen-bond-donating ability of PEG results in greater immiscibility, and thus, in a higher ability to form ABS, as a result of the much weaker interactions between the IL anion and the PEG end groups.

  3. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  4. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  5. Reduction of liquid hydrogen boiloff: Optimal reliquefaction system design and cost study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The refrigeration cycles investigated are referred to as Joule-Thomson cycles because they depend on the J-T effect to produce the low temperatures. Two basic competitive refrigeration cycles were evaluated. The first vents a portion of cold H2 gas to achieve the required precooling; the second uses LN2 for precooling. Both open loop and closed loop cycles were evaluated as well as combinations of venting to supplement the LN2 precooling. All cycles use a H2 compressor to achieve the desired high pressure (1325 psig). The heat compression was removed by cooling water. The high pressure H2 gas was cooled in counter flow heat exchangers by flowing cold H2 to the compressor. Further cooling was achieved for cycles using LN2 by passing H2 vapors through a LN2 heat exchanger. Finally, the high pressure H2 gas was expanded through a J-T valve where a portion of H2 was liquefied. The low pressure H2 gas flow back through the heat exchangers to the compressor is that portion not liquefied and makes up hydrogen gas from the dewar.

  6. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-25

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion.

  7. First calibration measurements of an FTIR absorption spectroscopy system for liquid hydrogen isotopologues for the isotope separation system of fusion power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Groessle, R.; Beck, A.; Bornschein, B.; Fischer, S.; Kraus, A.; Mirz, S.; Rupp, S.

    2015-03-15

    Fusion facilities like ITER and DEMO will circulate huge amounts of deuterium and tritium in their fuel cycle with an estimated throughput of kg per hour. One important capability of these fuel cycles is to separate the hydrogen isotopologues (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, T{sub 2}, HD, HT, DT). For this purpose the Isotope Separation System (ISS), using cryogenic distillation, as part of the Tritium Enrichment Test Assembly (TRENTA) is under development at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) has been selected to prove its capability for online monitoring of the tritium concentration in the liquid phase at the bottom of the distillation column of the ISS. The actual research-development work is focusing on the calibration of such a system. Two major issues are the identification of appropriate absorption lines and their dependence on the isotopic concentrations and composition. For this purpose the Tritium Absorption IR spectroscopy experiment has been set up as an extension of TRENTA. For calibration a Raman spectroscopy system is used. First measurements, with equilibrated mixtures of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2} and HD demonstrate that FTIR can be used for quantitative analysis of liquid hydro-gen isotopologues and reveal a nonlinear dependence of the integrated absorbance from the D{sub 2} concentration in the second vibrational branch of D{sub 2} FTIR spectra. (authors)

  8. A Low Cost, Self-Acting, Liquid Hydrogen Boil-Off Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelfrey, Joy w.

    2000-01-01

    PROJECT SUMMARY. 1 PROJECT OBJECTIVES. Detail Design. Final Analysis. Hardware Procurement. Component Tests. System Tests..Prototype Tests. 2. WORK PERFORMED. Detail Design. Final Analysis. Hardware Procurement. Component Tests. System Tests. Prototype Tests. 3. Results obtained. Detail Design. Final Analysis. Hardware Procurement. Component Tests. System Tests. Prototype Tests. 5. TECHNICAL MERIT AND FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT. 6. APPENDIX A: SIZE DETAIL DRAWINGS. 7. APPENDIX B: CONSULTANTS SENSITIVITY STUDY. 8. APPENDIX C: CONSULTANTS REPORT. ROTORDYNAMIC ANALYSIS 9. SF298 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE.

  9. DETAIL OF THE LIQUID HYDROGEN AND LIQUID OXYGEN VENT VALVES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE LIQUID HYDROGEN AND LIQUID OXYGEN VENT VALVES, SIXTH LEVEL OF THE EXTERNAL TANK CHECK-OUT CELLS, HB-2, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Roohnikan, Mahdi; Toader, Violeta; Rey, Alejandro; Reven, Linda

    2016-08-23

    Nanoparticle-liquid crystal (NP-LC) composites based on hydrogen bonding were explored using a model system. The ligand shells of 3 nm diameter zirconium dioxide nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were varied to control their interaction with 4-n-hexylbenzoic acid (6BA). The miscibility and effect of the NPs on the nematic order as a function of particle concentration was characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM), fluorescence microscopy and (2)H NMR spectroscopy. Nonfunctionalized ZrO2 NPs have the lowest miscibility and strongest effect on the LC matrix due to irreversible binding of 6BA to the NPs via a strong zirconium carboxylate bond. The ZrO2 NPs were functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid (6PHA) or 4-(6-phosphonohexyloxy)benzoic acid (6BPHA) which selectively bind to the ZrO2 NP surface via the phosphonic acid groups. The miscibility was increased by controlling the concentration of the pendant CO2H groups by adding hexylphosphonic acid (HPA) to act as a spacer group. Fluorescence microscopy of lanthanide doped ZrO2 NPs showed no aggregates in the nematic phase below the NP concentration where aggregates are observed in the isotropic phase. The functionalized NPs preferably concentrate into LC defects and any remaining isotropic liquid but are still present throughout the nematic liquid at a lower concentration. PMID:27466705

  11. Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Roohnikan, Mahdi; Toader, Violeta; Rey, Alejandro; Reven, Linda

    2016-08-23

    Nanoparticle-liquid crystal (NP-LC) composites based on hydrogen bonding were explored using a model system. The ligand shells of 3 nm diameter zirconium dioxide nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were varied to control their interaction with 4-n-hexylbenzoic acid (6BA). The miscibility and effect of the NPs on the nematic order as a function of particle concentration was characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM), fluorescence microscopy and (2)H NMR spectroscopy. Nonfunctionalized ZrO2 NPs have the lowest miscibility and strongest effect on the LC matrix due to irreversible binding of 6BA to the NPs via a strong zirconium carboxylate bond. The ZrO2 NPs were functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid (6PHA) or 4-(6-phosphonohexyloxy)benzoic acid (6BPHA) which selectively bind to the ZrO2 NP surface via the phosphonic acid groups. The miscibility was increased by controlling the concentration of the pendant CO2H groups by adding hexylphosphonic acid (HPA) to act as a spacer group. Fluorescence microscopy of lanthanide doped ZrO2 NPs showed no aggregates in the nematic phase below the NP concentration where aggregates are observed in the isotropic phase. The functionalized NPs preferably concentrate into LC defects and any remaining isotropic liquid but are still present throughout the nematic liquid at a lower concentration.

  12. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    H. Londer; G. R. Myneni; P. Adderley; G. Bartlok; J. Setina; W. Knapp; D. Schleussner

    2006-05-01

    Current ''Non evaporable getters'' (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  13. Hydrogen bonded network properties in liquid formamide.

    PubMed

    Bakó, Imre; Megyes, Tünde; Bálint, Szabolcs; Chihaia, Viorel; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire; Krienke, Hartmut; Kopf, Andreas; Suh, Soong-Hyuck

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid formamide using two different types of potential model (OPLS, Cordeiro). The structural results obtained from simulation were compared to experimental (x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements) outcomes. A generally good agreement for both models examined has been found, but in the hydrogen bonded region (2.9 A) the Cordeiro model shows a slightly better fit. Besides the evaluation of partial radial distribution functions, orientational correlation functions and energy distribution functions, describing the hydrogen bonded structure, have been calculated based on the statistical analysis of configurations, resulting into a new insight in the clustering properties and topology of hydrogen bonded network. It has been shown that in liquid formamide exists a continuous hydrogen bonded network and from the analysis of the distribution of small rings revealed the ring size distribution in liquid formamide. Our study resulted that the ring size distribution of the hydrogen bonded liquid formamide shows a broad distribution with a maximum around 11. It has been found that the topology in formamide is significantly different than in water.

  14. Liquid hydrogen in protonic chabazite.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Bordiga, Silvia; Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Lamberti, Carlo; Spoto, Giuseppe; Bjørgen, Morten; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-05-01

    Due to its fully reversible nature, H(2) storage by molecular adsorption could represent an advantage with respect to dissociative processes, where kinetic effects during the charging and discharging processes are present. A drawback of this strategy is represented by the extremely weak interactions that require low temperature and high pressure. High surface area materials hosting polarizing sites can represent a viable way toward more favorable working conditions. Of these, in this contribution, we have studied hydrogen adsorption in a series of zeolites using volumetric techniques and infrared spectroscopy at 15 K. We have found that in H-SSZ-13 zeolite the cooperative role played by high surface area, internal wall topology, and presence of high binding energy sites (protons) allows hydrogen to densify inside the nanopores at favorable temperature and pressure conditions. PMID:15853343

  15. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  16. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T.

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  17. Eddy Current Loss Induced in Aluminum Thermal Conduction Strips for ASPCS Coils Indirectly Cooled by Liquid Hydrogen through Thermo-siphon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Narumi; Katsura, Masashi; Ando, Kennosuke; Takao, Tomoaki; Shintomi, Takakazu; Makida, Yasuhiro; Hamajima, Takataro; Tsuda, Makoto; Miyagi, Daisuke; Tsujigami, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Shizuichi; Semba, Toshiaki; Iwaki, Katsuya

    To promote renewable energy sources, we proposed a new system called the Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), which consists of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage-system (SMES), Electrolyzer, and Fuel Cell, and is also combined with a liquid hydrogen station for vehicles. The SMES plays a role to compensate the fast fluctuations generated by the renewable energies. In case of the ASPCS with a capacity of 5 MW, we designed the 50 MJ-class SMES composed of 4 solenoid coils. The winding of the solenoid coils is double pancake and a basic coil is 2 m in diameter and 0.5 m in height. Each SMES coil is wound with MgB2 conductor and indirectly cooled at 20 K by liquid hydrogen flowing through a thermo-siphon cooling system. Pure aluminum strips are inserted between the double-pancake coils and the pure aluminum plates gathering the strips lead to liquid hydrogen pipes. This scheme enables the strips and the plates to transfer the heat load in the coils to the cooling pipes and keep the coils at low temperature. On the other hand, we must consider that the strips generate eddy current loss which is strongly affected by a width of the strips. At the same time as the primary study of the SMES coils, we experimented on the thermo-siphon cooling system and investigated the relationship between the heat load and the heat extraction ability of the cooling system. The experiments showed that the cooling system could proficiently function. The estimation of eddy current loss from the particular cooling aluminum strips for the SMES in the ASPCS is reported with the results of the thermo-siphon driving experiment.

  18. Small, high-pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested to a maximum speed of 9739 rad/s and a maximum pump discharge pressure of 2861 N/sq. cm. The approaches used in the analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  19. Liquid Hydrogen Consumption During Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the issue of liquid hydrogen consumption and the points of its loss in prior to the shuttle launch. It traces the movement of the fuel from the purchase to the on-board quantity and the loss that results in 54.6 of the purchased quantity being on board the Shuttle.

  20. Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen Initial Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.; Tomsik, T.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project has designed, assembled, and started testing of a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The system is unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. This paper will present and discuss the results of the initial phase of testing of the GODU LH2 system.

  1. Ground operations demonstration unit for liquid hydrogen initial test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.; Tomsik, T.

    2015-12-01

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project has designed, assembled, and started testing of a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The system is unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. This paper will present and discuss the results of the initial phase of testing of the GODU LH2 system.

  2. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E.

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  3. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17...) § 179.102-17 Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  4. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  5. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  6. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  7. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  8. Stereoselective iron-catalyzed alkyne hydrogenation in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Gieshoff, Tim N; Welther, Alice; Kessler, Michael T; Prechtl, Martin H G; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Iron(0) nanoparticles in ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to catalyse the semi-hydrogenation of alkynes. In the presence of a nitrile-functionalised IL or acetonitrile, stereoselective formation of (Z)-alkenes was observed. The biphasic solvent system allowed facile separation and re-use of the catalyst.

  9. Small, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Warren, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, low capacity, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design configuration of the turbopump is summarized and the results of the analytical and test efforts are presented. Approaches used to pin point the cause of poor suction performance with the original design are described and performance data are included with an axial inlet design which results in excellent suction capability.

  10. Comparison of supramolecular hydrogen bonded liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongali Sathya Prabu, N.; Vijayakumar, V. N.; Madhu Mohan, M. L. N.

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular hydrogen bonded liquid crystals are formed by methoxy hydroquinone (MHQ) and alkyloxy benzoic acids are isolated and characterised. MHQ formed double hydrogen bonds with p-n-alkyloxy benzoic acids. Fourier Transform-Infrared studies confirm the hydrogen bond formation in the complex. Polarising Optical Microscopic (POM) studies revealed the textural information, while the transition and enthalpy values are experimentally deduced from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) studies. Phase diagram has been constructed from the POM and DSC data, respectively. Experimental data of optical tilt angle in Smectic C phase have been fitted to a power law and it has been observed that the temperature variation of the tilt angle follows Mean Field theory prediction. Present homologous are compared with hydroquinone alkyloxy benzoic acids complexes and the influence of methyl group on the occurrence of phases and its transition temperatures are discussed.

  11. Modeling efficiency and water balance in PEM fuel cell systems with liquid fuel processing and hydrogen membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Joshua B.; Bhargav, Atul; Shields, Eric B.; Jackson, Gregory S.; Hearn, Patrick L.

    Integrating PEM fuel cells effectively with liquid hydrocarbon reforming requires careful system analysis to assess trade-offs associated with H 2 production, purification, and overall water balance. To this end, a model of a PEM fuel cell system integrated with an autothermal reformer for liquid hydrocarbon fuels (modeled as C 12H 23) and with H 2 purification in a water-gas-shift/membrane reactor is developed to do iterative calculations for mass, species, and energy balances at a component and system level. The model evaluates system efficiency with parasitic loads (from compressors, pumps, and cooling fans), system water balance, and component operating temperatures/pressures. Model results for a 5-kW fuel cell generator show that with state-of-the-art PEM fuel cell polarization curves, thermal efficiencies >30% can be achieved when power densities are low enough for operating voltages >0.72 V per cell. Efficiency can be increased by operating the reformer at steam-to-carbon ratios as high as constraints related to stable reactor temperatures allow. Decreasing ambient temperature improves system water balance and increases efficiency through parasitic load reduction. The baseline configuration studied herein sustained water balance for ambient temperatures ≤35 °C at full power and ≤44 °C at half power with efficiencies approaching ∼27 and ∼30%, respectively.

  12. Stabilized rhodium(0) nanoparticles: a reusable hydrogenation catalyst for arene derivatives in a biphasic water-liquid system.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Roucoux, A; Patin, H

    2000-02-18

    A colloidal system based on an aqueous suspension of rhodium(o) nanoparticles proved to be an efficient catalyst for the hydrogenation of arene derivatives under biphasic conditions. The rhodium nanoparticles (2-2.5 nm) were synthesized by the reduction of RhCl3 x 3H2O with sodium borohydride and were stabilized by highly water-soluble N-alkyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium salts (HEA-Cn). These surfactant molecules were characterized by measurements of the surface tension and the aqueous dispersions with rhodium were observed by transmission electron cryomicroscopy. The catalytic system is efficient under ultramild conditions, namely room temperature and 1 atm H2 pressure. The aqueous phase which contains the protected rhodium(0) colloids can be reused without significant loss of activity. The microheterogeneous behavior of this catalytic system was confirmed on a mercury poisoning experiment.

  13. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  14. Development of an experimental system for characterization of high-temperature superconductors cooled by liquid hydrogen under the external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Shirai, Y.; Shiotsu, M.; Naruo, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Inatani, Y.

    2014-05-01

    An experimental system has been developed to investigate electro-magnetic properties of high-Tc superconductors cooled by liquid hydrogen under the external magnetic field of up to 7 T. A LH2 cryostat is concentrically mounted on the inside of a LHe cryostat to cool a NbTi superconducting magnet. The experimental system is installed in an explosion-proof room. Explosion proof electrical devices are used and current leads are covered with an enclosure filled with nitrogen gas. A remote control system has been developed. Furthermore, the effects of stray magnetic field on the existing and the new devices are investigated and electro-magnetic shielding panels and enclosure made of iron were designed. It is confirmed through the cryogenic test that the experimental system meets the design requirements.

  15. Integrated Refrigeration and Storage for Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has used liquefied hydrogen (LH2) on a large scale since the beginning of the space program as fuel for the Centaur and Apollo upper stages, and more recently to feed the three space shuttle main engines. The LH2 systems currently in place at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch pads are aging and inefficient compared to the state-of-the-art. Therefore, the need exists to explore advanced technologies and operations that can drive commodity costs down, and provide increased capabilities. The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) was developed at KSC to pursue these goals by demonstrating active thermal control of the propellant state by direct removal of heat using a cryocooler. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The key technology challenge was efficiently integrating the cryogenic refrigerator into the LH2 storage tank. A Linde LR1620 Brayton cycle refrigerator is used to produce up to 900W cooling at 20K, circulating approximately 22 g/s gaseous helium through the hydrogen via approximately 300 m of heat exchanger tubing. The GODU-LH2 system is fully operational, and is currently under test. This paper will discuss the design features of the refrigerator and storage system, as well as the current test results.

  16. Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Rocket fuel needs to stay cool - super cool, in fact. The ability to store gas propellants like liquid hydrogen and oxygen at cryogenic temperatures (below -243 F) is crucial for space missions in order to reduce their volumes and allow their storage in smaller (and therefore, less costly) tanks. The Agency has used these cryogenic fluids for vehicle propellants, reactants, and life support systems since 1962 with the Centaur upper stage rocket, which was powered with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. During proposed long-duration missions, super-cooled fluids will also be used in space power systems, spaceports, and lunar habitation systems. In the next generation of launch vehicles, gaseous propellants will be cooled to and stored for extended periods at even colder temperatures than currently employed via a process called densification. Densification sub-cools liquids to temperatures even closer to absolute zero (-459 F), increasing the fluid s density and shrinking its volume beyond common cryogenics. Sub-cooling cryogenic liquid hydrogen, for instance, from 20 K (-423 F) to 15 K (-432.4 F) reduces its mass by 10 percent. These densified liquid gases can provide more cost savings from reduced payload volume. In order to benefit from this cost savings, the Agency is working with private industry to prevent evaporation, leakage, and other inadvertent loss of liquids and gases in payloads - requiring new cryogenic systems to prevent 98 percent (or more) of boil-off loss. Boil-off occurs when cryogenic or densified liquids evaporate, and is a concern during launch pad holds. Accurate sensing of propellants aboard space vehicles is also critical for proper engine shutdown and re-ignition after launch, and zero boil-off fuel systems are also in development for the Altair lunar lander.

  17. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  18. Hydrogenation of coal liquid utilizing a metal carbonyl catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Feder, Harold M.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1979-01-01

    Coal liquid having a dissolved transition metal, catalyst as a carbonyl complex such as Co.sub.2 (CO.sub.8) is hydrogenated with hydrogen gas or a hydrogen donor. A dissociating solvent contacts the coal liquid during hydrogenation to form an immiscible liquid mixture at a high carbon monoxide pressure. The dissociating solvent, e.g. ethylene glycol, is of moderate coordinating ability, while sufficiently polar to solvate the transition metal as a complex cation along with a transition metal, carbonyl anion in solution at a decreased carbon monoxide pressure. The carbon monoxide pressure is reduced and the liquids are separated to recover the hydrogenated coal liquid as product. The dissociating solvent with the catalyst in ionized form is recycled to the hydrogenation step at the elevated carbon monoxide pressure for reforming the catalyst complex within fresh coal liquid.

  19. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  20. Hydrogen storage in metal-hydrogen systems and their derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, U.; Arnold, G.; von Helmolt, R.

    During the last years, the power densities of automotive fuel cell systems have been raised dramatically. However, a major technology improvement is still needed for the on-board fuel storage system since hydrogen exhibits a rather low volumetric energy density (regardless whether it is stored as a liquid at cryogenic temperatures or as a compressed gas). Furthermore, the cost for current hydrogen containers is far from what gasoline tanks cost. Therefore, alternatives like solid-state absorbers of hydrogen (e.g. metal hydrides or complex hydrides) are investigated for their feasibility by the car industry. These kinds of systems show very high volumetric storage densities on a materials basis. Unfortunately, the host compounds are usually quite heavy and thus possess a low gravimetric storage density. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of the absorption/desorption reactions and their impact on the tank design in general (and on the heat management in particular) have to be considered. Within the framework of this paper, the properties of the most promising solid-state storage systems are discussed and compared to those of the liquid and compressed gaseous hydrogen technologies.

  1. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, J. P.; SaintCyr, W. W.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank.

  2. Microscopic dynamics and relaxation processes in liquid hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, R.; Giura, P.; Monaco, G.; Sette, F.; Fioretto, D.; Ruocco, G.

    2004-12-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering and Brillouin light scattering measurements of the dynamic structure factor of liquid hydrogen fluoride have been performed in the temperature range T=214-283 K. The data, analyzed using a viscoelastic model with a two time-scale memory function, show a positive dispersion of the sound velocity c(Q) between the low frequency value c{sub 0}(Q) and the high frequency value c{sub {infinity}}{sub {alpha}}(Q). This finding confirms the existence of a structural ({alpha}) relaxation directly related to the dynamical organization of the hydrogen bonds network of the system. The activation energy E{sub a} of the process has been extracted by the analysis of the temperature behavior of the relaxation time {tau}{sub {alpha}}(T) that follows an Arrhenius law. The obtained value for E{sub a}, when compared with that observed in another hydrogen bond liquid as water, suggests that the main parameter governing the {alpha}-relaxation process is the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule.

  3. System for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jenshan; Norton, David P.; Pearton, Stephen J.; Ren, Fan

    2010-01-01

    A low-power, wireless gas-sensing system is designed to safeguard the apparatus to which it is attached, as well as associated personnel. It also ensures the efficiency and operational integrity of the hydrogen-powered apparatus. This sensing system can be operated with lower power consumption (less than 30 nanowatts), but still has a fast response. The detecting signal can be wirelessly transmitted to remote locations, or can be posted on the Web. This system can also be operated by harvesting energy.

  4. Hydrogen evolution across nano-Schottky junctions at carbon supported MoS2 catalysts in biphasic liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Ge, Peiyu; Scanlon, Micheál D; Peljo, Pekka; Bian, Xiaojun; Vubrel, Heron; O'Neill, Arlene; Coleman, Jonathan N; Cantoni, Marco; Hu, Xile; Kontturi, Kyösti; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-07-01

    The activities of a series of MoS(2)-based hydrogen evolution catalysts were studied by biphasic reactions monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. Carbon supported MoS(2) catalysts performed best due to an abundance of catalytic edge sites and strong electronic coupling of catalyst to support.

  5. Liquid-hydrogen rocket engine development at Aerojet, 1944 - 1950

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, G. H.; Gordon, R.; Coplen, H. L.; James, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    This program demonstrated the feasibility of virtually all the components in present-day, high-energy, liquid-rocket engines. Transpiration and film-cooled thrust chambers were successfully operated. The first liquid-hydrogen tests of the coaxial injector was conducted and the first pump to successfully produce high pressures in pumping liquid hydrogen was tested. A 1,000-lb-thrust gaseous propellant and a 3,000-lb-thrust liquid-propellant thrust chamber were operated satisfactorily. Also, the first tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of jet overexpansion and separation on performance of rocket thrust chambers with hydrogen-oxygen propellants.

  6. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of −20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of −0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production. PMID:26541371

  7. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  8. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed 'green technique'. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production. PMID:26541371

  9. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-06

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed 'green technique'. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  10. Behavior of liquid hydrogen inside an ICF target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Mok, L.; Bernat, T.

    1982-01-01

    The configuration of liquid hydrogen inside spherical glass shell ICF target was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Because of the zero contact angle between the .D2 liquid and glass substrate and the limited wetting surface that is continuous, the liquid hydrogen completely covers the interior of the glass shell, resulting in the formation of a void at the center. For this reason, the present problem distinguishes itself from that for a sessile drop sitting on a flat surface. A theory was formulated to calculate the liquid hydrogen configuration by including the London-dispersion force between the liquid and the substrate molecules. The net result is an augmented Bashforth-Adams equation appropriate to a spherical substrate, which is considered to be the major contribution of the present work. Preliminary calculations indicate that this equation accurately models the liquid hydrogen behavior inside a spherical microshell.

  11. Mixing and transient interface condensation of a liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Nyland, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of axial jet-induced mixing on the pressure reduction of a thermally stratified liquid hydrogen tank. The tank was nearly cylindrical, having a volume of about 0.144 cu m with 0.559 m in diameter and 0.711 m length. A mixer/pump unit, which had a jet nozzle outlet of 0.0221 m in diameter was located 0.178 m from the tank bottom and was installed inside the tank to generate the axial jet mixing and tank fluid circulation. Mixing tests began with the tank pressures at which the thermal stratification results in 4.9-6.2 K liquid subcooling. The mixing time and transient vapor condensation rate at the liquid-vapor interface are determined. Two mixing time correlations, based on the thermal equilibrium and pressure equilibrium, are developed and expressed as functions of system and buoyancy parameters. The limited liquid hydrogen data of the present study shows that the modified steady state condensation rate correlation may be used to predict the transient condensation rate in a mixing process if the instantaneous values of jet sub cooling and turbulence intensity at the interface are employed.

  12. Supercritical phenomenon of hydrogen beyond the liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Chen, Ji; Li, Xinzheng; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the supercritical phenomenon associated with the liquid-liquid phase transition of hydrogen by studying the isothermal response functions, such as electric conductivity, molecular dissociation coefficient and isothermal compressibility, with respect to pressure. We find that, along each isotherm in the supercritical region, each of these response functions shows a maximum, the location of which is different for different response functions. As temperature decreases, the loci of these maxima asymptotically converge to a line of zero ordering field, known as the Widom line along which the magnitude of the response function maxima becomes larger and larger until it diverges as the critical point is approached. Thus, our study provides a possible way to locate the liquid-liquid critical point of hydrogen from the supercritical region at lower pressures. It also indicates that the supercritical phonomenon near the critical point of hydrogen is a rather general feature of second-order phase transition, it is not only true for classical systems with weak interactions but also true for highly condensed system with strong inter-atomic interactions.

  13. Liquid-vapour surface sensors for liquid nitrogen and hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwarth, J. D.; Voth, R. O.; Snyder, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper identifies devices to serve as liquid-vapor detectors in zero gravity. The testing in LH2 was done in a sealed glass Dewar system to eliminate any chance of mixing H2 and air. Most of the tests were performed with the leads to the sensor horizontal. Some results of rapid cycle testing of LVDG in LH2 are presented. Findings of rapid-cycle testing of LVDG in LH2 are discussed. The sensor crossed the liquid surface when the position sensor registered 1.9 V, which occurred at about 0.4075 s. The delay time was about 1.5 ms. From the estimated slope of the position sensor curve at 1.9 V, the velocity of the sensor through the liquid surface is over 3 m/s. Results of tests of optical sensors are presented as well.

  14. Aerogel Insulation Applications for Liquid Hydrogen Launch Vehicle Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerogel based insulation systems for ambient pressure environments were developed for liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank applications. Solutions to thermal insulation problems were demonstrated for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) through extensive testing at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. Demonstration testing was performed using a 1/10th scale ET LH2 intertank unit and liquid helium as the coolant to provide the 20 K cold boundary temperature. Cryopumping tests in the range of 20K were performed using both constant mass and constant pressure methods. Long-duration tests (up to 10 hours) showed that the nitrogen mass taken up inside the intertank is reduced by a factor of nearly three for the aerogel insulated case as compared to the un-insulated (bare metal flight configuration) case. Test results including thermal stabilization, heat transfer effectiveness, and cryopumping confirm that the aerogel system eliminates free liquid nitrogen within the intertank. Physisorption (or adsorption) of liquid nitrogen within the fine pore structure of aerogel materials was also investigated. Results of a mass uptake method show that the sorption ratio (liquid nitrogen to aerogel beads) is about 62 percent by volume. A novel liquid nitrogen production method of testing the liquid nitrogen physical adsorption capacity of aerogel beads was also performed to more closely approximate the actual launch vehicle cooldown and thermal stabilization effects within the aerogel material. The extraordinary insulating effectiveness of the aerogel material shows that cryopumping is not an open-cell mass transport issue but is strictly driven by thermal communication between warm and cold surfaces. The new aerogel insulation technology is useful to solve heat transfer problem areas and to augment existing thermal protection systems on launch vehicles. Examples are given and potential benefits for producing launch systems that are more reliable, robust, reusable, and efficient are outlined.

  15. Liquid crystal nanocomposites produced by mixtures of hydrogen bonded achiral liquid crystals and functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katranchev, B.; Petrov, M.; Keskinova, E.; Naradikian, H.; Rafailov, P. M.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Spassov, T.

    2014-12-01

    The liquid crystalline (LC) nature of alkyloxybenzoic acids is preserved after adding of any mesogenic or non-mesogenic compound through hydrogen bonding. However, this noncovalent interaction provokes a sizable effect on the physical properties as, e. g. melting point and mesomorphic states. In the present work we investigate nanocomposites, prepared by mixture of the eighth homologue of p-n-alkyloxybenzoic acids (8OBA) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) with the purpose to modify the optical properties of the liquid crystal. We exercise optical control on the LC system by inserting SWCNT specially functionalized by carboxylic groups. Since the liquid crystalline state combines order and mobility at the molecular (nanoscale) level, molecular modification can lead to different macroscopical nanocomposite symmetry. The thermal properties of the functionalized nanocomposite are confirmed by DSC analyses. The mechanism of the interaction between surface-treated nanoparticles (functionalized nanotubes) and the liquid crystal 8OBA bent- dimer molecules is briefly discussed.

  16. Fractional consumption of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen during the space shuttle program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2012-06-01

    The Space Shuttle uses the propellants, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, to meet part of the propulsion requirements from ground to orbit. The Kennedy Space Center procured over 350 million liters of liquid hydrogen and over 200 million liters of liquid oxygen during the 30-year Space Shuttle Program. Because of the nature of the cryogenic propellants, approximately 54% of the total purchased liquid hydrogen and 32% of the total purchased liquid oxygen were used in the Space Shuttle Main Engines. The balance of the propellants were vaporized during operations for various purposes. This paper dissects the total consumption of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen and determines the fraction attributable to each of the various processing and launch operations that occurred during the entire Space Shuttle Program at the Kennedy Space Center.

  17. Fractional Consumption of Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen During the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle uses the propellants, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, to meet part of the propulsion requirements from ground to orbit. The Kennedy Space Center procured over 25 million kilograms of liquid hydrogen and over 250 million kilograms of liquid oxygen during the 3D-year Space Shuttle Program. Because of the cryogenic nature of the propellants, approximately 55% of the total purchased liquid hydrogen and 30% of the total purchased liquid oxygen were used in the Space Shuttle Main Engines. The balance of the propellants were vaporized during operations for various purposes. This paper dissects the total consumption of liqUid hydrogen and liqUid oxygen and determines the fraction attributable to each of the various processing and launch operations that occurred during the entire Space Shuttle Program at the Kennedy Space Center.

  18. An exploratory study to determine the integrated technological air transportation system ground requirements of liquid-hydrogen-fueled subsonic, long-haul civil air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A baseline air terminal concept was developed which permitted airlines and the airport to operate JP- or LH2-fueled aircraft at common terminal gates. The concept included installation of a hydrogen liquefaction and storage facility on airport property, as well as the fuel distribution system. The capital investment and hydrogen-related operating costs to the airlines were estimated.

  19. Guide for Hydrogen Hazards Analysis on Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Woods, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The physical and combustion properties of hydrogen give rise to hazards that must be considered when designing and operating a hydrogen system. One of the major concerns in the use of hydrogen is that of fire or detonation because of hydrogen's wide flammability range, low ignition energy, and flame speed. Other concerns include the contact and interaction of hydrogen with materials, such as the hydrogen embrittlement of materials and the formation of hydrogen hydrides. The low temperature of liquid and slush hydrogen bring other concerns related to material compatibility and pressure control; this is especially important when dissimilar, adjoining materials are involved. The potential hazards arising from these properties and design features necessitate a proper hydrogen hazards analysis before introducing a material, component, or system into hydrogen service. The objective of this guide is to describe the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility hydrogen hazards analysis method that should be performed before hydrogen is used in components and/or systems. The method is consistent with standard practices for analyzing hazards. It is recommended that this analysis be made before implementing a hydrogen component qualification procedure. A hydrogen hazards analysis is a useful tool for hydrogen-system designers, system and safety engineers, and facility managers. A hydrogen hazards analysis can identify problem areas before hydrogen is introduced into a system-preventing damage to hardware, delay or loss of mission or objective, and possible injury or loss of life.

  20. Hydrogen engines based on liquid fuels, a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Voecks, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of storing hydrogen as part of a liquid fuel, such as gasoline or methanol, and subsequent onboard generation of the hydrogen from such liquids, is reviewed. Hydrogen generation processes, such as steam reforming, partial oxidation, and thermal decomposition are evaluated in terms of theoretical potential and practical limitations, and a summary is presented on the major experimental work on conversion of gasoline and methanol. Results of experiments indicate that onboard hydrogen generation from methanol is technically feasible and will yield substantial improvements in fuel economy and emissions, especially if methanol decomposition is brought about by the use of engine exhaust heat; e.g., a methanol decomposition reactor of 3.8 provides hydrogen-rich gas for a 4 cylinder engine (1.952), and 80% of the methanol is converted, engine exhaust gas being the only heat supply. A preliminary outline of the development of a methanol-based hydrogen engine and a straight hydrogen engine is presented.

  1. Performance of a 10-kJ SMES model cooled by liquid hydrogen thermo-siphon flow for ASPCS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makida, Y.; Shintomi, T.; Hamajima, T.; Ota, N.; Katsura, M.; Ando, K.; Takao, T.; Tsuda, M.; Miyagi, D.; Tsujigami, H.; Fujikawa, S.; Hirose, J.; Iwaki, K.; Komagome, T.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new electrical power storage and stabilization system, called an Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), which consists of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and hydrogen energy storage, converged on a liquid hydrogen station for fuel cell vehicles. A small 10- kJ SMES system, in which a BSCCO coil cooled by liquid hydrogen was installed, was developed to create an experimental model of an ASPCS. The SMES coil is conductively cooled by liquid hydrogen flow through a thermo-siphon line under a liquid hydrogen buffer tank. After fabrication of the system, cooldown tests were carried out using liquid hydrogen. The SMES coil was successfully charged up to a nominal current of 200 A. An eddy current loss, which was mainly induced in pure aluminum plates pasted onto each pancake coils for conduction cooling, was also measured.

  2. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  3. Mixing and transient interface condensation of a liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Nyland, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of axial jet-induced mixing on the pressure reduction of a thermally stratified liquid hydrogen tank. The tank was nearly cylindrical, having a volume of about 0.144 cu m with 0.559 m in diameter and 0.711 m long. A mixer/pump unit, which had a jet nozzle outlet of 0.0221 m in diameter was located 0.178 m from the tank bottom and was installed inside the tank to generate the axial jet mixing and tank fluid circulation. The liquid fill and jet flow rate ranged from 42 to 85 percent (by volume) and 0.409 to 2.43 cu m/hr, respectively. Mixing tests began with the tank pressure ranging from 187.5 to 238.5 kPa at which the thermal stratification results in 4.9 to 6.2 K liquid sub cooling. The mixing time and transient vapor condensation rate at the liquid-vapor interface are determined. Two mixing time correlations, based on the thermal equilibrium and pressure equilibrium, are developed. Both mixing time correlations are expressed as functions of system and buoyancy parameters and compared well with other experimental data. The steady state condensation rate correlation of Sonin et al. based on steam-water data is modified and expressed as a function of jet subcooling. The limited liquid hydrogen data of the present study shows that the modified steady state condensation rate correlation may be used to predict the transient condensation rate in a mixing process if the instantaneous values of jet sub cooling and turbulence intensity at the interface are employed.

  4. Additive Manufacturing a Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Carl P.; Robertson, Elizabeth H.; Koelbl, Mary Beth; Singer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Space Propulsion is a 5 day event being held from 2nd May to the 6th May 2016 at the Rome Marriott Park Hotel in Rome, Italy. This event showcases products like Propulsion sub-systems and components, Production and manufacturing issues, Liquid, Solid, Hybrid and Air-breathing Propulsion Systems for Launcher and Upper Stages, Overview of current programmes, AIV issues and tools, Flight testing and experience, Technology building blocks for Future Space Transportation Propulsion Systems : Launchers, Exploration platforms & Space Tourism, Green Propulsion for Space Transportation, New propellants, Rocket propulsion & global environment, Cost related aspects of Space Transportation propulsion, Modelling, Pressure-Thrust oscillations issues, Impact of new requirements and regulations on design etc. in the Automotive, Manufacturing, Fabrication, Repair & Maintenance industries.

  5. Hydrogen gettering the overpressure gas from highly radioactive liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.L.; McCoy, J.C.; Schicker, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    Remediation of current inventories of high-activity radioactive liquid waste (HALW) requires transportation of Type-B quantities of radioactive material, possibly up to several hundred liters. However, the only currently certified packaging is limited to quantities of 50 ml (0.01 gal) quantities of Type-B radioactive liquid. Efforts are under way to recertify the existing packaging to allow the shipment of up to 4 L (1.1 gal) of Type-B quantities of HALW, but significantly larger packaging could be needed in the future. Scoping studies and preliminary designs have identified the feasibility of retrofitting an insert into existing casks, allowing the transport of up to 380 L (100 gal) of HALW. However, the insert design and ultimate certification strategy depend heavily on the gas-generating attributes of the HALW. A non-vented containment vessel filled with HALW, in the absence of any gas-mitigation technologies, poses a deflagration threat and, therefore, gas generation, specifically hydrogen generation, must be reliably controlled during all phases of transportation. Two techniques are available to mitigate hydrogen accumulation: recombiners and getters. Getters have an advantage over recombiners in that oxides are not required to react with the hydrogen. A test plan was developed to evaluate three forms of getter material in the presence of both simulated HALW and the gases that are produced by the HALW. These tests demonstrated that getters can react with hydrogen in the presence of simulated waste and in the presence of several other gases generated by the HALW, such as nitrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide. Although the use of such a gettering system has been shown to be technically feasible, only a preliminary design for its use has been completed. No further development is planned until the requirement for bulk transport of Type-B quantities of HALW is more thoroughly defined.

