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Sample records for liquid lithium uptake

  1. Erosive effects in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Down, M.G.; Bagnall, C.; Keeton, A.R.; Tsu, T.C.

    1982-09-01

    Results are reported of experimental testing to investigate the potential erosive effect of liquid lithium at 270/sup 0/C and velocities up to 24 ms/sup -1/, on type 304 stainless steel. Two experiments were performed in order to compare data from a conventional flow-through isothermal test leg with those from specimens attached to the circumference of a rotating disc in static lithium.

  2. Ionic Liquids in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are among the most widespread energy storage devices in our society. In order to introduce these devices in new key applications such as transportation, however, their safety and their operative temperature range need to be significantly improved. These improvements can be obtained only by developing new electrolytes. Ionic liquids are presently considered among the most attractive electrolytes for the development of advanced and safer lithium-ion batteries. In this manuscript, the use of various types of ionic liquids, e.g. aprotic and protic, in lithium-ion batteries is considered. The advantages and the limits associated to the use of these innovative electrolytes are critically analysed.

  3. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; and others

    2015-05-15

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  4. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium wallsa)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.; Tritz, K.

    2015-05-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasm surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  5. Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz,John; Newman, John

    2005-09-29

    We have investigated possible anticipated advantages of ionic-liquid electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries. Thermal stabilities and phase behavior were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazoliumTFSI systems, pyrrolidiniumTFSI, BMIMPF{sub 6}, BMIMBF{sub 4}, and BMIMTf. Thermal stabilities were measured for neat ionic liquids and for BMIMBF{sub 4}-LiBF{sub 4}, BMIMTf-LiTf, BMIMTFSI-LiTFSI mixtures. Conductivities have been measured for various ionic-liquid lithium-salt systems. We show the development of interfacial impedance in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell and we report results from cycling experiments for a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + 1 mol/kg LIBF{sub 4}|C cell. The interfacial resistance increases with time and the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode. As expected, imidazolium-based ionic liquids react with lithium electrodes. We seek new ionic liquids that have better chemical stabilities.

  6. Phase formation and microstructure in lithium-carbon intercalation compounds during lithium uptake and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drüe, Martin; Seyring, Martin; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2017-06-01

    The intercalation and de-intercalation behavior of lithium in graphite was investigated with respect to the formation of lithium graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GICs) using a combination of XRD measurements and metallography. Microstructural features and the evolution of phases and structural details of Li-GICs during Li uptake and release are correlated for the first time, giving new insight into the formation of Li-GICs. Lithium evaporation loss during annealing was exploited for studying the phase evolution during lithium de-intercalation, whereas phase formation during lithium uptake was studied in a sample exhibiting a lithium concentration gradient. The experiments indicate that growth and dissolution of the compound LiC6 do not occur by an inverse mechanism, as shown by the formation of different intermediate phases. The compound LiC12 was found to be a non-stoichiometric solid solution. LiC6 can be clearly identified in micrographs by the color and distinct phase boundaries, while LiC12 is situated in the vicinity of the LiC6 phase with varying coloration depending on the Li content.

  7. Lithium-Air and ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The final portion of this project was accomplished at Sandia National Labs, Livermore, with the overall goal being to optimize lithium-air cells with an ionic liquid electrolyte. Both of these are potential future routes for lithium-ion technology. Lithiumair presents the advantage of higher gravimetric energy density, and ionic liquids present the advantage of greater hydrophobicity and much lower volatility, along with a larger window of electrochemical stability. Ionic liquids however have several drawbacks for the battery industry. Currently they are not as cost effective as many organic solvents. Additionally, because of the added viscosity of ionic interactions compared to the typical dipole interactions of a solvent, the ionic conductivity is lower than for common organic solvents.

  8. Liquid electrolytes for lithium and lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, George E.

    A number of advances in electrolytes have occurred in the past 4 years, which have contributed to increased safety, wider temperature range of operation, better cycling and other enhancements to lithium-ion batteries. The changes to basic electrolyte solutions that have occurred to accomplish these advances are discussed in detail. The solvent components that have led to better low-temperature operation are also considered. Also, additives that have resulted in better structure of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) are presented as well as proposed methods of operation of these additives. Other additives that have lessened the flammability of the electrolyte when exposed to air and also caused lowering of the heat of reaction with the oxidized positive electrode are discussed. Finally, additives that act to open current-interrupter devices by releasing a gas under overcharge conditions and those that act to cycle between electrodes to alleviate overcharging are presented. As a class, these new electrolytes are often called "functional electrolytes". Possibilities for further progress in this most important area are presented. Another area of active work in the recent past has been the reemergence of ambient-temperature molten salt electrolytes applied to alkali metal and lithium-ion batteries. This revival of an older field is due to the discovery of new salt types that have a higher voltage window (particularly to positive potentials) and also have greatly increased hydrolytic stability compared to previous ionic liquids. While practical batteries have not yet emerged from these studies, the increase in the number of active researchers and publications in the area demonstrates the interest and potentialities of the field. Progress in the field is briefly reviewed. Finally, recent results on the mechanisms for capacity loss on shelf and cycling in lithium-ion cells are reviewed. Progress towards further market penetration by lithium-ion cells hinges on improved

  9. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium wallsa)

    DOE PAGES

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; ...