  6. PEP liquid level system

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritzen, T.; Sah, R.C.

    1981-03-01

    A liquid level system has been installed in the accelerator housing of the PEP storage ring. This instrument spans the entire 2.2 km circumference of the PEP project, and over one hundred readouts provide reference elevations which are used for the accurate alignment of accelerator components. The liquid level has proven to be extremely precise (+-0.10 mm) and quick to use, and it has contributed to the accurate alignment of PEP before beam turn-on. Since the liquid level readouts are rigidly attached to the accelerator housing, the liquid level has been a convenient means to monitor the settling of the accelerator housing.

  7. Safe Use of Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This is a viewgraph presentation that is a course for teaching the safe use of hydrogen. The objectives of the course are 1. To familiarize the student with H2 safety properties 2. To enable the identification, evaluations and addressing of H2 system hazards 3. To teach: a. Safe practices for, b. Design, c. Materials selection, d. H2 system operation, e. Physical principles and empirical observations on which these safe practices are based, f. How to respond to emergency situations involving H2, g How to visualize safety concepts through in-class exercises, h. Identify numerous parameters important to H2 safety.

  8. Liquid hydrogen as a propulsion fuel, 1945-1959

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloop, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    A historical review is presented on the research and development of liquid hydrogen for use as a propulsion fuel. The document is divided into three parts: Part 1 (1945-1950); Part 2 (1950-1957); and Part 3 (1957-1958), encompassing eleven topics. Two appendixes are included. Hydrogen Technology Through World War 2; and Propulsion Primer, Performance Parameters and Units.

  9. Study on Introduction of CO2 Free Energy to Japan with Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Shoji; Nishimura, Motohiko; Harada, Eichi

    In Japan, both CO2(Carbon dioxide) emission reduction and energy security are the very important social issues after Fukushima Daiichi accident. On the other hand, FCV (Fuel Cell Vehicle)using hydrogen will be on the market in 2015. Introducing large mass hydrogen energy is being expected as expanding hydrogen applications, or solution to energy issues of Japan.And then,the Japanese government announced the road map for introducing hydrogen energy supply chain in this June,2014. Under these circumstances, imported CO2 free hydrogen will be one of the solutions for energy security and CO2 reduction, if the hydrogen price is affordable. To achieve this, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) performed a feasibility studyon CO2-free hydrogen energy supply chainfrom Australian brown coal linked with CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) to Japan. In the study, hydrogen production systems utilizing brown coal gasificationandLH2 (liquid hydrogen)systems as storing and transporting hydrogen are examined.This paper shows the possibilityof realizingthe CO2 free hydrogen supply chain, the cost breakdown of imported hydrogen cost, its cost competitiveness with conventionalfossil, andLH2systems as key technologies of the hydrogen energy chain.

  10. Hydrogen-methane fuel control systems for turbojet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, J. S.; Bennett, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Design, development, and test of a fuel conditioning and control system utilizing liquid methane (natural gas) and liquid hydrogen fuels for operation of a J85 jet engine were performed. The experimental program evaluated the stability and response of an engine fuel control employing liquid pumping of cryogenic fuels, gasification of the fuels at supercritical pressure, and gaseous metering and control. Acceptably stable and responsive control of the engine was demonstrated throughout the sea level power range for liquid gas fuel and up to 88 percent engine speed using liquid hydrogen fuel.

  11. Catalytic hydrogenation process and apparatus with improved vapor liquid separation

    DOEpatents

    Chervenak, Michael C.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1980-01-01

    A continuous hydrogenation process and apparatus wherein liquids are contacted with hydrogen in an ebullated catalyst reaction zone with the liquids and gas flowing vertically upwardly through that zone into a second zone substantially free of catalyst particles and wherein the liquid and gases are directed against an upwardly inclining surface through which vertical conduits are placed having inlet ends at different levels in the liquid and having outlet ends at different levels above the inclined surface, such that vapor-rich liquid is collected and discharged through conduits terminating at a higher level above the inclined surface than the vapor-poor liquid which is collected and discharged at a level lower than the inclined surface.

  12. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, J. P.; Cyr, W. W. St.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2010-04-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years.

  13. Nanoscale Ru(0) particles: arene hydrogenation catalysts in imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Prechtl, Martin H G; Scariot, Morgana; Scholten, Jackson D; Machado, Giovanna; Teixeira, Sérgio R; Dupont, Jairton

    2008-10-01

    The reduction of [Ru(COD)(2-methylallyl) 2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) dispersed in various room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs), namely, 1- n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMI) and 1- n-decyl-3-methylimidazolium (DMI), associated with the N-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imidates (NTf 2) and the corresponding tetrafluoroborates (BF 4) with hydrogen gas (4 bar) at 50 degrees C leads to well-dispersed immobilized nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the particles dispersed in the ionic liquid shows the presence of [Ru(0)] n nanoparticles (Ru-NPs) of 2.1-3.5 nm in diameter. Nanoparticles with a smaller mean diameter were obtained in the ILs containing the less coordinating anion (NTf 2) than that in the tetrafluoroborate analogues. The ruthenium nanoparticles in ionic liquids were used for liquid-liquid biphasic hydrogenation of arenes under mild reaction conditions (50-90 degrees C and 4 bar). The apparent activation energy of E A = 42.0 kJ mol (-1) was estimated for the hydrogenation of toluene in the biphasic liquid-liquid system with Ru-NPs/BMI.NTf 2. TEM analysis of the ionic liquid material after the hydrogenation reactions shows no significant agglomeration of the [Ru(0)] n nanoparticles. The catalyst ionic liquid phase can be reused several times without a significant loss in catalytic activity.

  14. A single-component liquid-phase hydrogen storage material.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Campbell, Patrick G; Zakharov, Lev N; Liu, Shih-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    The current state-of-the-art for hydrogen storage is compressed H(2) at 700 bar. The development of a liquid-phase hydrogen storage material has the potential to take advantage of the existing liquid-based distribution infrastructure. We describe a liquid-phase hydrogen storage material that is a liquid under ambient conditions (i.e., at 20 °C and 1 atm pressure), air- and moisture-stable, and recyclable; releases H(2) controllably and cleanly at temperatures below or at the proton exchange membrane fuel cell waste-heat temperature of 80 °C; utilizes catalysts that are cheap and abundant for H(2) desorption; features reasonable gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity; and does not undergo a phase change upon H(2) desorption.

  15. Compression mass gauge testing in a liquid hydrogen dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, J. M.; Rogers, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes testing that was conducted using a mass gauge in a liquid hydrogen environment. The mass gauge, herein referred to as the 'compressibility gauge,' is being developed as a means to accurately determine the mass of liquid contained in a tank in a low-gravity environment. The concept is based on the thermodynamic principle that the pressure of gas or vapor changes when its volume changes. Previous work has been conducted by Southwest Research Institute in collaboration with NASA Lewis Research Center. This consisted of testing the concept with water and other cryogenic simulant fluids. The purpose of conducting liquid hydrogen tests is to test the concept in actual cryogenic conditions, and address hardware issues that arise in fabricating a test article for use in liquid hydrogen.

  16. Coordinating Chiral Ionic Liquids: Design, Synthesis, and Application in Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation under Aqueous Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vasiloiu, Maria; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Bica, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophilic coordinating chiral ionic liquids with an amino alcohol substructure were developed and efficiently applied to the asymmetric reduction of ketones. Their careful design and adaptability to the desired reaction conditions allow for these chiral ionic liquids to be used as the sole source of chirality in a ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation reaction of aromatic ketones. When used in this reaction system, these chiral ionic liquids afforded excellent yields and high enantioselectivities. PMID:26279638

  17. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  18. 14 CFR 420.66 - Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored... Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.66 Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide... section for each explosive hazard facility storing: (1) Hydrogen peroxide in concentrations of...

  19. 14 CFR 420.66 - Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored... Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.66 Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide... section for each explosive hazard facility storing: (1) Hydrogen peroxide in concentrations of...

  20. Control system maintains selected liquid level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeson, R. L.; Schuck, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Single-sensor control system maintains liquid hydrogen at a preselected desired level within a tank, regardless of boiloff. It calibrates output in percentage. Thus, when the fuel is at the desired level, the system output will indicate 100 percent regardless of what percent of tank capacity the fuel has reached.

  1. Low-cost industrially available molybdenum boride and carbide as "platinum-like" catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction in biphasic liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Micheál D; Bian, Xiaojun; Vrubel, Heron; Amstutz, Véronique; Schenk, Kurt; Hu, Xile; Liu, BaoHong; Girault, Hubert H

    2013-02-28

    Rarely reported low-cost molybdenum boride and carbide microparticles, both of which are available in abundant quantities due to their widespread use in industry, adsorb at aqueous acid-1,2-dichloroethane interfaces and efficiently catalyse the hydrogen evolution reaction in the presence of the organic electron donor - decamethylferrocene. Kinetic studies monitoring biphasic reactions by UV/vis spectroscopy, and further evidence provided by gas chromatography, highlight (a) their superior rates of catalysis relative to other industrially significant transition metal carbides and silicides, as well as a main group refractory compound, and (b) their highly comparable rates of catalysis to Pt microparticles of similar dimensions. Insight into the catalytic processes occurring for each adsorbed microparticle was obtained by voltammetry at the liquid-liquid interface.

  2. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  3. Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

    2008-02-01

    . The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines

  4. Liquid Level Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Duffell, Amanda G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A liquid level sensing system includes waveguides disposed in a liquid and distributed along a path with a gap between adjacent waveguides. A source introduces electromagnetic energy into the waveguides at a first end of the path. A portion of the electromagnetic energy exits the waveguides at a second end of the path. A detector measures the portion of the electromagnetic energy exiting the second end of the path.

  5. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

  6. ALS liquid hydrogen turbopump: Advanced Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimp, Nancy R.; Claffy, George J.

    1989-01-01

    The point of departure (POD) turbopump concept was reviewed and finalized. The basis for the POD was the configuration presented in the Aerojet proposal. After reviewing this proposal concept, several modifications were made. These modifications include the following: (1) the dual pump discharge arrangement was changed to a single discharge; (2) commonality of the turbine inlet manifold with the advanced launch system (ALS) liquid oxygen (LOX) TPA was dropped for this program; (3) the turbine housing flange arrangement was improved by relocating it away from the first stage nozzles; (4) a ten percent margin (five percent diameter increase) was built into the impeller design to ensure meeting the required discharge pressure without the need for increasing speed; (5) a ten percent turbine power margin was imposed which is to be obtained by increasing turbine inlet pressure if required; and (6) the backup concept, as an alternative to the use of cast impellers, now incorporates forged/machined shrouded impellers, rather than the unshrouded type originally planned.

  7. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  8. Transient heat transfer characteristics of liquid hydrogen, including freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waynert, J. A.; Jaeger, S.; Barclay, J. A.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a novel technique for obtaining the transient heating, cooling, and freezing heat transfer characteristics of liquid hydrogen. The method is based on the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). The MCE refers to the reversible change in temperature exhibited by certain magnetic materials as they experience increasing or decreasing magnetic fields. A single crystal of paramagnetic gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) was placed in a temperature regulated chamber which could be filled with liquid hydrogen. The temperature of the GGG was monitored as it experienced relatively rapid increasing or decreasing magnetic field strengths in vacuum or in the presence of liquid hydrogen. The results of a one dimensional finite difference model were compared to the data to yield the transient heat transfer characteristics.

  9. Video System Highlights Hydrogen Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Gleman, Stuart M.; Moerk, John S.

    1992-01-01

    Video system combines images from visible spectrum and from three bands in infrared spectrum to produce color-coded display in which hydrogen fires distinguished from other sources of heat. Includes linear array of 64 discrete lead selenide mid-infrared detectors operating at room temperature. Images overlaid on black and white image of same scene from standard commercial video camera. In final image, hydrogen fires appear red; carbon-based fires, blue; and other hot objects, mainly green and combinations of green and red. Where no thermal source present, image remains in black and white. System enables high degree of discrimination between hydrogen flames and other thermal emitters.

  10. Nanoparticulate gellants for metallized gelled liquid hydrogen with aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Starkovich, John; Adams, Scott

    1996-01-01

    Gelled liquid hydrogen was experimentally formulated using sol-gel technology. As a follow-on to work with cryogenic simulants, hydrogen was gelled with an alkoxide material: BTMSE. Initial results demonstrated that gellants with a specific surface area of 1000 m(exp 2)/g could be repeatably fabricated. Gelled hexane and metallized gelled hexane (with 13.8-wt% Al) were produced. Propellant settling testing was conducted for acceleration levels of 2 to 10 times normal gravity and a minimum gellant percentage was determined for stable gelled hexane and metalized gelled hexane. A cryogenic capillary rheometer was also designed, constructed, and used to determine the viscosity of gelled hydrogen. Small volumes of liquid hydrogen were gelled with a 7- to 8-wt% gellant level. The gelled H2 viscosity was 1.5 to 3.7 times that of liquid hydrogen: 0.048 to 0.116 mPa-s versus 0.03 mPa-s for liquid H2 (at 16 K and approximately 1 atm pressure).

  11. The Ammonia-Hydrogen System under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, Bethany A; Strobel, Timothy A

    2012-01-20

    Binary mixtures of hydrogen and ammonia were compressed in diamond anvil cells to 15 GPa at room temperature over a range of compositions. The phase behavior was characterized using optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Below 1.2 GPa we observed two-phase coexistence between liquid ammonia and fluid hydrogen phases with limited solubility of hydrogen within the ammonia-rich phase. Complete immiscibility was observed subsequent to the freezing of ammonia phase III at 1.2 GPa, although hydrogen may become metastably trapped within the disordered face-centered-cubic lattice upon rapid solidification. For all compositions studied, the phase III to phase IV transition of ammonia occurred at ~3.8 GPa and hydrogen solidified at ~5.5 GPa, transition pressures equivalent to those observed for the pure components. A P-x phase diagram for the NH3-H2 system is proposed on the basis of these observations with implications for planetary ices, molecular compound formation, and possible hydrogen storage materials.

  12. Hydrogen Event Containment Response Code System.

    1999-11-23

    Version: 00 Distribution is restricted to the United States Only. HECTR1.5 (Hydrogen Event-Containment Transient Response) is a lumped-volume containment analysis program that is most useful for performing parametric studies. Its main purpose is to analyze nuclear reactor accidents involving the transport and combustion of hydrogen, but HECTR can also function as an experiment analysis tool and can solve a limited set of other containment problems. Six gases; steam, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbonmore » dioxide are modified along with sumps containing liquid water. HECTR can model virtually all the containment systems of importance in ice condenser, large dry and Mark III containments. A postprocessor, ACHILES1.5, is included. It processes the time-dependent variable output (compartment pressures, flow junction velocities, surface temperatures, etc.) produced by HECTR. ACHILES can produce tables and graphs of these data.« less

  13. Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the objectives of a hydrogen energy systems technology study directed toward determining future demand for hydrogen based on current trends and anticipated new uses and identifying the critical research and technology advancements required to meet this need with allowance for raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects. Attention is focused on historic production and use of hydrogen, scenarios used as a basis for projections, projections of energy sources and uses, supply options, and technology requirements and needs. The study found more than a billion dollar annual usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs, supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks. Evaluation of the progress in developing nuclear fusion and solar energy sources relative to hydrogen production will be necessary to direct the pace and character of research and technology work in the advanced water-splitting areas.

  14. Experimental study of liquid level gauge for liquid hydrogen using Helmholtz resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Akihiro; Nishizu, Takahisa

    2016-07-01

    The Helmholtz resonance technique was applied to a liquid level gauge for liquid hydrogen to confirm the applicability of the technique in the cryogenic industrial field. A specially designed liquid level gauge that has a Helmholtz resonator with a small loudspeaker was installed in a glass cryostat. A swept frequency signal was supplied to the loudspeaker, and the acoustic response was detected by measuring the electrical impedance of the loudspeaker's voice coil. The penetration depth obtained from the Helmholtz resonance frequency was compared with the true value, which was read from a scale. In principle, the Helmholtz resonance technique is available for use with liquid hydrogen, however there are certain problems as regards practical applications. The applicability of the Helmholtz resonance technique to liquid hydrogen is discussed in this study.

  15. Liquid organic hydrogen carriers: surface science studies of carbazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Papp, Christian; Wasserscheid, Peter; Libuda, Jörg; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2014-10-01

    We review recent results towards a molecular understanding of the adsorption and dehydrogenation of carbazole-derived liquid organic hydrogen carriers on platinum and palladium single crystals and on Al2 O3 -supported Pt and Pd nanoparticles. By combining synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, advanced molecular beam methods and temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy, detailed insights into the reaction mechanism are obtained. On Pt(111), dehydrogenation of perhydro-N-ethylcarbazole, H12 -NEC, starts with activation of the hydrogen atoms at the pyrrole unit, yielding H8 -NEC as the first stable reaction intermediate at ∼340 K, followed by further dehydrogenation to NEC at ∼380 K. Above 390 K, dealkylation starts, yielding carbazole as an undesired byproduct. On small supported Pt particles, the dealkylation sets in at lower temperatures, due to the higher reactivity of low-coordinated sites, while on larger particles with (111) facets a reactivity as on the flat surface is observed. Carbazole derivatives with ethyl, propyl and butyl chains show an overall very similar reactivity, both on Pt(111) and on Pt nanoparticles. When comparing the dealkylation behavior of H12 -NEC on Pt(111) and Pt nanoparticles to that on Pd(111) and Pd nanoparticles, we find a higher reactivity for the Pd systems.

  16. Transport properties of liquid metal hydrogen under high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. C.; March, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    A theory is developed for the compressibility and transport properties of liquid metallic hydrogen, near to its melting point and under high pressure. The interionic force law is assumed to be of the screened Coulomb type, because hydrogen has no core electrons. The random phase approximation is used to obtain the structure factor S(k) of the system in terms of the Fourier transform of this force law. The long wavelenth limit of the structure factor S(o) is related to the compressibility, which is much lower than that of alkali metals at their melting points. The diffusion constant at the melting point is obtained in terms of the Debye frequency, using a frequency spectrum analogous with the phonon spectrum of a solid. A similar argument is used to obtain the combined shear and bulk viscosities, but these depend also on S(o). The transport coefficients are found to be about the same size as those of alkali metals at their melting points.

  17. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    DOEpatents

    Pez, Guido Peter; Cooper, Alan Charles; Scott, Aaron Raymond

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  18. Hydrogen bonding in 1-butyl- and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Dellis, Dimitris; Matthews, Richard P; Welton, Tom; Hunt, Patricia A

    2012-04-26

    A detailed investigation of hydrogen bonding in the pure ionic liquids [C4C1im]Cl and [C2C1im]Cl has been carried out using primarily molecular dynamics techniques. Analyses of the individual atom-atom pair radial distribution functions, and in particular those for C···Cl(-), have revealed that hydrogen bonding to the first methylene or methyl units of the substituent groups is important. Multiple geometric criteria for defining a hydrogen bond have been applied, and in particular the choice of the cutoff angle has been carefully examined. The interpretation of hydrogen bonding within these ionic liquids is highly angle dependent, and justification is provided for why it may be appropriate to employ a wider angle criteria than the 30° used for water or alcohol systems. The different types of hydrogen bond formed are characterized, and "top" conformations where the Cl anion resides above (or below) the imidazolium ring are investigated. The number of hydrogen bonds undertaken by each hydrogen atom (and the chloride anion) is quantified, and the propensity to form zero, one, or two hydrogen bonds is established. The effects of an increase in temperature on the static hydrogen bonding are also briefly examined.

  19. Clogging of Joule-Thomson Devices in Liquid Hydrogen Handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; Lekki, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center indicate that Joule-Thomson devices become clogged when transferring liquid hydrogen (LH2), operating at a temperature range from 20.5 to 24.4 K. Blockage does not exist under all test conditions but is found to be sensitive to the inlet temperature of the LH2. At a subcooled inlet temperature of 20.5 K blockage consistently appears but is dissipated when the fluid temperature is raised above 24.5 K. Clogging steadily reduced flow rate through the orifices, eventually resulting in complete blockage. This tendency poses a threat to spacecraft cryogenic propulsion systems that would utilize passive thermal control systems. We propose that this clogging is due to trace amounts of neon in the regular LH2 supply. Neon freezes at 24.5 K at one atmosphere pressure. It is postulated that between 20.5 and 24.5 K, neon remains in a meta-stable, supercooled liquid state. When impacting the face of an orifice, liquid neon droplets solidify and accumulate, blocking flow over time. The purpose of this test program was to definitively quantify the phenomena experimentally by obtaining direct visual evidence of orifice clogging by accretion from neon contaminates in the LH2 flow stream, utilizing state of the art imaging technology. Tests were conducted with LH2 flowing in the temperature range of 20.5 to 24.4 K. Additional imaging was also done at LH2 temperatures with no flow to verify clear view through the orifice.

  20. Performance of a Small Gas Generator Using Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, Loren W.; Fenn, David B.; Dietrich, Marshall W.

    1961-01-01

    The performance and operating problems of a small hot-gas generator burning liquid hydrogen with liquid oxygen are presented. Two methods of ignition are discussed. Injector and combustion chamber design details based on rocket design criteria are also given. A carefully fabricated showerhead injector of simple design provided a gas generator that yielded combustion efficiencies of 93 and 96 percent.

  1. A liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the MEG and MEG II liquid xenon calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorelli, G.; Baldini, A. M.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Nicolò, D.; Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Grassi, M.; Papa, A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    We designed, built and operated a liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the liquid xenon calorimeter of the MEG experiment. The target was used throughout the entire data taking period, from 2008 to 2013 and it is being refurbished and partly re-designed to be integrated and used in the MEG-II experiment.

  2. The Liquid Hydrogen Option for the Subsonic Transport: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycinski, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    Continued subsonic air transport design studies include the option for a liquid hydrogen fuel system as an aircraft fuel conservation measure. Elements of this option discussed include: (1) economical production of hydrogen; (2) efficient liquefaction of hydrogen; (3) materials for long service life LH2 fuel tanks; (4) insulation materials; (5) LH2 fuel service and installations at major air terminals; (6) assessment of LH2 hazards; and (7) the engineering definition of an LH2 fuel system for a large subsonic passenger air transport.

  3. Two-phase flow of solid hydrogen particles and liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Rouelle, A.; Smith, K. M.; Celik, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2004-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen propellant feed systems may require transporting solid hydrogen particles containing atomic species from storage tanks to the engines using liquid helium as the carrier fluid. In this paper, a three-dimensional two-phase mixture model, along with the standard k- ɛ mixture turbulence model is employed to study the turbulent mixing of the fluid-particle slurry system. Numerical results show that turbulent flow is required to keep the hydrogen particles in suspension, which otherwise form a sliding layer of particles on top of the helium layer. Hydrogen particle concentration profiles in the slurry system are functions of particle size, flow velocity, and influx volume fraction of hydrogen particles. Particle dispersion at different Stokes numbers, different Kolmogorov length scales, and different time scales are discussed.

  4. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  5. Two-component Fermi-liquid theory - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the transition of condensed hydrogen from an insulating molecular crystal phase to a metallic liquid phase, at zero temperature and high pressure, appears possible. Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH), comprising interpenetrating proton and electron fluids, would constitute a two-component Fermi liquid with both a very high component-mass ratio and long-range, species-dependent bare interactions. The low-temperature equilibrium properties of LMH are examined by means of a generalization to the case of two components of the phenomenological Landau Fermi-liquid theory, and the low-temperature specific heat, compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and spin susceptibility are given. It is found that the specific heat and the thermal expansion coefficient are vastly greater in the liquid than in the corresponding solid, due to the presence of proton quasiparticle excitations in the liquid.

  6. Performance of turbine-type flowmeters in liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Tests using commercially available flowmeters provide information on the constancy in water of the calibration factor /pulses per unit volume/, on the maximum deviation of the factor from its mean value, and on the probability of predicting the calibration factor of a meter in liquid hydrogen at full scale.

  7. 20. DECOMMISIONED HYDROGEN TANK IN FORMER LIQUID OXYGEN STORAGE AREA, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DECOMMISIONED HYDROGEN TANK IN FORMER LIQUID OXYGEN STORAGE AREA, BETWEEN TEST STAND 1-A AND INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL BUILDING. Looking northwest. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Hydrogen-bonding molecular ruler surfactants as probes of specific solvation at liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Siler, A Renee; Brindza, Michael R; Walker, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    Resonance-enhanced, second harmonic generation (SHG) is used to measure the electronic structure of solutes sensitive to specific solvation adsorbed to liquid/liquid and liquid/solid interfaces. Here, specific solvation refers to solvent-solute interactions that are directional and localized. N-methyl-p-methoxyaniline (NMMA) is a solute whose first allowed electronic transition wavelength remains almost constant (approximately 315 nm) in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents regardless of solvent polarity. However, in hydrogen-bond-accepting solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, NMMA's absorbance shifts to longer wavelengths (320 nm), whereas in hydrogen-bond-donating solvents (e.g., water), the absorbance shifts to shorter wavelengths (approximately 300 nm). SHG experiments show that at alkane/silica interfaces, surface silanol groups serve as moderately strong hydrogen-bond donors as evidenced by NMMA's absorbance of 307 nm. At the carbon tetrachloride/water interface, NMMA absorbance also shifts to slightly shorter wavelengths (298 nm) implying that water molecules at this liquid/liquid interface are donating strong hydrogen bonds to the adsorbed NMMA solutes. In contrast, experiments using newly developed molecular ruler surfactants with NMMA as a model hydrophobic solute and a hydrophilic, cationic headgroup imply that, as NMMA migrates across an aqueous/alkane interface, it carries with it water that functions as a hydrogen-bond-accepting partner.

  9. Sloshing in the Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen Propellant Tanks After Main Engine Cut Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sura; West, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is designing and developing the Main Propulsion System (MPS) for Ares launch vehicles. Propellant sloshing in the liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant tanks after Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) was modeled using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) module of the computational fluid dynamics code, CFD-ACE+. The present simulation shows that there is substantial sloshing side forces acting on the LH2 tank during the deceleration of the vehicle after MECO. The LH2 tank features a side wall drain pipe. The side loads result from the residual propellant mass motion in the LH2 tank which is initiated by the stop of flow into the drain pipe at MECO. The simulations show that radial force on the LH2 tank wall is less than 50 lbf and the radial moment calculated based up through the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted to be as high as 300 lbf-ft. The LO2 tank features a bottom dome drain system and is equipped with sloshing baffles. The remaining LO2 in the tank slowly forms a liquid column along the centerline of tank under the zero gravity environments. The radial force on the LO2 tank wall is predicted to be less than 100 lbf. The radial moment calculated based on the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted as high as 4500 lbf-ft just before MECO and dropped down to near zero after propellant draining stopped completely.

  10. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of research on the development of new catalytic pathways for the hydrogenation of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons and the hydrotreating of coal liquids at The University of Chicago under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91056. The work, which is described in three parts, is primarily concerned with the research on the development of new catalytic systems for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen. Part A discusses the activation of dihydrogen by very basic molecular reagents to form adducts that can facilitate the reduction of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons. Part B examines the hydrotreating of coal liquids catalyzed by the same base-activated dihydrogen complexes. Part C concerns studies of molecular organometallic catalysts for the hydrogenation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under mild conditions.

  11. Trade study: Liquid hydrogen transportation - Kennedy Space Center. [cost and operational effectivenss of shipping methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Cryogenic transportation methods for providing liquid hydrogen requirements are examined in support of shuttle transportation system launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during the time frames 1982-1991 in terms of cost and operational effectiveness. Transportation methods considered included sixteen different options employing mobile semi-trailer tankers, railcars, barges and combinations of each method. The study concludes that the most effective method of delivering liquid hydrogen from the vendor production facility in New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center includes maximum utilization of existing mobile tankers and railcars supplemented by maximum capacity mobile tankers procured incrementally in accordance with shuttle launch rates actually achieved.

  12. Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid WaterMicrojets

    SciTech Connect

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2007-05-31

    We describe a method for generating molecular hydrogen directly from the charge separation effected via rapid flow of liquid water through a metal orifice, wherein the input energy is the hydrostatic pressure times the volume flow rate. Both electrokinetic currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to follow simple equations derived from the overlap of the fluid velocity gradient and the anisotropic charge distribution resulting from selective adsorption of hydroxide ions to the nozzle surface. Pressure-driven fluid flow shears away the charge balancing hydronium ions from the diffuse double layer and carries them out of the aperture. Downstream neutralization of the excess protons at a grounded target electrode produces gaseous hydrogen molecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currently very low (ca. 10-6) for a single cylindrical jet, but can be improved with design changes.

  13. Fluid Mechanics of Liquid-Liquid Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, John Reed

    The detailed hydrodynamics of selected liquid -liquid flow systems are investigated to provide a firm foundation for the rational design of separation processes. The implementation of this objective centers on the development of a robust code to simulate liquid-liquid flows. We have applied this code to the realistic simulation of aspects of the complex fluid mechanical behavior, and developed quantitative insight into the underlying processes involved. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is combined with the Continuous Surface Force (CSF) algorithm to provide a numerically stable code capable of solving high Reynolds numbers free surface flows. One of the developments during the testing was an efficient method for solving the Young-Laplace equation describing the shape of the meniscus in a vertical cylinder for a constrained liquid volume. The steady-state region near the nozzle for the laminar flow of a Newtonian liquid jet injected vertically into another immiscible Newtonian liquid is investigated for various Reynolds numbers by solving the axisymmetric transient equations of motion and continuity. The analysis takes into account pressure, viscous, inertial, gravitational, and surface tension forces, and comparison with previous experimental measurements shows good agreement. Comparisons of the present numerical method with the numerical results of previous boundary-layer methods help establish their range of validity. A new approximate equation for the shape of the interface of the steady jet, based on an overall momentum balance, is also developed. The full transient from liquid-liquid jet startup to breakup into drops is also simulated numerically. In comparison with experiment, the results of the present numerical method show a greater sensitivity of the jet length to the Reynolds number than the best predictions of previous linear stability analyses. The formation of drops is investigated at low to high Reynolds numbers before and after jet formation. The

  14. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Liquid Hydrogen Pressure Control Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. D.; Otto, J. M.; Cody, J. C.; Hastings, L. J.; Bryant, C. B.; Gautney, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy cryogenic propellant is an essential element in future space exploration programs. Therefore, NASA and its industrial partners are committed to an advanced development/technology program that will broaden the experience base for the entire cryogenic fluid management community. Furthermore, the high cost of microgravity experiments has motivated NASA to establish government/aerospace industry teams to aggressively explore combinations of ground testing and analytical modeling to the greatest extent possible, thereby benefitting both industry and government entities. One such team consisting of ManTech SRS, Inc., Edwards Air Force Base, and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was formed to pursue a technology project designed to demonstrate technology readiness for an SRS liquid hydrogen (LH2) in-space propellant management concept. The subject testing was cooperatively performed June 21-30, 2000, through a partially reimbursable Space Act Agreement between SRS, MSFC, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. The joint statement of work used to guide the technical activity is presented in appendix A. The key elements of the SRS concept consisted of an LH2 storage and supply system that used all of the vented H2 for solar engine thrusting, accommodated pressure control without a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), and minimized or eliminated the need for a capillary liquid acquisition device (LAD). The strategy was to balance the LH2 storage tank pressure control requirements with the engine thrusting requirements to selectively provide either liquid or vapor H2 at a controlled rate to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity environment of space operations. The overall test objective was to verify that the proposed concept could enable simultaneous control of LH2 tank pressure and feed system flow to the thruster without necessitating a TVS and a capillary LAD. The primary program objectives were designed to demonstrate technology readiness of the SRS concept

  15. High-pressure gas facilitates calibration of turbine flowmeters for liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Szaniszlo, A. J.

    1968-01-01

    Nitrogen gas at a pressure of 60 atmospheres and ambient temperature facilitates the calibration of turbine flowmeters used for monitoring the flow of liquid hydrogen in cryogenic systems. Full-scale calibration factors can be obtained to an accuracy of 0.4 percent.

  16. The liquid annular reactor system (LARS) propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Maise, G.; Lazareth, O.W.; Horn, F.; Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H. ); Lenard, R.X. )

    1991-01-05

    A new concept for very high specific impulse ({gt}2000 seconds) direct nuclear propulsion is described. The concept, termed LARS (Liquid Annular Reactor System) uses liquid nuclear fuel elements to heat hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures ({similar to}6000 K). Operating pressure is moderate ({similar to}10 atm), with the result that the outlet hydrogen is virtually 100% dissociated to monatomic H. The molten fuel is contained in a solid container of its own material, which is rotated to stabilize the liquid layer by centripetal force. LARS reactor designs are described, together with neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses. Power levels are on the order of 200 megawatts. Typically, LARS designs use 7 rotating fuel elements, are beryllium moderated and have critical radii of {similar to}100 cm (core L/D{approx}1.5).

  17. The Liquid Annular Reactor System (LARS) propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, James; Ludewig, Hans; Horn, Frederick; Lenard, Roger

    1990-01-01

    A concept for very high specific impulse (greater than 2000 seconds) direct nuclear propulsion is described. The concept, termed the liquid annular reactor system (LARS), uses liquid nuclear fuel elements to heat hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (approximately 6000 K). Operating pressure is moderate (approximately 10 atm), with the result that the outlet hydrogen is virtually 100 percent dissociated to monatomic H. The molten fuel is contained in a solid container of its own material, which is rotated to stabilize the liquid layer by centripetal force. LARS reactor designs are described, together with neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses. Power levels are on the order of 200 megawatts. Typically, LARS designs use seven rotating fuel elements, are beryllium moderated, and have critical radii of approximately 100 cm (core L/D approximately equal to 1.5).

  18. Distinct metallization and atomization transitions in dense liquid hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-03-13

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations driven by accurate quantum Monte Carlo forces on dense liquid hydrogen. There is a recent report of a complete atomization transition between a mixed molecular-atomic liquid and a completely dissociated fluid in an almost unaccessible pressure range [Nat. Commun. 5, 3487 (2014)]. Here, instead, we identify a different transition between the fully molecular liquid and the mixed-atomic fluid at ∼400  GPa, i.e., in a much more interesting pressure range. We provide numerical evidence supporting the metallic behavior of this intermediate phase. Therefore, we predict that the metallization at finite temperature occurs in this partially dissociated molecular fluid, well before the complete atomization of the liquid. At high temperature this first-order transition becomes a crossover, in very good agreement with the experimental observation. Several systematic tests supporting the quality of our large scale calculations are also reported.

  19. FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    VAJO, JOHN

    2014-06-12

    DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ≥6 wt% and ≥50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the

  20. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-10-19

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  1. Evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition in hot dense hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dzyabura, Vasily; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Silvera, Isaac F

    2013-05-14

    We use pulsed-laser heating of hydrogen at static pressures in the megabar pressure region to search for the plasma phase transition to liquid atomic metallic hydrogen. We heat our samples substantially above the melting line and observe a plateau in a temperature vs. laser power curve that otherwise increases with power. This anomaly in the heating curve appears correlated with theoretical predictions for the plasma phase transition. PMID:23630287

  2. Hydrogen mitigation Gas Characterization System: System design description

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1998-07-17

    The Gas Characterization System (GCS) design is described for flammable gas monitoring. Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is known to experience periodic tank level increases and decreases during which hydrogen gas is released. It is believed that the generated gases accumulate in the solids-containing layer near the bottom of the tank. Solids and gases are also present in the crust and may be present in the interstitial liquid layer. The accumulation of gases creates a buoyancy that eventually overcomes the density and bonding strength of the bottom layer. When this happens, the gas from the bottom layer is released upward through the liquid layer to the vapor space above the tank crust. Previous monitoring of the vapor space gases during such an event indicates hydrogen release concentrations greater than the lower flammability limit (LFL) of hydrogen in a partial nitrous oxide atmosphere. Tanks 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, and 241-SY-103 have been identified as having the potential to behave similar to SY-101. These waste tanks have been placed on the flammable gas watch list (FGWL). All waste tanks on the FGWL will have a standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) installed to measure hydrogen. In the event that hydrogen levels exceed 0.75% by volume, additional characterization will be required. The purpose of this additional vapor space characterization is to determine the actual lower flammability limit of these tanks, accurately measure low baseline gas release concentrations, and to determine potential hazards associated with larger Gas Release Events (GREs). The instruments to be installed in the GCS for vapor monitoring will allow accurate analysis of samples from the tank vapor space. It will be possible to detect a wide range of hydrogen from parts per million to percent by volume, as well as other gas species suspected to be generated in waste tanks.

  3. A history of the UK liquid hydrogen programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, J.

    1992-07-01

    A review is presented of the evolution of UK liquid hydrogen (LH2) programs into the testing of low- and higher-pressure engines for upper stage applications with attention given to the production of LH2. The engine requirements are examined of launchers such as the Black Knight and Black Prince vehicles and LOX/LH2 upper stages for the European Launcher Development Organization (ELDO). High-energy second and third stages are described for the ELDO vehicles, and injector types and thrust-chamber designs are illustrated for the use of LH2/LOX. Successful firings of the RZ-20 chamber are reported, and the production of liquid hydrogen is shown to be adequate for testing and usage over all of the experimental phases. Developments from the LH2 programs in the UK can provide technologies for current items such as the propellant feed lines for the Ariane program.

  4. Composite seals for liquid hydrogen and nuclear radiation environments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Auken, R. L.; Chase, V. A.

    1971-01-01

    Description of plastic composite seals for service in a liquid-hydrogen and nuclear-radiation environment. The radiation-resistant aromatic heterocyclic class of polymers, including polyimide, polybenzimidazole, and polyquinoxaline, were evaluated for this application. The seal developed is based on a design involving a resin-starved laminate consisting of alternating layers of woven glass fabric and polymer film. This design imparts a mechanical spring characteristic to the seal, resulting in essentially complete elastic recovery when unloaded, and eliminates cold flow. Encapsulating techniques employing the polyquinoxaline polymer were developed which rendered the seal impervious to liquid hydrogen. The seals were tested before and after gamma irradiation up to 10 to the 10th ergs/g. Load/deflection and leakage tests were performed over a temperature range from -423 through +500 F.

  5. Liquid hydrogen production and commercial demand in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydorn, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center, the single largest purchaser of liquid hydrogen (LH2) in the United States, evaluated current and anticipated hydrogen production and consumption in the government and commercial sectors. Specific objectives of the study are as follows: (1) identify LH2 producers in the United States and Canada during 1980-1989 period; (2) compile information in expected changes in LH2 production capabilities over the 1990-2000 period; (3) describe how hydrogen is used in each consuming industry and estimate U.S. LH2 consumption for the chemicals, metals, electronics, fats and oil, and glass industries, and report data on a regional basis; (4) estimate historical and future consumption; and (5) assess the influence of international demands on U.S. plants.

  6. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  7. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-02-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  8. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  9. Establishment of Design Method for Liquid Hydrogen Regenerative Cooling Combustor of LOX/Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuyanagi, Nobuyuki

    An optimum method for design of a liquid hydrogen regenerative cooling combustor for the LOX/hydrogen engine was constructed using the author’s previous empirical correlation of C* efficiency and calculation model for combustion characteristics, and the present calculation model for the heat load characteristics for LOX/hydrogen combustion. Using this method, the atomization characteristics of the injected LOX jet, the combustion performance including combustion stability, and the heat load on the combustor were evaluated for LOX/hydrogen upper-stage engines such as the LE-5, RL-10 and HM-7. This method was then applied to the LE-5B engine, which is the derivative engine of the LE-5 and has been used as the second stage of the H-2A launcher, to improve combustion stability and to optimize configuration of the injector and combustor. A reduction of about 30% in chamber length of it with sufficient combustion performance was achieved by such optimization.

  10. Performance Gains of Propellant Management Devices for Liquid Hydrogen Depots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents background, experimental design, and preliminary experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to investigate the parameters that affect liquid acquisition device (LAD) performance in a liquid hydrogen (LH2) propellant tank, to mitigate risk in the final design of the LAD for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission, and to provide insight into optimal LAD operation for future LH2 depots. Preliminary test results show an increase in performance and screen retention over the low reference LH2 bubble point value for a 325 2300 screen in three separate ways, thus improving fundamental LH2 LAD performance. By using a finer mesh screen, operating at a colder liquid temperature, and pressurizing with a noncondensible pressurant gas, a significant increase in margin is achieved in bubble point pressure for LH2 screen channel LADs.

  11. Fiber-Optic System Would Detect Leaking Liquid H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, Charles H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed instrument based on optical time-domain reflectometry measures both locations and sizes of leaks in tanks and plumbing storing and transferring liquid hydrogen. Conceived for use in detecting leaks of hydrogen from propulsion system of Space Shuttle, concept applicable to detection of flammable and/or poisonous fumes in chemical-processing plants, fuel-distributing equipment, and other terrestrial applications.

  12. 15 K liquid hydrogen thermal Energy Storage Unit for future ESA science missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges de Sousa, P.; Martins, D.; Tomás, G.; Barreto, J.; Noite, J.; Linder, M.; Fruchart, D.; de Rango, P.; Haettel, R.; Catarino, I.; Bonfait, G.

    2015-12-01

    A thermal Energy Storage Unit (ESU) using liquid hydrogen has been developed as a solution for absorbing the heat peaks released by the recycling phase of a 300 mK cooler that is a part of the cryogenic chain of one of ESA's new satellites for science missions. This device is capable of storing 400 J of thermal energy between 15 and 16 K by taking advantage of the liquid-to-vapor latent heat of hydrogen in a closed system. This paper describes some results obtained with the development model of the ESU under different configurations and using two types of hydrogen storage: a large expansion volume for ground testing and a much more compact unit, suitable for space applications and that can comply with ESA's mass budget.

  13. Covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water can be probed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Elgabarty, Hossam; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-09-15

    The concept of covalency is widely used to describe the nature of intermolecular bonds, to explain their spectroscopic features and to rationalize their chemical behaviour. Unfortunately, the degree of covalency of an intermolecular bond cannot be directly measured in an experiment. Here we established a simple quantitative relationship between the calculated covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water and the anisotropy of the proton magnetic shielding tensor that can be measured experimentally. This relationship enabled us to quantify the degree of covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water using the experimentally measured anisotropy. We estimated that the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is on the order of 10  m while the stabilization energy due to this charge transfer is ∼15 kJ mol(-1). The physical insight into the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding provided in this work will facilitate new studies of intermolecular bonding in a variety of molecular systems.

  14. Quantum effects of hydrogen atoms on the dynamical rearrangement of hydrogen-bond networks in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2010-04-28

    Quantum effects such as zero-point energy and delocalization of wave packets (WPs) representing water hydrogen atoms are essential to understand anomalous energetics and dynamics in water. Since quantum calculations of many-body dynamics are highly complicated, no one has yet directly viewed the quantum WP dynamics of hydrogen atoms in liquid water. Our semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation made it possible to observe the hydrogen WP dynamics in liquid water. We demonstrate that the microscopic WP dynamics are closely correlated with and actually play key roles in the dynamical rearrangement in the hydrogen-bond network (HBN) of bulk water. We found the quantum effects of hydrogen atoms on liquid water dynamics such as the rearrangement of HBN and the concomitant fluctuation and relaxation. Our results provide new physical insights on HBN dynamics in water whose significance is not limited to pure liquid dynamics but also a greater understanding of chemical and biological reactions in liquid water.

  15. Passive ZBO storage of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen applied to space science mission concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Jurns, J. M.; Kittel, P.

    2006-02-01

    Liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic propulsion and storage were recently considered for application to Titan Explorer and Comet Nuclear Sample Return space science mission investigations. These missions would require up to 11 years of cryogenic storage. We modeled and designed cryogenic propellant storage concepts for these missions. By isolating the propellant tank’s view to deep space, we were able to achieve zero boil-off for both liquid hydrogen and oxygen propellant storage without cryocoolers. Several shades were incorporated to protect the tanks from the sun and spacecraft bus, and to protect the hydrogen tank from the warmer oxygen tank. This had a dramatic effect on the surface temperatures of the propellant tank insulation. These passive storage concepts for deep space missions substantially improved this application of cryogenic propulsion. It is projected that for missions requiring larger propellant tank sizes, the results would be even more dramatic.

  16. Laser-induced separation of hydrogen isotopes in the liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Beattie, Willard H.; Holland, Redus F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation is achieved by either (a) dissolving a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound in a liquid solvent, or (b) liquefying a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound, the liquid phase thus resulting being kept at a temperature at which spectral features of the feedstock relating to a particular hydrogen isotope are resolved, i.e., a clear-cut isotope shift is delineated, irradiating the liquid phase with monochromatic radiation of a wavelength which at least preferentially excites those molecules of the feedstock containing a first hydrogen isotope, inducing photochemical reaction in the excited molecules, and separating the reaction product containing the first isotope from the liquid phase.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  18. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  19. Flow Visualization of Liquid Hydrogen Line Chilldown Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen John B.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of wall and fluid temperature during chill-down tests of a warm cryogenic line with liquid hydrogen. Synchronized video and fluid temperature measurements are used to interpret stream temperature profiles versus time. When cold liquid hydrogen starts to flow into the warm line, a sequence of flow regimes, spanning from all-vapor at the outset to bubbly with continuum liquid at the end can be observed at a location far downstream of the cold inlet. In this paper we propose interpretations to the observed flow regimes and fluid temperature histories for two chilldown methods, viz. trickle (i.e. continuous) flow and pulse flow. Calculations of heat flux from the wall to the fluid versus wall temperature indicate the presence of the transition/nucleate boiling regimes only. The present tests, run at typical Reynolds numbers of approx O(10 (exp 5)), are in sharp contrast to similar tests conducted at lower Reynolds numbers where a well-defined film boiling region is observed.

  20. Dispersion of multi walled carbon nanotubes in a hydrogen bonded liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, V. N.; Madhu Mohan, M. L. N.

    2010-11-01

    In a newly synthesized self assembled system, namely, hydrogen bonded liquid crystal, multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are dispersed. This self assembly system of liquid crystal is realized by formation of hydrogen bond between levo tartaric acid and undecyloxy benzoic acid. The proposed structure is confirmed by FTIR and P-NMR studies. Thermal and electrical properties of this system dispersed with MWCNT are studied. Alignment of carbon nanotubes in the nematic phase of the self assembled system is responsible for the observation of bistable electrical states namely ON and OFF. Optical textural observations of these two states are recorded and the light intensity complexly decays and unwinding of the helix with the application of external field indicates an optical shuttering action. It is interesting to note that a small threshold value of 3.5 V/μm is sufficient to realize an optical shutter. DSC studied reveals that the enthalpy values pertaining to liquid crystal dispersed with MWCNT is approximately two fold to that of the pure liquid crystal. Results of conductance relating to the liquid crystal with MWCNT dispersion are discussed.

  1. Thermo-physical performance prediction of the KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit for liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, J. H.; Notardonato, W. U.; Karng, S. W.; Oh, I.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) researchers have been working on enhanced and modernized cryogenic liquid propellant handling techniques to reduce life cycle costs of propellant management system for the unique KSC application. The KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit (GODU) for liquid hydrogen (LH2) plans to demonstrate integrated refrigeration, zero-loss flexible term storage of LH2, and densified hydrogen handling techniques. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has partnered with the KSC researchers to develop thermal performance prediction model of the GODU for LH2. The model includes integrated refrigeration cooling performance, thermal losses in the tank and distribution lines, transient system characteristics during chilling and loading, and long term steady-state propellant storage. This paper will discuss recent experimental data of the GODU for LH2 system and modeling results.

  2. Capture of liquid hydrogen boiloff with metal hydride absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosso, M. J.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure which uses metal hydrides to capture some of this low pressure (,1 psig) hydrogen for subsequent reliquefaction is described. Of the five normally occurring sources of boil-off vapor the stream associated with the off-loading of liquid tankers during dewar refill was identified as the most cost effective and readily recoverable. The design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept capture device, operating at a rate that is commensurate with the evolution of vapor by the target stream, is described. Liberation of the captured hydrogen gas at pressure .15 psig at normal temperatures (typical liquefier compressor suction pressure) are also demonstrated. A payback time of less than three years is projected.

  3. Minimum energy, liquid hydrogen supersonic cruise vehicle study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential was examined of hydrogen-fueled supersonic vehicles designed for cruise at Mach 2.7 and at Mach 2.2. The aerodynamic, weight, and propulsion characteristics of a previously established design of a LH2 fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise vehicle (SCV) were critically reviewed and updated. The design of a Mach 2.2 SCV was established on a corresponding basis. These baseline designs were then studied to determine the potential of minimizing energy expenditure in performing their design mission, and to explore the effect of fuel price and noise restriction on their design and operating performance. The baseline designs of LH2 fueled aircraft were than compared with equivalent designs of jet A (conventional hydrocarbon) fueled SCV's. Use of liquid hydrogen for fuel for the subject aircraft provides significant advantages in performance, cost, noise, pollution, sonic boom, and energy utilization.

  4. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    SciTech Connect

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  5. Liquid-liquid equilibria for hydrogen fluoride + 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane at {minus}20 and 20 C

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1995-03-01

    1,1-Dichloro-1-fluoroethane is presently under consideration as a replacement for trichlorofluoromethane, which is widely used as a foam blowing agent. 1-Chloro-1,1-difluoroethane is the major raw material for the production of poly(vinylidene fluoride). These two materials are normally manufactured by the fluorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane or vinylidene chloride with hydrogen fluoride. A phase separator is normally used to retrieve hydrogen fluoride from the product stream. To design the phase separator, liquid-liquid equilibrium data are required. Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary system (hydrogen fluoride + 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) have been measured at {minus}20 and 20 C. The results are correlated with the NRTL model, and the relevant parameters are presented.

  6. Thermophysical properties of hydrogen along the liquid-vapor coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, S. M.; Sulaiman, N.; Bahaa Khedr, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present Theoretical Calculations for the Liquid-Vapor Coexistence (LVC) curve of fluid Hydrogen within the first order perturbation theory with a suitable first order quantum correction to the free energy. In the present equation of state, we incorporate the dimerization of H2 molecule by treating the fluid as a hard convex body fluid. The thermophysical properties of fluid H2 along the LVC curve, including the pressure-temperature dependence, density-temperature asymmetry, volume expansivity, entropy and enthalpy, are calculated and compared with computer simulation and empirical results.

  7. Electrons and Hydrogen-Bond Connectivity in Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Serra, M.V.; Artacho, Emilio

    2006-01-13

    The network connectivity in liquid water is revised in terms of electronic signatures of hydrogen bonds (HBs) instead of geometric criteria, in view of recent x-ray absorption studies. The analysis is based on ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations at ambient conditions. Even if instantaneous threadlike structures are observed in the electronic network, they continuously reshape in oscillations reminiscent of the r and t modes in ice ({tau}{approx}170 fs). However, two water molecules initially joined by a HB remain effectively bound over many periods regardless of its electronic signature.

  8. Hydrogen fueled-hydrogen transport rail system - A NASA proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, A. L.; Tison, R. R.; Spafka, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The technical possibility of fueling motive power equipment with hydrogen as an alternative to petroleum is studied, and the economics of operating hydrogen-fueled systems are evaluated. Technical considerations include the areas of fuel storage and distribution systems, engine design changes, and a test and evaluation program. A conversion methodology, which conforms to the scheme of high-pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the cylinder late in the compresssion stroke and injection of pilot diesel fuel for ignition, is illustrated with detailed diagrams.

  9. Pressurization and expulsion of a flightweight liquid hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandresar, N. T.; Stochl, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for pressurization and expulsion of a flight-weight 4.89 cu m liquid hydrogen storage tank under normal gravity conditions. Pressurization and expulsion times are parametrically varied to study the effects of longer transfer times expected in future space flight applications. It is found that the increase in pressurant consumption with increased operational time is significant at shorter pressurization or expulsion durations and diminishes as the duration lengthens. Gas-to-wall heat transfer in the ullage is the dominant mode of energy exchange, with more than 50 percent of the pressurant energy being lost to tank wall heating in expulsions and the long duration pressurizations. Advanced data analysis will require a multidimensional approach combined with improved measurement capabilities of liquid-vapor interfacial transport phenomena.

  10. Prediction of pressurant mass requirements for axisymmetric liquid hydrogen tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandresar, N. T.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data from several test series are compared to an existing correlation that predicts the amount of pressurant gas mass required to expel liquid hydrogen from axisymmetric tanks. It was necessary to use an alternate definition of the tank equivalent diameter to accommodate thermal mass in the tank wall that is initially warm and to accommodate liquid residuals in the tank after expulsion is stopped. With this modification, the existing correlation predicted mass requirements to within 14 percent of experimental results. Revision of the correlation constants using a nonlinear least-squares fit of the current experimental data has a minor effect, thus supporting the validity of the original correlation's form, its fitted constants, and the alternate definition of the tank equivalent diameter.

  11. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  12. Design and development of liquid hydrogen mixer unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. W.; Wuertz, K.; Rudich, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    A dc brushless motor driven mixer unit (a vaneaxial fan) was designed and evaluated for use in cryogenic fluids (liquids and gases). It was found to operate well in all fluids in which it was tested. The test fluids were liquid and gaseous helium, hydrogen in the liquid phase gas phase and mixtures of the two phases, and liquid nitrogen. It operated for over 100 hr at cryogenic temperatures without damage to the bearings and at the conclusion of testing the condition of the bearings was such that an operational life of 5000 hr appeared possible. The unit demonstrated that (with the brushless dc motor principle) useful pumping of cryogenic fluids could be accomplished with very small power inputs to the mixer motor. During test, the motor input power varied from approximately 0.5 W to 2.5 W, depending on fluid density. The high power input produced a mixer efficiency of over 49 percent. In an earlier program (see NASA Report CR-72365), a mixer using an ac induction motor demonstrated an efficiency of 17.7 percent under the same conditions, illustrating the advantage of the dc brushless motor driven unit. The mixer also demonstrated its ability to automatically vary speed as a function of the density of the fluid being pumped. This causes the unit to deliver higher volumetric flow rates as fluid density decreases.

  13. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  14. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  15. Liquid and slush hydrogen ground support facilities for aero-space planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, David A.; Moore, Robert B.

    1992-12-01

    A conceptual planning study by the NASP Ground Systems Associate Contractor team has defined an optimal design for liquid and slush hydrogen facilities necessary for flight testing of an aerospace plane. Several technology and component development issues are identified and an approach to resolving these issues in a cost effective manner through early development of a portion of the flight test facility and its utilization as a pilot plant is discussed.

  16. Producing liquid-solid mixtures (slushes) of oxygen or hydrogen using an auger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, R. O.

    An auger rotating inside a brass tube refrigerated with liquid helium was used to produce liquid-solid (slush) mixtures of hydrogen and of oxygen. The auger produced small particles from the cryogens so that the resulting slush mixture could be transferred and stored. The auger could produce slush continuously in an appropriate system; it could produce slush at pressures higher than the triple point pressure of the cryogen, and the energy required to produce the slush was less than the energy required to produce slush using the freeze-thaw process.

  17. Hydrogen-bond acidity of ionic liquids: an extended scale†

    PubMed Central

    Kurnia, Kiki A.; Lima, Filipa; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main drawbacks comprising an appropriate selection of ionic liquids (ILs) for a target application is related to the lack of an extended and well-established polarity scale for these neoteric fluids. Albeit considerable progress has been made on identifying chemical structures and factors that influence the polarity of ILs, there still exists a high inconsistency in the experimental values reported by different authors. Furthermore, due to the extremely large number of possible ILs that can be synthesized, the experimental characterization of their polarity is a major limitation when envisaging the choice of an IL with a desired polarity. Therefore, it is of crucial relevance to develop correlation schemes and a priori predictive methods able to forecast the polarity of new (or not yet synthesized) fluids. In this context, and aiming at broadening the experimental polarity scale available for ILs, the solvatochromic Kamlet–Taft parameters of a broad range of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-([NTf2]−)-based fluids were determined. The impact of the IL cation structure on the hydrogen-bond donating ability of the fluid was comprehensively addressed. Based on the large amount of novel experimental values obtained, we then evaluated COSMO-RS, COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents, as an alternative tool to estimate the hydrogen-bond acidity of ILs. A three-parameter model based on the cation–anion interaction energies was found to adequately describe the experimental hydrogen-bond acidity or hydrogen-bond donating ability of ILs. The proposed three-parameter model is also shown to present a predictive capacity and to provide novel molecular-level insights into the chemical structure characteristics that influence the acidity of a given IL. It is shown that although the equimolar cation–anion hydrogen-bonding energies (EHB) play the major role, the electrostatic-misfit interactions (EMF) and van der Waals forces (EvdW) also contribute

  18. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  19. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  20. Oxidizer Selection for the ISTAR Program (Liquid Oxygen versus Hydrogen Peroxide)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jason Eugene; Koelbl, Mary E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses a study of two alternate oxidizers, liquid oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, for use in a rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) demonstrator vehicle. The flight vehicle is baselined as an airlaunched self-powered Mach 0.7 to 7 demonstration of an RBCC engine through all or its air breathing propulsion modes. Selection of an alternate oxidizer has the potential to lower overall vehicle size, system complexity/ cost and ultimately the total program risk. This trade study examined the oxidizer selection effects upon the overall vehicle performance, safety and operations. After consideration of all the technical and programmatic details available at this time, 90% hydrogen peroxide was selected over liquid oxygen for use in this program.

  1. Development of a Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, W. U.

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project will design, assemble, and test a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives and will culminate with an operational demonstration of the loading of a simulated flight tank with densified propellants. The system will be unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. The integrated refrigerator is the critical feature enabling the testing of the following three functions: zero-loss storage and transfer, propellant densification/conditioning, and on-site liquefaction. This paper will discuss the test objectives, the design of the system, and the current status of the installation.

  2. Solar liquid heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, D.J.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a solar heater for heating liquids. It comprises: a heatable bag, a support means supporting the heatable bag, a heatable body of liquid in the heatable bag, the heatable bag being disposed in sunlight so as to become heated thereby, a topside gas bag above the heatable bag, the topside gas bag containing a gas for serving as insulation, a topside fluid bag disposed above the topside gas bag and containing a fluid for further insulation. The bags being substantially gasproof and waterproof and also being flexible whereby the gravity pull on the bags and the flexibility thereof causes the upper sides of the bags to seek horizontal levels.

  3. Performance test of a 6 L liquid hydrogen fuel tank for unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garceau, N. M.; Kim, S. Y.; Lim, C. M.; Cho, M. J.; Kim, K. Y.; Baik, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    A 6 L liquid hydrogen fuel tank has been designed, fabricated and tested to optimize boil-off rate and minimize weight for a 200 W light weight fuel cell in an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The 200 W fuel cell required a maximum flow rate of 2.3 SLPM or less liquid hydrogen boil-off from the fuel tank. After looking at several different insulation schemes, the system was optimized as two concentric lightweight aluminum cylinders with high vacuum and multi-layer insulation in between. MLI thickness and support structures were designed to minimize the tank weight. For support, filling and feed gas to a fuel-cell, the system was designed with two G-10 CR tubes which connected the inner vessel to the outer shell. A secondary G10-CR support structure was also added to ensure stability and durability during a flight. After fabrication the fuel tank was filled with liquid hydrogen. A series of boil-off tests were performed in various operating conditions to confirm thermal performance of the fuel tank for a 200 W fuel cell.

  4. Polymer system for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    2000-01-01

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  5. Polymer system for gettering hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    2000-05-16

    A novel composition is described comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  6. Method and system for hydrogen evolution and storage

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Cameron, Thomas M.

    2012-12-11

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen (H.sub.2) employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  7. Method and System for Hydrogen Evolution and Storage

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Cameron, Thomas M.

    2008-10-21

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  8. Effect of cashew nut shell liquid on metabolic hydrogen flow on bovine rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Enishi, Osamu; Shinkai, Takumi; Higuchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Takenaka, Akio; Nagashima, Kyo; Mochizuki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2014-03-01

    Effect of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), a methane inhibitor, on bovine rumen fermentation was investigated through analysis of the metabolic hydrogen flow estimated from concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and methane. Three cows were fed a concentrate and hay diet without or with a CNSL-containing pellet. Two trials were conducted using CNSL pellets blended with only silica (trial 1) or with several other ingredients (trial 2). Methane production was measured in a respiration chamber system, and energy balance and nutrient digestibility were monitored. The estimated flow of metabolic hydrogen demonstrated that a part of metabolic hydrogen was used for hydrogen gas production, and a large amount of it flowed into production of methane and SCFA in both trial 1 and 2, when CNSL was administered to the bovine rumen. The results obtained by regression analyses showed that the effect of CNSL supply on methane reduction was coupled with a significant (P < 0.01) decrease of acetate and a significant (P < 0.01) increase of propionate and hydrogen gas. These findings reveal that CNSL is able to reduce methane and acetate production, and to increase hydrogen gas and propionate production in vivo. PMID:24128067

  9. Effect of cashew nut shell liquid on metabolic hydrogen flow on bovine rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Enishi, Osamu; Shinkai, Takumi; Higuchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Takenaka, Akio; Nagashima, Kyo; Mochizuki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2014-03-01

    Effect of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), a methane inhibitor, on bovine rumen fermentation was investigated through analysis of the metabolic hydrogen flow estimated from concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and methane. Three cows were fed a concentrate and hay diet without or with a CNSL-containing pellet. Two trials were conducted using CNSL pellets blended with only silica (trial 1) or with several other ingredients (trial 2). Methane production was measured in a respiration chamber system, and energy balance and nutrient digestibility were monitored. The estimated flow of metabolic hydrogen demonstrated that a part of metabolic hydrogen was used for hydrogen gas production, and a large amount of it flowed into production of methane and SCFA in both trial 1 and 2, when CNSL was administered to the bovine rumen. The results obtained by regression analyses showed that the effect of CNSL supply on methane reduction was coupled with a significant (P < 0.01) decrease of acetate and a significant (P < 0.01) increase of propionate and hydrogen gas. These findings reveal that CNSL is able to reduce methane and acetate production, and to increase hydrogen gas and propionate production in vivo.

  10. Nickel-hydrogen bipolar battery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cells are currently being manufactured on a semi-experimental basis. Rechargeable nickel-hydrogen systems are described that more closely resemble a fuel cell system than a traditional nickel-cadmium battery pack. This has been stimulated by the currently emerging requirements related to large manned and unmanned low earth orbit applications. The resultant nickel-hydrogen battery system should have a number of features that would lead to improved reliability, reduced costs as well as superior energy density and cycle lives as compared to battery systems constructed from the current state-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen individual pressure vessel cells.

  11. Nickel hydrogen battery expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, Sajjan G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Telescope Battery Testbed at MSFC uses the Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) Battery Expert System (NICBES-2) which supports the evaluation of performance of Hubble Telescope spacecraft batteries and provides alarm diagnosis and action advice. NICBES-2 provides a reasoning system along with a battery domain knowledge base to achieve this battery health management function. An effort is summarized which was used to modify NICBES-2 to accommodate Nickel Hydrogen (NiH2) battery environment now in MSFC testbed. The NICBES-2 is implemented on a Sun Microsystem and is written in SunOS C and Quintus Prolog. The system now operates in a multitasking environment. NICBES-2 spawns three processes: serial port process (SPP); data handler process (DHP); and the expert system process (ESP) in order to process the telemetry data and provide the status and action advice. NICBES-2 performs orbit data gathering, data evaluation, alarm diagnosis and action advice and status and history display functions. The adaptation of NICBES-2 to work with NiH2 battery environment required modification to all of the three component processes.

  12. Cu nanoparticles electrodeposited at liquid-liquid interfaces: a highly efficient catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Emre; Patir, Imren Hatay; Ersoz, Mustafa

    2015-03-16

    The electrochemical deposition of Cu nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 25-35 nm has been reported at liquid-liquid interfaces by using the organic-phase electron-donor decamethylferrocene (DMFc). The electrodeposited Cu nanoparticles display excellent catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER); this is the first reported catalytic effect of Cu nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interfaces.

  13. Design, fabrication, assembly, and test of a liquid hydrogen acquisition subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackman, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a cryogenic fluid system to supply liquid hydrogen to a turbopump at flowrates up to 7.5 pounds per second for a period of approximately 5 seconds before refill, is discussed. Refill is accomplished in less than 10 seconds, during which a constant flowrate can be maintained to the pumps. Diagrams are provided to show the configuration of the system. Subsystem acceptance and functional tests, including acquisition subsystem expulsion, pressurization, and refill were performed. The tests included: (1) thermodynamic vent system operation, (2) warm-gas pressurization effects, (3) hydraulic pressure surge effects, (4) screen device operational limitations, (5) feedline vapor control, and (6) two-phase refill.

  14. Analysis of Hybrid Hydrogen Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.; Braun, R.; Munoz, D.; Penev, M.; Kinchin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Report on biomass pathways for hydrogen production and how they can be hybridized to support renewable electricity generation. Two hybrid systems were studied in detail for process feasibility and economic performance. The best-performing system was estimated to produce hydrogen at costs ($1.67/kg) within Department of Energy targets ($2.10/kg) for central biomass-derived hydrogen production while also providing value-added energy services to the electric grid.

  15. Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-15

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

  16. Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to hydrogen and to maximize hydrogen productivity. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) systems were constructed to carry out this fermentation process, and seed sludge obtained from a dairy manure anaerobic digester and pretreated by nutrient acclimation, heat and pH treatment was used as inoculum. High system stability was indicated by a short startup period of 12 days followed by stable hydrogen production, and successful sludge granulation occurred within 23 days of startup at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours. Operation at a progressively decreasing HRT from 24 to 8h gave rise to an increasing biogas production rate from 15.2-34.4L/d, while good linear relationships were observed between both total biogas and hydrogen production rates correlated to HRT, with R2 values of 0.993 and 0.997, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.63 mol-H 2/mol-hexose-feed occurred at HRT of 16h, while the HRT of 12h was highly suggested to achieve both high production rate and efficient yield. Hexose utilization efficiencies over 98%, considerable hydrogen production rate up to 14.3 L/d and hydrogen percentage of off-gas up to 43% (i.e., a CO 2/H2 ratio of 1.2) with the absence of CH4 production throughout the whole course of experiment at a pH of 5.0 strongly validated the feasibility of the fermentative H2 production from liquid swine manure using an ASBR system. Ethanol as well as acetic, butyric and valeric acids were produced in the system accompanying the hydrogen production, with acetic acid being the dominant

  17. Liquid Hydrogen Zero-Boiloff Testing and Analysis for Long-Term Orbital Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Bryant, C. B.; Flachbart, R. H.

    2004-06-01

    Advancement of cryocooler and passive insulation technologies in recent years has improved the prospects for zero-boiloff (ZBO) storage of cryogenic fluids. The ZBO concept involves the use of a cryocooler/radiator system to balance storage system incoming and extracted energy such that zero boiloff (no venting) occurs. A large-scale demonstration of the ZBO concept was conducted using the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) along with a commercial cryocooler unit. The liquid hydrogen (LH2) was withdrawn from the tank, passed through the cryocooler heat exchanger, and then the chilled liquid was sprayed back into the tank through a spray bar. The spray bar recirculation system was designed to provide destratification independent of ullage and liquid positions in a zero-gravity environment. The insulated MHTB tank, combined with the vacuum chamber conditions, enabled orbital storage simulation. ZBO was demonstrated for fill levels of 95%, 50%, and 25%. At each fill level, a steady-state boiloff test was performed prior to operating the cryocooler to establish the baseline heat leak. Control system logic based on real-time thermal data and ullage pressure response was implemented to automatically provide a constant tank pressure. A comparison of test data and analytical results is presented in this paper.

  18. Low Temperature Regenerators for Zero Boil-Off Liquid Hydrogen Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kashani, Ali; Helvensteijn, Ben; Kittel, Peter; Arnoldm James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of attention has been focused on zero boil-off (ZBO) propellant storage as a means of minimizing the launch mass required for long-term exploration missions. A key component of ZBO systems is the cooler. Pulse tube coolers offer the advantage of zero moving mass at the cold head, and recent advances in lightweight, high efficiency cooler technology have paved the way for reliable liquid oxygen (LOx) temperature coolers to be developed which are suitable for flight ZBO systems. Liquid hydrogen (LH2) systems, however, are another matter. For ZBO liquid hydrogen systems, cooling powers of 1-5 watts are required at 20 K. The final development from tier for these coolers is to achieve high efficiency and reliability at lower operating temperatures. Most of the life-limiting issues of flight Stirling and pulse tube coolers are associated with contamination, drive mechanisms, and drive electronics. These problems are well in hand in the present generation coolers. The remaining efficiency and reliability issues reside with the low temperature regenerators. This paper will discuss advances to be made in regenerators for pulse tube LH2 ZBO coolers, present some historical background, and discuss recent progress in regenerator technology development using alloys of erbium.

  19. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  20. The hydrogen diffusion in liquid aluminum alloys from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jakse, N; Pasturel, A

    2014-09-01

    We study the hydrogen diffusion in liquid aluminum alloys through extensive ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. At the microscopic scale, we show that the hydrogen motion is characterized by a broad distribution of spatial jumps that does not correspond to a Brownian motion. To determine the self-diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in liquid aluminum alloys, we use a generalized continuous time random walk model recently developed to describe the hydrogen diffusion in pure aluminum. In particular, we show that the model successfully accounts the effects of alloying elements on the hydrogen diffusion in agreement with experimental features.

  1. Cryogenic hydrogen circulation system of neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Y. N.; Hu, Z. J.; Wu, J. H.; Li, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, P.; Wang, G. P.

    2014-01-29

    Cold neutron sources of reactors and spallation neutron sources are classic high flux neutron sources in operation all over the world. Cryogenic fluids such as supercritical or supercooled hydrogen are commonly selected as a moderator to absorb the nuclear heating from proton beams. By comparing supercritical hydrogen circulation systems and supercooled hydrogen circulation systems, the merits and drawbacks in both systems are summarized. When supercritical hydrogen circulates as the moderator, severe pressure fluctuations caused by temperature changes will occur. The pressure control system used to balance the system pressure, which consists of a heater as an active controller for thermal compensation and an accumulator as a passive volume controller, is preliminarily studied. The results may provide guidelines for design and operation of other cryogenic hydrogen system for neutron sources under construction.

  2. Integrated photoelectrochemical cell and system having a liquid electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Xu, Liwei

    2010-07-06

    An integrated photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell generates hydrogen and oxygen from water while being illuminated with radiation. The PEC cell employs a liquid electrolyte, a multi-junction photovoltaic electrode, and a thin ion-exchange membrane. A PEC system and a method of making such PEC cell and PEC system are also disclosed.

  3. Microwave Plasma Hydrogen Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James; Wheeler, Richard, Jr.; Dahl, Roger; Hadley, Neal

    2010-01-01

    A microwave plasma reactor was developed for the recovery of hydrogen contained within waste methane produced by Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA), which reclaims oxygen from CO2. Since half of the H2 reductant used by the CRA is lost as CH4, the ability to reclaim this valuable resource will simplify supply logistics for longterm manned missions. Microwave plasmas provide an extreme thermal environment within a very small and precisely controlled region of space, resulting in very high energy densities at low overall power, and thus can drive high-temperature reactions using equipment that is smaller, lighter, and less power-consuming than traditional fixed-bed and fluidized-bed catalytic reactors. The high energy density provides an economical means to conduct endothermic reactions that become thermodynamically favorable only at very high temperatures. Microwave plasma methods were developed for the effective recovery of H2 using two primary reaction schemes: (1) methane pyrolysis to H2 and solid-phase carbon, and (2) methane oligomerization to H2 and acetylene. While the carbon problem is substantially reduced using plasma methods, it is not completely eliminated. For this reason, advanced methods were developed to promote CH4 oligomerization, which recovers a maximum of 75 percent of the H2 content of methane in a single reactor pass, and virtually eliminates the carbon problem. These methods were embodied in a prototype H2 recovery system capable of sustained high-efficiency operation. NASA can incorporate the innovation into flight hardware systems for deployment in support of future long-duration exploration objectives such as a Space Station retrofit, Lunar outpost, Mars transit, or Mars base. The primary application will be for the recovery of hydrogen lost in the Sabatier process for CO2 reduction to produce water in Exploration Life Support systems. Secondarily, this process may also be used in conjunction with a Sabatier reactor employed to

  4. Hydrogen Fire Detection System Features Sharp Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, C. S.

    1966-01-01

    Hydrogen fire detection system discovers fires by detecting the flickering ultraviolet radiation emitted by the OH molecule, a short-lived intermediate combustion product found in hydrogen-air flames. In a space application, the system discriminates against false signals from sunlight and rocket engine exhaust plume radiation.

  5. Standard hydrogen monitoring system equipment installation instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-09-27

    This document provides the technical specifications for the equipment fabrication, installation, and sitework construction for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System is designed to remove gases from waste tank vapor space and exhaust headers for continual monitoring and remote sample analysis.

  6. Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition Hot Dense Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Dzyabura, Vasily; Zaghoo, Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We use pulsed laser heating of hydrogen at static pressures in the megabar pressure region generated in a diamond anvil cell to search for the plasma phase transition (PPT) to liquid atomic metallic hydrogen. Heating the sample substantially above the melting line we observe a plateau in a temperature vs laser power curve that otherwise increases with power. This anomaly in the heating curve is closely correlated with theoretical predictions for the PPT, falling within the theoretically predicted range and having a negative slope with increasing pressure. Details will be presented. The NSF, grant DMR-0804378 and the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance program, grant DE-FG52-10NA29656 supported this research.

  7. Hydrogen energy systems studies. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.; Kartha, S.; Iwan, L.

    1996-08-13

    The results of previous studies suggest that the use of hydrogen from natural gas might be an important first step toward a hydrogen economy based on renewables. Because of infrastructure considerations (the difficulty and cost of storing, transmitting and distributing hydrogen), hydrogen produced from natural gas at the end-user`s site could be a key feature in the early development of hydrogen energy systems. In the first chapter of this report, the authors assess the technical and economic prospects for small scale technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas (steam reformers, autothermal reformers and partial oxidation systems), addressing the following questions: (1) What are the performance, cost and emissions of small scale steam reformer technology now on the market? How does this compare to partial oxidation and autothermal systems? (2) How do the performance and cost of reformer technologies depend on scale? What critical technologies limit cost and performance of small scale hydrogen production systems? What are the prospects for potential cost reductions and performance improvements as these technologies advance? (3) How would reductions in the reformer capital cost impact the delivered cost of hydrogen transportation fuel? In the second chapter of this report the authors estimate the potential demand for hydrogen transportation fuel in Southern California.

  8. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the DC-XA Composite Liquid Hydrogen Tank During Structural Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the DC-XA composite liquid hydrogen tank are presented in this report. The tank was subjected to pressurization, tensile, and compressive loads at ambient temperatures and also while full of liquid nitrogen. The tank was also pressurized with liquid hydrogen. AE was used to monitor the tank for signs of structural defects developing during the test.

  9. Supported liquid membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.; Bush, H. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    A cell apparatus for a supported liquid membrane including opposing faceplates, each having a spirally configured groove, an inlet groove at a first end of the spirally configured groove, and an outlet groove at the other end of the spirally configured groove, within the opposing faces of the faceplates, a microporous membrane situated between the grooved faces of the faceplates, said microporous membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for a predetermined chemical species within the pores of said membrane, means for aligning the grooves of the faceplates in an directly opposing configuration with the porous membrane being situated therebetween, such that the aligned grooves form a pair of directly opposing channels, separate feed solution and stripping solution compartments connected to respective channels between the faceplates and the membrane, separate pumping means for passing feed solution and stripping solution through the channels is provided.