    2015-05-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasm surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceedmore » several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.« less

  10. Deuterium uptake in magnetic-fusion devices with lithium-conditioned carbon walls.

    PubMed

    Krstic, P S; Allain, J P; Taylor, C N; Dadras, J; Maeda, S; Morokuma, K; Jakowski, J; Allouche, A; Skinner, C H

    2013-03-08

    Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen.

  11. Lithium solvation in bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Lassègues, Jean-Claude; Grondin, Joseph; Talaga, David

    2006-12-28

    The lithium solvation in (1 -x)(EMI-TFSI), xLiTFSI ionic liquids where EMI(+) is the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and TFSI(-) the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion, is shown by Raman spectroscopy to involve essentially [Li(TFSI)(2)](-) anionic clusters for 0 < x < 0.4, but addition of stoichiometric amounts of solvents S such as oligoethers changes the lithium solvation into [Li(S)(m)](+) cationic clusters; the lithium transference number in TFSI-based ionic liquid electrolytes for lithium batteries should thus be strongly improved.

  12. Advances in primary lithium liquid cathode batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, George E.

    1989-05-01

    Recent work on cell development and various aspects of cell chemistry and cell development of lithium/thionyl chloride liquid cathode batteries is reviewed. As a result of safety studies, a number of cell sizes can now be considered satisfactory for many applications and the energy densities of these cells is higher than any other developed battery system. Primary batteries operate with low to moderate currents and the anode delay effect appears to be under reasonable control. Reserve cells are in the design stage and operate at high to very high power densities as well as very high energy densities. The nature of the anode film and the operation of the lithium anode has been studied with substantial success and understanding has grown accordingly. Also, studies of the structure of the electrolyte and the effects on the electrolyte of impurities and additives have led to improved understanding in this area as well. Work in progress on new electrolytes is reviewed. The state of the art of mathematical modeling is also discussed and it is expected that this work will continue to develop.

  13. Liquid-free lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Balaish, Moran; Peled, Emanuel; Golodnitsky, Diana; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2015-01-07

    Non-aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries are considered as most advanced power sources, albeit they are facing numerous challenges concerning almost each cell component. Herein, we diverge from the conventional and traditional liquid-based non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries to a Li-O2 system based on a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE-) and operated at a temperature higher than the melting point of the polymer electrolyte, where useful and most applicable conductivity values are easily achieved. The proposed SPE-based Li-O2 cell is compared to Li-O2 cells based on ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (glyme) through potentiodynamic and galvanostatic studies, showing a higher cell discharge voltage by 80 mV and most significantly, a charge voltage lower by 400 mV. The solid-state battery demonstrated a comparable discharge-specific capacity to glyme-based Li-O2 cells when discharged at the same current density. The results shown here demonstrate that the safer PEO-based Li-O2 battery is highly advantageous and can potentially replace the contingent of liquid-based cells upon further investigation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Recovery of tritium from a liquid lithium blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The sorption of tritium on yttrium from liquid lithium and the subsequent release of tritium from yttrium by thermal regeneration of the metal sorbent were investigated to study such a tritium-recovery process for a fusion reactor blanket of liquid lithium. Recent static sorption experiments have shown the effects of lithium temperature and possible impurities on the sorption of tritium. Diffusivity data, obtained from previous tritium recovery experiments, were evaluated to show the importance of the yttrium surface condition in controlling the release of tritium.

  15. Study of the microdynamics of liquid lithium and lithium-hydrogen melt by inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Blagoveshchenskii, N. M.; Morozov, V. A.; Novikov, A. G.; Pashnev, M. A. Savostin, V. V.; Shimkevich, A. L.