  10. Theoretical performance of liquid hydrogen and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Huff, Vearl N

    1953-01-01

    Theoretical values of performance parameters for liquid hydrogen and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant were calculated on the assumption of equilibrium composition during the expansion process for a wide range of fuel-oxidant and expansion ratios. The parameters included were specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, equilibrium composition, mean molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ration of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, coefficient of viscosity, and coefficient of thermal conductivity. The maximum value of specific impulse was 364.6 pound-seconds per pound for a chamber pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute (20.41 atm) and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  11. Theoretical Performance of Liquid Hydrogen with Liquid Oxygen as a Rocket Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    1959-01-01

    Theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen composition during expansion was calculated for the propellant combination liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen at four chamber pressures (60, 150, 300, and 600 lb/sq in. abs) and a wide range of pressure ratios (1 to 4000) and oxidant-fuel ratios (1.190 to 39.683). Data are given to estimate performance parameters at chamber pressures other than those for which data are tabulated. The parameters included are specific impulse, specific impulse in vacuum, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, molecular weight, molecular-weight derivatives, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, thermal conductivity, Mach number, and equilibrium gas compositions.

  12. Investigation of the reaction of liquid hydrogen with liquid air in a pressure tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karb, Erich H.

    1987-01-01

    A pressure tube should protect the FR-2 reactor from the consequences of a hydrogen-air reaction, which is conceivable in the breakdown of several safety devices of the planned cold neutron source Project FR-2/16. The magnitudes and time pattern of the pressures to be expected were investigated. In the geometry used and the ignition mechanism selected, which is comparable to the strongest ignition process conceivable in the reactor, the reaction proceeds with greater probability than combustion. The combustion is possibly smaller if local limited partial detonations are superimposed. The magnitude of the pressure was determined by the masses of the reaction partners, liquid H2 and liquid air, and determines their ratio to each other.

  13. Catalytic pressurization of liquid hydrogen fuel tanks for unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leachman, Jacob; Street, Melissa Jean; Graham, Teira

    2012-06-01

    As the use and applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) expand, the need for a lighter weight fuel allowing for longer duration flights has become the primary limiting factor in the advancement of these vehicles. To extend the operational envelope of UAV, onboard condensed hydrogen storage for missions exceeding one week is necessary. Currently, large spherical liquid hydrogen tanks that are pressurized with external helium tanks or electronic heating elements are utilized for this purpose. However, the mass, size, and power consumption of the fuel storage tank and fuel pressurization system significantly limit the flight envelope of UAV. In an effort to alleviate these issues, this paper investigates the technological feasibility of orthohydrogen-parahydrogen catalysis as a method of fuel pressurization. Typical pressurization requirements for takeoff, cruise, and landing are reviewed. Calculations of the catalyst system mass and response time are presented.

  14. Hydrogen bond network topology in liquid water and methanol: a graph theory approach.

    PubMed

    Bakó, Imre; Bencsura, Akos; Hermannson, Kersti; Bálint, Szabolcs; Grósz, Tamás; Chihaia, Viorel; Oláh, Julianna

    2013-09-28

    Networks are increasingly recognized as important building blocks of various systems in nature and society. Water is known to possess an extended hydrogen bond network, in which the individual bonds are broken in the sub-picosecond range and still the network structure remains intact. We investigated and compared the topological properties of liquid water and methanol at various temperatures using concepts derived within the framework of graph and network theory (neighbour number and cycle size distribution, the distribution of local cyclic and local bonding coefficients, Laplacian spectra of the network, inverse participation ratio distribution of the eigenvalues and average localization distribution of a node) and compared them to small world and Erdős-Rényi random networks. Various characteristic properties (e.g. the local cyclic and bonding coefficients) of the network in liquid water could be reproduced by small world and/or Erdős-Rényi networks, but the ring size distribution of water is unique and none of the studied graph models could describe it. Using the inverse participation ratio of the Laplacian eigenvectors we characterized the network inhomogeneities found in water and showed that similar phenomena can be observed in Erdős-Rényi and small world graphs. We demonstrated that the topological properties of the hydrogen bond network found in liquid water systematically change with the temperature and that increasing temperature leads to a broader ring size distribution. We applied the studied topological indices to the network of water molecules with four hydrogen bonds, and showed that at low temperature (250 K) these molecules form a percolated or nearly-percolated network, while at ambient or high temperatures only small clusters of four-hydrogen bonded water molecules exist.

  15. Infrared spectroscopic study of molecular hydrogen bonding in chiral smectic liquid crystals

    PubMed

    Jang; Park; Kim; Glaser; Clark

    2000-10-01

    We report the use of Fourier-transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy to probe intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in thermotropic liquid-crystal phases. Infrared spectra of aligned smectic liquid crystal materials vs temperature, and of isotropic liquid-crystal mixtures vs concentration were measured in homologs both with and without hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding significantly changes the direction and magnitude of the vibrational dipole transition moments, causing marked changes in the IR dichroic absorbance profiles of hydrogen-bonded molecular subfragments. A GAUSSIAN94 computation of the directions, magnitudes, and frequencies of the vibrational dipole moments of molecular subfragments shows good agreement with the experimental data. The results show that IR dichroism can be an effective probe of hydrogen bonding in liquid-crystal phases.

  16. Selective partial hydrogenation of alkynes to (Z)-alkenes with ionic liquid-doped nickel nanocatalysts at near ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Konnerth, Hannelore; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2016-07-12

    A selective hydrogenation method for forming (Z)-alkenes from alkynes has been developed using a catalyst system of cheap Ni-NPs in a nitrile functionalised imidazolium based ionic liquid (IL) operating under very mild reaction conditions of 30-50 °C and 1-4 bar H2 pressure.

  17. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  18. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ??? in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ??2H reproducibility (1?? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ??? to 0.58 ???. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  19. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coplen, Tyler B; Qi, Haiping

    2010-09-15

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ(2)H reproducibility (1σ standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN(2) is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. PMID:20718408

  20. Study of thermal insulation for airborne liquid hydrogen fuel tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruccia, F. E.; Lindstrom, R. S.; Lucas, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    A concept for a fail-safe thermal protection system was developed. From screening tests, approximately 30 foams, adhesives, and reinforcing fibers using 0.3-meter square liquid nitrogen cold plate, CPR 452 and Stafoam AA1602, both reinforced with 10 percent by weight of 1/16 inch milled OCF Style 701 Fiberglas, were selected for further tests. Cyclic tests with these materials in 2-inch thicknesses bonded on a 0.6-meter square cold plate with Crest 7410 adhesive systems, were successful. Zero permeability gas barriers were identified and found to be compatible with the insulating concept.

  1. Experimental hybrid power transmission line with liquid hydrogen and MgB2-based superconducting cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, V. V.; Antyukhov, I. V.; Blagov, E. V.; Vysotsky, V. S.; Katorgin, B. I.; Nosov, A. A.; Fetisov, S. S.; Firsov, V. P.

    2012-03-01

    Results of developing and testing an experimental hybrid power transmission line with liquid hydrogen and superconducting power (SCP) cable based on magnesium diboride (MgB2) are presented. Critical currents of the MgB2 based prototype SCP cable have been determined for the first time at the forced flow of liquid hydrogen in a temperature interval of 20-26 K. Various regimes of SCP cable cryostatting with both subcooled saturated liquid hydrogen have been tested in a broad range of supply rates (7-220 g/s) and pressures (0.15-0.4 MPa).

  2. Polymer formulation for removing hydrogen and liquid water from an enclosed space

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2006-02-21

    This invention describes a solution to the particular problem of liquid water formation in hydrogen getters exposed to quantities of oxygen. Water formation is usually desired because the recombination reaction removes hydrogen without affecting gettering capacity and the oxygen removal reduces the chances for a hydrogen explosion once free oxygen is essentially removed. The present invention describes a getter incorporating a polyacrylate compound that can absorb up to 500% of its own weight in liquid water without significantly affecting its hydrogen gettering/recombination properties, but that also is insensitive to water vapor.

  3. Liquid sodium dip seal maintenance system

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Richard L.; Meacham, Sterling A.

    1980-01-01

    A system for spraying liquid sodium onto impurities associated with liquid dip seals of nuclear reactors. The liquid sodium mixing with the impurities dissolves the impurities in the liquid sodium. The liquid sodium having dissolved and diluted the impurities carries the impurities away from the site thereby cleaning the liquid dip seal and surrounding area. The system also allows wetting of the metallic surfaces of the dip seal thereby reducing migration of radioactive particles across the wetted boundary.

  4. Diagnosis of a Poorly Performing Liquid Hydrogen Bulk Storage Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenn, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    There are two 850,000 gallon Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A and the other at Launch Pad B. The LH2 Sphere at Pad B has had a high boiloff rate since being brought into service in the 1960's. The daily commodity loss was estimated to be approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the minimum required by the sphere's specification. Additionally, after being re-painted in the late 1990's a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere which resulted in a poor paint bond, and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of Space Shuttle program service which provided a unique opportunity to diagnose the sphere's poor performance. The sphere was drained and inerted, and then opened from the annular relief device on the top where a series of boroscoping operations were accomplished. Boroscoping revealed a large Perlite insulation void in the region of the sphere where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and off-loaded into the annular void region until the annulus was full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  5. Diagnosis of a poorly performing liquid hydrogen bulk storage sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Angela Gray

    2012-06-01

    There are two 3,218 cubic meter (850,000 gallon) Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A, the other at Launch Pad B. The Sphere at Pad B had a high boiloff rate when brought into service in the 1960s. In 2001, the daily commodity loss was approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the maximum allowed by the specification. After being re-painted in the 1990s a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere that resulted in poor paint bonding and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of service, which provided a unique opportunity to perform a series of visual inspections of the insulation. Boroscope examinations revealed a large Perlite void in the region where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and offloaded into the annular void region until full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide concentration by pervaporation of a ternary liquid solution in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ziemecka, Iwona; Haut, Benoît; Scheid, Benoit

    2015-01-21

    Pervaporation in a microfluidic device is performed on liquid ternary solutions of hydrogen peroxide-water-methanol in order to concentrate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by removing methanol. The quantitative analysis of the pervaporation of solutions with different initial compositions is performed, varying the operating temperature of the microfluidic device. Experimental results together with a mathematical model of the separation process are used to understand the effect of the operating conditions on the microfluidic device efficiency. The parameters influencing significantly the performance of pervaporation in the microfluidic device are determined and the limitations of the process are discussed. For the analysed system, the operating temperature of the chip has to be below the temperature at which H2O2 decomposes. Therefore, the choice of an adequate reduced operating pressure is required, depending on the expected separation efficiency.

  7. Testing of Densified Liquid Hydrogen Stratification in a Scale Model Propellant Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; Greene, William D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a test program that was conducted at NASA to demonstrate the ability to load densified LH2 into a subscale propellant tank. This work was done through a collaborative effort between NASA Glenn Research Center and the Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems (LMMSS). The Multilobe tank, which was made from composite materials similar to that to be used on X-33, was formed from two lobes with a center septum. Test results are shown for data that was collected on filling the subscale tank with densified liquid hydrogen (DLH2) propellant that was produced at the NASA Plum Brook Station. Data is compared to analytical predictions. Data collected for this test series agrees well with analytical predictions of the environmental heat leak into the tank and the thermal stratification characteristics of the hydrogen propellant in the tank as it was filled with DLH2.

  8. Assessment of liquid hydrogen cooled MgB2 conductors for magnetically confined fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, B. A.; Nuttall, W. J.

    2008-02-01

    Importantly environmental factors are not the only policy-driver for the hydrogen economy. Over the timescale of the development of fusion energy systems, energy security issues are likely to motivate a shift towards both hydrogen production and fusion as an energy source. These technologies combine local control of the system with the collaborative research interests of the major energy users in the global economy. A concept Fusion Island Reactor that might be used to generate H2 (rather than electricity) is presented. Exploitation of produced hydrogen as a coolant and as a fuel is proposed in conjunction with MgB2 conductors for the tokomak magnets windings, and electrotechnical devices for Fusion Island's infrastructure. The benefits of using MgB2 over the Nb-based conductors during construction, operation and decommissioning of the Fusion Island Reactor are presented. The comparison of Nb3Sn strands for ITER fusion magnet with newly developed high field composite MgB2 PIT conductors has shown that at 14 Tesla MgB2 possesses better properties than any of the Nb3Sn conductors produced. In this paper the potential of MgB2 conductors is examined for tokamaks of both the conventional ITER type and a Spherical Tokamak geometry. In each case MgB2 is considered as a conductor for a range of field coil applications and the potential for operation at both liquid helium and liquid hydrogen temperatures is considered. Further research plans concerning the application of MgB2 conductors for Fusion Island are also considered.

  9. Hydrogen Bonding and Related Properties in Liquid Water: A Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Guardia, Elvira; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco

    2015-07-23

    The local hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of liquid water have been investigated using the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation technique. The radial distribution functions and coordination numbers around water molecules have been found to be strongly dependent on the number of hydrogen bonds formed by each molecule, revealing also the existence of local structural heterogeneities in the structure of the liquid. The results obtained have also revealed the strong effect of the local hydrogen-bonding network on the local tetrahedral structure and entropy. The investigation of the dynamics of the local hydrogen-bonding network in liquid water has shown that this network is very labile, and the hydrogen bonds break and reform very rapidly. Nevertheless, it has been found that the hydrogen-bonding states associated with the formation of four hydrogen bonds by a water molecule exhibit the largest survival probability and corresponding lifetime. The reorientational motions of water molecules have also been found to be strongly dependent on their initial hydrogen-bonding state. Finally, the dependence of the librational and vibrational modes of water molecules on the local hydrogen-bonding network has been carefully examined, revealing a significant effect upon the libration and bond-stretching peak frequencies. The calculated low frequency peaks come in agreement with previously reported interpretations of the experimental low-frequency Raman spectrum of liquid water.

  10. Thermal diffusion and colored energy dissipation in hydrogen bonded liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettori, Riccardo; Melis, Claudio; Ceriotti, Michele; Donadio, Davide; Colombo, Luciano

    H-bonded liquids show a manifold energy dissipation dynamics due to: strong directionality of H-bonds and complexity of their network. This affects both thermal diffusion and energy dissipation mechanisms in pump-probe spectroscopy experiments. By nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we investigate such phenomena in liquid methanol. While heat transport is studied by approach-to-equilibrium MD, energy dissipation is investigated by making use of a novel Generalized Langevin Equation (GLE) colored noise thermostat, which can generate a non-equilibrium frequency-resolved dynamics by using a correlated noise. The colored thermostat can thermally excite a narrow range of vibrational modes, typically the stretching mode of the OH involved in H-bonding, leaving the other degrees of freedom at the equilibrium temperature. The energy dissipation is then observed as a function of time, by probing the excitation decay and the energy transfer to other modes. In particular, by monitoring in time the different contributions to the potential energy of the system, we evaluate how energy is transferred from the excited mode to other modes of the nearby molecules and provide understanding on the dynamics of H-bonded liquids, as resulting from current experimental investigations

  11. The Los ALamos Neutron Science Center Hydrogen Moderator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarmer, J. J.; Knudson, J. N.

    2006-04-01

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), spallation neutrons are produced by an 800-MeV proton beam interacting with tungsten targets. Gun-barrel-type penetrations through the heavy concrete and steel shielding that surround the targets collimate neutrons to form neutron beams used for scattering experiments. Two liquid hydrogen moderators of one-liter volume each are positioned adjacent to the neutron-production targets. Some of the neutrons that pass through a moderator interact with or scatter from protons in the hydrogen. The neutron-proton interaction reduces the energy or moderates neutrons to lower energies. Lower energy "moderated" neutrons are the most useful for some neutron scattering experiments. We provide a description of the LANSCE hydrogen-moderator system and its cryogenic performance with proton beams of up to 125 micro-amp average current.

  12. An assessment of the government liquid hydrogen requirements for the 1995-2005 time frame including addendum, liquid hydrogen production and commercial demand in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, Addison

    1990-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen will continue to be an integral element in virtually every major space program, and it has also become a significant merchant product for certain commercial markets. Liquid hydrogen is not a universally available commodity, and the number of supply sources historically have been limited to regions having concentrated consumption patterns. With the increased space program activity it becomes necessary to assess all future programs on a collective and unified basis. An initial attempt to identify projected requirements on a long range basis is presented.

  13. The role of ionic liquids in hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Sahler, Sebastian; Sturm, Sebastian; Kessler, Michael T; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2014-07-14

    Ionic liquid (IL) based H2 storage for H2 generation from NH3BH3 derivatives is shown. These systems promote H2 generation at low temperature, with good reaction rates and high total H2 yields. The effects of ILs and the H2 yield in correlation with the basicity, the cations of the ILs, and the role of carbenes are discussed. Furthermore, mechanistic findings on the dehydrogenation are described. IL material blends are competitive with conventional H2 storage materials with experimental efficiencies of at least 6.5 wt % H2.

  14. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Malinowski, M.E.; Wally, K.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a newly developed fuel cell vehicle hydride storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. An experimental test facility, the Hydride Bed Testing Laboratory (HBTL) has been designed and fabricated. The development of this facility and its use in storage system development will be reviewed. These two capabilities (analytical and experimental) form the basis of an integrated approach to storage system design and development. The initial focus of these activities has been on hydride utilization for vehicular applications.

  15. Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to hydrogen and to maximize hydrogen productivity. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) systems were constructed to carry out this fermentation process, and seed sludge obtained from a dairy manure anaerobic digester and pretreated by nutrient acclimation, heat and pH treatment was used as inoculum. High system stability was indicated by a short startup period of 12 days followed by stable hydrogen production, and successful sludge granulation occurred within 23 days of startup at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours. Operation at a progressively decreasing HRT from 24 to 8h gave rise to an increasing biogas production rate from 15.2-34.4L/d, while good linear relationships were observed between both total biogas and hydrogen production rates correlated to HRT, with R2 values of 0.993 and 0.997, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.63 mol-H 2/mol-hexose-feed occurred at HRT of 16h, while the HRT of 12h was highly suggested to achieve both high production rate and efficient yield. Hexose utilization efficiencies over 98%, considerable hydrogen production rate up to 14.3 L/d and hydrogen percentage of off-gas up to 43% (i.e., a CO 2/H2 ratio of 1.2) with the absence of CH4 production throughout the whole course of experiment at a pH of 5.0 strongly validated the feasibility of the fermentative H2 production from liquid swine manure using an ASBR system. Ethanol as well as acetic, butyric and valeric acids were produced in the system accompanying the hydrogen production, with acetic acid being the dominant

  16. Tuning the Liquid-Liquid Transition by Modulating the Hydrogen-Bond Angular Flexibility in a Model for Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Sciortino, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    We propose a simple extension of the well known ST2 model for water [F. H. Stillinger and A. Rahman, J. Chem. Phys. 60, 1545 (1974)] that allows for a continuous modification of the hydrogen-bond angular flexibility. We show that the bond flexibility affects the relative thermodynamic stability of the liquid and of the hexagonal (or cubic) ice. On increasing the flexibility, the liquid-liquid critical point, which in the original ST2 model is located in the no-man's land (i.e., the region where ice is the thermodynamically stable phase) progressively moves to a temperature where the liquid is more stable than ice. Our study definitively proves that the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model is a genuine phenomenon, of high relevance in all tetrahedral network-forming liquids, including water.

  17. Tuning the Liquid-Liquid Transition by Modulating the Hydrogen-Bond Angular Flexibility in a Model for Water.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Sciortino, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    We propose a simple extension of the well known ST2 model for water [F. H. Stillinger and A. Rahman, J. Chem. Phys. 60, 1545 (1974)] that allows for a continuous modification of the hydrogen-bond angular flexibility. We show that the bond flexibility affects the relative thermodynamic stability of the liquid and of the hexagonal (or cubic) ice. On increasing the flexibility, the liquid-liquid critical point, which in the original ST2 model is located in the no-man's land (i.e., the region where ice is the thermodynamically stable phase) progressively moves to a temperature where the liquid is more stable than ice. Our study definitively proves that the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model is a genuine phenomenon, of high relevance in all tetrahedral network-forming liquids, including water.

  18. Kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol on a palladium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kotova, V.G.; Kul'kova, N.V.; Temkin, M.I.

    1988-08-01

    The kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol into cyclohexanone on a Pd catalyst were studied. At atmospheric pressure, the reaction rate is described by the equation previously obtained for liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzoic acid. At pressures of 0.7-4 MPa, the rate obeys a zero-order equation. The preexponential factor of the Arrhenius equation for the number of rotations in the zero-order region correspond to a transmission coefficient of /kappa/ << 1.

  19. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Results of the analytical model development portion of this project will be discussed. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a recently developed fuel cell vehicle storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use, power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. Model calibration results of fuel cell fluid inlet and exit temperatures at various fuel cell idle speeds, assumed fuel cell heat capacities, and ambient temperatures are presented. The model predicts general increases in temperature with fuel cell power and differences between inlet and exit temperatures, but under predicts absolute temperature values, especially at higher power levels.

  20. Hydrogen turbine power conversion system assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. E.; Lucci, A. D.; Campbell, J.; Lee, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A three part technical study was conducted whereby parametric technical and economic feasibility data were developed on several power conversion systems suitable for the generation of central station electric power through the combustion of hydrogen and the use of the resulting heat energy in turbogenerator equipment. The study assessed potential applications of hydrogen-fueled power conversion systems and identified the three most promising candidates: (1) Ericsson Cycle, (2) gas turbine, and (3) direct steam injection system for fossil fuel as well as nuclear powerplants. A technical and economic evaluation was performed on the three systems from which the direct injection system (fossil fuel only) was selected for a preliminary conceptual design of an integrated hydrogen-fired power conversion system.

  1. Critical Current Test of Liquid Hydrogen Cooled HTC Superconductors under External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Tatsumoto, Hideki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Nonaka, Satoshi; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    High-Tc (HTC) superconductors including MgB2 will show excellent properties under temperature of Liquid Hydrogen (LH2:20K), which has large latent heat and low viscosity coefficient. In order to design and fabricate the LH2 cooled superconducting energy devices, we must clear the cooling property of LH2 for superconductors, the cooling system and safety design of LH2 cooled superconducting devices and electro-magnetic property evaluation of superconductors (BSCCO, REBCO and MgB2) and their magnets cooled by LH2. As the first step of the study, an experimental setup which can be used for investigating heat transfer characteristics of LH2 in a pool and also in forced flow (circulation loop with a pump), and also for evaluation of electro-magnetic properties of LH2 cooled superconductors under external magnetic field (up to 7 T). In this paper, we will show a short sketch of the experimental set-up, practical experiences in safety operation of liquid hydrogen cooling system and example test results of critical current evaluation of HTC superconductors cooled by LH2.

  2. Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob

    2014-01-29

    Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate.

  3. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  4. Composite material systems for hydrogen management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangborn, R. N.; Queeney, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The task of managing hydrogen entry into elevated temperature structural materials employed in turbomachinery is a critical engineering area for propulsion systems employing hydrogen or decomposable hydrocarbons as fuel. Extant structural materials, such as the Inconel series, are embrittled by the ingress of hydrogen in service, leading to a loss of endurance and general deterioration of load-bearing dependability. Although the development of hydrogen-insensitive material systems is an obvious engineering option, to date insensitive systems cannot meet the time-temperature-loading service extremes encountered. A short-term approach that is both feasible and technologically sound is the development and employment of hydrogen barrier coatings. The present project is concerned with developing, analyzing, and physically testing laminate composite hydrogen barrier systems, employing Inconel 718 as the structural material to be protected. Barrier systems will include all metallic, metallic-to-ceramic, and, eventually, metallic/ceramic composites as the lamellae. Since space propulsion implies repetitive engine firings without earth-based inspection and repair, coating durability will be closely examined, and testing regimes will include repetitive thermal cycling to simulate damage accumulation. The target accomplishments include: generation of actual hydrogen permeation data for metallic, ceramic-metallic, and hybrid metallic/ceramic composition barrier systems, practically none of which is currently extant; definition of physical damage modes imported to barrier systems due to thermal cycling, both transient temperature profiles and steady-state thermal mismatch stress states being examined as sources of damage; and computational models that incorporate general laminate schemes as described above, including manufacturing realities such as porosity, and whatever defects are introduced through service and characterized during the experimental programs.

  5. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-10-06

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Small Clusters and Liquid Hydrogen Sulfide at Different Thermodynamic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Albertí, M; Amat, A; Aguilar, A; Pirani, F

    2016-07-14

    A new force field for the intermolecular H2S-H2S interaction has been used to study the most relevant properties of the hydrogen sulfide system from gaseous to liquid phases by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In order to check the validity of the interaction formulation, ab initio CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations, including the counterpoise correction on the H2S, (H2S)2, and (H2S)3 structures optimized at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level, have been performed. The (H2S)2,3 systems have been characterized by performing NVE MD simulations at decreasing values of the temperature, while the liquid sulfide behavior has been investigated considering a NpT ensemble of 512 molecules at several thermodynamic states, defined by different pressure and temperature values. Additional calculations using an ensemble of 2197 molecules at two different temperatures have been performed to investigate the liquid/vapor interface of the system. The S-S, S-H, and H-H radial distribution functions and the coordination number, calculated at the same conditions used in X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments, and the evaluated thermodynamic and structural properties have been compared successfully with experimental data, thus confirming the reliability of the force field formulation and of the MD predictions.

  7. Liquid-phase hydrogenation of citral over Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. 2. Hydrogenation of reaction intermediate compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, U.K.; Sysak, M.N.; Vannice, M.A.

    2000-04-01

    Liquid-phase hydrogenation of the four principal reaction intermediates formed during citral hydrogenation, i.e., nerol, geraniol, citronellal, and citronellol, was studied at 298 and 373 K under 20 atm H{sub 2} at concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 M in hexane. A decrease in the initial reaction rate as temperature increased from 298 to 373 K was exhibited during the hydrogenation of all four compounds, just as reported earlier for citral; however, the decrease in rate at 373 K was only one-half for citronellal whereas it was orders of magnitude greater for nerol and geraniol. Furthermore, simultaneous hydrogenation of citronellal and geraniol at 298 K resulted in a continuous decrease in the rate of citronellal disappearance in contrast to the nearly constant rate of disappearance observed during hydrogenation of citronellal alone. Competitive hydrogenation of citral with either geraniol or citronellal showed that geraniol hydrogenation to citronellol is kinetically insignificant during citral hydrogenation at 373 K. The initial activity for hydrogenation of the intermediates at 298 K follows the following trend: geraniol > nerol < citronellol < E-citral, citronellal > Z-citral. Based on the relative hydrogenation rates of the intermediate alone versus its hydrogenation in the presence of other reactants, the relative size of the adsorption equilibrium constants for the various organic compounds appears to be as follows: citral > citronellal > geraniol, nerol > citronellol > 3,7-dimethyloctanol. This study indicates that activation of the C{double_bond}O bond should be performed at higher reaction temperatures to maximize selectivity to the unsaturated alcohols.

  8. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented. PMID:21280769

  9. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented.

  10. The use of infrared absorption to determine density of liquid hydrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unland, H. D.; Timmerhaus, K. D.; Kropschot, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the use of infrared absorption for determining the density of liquid hydrogen, and discussion of the feasibility of an airborne densitometer based on this concept. The results indicate that infrared absorption of liquid hydrogen is highly sensitive to the density of hydrogen, and, under the operating limitations of the equipment and experimental techniques used, the determined values proved to be repeatable to an accuracy of 2.7%. The desiderata and limitations of an in-flight density-determining device are outlined, and some of the feasibility problems are defined.

  11. Isentropic compression of fused quartz and liquid hydrogen to several Mbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, R. S.; Duerre, D. E.; Huebel, J. G.; Keeler, R. N.; Klapper, H.

    1972-01-01

    Models of the major planets are in part based on the equations of state of very compressible materials such as hydrogen and helium. A technique of isentropically compressing soft material to several Mbar and some preliminary results on fused quartz (silicon dioxide) and liquid hydrogen is described. Quartz was found to be an electrical non-conductor up to 5 Mbar and has a volume of about 0.15 cubic centimeters per gram at that pressure. Liquid hydrogen was found to have a volume of about 1 cm3/g at a pressure of about 2 Mbar. It was not determined if it was transformed into a metal.

  12. Simulation of Liquid Level, Temperature and Pressure Inside a 2000 Liter Liquid Hydrogen Tank During Truck Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Nara, Hiroyuki; Maekawa, Kazuma; Fujikawa, Shizuichi; Matsuno, Yu; Kuroda, Tsuneo; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    Hydrogen is an ultimate energy source because only water is produced after the chemical reaction of hydrogen and oxygen. In the near future, a large amount of hydrogen, produced using sustainable/renewable energy, is expected to be consumed. Since liquid hydrogen (LH2) has the advantage of high storage efficiency, it is expected to be the ultimate medium for the worldwide storage and transportation of large amounts of hydrogen. To make a simulation model of the sloshing of LH2 inside a 2000 liter tank, simulation analyses of LH2 surface oscillation, temperature and pressure inside the tank during a truck transportation have been carried out using a multipurpose software ANSYS CFX. Numerical results are discussed in comparison with experimental results.

  13. Cryogenic Tests of 30 m Flexible Hybrid Energy Transfer Line with Liquid Hydrogen and Superconducting MgB2 Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotsky, V. S.; Antyukhov, I. V.; Firsov, V. P.; Blagov, E. V.; Kostyuk, V. V.; Nosov, A. A.; Fetisov, S. S.; Zanegin, S. Yu.; Rachuk, V. S.; Katorgin, B. I.

    Recently we reported about first in the world test of 10 m hybrid energy transfer line with liquid hydrogen and MgB2 superconducting cable. In this paper we present the new development of our second hybrid energy transfer line with 30 m length. The flexible 30 m hydrogen cryostat has three sections with different types of thermal insulation in each section: simple vacuum superinsulation, vacuum superinsulation with liquid nitrogen shield and active evaporating cryostatting (AEC) system. We performed thermo-hydraulic tests of the cryostat to compare three thermo-insulating methods. The tests were performed at temperatures from 20 to 26 K, hydrogen flow from 100 to 450 g/s and pressure from 0.25 to 0.5 MPa. It was found that AEC thermal insulation practically eliminated completely heat transfer from room temperature to liquid hydrogen in the 10 m section. AEC thermal insulation method can be used for long superconducting power cables. High voltage current leads were developed as well. The current leads and superconducting MgB2 cable have been passed high voltage DC test up to 50 kV DC. Critical current of the cable at ∼21 K was ∼3500 A. The 30 m hybrid energy system developed is able to deliver up to 135 MW of chemical and electrical power in total.

  14. Nonlinear Thermal Analyses of a Liquid Hydrogen Tank Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Waters, W. Allen, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A thermal evaluation of a composite tank wall design for a liquid hydrogen tank was performed in the present study. The primary focus of the current effort was to perform one-dimensional, temperature nonlinear, transient thermal analyses to determine the through-the-thickness temperature profiles. These profiles were used to identify critical points within the flight envelope that could have detrimental effects on the adhesive bondlines used in the construction of the tank wall. Additionally, this paper presents the finite element models, analysis strategies, and thermal analysis results that were determined for several vehicle flight conditions. The basic tank wall configuration used to perform the thermal analyses consisted of carbon-epoxy facesheets and a Korex honeycomb core sandwich that was insulated with an Airex cryogenic foam and an Alumina Enhanced Thermal Barrier (AETB-12). Nonlinear, transient thermal analyses were conducted using the ABAQUS finite element code. Tank wall models at a windward side location on the fuel tank were analyzed for three basic flight conditions: cold-soak (ground-hold), ascent, and re-entry. Additionally, three ambient temperature boundary conditions were applied to the tank wall for the cold-soak condition, which simulated the launch pad cooldown process. Time-dependent heating rates were used in the analyses of the ascent and reentry segments of the flight history along with temperature dependent material properties. The steady-state through-the-thickness temperature profile from the cold-soak condition was used as the initial condition for the ascent analyses. Results from the nonlinear thermal analyses demonstrated very good correlation with results from similar models evaluated by Northrop- Grumman using a different analysis tool. Wall through-the-thickness temperature gradients as a function of flight time were obtained for future incorporation into a full-scale thermostructural analysis to evaluate the adhesive bondlines

  15. Topological hydrogen-bond definition to characterize the structure and dynamics of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Henchman, Richard H; Irudayam, Sheeba Jem

    2010-12-23

    A definition that equates a hydrogen bond topologically with a local energy well in the potential energy surface is used to study the structure and dynamics of liquid water. We demonstrate the robustness of this hydrogen-bond definition versus the many other definitions which use fixed, arbitrary parameters, do not account for variable molecular environments, and cannot effectively resolve transition states. Our topology definition unambiguously shows that most water molecules are double acceptors but sizable proportions are single or triple acceptors. Almost all hydrogens are found to take part in hydrogen bonds. Broken hydrogen bonds only form when two molecules try to form two hydrogen bonds between them. The double acceptors have tetrahedral geometry, lower potential energy, entropy, and density, and slower dynamics. The single and triple acceptors have trigonal and trigonal bipyramidal geometry and when considered together have higher density, potential energy, and entropy, faster dynamics, and a tendency to cluster. These calculations use an extended theory for the entropy of liquid water that takes into account the variable number of hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen-bond switching is shown to depend explicitly on the variable number of hydrogen bonds accepted and the presence of interstitial water molecules. Transition state theory indicates that the switching of hydrogen bonds is a mildly activated process, requiring only a moderate distortion of hydrogen bonds. Three main types of switching events are observed depending on whether the donor and acceptor are already sharing a hydrogen bond. The switch may proceed with no intermediate or via a bifurcated-oxygen or cyclic dimer, both of which have a broken hydrogen bond and symmetric and asymmetric forms. Switching is found to be strongly coupled to whole-molecule vibration, particularly for the more mobile single and triple acceptors. Our analysis suggests that even though water is heterogeneous in terms of the

  16. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  17. Dispersion of flammable vapor clouds resulting from large spills of liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the preliminary findings of hydrogen vapor cloud dispersion experiments conducted by NASA. The experiments were performed to obtain basic information regarding the physical phenomena governing the dispersion of flammable clouds formed as the result of spills of large quantities of liquid hydrogen. The experiments consisted of ground spills of up to 5.7 cubic meters (1500 gal) of liquid hydrogen, with spill durations of approximately 35 seconds. Instrumented towers, located downwind of the spill site, gather data on the temperature, hydrogen concentration, and turbulence levels as the hydrogen vapor cloud drifted downwind. Visual phenomena were recorded by motion picture and still cameras. Preliminary results of the experiments indicate that, for rapid spills, thermal and momentum induced turbulences cause the cloud to disperse to safe concentration levels and become positively buoyant long before mixing due to normal atmospheric turbulence becomes a major factor.

  18. Blending materials composed of boron, nitrogen and carbon to transform approaches to liquid hydrogen stores.

    PubMed

    Whittemore, Sean M; Bowden, Mark; Karkamkar, Abhijeet; Parab, Kshitij; Neiner, Doinita; Autrey, Tom; Ishibashi, Jacob S A; Chen, Gang; Liu, Shih-Yuan; Dixon, David A

    2016-04-14

    Mixtures of hydrogen storage materials containing the elements of boron, nitrogen, carbon, i.e., isomers of BN cyclopentanes are examined to find a 'fuel blend' that remains a liquid phase throughout hydrogen release, maximizes hydrogen storage density, minimizes impurities and remains thermally stable at ambient temperatures. We find that the mixture of ammonia borane dissolved in 3-methyl-1,2-dihydro-1,2-azaborolidine (compound B) provide a balance of these properties and provides ca. 5.6 wt% hydrogen. The two hydrogen storage materials decompose at a faster rate than either individually and products formed are a mixture of molecular trimers. Digestion of the product mixture formed from the decomposition of the AB + B fuel blend with methanol leads to the two corresponding methanol adducts of the starting material and not a complex mixture of adducts. The work shows the utility of using blends of materials to reduce volatile impurities and preserve liquid phase.

  19. Nucleosynthesis of the elements and the liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie

    2012-10-01

    Modern nucleosynthesis theory stems from the anticipated life cycle of stellar objects. Within this framework, the Sun, as a relatively young and light main sequence star, is unable to synthesize any element beyond helium. All metallic elements in our solar system have consequently been hypothesized to arise from the explosion of early stars which previously populated this region of the galaxy. Much of nucleosynthesis theory currently rests on gaseous stellar models and has developed in a direction consistent which such objects. In this presentation, the problem of nucleosynthesis is briefly reconsidered within the context of a condensed Sun. Such an object, built from liquid metallic hydrogen provides a new avenue for nucleosynthesis. Nuclei and protons contained within a metallic hydrogen lattice, will be subjected to vibrational modes which should be conducive to promoting internuclear reaction. The pressures within the Sun should make the synthesis of all the elements possible based on the combination of lighter elements. In stark contrast to current theory, it is advanced that all elements, beyond hydrogen, can be made within such a thermonuclear furnace.

  20. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - have been identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described. An awareness of probable shortages of strategic materials has been maintained in these suggested programs.

  1. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described.

  2. Liquid Acquisition Device Hydrogen Outflow Testing on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Design Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Greg; Statham, Geoff; Garces, Rachel; Cartagena, Will

    2015-01-01

    As part of the NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Engineering Design Unit (EDU) testing with liquid hydrogen, screen-channel liquid acquisition devices (LADs) were tested during liquid hydrogen outflow from the EDU tank. A stainless steel screen mesh (325x2300 Dutch T will weave) was welded to a rectangular cross-section channel to form the basic LAD channel. Three LAD channels were tested, each having unique variations in the basic design. The LADs fed a common outflow sump at the aft end of the 151 cu. ft. volume aluminum tank, and included a curved section along the aft end and a straight section along the barrel section of the tank. Wet-dry sensors were mounted inside the LAD channels to detect when vapor was ingested into the LADs during outflow. The use of warm helium pressurant during liquid hydrogen outflow, supplied through a diffuser at the top of the tank, always led to early breakdown of the liquid column. When the tank was pressurized through an aft diffuser, resulting in cold helium in the ullage, LAD column hold-times as long as 60 minutes were achieved, which was the longest duration tested. The highest liquid column height at breakdown was 58 cm, which is 23 less than the isothermal bubble-point model value of 75 cm. This paper discusses details of the design, construction, operation and analysis of LAD test data from the CPST EDU liquid hydrogen test.