    2007-05-15

    The frequency spectra of vibrations of Li atoms at temperatures of 22, 227, 397, and 557 deg. C and the lithium-hydrogen melt (98 at % {sup 7}Li, 2 at % H) at 557 deg. C have been obtained from the experimental neutron inelastic scattering data. On the basis of the frequency spectra, the temperature dependences of the mean-square displacement of Li atoms, the mean-square amplitudes of atomic vibrations, and the velocity autocorrelation function of atoms have been calculated. The speed of sound in liquid lithium has been estimated within the Debye model. The frequency spectra of lithium-hydrogen melt and solid lithium hydride are compared. A generalized frequency spectrum of vibrations of hydrogen atoms in lithium-hydrogen melt is obtained.

  16. Mechanical Design of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    R. Ellis, R. Kaita, H. Kugel, G. Paluzzi, M. Viola and R. Nygren

    2009-02-19

    The Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) on NSTX will be the first test of a fully-toroidal liquid lithium divertor in a high-power magnetic confinement device. It will replace part of the lower outboard divertor between a specified inside and outside radius, and ultimately provide a lithium surface exposed to the plasma with enough depth to absorb a significant particle flux. There are numerous technical challenges involved in the design. The lithium layer must be as thin as possible, and maintained at a temperature between 200 and 400 degrees Celsius to minimize lithium evaporation. This requirement leads to the use of a thick copper substrate, with a thin stainless steel layer bonded to the plasma-facing surface. A porous molybdenum layer is then plasma-sprayed onto the stainless steel, to provide a coating that facilitates full wetting of the surface by the liquid lithium. Other challenges include the design of a robust, vacuumcompatible heating and cooling system for the LLD. Replacement graphite tiles that provided the proper interface between the existing outer divertor and the LLD also had to be designed, as well as accommodation for special LLD diagnostics. This paper describes the mechanical design of the LLD, and presents analyses showing the performance limits of the LLD.

  17. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  18. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  19. Different roles of ionic liquids in lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, Ali; Liu, Yang; Chen, Pu

    2016-12-01

    Ionic liquids are often named solvents of the future because of flexibility in design. This statement has given credence that ionic liquids should simply replace the problematic electrolytes of lithium batteries. As a result, the promising potentials of ionic liquids in electrochemical systems are somehow obscured by inappropriate expectations. We summarize recent advancements in this field, especially, ionic liquids as standalone electrolytes, additives, plasticizers in gel polymer electrolytes, and binders; and attempt to shed light on the future pathway of this area of research. Ionic liquids are not dilute media to serve as pure solvents in electrochemical systems where mobility of ions is the priority; instead, they can contribute to the ionic conductivity of various components in a battery system. Owing to the enormous possibilities of ionic liquids, it is not merely a matter of choice. Ionic liquids can be used to design novel types of electrolytes for a new generation of lithium batteries. A promising possibility, which is still at a very early stage, is supercooled ionic liquid crystals for fast ion diffusion through the guided channels of a liquid-like medium. This, of course, will be a breakthrough in the realm of electrochemistry, far beyond lithium battery field, when materialized.

  20. Liquid Lithium Limiter Effects on Tokamak Plasmas and Plasma-Liquid Surface Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; R. Doerner; G. Antar; M. Baldwin; R. Conn; P. Efthimion; M. Finkenthal; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; S. Krashenninikov; H. Kugel; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; J. Menard; T. Munsat; D. Stutman; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; V. Soukhanovskii; D. Whyte; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov

    2002-10-15

    We present results from the first experiments with a large area liquid lithium limiter in a magnetic fusion device, and its effect on improving plasma performance by reducing particle recycling. Using large area liquid metal surfaces in any major fusion device is unlikely before a test on a smaller scale. This has motivated its demonstration in the CDX-U spherical torus with a unique, fully toroidal lithium limiter. The highest current discharges were obtained with a liquid lithium limiter. There was a reduction in recycling, as indicated by a significant decrease in the deuterium-alpha emission and oxygen radiation. How these results might extrapolate to reactors is suggested in recycling/retention experiments with liquid lithium surfaces under high-flux deuterium and helium plasma bombardment in PISCES-B. Data on deuterium atoms retained in liquid lithium indicate retention of all incident ions until full volumetric conversion to lithium deuteride. The PISCES-B results also show a material loss mechanism that lowers the maximum operating temperature compared to that for the liquid surface equilibrium vapor pressure. This may restrict the lithium temperature in reactors.

  1. Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: from Liquid to Solid Cells?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liang, Chengdu

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries supply a theoretical specific energy 5 times higher than that of lithium-ion batteries (2,500 vs. ~500 Wh kg-1). However, the insulating properties and polysulfide shuttle effects of the sulfur cathode and the safety concerns of the lithium anode in liquid electrolytes are still key limitations to practical use of traditional Li-S batteries. In this review, we start with a brief discussion on fundamentals of Li-S batteries and key challenges associated with the conventional liquid cells. Then, we introduce the most recent progresses in the liquid systems, including the sulfur positive electrodes, the lithium negative electrodes, and the electrolytes and binders. We discuss the significance of investigating electrode reaction mechanisms in liquid cells using in-situ techniques to monitor the compositional and morphological changes. By moving from the traditional liquid cells to recent solid cells, we discuss the importance of this game-changing shift with positive advances in both solid electrolytes and electrode materials. Finally, the opportunities and perspectives for future research on Li-S batteries are presented.

  2. Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: from Liquid to Solid Cells?

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Zhan; Liang, Chengdu

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries supply a theoretical specific energy 5 times higher than that of lithium-ion batteries (2,500 vs. ~500 Wh kg-1). However, the insulating properties and polysulfide shuttle effects of the sulfur cathode and the safety concerns of the lithium anode in liquid electrolytes are still key limitations to practical use of traditional Li-S batteries. In this review, we start with a brief discussion on fundamentals of Li-S batteries and key challenges associated with the conventional liquid cells. Then, we introduce the most recent progresses in the liquid systems, including the sulfur positive electrodes, the lithium negative electrodes, and themore » electrolytes and binders. We discuss the significance of investigating electrode reaction mechanisms in liquid cells using in-situ techniques to monitor the compositional and morphological changes. By moving from the traditional liquid cells to recent solid cells, we discuss the importance of this game-changing shift with positive advances in both solid electrolytes and electrode materials. Finally, the opportunities and perspectives for future research on Li-S batteries are presented.« less

  3. Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

    2002-01-29

    Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

  4. Thermocapillary and thermoelectric effects in liquid lithium plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Morley, N. B.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2009-06-01

    Recent experiments have renewed interest in the use of liquid lithium as a plasma facing component (PFC). The liquid metal surface will experience a number of effects which are considered in the present work with simple analytical and more complete computational models. These include the thermal response under fusion relevant heat loads causing thermocapillary and thermoelectric effects. Analytical solutions for simplified flow are given showing the surface velocity of these liquid metals due to thermocapillary effects in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic drag. A parameter describing dominant conduction or convection is developed which shows that thin-films relevant to NSTX will be conduction dominated. Thermoelectric effects could propel liquid lithium with velocities of 10 s of cm/s providing a significant boost to energy transport.

  5. Simulations of NSTX with a Liquid Lithium Divertor Module

    SciTech Connect

    D. P. Stotler, R. Maingi, H.W. Kugel, A. Yu. Pigarov, T.D. Rognlien, V.A. Soukhanovskii

    2008-07-08

    The UEDGE edge plasma transport code is used to model the effect of the reduced recycling provided by the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) module that will be installed in NSTX. UEDGE's transport coefficients are calibrated against an existing NSTX shot using midplane and divertor diagnostic data. The LLD is then incorporated into the simulations as a reduction in the recycling coefficient over the outer divertor. Heat transfer calculations performed using the resulting heat flux profiles indicate that lithium evaporation will be negligible for pulse lengths < 2 s at low (~ 2 MW) input power. At high input power (~ 7 MW), the pulse length may have to be restricted.

  6. Simulations of NSTX with a Liquid Lithium Divertor Module

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Maingi, R.; Zakharov, L. E.; Kugel, H. W.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2010-02-18

    A strategy to develop self-consistent simulations of the behavior of lithium in the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) module to be installed in NSTX is described. In this initial stage of the plan, the UEDGE edge plasma transport code is used to simulate an existing NSTX shot, with UEDGE's transport coefficients set using midplane and divertor diagnostic data. The LLD is incorporated into the simulations as a reduction in the recycling coefficient over the outer divertor. Heat transfer calculations performed using the resulting heat flux profiles provide preliminary estimates on operating limits for the LLD as well as input data for subsequent steps in the LLD modeling effort.

  7. Comparison of H-Mode Plasmas Diverted to Solid and Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita, et. al.

    2012-07-20

    Experiments were conducted with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX. Among the goals was to use lithium recoating to sustain deuterium (D) retention by a static liquid lithium surface, approximating the ability of flowing liquid lithium to maintain chemical reactivity. Lithium evaporators were used to deposit lithium on the LLD surface. Improvements in plasma edge conditions were similar to those with lithiated graphite plasma-facing components (PFCs), including an increase in confinement over discharges without lithiumcoated PFCs and ELM reduction during H-modes. With the outer strike point on the LLD, the D retention in the LLD was about the same as that for solid lithium coatings on graphite, or about two times that achieved without lithium PFC coatings. There were also indications of contamination of the LLD surface, possibly due erosion and redeposition of carbon from PFCs. Flowing lithium may thus be needed for chemically active PFCs during long-pulse operation.