  3. Sustainable bioreactor systems for producing hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaborsky, O.R.; Radway, J.C.; Yoza, B.A.; Benemann, J.R.; Tredici, M.R.

    1998-08-01

    The overall goal of Hawaii`s BioHydrogen Program is to generate hydrogen from water using solar energy and microalgae under sustainable conditions. Specific bioprocess engineering objectives include the design, construction, testing and validation of a sustainable photobioreactor system. Specific objectives relating to biology include investigating and optimizing key physiological parameters of cyanobacteria of the genus Arthrospira (Spirulina), the organism selected for initial process development. Another objective is to disseminate the Mitsui-Miami cyanobacteria cultures, now part of the Hawaii Culture Collection (HCC), to other research groups. The approach is to use a single organisms for producing hydrogen gas from water. Key stages are the growth of the biomass, the dark induction of hydrogenase, and the subsequent generation of hydrogen in the light. The biomass production stage involves producing dense cultures of filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacteria and optimizing biomass productivity in innovative tubular photobioreactors. The hydrogen generation stages entail inducing the enzymes and metabolic pathways that enable both dark and light-driven hydrogen production. The focus of Year 1 has been on the construction and operation of the outdoor photobioreactor for the production of high-density mass cultures of Arthrospira. The strains in the Mitsui-Miami collection have been organized and distributed to other researchers who are beginning to report interesting results. The project is part of the International Energy Agency`s biohydrogen program.

  4. Study of Thermodynamic Vent and Screen Baffle Integration for Orbital Storage and Transfer of Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental program was performed to determine the feasibility of integrating an internal thermodynamic vent system and a full wall-screen liner for the orbital storage and transfer of liquid hydrogen (LH2). Ten screens were selected from a comprehensive screen survey. The experimental study determined the screen bubble point, flow-through pressure loss, and pressure loss along rectangular channels lined with screen on one side, for the 10 screens using LH2 saturated at 34.5 N/cm2 (50 psia). The correlated experimental data were used in an analysis to determine the optimum system characteristics in terms of minimum weight for 6 tanks ranging from 141.6 m3 (5,000 ft3) to 1.416 m3 (50 ft3) for orbital storage times of 30 and 300 days.

  5. Dispersion and Hydrogen Bonding Rule: Why the Vaporization Enthalpies of Aprotic Ionic Liquids Are Significantly Larger than those of Protic Ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Stange, Peter; Schick, Christoph; Verevkin, Sergey P; Ludwig, Ralf

    2016-09-12

    It is well known that gas-phase experiments and computational methods point to the dominance of dispersion forces in the molecular association of hydrocarbons. Estimates or even quantification of these weak forces are complicated due to solvent effects in solution. The dissection of interaction energies and quantification of dispersion interactions is particularly challenging for polar systems such as ionic liquids (ILs) which are characterized by a subtle balance between Coulomb interactions, hydrogen bonding, and dispersion forces. Here, we have used vaporization enthalpies, far-infrared spectroscopy, and dispersion-corrected calculations to dissect the interaction energies between cations and anions in aprotic (AILs), and protic (PILs) ionic liquids. It was found that the higher total interaction energy in PILs results from the strong and directional hydrogen bonds between cation and anion, whereas the larger vaporization enthalpies of AILs clearly arise from increasing dispersion forces between ion pairs. PMID:27504994

  6. Hydrogenation with monolith reactor under conditions of immiscible liquid phases

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved for the hydrogenation of an immiscible mixture of an organic reactant in water. The immiscible mixture can result from the generation of water by the hydrogenation reaction itself or, by the addition of, water to the reactant prior to contact with the catalyst. The improvement resides in effecting the hydrogenation reaction in a monolith catalytic reactor from 100 to 800 cpi, at a superficial velocity of from 0.1 to 2 m/second in the absence of a cosolvent for the immiscible mixture. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrogenation is carried out using a monolith support which has a polymer network/carbon coating onto which a transition metal is deposited.

  7. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  8. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-29

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  9. Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, M. L.

    2012-05-01

    This presentation summarizes NREL biological systems for hydrogen photoproduction work for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 14-18, 2012. General goal is develop photobiological systems for large-scale, low cost and efficient H{sub 2} production from water (barriers AH, AI and AJ). Specific tasks are: (1) Address the O{sub 2} sensitivity of hydrogenases that prevent continuity of H{sub 2} photoproduction under aerobic, high solar-to-hydrogen (STH) light conversion efficiency conditions; and (2) Utilize a limited STH H{sub 2}-producing method (sulfur deprivation) as a platform to address or test other factors limiting commercial algal H{sub 2} photoproduction, including low rates due to biochemical and engineering mechanisms.

  10. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; Comolli, Alfred G.; McLean, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  11. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  12. Automatic Refilling System For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, Aristides; Sansebastian, Mark; Geagen, Jay; Warner, Brent

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenic experiments left unattended for days. System automatically replenishes liquid helium in cryogenic experimental apparatus as liquid evaporates. Automatic filling system transfers liquid helium from storage vessel to experimental apparatus under computer control. Gaseous helium from cylinder supplies pumping pressure. Circuit senses level of liquid helium by sensing voltage across measuring resistors in series with silicon resistance thermometers (SRT's). Low voltage indicates SRT covered, while high voltage indicates uncovered.

  13. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  14. The Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, P.

    1996-10-01

    The present paper describes, for purposes of the Department of Energy (DoE) Hydrogen Program Review, Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period January through June 1996. This period represents the first six months of the three year project. The estimated cost over three years is $3.9M, $1.859M of which is funded by the DoE ($600 k for fiscal year 1996). The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project will demonstrate the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as vehicle power plants. This transportation system will be developed in the City of Palm Desert in southern California and will include a fleet of 8 fuel cell powered vehicles, solar and wind powered hydrogen generating facilities, a consumer-ready refueling station, and a service infrastructure. The system holds the promise of a clean environment and an energy supply that is predictable, domestic, safe, and abundant. During, the first part of 1996 SERC has nearly completed building a fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle, which features an upgraded safety and computer system; they have designed and built a test bench that is able to mimic golf cart loads and test fuel cell system auxiliary components; they have begun the design of the solar hydrogen generating station; they have worked with Sandia National Laboratory on an advanced metal hydride storage system; they have increased the power density of the SERC fuel cell by as much as 50%; and they have reached out to the rest of the world with a new fact sheet, world wide web pages, a press release, video footage for a television program. and instruction within the community.

  15. Liquid-Liquid phase transition in a single component system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-06-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus, a single-component system, can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order LDL-HDL transition line ending in a critical point is consistent with experimental data and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations for a variety of single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. By means of MD, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and with not one but `two' preferred short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state, in particular liquid metals. For the fisrt time, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can occur in systems with no density anomaly, opening an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly.

  16. Slosh wave and geyser excitations due to liquid hydrogen shut-off during draining in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of liquid hydrogen shut-off during draining, and shut-off at the moment of the incipience of a suction dip have been investigated. It shows that a large amplitude surge is observed for liquid in the container at the moment of liquid hydrogen shut-off in reduced gravity. It also shows that slosh waves accompanied by a strong geyser are developed for surge-related flow fields induced by liquid hydrogen shut-off at the incipience of a suction dip. In the slosh wave excitation, both a lower gravity environment and higher flow rate before the shut-off of liquid draining are resonsible for the initiation of greater amplitude slosh waves. Slosh wave excitation, due to shut-off during liquid hydrogen draining, shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which imposes time-dependent variation in the spacecraft moment of inertia. This provides important information necessary for on-orbit guidance and attitude control of spacecraft.

  17. Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility: Initial hydrogen and nitrogen no-vent fill data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Papell, S. Stephen

    1990-01-01

    The Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility is a versatile testbed for ground-based cryogenic fluid storage, handling, and transfer experimentation. The test rig contains two well instrumented tanks, and a third interchangeable tank, designed to accommodate liquid nitrogen or liquid hydrogen testing. The internal tank volumes are approx. 18, 5, and 1.2 cu. ft. Tank pressures can be varied from 2 to 30 psia. Preliminary no vent fill tests with nitrogen and hydrogen were successfully completed with the test rig. Initial results indicate that no vent fills of nitrogen above 90 percent full are achievable using this test configuration, in a 1-g environment, and with inlet liquid temperatures as high as 143 R, and an average tank wall temperature of nearly 300 R. This inlet temperature corresponds to a saturation pressure of 19 psia for nitrogen. Hydrogen proved considerably more difficult to transfer between tanks without venting. The highest temperature conditions resulting in a fill level greater than 90 percent were with an inlet liquid temperature of 34 R, and an estimated tank wall temperature of slightly more than 100 R. Saturation pressure for hydrogen at this inlet temperature is 10 psia. All preliminary no vent fill tests were performed with a top mounted full cone nozzle for liquid injection. The nozzle produces a 120 degree conical droplet spray at a differential pressure of 10 psi. Pressure in the receiving tank was held to less than 30 psia for all tests.

  18. Direct experimental access to microscopic dynamics in liquid hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Celli, M; Colognesi, D; Zoppi, M

    2002-08-01

    We have obtained the double-differential incoherent neutron scattering cross section of liquid and solid parahydrogen in various thermodynamic conditions using TOSCA, a time-of-flight, inverse geometry, crystal analyzer spectrometer, operating at the pulsed neutron source ISIS. The measured cross section provides direct experimental access to the self part of the center-of-mass inelastic structure factor of the parahydrogen molecules in the system. Data have been corrected for the experimental effects and then analyzed in the framework of the Young-Koppel model and the Gaussian approximation. The velocity autocorrelation functions and their energy spectra have been obtained from a fitting procedure, making use of the quantum generalized Langevin equation and of model memory functions, and finally compared to the most recent results of both molecular centroid dynamics and self-consistent quantum mode-coupling theory. Some dynamic quantities were also related to simple equilibrium properties and simulated through a standard path integral Monte Carlo code. Results are very interesting but still urge for further developments of theoretical and dynamic simulation approaches, as well as for more extensive experimental efforts.

  19. Direct experimental access to microscopic dynamics in liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, M.; Colognesi, D.; Zoppi, M.

    2002-08-01

    We have obtained the double-differential incoherent neutron scattering cross section of liquid and solid parahydrogen in various thermodynamic conditions using TOSCA, a time-of-flight, inverse geometry, crystal analyzer spectrometer, operating at the pulsed neutron source ISIS. The measured cross section provides direct experimental access to the self part of the center-of-mass inelastic structure factor of the parahydrogen molecules in the system. Data have been corrected for the experimental effects and then analyzed in the framework of the Young-Koppel model and the Gaussian approximation. The velocity autocorrelation functions and their energy spectra have been obtained from a fitting procedure, making use of the quantum generalized Langevin equation and of model memory functions, and finally compared to the most recent results of both molecular centroid dynamics and self-consistent quantum mode-coupling theory. Some dynamic quantities were also related to simple equilibrium properties and simulated through a standard path integral Monte Carlo code. Results are very interesting but still urge for further developments of theoretical and dynamic simulation approaches, as well as for more extensive experimental efforts.

  20. Liquid hydrogen suction dip and slosh wave excitation during draining under normal and reduced gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the dynamical behavior of vapor ingestion, liquid residual at the incipience of suction dip, slosh wave excitation under normal and reduced gravity and different flow rates during liquid hydrogen draining. Liquid residuals at the incipience of suction dip increase as the values of gravity decrease. Also liquid residuals increase with the draining flow rates. Lower ratio of Bond number and Weber number are unable to excite slosh waves. Lower flow rates and higher gravity excites waves with lower frequencies and higher wave amplitude slosh waves.

  1. Using Aerogel-Based Insulation Material To Prevent Foam Loss on the Liquid-Hydrogen Intertank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Uninsulated areas on cryogenic propellant tanks and feedlines cause moisture in the air to condense or ice to form. Flange joints, bracket supports, expansion bellows, and other cavities are uninsulated by design. These areas cannot be sealed because conventional thermal insulation materials would restrict mechanical articulations. Aerogel-based thermal insulation systems are able to seal critical locations such as the liquid-oxygen (LO2) feedline bellows. A new thermal insulation system was also necessary between the intertank wall, flange, and the liquid-hydrogen (LH2) tank dome, where there is a cavity (or crevice) with an exposed 20-K surface. When nitrogen gas is used for purging within the intertank volume, it condenses on this cold surface. Some solid nitrogen may also form on the colder side of the crevice. Voids or discontinuities within the foam can pressurize and cause areas of foam to weaken and break off, reducing thermal efficiency and creating potentially dangerous debris. To prevent this foam loss, we developed a thermal insulation system using bulk-fill aerogel material and demonstrated it with a one-tenth-scale model of the LH2 intertank flange area

  2. Liquid state of hydrogen bond network in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkin, M. I.; Klyuev, A. V.; Sinitsyn, V. V.; Ryzhkin, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Here we theoretically show that the Coulomb interaction between violations of the Bernal-Fowler rules leads to a temperature induced step-wise increase in their concentration by 6-7 orders of magnitude. This first-order phase transition is accompanied by commensurable decrease in the relaxation time and can be interpreted as melting of the hydrogen bond network. The new phase with the melted hydrogen lattice and survived oxygen one is unstable in the bulk of ice, and further drastic increase in the concentrations of oxygen interstitials and vacancies accomplishes the ice melting. The fraction of broken hydrogen bonds immediately after the melting is about 0.07 of their total number that implies an essential conservation of oxygen lattice in water.

  3. Nature of the asymmetry in the hydrogen-bond networks of hexagonal ice and liquid water.

    PubMed

    Kühne, Thomas D; Khaliullin, Rustam Z

    2014-03-01

    The interpretation of the X-ray spectra of water as evidence for its asymmetric structure has challenged the traditional nearly tetrahedral model and initiated an intense debate about the order and symmetry of the hydrogen-bond network in water. Here, we present new insights into the nature of local interactions in ice and liquid water obtained using a first-principle energy decomposition method. A comparative analysis shows that the majority of molecules in liquid water in our simulation exhibit hydrogen-bonding energy patterns similar to those in ice and retain the four-fold coordination with only moderately distorted tetrahedral configurations. Although this result indicates that the traditional description of liquid water is fundamentally correct, our study also demonstrates that for a significant fraction of molecules the hydrogen-bonding environments are highly asymmetric with extremely weak and distorted bonds.

  4. Microfluidic hydrogen fuel cell with a liquid electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Jayashree, Ranga S; Mitchell, Michael; Natarajan, Dilip; Markoski, Larry J; Kenis, Paul J A

    2007-06-19

    We report the design and characterization of a microfluidic hydrogen fuel cell with a flowing sulfuric acid solution instead of a Nafion membrane as the electrolyte. We studied the effect of cell resistance, hydrogen and oxygen flow rates, and electrolyte flow rate on fuel cell performance to obtain a maximum power density of 191 mW/cm2. This flowing electrolyte design avoids water management issues, including cathode flooding and anode dry out. Placing a reference electrode in the outlet stream allows for independent analysis of the polarization losses on the anode and the cathode, thereby creating an elegant catalyst characterization and optimization tool.

  5. Challenges and design solutions of the liquid hydrogen circuit at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, S.; Nilsson, P.; Sabbagh, P.; Takibayev, A.; Weisend, J. G., II; Beßler, Y.; Klaus, M.

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), Lund, Sweden will be a 5MW long-pulse neutron spallation research facility and will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. Neutrons are produced by accelerating a high-energy proton beam into a rotating helium-cooled tungsten target. These neutrons pass through moderators to reduce their energy to an appropriate range (< 5 meV for cold neutrons); two of which will use liquid hydrogen at 17 K as the moderating and cooling medium. There are several technical challenges to overcome in the design of a robust system that will operate under such conditions, not least the 20 kW of deposited heat. These challenges and the associated design solutions will be detailed in this paper.

  6. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Liquid Hydrogen Pressure Control Testing and Analytical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, A. D.; Cady, E. C.; Jenkins, D. S.; Chandler, F. O.; Grayson, G. D.; Lopez, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Pedersen, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    The demonstration of a unique liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage and feed system concept for solar thermal upper stage was cooperatively accomplished by a Boeing/NASA Marshall Space Flight Center team. The strategy was to balance thermodynamic venting with the engine thrusting timeline during a representative 30-day mission, thereby, assuring no vent losses. Using a 2 cubic m (71 cubic ft) LH2 tank, proof-of-concept testing consisted of an engineering checkout followed by a 30-day mission simulation. The data were used to anchor a combination of standard analyses and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Dependence on orbital testing has been incrementally reduced as CFD codes, combined with standard modeling, continue to be challenged with test data such as this.

  7. An assessment of the crash fire hazard of liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The crash fire hazards of liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft relative to those of mission equivalent aircraft fueled either with conventional fuel or with liquefied methane were evaluated. The aircraft evaluated were based on Lockheed Corporation design for 400 passenger, Mach 0.85, 5500 n. mile aircraft. Four crash scenarios were considered ranging from a minor incident causing some loss of fuel system integrity to a catastrophic crash. Major tasks included a review of hazardous properties of the alternate fuels and of historic crash fire data; a comparative hazard evluation for each of the three fuels under four crash scenarios a comprehensive review and analysis and an identification of areas further development work. The conclusion was that the crash fire hazards are not significantly different when compared in general for the three fuels, although some fuels showed minor advantages in one respect or another.

  8. An assessment of the government liquid hydrogen requirements for the 1995-2005 time frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, Addison

    1990-01-01

    The results of government study of long range liquid hydrogen (LH2) requirements for the time period of 1995 through the year 2005 are presented. To assure an adequate supply of LH2 is available in support of various programs, it is imperative a long range projection of LH2 requirements be developed and maintained. This information is vital in planning for necessary procurement actions and assuring adequate industry lead time to acquiring the necessary production and distribution capabilities. The Advanced Launch System and High-Altitude Long-Endurance programs may represent the predominant government needs for LH2 in the long range. The assembled data clearly indicates a need for KSC (Kennedy Space Center) constant program/project surveillance. Also clear is the need for KSC to monitor industry's plans for LH2 plant production and distribution expansion.

  9. The Palm Desert renewable [hydrogen] transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, C.E.; Lehman, P.

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period June 1997 through May 1998. The project began in March 1996. The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project demonstrates the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a vehicle power system. The project includes designing and building 4 fuel cell powered vehicles, a solar hydrogen generating and refueling station, and a fuel cell vehicle diagnostic center. Over this last year, SERC has built a fuel cell powered neighborhood electric vehicle and delivered it to the City of Palm Desert. The design of the hydrogen refueling station is near completion and it is anticipated that construction will be complete in the fall of 1998. The vehicles are currently being refueled at a temporary refueling station. The diagnostic center is being designed and maintenance procedures as well as computer diagnostic programs for the fuel cell vehicles are being developed. City employees are driving the vehicles daily and monitoring data are being collected. The drivers are pleased with the performance of the vehicles.

  10. Study on hydrogen isotopes permeation in fluidized state of liquid lithium-lead

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, S.; Yoshimura, R.; Okada, M.; Fukada, S.; Edao, Y.

    2015-03-15

    Lithium-lead (Li-Pb) is one of the most promising candidate materials for the liquid blanket of fusion reactors. Hydrogen transfer under a fluidized condition of Li-Pb is investigated experimentally to design a Li-Pb blanket system. Li-Pb eutectic alloy flows inside a Ni tube in the experimental system, where H{sub 2} permeates into and out of the forced Li-Pb flow. The overall H{sub 2} permeation rate is analyzed using a mass balance model. Hydrogen atoms diffuse in Ni and Li-Pb. The steady-state H{sub 2} permeation rate obtained by this experiment is smaller than the result of the calculation model. A resistance factor is introduced to the present analysis in order to evaluate the influence of other H{sub 2} transfer mechanisms, such as diffusion in Li-Pb and dissolution reaction between Ni and Li-Pb. The contribution of the resistance to the overall H{sub 2} permeation rate becomes large when the flow rate of Li-Pb is low. This is because the boundary layer thickness between Ni and Li-Pb affects the overall H{sub 2} permeation rate. When the flow velocity of Li-Pb increases, the thickness of the boundary layer becomes thin, and the driving force of H{sub 2} permeation through the Ni wall becomes bigger. (authors)

  11. Systems and methods for selective hydrogen transport and measurement

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C

    2013-10-29

    Systems and methods for selectively removing hydrogen gas from a hydrogen-containing fluid volume are disclosed. An exemplary system includes a proton exchange membrane (PEM) selectively permeable to hydrogen by exclusively conducting hydrogen ions. The system also includes metal deposited as layers onto opposite sides or faces of the PEM to form a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA), each layer functioning as an electrode so that the MEA functions as an electrochemical cell in which the ionic conductors are hydrogen ions, and the MEA functioning as a hydrogen selective membrane (HSM) when located at the boundary between a hydrogen-containing fluid volume and a second fluid.

  12. Evidence of a liquid–liquid phase transition in hot dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Dzyabura, Vasily; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Silvera, Isaac F.

    2013-01-01

    We use pulsed-laser heating of hydrogen at static pressures in the megabar pressure region to search for the plasma phase transition to liquid atomic metallic hydrogen. We heat our samples substantially above the melting line and observe a plateau in a temperature vs. laser power curve that otherwise increases with power. This anomaly in the heating curve appears correlated with theoretical predictions for the plasma phase transition. PMID:23630287

  13. Wear reduction systems liquid piston ring

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R.J.; Chen, T.N.; DiNanno, L.

    1990-09-01

    The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of achieving an acceptable wear rate for the cylinder liner, piston, and piston rings in a coal/water-slurry-fueled engine that utilized the concept of a liquid piston ring above the conventional piston rings and to identify technical barriers and required research and development. The study included analytical modeling of the system, a bench study of the fluid motion in the liquid piston ring, and a single-cylinder test rig for wear comparison. A system analysis made on the different variations of the liquid supply system showed the desirability of the once-through version from the standpoint of system simplicity. The dynamics of the liquid ring were modeled to determine the important design parameters that influence the pressure fluctuation in the liquid ring during a complete engine cycle and the integrity of the liquid ring. This analysis indicated the importance of controlling heat transfer to the liquid ring through piston and liner to avoid boiling the liquid. A conceptual piston design for minimizing heat transfer is presented in this report. Results showed that the liquid piston ring effectively reduced the solid particles on the wall by scrubbing, especially in the case where a surfactant was added to the water. The wear rates were reduced by a factor of 2 with the liquid ring. However, leakage of the contaminated liquid ring material past the top ring limited the effectiveness of the liquid ring concept. 8 refs., 33 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Safety switch for hydrogen generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, C.E.

    1980-04-29

    A safety cutoff switch for a hydrogen gas generator system is disclosed. The hydrogen gas generator system is of the type for use with automotive internal combustion engines wherein combustible hydrogen gas generated by the system is co-mingled with exhaust gases from the internal combustion engine and fed into the intake manifold. The hydrogen gas generator system includes a group or groups of hydrogen gas fuel cells which are provided with electrical current generated by alternators driven by the engine or the automotive drive train. The current from the alternators is supplied through the safety cutoff switch and individual, manually operable switches to each fuel cell. The safety cutoff switch comprises a solenoid structure having a spring biased armature carrying an electrical contactor for making an electrical circuit between two electrical contact posts. Movement of the armature makes or breaks electrical contact between the two electrical contact posts, and the spring bias of the armature is such that the electrical circuit between the two electrical contact posts is normally an open circuit. A pair of vacuum actuators are provided to act against the spring bias of the armature and cause the electrical contactor to make the circuit between the two electrical contact posts. One of the vacuum actuators is connected by a hose to the venturi of the engine carburetor, while the other vacuum actuator is connected by a hose to the intake manifold. Thus, when the engine is running, one or the other of the vacuum actuators operates to actuate the safety cutoff switch, but in the event that the engine stops running, the spring bias of the switch opens the electrical circuit supplying current to the fuel cells.

  15. Development of nickel hydrogen battery expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, Sajjan G.

    1990-01-01

    The Hubble Telescope Battery Testbed employs the nickel-cadmium battery expert system (NICBES-2) which supports the evaluation of performances of Hubble Telescope spacecraft batteries and provides alarm diagnosis and action advice. NICBES-2 also provides a reasoning system along with a battery domain knowledge base to achieve this battery health management function. An effort to modify NICBES-2 to accommodate nickel-hydrogen battery environment in testbed is described.

  16. Power generation in fuel cells using liquid methanol and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is directed to an encapsulated fuel cell including a methanol source that feeds liquid methanol (CH.sub.3 OH) to an anode. The anode is electrical communication with a load that provides electrical power. The fuel cell also includes a hydrogen peroxide source that feeds liquid hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2 O.sub.2) to the cathode. The cathode is also in communication with the electrical load. The anode and cathode are in contact with and separated by a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membrane.

  17. Unexpectedly high pressure for molecular dissociation in liquid hydrogen by electronic simulation.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Yunoki, Seiji; Sorella, Sandro

    2014-03-19

    The study of the high pressure phase diagram of hydrogen has continued with renewed effort for about one century as it remains a fundamental challenge for experimental and theoretical techniques. Here we employ an efficient molecular dynamics based on the quantum Monte Carlo method, which can describe accurately the electronic correlation and treat a large number of hydrogen atoms, allowing a realistic and reliable prediction of thermodynamic properties. We find that the molecular liquid phase is unexpectedly stable, and the transition towards a fully atomic liquid phase occurs at much higher pressure than previously believed. The old standing problem of low-temperature atomization is, therefore, still far from experimental reach.

  18. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  19. Neutron Scattering of Residual Hydrogen in 1,4-Dioxane-d8 Liquid: Understanding Measurements with Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Liu, Hongjun; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle K

    2016-06-23

    That incoherent scattering from protiated molecular liquids adds a constant background to the measured scattering intensity is well-known, but less appreciated is the fact that coherent scattering is also induced by the presence of hydrogen in a deuterated liquid. In fact, the scattering intensity can be very sensitive, in the small-q region, with respect to the amounts and distribution of residual H in the system. We used 1,4-dioxane liquid to demonstrate that the partial structure factors of the HD and DD atom pairs contribute significantly to intermolecular scattering and that uncertainty in the extent of deuteration account for discrepancies between simulations and measurements. Both contributions to uncertainty have similar magnitudes: scattering interference of the hydrogen-deuterium pair, and complementary interference from the deuterium-deuterium pair by virtue of chemical inhomogeneity. This situation arises in practice since deuteration of liquids is often 99% or less. A combined experimental and extensive computational study of static thermal neutron scattering of 1,4-dioxane demonstrates the foregoing. We show, through simulations, that the reason for the differences is the content of protiated dioxane (vendors quote 1%). We estimate that up to 5% (at 298 K and at 343 K) protiated molar fraction may be involved in generating the scattering differences. Finally, we find that the particular distribution of hydrogen in the protiated molecules affects the results significantly; here, we considered molecules to be either fully protiated or fully deuterated. This scenario best reconciles the computational and experimental results, and leads us to speculate that the deuteration synthesis process tends to leave a molecule either fully deuterated or fully protiated. Although we have used 1,4-dioxane as a model liquid, the effects described in this study extend to similar liquids, and similar systematic experimental/computational studies can be performed to

  20. Liquid injection system with venturi injector

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, K.F.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a liquid injection system for used with an internal combustion engine having a carburetor and an air cleaner housing, the system being designed to inject a predetermined amount of an external liquid, responsive to changes in vacuum in the air cleaner housing and in the carburetor, into at least one of the carburetors of the internal combustion engine from the proximity of the air cleaner and through the carburetor's air intake and within the air cleaner housing, and within the air cleaner, comprising: a venturi injection; a liquid level control chamber; a remote liquid tank; pressure pumping means; a connecting tube; and a liquid control chamber with pumping means.

  1. Modification of a liquid hydrogen tank for integrated refrigeration and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanger, A. M.; Jumper, K. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Notardonato, W. U.

    2015-12-01

    The modification and outfitting of a 125,000-liter liquid hydrogen tank was performed to provide integrated refrigeration and storage capability. These functions include zero boil-off, liquefaction, and densification and therefore require provisions for sub-atmospheric tank pressures within the vacuum-jacketed, multilayer insulated tank. The primary structural modification was to add stiffening rings inside the inner vessel. The internal stiffening rings were designed, built, and installed per the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, to prevent collapse in the case of vacuum jacket failure in combination with sub-atmospheric pressure within the tank. For the integrated refrigeration loop, a modular, skeleton-type heat exchanger, with refrigerant temperature instrumentation, was constructed using the stiffening rings as supports. To support the system thermal performance testing, three custom temperature rakes were designed and installed along the 21-meter length of the tank, once again using rings as supports. The temperature rakes included a total of 20 silicon diode temperature sensors mounted both vertically and radially to map the bulk liquid temperature within the tank. The tank modifications were successful and the system is now operational for the research and development of integrated refrigeration technology.

  2. Thermal energy storage with liquid-liquid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Santana, E.A.; Stiel, L.I.

    1989-03-01

    The use of liquid-liquid mixtures for heat and cool storage applications has been investigated. Suitable mixtures exhibit large changes in the heat of mixing above and below the critical solution temperature of the system. Analytical procedures have been utilized to determine potential energy storage capabilities of systems with upper or lower critical solution temperatures. It has been found that aqueous systems with lower critical solution temperatures in a suitable range can result in large increases in the effective heat capacity in the critical region. For cool storage with a system of this type, the cooling process results in a transformation from two liquid phases to a single phase. Heats of mixing have been measured with a flow calorimeter system for a number of potential mixtures, and the results are summarized.

  3. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to

  4. Method and apparatus for regenerating cold traps within liquid-metal systems

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Jr., John M.

    1976-01-01

    Oxide and hydride impurities of a liquid metal such as sodium are removed from a cold trap by heating to a temperature at which the metal hydroxide is stable in a molten state. The partial pressure of hydrogen within the system is measured to determine if excess hydride or oxide is present. Excess hydride is removed by venting hydrogen gas while excess oxide can be converted to molten hydroxide through the addition of hydrogen. The resulting, molten hydroxide is drained from the trap which is then returned to service at cold trap temperatures within the liquid-metal system.

  5. Low gravity reorientation in a scale-model Centaur liquid-hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, J. A.; Masica, W. J.; Lacovic, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the process of liquid reorientation from one end of a scale-model Centaur liquid-hydrogen tank to the other end by means of low-level accelerations. Prior to reorientation, the liquid was stabilized at the top of the tank at a Bond number of 15. Tanks both with and without ring baffles and with tank radii of 5.5 and 7.0 centimeters were used in the study. Reorientation acceleration values were varied to obtain Bond numbers of 200 and 450. Liquid fill levels of 20 and 70 percent were used. From the data in this study, relations were developed to estimate reorientation event times in unbaffled tanks through the point of final liquid clearing from the top of the tank. The insertion of ring baffles drastically changed the reorientation flow profiles but resulted in only minor differences in the times of tank-top uncovering and liquid collection.

  6. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

    2010-03-03

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  7. Hydrogen bonding discotic liquid crystals: Synthesis, self-assembly, and molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushey, Mark Lawrence

    The triamides shown below form discotic liquid crystalline phases with intermolecular hydrogen bonding stabilizing the columnar structure, A and B. The mesomorphic orientations of the columns are dependent on the amide side chain. Three mesophasic orientations are described: columns aligned perpendicular to the surface, columns aligned parallel to the surface in a radial pattern, and columns aligned parallel to the surface in a parallel or aligned pattern. The aggregation of the tridodecyloxy-triamides show N-H shifting in the IR at elevated temperatures, an indication that hydrogen bonding is important in the association of liquid crystalline mesophases. Powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate packing of the columns into a hexagonal lattice.* Studies on triamides with chiral side chains result in molecules stacking into columns displaying a helical pitch. In concentrated solutions of dodecane, molecules with chiral side chains display behavior consistent with chiral nematic liquid crystals; a super helical packing of the chiral columns. These superhelical packed systems show temperature dependent selective reflection of visible light and fingerprint textures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirms in sub-monolayer films, that molecules preferring an edge-on orientation form long columns on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), those that prefer a face-on orientation form large amorphous domains. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) images of the domains of molecules in the edge-on orientation provides no discernible polarity, imaging of the domains of molecules in the face-on orientation indicates a negative polar orientation. Scanning probe measurements (SPM) of the tridodecynyl-triamide have shown similar edge-on orientations of other tridodecyloxy-triamides. Powder X-ray diffraction of these liquid crystalline phases shows a hexagonal packing of the columnar assembly. Electro-optic switching studies indicate a piezoelectric switching mechanism, possibly

  8. Conformational equilibrium and hydrogen bonding in liquid 2-phenylethylamine explored by Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min; Qi, Yajing; Hu, Yongjun

    2011-04-14

    2-Phenylethylamine (PEA) is the simplest aromatic amine neurotransmitter, as well as one of the most important. In this work, the conformational equilibrium and hydrogen bonding in liquid PEA were studied by means of Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations (DFT/MP2). By changing the orientation of the ethyl and the NH(2) group, nine possible conformers of PEA were found, including four degenerate conformers. Comparison of the experimental Raman spectra of liquid PEA and the calculated Raman spectra of the five typical conformers in selected regions (550-800 and 1250-1500 cm(-1)) revealed that the five conformers can coexist in conformational equilibrium in the liquid. The NH(2) stretching mode of the liquid is red-shifted by ca. 30 cm(-1) relative to that of an isolated PEA molecule (measured previously), implying that intermolecular N-H···N hydrogen bonds play an important role in liquid PEA. The relative intensity of the Raman band at 762 cm(-1) was found to increase with increasing temperature, indicating that the anti conformer might be favorable in liquid PEA at room temperature. The blue shift of the band for the bonded N-H stretch with increasing temperature also provides evidence of the existence of intermolecular N-H···N hydrogen bonds.

  9. Large-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Testing of Variable Density Multilayer Insulation with a Foam Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Hastings, L.

    2001-01-01

    The multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB), with an 18-cu m liquid hydrogen tank, was used to evaluate a combination foam/multilayer combination insulation (MLI) concept. The foam element (Isofoam SS-1171) insulates during ground hold/ascent flight, and allowed a dry nitrogen purge as opposed to the more complex/heavy helium purge subsystem normally required. The 45-layer MLI was designed for an on-orbit storage period of 45 days. Unique WI features include a variable layer density, larger but fewer double-aluminized Mylar perforations for ascent to orbit venting, and a commercially established roll-wrap installation process that reduced assembly man-hours and resulted in a roust, virtually seamless MLI. Insulation performance was measured during three test series. The spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) successfully prevented purge gas liquefaction within the MLI and resulted in the expected ground hold heat leak of 63 W/sq m. The orbit hold tests resulted in heat leaks of 0.085 and 0.22 W/sq m with warm boundary temperatures of 164 and 305 K, respectively. Compared to the best previously measured performance with a traditional MLI system, a 41-percent heat leak reduction with 25 fewer MLI layers was achieved. The MHTB MLI heat leak is half that calculated for a constant layer density MLI.

  10. Feasibility study: Liquid hydrogen plant, 30 tons per day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The design considerations of the plant are discussed in detail along with management planning, objective schedules, and cost estimates. The processing scheme is aimed at ultimate use of coal as the basic raw material. For back-up, and to provide assurance of a dependable and steady supply of hydrogen, a parallel and redundant facility for gasifying heavy residual oil will be installed. Both the coal and residual oil gasifiers will use the partial oxidation process.

  11. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.; Hua, T.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Gardiner, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC; U.S. DOE

    2010-05-01

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage are assessed and compared to the targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm. The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) or by central electrolysis. The main conclusions are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity, mid-term target for system volumetric capacity, and the target for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. However, the high-volume manufacturing cost and the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production scenario are, respectively, 2-4 and 1.6-2.4 times the current targets, and the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  12. FLUSH: A tool for the design of slush hydrogen flow systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the National Aerospace Plane Project an analytical model was developed to perform calculations for in-line transfer of solid-liquid mixtures of hydrogen. This code, called FLUSH, calculates pressure drop and solid fraction loss for the flow of slush hydrogen through pipe systems. The model solves the steady-state, one-dimensional equation of energy to obtain slush loss estimates. A description of the code is provided as well as a guide for users of the program. Preliminary results are also presented showing the anticipated degradation of slush hydrogen solid content for various piping systems.

  13. Sloshing in Liquid Hydrogen and LOX Propellant Tanks After Main Engine Cut-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sura

    2011-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is designing and developing the Main Propulsion System (MPS) for Ares launch vehicles. The objective of this study is to calculate the sloshing forces and moments in the LH2 and LO2 propellant tanks using a CFD/VOF analysis under realistic flight conditions. Propellant sloshing in the liquid hydrogen (LH2) and the liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant tanks after Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) was modeled using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) module of the computational fluid dynamics code, CFD-ACE+. The present simulation shows that there are substantial sloshing side forces acting on the LH2 tank during the deceleration of the vehicle after MECO. The LH2 tank features a side wall drain pipe. The side loads result from the residual propellant mass motion in the LH2 tank which is initiated by the stop of flow into the drain pipe at MECO. The simulations show that radial force on the LH2 tank wall is less than 50 lbf and the radial moment calculated based up the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted to be as high as 300 lbf-ft. The LO2 tank features a bottom dome drain system and is equipped with sloshing baffles. The remaining LO2 in the tank slowly forms a liquid column along the centerline of tank under the zero gravity environments. The radial force on the LO2 tank wall is predicted less than 100 lbf. The radial moment calculated based on the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted as high as 4500 lbf-ft just before MECO and dropped down to near zero after propellant draining stopped completely.

  14. Project plan hydrogen energy systems technology. Phase 1: Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An overview of the potential need for hydrogen as a source of energy in the future was presented in order to identify and define the technology requirements for the most promising approaches to meet that need. The following study objectives were discussed: (1) determination of the future demand for hydrogen, based on current trends and anticipated new uses, (2) identification of the critical research and technology advances required to meet this need considering, to the extent possible, raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects, and (3) definition and recommendation of the scope and space of a National Hydrogen Energy Systems Technology Program and outline of a Program Development Plan.

  15. Liquid Iron Alloys with Hydrogen at Outer Core Conditions by First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Hirose, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the density of the outer core deduced from seismic data is about 10% lower than that of pure iron at core pressures and temperatures (P-T), it is widely believed that the outer core includes one or more light elements. Although intensive experimental and theoretical studies have been performed so far, the light element in the core has not yet been identified. Comparison of the density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys with observations, such as the PREM, is a promising way to determine the species and quantity of light alloying component(s) in the outer core. Here we report the results of a first-principles molecular dynamics study on liquid iron alloyed with hydrogen, one of candidates of the light elements. Hydrogen had been much less studied than other candidates. However, hydrogen has been known to reduce the melting temperature of Fe-H solid [1]. Furthermore, very recently, Nomura et al. argued that the outer core may include 24 at.% H in order to be molten under relatively low temperature (< 3600 K) [2]. Since then hydrogen has attracted strong interests. We clarify the effects of hydrogen on density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys under outer core P-T conditions. It is shown that ~1 wt% hydrogen can reproduce PREM density and sound velocity simultaneously very well. In addition, we show the presence of hydrogen rather reduces Gruneisen parameters. It indicates that, if hydrogen exists in the outer core, temperature profile of the outer core could be changed considerably from one estimated so far. [1] Sakamaki, K., E. Takahashi, Y. Nakajima, Y. Nishihara, K. Funakoshi, T. Suzuki, and Y. Fukai, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 174, 192-201 (2009). [2] Nomura, R., K. Hirose, K. Uesugi, Y. Ohishi, A. Tsuchiyama, A. Miyake, and Y. Ueno, Science 31, 522-525 (2014).

  16. Convergent strand array liquid pumping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A surface-tension liquid pumping system is provided by one or more arrays of converging solid monofilament fibers or metal wires (strands) spaced apart at an input end to gather liquid, and gathered close together at the opposite end where menisci forms between wetted strands to force liquid in the direction of convergence of the strands. The liquid pumping system is independent of gravity. It is illustrated as being used in a heat pump having a heating box to vaporize the liquid and a condensing chamber. Condensed liquid is returned by the pumping system to the heating box where it is again vaporized. A vapor tube carries the vapor to the condensing chamber. In that way, a closed system pumps heat from the heating box to the evaporating chamber and from there radiated to the atmosphere.

  17. Optimization of two methods for the analysis of hydrogen peroxide: high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection in direct current mode.

    PubMed

    Tarvin, Megan; McCord, Bruce; Mount, Kelly; Sherlach, Katy; Miller, Mark L

    2010-11-26

    Two complementary methods were optimized for the separation and detection of trace levels of hydrogen peroxide. The first method utilized reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD). With this approach, hydrogen peroxide was detected based upon its participation in the hemin-catalyzed oxidation of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid to yield the fluorescent dimer. The second method utilized high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED). With this approach, hydrogen peroxide was detected based upon its oxidation at a gold working electrode at an applied potential of 400 mV vs. hydrogen reference electrode (Pd/H(2)). Both methods were linear across the range of 15-300 μM, and the electrochemical method was linear across a wider range of 7.4-15,000 μM. The limit of detection for hydrogen peroxide was 6 μM by HPLC/FD, and 0.6 μM by HPLC/ED. A series of organic peroxides and inorganic ions were evaluated for their potential to interfere with the detection of hydrogen peroxide. Studies investigating the recovery of hydrogen peroxide with three different extraction protocols were also performed. Post-blast debris from the detonation of a mixture of concentrated hydrogen peroxide with nitromethane was analyzed on both systems. Hydrogen peroxide residues were successfully detected on this post-blast debris.

  18. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  19. Performance analysis of no-vent fill process for liquid hydrogen tank in terrestrial and on-orbit environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Yanzhong; Zhang, Feini; Ma, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Two finite difference computer models, aiming at the process predictions of no-vent fill in normal gravity and microgravity environments respectively, are developed to investigate the filling performance in a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank. In the normal gravity case model, the tank/fluid system is divided into five control volume including ullage, bulk liquid, gas-liquid interface, ullage-adjacent wall, and liquid-adjacent wall. In the microgravity case model, vapor-liquid thermal equilibrium state is maintained throughout the process, and only two nodes representing fluid and wall regions are applied. To capture the liquid-wall heat transfer accurately, a series of heat transfer mechanisms are considered and modeled successively, including film boiling, transition boiling, nucleate boiling and liquid natural convection. The two models are validated by comparing their prediction with experimental data, which shows good agreement. Then the two models are used to investigate the performance of no-vent fill in different conditions and several conclusions are obtained. It shows that in the normal gravity environment the no-vent fill experiences a continuous pressure rise during the whole process and the maximum pressure occurs at the end of the operation, while the maximum pressure of the microgravity case occurs at the beginning stage of the process. Moreover, it seems that increasing inlet mass flux has an apparent influence on the pressure evolution of no-vent fill process in normal gravity but a little influence in microgravity. The larger initial wall temperature brings about more significant liquid evaporation during the filling operation, and then causes higher pressure evolution, no matter the filling process occurs under normal gravity or microgravity conditions. Reducing inlet liquid temperature can improve the filling performance in normal gravity, but cannot significantly reduce the maximum pressure in microgravity. The presented work benefits the

  20. The intermolecular hydrogen-hydrogen structure of chain-molecule liquids from neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J. D.; Annis, B. K.; Turner, J. Z.; Soper, A. K.

    1994-11-01

    Neutron diffraction isotopic substitution experiments on liquid n-decane (C10H22) and n-eicosane (C20H42) are described. The intermolecular H-H structure function hHH(Q) and the intermolecular H-H correlation function ginterHH(r) are obtained without recourse to models of the intramolecular structure. The structure of the ginterHH(r) found at 2.5, 5.0, and 7.0 Å corresponds to different shells in the H-H pair correlation function. In addition, ginterHH(r)<1 for a considerable range, due to the screening of intermolecular correlations by intramolecular correlations. This ``correlation hole'' effect is accentuated by extrapolation of the structure functions to the expected infinite wavelength limit, and shows good agreement with values determined from small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data. All of these features are in good agreement with the results of molecular dynamics simulations for the closely related system C13H28.

  1. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of hydrogen bonded water molecules in binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricknell, B. C.; Ford, T. A.; Letcher, T. M.

    1997-03-01

    Some relationships have been found between the infrared spectroscopic properties of water molecules hydrogen bonded to a number of bases in binary liquid mixtures, and the partial eolar excess enthalpies at infinite dilution of water of the solutions. The results suggest a new approach to the use of the well-known Badger-Bauer relationship.

  2. High speed machining of space shuttle external tank liquid hydrogen barrel panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Actual and projected optimum High Speed Machining data for producing shuttle external tank liquid hydrogen barrel panels of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are reported. The data included various machining parameters; e.g., spindle speeds, cutting speed, table feed, chip load, metal removal rate, horsepower, cutting efficiency, cutter wear (lack of) and chip removal methods.

  3. Self-pressurization of a spherical liquid hydrogen storage tank in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal stratification and self-pressurization of partially filled liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage tanks under microgravity condition is studied theoretically. A spherical tank is subjected to a uniform and constant wall heat flux. It is assumed that a vapor bubble is located in the tank center such that the liquid-vapor interface and tank wall form two concentric spheres. This vapor bubble represents an idealized configuration of a wetting fluid in microgravity conditions. Dimensionless mass and energy conservation equations for both vapor and liquid regions are numerically solved. Coordinate transformation is used to capture the interface location which changes due to liquid thermal expansion, vapor compression, and mass transfer at liquid-vapor interface. The effects of tank size, liquid fill level, and wall heat flux on the pressure rise and thermal stratification are studied. Liquid thermal expansion tends to cause vapor condensation and wall heat flux tends to cause liquid evaporation at the interface. The combined effects determine the direction of mass transfer at the interface. Liquid superheat increases with increasing wall heat flux and liquid fill level and approaches an asymptotic value.

  4. Experimental and analytical analyses of the mechanisms governing the dispersion of flammable clouds formed by liquid hydrogen spills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, R. D.; Chirivella, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the initial findings of hydrogen vapor cloud dispersion experiments conducted by NASA. The experiments were performed to obtain basic information regarding the physical phenomena governing the dispersion of flammable clouds formed as the result of spills of large quantities of liquid hydrogen. The experiments consisted of ground spills of up to 5.7 cu m of liquid hydrogen with spill durations of approx. 35 s. Instrumented towers, located downwind of the spill site, gathered data on the temperature, hydrogen concentration and turbulence levels as the hydrogen vapor cloud drifted downwind. Preliminary results of the experiments indicate that, for rapid spills, thermal and momentum-induced turbulences cause the cloud to disperse to safe concentration levels and become positively buoyant long before mixing due to normal atmospheric turbulence becomes a major factor. An adiabatic mixing model has been developed to deduce hydrogen-air mixture ratios for temperature measurements obtained within the cloud formed by liquid hydrogen spills.

  5. Structure of hydrogenous liquids: separation of coherent and incoherent cross sections using polarised neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunault, A.; Vial, S.; Pusztai, L.; Cuello, G. J.; Temleitner, L.

    2016-04-01

    The determination of the coherent structure factor of hydrogenous liquids is very difficult: while X-rays are barely sensitive to hydrogen, neutrons results still lack accuracy due to the contamination of the scattering intensities by a huge spin-incoherent signal from the 1H atoms. Using polarised neutrons with polarisation analysis, one can experimentally separate the coherent and incoherent contributions to the scattered intensity. We present the upgrade of the D3 polarised hot neutron diffractometer at ILL to study hydrogenated liquids. We show first data obtained from a test sample of water and detail the data reduction leading to an unprecedented accuracy in the extraction of the coherent signal, representative of the structure.

  6. Hydrogen Bonding in Liquid Water and in the Hydration Shell of Salts.

    PubMed

    Dagade, Dilip H; Barge, Seema S

    2016-03-16

    A near-IR spectral study on pure water and aqueous salt solutions is used to investigate stoichiometric concentrations of different types of hydrogen-bonded water species in liquid water and in water comprising the hydration shell of salts. Analysis of the thermodynamics of hydrogen-bond formation signifies that hydrogen-bond making and breaking processes are dominated by enthalpy with non-negligible heat capacity effects, as revealed by the temperature dependence of standard molar enthalpies of hydrogen-bond formation and from analysis of the linear enthalpy-entropy compensation effects. A generalized method is proposed for the simultaneous calculation of the spectrum of water in the hydration shell and hydration number of solutes. Resolved spectra of water in the hydration shell of different salts clearly differentiate hydrogen bonding of water in the hydration shell around cations and anions. A comparison of resolved liquid water spectra and resolved hydration-shell spectra of ions highlights that the ordering of absorption frequencies of different kinds of hydrogen-bonded water species is also preserved in the bound state with significant changes in band position, band width, and band intensity because of the polarization of water molecules in the vicinity of ions.

  7. Luminescent gold(I) metallo-acids and their hydrogen bonded supramolecular liquid crystalline derivatives with decyloxystilbazole as hydrogen acceptor.

    PubMed

    Coco, Silverio; Cordovilla, Carlos; Domínguez, Cristina; Espinet, Pablo

    2008-12-28

    Gold complexes of 4-isocyanobenzoic acid, [AuX(CNC(6)H(4)CO(2)H)] (X = C[triple bond]C-C(6)H(4)-C(9)H(19), C(6)F(5), C(6)F(4)OC(6)H(13), C(6)F(4)C(6)F(4)Br) and [(mu-4,4'-C(6)F(4)C(6)F(4)){Au(CNC(6)H(4)CO(2)H)}(2)], have been isolated. These metallo-acids are luminescent. The single crystal X-ray diffraction study of [Au(C(6)F(5))(CNC(6)H(4)CO(2)H)](infinity) confirms a rod-like structure of the molecule, with a linear coordination around the gold atom, which extends into a supramolecular entity supported by hydrogen bond, gold-gold, and fluorophilic (F(ortho) ... F(meta)) interactions. The carboxylic acid group of the gold isocyanide complexes acts also as a hydrogen donor towards the hydrogen acceptor decyloxystilbazole, affording some hydrogen-bonded supramolecular liquid crystals.

  8. Using silicon diodes for detecting the liquid-vapor interface in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Fabik, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed using commercially available silicon diode temperature sensors to detect the location of the liquid-vapor interface in hydrogen during ground test programs. Results show that by increasing the current into the sensor, silicon diodes can be used as liquid level point sensors. After cycling the sensors from liquid to vapor several times, it was found that with a 30 mA (milliamps) input current, the sensors respond within 2 seconds by measuring a large voltage difference when transitioning from liquid to vapor across the interface. Nearly instantaneous response resulted during a transition form vapor to liquid. Detailed here are test procedures, experimental results, and guidelines for applying this information to other test facilities.

  9. Vacuum Surface Science Meets Heterogeneous Catalysis: Dehydrogenation of a Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier in the Liquid State.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takashi; Taccardi, Nicola; Schwegler, Johannes; Wasserscheid, Peter; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Maier, Florian

    2015-06-22

    Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface science techniques are used to study the heterogeneous catalytic dehydrogenation of a liquid organic hydrogen carrier in its liquid state close to the conditions of real catalysis. For this purpose, perhydrocarbazole (PH), otherwise volatile under UHV, is covalently linked as functional group to an imidazolium cation, forming a non-volatile ionic liquid (IL). The catalysed dehydrogenation of the PH unit as a function of temperature is investigated for a Pt foil covered by a macroscopically thick PH-IL film and for Pd particles suspended in the PH-IL film, and for PH-IL on Au as inert support. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy allows us to follow in situ the catalysed transition of perhydrocarbazole to carbazole at technical reaction temperatures. The data demonstrate the crucial role of the Pt and Pd catalysts in order to shift the dehydrogenation temperature below the critical temperature of thermal decomposition.

  10. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    SciTech Connect

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; Baisden, P.; Bertolini, L.; Boehm, K; Chernov, A.; Coffee, K.; Coffield, F.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edwards, O.; Fair, J.; Fedorov, M.; Fry, J.; Gibson, C.; Haid, B.; Holunga, D.; Kohut, T.; Lewis, T.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E.; Sater, J.; Skulina, K.; Trummer, D.; Walters, C.

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highly constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.

  11. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; Baisden, P.; Bertolini, L.; Boehm, K; Chernov, A.; Coffee, K.; Coffield, F.; Dylla-Spears, R.; et al

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highlymore » constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.« less

  12. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  13. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1985-01-01

    A chromatographic system that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a non-transparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extremely low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  14. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    A chromatographic system is described that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a nontransparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extreme low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  15. A cooperative hydrogen bonding system with a Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond in ofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiuxiang; Liu, Yufeng; Li, Huizhen; Bian, Jiang; Zhao, Ying; Cao, Ye; Mao, Yuezhi; Li, Xin; Xu, Yizhuang; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Wu, Jinguang

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated a cooperative hydrogen bonding system with a Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond in ofloxacin by using NMR, UV-Vis spectra together with quantum chemistry calculation. Both pH-dependent NMR experiments and DFT calculation indicate that the intra-molecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond between an aromatic proton and an oxygen atom from the carboxyl group is formed. Notably, the Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond forms a cooperative hydrogen bonding system with a neighboring Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group and the keto oxygen. The cooperative hydrogen bonding system makes the formation and disruption of the Osbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds in a synergistic manner. Comparison on the pKa value of the carboxylic group in different fluoroquinolones compounds indicates that the Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond plays a significant role in stabilizing the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. In addition, the formation and disruption of the cooperative hydrogen bonding system could regulate the conformation of the carboxyl group, which affects the size of the conjugated system and spectral behavior of π-π transition of ofloxacin.

  16. Development of the ReaxFFCBN reactive force field for the improved design of liquid CBN hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sung Jin; Yeo, Byung Chul; Han, Sang Soo

    2016-01-21

    Liquid CBN (carbon-boron-nitrogen) hydrogen-storage materials such as 3-methyl-1,2-BN-cyclopentane have the advantage of being easily accessible for use in current liquid-fuel infrastructure. To develop practical liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials, it is of great importance to understand the reaction pathways of hydrogenation/dehydrogenation in the liquid phase, which are difficult to discover by experimental methods. Herein, we developed a reactive force field (ReaxFFCBN) from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations based on density functional theory for the storage of hydrogen in BN-substituted cyclic hydrocarbon materials. The developed ReaxFFCBN provides similar dehydrogenation pathways and energetics to those predicted by QM calculations. Moreover, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the developed ReaxFFCBN can predict the stability and dehydrogenation behavior of various liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials. Our simulations reveal that a unimolecular dehydrogenation mechanism is preferred in liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials. However, as the temperature in the simulation increases, the contribution of a bimolecular dehydrogenation mechanism also increases. Moreover, our ReaxFF MD simulations show that in terms of thermal stability and dehydrogenation kinetics, liquid CBN materials with a hexagonal structure are more suitable materials than those with a pentagonal structure. We expect that the developed ReaxFFCBN could be a useful protocol in developing novel liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials. PMID:26681481

  17. Development of the ReaxFFCBN reactive force field for the improved design of liquid CBN hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sung Jin; Yeo, Byung Chul; Han, Sang Soo

    2016-01-21

    Liquid CBN (carbon-boron-nitrogen) hydrogen-storage materials such as 3-methyl-1,2-BN-cyclopentane have the advantage of being easily accessible for use in current liquid-fuel infrastructure. To develop practical liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials, it is of great importance to understand the reaction pathways of hydrogenation/dehydrogenation in the liquid phase, which are difficult to discover by experimental methods. Herein, we developed a reactive force field (ReaxFFCBN) from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations based on density functional theory for the storage of hydrogen in BN-substituted cyclic hydrocarbon materials. The developed ReaxFFCBN provides similar dehydrogenation pathways and energetics to those predicted by QM calculations. Moreover, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the developed ReaxFFCBN can predict the stability and dehydrogenation behavior of various liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials. Our simulations reveal that a unimolecular dehydrogenation mechanism is preferred in liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials. However, as the temperature in the simulation increases, the contribution of a bimolecular dehydrogenation mechanism also increases. Moreover, our ReaxFF MD simulations show that in terms of thermal stability and dehydrogenation kinetics, liquid CBN materials with a hexagonal structure are more suitable materials than those with a pentagonal structure. We expect that the developed ReaxFFCBN could be a useful protocol in developing novel liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials.

  18. Hydrogen fluoride capture by imidazolium acetate ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-04-01

    Extraction of hydrofluoric acid (HF) from oils is a drastically important problem in petroleum industry, since HF causes quick corrosion of pipe lines and brings severe health problems to humanity. Some ionic liquids (ILs) constitute promising scavenger agents thanks to strong binding to polar compounds and tunability. PM7-MD simulations and hybrid density functional theory are employed here to consider HF capture ability of ILs. Discussing the effects and impacts of the cation and the anion separately and together, we evaluate performance of imidazolium acetate and outline systematic search guidelines for efficient adsorption and extraction of HF.

  19. Study of the microdynamics of liquid lithium and lithium-hydrogen melt by inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Blagoveshchenskii, N. M.; Morozov, V. A.; Novikov, A. G.; Pashnev, M. A. Savostin, V. V.; Shimkevich, A. L.

    2007-05-15

    The frequency spectra of vibrations of Li atoms at temperatures of 22, 227, 397, and 557 deg. C and the lithium-hydrogen melt (98 at % {sup 7}Li, 2 at % H) at 557 deg. C have been obtained from the experimental neutron inelastic scattering data. On the basis of the frequency spectra, the temperature dependences of the mean-square displacement of Li atoms, the mean-square amplitudes of atomic vibrations, and the velocity autocorrelation function of atoms have been calculated. The speed of sound in liquid lithium has been estimated within the Debye model. The frequency spectra of lithium-hydrogen melt and solid lithium hydride are compared. A generalized frequency spectrum of vibrations of hydrogen atoms in lithium-hydrogen melt is obtained.

  20. Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2010-05-01

    We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the management of two cases of hydrogen sulfide toxicity from liquid manure.

    PubMed

    Belley, Richard; Bernard, Nicolas; Côté, Mario; Paquet, Francois; Poitras, Julien

    2005-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a potent lethal gas. Supportive care, nitrite therapy and hyperbaric oxygen are the treatment modalities reported in the literature in cases of hydrogen sulfide exposure. We describe an industrial exposure in which 6 workers inhaled high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide when they entered a closed spreader tank partially filled with liquid swine manure. Five of the 6 lost consciousness, and 2 were agitated and poorly responsive on arrival to the emergency department despite having already received high-flow oxygen for nearly 1 hour. These 2 patients received nitrite therapy followed by orotracheal intubation and hyperbaric oxygen. All patients were discharged home without sequelae after short stays in hospital. The emergency management of hydrogen sulfide exposure is briefly reviewed.

  2. Purification of dinosterol for hydrogen isotopic analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smittenberg, Rienk H; Sachs, Julian P

    2007-10-26

    A semi-preparative normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method is presented for the purification of various alcohol fractions from total lipid extracts derived from sediments, for the purpose of hydrogen isotopic measurement by gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). 4-methylsterols, including the dinoflagellate-specific marker dinosterol (4,23,24-trimethylcholestan-22-en-3beta-ol), were successfully separated from notoriously co-eluting plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenoid alcohols and alkyl alcohols. We find that substantial hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs during chromatographic separation, demonstrating the importance of recovering the entire peak when subsequent hydrogen isotope analyses are to be performed. This is the first report of such hydrogen isotopic fractionation for a natural unlabelled compound.

  3. Coherent Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy of Vibrational Excitons in Hydrogen-Bonded Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paarmann, Alexander

    The structure and structural dynamics of hydrogen bonded liquids were studied experimentally and theoretically with coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. The resonant intermolecular interactions within the fully resonant hydrogen bond networks give access to spatial correlations in the dynamics of the liquid structures. New experimental and theoretical tools were developed that significantly reduced the technical challenges of these studies. A nanofluidic flow device was designed and manufactured providing sub-micron thin, actively stabilized liquid sample layers between similarly thin windows. A simulation protocol for nonlinear vibrational response calculations of disordered fluctuating vibrational excitons was developed that allowed for the first treatment of resonant intermolecular interactions in the 2DIR response of liquid water. The 2DIR spectrum of the O-H stretching vibration of pure liquid water was studied experimentally at different temperatures. At ambient conditions the loss of frequency correlations is extremely fast, and is attributed to very efficient modulations of the two-dimensional O-H stretching vibrational potential through librational motions in the hydrogen bond network. At temperatures near freezing, the librational motions are significantly reduced leading to a pronounced slowing down of spectral diffusion dynamics. Comparison with energy transfer time scales revealed the first direct proof of delocalization of the vibrational excitations. This work establishes a fundamentally new view of vibrations in liquid water by providing a spatial length scale of correlated hydrogen-bond motions. The linear and 2DIR response of the amide I mode in neat liquid formamide was found to be dominated by excitonic effects due to largely delocalized vibrational excitations. The spectral response and dynamics are very sensitive to the excitonic mode structure and infrared activity distributions, leading to a pronounced asymmetry of linear

  4. Probing hydrogen-bonding in binary liquid mixtures with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a comparison of Debye and absorption analysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nicholas Y; Li, Ruoyu; Bräuer, Pierre; D'Agostino, Carmine; Gladden, Lynn F; Zeitler, J Axel

    2015-02-28

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is used to explore hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics in binary liquid mixtures, spanning a range of protic-protic, protic-aprotic and aprotic-aprotic systems. A direct absorption coefficient analysis is compared against more complex Debye analysis and we observed good agreement of the two methods in determining the hydrogen bonding properties when at least one of the mixture components is protic. When both components are aprotic, we show that the trend in absorption coefficients match well with the theoretical trend in strength of hydrogen bond interactions predicted based on steric and electronic properties of the components.

  5. Neutron scattering of residual hydrogen in 1,4-dioxane d8 liquid: Understanding measurements with molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Hongjun; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Kidder, Michelle K.; de Almeida, Valmor F.

    2016-06-08

    That incoherent scattering from protiated molecular liquids adds a constant background to the measured scattering intensity is well-known, but less appreciated is the fact that coherent scattering is also induced by the presence of hydrogen in a deuterated liquid. In fact, the scattering intensity can be very sensitive, in the small-q region, with respect to the amounts and distribution of residual H in the system. We used 1,4-dioxane liquid to demonstrate that the partial structure factors of the HD and DD atom pairs contribute significantly to intermolecular scattering and that uncertainty in the extent of deuteration account for discrepancies betweenmore » simulations and measurements. Both contributions to uncertainty have similar magnitudes: scattering interference of the hydrogen–deuterium pair, and complementary interference from the deuterium–deuterium pair by virtue of chemical inhomogeneity. This situation arises in practice since deuteration of liquids is often 99% or less. A combined experimental and extensive computational study of static thermal neutron scattering of 1,4-dioxane demonstrates the foregoing. We show, through simulations, that the reason for the differences is the content of protiated dioxane (vendors quote 1%). We estimate that up to 5% (at 298 K and at 343 K) protiated molar fraction may be involved in generating the scattering differences. Finally, we find that the particular distribution of hydrogen in the protiated molecules affects the results significantly; here, we considered molecules to be either fully protiated or fully deuterated. This scenario best reconciles the computational and experimental results, and leads us to speculate that the deuteration synthesis process tends to leave a molecule either fully deuterated or fully protiated. As a result, we have used 1,4-dioxane as a model liquid, the effects described in this study extend to similar liquids, and similar systematic experimental/computational studies can be

  6. Liquid iron-hydrogen alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei

    2015-09-01

    We examined the density, bulk sound (compressional) velocity, and Grüneisen parameter of liquid pure Fe, Fe100H28 (0.50 wt % H), Fe88H40 (0.81 wt % H), and Fe76H52 (1.22 wt % H) at Earth's outer core pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions (~100 to 350 GPa, 4000 to 7000 K) based on first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. The results demonstrate that the thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of liquid iron alloy decreases with increasing pressure, temperature, and hydrogen concentration, indicating a relatively small temperature gradient in the outer core when hydrogen is present. Along such temperature profile, both the density and compressional velocity of liquid iron containing ~1 wt % hydrogen match seismological observations. It suggests that hydrogen could be a primary light element in the core, although the shear velocity of the inner core is not reconciled with solid Fe-H alloy and thus requires another impurity element.

  7. Hexagonal Substructure and Hydrogen Bonding in Liquid-Ordered Phases Containing Palmitoyl Sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Sodt, Alexander J; Pastor, Richard W; Lyman, Edward

    2015-09-01

    All-atom simulation data are presented for ternary mixtures of palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), cholesterol, and either palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidyl choline or dioleoyl phosphatidyl choline (DOPC). For comparison, data for a mixture of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), cholesterol, and DOPC are also presented. Compositions corresponding to the liquid-ordered phase, the liquid-disordered phase, and coexistence of the two phases are simulated for each mixture. Within the liquid-ordered phase, cholesterol is preferentially solvated by DOPC if it is available, but if DOPC is replaced by POPC, cholesterol is preferentially solvated by PSM. In the DPPC mixtures, cholesterol interacts preferentially with the saturated chains via its smooth face, whereas in the PSM mixtures, cholesterol interacts preferentially with PSM via its rough face. Interactions between cholesterol and PSM have a very particular character: hydrogen bonding between cholesterol and the amide of PSM rotates the tilt of the amide plane, which primes it for more robust hydrogen bonding with other PSM. Cholesterol-PSM hydrogen bonding also locally modifies the hexagonal packing of hydrocarbon chains in the liquid-ordered phase of PSM mixtures.

  8. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-03-30

    Professors and graduate students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and hydrocarbon gases and liquids produced from coal. An Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report summarizes the results obtained in this program during the period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2006. The results are presented in detailed reports on 16 research projects headed by professors at each of the five CFFS Universities and an Executive Summary. Some of the highlights from these results are: (1) Small ({approx}1%) additions of acetylene or other alkynes to the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction increases its yield, causes chain initiation, and promotes oxygenate formation. (2) The addition of Mo to Fe-Cu-K/AC F-T catalysts improves catalyst lifetime and activity. (3) The use of gas phase deposition to place highly dispersed metal catalysts on silica or ceria aerogels offers promise for both the F-T and the water-gas shift WGS reactions. (4) Improved activity and selectivity are exhibited by Co F-T catalysts in supercritical hexane. (5) Binary Fe

  9. Liquid-Hydrogen-Cooled 450-hp Electric Motor Test Stand Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Brown, Gerald V.

    2005-01-01

    With growing concerns about global warming, there is a need to develop pollution-free aircraft. One approach is to use hydrogen-fueled airc raft that use fuel cells or turbogenerators to produce electric power to drive the electric motors that turn the aircraft#s propulsive fan s. Hydrogen fuel would be carried as a liquid, stored at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 ?F). Conventional electric motors, however, are too heavy to use on an aircraft. We need to develop high-power, lig htweight electric motors (high-powerdensity motors).

  10. Correlation of structural order, anomalous density, and hydrogen bonding network of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Dibyendu; Mohan, S; Ghosh, S K; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2013-07-25

    We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations employing different state-of-the-art force fields to find a common framework for comparing structural orders and density anomalies as obtained from different water models. It is found that the average number of hydrogen bonds correlates well with various order parameters as well as the temperature of maximum densities across the different models, unifying apparently disparate results from different models and emphasizing the importance of hydrogen bonding in determining anomalous properties and the structure of water. A deeper insight into the hydrogen bond network of water reveals that the solvation shell of a water molecule can be defined by considering only those neighbors that are hydrogen-bonded to it. On the basis of this view, the origin of the appearance of a non-tetrahedral peak at a higher temperature in the distribution of tetrahedral order parameters has been explained. It is found that a neighbor that is hydrogen-bonded to the central molecule is tetrahedrally coordinated even at higher temperatures. The non-tetrahedral peak at a higher temperature arises due to the strained orientation of the neighbors that are non-hydrogen-bonded to the central molecule. With the new definition of the solvation shell, liquid water can be viewed as an instantaneously changing random hydrogen-bonded network consisting of differently coordinated hydrogen-bonded molecules with their distinct solvation shells. The variation of the composition of these hydrogen-bonded molecules against temperature accounts for the density anomaly without introducing the concept of large-scale structural polyamorphism in water.

  11. Fiber optic cryogenic liquid level detection system for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Yang, Chengning; Chen, Shiping

    2009-05-01

    Liquid hydrogen and oxygen are widely used as fuels in space vehicles. Because both are highly dangerous materials prone to explosion, detection of the liquid level in fuel tank becomes a critical element for the safety and efficiency in space operations. Two liquid level sensing techniques are presented in this paper. The first technique is based on optical fiber long period gratings. In this technique, the full length of a specially fabricated fiber is the body of the probe becomes the length of the sensing fiber that is submerged in the liquid can be detected by the interrogation system. The second system uses optical fibers to guide light to and from an array of point probes. These probes are specially fabricated, miniature optical components which reflects a substantial amount of light back into the lead fiber when the probe is gas but almost no light when it is in liquid. A detailed theoretical study by computer simulation was carried out on these two techniques in order to determine which technique was more suitable for experimental investigation. The study revealed that although the first technique may provide more potential benefits in terms of weight and easy installation; a number of technical challenges make it not suitable for a short term solution. The second, probe array based technique, on the other hand, is more mature technically. The rest of the research program was therefore focused on the experimental investigation of the probe array detection technique and the test results are presented in this paper.

  12. Real-time monitoring of hydrogen peroxide consumption in an oxidation reaction in molecular solvent and ionic liquids by a hydrogen peroxide electrochemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Daniela; Arduini, Fabiana; Conte, Valeria; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe

    2011-06-20

    An efficient electrochemical protocol to monitor hydrogen peroxide consumption during metal-catalyzed oxidation by using screen-printed electrodes modified with Prussian blue is presented. In particular, cyclooctene oxidation to cyclooctene oxide, catalyzed by a vanadium(V)-salophen complex (H(2)salophen=N,N'-o-phenylenebis(salicylideneimine)), in molecular and ionic media was tested. Initially, a protocol for batch analysis was developed for a monophasic system in acetonitrile, and subsequently, an in situ protocol was developed for a biphasic system of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate/phosphate buffer. Calibration curves were performed in amperometric mode by applying -50 mV versus an Ag pseudo-reference. The calibration curve of hydrogen peroxide showed a linear correlation from 1 × 10(-6) up to 5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) with satisfactory inter- and intra-electrode reproducibility (relative standard deviation (RSD) values of 5 and 13%, respectively, for the monophasic system and 11 and 13%, respectively, for the biphasic system). Kinetic studies to investigate the oxidation reaction for both the mono- and biphasic systems have been carried out in amperometric mode as well. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was examined, which showed that, in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate(,) it completely decomposed in 300 min, whereas in acetonitrile, in the same time frame, 20% of the initial amount was still active. In the presence of 1% of the catalyst the decomposition rate increased in both solvents. Finally, the complete oxidation of cyclooctene was followed and the effective conversion was determined. The developed protocols showed high reproducibility, with the advantage that the environmentally friendly biphasic system could also be recycled. The good analytical performance obtained, coupled with a short analysis time, the possibility of in-line automation and the use of ionic liquids instead of molecular solvents, made this

  13. The noncavitating performance and life of a small vane-type positive displacement pump in liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbricht, T. E.; Hemminger, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The low flow rate and high head rise requirements of hydrogen/oxygen auxiliary propulsion systems make the application of centrifugal pumps difficult. Positive displacement pumps are well-suited for these flow conditions, but little is known about their performance and life characteristics in liquid hydrogen. An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the performance and life characteristics of a vane-type, positive displacement pump. In the experimental part of this effort, mass flow rate and shaft torque were determined as functions of shaft speed and pump pressure rise. Since liquid hydrogen offers little lubrication in a rubbing situation, pump life is an issue. During the life test, the pump was operated intermittently for 10 hr at the steady-state point of 0.074 lbm/sec (0.03 kg/sec) flow rate, 3000 psid (2.07 MPa) pressure rise, and 9000 rpm (938 rad/sec) shaft speed. Pump performance was monitored during the life test series and the results indicated no loss in performance. Material loss from the vanes was recorded and wear of the other components was documented. In the analytical part of this effort, a comprehensive pump performance analysis computer code, developed in-house, was used to predict pump performance. The results of the experimental investigation are presented and compared with the results of the analysis. Results of the life test are also presented.

  14. The noncavitating performance and life of a small vane-type positive displacement pump in liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbricht, T. E.; Hemminger, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The low flow rate and high head rise requirements of hydrogen/oxygen auxiliary propulsion systems make the application of centrifugal pumps difficult. Positive displacement pumps are well-suited for these flow conditions, but little is known about their performance and life characteristics in liquid hydrogen. An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the performance and life characteristics of a vane-type, positive displacement pump. In the experimental part of this effort, mass flow rate and shaft torque were determined as functions of shaft speed and pump pressure rise. Since liquid hydrogen offers little lubrication in a rubbing situation, pump life is an issue. During the life test, the pump was operated intermittently for 10 hr at the steady-state point of 0.074 lbm/sec (0.03 kg/sec) flow rate, 3000 psid (2.07 MPa) pressure rise, and 8000 rpm (838 rad/sec) shaft speed. Pump performance was monitored during the life test series and the results indicated no loss in performance. Material loss from the vanes was recorded and wear of the other components was documented. In the analytical part of this effort, a comprehensive pump performance analysis computer code, developed in-house, was used to predict pump performance. The results of the experimental investigation are presented and compared with the results of the analysis. Results of the life test are also presented.

  15. Modeling the Thermal Mechanical Behavior of a 300 K Vacuum Vesselthat is Cooled by Liquid Hydrogen in Film Boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.

    2004-05-07

    This report discusses the results from the rupture of a thin window that is part of a 20-liter liquid hydrogen vessel. This rupture will spill liquid hydrogen onto the walls and bottom of a 300 K cylindrical vacuum vessel. The spilled hydrogen goes into film boiling, which removes the thermal energy from the vacuum vessel wall. This report analyzes the transient heat transfer in the vessel and calculates the thermal deflection and stress that will result from the boiling liquid in contact with the vessel walls. This analysis was applied to aluminum and stainless steel vessels.

  16. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  17. PROPULSE 980: A Hydrogen Peroxide Enrichment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, Robert; Bromley, G.; Wanger, Robert; Pauls, Dan; Maynard, Bryon; McNeal, Curtis; Dumbacher, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The PROPULSE 980 unit is a transportable processing plant that enriches aerospace grade hydrogen peroxide from 90% to 98% final concentration. The unit was developed by Degussa-H Is, in cooperation with Orbital, NASA Marshall Space Center, and NASA Stennis Space Center. The system is a self-contained unit that houses all of the process equipment, instrumentation and controls to perform the concentration operation nearly autonomously. It is designed to produce non-bulk quantities of 98% hydrogen peroxide. The enrichment unit design also maintains system, personnel and environmental safety during all aspects of the enrichment process and final product storage. As part of the Propulse 980 checkout and final buyoff, it will be disassembled at the Degussa-H Is Corporation plant in Theodore, AL, transported to the Stennis Space Center, reassembled and subjected to a series of checkout tests to verify design objectives have been met. This paper will summarize the basic project elements and provide an update on the present status of the project.