  8. Electrical detection of liquid lithium leaks from pipe jointsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. A.; Jaworski, M. A.; Mehl, J.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R.

    2014-11-01

    A test stand for flowing liquid lithium is under construction at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. As liquid lithium reacts with atmospheric gases and water, an electrical interlock system for detecting leaks and safely shutting down the apparatus has been constructed. A defense in depth strategy is taken to minimize the risk and impact of potential leaks. Each demountable joint is diagnosed with a cylindrical copper shell electrically isolated from the loop. By monitoring the electrical resistance between the pipe and the copper shell, a leak of (conductive) liquid lithium can be detected. Any resistance of less than 2 kΩ trips a relay, shutting off power to the heaters and pump. The system has been successfully tested with liquid gallium as a surrogate liquid metal. The circuit features an extensible number of channels to allow for future expansion of the loop. To ease diagnosis of faults, the status of each channel is shown with an analog front panel LED, and monitored and logged digitally by LabVIEW.

  9. Electrical detection of liquid lithium leaks from pipe joints

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J. A. Jaworski, M. A.; Mehl, J.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R.

    2014-11-15

    A test stand for flowing liquid lithium is under construction at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. As liquid lithium reacts with atmospheric gases and water, an electrical interlock system for detecting leaks and safely shutting down the apparatus has been constructed. A defense in depth strategy is taken to minimize the risk and impact of potential leaks. Each demountable joint is diagnosed with a cylindrical copper shell electrically isolated from the loop. By monitoring the electrical resistance between the pipe and the copper shell, a leak of (conductive) liquid lithium can be detected. Any resistance of less than 2 kΩ trips a relay, shutting off power to the heaters and pump. The system has been successfully tested with liquid gallium as a surrogate liquid metal. The circuit features an extensible number of channels to allow for future expansion of the loop. To ease diagnosis of faults, the status of each channel is shown with an analog front panel LED, and monitored and logged digitally by LabVIEW.

  10. Uptake and transfer of lithium in pregnancy and lactation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Smithberg, M; Dixit, P K; Singer, L

    1984-02-01

    The uptake of lithium in pregnant and lactating mice as well as its transfer to their respective fetuses (18-day postcoitum) and nurslings (11- to 15-day postnatal) were quantified. Lithium carbonate in concentrations of 1 or 2 mg/ml given ad libitum in drinking water produced plasma levels in adults ranging from 0.46 to 1.7 meq/liter. In pregnancy, plasma lithium of the adult was twice that of the fetal plasma. However, there was no statistical difference in brain lithium content between adults and fetuses at the 1- or 2-mg dosage. A significant decrease in bone lithium content was found in fetuses as compared to adults at the 2-mg level. During lactation the plasma lithium of nurslings was one-fourth to one-sixth that of the mothers' plasma. Lithium content in brain and in bone of adults was significantly lower than those of nurslings at both drug concentrations. No apparent effects on adults, fetuses, or nurslings were noted in the short term.

  11. Velocity Measurements of Thermoelectric Driven Flowing Liquid Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szott, Matthew; Xu, Wenyu; Fiflis, Peter; Haehnlein, Ian; Kapat, Aveek; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid lithium has garnered additional attention as a PFC due to its several advantages over solid PFCs, including reduced erosion and thermal fatigue, increased heat transfer, higher device lifetime, and enhanced plasma performance due to the establishment of low recycling regimes at the wall. The Lithium Metal Infused Trenches concept (LiMIT) has demonstrated thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic flow of liquid lithium through horizontal open-faced metal trenches with measured velocities varying from 3.7+/-0.5 cm/s in the 1.76 T field of HT-7 to 22+/-3 cm/s in the SLiDE facility at UIUC at 0.059 T. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, a new LiMIT design using narrower trenches shows steady state, thermoelectric-driven flow at an arbitrary angle from horizontal. Velocity characteristics are measured and discussed. Based on this LiMIT concept, a new limiter design has been developed to be tested on the mid-plane of the EAST plasma. Preliminary modelling suggests lithium flow of 6 cm/s in this device. Additionally, recent testing at the Magnum-PSI facility has given encouraging results, and velocity measurements in relation to magnetic field strength and plasma flux are also presented.

  12. Effect of Energetic Plasma Flux on Flowing Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Jung, Soonwook; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Szott, Mathew; Ruzic, David

    2014-10-01

    An operational liquid lithium system with steady state flow driven by thermo-electric magneto-hydrodynamic force and capable of constantly refreshing the plasma exposed surface have been demonstrated at U of I. To evaluate the system performance in reactor relevant conditions, specifically to understand the effect of disruptive plasma events on the performance of the liquid metal PFCs, the setup was integrated to a pulsed plasma generator. A coaxial plasma generator drives the plasma towards a theta pinch which preferentially heats the ions, simulating ELM like flux, and the plasma is further guided towards the target chamber which houses the flowing lithium system. The effect of the incident flux is examined using diagnostic tools including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, rogowski coils, Ion energy analyzers, and fast frame spectral image acquisition with specific optical filters. The plasma have been well characterized and a density of ~1021 m-3, with electron temperature ~10 - 20 eV is measured, and final plasma velocities of 34 - 74 kms-1 have been observed. Calorimetric measurements using planar molybdenum targets indicate a maximum plasma energy (with 6 kV plasma gun and 20 kV theta pinch) of 0.08 MJm-2 with plasma divergence effects resulting in marginal reduction of 40 +/- 23 J in plasma energy. Further results from the other diagnostic tools, using the flowing lithium targets and the planar targets coated with lithium will be presented. DOE DE-SC0008587.

  13. Ionic liquid based lithium battery electrolytes: charge carriers and interactions derived by density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Angenendt, Knut; Johansson, Patrik

    2011-06-23

    The solvation of lithium salts in ionic liquids (ILs) leads to the creation of a lithium ion carrying species quite different from those found in traditional nonaqueous lithium battery electrolytes. The most striking differences are that these species are composed only of ions and in general negatively charged. In many IL-based electrolytes, the dominant species are triplets, and the charge, stability, and size of the triplets have a large impact on the total ion conductivity, the lithium ion mobility, and also the lithium ion delivery at the electrode. As an inherent advantage, the triplets can be altered by selecting lithium salts and ionic liquids with different anions. Thus, within certain limits, the lithium ion carrying species can even be tailored toward distinct important properties for battery application. Here, we show by DFT calculations that the resulting charge carrying species from combinations of ionic liquids and lithium salts and also some resulting electrolyte properties can be predicted.

  14. An imidazolium based ionic liquid electrolyte for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Kwang; Matic, Aleksandar; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Jacobsson, Per

    An electrolyte for lithium batteries based on the ionic liquid 3-methy-1-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethysulfony)imide (PMIMTFSI) complexed with lithium bis(trifluoromethysulfony)imide (LiTFSI) at a molar ratio of 1:1 has been investigated. The electrolyte shows a high ionic conductivity (∼1.2 × 10 -3 S cm -1) at room temperature. Over the whole investigated temperature range the ionic conductivity is more than one order of magnitude higher than for an analogue electrolyte based on N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Py 14TFSI) complexed with LiTFSI and used here as a benchmark. Raman results indicate furthermore that the degree of lithium coordinated TFSI is slightly lower in the electrolyte based on PMIMTFSI and thus that the Li + charge carriers should be higher than in electrolytes based on Py 14TFSI. An ionic liquid gel electrolyte membrane was obtained by soaking a fibrous fully interconnected membrane, made of electrospun P(VdF-HFP), in the electrolyte. The gel electrolyte was cycled in Li/ionic liquid polymer electrolyte/Li cells over 15 days and in Li/LiFePO 4 cells demonstrating good interfacial stability and highly stable discharge capacities with a retention of >96% after 50 cycles (∼146 mAh g -1).

  15. Liquid crystal deposition on poled, single crystalline lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath, S. C.; Pimputkar, K. R.; Pronschinske, A. M.; Pearl, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the mechanisms for molecular organization at poled ferroelectric surfaces, single crystalline lithium niobate (LN), 'Z-cut' along the (0 0 0 1) plane, has been prepared and characterized and subsequently exposed to liquid crystal molecules. As a model system we chose to study the anchoring of 4- n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) to LN. Liquid crystalline films are of interest because of their useful electronic and optical properties as well as chemical sensing attributes. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface contact angle measurements (CA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface of lithium niobate as well as the nature of 8CB films grown on the surface. Atomically flat LN surfaces were prepared as a support for monolayer thick, 8CB molecular domains. 8CB liquid crystal molecules were deposited by an ambient vaporization technique and the films were analyzed using XPS and CA. Understanding electrostatic anchoring mechanisms and thin film organization for this molecule on uniformly poled surfaces allows for a fuller appreciation of how molecular deposition of other polarizable molecules on periodically poled and patterned poled lithium niobate surfaces would occur.