  18. Borazine-boron nitride hybrid hydrogen storage system

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K [Knoxville, TN; Simonson, J Michael [Knoxville, TN; Maya, Leon [Knoxville, TN; Paine, Robert T [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-22

    A hybrid hydrogen storage composition includes a first phase and a second phase adsorbed on the first phase, the first phase including BN for storing hydrogen by physisorption and the second phase including a borazane-borazine system for storing hydrogen in combined form as a hydride.

  19. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given

  20. Liquid-solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H2 and D2 in an ˜85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid-solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ˜4 K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H2 and D2 confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H2 and D2 are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  1. Slow dielectric response of Debye-type in water and other hydrogen bonded liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Helén; Bergman, Rikard; Swenson, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The slow dynamics of some hydrogen bonded glass-forming liquids has been investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy. We show that the polyalcohols glycerol, xylitol, and sorbitol, and mixtures of glycerol and water, and in fact, even pure water exhibit a process of Debye character at longer time-scales than the glass transition and viscosity related α-relaxation. Even if it is less pronounced, this process displays many similarities to the well-studied Debye-like process in monoalcohols. It can be observed in both the negative derivative of the real part of the permittivity or in the imaginary part of the permittivity, if the conductivity contribution is reduced. In the present study the conductivity contribution has been suppressed by use of a thin Teflon film placed between the sample and one of the electrodes. The new findings might have important implications for the structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded liquids in general, and for water in particular.

  2. A study on polymorphism of hydrogen-bonded thermotropic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajanandkumar, R.; Pongali Sathya Prabu, N.; Murugadass, K.; Madhu Mohan, M. L. N.

    2016-09-01

    A novel mesogenic homologous series comprising of eight hydrogen-bonded liquid crystalline complexes are isolated and analyzed by forming a hydrogen bond between p-n alkyloxy benzoic acids (where n represent alkyloxy carbon number which varies from 5 to 12) and mesaconic acid, respectively. Eight synthesized complexes are subjected to Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, polarizing optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry studies to meet the basic characterization. The variation of optical tilt angle with respect to temperature in various conventional and smectic X phases are investigated and analyzed. A phase diagram is constructed to elucidate the mesogenic behavior of novel liquid crystalline series. The Cox ratio that reveals the order of various mesophases and the stability factor, to invoke the thermal stability of mesophases, is studied under the results of DSC thermogram.

  3. Observation of Fractional Stokes-Einstein Behavior in the Simplest Hydrogen-bonded Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Herwig, Kenneth W; Molaison, Jamie J; Fernandez-Alonso, F.; Bermejo, F. J.; Turner, John F. C.; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2007-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate the single-particle dynamics of hydrogen fluoride across its entire liquid range at ambient pressure. For T > 230 K, translational diffusion obeys the celebrated Stokes-Einstein relation, in agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance studies. At lower temperatures, we find significant deviations from the above behavior in the form of a power law with exponent xi = -0.71+/-0.05. More striking than the above is a complete breakdown of the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation for rotational diffusion. Our findings provide the first experimental verification of fractional Stokes-Einstein behavior in a hydrogen-bonded liquid, in agreement with recent computer simulations.

  4. Hydrogen-bonded side chain liquid crystalline block copolymer: Molecular design, synthesis, characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chi-Yang

    Block copolymers can self-assemble into highly regular, microphase-separated morphologies with dimensions at nanometer length scales. Potential applications such as optical wavelength photonic crystals, templates for nanolithographic patterning, or nanochannels for biomacromolecular separation take advantage of the well-ordered, controlled size microdomains of block copolymers. Side-chain liquid crystalline block copolymers (SCLCBCPs) are drawing increasing attention since the incorporation of liquid crystallinity turns their well-organized microstructures into dynamic functional materials. As a special type of block copolymer, hydrogen-bonded SCLCBCPs are unique, compositionally tunable materials with multiple dynamic functionalities that can readily respond to thermal, electrical and mechanical fields. Hydrogen-bonded SCLCBCPs were synthesized and assembled from host poly(styrene- b-acrylic acid) diblock copolymers with narrow molecular weight distributions as proton donors and guest imidazole functionalized mesogenic moieties as proton acceptors. In these studies non-covalent hydrogen bonding is employed to connect mesogenic side groups to a block copolymer backbone, both for its dynamic character as well as for facile materials preparation. The homogeneity and configuration of the hydrogen-bonded complexes were determined by both the molecular architecture of imidazolyl side groups and the process conditions. A one-dimensional photonic crystal composed of high molecular weight hydrogen-bonded SCLCBCP, with temperature dependent optical wavelength stop bands was successfully produced. The microstructures of hydrogen-bonded complexes could be rapidly aligned in an AC electric field at temperatures below the order-disorder transition but above their glass transitions. Remarkable dipolar properties of the mesogenic groups and thermal dissociation of hydrogen bonds are key elements to fast orientation switching. Studies of a wide range of mesogen and polymer

  5. The Use of Liquid Isopropyl Alcohol and Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma to Biologically Decontaminate Spacecraft Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, J. K.; Tudryn, Carissa D.; Choi, Sun J.; Eulogio, Sebastian E.; Roberts, Timothy J.; Tudryn, Carissa D.

    2006-01-01

    Legitimate concern exists regarding sending spacecraft and their associated hardware to solar system bodies where they could possibly contaminate the body's surface with terrestrial microorganisms. The NASA approved guidelines for sterilization as set forth in NPG 8020.12C, which is consistent with the biological contamination control objectives of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), recommends subjecting the spacecraft and its associated hardware to dry heat-a dry heat regimen that could potentially employ a temperature of 110(deg)C for up to 200 hours. Such a temperature exposure could prove detrimental to the spacecraft electronics. The stimulated growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in metallic interconnects and/or thermal degradation of organic materials composing much of the hardware could take place over a prolonged temperature regimen. Such detrimental phenomena would almost certainly compromise the integrity and reliability of the electronics. Investigation of sterilization procedures in the medical field suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H202) gas plasma (HPGP) technology can effectively function as an alternative to heat sterilization, especially for heat-sensitive items. Treatment with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) in liquid form prior to exposure of the hardware to HPGP should also prove beneficial. Although IPA is not a sterilant, it is frequently used as a disinfectant because of its bactericidal properties. The use of IPA in electronics cleaning is widely recognized and has been utilized for many years with no adverse affects reported. In addition, IPA is the principal ingredient of the test fluid used in ionic contamination testers to assess the amount of ionic contamination found on the surfaces of printed wiring assemblies. This paper will set forth experimental data confirming the feasibility of the IPA/H202 approach to reach acceptable microbial reduction (MR) levels of spacecraft electronic hardware. In addition, a proposed process flow in

  6. Ground state properties of solid and liquid spin-aligned atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilowicz, R. L.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Etters, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Calculations of the ground state energy in the solid phase were performed with the aid of a variational approach. The Morse potential form of the atomic triple potential computed by Kolos and Wolniewicz (1965) was employed for the calculations. The ground state energies of both the liquid and solid phases of spin-aligned atomic hydrogen around the volume of the transition are presented in a graph.

  7. Measuring Air Leaks into the Vacuum Space of Large Liquid Hydrogen Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley; Nurge, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Large cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks are composed of inner and outer shells. The outer shell is exposed to the ambient environment while the inner shell holds the liquid hydrogen. The region between these two shells is evacuated and typically filled with a powderlike insulation to minimize radiative coupling between the two shells. A technique was developed for detecting the presence of an air leak from the outside environment into this evacuated region. These tanks are roughly 70 ft (approx. equal 21 m) in diameter (outer shell) and the inner shell is roughly 62 ft (approx. equal 19 m) in diameter, so the evacuated region is about 4 ft (approx. equal 1 m) wide. A small leak's primary effect is to increase the boil-off of the tank. It was preferable to install a more accurate fill level sensor than to implement a boil-off meter. The fill level sensor would be composed of an accurate pair of pressure transducers that would essentially weigh the remaining liquid hydrogen. This upgrade, allowing boil-off data to be obtained weekly instead of over several months, is ongoing, and will then provide a relatively rapid indication of the presence of a leak.

  8. Heat-driven thermoacoustic cryocooler operating at liquid hydrogen temperature with a unique coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Luo, E. C.; Li, S. F.; Yu, B.; Dai, W.

    2008-05-01

    A heat-driven thermoacoustic cryocooler is constructed. A unique coupler composed of a tube, reservoir, and elastic diaphragm is introduced to couple a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine (TE) and two-stage pulse tube refrigerator (PTR). The amplitude of the pressure wave generated in the engine is first amplified in the coupler and the wave then passes into the refrigerator to pump heat. The TE uses nitrogen as its working gas and the PTR still uses helium as its working gas. With this coupler, the efficiency of the system is doubled. The engine and coupler match at a much lower operating frequency, which is of great benefit for the PTR to obtain a lower cooling temperature. The coupling place between the coupler and engine is also optimized. The onset problem is effectively solved. With these improvements, the heat-driven thermoacoustic cryocooler reaches a lowest temperature of 18.1K, which is the demonstration of heat-driven thermoacoustic refrigeration technology used for cooling at liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  9. Optimization of a Brayton cryocooler for ZBO liquid hydrogen storage in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserranno, D.; Zagarola, M.; Li, X.; Mustafi, S.

    2014-11-01

    NASA is evaluating and developing technology for long-term storage of cryogenic propellant in space. A key technology is a cryogenic refrigerator which intercepts heat loads to the storage tank, resulting in a reduced- or zero-boil-off condition. Turbo-Brayton cryocoolers are particularly well suited for cryogen storage applications because the technology scales well to high capacities and low temperatures. In addition, the continuous-flow nature of the cycle allows direct cooling of the cryogen storage tank without mass and power penalties associated with a cryogenic heat transport system. To quantify the benefits and mature the cryocooler technology, Creare Inc. performed a design study and technology demonstration effort for NASA on a 20 W, 20 K cryocooler for liquid hydrogen storage. During the design study, we optimized these key components: three centrifugal compressors, a modular high-capacity plate-fin recuperator, and a single-stage turboalternator. The optimization of the compressors and turboalternator were supported by component testing. The optimized cryocooler has an overall flight mass of 88 kg and a specific power of 61 W/W. The coefficient of performance of the cryocooler is 23% of the Carnot cycle. This is significantly better performance than any 20 K space cryocooler existing or under development.

  10. Comparison of Investment and Related Requirements for Selected Hydrogen Vehicle System Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogart, S. Locke

    2002-12-01

    A model was developed for production, transmission, delivery, and consumption of hydrogen for large-scale systems ultimately providing shaft-work for hydrogen-based vehicles. (See Glossary, after References). Presently, the supply technologies are limited to solar photovoltaic, wind, nuclear, and nuclear thermochemical sources. Transmission technologies include electric power, hydrogen pipeline, and liquid hydrocarbon pipeline. Delivery technologies include both liquid and gaseous hydrogen and liquid hydrocarbon. Storage modes were selected as appropriate for the pathway transmission and delivery modes. Finally, consumption technologies are fuel-cell based, with and without a fuel processor (reformer). Overall, there were 39 separate pathways in this initial analysis. Subsystem efficiencies, capital costs, and capacity factors were derived from a literature search and supported by calculations where necessary. Overall systems efficiency, system peak power capital costs, and systems average power capital costs were calculated to indicate the potential capital investment requirements. The model was exercised to assess the capital cost (and related aspects) requirements to provide the equivalent automobile shaftwork of eleven million barrels of oil per day by the year 2040 (the Administration's objective). These costs range from 650 billion to 11.7 trillion and primarily depend on the selected energy source. The results reveal that nuclear thermochemical systems based on liquid hydrocarbon transmission and delivery lie at the low-cost end of the range, followed by nuclear or wind electric, then nuclear or wind hydrogen pipeline, and finally by solar electric and solar hydrogen pipeline. It is noted that thermochemical systems based on liquid hydrocarbons was the least-cost option for all of the energy sources. One vehicle storage technology, chemical hydride, was determined to be too costly to be included for later analysis. The results were compared against what

  11. Hydrogen generation systems and methods utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-08-11

    Systems, devices, and methods combine thermally stable reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen and a non-toxic liquid by-product. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Springs and other pressurization mechanisms pressurize and deliver an aqueous solution to the reaction. A check valve and other pressure regulation mechanisms regulate the pressure of the aqueous solution delivered to the reactant fuel material in the reactor based upon characteristics of the pressurization mechanisms and can regulate the pressure of the delivered aqueous solution as a steady decay associated with the pressurization force. The pressure regulation mechanism can also prevent hydrogen gas from deflecting the pressure regulation mechanism.

  12. Conceptual design of a hydrogen storage system for a Mars Sample Return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Paul John, III

    A Mars Sample Return mission concept under consideration by NASA uses carbon dioxide from the Martian atmosphere, in combination with hydrogen brought from Earth, to create oxygen and methane propellants for the return trip. This may allow launch from Earth on a smaller, less expensive launch vehicle. A major engineering challenge for this concept is to design a system that can store the hydrogen during the 8-month trip to Mars. A wide variety of design options was considered, including solid, liquid, or slush hydrogen, tank materials, insulation configurations, etc. A comprehensive computer simulation program was written and used to arrive at a preferred hydrogen storage system conceptual design, optimized in terms of mass, insulation thickness, maximum tank pressure, and tank volume. The feasibility of this concept in terms of total spacecraft mass could not be firmly established; however, it appeared very promising and worthy of further development.

  13. Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Integrated Propulsion System Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Howard; Lusby, Brian; Villemarette, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In support of NASA?s Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, a liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) Integrated Propulsion System Test Bed (IPSTB) was designed and advanced to the Critical Design Review (CDR) stage at the Johnson Space Center. The IPSTB?s primary objectives are to study LO2/LCH4 propulsion system steady state and transient performance, operational characteristics and to validate fluid and thermal models of a LO2/LCH4 propulsion system for use in future flight design work. Two phase thermal and dynamic fluid flow models of the IPSTB were built to predict the system performance characteristics under a variety of operating modes and to aid in the overall system design work. While at ambient temperature and simulated altitude conditions at the White Sands Test Facility, the IPSTB and its approximately 600 channels of system instrumentation would be operated to perform a variety of integrated main engine and reaction control engine hot fire tests. The pressure, temperature, and flow rate data collected during this testing would then be used to validate the analytical models of the IPSTB?s thermal and dynamic fluid flow performance. An overview of the IPSTB design and analytical model development will be presented.

  14. Simulation of Liquid and Supercritical Hydrogen Sulfide and of Alkali Ions in the Pure and Aqueous Liquid.

    PubMed

    Orabi, Esam A; Lamoureux, Guillaume

    2014-08-12

    A polarizable model for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is optimized based on the experimental properties of the monomer and of the bulk liquid. The model is characterized by rigid SH bonds but flexible HSH angle and the polarizability is based on the Drude oscillator model. Bonded parameters and atomic charges are based on the experimental properties of the gaseous monomer. Atomic Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters are adjusted based on the density of H2S around the critical point (in the temperature range 363-393 K and pressure range 8.023-10.013 MPa). The model gives binding energies for H2S dimers, trimers, and tetramers in good agreement with ab initio MP2(full)/6-311++G(d,p) results. It shows a liquid structure in very good agreement with neutron diffraction data. The model also gives density, self-diffusion coefficient, heat of vaporization, and dielectric constant of liquid hydrogen sulfide at the normal boiling point in good agreement with experimental data. In addition, the model is transferable to high temperature and pressure conditions, as evidenced from simulations up to 542.2 K and 40 MPa. The model is used in combination with the SWM4-NDP water model, with LJ parameters between the S and O atoms adjusted to reproduce the experimental hydration free energy of H2S. Simulations suggest that, in its first solvation shell, a single H2O molecule is solvated by 10 H2S molecules while a single H2S molecule is solvated by 20.5 H2O molecules. Pair-specific LJ parameters between alkali ions (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+)) and the S atom are adjusted to reproduce ab initio binding energies of the ion-H2S pairs at the CCSD(T) level. Simulations based on these parameters show that alkali ions have higher coordination numbers and lower solvation free energies in liquid H2S than in liquid water or liquid ammonia. The model is also used to investigate the preferential solvation of the ions in aqueous solutions with a 10% H2S mole fraction. Results show that the ions are

  15. How hydrogen bonds influence the mobility of imidazolium-based ionic liquids. A combined theoretical and experimental study of 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Brehm, Martin; Lingscheid, Yves; Giernoth, Ralf; Sangoro, Joshua; Kremer, Friedrich; Naumov, Sergej; Iacob, Ciprian; Kärger, Jörg; Valiullin, Rustem; Kirchner, Barbara

    2011-12-29

    The virtual laboratory allows for computer experiments that are not accessible via real experiments. In this work, three previously obtained charge sets were employed to study the influence of hydrogen bonding on imidazolium-based ionic liquids in molecular dynamics simulations. One set provides diffusion coefficients in agreement with the experiment and is therefore a good model for real-world systems. Comparison with the other sets indicates hydrogen bonding to influence structure and dynamics differently. Furthermore, in one case the total charge was increased and in another decreased by 0.1 e. Both the most acidic proton as well as the corresponding carbon atom were artificially set to zero, sequentially and simultaneously. In the final setup a negative charge was placed on the proton in order to introduce a barrier for the anion to contact the cation via this most acidic hydrogen atom. The following observations were made: changing the hydrogen bonding ability strongly influences the structure while the dynamic properties, such as diffusion and viscosity, are only weakly changed. However, the introduction of larger alterations (stronger hydrogen bonding and antihydrogen bonding) also strongly influences the diffusion coefficients. The dynamics of the hydrogen bond, ion pairing, and the ion cage are all affected by the level of hydrogen bonding. A change in total charges predominantly influences transport properties rather than structure. For ion cage dynamics with respect to transport porperties, we find a good correlation and a weak or no correlation for the ion pair or the hydrogen bond dynamics, respectively. Nevertheless, the hydrogen bond does influence ion cage dynamics. Therefore, we confirm that ionic liquids rather consist of loosely interacting counterions than of discrete ion pairs. Hydrogen bonding affects the properties only in a secondary or indirect manner.

  16. Microwave-assisted partial hydrogenation of citral by using ionic liquid-coated porous glass catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gallert, Thomas; Hahn, Martin; Sellin, Martin; Schmöger, Christine; Stolle, Achim; Ondruschka, Bernd; Keller, Thomas F; Jandt, Klaus D

    2011-11-18

    The microwave-assisted hydrogenation of citral (3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dienal) to citronellal with molecular hydrogen as the reducing agent was investigated. Several polar and non-polar solvents were screened and imidazolium-based ionic liquids were applied as modifiers for the palladium-containing porous glass catalysts (Pd/TP). The best results were obtained with N-ethyl-N'-methylimidazolium dicyanamide, N-ethyl-N'-methylimidazolium acetate, or N-ethyl-N'-methylimidazolium trifluoroacetate, which were used to prepare supported catalysts with an ionic liquid layer (SCILL) on Pd/TP by wet-impregnation. The influence of pressure and temperature when using these ionic liquid-containing catalysts, as well as their long-term stabilities, were examined. Working with microwave-assisted heating, high yields of citronellal were achieved under mild conditions within short reaction times. Catalyst characterization was carried out by means of BET measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermo-gravimetric analyses. The influences of the ionic liquid layer were derived from experiments carried out before and after the reactions.

  17. The Bevatron liquid nitrogen circulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D.; Stover, G.

    1987-03-01

    A nitrogen liquefier and computer controlled valving system have been added to the Bevatron cryoliner vacuum system to cut operating costs by reducing liquid nitrogen consumption. The computer and interface electronic systems, which control the temperatures of twenty-eight liquid nitrogen circuits, have been chosen and designed to operate in the Bevatron's pulsating magnetic field. The nitrogen exhaust is routed back to a liquefier, of about five kilowatt capacity, liquefied, and rerouted through the cooling circuits. A description of the system and operating results are presented.

  18. System for the co-production of electricity and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Anderson, Brian Lee

    2007-10-02

    Described herein is a system for the co-generation of hydrogen gas and electricity, wherein the proportion of hydrogen to electricity can be adjusted from 0% to 100%. The system integrates fuel cell technology for power generation with fuel-assisted steam-electrolysis. A hydrocarbon fuel, a reformed hydrocarbon fuel, or a partially reformed hydrocarbon fuel can be fed into the system.

  19. Hydrogen bonding in asphaltenes and coal liquids. Quarterly report, 1 February-30 April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N. C.; Jones, L.; Yaggi, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the nature and strength of hydrogen bonding and other molecular interactions in coal liquids and their fractions. Determinations are made of the molecular interactions involving the preasphaltene, asphaltent and oil, together with their separated fractions, obtained from coal liquids after hydroprocessing under different processing conditions and accelerated aging. NMR, IR, GC/MS, calorimetric, GPC, ESR, viscosity methods are used to determine structural changes caused by upgrading and aging of coal liquids. The upgraded coal liquids, derived from catalytic hydroprocessing of a 30 to 70 weight percent blend of solid solvent refined coal product (SRC-I) with liquid solvent-refined coal product (SRC-II) were analyzed as a function of contact time and temperature, and the observed variations of structural parameters were correlated with the physical properties of the liquid products. The oxidative degradation of a SRC-II middle distillate, which is an oil, free of asphaltenes and benzene-insolubles, was investigated to determine the molecular types of compounds responsible for the viscosity change and postulate mechanisms. Since the middle distillate is relatively stable to oxidative degradation, copper shavings were added to accelerate the process. Results and discussion are presented in detail.

  20. Risk Assessment for Titanium Pressure Vessels Operating Inside the ARES I's Liquid Hydrogen Tank Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium alloy (Ti-6-4) is currently being proposed for the manufacturing of pressure vessels (PV) for storage of compressed helium gas, which are mounted inside the ARES I's liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank. At cryogenic temperature, titanium alloys usually have the highest strength-to-weight ratio property and have been considered as the metallic materials of choice for lightweight PV operating in LH2 environment. Titanium PV s are also considered as heritage hardware because they have been used by NASA for the Saturn IV-B rocket s LH2 tank in the mid 1960 s. However, hydrogen embrittlement is possible if Ti-6-4 alloy is exposed to gaseous hydrogen at certain pressure and temperature during the LH2 tank filling and draining operations on the launch pad, and during the J2X engine burn period for the ARES I s upper stage. Additionally, the fracture toughness and ductility properties of Ti-6-4 are significantly decreased at cryogenic temperature. These factors do not necessary preclude the use of titanium PV in hydrogen or at cryogenic applications; however, their synergistic effects and the material damage tolerance must be accounted for in the mission life assessment for PV s, which are considered as fracture critical hardware. In this paper, an overview of the risk assessment for Ti-6-4 alloy, strategy to control hydrogen embrittlement and brief metallic material trade study for PV operating in LH2 tank will be presented.

  1. Polymers for hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems :

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Rachel Reina; Simmons, Kevin L.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2013-10-01

    This document addresses polymer materials for use in hydrogen service. Section 1 summarizes the applications of polymers in hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems and identifies polymers used in these applications. Section 2 reviews the properties of polymer materials exposed to hydrogen and/or high-pressure environments, using information obtained from published, peer-reviewed literature. The effect of high pressure on physical and mechanical properties of polymers is emphasized in this section along with a summary of hydrogen transport through polymers. Section 3 identifies areas in which fuller characterization is needed in order to assess material suitability for hydrogen service.

  2. Hydrogen energy - An inexhaustible abundant clean energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayar, M. G.

    1981-04-01

    A review is presented of various hydrogen production processes from possible primary energy resources. The processes covered are nuclear coal gasification, thermochemical hydrogen production, and hydrogen production by electrolysis, which includes solid polymer electrolyte-based electrolyzers, high-temperature electrolyzers, and photoelectrochemical decomposition of water. Attention is given to hydrogen transport and storage (in metal hydride systems) and to its application as an automotive fuel. Hydrogen as a secondary energy source is also discussed, and its uses as an off-peak power storage medium and as an energy transmission medium are described. Costs, flow diagrams and chemical formulas are analyzed in detail.

  3. Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System Research Project consisted mainly of a feasibility study, including theoretical and engineering analysis, of a proof-of-concept prototype of this particular cleaning system developed by NASA-KSC. The cleaning system utilizes gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the device to be cleaned. The cleaning fluid being accelerated to these high velocities may consist of any solvent or liquid, including water. Compressed air or any inert gas is used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid, as well as substantially reduce the total amount of liquid needed to perform adequate surface cleaning and cleanliness verification. This type of aqueous cleaning system is considered to be an excellent way of conducting cleaning and cleanliness verification operations as replacements for the use of CFC 113 which must be discontinued by 1995. To utilize this particular cleaning system in various cleaning applications for both the Space Program and the commercial market, it is essential that the cleaning system, especially the supersonic nozzle, be characterized for such applications. This characterization consisted of performing theoretical and engineering analysis, identifying desirable modifications/extensions to the basic concept, evaluating effects of variations in operating parameters, and optimizing hardware design for specific applications.

  4. Hazards Induced by Breach of Liquid Rocket Fuel Tanks: Conditions and Risks of Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixture Explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osipov, Viatcheslav; Muratov, Cyrill; Hafiychuk, Halyna; Ponizovskya-Devine, Ekaterina; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Mathias, Donovan; Lawrence, Scott; Werkheiser, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the data of purposeful rupture experiments with LOx and LH2 tanks, the Hydrogen-Oxygen Vertical Impact (HOVI) tests that were performed to clarify the ignition mechanisms, the explosive power of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures under different conditions, and to elucidate the puzzling source of the initial formation of flames near the intertank section during the Challenger disaster. We carry out a physics-based analysis of general explosions scenarios for cryogenic gaseous H2/Ox mixtures and determine their realizability conditions, using the well-established simplified models from the detonation and deflagration theory. We study the features of aerosol H2/Ox mixture combustion and show, in particular, that aerosols intensify the deflagration flames and can induce detonation for any ignition mechanism. We propose a cavitation-induced mechanism of self-ignition of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures that may be realized when gaseous H2 and Ox flows are mixed with a liquid Ox turbulent stream, as occurred in all HOVI tests. We present an overview of the HOVI tests to make conclusion on the risk of strong explosions in possible liquid rocket incidents and provide a semi-quantitative interpretation of the HOVI data based on aerosol combustion. We uncover the most dangerous situations and discuss the foreseeable risks which can arise in space missions and lead to tragic outcomes. Our analysis relates to only unconfined mixtures that are likely to arise as a result of liquid propellant space vehicle incidents.

  5. Measurement of hydrogen solubility and desorption rate in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Erck, R.; Park, E.T.

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium was measured at a hydrogen pressure of 9.09 x 10{sup {minus}4} torr at temperatures between 250 and 700{degrees}C. Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium decreased with temperature. The measured desorption rate of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process; the activation energy is 0.067 eV. Oxygen-charged V-4Cr-4Ti specimens were also investigated to determine the effect of oxygen impurity on hydrogen solubility and desorption in the alloy. Oxygen in V-4Cr-4Ti increases hydrogen solubility and desorption kinetics. To determine the effect of a calcium oxide insulator coating on V-4Cr-4Ti, hydrogen solubility in lithium-calcium alloys that contained 0-8.0 percent calcium was also measured. The distribution ratio R of hydrogen between liquid lithium or lithium-calcium and V-4Cr-4Ti increased as temperature decreased (R {approx} 10 and 100 at 700 and 250{degrees}C, respectively). However at <267{degrees}C, solubility data could not be obtained by this method because of the slow kinetics of hydrogen permeation through the vanadium alloy.

  6. Performance evaluation of a liquid tin anode solid oxide fuel cell operating under hydrogen, argon and coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Sanchit; LaBarbera, Mark; Fedkin, Mark V.; Lvov, Serguei N.; Abernathy, Harry; Gerdes, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    A liquid tin anode solid oxide fuel cell is constructed and investigated under different operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is used to reflect the effect of fuel feed as the EIS spectra changes significantly on switching the fuel from argon to hydrogen. A cathode symmetric cell is used to separate the impedance from the two electrodes, and the results indicate that a major contribution to the charge-transfer and mass-transfer impedance arises from the anode. The OCP of 0.841 V for the cell operating under argon as a metal-air battery indicates the formation of a SnO2 layer at the electrolyte/anode interface. The increase in the OCP to 1.1 V for the hydrogen fueled cell shows that H2 reduces the SnO2 film effectively. The effective diffusion coefficients are calculated using the Warburg element in the equivalent circuit model for the experimental EIS data, and the values of 1.9 10-3 cm2 s-1 at 700 °C, 2.3 10-3 cm2 s-1 at 800 °C and 3.5 10-3 cm2 s-1 at 900 °C indicate the system was influenced by diffusion of hydrogen in the system. Further, the performance degradation over time is attributed to the irreversible conversion of Sn to SnO2 resulting from galvanic polarization.

  7. Simple and Efficient System for Combined Solar Energy Harvesting and Reversible Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Mu, Xiaoyue; Liu, Wenbo; Mi, Zetian; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-06-24

    Solar energy harvesting and hydrogen economy are the two most important green energy endeavors for the future. However, a critical hurdle to the latter is how to safely and densely store and transfer hydrogen. Herein, we developed a reversible hydrogen storage system based on low-cost liquid organic cyclic hydrocarbons at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. A facile switch of hydrogen addition (>97% conversion) and release (>99% conversion) with superior capacity of 7.1 H2 wt % can be quickly achieved over a rationally optimized platinum catalyst with high electron density, simply regulated by dark/light conditions. Furthermore, the photodriven dehydrogenation of cyclic alkanes gave an excellent apparent quantum efficiency of 6.0% under visible light illumination (420-600 nm) without any other energy input, which provides an alternative route to artificial photosynthesis for directly harvesting and storing solar energy in the form of chemical fuel. PMID:26059734

  8. A novel anaerobic co-culture system for bio-hydrogen production from sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingrong; Zhu, Mingjun

    2013-09-01

    A novel co-culture of Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense with pretreated sugarcane bagasse (SCB) under mild alkali conditions for bio-hydrogen production was established, exhibiting a cost-effective and synergetic advantage in bio-hydrogen production over monoculture of C. thermocellum or T. aotearoense with untreated SCB. The optimized pretreatment conditions were established to be 3% NaOH, and a liquid to solid ratio of 25:1 at 80°C for 3h. A final hydrogen production of 50.05±1.51 mmol/L was achieved with 40 g/L pretreated SCB at 55°C. The established co-culture system provides a novel consolidated bio-processing strategy for bioconversion of SCB to bio-hydrogen. PMID:23899575

  9. Simple and Efficient System for Combined Solar Energy Harvesting and Reversible Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Mu, Xiaoyue; Liu, Wenbo; Mi, Zetian; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-06-24

    Solar energy harvesting and hydrogen economy are the two most important green energy endeavors for the future. However, a critical hurdle to the latter is how to safely and densely store and transfer hydrogen. Herein, we developed a reversible hydrogen storage system based on low-cost liquid organic cyclic hydrocarbons at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. A facile switch of hydrogen addition (>97% conversion) and release (>99% conversion) with superior capacity of 7.1 H2 wt % can be quickly achieved over a rationally optimized platinum catalyst with high electron density, simply regulated by dark/light conditions. Furthermore, the photodriven dehydrogenation of cyclic alkanes gave an excellent apparent quantum efficiency of 6.0% under visible light illumination (420-600 nm) without any other energy input, which provides an alternative route to artificial photosynthesis for directly harvesting and storing solar energy in the form of chemical fuel.

  10. A novel anaerobic co-culture system for bio-hydrogen production from sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingrong; Zhu, Mingjun

    2013-09-01

    A novel co-culture of Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense with pretreated sugarcane bagasse (SCB) under mild alkali conditions for bio-hydrogen production was established, exhibiting a cost-effective and synergetic advantage in bio-hydrogen production over monoculture of C. thermocellum or T. aotearoense with untreated SCB. The optimized pretreatment conditions were established to be 3% NaOH, and a liquid to solid ratio of 25:1 at 80°C for 3h. A final hydrogen production of 50.05±1.51 mmol/L was achieved with 40 g/L pretreated SCB at 55°C. The established co-culture system provides a novel consolidated bio-processing strategy for bioconversion of SCB to bio-hydrogen.

  11. A hydrogen leak detection system for aerospace and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Makel, D. B.; Jansa, E. D.; Patterson, G.; Cova, P. J.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1995-10-01

    Leaks on the space shuttle while on the launch pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. Microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). These sensors have been integrated into hardware and software designed by Aerojet. This complete system allows for multipoint leak monitoring designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. This system is in operation in an automotive application which requires high sensitivity to hydrogen.

  12. A Hydrogen Leak Detection System for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Makel, D. B.; Jansa, E. D.; Patterson, G.; Cova, P. J.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    Leaks on the space shuttle while on the launch pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. Microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). These sensors have been integrated into hardware and software designed by Aerojet. This complete system allows for multipoint leak monitoring designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. This system is in operation in an automotive application which requires high sensitivity to hydrogen.

  13. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  14. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  15. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  16. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  17. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with...

  18. THE LIQUID AND GASEOUS FUEL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the national liquid and gaseous fuel distribution system. he study leading to the report was performed as part of an effort to better understand emissions of volatile organic compounds from the fuel distribution system. he primary, secondary, and tertiary seg...

  19. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2005-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  20. Visualization of a cryogenic jet simulating leak from a liquid hydrogen storage tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Tim; Agrawal, Ajay

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen is considered an alternative fuel in propulsion and power generation due to fuel economy standards and environmental pollution. However, if an accidental leak were to occur in a hydrogen storage tank, the discharged fuel could find an ignition source and produce an explosion. A barrier wall can be used to contain the leak from the storage tank, therefore protecting equipment and people from the explosion. Past studies have investigated the jet/barrier wall interaction, in a laboratory setting, with fuel stored as a gas. Hydrogen fuel stored as a liquid offers higher energy density. In this work, we have studied the leak at cryogenic conditions due to liquid storage parameters. Jet fluid structure is visualized in a laboratory setting using helium as the supersonic jet fluid. High-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) images are used to show instantaneous flow structure of jet (leakage point) and barrier wall interactions. Results show the jet inlet temperature leads to significant differences in the spread angle and the extent of fuel-air mixture region adjacent to the barrier wall.

  1. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  2. Liquid-Hydrogen-Cooled 450-hp Electric Motor Test Stand Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Brown, Gerald V.

    2005-01-01

    With growing concerns about global warming, there is a need to develop pollution-free aircraft. One approach is to use hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbogenerators to produce electric power to drive the electric motors that turn the aircraft s propulsive fans. Hydrogen fuel would be carried as a liquid, stored at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are too heavy for aircraft propulsion. We need to develop high-power, lightweight electric motors (highpower- density motors). One approach is to increase the conductivity of the wires by cooling them with liquid hydrogen (LH2). This would allow superconducting rotors with an ironless core. In addition, the motor could use very pure aluminum or copper, substances that have low resistances at cryogenic temperatures. A preliminary design of a 450-hp LH2-cooled electric motor was completed and is being manufactured by a contractor. This motor will be tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center and will be used to test different superconducting materials such as magnesium diboride (MgB2). The motor will be able to operate at speeds of up to 6000 rpm.

  3. Influence of heat transfer rates on pressurization of liquid/slush hydrogen propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasmal, G. P.; Hochstein, J. I.; Hardy, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-dimensional computational model of the pressurization process in liquid/slush hydrogen tank is developed and used to study the influence of heat flux rates at the ullage boundaries on the process. The new model computes these rates and performs an energy balance for the tank wall whereas previous multi-dimensional models required a priori specification of the boundary heat flux rates. Analyses of both liquid hydrogen and slush hydrogen pressurization were performed to expose differences between the two processes. Graphical displays are presented to establish the dependence of pressurization time, pressurant mass required, and other parameters of interest on ullage boundary heat flux rates and pressurant mass flow rate. Detailed velocity fields and temperature distributions are presented for selected cases to further illuminate the details of the pressurization process. It is demonstrated that ullage boundary heat flux rates do significantly effect the pressurization process and that minimizing heat loss from the ullage and maximizing pressurant flow rate minimizes the mass of pressurant gas required to pressurize the tank. It is further demonstrated that proper dimensionless scaling of pressure and time permit all the pressure histories examined during this study to be displayed as a single curve.

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIii of... - Work Practice Standards-Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks 3 Table 3 to... Standards—Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks... cell back into service until the leaking equipment is repaired. 3. A decomposer or hydrogen...

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIii of... - Work Practice Standards-Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks 3 Table 3 to... Standards—Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks... cell back into service until the leaking equipment is repaired. 3. A decomposer or hydrogen...

  6. Inverse momentum expectation values for hydrogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Delbourgo, R.; Elliott, D.

    2009-06-15

    By using the Fourier transforms of the general hydrogenic bound state wave functions (as ultraspherical polynomials), one may find expectation values of arbitrary functions of momentum p. In this manner the effect of a reciprocity perturbation b/p can be evaluated for all hydrogenic states.

  7. Liquid-liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Morales, Miguel A.; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25-30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization.

  8. Liquid-liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Morales, Miguel A; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25-30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization. PMID:27099295

  9. Supersonic gas-liquid cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    A system to perform cleaning and cleanliness verification is being developed to replace solvent flush methods using CFC 113 for fluid system components. The system is designed for two purposes: internal and external cleaning and verification. External cleaning is performed with the nozzle mounted at the end of a wand similar to a conventional pressure washer. Internal cleaning is performed with a variety of fixtures designed for specific applications. Internal cleaning includes tubes, pipes, flex hoses, and active fluid components such as valves and regulators. The system uses gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the object to be cleaned. Compressed air or any inert gas may be used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid. The converging-diverging nozzles accelerate the gas-liquid mixture to supersonic velocities. The liquid being accelerated may be any solvent including water. This system may be used commercially to replace CFC and other solvent cleaning methods widely used to remove dust, dirt, flux, and lubricants. In addition, cleanliness verification can be performed without the solvents which are typically involved. This paper will present the technical details of the system, the results achieved during testing at KSC, and future applications for this system.

  10. Thermal and Optical Properties of Some Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystal Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumuş, Mustafa; Özgan, Şükrü; Yılmaz, Süleyman

    2014-08-01

    Phase transition properties of the mixtures of hydrogen-bonded nematic liquid crystals (HBLC) 4-hexylbenzoic acid (6BA), 4-(octyloxy)benzoic acid (8OBA), and 4-(decyloxy)benzoic acid (10OBA) have been investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarize optic microscope (POM). The DSC and POM results clearly indicate the existence of smectic and nematic phase transitions in binary mixtures. The phase transition temperature values of 6BA/10OBA mixtures have clearly increased with increasing heating rate. The activation energies were calculated for the phase transitions of 6BA/10OBA liquid crystal (LC) mixture. The optical transmittance of these mixed hydrogen-bonded nematic liquid crystals was investigated in terms of temperature variations through electrooptic methods. The electrooptic experiments indicate that, while low in the nematic phase, the optical transmittance is very high at the nematic-isotropic phase transition. The transmitted light intensity values of 6BA/8OBA mixture are somewhat higher than those of other binary mixtures, 6BA/10OBA and 8OBA/10OBA, a result associated with the different alkyloxy chain lengths.

  11. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  12. Optical modulation in nematic phase of halogen substituted hydrogen bonded liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, V. N.; Madhu Mohan, M. L. N.

    2012-01-01

    A series of halogen-substituted hydrogen-bonded liquid crystalline complexes have been designed and synthesised. A successful attempt has been made to form complementary hydrogen bonding between the dodecyloxy benzoic acid (12BAO) and halogen-substituted benzoic acids and the physical properties exhibited by the individual complexes are studied. The complexes obtained are analysed by polarising optical microscope (POM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and dielectric studies. The formation of complementary hydrogen bond is confirmed through FTIR spectra. An interesting feature of this series is the observation of a field-induced transition (FiT) in nematic phase. Another interesting phenomenon is the observation of a new smectic X phase (worm-like texture) in all the synthesised complexes. Dielectric relaxation studies in the smectic C phase of these hydrogen bonded complexes along with the Arrhenius and the Cole-Cole plots are discussed. Optical tilt angle in smectic C phase and the corresponding fitted data analysis concur with the Mean field theory prediction.

  13. HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R

    2010-05-02

    Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

  14. Extraction of proteins with ionic liquid aqueous two-phase system based on guanidine ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qun; Wang, Yuzhi; Li, Na; Huang, Xiu; Ding, Xueqin; Lin, Xiao; Huang, Songyun; Liu, Xiaojie

    2013-11-15

    Eight kinds of green ionic liquids were synthesized, and an ionic liquid aqueous two-phase system (ILATPS) based on 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguandine acrylate (TMGA) guanidine ionic liquid was first time studied for the extraction of proteins. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction efficiency of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was influenced by the mass of IL, K2HPO4 and BSA, also related to the separation time and temperature. The optimum conditions were determined through orthogonal experiment by the five factors described above. The results showed that under the optimum conditions, the extraction efficiency could reach up to 99.6243%. The relative standard deviations (RSD) of extraction efficiencies in precision experiment, repeatability experiment and stability experiment were 0.8156% (n=5), 1.6173% (n=5) and 1.6292% (n=5), respectively. UV-vis and FT-IR spectra confirmed that there were no chemical interactions between BSA and ionic liquid in the extraction process, and the conformation of the protein was not changed after extraction. The conductivity, DLS and TEM were combined to investigate the microstructure of the top phase and the possible mechanism for the extraction. The results showed that hydrophobic interaction, hydrogen bonding interaction and the salt out effect played important roles in the transferring process, and the aggregation and embrace phenomenon was the main driving force for the separation. All these results proved that guanidine ionic liquid-based ATPSs have the potential to offer new possibility in the extraction of proteins. PMID:24148423

  15. Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoretti, C. Jorand; Ulmann, M.; Augustynski, J. ); Linkous, C.A. )

    2000-01-01

    This report was prepared as part of the documentation of Annex 10 (Photoproduction of Hydrogen) of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. Subtask A of this Annex concerned photo-electrochemical hydrogen production, with an emphasis on direct water splitting. However, studies of non oxygen-evolving systems were also included in view of their interesting potential for combined hydrogen production and waste degradation. Annex 10 was operative from 1 March 1995 until 1 October 1998. One of the collaborative projects involved scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and the Federal Institute of Technology in Laussane, Switzerland. A device consisting of a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) with a WO{sub 3} photoanode connected in series with a so-called Grazel cell (a dye sensitized liquid junction photovoltaic cell) was developed and studied in this project. Part of these studies concerned the combination of hydrogen production with degradation of organic pollutants, as described in Chapter 3 of this report. For completeness, a review of the state of the art of organic waste treatment is included in Chapter 2. Most of the work at the University of Geneva, under the supervision of Prof. J. Augustynski, was focused on the development and testing of efficient WO{sub 3} photoanodes for the photoelectrochemical degradation of organic waste solutions. Two types of WO{sub 3} anodes were developed: non transparent bulk photoanodes and non-particle-based transparent film photoanodes. Both types were tested for degradation and proved to be very efficient in dilute solutions. For instance, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency of 9% was obtained by operating the device in a 0.01M solution of methanol (as compared to about 4% obtained for direct water splitting with the same device). These organic compounds are oxidized to CO{sub 2} by the photocurrent produced by the photoanode. The advantages of this procedure over conventional electrolytic degradation are that much (an

  16. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Volume 2: Addendum 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The potential of a common Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) design was evaluated for use with both the Space Transportation System (STS) and the Advanced Launch System (ALS). A goal is to have a common Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen (LO2/LH2) engine developed for both the ALS booster and the core stage. The LO2/LH2 option for the STS was evaluated to identify potential LRB program cost reductions. The objective was to identify the structural impacts to the external tank (ET), and to determine if any significant ET re-development costs are required as a result of the larger LO2/LH2 LRB. The potential ET impacts evaluated are presented.

  17. Ethylene glycol revisited: Molecular dynamics simulations and visualization of the liquid and its hydrogen-bond network.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Ismailova, Oksana; Koskela, Antti; Huber, Stefan E; Ritter, Marcel; Cosenza, Biagio; Benger, Werner; Nazmutdinov, Renat; Probst, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid ethylene glycol described by the OPLS-AA force field were performed to gain insight into its hydrogen-bond structure. We use the population correlation function as a statistical measure for the hydrogen-bond lifetime. In an attempt to understand the complicated hydrogen-bonding, we developed new molecular visualization tools within the Vish Visualization shell and used it to visualize the life of each individual hydrogen-bond. With this tool hydrogen-bond formation and breaking as well as clustering and chain formation in hydrogen-bonded liquids can be observed directly. Liquid ethylene glycol at room temperature does not show significant clustering or chain building. The hydrogen-bonds break often due to the rotational and vibrational motions of the molecules leading to an H-bond half-life time of approximately 1.5 ps. However, most of the H-bonds are reformed again so that after 50 ps only 40% of these H-bonds are irreversibly broken due to diffusional motion. This hydrogen-bond half-life time due to diffusional motion is 80.3 ps. The work was preceded by a careful check of various OPLS-based force fields used in the literature. It was found that they lead to quite different angular and H-bond distributions.

  18. Pressure Dependence of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics in Liquid Water Probed by Ultrafast Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lapini, Andrea; Pagliai, Marco; Fanetti, Samuele; Citroni, Margherita; Scandolo, Sandro; Bini, Roberto; Righini, Roberto

    2016-09-15

    Clarifying the structure/dynamics relation of water hydrogen-bond network has been the aim of extensive research over many decades. By joining anvil cell high-pressure technology, femtosecond 2D infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we studied, for the first time, the spectral diffusion of the stretching frequency of an HOD impurity in liquid water as a function of pressure. Our experimental and simulation results concordantly demonstrate that the rate of spectral diffusion is almost insensitive to the applied pressure. This behavior is in contrast with the previously reported pressure-induced speed up of the orientational dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of large angular jumps involving sudden switching between two hydrogen-bonded configurations. The different trend of the spectral diffusion can be, instead, inferred considering that the first solvation shell preserves the tetrahedral structure with pressure and the OD stretching frequency is only slight perturbed. PMID:27560355

  19. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-09-30

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

  20. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research.

  1. Superconducting characteristics of short MgB2 wires of long level sensor for liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Inoue, Y.; Maekawa, K.; Matsuno, Y.; Fujikawa, S.; Kumakura, H.

    2015-12-01

    To establish the worldwide storage and marine transport of hydrogen, it is important to develop a high-precision and long level sensor, such as a superconducting magnesium diboride (MgB2) level sensor for large liquid hydrogen (LH2) tanks on board ships. Three 1.7- m-long MgB2 wires were fabricated by an in situ method, and the superconducting characteristics of twenty-four 20-mm-long MgB2 wires on the 1.7-m-long wires were studied. In addition, the static level-detecting characteristics of five 500-mm-long MgB2 level sensors were evaluated under atmospheric pressure.

  2. Temperature effects on the behavior of liquid hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical-shell directly driven inertial confinement fusion target

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Mok, L.S.

    1984-05-01

    The present work studies the temperature effects on the formation of a uniform liquid hydrogen layer inside a spherical glass shell (SGS). The profile of the liquid layer is first investigated for an isothermal case. An equation suitable for describing the profile is derived by including the London-van der Waals attractive forces between the liquid and substrate molecules. Two theoretical models are then established to explain the changes in the liquid layer profile under the influence of a vertically applied temperature gradient. The characteristics of the fluid flows are obtained by solving the fluid equations under the low-Reynolds-number approximations. The effect of the component separation both in the liquid layer and the vapor region, which is induced by the temperature gradient, is studied when the enclosure inside the SGS is a mixture of hydrogen isotopes. A uniform layer can also be formed for the mixture liquid except that the required temperature gradient is now positive in direction, unlike the case of the single-component liquid. The heating effect due to the radioactive decay of tritium is also evaluated. An experimental apparatus capable of generating a desired temperature gradient across the SGS at liquid hydrogen temperatures is described. The profiles of the liquid layer are observed for different temperature gradients and the results are in qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide in the mammalian cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hong; Lu, Ming; Hu, Li-Fang; Wong, Peter T-H; Webb, George D; Bian, Jin-Song

    2012-07-01

    For more than a century, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) has been regarded as a toxic gas. This review surveys the growing recognition of the role of H(2)S as an endogenous signaling molecule in mammals, with emphasis on its physiological and pathological pathways in the cardiovascular system. In biological fluids, H(2)S gas is a weak acid that exists as about 15% H(2)S, 85% HS(-), and a trace of S(2-). Here, we use "H(2)S" to refer to this mixture. H(2)S has been found to influence heart contractile functions and may serve as a cardioprotectant for treating ischemic heart diseases and heart failure. Alterations of the endogenous H(2)S level have been found in animal models with various pathological conditions such as myocardial ischemia, spontaneous hypertension, and hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. In the vascular system, H(2)S exerts biphasic regulation of a vascular tone with varying effects based on its concentration and in the presence of nitric oxide. Over the past decade, several H(2)S-releasing compounds (NaHS, Na(2)S, GYY4137, etc.) have been utilized to test the effect of exogenous H(2)S under different physiological and pathological situations in vivo and in vitro. H(2)S has been found to promote angiogenesis and to protect against atherosclerosis and hypertension, while excess H(2)S may promote inflammation in septic or hemorrhagic shock. H(2)S-releasing compounds and inhibitors of H(2)S synthesis hold promise in alleviating specific disease conditions. This comprehensive review covers in detail the effects of H(2)S on the cardiovascular system, especially in disease situations, and also the various underlying mechanisms.

  4. A hydrogen energy carrier. Volume 2: Systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, R. L. (Editor); Blank, L. (Editor); Cady, T. (Editor); Cox, K. (Editor); Murray, R. (Editor); Williams, R. D. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A systems analysis of hydrogen as an energy carrier in the United States indicated that it is feasible to use hydrogen in all energy use areas, except some types of transportation. These use areas are industrial, residential and commercial, and electric power generation. Saturation concept and conservation concept forecasts of future total energy demands were made. Projected costs of producing hydrogen from coal or from nuclear heat combined with thermochemical decomposition of water are in the range $1.00 to $1.50 per million Btu of hydrogen produced. Other methods are estimated to be more costly. The use of hydrogen as a fuel will require the development of large-scale transmission and storage systems. A pipeline system similar to the existing natural gas pipeline system appears practical, if design factors are included to avoid hydrogen environment embrittlement of pipeline metals. Conclusions from the examination of the safety, legal, environmental, economic, political and societal aspects of hydrogen fuel are that a hydrogen energy carrier system would be compatible with American values and the existing energy system.

  5. Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket, 1958-2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Virginia P.; Bowles, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    During its maiden voyage in May 1962, a Centaur upper stage rocket, mated to an Atlas booster, exploded 54 seconds after launch, engulfing the rocket in a huge fireball. Investigation revealed that Centaur's light, stainless-steel tank had split open, spilling its liquid-hydrogen fuel down its sides, where the flame of the rocket exhaust immediately ignited it. Coming less than a year after President Kennedy had made landing human beings on the Moon a national priority, the loss of Centaur was regarded as a serious setback for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). During the failure investigation, Homer Newell, Director of Space Sciences, ruefully declared: "Taming liquid hydrogen to the point where expensive operational space missions can be committed to it has turned out to be more difficult than anyone supposed at the outset." After this failure, Centaur critics, led by Wernher von Braun, mounted a campaign to cancel the program. In addition to the unknowns associated with liquid hydrogen, he objected to the unusual design of Centaur. Like the Atlas rocket, Centaur depended on pressure to keep its paper-thin, stainless-steel shell from collapsing. It was literally inflated with its propellants like a football or balloon and needed no internal structure to give it added strength and stability. The so-called "pressure-stabilized structure" of Centaur, coupled with the light weight of its high- energy cryogenic propellants, made Centaur lighter and more powerful than upper stages that used conventional fuel. But, the critics argued, it would never become the reliable rocket that the United States needed.

  6. Hydrogen-bonding interactions between a nitrile-based functional ionic liquid and DMSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Deng, Geng; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-11-01

    Task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) have been introduced by incorporating additional functional groups in the cation or anion to impart specific properties or reactivates. In this work, the hydrogen-bonding interactions between a nitrile-functional TSIL 1-propylnitrile-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([PCNMIM][BF4]) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) were investigated in detail by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), combined with hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and density functional theory calculations (DFT). It was found that, first, introducing a nitrile group into the alkyl chain does not change the main interaction site in the cation. It is still the C2 hydrogen. So the v(C2-H) is more sensitive to the environmental change and can be used as an indicator of the environments change of IL. Second, the wavenumber shift changes of v(C2-H) have two turning points (xDMSO ≈ 0.6 and 0.9), dividing the dilution process into three stages. Combined with the calculation results, the dilution process is identified as: From larger ion clusters to smaller ion clusters (xDMSO < 0.6), then to ion pairs (0.6 0.9). Introducing a nitrile group into the alkyl chain does not influence the dilution process of IL dissolving in DMSO. Third, the Ctbnd N in [PCNMIM][BF4] can work as an electron donor in forming hydrogen-bonds with the methyl group of [PCNMIM]+ and DMSO, but its strength is weaker than that formed by the imidazolium ring C-Hs. The dual roles of the cation to work as both electron acceptor and donor expand the wide applications of this nitrile-functional ionic liquid.

  7. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  8. Microscopic structure factor of liquid hydrogen by neutron-diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Celli, M.; Bafile, U.; Zoppi, M.; Cuello, G.J.; Formisano, F.; Magli, R.; Neumann, M.

    2005-01-01

    The center-of-mass structure factor of liquid para hydrogen has been measured, using neutron diffraction, in four thermodynamic states close to the triple point. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out at the same temperatures and densities. The present experimental data are in reasonable quantitative agreement with the simulations and closer to these results than previous neutron determinations available in the literature. The thermodynamic derivatives of the structure factor, from both experiment and simulation, have been compared to previous measurements obtaining a quantitative consistency.

  9. Collins Cryocooler Design for Zero-Boil Storage of Liquid Hydrogen and Oxygen in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segado, M. A.; Hannon, C. L.; Brisson, J. G.

    2010-04-01

    Several models of multi-stage cryocoolers are developed for zero-boil-off storage of liquid hydrogen and oxygen in space. The thermodynamic cycles are based on a modified Collins cycle being developed by MIT and AMTI, and each configuration is optimized for maximum efficiency by varying the mass flows, heat exchanger UA distribution, and other variables where applicable, subject to the required heat loads of 100 W at 100 K and 20 W at 25 K. By using double expanders connected in series with the heat loads in one or more stages of the cooler, we were able to achieve predicted efficiency gains of 10-24% over single expander designs.

  10. Bonded and Sealed External Insulations for Liquid-Hydrogen-Fueled Rocket Tanks During Atmospheric Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Gelder, T. F.; Cochran, R. P.; Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1960-01-01

    Several currently available nonmetallic insulation materials that may be bonded onto liquid-hydrogen tanks and sealed against air penetration into the insulation have been investigated for application to rockets and spacecraft. Experimental data were obtained on the thermal conductivities of various materials in the cryogenic temperature range, as well as on the structural integrity and ablation characteristics of these materials at high temperatures occasioned by aerodynamic heating during atmospheric escape. Of the materials tested, commercial corkboard has the best overall properties for the specific requirements imposed during atmospheric flight of a high-acceleration rocket vehicle.

  11. Progress on the MICE Liquid Absorber Cooling and CryogenicDistribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Drumm, P.; Ivanyushenkov,Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Lau, W.W.; Yang, S.Q.

    2005-05-13

    This report describes the progress made on the design of the cryogenic cooling system for the liquid absorber for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The absorber consists of a 20.7-liter vessel that contains liquid hydrogen (1.48 kg at 20.3 K) or liquid helium (2.59 kg at 4.2 K). The liquid cryogen vessel is located within the warm bore of the focusing magnet for the MICE. The purpose of the magnet is to provide a low beam beta region within the absorber. For safety reasons, the vacuum vessel for the hydrogen absorber is separated from the vacuum vessel for the superconducting magnet and the vacuum that surrounds the RF cavities or the detector. The absorber thin windows separate the liquid in the absorber from the absorber vacuum. The absorber vacuum vessel also has thin windows that separate the absorber vacuum space from adjacent vacuum spaces. Because the muon beam in MICE is of low intensity, there is no beam heating in the absorber. The absorber can use a single 4 K cooler to cool either liquid helium or liquid hydrogen within the absorber.

  12. Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets

    DOEpatents

    Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

    2013-02-12

    A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

  13. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    K. C. Kwon

    2006-09-30

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2} in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of

  14. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2009-09-30

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components

  15. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    K. C. Kwon

    2007-09-30

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components

  16. Hydrogen Fuel System Design Trades for High-Altitude Long-Endurance Remotely- Operated Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Jurns, John M.; Guynn, Mark D.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; VanOverbeke, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary design trades are presented for liquid hydrogen fuel systems for remotely-operated, high-altitude aircraft that accommodate three different propulsion options: internal combustion engines, and electric motors powered by either polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells or solid oxide fuel cells. Mission goal is sustained cruise at 60,000 ft altitude, with duration-aloft a key parameter. The subject aircraft specifies an engine power of 143 to 148 hp, gross liftoff weight of 9270 to 9450 lb, payload of 440 lb, and a hydrogen fuel capacity of 2650 to 2755 lb stored in two spherical tanks (8.5 ft inside diameter), each with a dry mass goal of 316 lb. Hydrogen schematics for all three propulsion options are provided. Each employs vacuum-jacketed tanks with multilayer insulation, augmented with a helium pressurant system, and using electric motor driven hydrogen pumps. The most significant schematic differences involve the heat exchangers and hydrogen reclamation equipment. Heat balances indicate that mission durations of 10 to 16 days appear achievable. The dry mass for the hydrogen system is estimated to be 1900 lb, including 645 lb for each tank. This tank mass is roughly twice that of the advanced tanks assumed in the initial conceptual vehicle. Control strategies are not addressed, nor are procedures for filling and draining the tanks.

  17. Liquid low level waste management expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J. ); Jackson, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Effect of photosensitizer and hydrogen peroxide on desulfurization of light oil by photochemical reaction and liquid-liquid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Takayuki; Shiraishi, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Ken; Komasawa, Isao

    1997-03-01

    A desulfurization process for dibenzothiophene (DBT) by a combination of photochemical reaction and liquid-liquid extraction has been investigated. The DBT dissolved in tetradecane was photodecomposed by the use of a high-pressure mercury lamp and removed into the water phase at conditions of room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The addition of benzophenone (BZP), a triplet photosensitizer, enhanced the removal of DBT from tetradecane. This reaction, however, hardly proceeded in the presence of naphthalene (NP), probably because of triplet energy transfer from photoexcited DBT or BZP to ground-state NP. The addition of hydrogen peroxide enhanced the desulfurization of commercial light oil as well as the removal of DBT from tetradecane, since H{sub 2}O{sub 2} acted as a weak oxidizing agent for photoexcited DBT and interrupted the energy transfer from excited DBT to NP to some extent. In the case using a 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution, the desulfurization yield of commercial light oil was 75% following 24 h of photoirradiation and the sulfur content in the light oil was reduced from 0.2 wt % to less than 0.05 wt %.

  19. Method and system for storing and generating hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sri R. (Inventor); Huang, Yuhong (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and system for storing and generating hydrogen. The method comprises generating hydrogen and heat from the reaction of a metal or metal compound with water. The heat generated from this reaction may then be converted to other forms of energy such as by passing the heat through a thermal electric device to recover electrical energy for storage in a battery. In an alternative and preferred embodiment, the heat is used to drive additional reactions for generating more hydrogen and is preferably used to drive an endothermic dehydrogenation reaction resulting in increased hydrogen generation and consumption of the heat.

  20. Photoelectric system continuously monitors liquid level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Immersion probe presents a depth-sensitive optical transmission path between a light source and a photoelectric cell to continuously monitor the level of a transparent liquid in a tank. This system operates automatically, without moving parts, and provides output signals to a remote recorder.

  1. The determinants of hydrogen concentrations in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared using a triode deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Satoshi; Matsuda, Akihisa; Kondo, Michio

    2007-03-15

    It is important to reduce the hydrogen concentration, in particular, the Si-H{sub 2} bond concentration, in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film to improve its light-soaking stability. In a previous study, we found that a triode configuration plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method provides high quality and a very low hydrogen concentration film; however, the origin of the hydrogen reduction has been unknown. In this article, we investigate the essential factor causing the very low hydrogen concentrations observed in the triode system. In several experiments, we observed strong influences of deposition precursors on the resulting hydrogen concentrations. We propose that due to a steric hindrance, the hydrogen elimination process during film growth is disturbed when higher silane radicals stick to a growth surface. In a triode system, corresponding with the separation of the film growth surface from the precursor generation region, the contribution of higher silane radicals to film growth is suppressed due to their short diffusion length and frequent collisions with silane molecules.

  2. Electrochemical studies of hydrogen chloride gas in several room temperature ionic liquids: mechanism and sensing.

    PubMed

    Murugappan, Krishnan; Silvester, Debbie S

    2016-01-28

    The electrochemical behaviour of highly toxic hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas has been investigated in six room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) containing imidazolium/pyrrolidinium cations and range of anions on a Pt microelectrode using cyclic voltammetry (CV). HCl gas exists in a dissociated form of H(+) and [HCl2](-) in RTILs. A peak corresponding to the oxidation of [HCl2](-) was observed, resulting in the formation of Cl2 and H(+). These species were reversibly reduced to H2 and Cl(-), respectively, on the cathodic CV scan. The H(+) reduction peak is also present initially when scanned only in the cathodic direction. In the RTILs with a tetrafluoroborate or hexafluorophosphate anion, CVs indicated a reaction of the RTIL with the analyte/electrogenerated products, suggesting that these RTILs might not be suitable solvents for the detection of HCl gas. This was supported by NMR spectroscopy experiments, which showed that the hexafluorophosphate ionic liquid underwent structural changes after HCl gas electrochemical experiments. The analytical utility was then studied in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C2mim][NTf2]) by utilising both peaks (oxidation of [HCl2](-) and reduction of protons) and linear calibration graphs for current vs. concentration for the two processes were obtained. The reactive behaviour of some ionic liquids clearly shows that the choice of the ionic liquid is very important if employing RTILs as solvents for HCl gas detection.

  3. Solar hydrogen energy system. Annual report, 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N.

    1996-12-31

    The paper reports progress on three tasks. Task A, System comparison of hydrogen with other alternative fuels in terms of EPACT requirements, investigates the feasibility of several alternative fuels, namely, natural gas, methanol, ethanol, hydrogen and electricity, to replace 10% of gasoline by the year 2000. The analysis was divided into two parts: analysis of vehicle technologies and analysis of fuel production, storage and distribution. Task B, Photovoltaic hydrogen production, involves this fuel production method for the future. The process uses hybrid solar collectors to generate dc electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The third task, Hydrogen safety studies, covers two topics: a review of codes, standards, regulations, recommendations, certifications, and pamphlets which address safety of gaseous fuels; and an experimental investigation of hydrogen flame impingement.

  4. Methods and systems for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Chang H.; Kim, Eung S.; Sherman, Steven R.

    2012-03-13

    Methods and systems are disclosed for the production of hydrogen and the use of high-temperature heat sources in energy conversion. In one embodiment, a primary loop may include a nuclear reactor utilizing a molten salt or helium as a coolant. The nuclear reactor may provide heat energy to a power generation loop for production of electrical energy. For example, a supercritical carbon dioxide fluid may be heated by the nuclear reactor via the molten salt and then expanded in a turbine to drive a generator. An intermediate heat exchange loop may also be thermally coupled with the primary loop and provide heat energy to one or more hydrogen production facilities. A portion of the hydrogen produced by the hydrogen production facility may be diverted to a combustor to elevate the temperature of water being split into hydrogen and oxygen by the hydrogen production facility.

  5. Towards a unified description of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water: A dynamics based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah Zhou, Tiecheng; Clark, Aurora E.

    2014-12-07

    The definition of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) is intimately related to the topological and dynamic properties of the hydrogen bond network within liquid water. The development of a universal H-bond definition for water is an active area of research as it would remove many ambiguities in the network properties that derive from the fixed definition employed to assign whether a water dimer is hydrogen bonded. This work investigates the impact that an electronic-structure based definition, an energetic, and a geometric definition of the H-bond has upon both topological and dynamic network behavior of simulated water. In each definition, the use of a cutoff (either geometric or energetic) to assign the presence of a H-bond leads to the formation of transiently bonded or broken dimers, which have been quantified within the simulation data. The relative concentration of transient species, and their duration, results in two of the three definitions sharing similarities in either topological or dynamic features (H-bond distribution, H-bond lifetime, etc.), however no two definitions exhibit similar behavior for both classes of network properties. In fact, two networks with similar local network topology (as indicated by similar average H-bonds) can have dramatically different global network topology (as indicated by the defect state distributions) and altered H-bond lifetimes. A dynamics based correction scheme is then used to remove artificially transient H-bonds and to repair artificially broken bonds within the network such that the corrected network exhibits the same structural and dynamic properties for two H-bond definitions (the properties of the third definition being significantly improved). The algorithm described represents a significant step forward in the development of a unified hydrogen bond network whose properties are independent of the original hydrogen bond definition that is employed.

  6. Towards a unified description of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water: a dynamics based approach.

    PubMed

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Zhou, Tiecheng; Clark, Aurora E

    2014-12-01

    The definition of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) is intimately related to the topological and dynamic properties of the hydrogen bond network within liquid water. The development of a universal H-bond definition for water is an active area of research as it would remove many ambiguities in the network properties that derive from the fixed definition employed to assign whether a water dimer is hydrogen bonded. This work investigates the impact that an electronic-structure based definition, an energetic, and a geometric definition of the H-bond has upon both topological and dynamic network behavior of simulated water. In each definition, the use of a cutoff (either geometric or energetic) to assign the presence of a H-bond leads to the formation of transiently bonded or broken dimers, which have been quantified within the simulation data. The relative concentration of transient species, and their duration, results in two of the three definitions sharing similarities in either topological or dynamic features (H-bond distribution, H-bond lifetime, etc.), however no two definitions exhibit similar behavior for both classes of network properties. In fact, two networks with similar local network topology (as indicated by similar average H-bonds) can have dramatically different global network topology (as indicated by the defect state distributions) and altered H-bond lifetimes. A dynamics based correction scheme is then used to remove artificially transient H-bonds and to repair artificially broken bonds within the network such that the corrected network exhibits the same structural and dynamic properties for two H-bond definitions (the properties of the third definition being significantly improved). The algorithm described represents a significant step forward in the development of a unified hydrogen bond network whose properties are independent of the original hydrogen bond definition that is employed.

  7. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 2 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Moreover, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be a major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  8. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 1 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Morever, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be of major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  9. Hydrogen-Free Liquid-Helium Recovery Plants: The Solution for Low-Temperature Flow Impedance Blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabal, M.; Arauzo, A.; Camón, A.; Castrillo, M.; Guerrero, E.; Lozano, M. P.; Pina, M. P.; Sesé, J.; Spagna, S.; Diederichs, J.; Rayner, G.; Sloan, J.; Galli, F.; van der Geest, W.; Haberstroh, C.; Dittmar, N.; Oca, A.; Grau, F.; Fernandes, A.; Rillo, C.

    2016-08-01

    The blocking of fine-capillary tubes used as flow impedances in 4H3 evaporation cryostats to achieve temperatures below 4.2 K is generally attributed to nitrogen or air impurities entering these tubes from the main bath. The failure of even the most rigorous low-temperature laboratory best practices aimed at eliminating the problem by maintaining the cleanliness of the helium bath and preventing impurities from entering the capillary tubes suggests that a different cause is responsible for the inexplicable reduction of impedance flow. Many low-temperature research laboratories around the world have suffered this nuisance at a considerable financial cost due to the fact that the affected systems have to be warmed to room temperature in order to recover their normal low-temperature operation performance. Here, we propose an underlying physical mechanism responsible for the blockages based upon the freezing of molecular H2 traces present in the liquid-helium bath. Solid H2 accumulates at the impedance low-pressure side, and, after some time, it produces a total impedance blockage. The presence of H2 traces is unavoidable due its occurrence in the natural gas wells where helium is harvested, forcing gas suppliers to specify a lower bound for impurity levels at about 100 ppb even in high-grade helium. In this paper, we present a simple apparatus to detect hydrogen traces present in liquid helium and easily check the quality of the liquid. Finally, we propose a solution to eliminate the hydrogen impurities in small- and large-scale helium recovery plants. The solution has been implemented in several laboratories that previously experienced a chronic occurrence of blocking, eliminating similar occurrences for more than one year.

  10. Standard-B Hydrogen Monitoring System, system design description

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1995-01-16

    During most of the year, it is assumed that the vapor in the 177 radioactive waste tanks on the Hanford Project site contain a uniform mixture of gases. Several of these waste tanks (currently twenty five, 6 Double Shell Tanks and 19 Single Shell Tanks) were identified as having the potential for the buildup of gases to a flammable level. An active ventilation system in the Double Shell Tanks and a passive ventilation system in the Single Shell Tanks provides a method of expelling gases from the tanks. A gas release from a tank causes a temporary rise in the tank pressure, and a potential for increased concentration of hydrogen gas in the vapor space. The gas is released via the ventilation systems until a uniform gas mixture in the vapor space is once again achieved. This document describes the design of the Standard-B Hydrogen Monitoring System, (SHMS) and its components as it differs from the original SHMS. The differences are derived from changes made to improve the system performance but not implemented in all the installed enclosures.

  11. A manual of recommended practices for hydrogen energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, W.; Leach, S.

    1997-12-31

    Technologies for the production, distribution, and use of hydrogen are rapidly maturing and the number and size of demonstration programs designed to showcase emerging hydrogen energy systems is expanding. The success of these programs is key to hydrogen commercialization. Currently there is no comprehensive set of widely-accepted codes or standards covering the installation and operation of hydrogen energy systems. This lack of codes or standards is a major obstacle to future hydrogen demonstrations in obtaining the requisite licenses, permits, insurance, and public acceptance. In a project begun in late 1996 to address this problem, W. Hoagland and Associates has been developing a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Systems intended to serve as an interim document for the design and operation of hydrogen demonstration projects. It will also serve as a starting point for some of the needed standard-setting processes. The Manual will include design guidelines for hydrogen procedures, case studies of experience at existing hydrogen demonstration projects, a bibliography of information sources, and a compilation of suppliers of hydrogen equipment and hardware. Following extensive professional review, final publication will occur later in 1997. The primary goal is to develop a draft document in the shortest possible time frame. To accomplish this, the input and guidance of technology developers, industrial organizations, government R and D and regulatory organizations and others will be sought to define the organization and content of the draft Manual, gather and evaluate available information, develop a draft document, coordinate reviews and revisions, and develop recommendations for publication, distribution, and update of the final document. The workshop, Development of a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Energy Systems, conducted on March 11, 1997 in Alexandria, Virginia, was a first step.

  12. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    DOEpatents

    Johansson, Lennart N.

    2004-06-29

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  13. Rotor-Liquid-Fundament System's Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kydyrbekuly, A.

    The work is devoted to research of oscillation and sustainability of stationary twirl of vertical flexible static dynamically out-of-balance rotor with cavity partly filled with liquid and set on relative frame fundament. The accounting of such factors like oscillation of fundament, liquid oscillation, influence of asymmetry of installation of a rotor on a shaft, anisotropism of shaft support and fundament, static and dynamic out-of-balance of a rotor, an external friction, an internal friction of a shaft, allows to settle an invoice more precisely kinematic and dynamic characteristics of system.

  14. The development of a fullerene based hydrogen storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, E.L.; Davey, J.R.; Garzon, F.H.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate hydrogen uptake by fullerene substrates and to probe the potential of the hydrogen/fullerene system for hydrogen fuel storage. As part of this project, the authors have completed and tested a fully automated, computer controlled system for measuring hydrogen uptake that is capable of handling both a vacuum of 1 x 10{sup -6} torr and pressures greater than 200 bars. The authors have first established conditions for significant uptake of hydrogen by fullerenes. Subsequently, hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of pure and catalyst-doped C60 was further studied to probe suitability for hydrogen storage applications. C60 {center_dot} H18.7 was prepared at 100 bar H2 and 400 C, corresponding to hydrogen uptake of 2.6 wt%. Dehydrogenation of C60 {center_dot} H18.7 was studied using thermogravimetric and powder x-ray diffraction analysis. The C60 {center_dot} H18.7 molecule was found to be stable up to 430 C in Ar, at which point the release of hydrogen took place simultaneously with the collapse of the fullerene structure. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on C60 {center_dot} H18.7 samples dehydrogenated at 454 C, 475 C, and 600 C showed an increasing volume fraction of amorphous material due to randomly oriented, single-layer graphine sheets. Evolved gas analysis using gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy confirmed the presence of both H{sub 2} and methane upon dehydrogenation, indicating decomposition of the fullerene. The remaining carbon could not be re-hydrogenated. These results provide the first complete evidence for the irreversible nature of fullerene hydrogenation and for limitations imposed on the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation cycle by the limited thermal stability of the molecular crystal of fullerene.

  15. Nano-TiO2 enhanced photofermentative hydrogen produced from the dark fermentation liquid of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuxiao; Chen, Yinguang

    2011-10-01

    After anaerobic dark fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for hydrogen production, there are a large number of organic compounds including protein, polysaccharide, and volatile fatty acids left in the dark fermentation liquid, which can be further bioconverted to hydrogen by photofermentation techniquea. In this study, the enhancement of photofermentative hydrogen produced from WAS dark fermentation liquid by using nano-TiO2 is reported. First, high concentration of NH(4)(+)-N in the dark fermentation liquid was observed to inhibit the photofermentative hydrogen production, and its removal was essential. Then the effect of nano-TiO2 on photofermentative hydrogen generation was investigated, and the addition of 100 mg/L nano-TiO2 increased hydrogen by 46.1%. Finally, the mechanisms for nano-TiO2 improving hydrogen production were investigated. It was found that nano-TiO2 improved the decomposition of protein and polysaccharide to small-molecule organic compounds and promoted the growth of photosynthetic bacteria and the activity of nitrogenase but decreased the H2-uptake hydrogenase activity.

  16. Liquid chromatography detection unit, system, and method

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    2015-10-27

    An embodiment of a liquid chromatography detection unit includes a fluid channel and a radiation detector. The radiation detector is operable to image a distribution of a radiolabeled compound as the distribution travels along the fluid channel. An embodiment of a liquid chromatography system includes an injector, a separation column, and a radiation detector. The injector is operable to inject a sample that includes a radiolabeled compound into a solvent stream. The position sensitive radiation detector is operable to image a distribution of the radiolabeled compound as the distribution travels along a fluid channel. An embodiment of a method of liquid chromatography includes injecting a sample that comprises radiolabeled compounds into a solvent. The radiolabeled compounds are then separated. A position sensitive radiation detector is employed to image distributions of the radiolabeled compounds as the radiolabeled compounds travel along a fluid channel.

  17. Cryogenic liquid hydrogen reorientation activated by constant reverse gravity acceleration of geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    A key objective for cryogenic fluid management in a spacecraft propulsion system is development of the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing a reverse gravity acceleration from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines which exceeds critical value for the initiation of a geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flow fields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted. These parameters hold near-constant values through the entire range of liquid filled levels, from 30 to 80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  18. Constant reverse thrust activated reorientation of liquid hydrogen with Geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    A key objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing reverse gravity acceleration, resulting from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines, which exceeds critical value for the initiation of geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flowfields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted in this study. It shows that these parameters hold near-constant values through the entire ranges of liquid filled levels, from 30-80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  19. Systems Engineering of Chemical Hydrogen Storage, Pressure Vessel and Balance of Plant for Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done with cryo-sorbent based and chemical-based hydrogen storage materials. Balance of plant components were developed, proof-of-concept testing performed, system costs estimated, and transient models validated as part of this work.

  20. Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.