  16. Lithium, Vanadium and Chromium Uptake Ability of Brassica juncea from Lithium Mine Tailings.

    PubMed

    Elektorowicz, M; Keropian, Z

    2015-01-01

    The potential for phytoremediation and phytostabilization of lithium in lieu with vanadium and chromium on a formulated acidic heterogeneous growth media engineered around lithium mine tailings, was investigated in four phases: (1) overall efficiency of the removal of the three metals, (2) bioaccumulation ratios of the three metals, (3) overall relative growth rate, and (4) translocation index of the three metals in the physiology of the hyperaccumulator plant. A pot study was conducted to assess the suitability of Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) in a phytoremediation process whereby it was lingered for eighty-six days under homogeneous growth conditions and irrigated bidaily with organic fertilizer amended with LiCl. A post harvest data analysis was achieved through ashing and the implementation of cold digestion procedure in a concentrated hydrochloric acidic matrix. In physiological efficiency parameters, the hyperaccumulator plant was twice as able to phytostabilize chromium and four times was able to phytostabilize vanadium in comparison to lithium. Moreover, it was extremely efficient in translocating and accumulating lithium inside its upper physiological sites, more so than chromium and vanadium, thereby demonstrating Indian mustard, as a hyperaccumulator plant, for phytoextraction and phytostabilization in an acidic heterogeneous rhizosphere, with an extremely low relative growth rate.

  17. Investigation of parameters of interaction of hydrogen isotopes with liquid lithium and lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tazhibayeva, I. L. Kulsartov, T. V.; Gordienko, Yu. N.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Ponkratov, Yu. V.; Barsukov, N. I.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Baklanov, V. V.; Gnyrya, V. S.; Kenzhin, Ye. A.

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the effect of reactor irradiation on the processes of interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) is considered. The experiments are carried out by the gas-absorption method with use of a specially designed ampoule device. The results of investigation of the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium CPS under conditions of reactor irradiation are described; namely, these are the temperature dependences of the rate constant for the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium at different reactor powers, the activation energies of the processes, and the pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius dependence. The effect of increasing absorption of hydrogen by the samples under investigation as a result of the reactor irradiation is fixed. The effect can be explained by increasing mobility of hydrogen in liquid lithium due to hot spots in lithium bulk and the interaction of helium and tritium ions (formed as a result of the nuclear reaction of {sup 6}Li with neutron) with a surface hydride film.

  18. The Role of Dissolved Gas in Ionic Liquid Electrolytes for Secondary Lithium Metal Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-07

    devices use lithium - ion batteries comprised of a graphite anode and metal oxide cathode. Lithium , being the third-lightest element, is already synonymous...support shuttling lithium ions ( battery cycling) such as the separator, electrolyte, and cathode and anode superstructures contribute most of the...The Role of Dissolved Gas in Ionic Liquid Electrolytes for Secondary Lithium Metal Batteries Johanna K. Stark1, Yi Ding2, and Paul A. Kohl1

  19. Preparation of the liquid lithium divertor plates for NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygren, R. E.; McKee, G. R.; Fordham, J. A.; Lewis, S. A.; Kugel, H.; Ellis, R. A.; Viola, M. E.; O'Dell, J. S.

    2011-10-01

    Each of the four toroidal panels of the liquid lithium divertor being installed in NSTX for operation in the 2010 campaign is a conical section inclined at 22° like the previous graphite divertor tiles. Each panel is a copper plate clad with stainless steel and a surface layer of porous plasma sprayed molybdenum (Mo) that will host lithium deposited from an evaporator. This paper describes the processes in fabrication; these include cutting to rough shape, die pressing into conical sections, machining to near final shape with holes for electrical heaters, thermocouples and a groove for a cooling tube, brazing of the 0.25-mm cladding and vacuum plasma spraying of the Mo coating.

  20. Reactive uptake of NO3 by liquid and frozen organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, T.; Talukdar, R. K.; Frost, G. J.; Fox, R. W.; Rudich, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The reactive uptake of the NO3 radical by liquid and frozen organics was studied in a rotating wall flow tube coupled to a White cell. The organic liquids used included alkanes, alkenes, an alcohol, and carboxylic acids with conjugated and nonconjugated unsaturated bonds.. The reactive uptake coefficients, γ, of NO3 on n-hexadecane, 1-octadecene, 1-hexadecene, cis + trans 7-tetradecene, n-octanoic acid, 2,2,4,4,6,8,8 heptamethyl nonane, 1-octanol, cis, trans 9,11 and 10,12 octadecadienoic acid, cis-9, cis-12 octadecadienoic acid were determined. The reactive uptake coefficients measured with the organic liquids varied from 1.4 × 10-3 to 1.5 × 10-2. The uptake coefficients of NO3 by n-hexadecane and n-octanoic acid decreased by a factor of ~5 upon freezing. This behavior is explained by reaction occurring in the bulk of the organic liquid as well as on the surface. For the rest of the compounds the change in values of γ upon freezing of the liquids was within the experimental uncertainty. This is attributed to predominant uptake of NO3 by the top few molecular surface layers of the organic substrate and continuous replenishment of the surface layer by evaporation and/or mobility of the surface. These conclusions are corroborated by estimation of the diffuso-reactive length and solubility constant of NO3 in these liquids. The reactivity of NO3 with the organic surfaces is shown to correlate well with the known gas-phase chemistry of NO3. The effect on the atmospheric chemistry of the NO3 radical due to its interaction with organic aerosols is studied using an atmospheric box model applying realistic atmospheric scenarios. The inclusion of NO3 uptake on organic aerosol can decrease the NO3 lifetime by 10% or more.

  1. A thermo-electric-driven flowing liquid lithium limiter/divertor for magnetic confined fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Xu, Wenyu; Curreli, Davide; Andruczyk, Daniel; Mui, Travis

    2012-10-01

    The concept of using a liquid metal, especially liquid lithium, as the plasma facing surface may provide the best path forward toward reactor designs. A liquid PFC can effectively eliminate the erosion and thermal stress problems compared to the solid PFC while transferring heat and prolong the lifetime limit of the PFCs. A liquid lithium surface can also suppress the hydrogen isotopes recycling and getter the impurities in fusion reactor. The Lithium/metal infused trench (LiMIT) concept successfully proved that the thermoelectric effect can induce electric currents inside liquid lithium and an external magnetic field can drive liquid lithium to flow within metallic open trenches. IR camera and thermocouple measurements prove the strong heat transfer ability of this concept. A new flowing lithium system with active control of the temperature gradient inside the lithium trenches and back flow channels has been designed. TEMHD driven liquid lithium run steady state and pulsed for a few seconds of high heat flux (˜15MW/m^2) has been used to investigate the transient reaction of the flowing lithium. A similar tray is scheduled to be tested in HT-7, Hefei, China as a limiter in Sept. 2012. Related movies and analysis will be shown.

  2. Lithium insertion in graphite from ternary ionic liquid-lithium salt electrolytes. I. Electrochemical characterization of the electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appetecchi, Giovanni B.; Montanino, Maria; Balducci, Andrea; Lux, Simon F.; Winterb, Martin; Passerini, Stefano

    In this paper we report the results of chemical-physical investigation performed on ternary room temperature ionic liquid-lithium salt mixtures as electrolytes for lithium-ion battery systems. The ternary electrolytes were made by mixing N-methyl- N-propyl pyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl) imide (PYR 13FSI) and N-butyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (PYR 14TFSI) ionic liquids with lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF 6) or lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI). The mixtures were developed based on preliminary results on the cyclability of graphite electrodes in the IL-LiX binary electrolytes. The results clearly show the beneficial synergic effect of the two ionic liquids on the electrochemical properties of the mixtures.

  3. Response of NSTX Liquid Lithium divertor to High Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Tyler; Kallman, J; Kaitaa, R; Foley, E L; Grayd, T K; Kugel, H; Levinton, F; McLean, A G; Skinner, C H

    2012-07-18

    Samples of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) with and without an evaporative Li coating were directly exposed to a neutral beam ex-situ at a power of ~1.5 MW/m2 for 1-3 seconds. Measurements of front face and bulk sample temperature were obtained. Predictions of temperature evolution were derived from a 1D heat flux model. No macroscopic damage occurred when the "bare" sample was exposed to the beam but microscopic changes to the surface were observed. The Li-coated sample developed a lithium hydroxide (LiOH) coating, which did not change even when the front face temperature exceeded the pure Li melting point. These results are consistent with the lack of damage to the LLD surface and imply that heating alone may not expose pure liquid Li if the melting point of surface impurities is not exceeded. This suggests that flow and heat are needed for future PFCs requiring a liquid Li surface. __________________________________________________

  4. Room temperature lithium polymer batteries based on ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appetecchi, G. B.; Kim, G. T.; Montanino, M.; Alessandrini, F.; Passerini, S.

    In this manuscript are reported the results of an investigation performed on rechargeable, all-solid-state, solvent-free, Li/LiFePO 4 polymer batteries incorporating N-butyl- N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, PYR 14TFSI, ionic liquid (IL). The tests show clearly the beneficial effect due to the incorporation of ionic liquids on room temperature battery performance that, conversely, results extremely poor in IL-free lithium polymer batteries. The theoretical capacity is delivered at 30 °C whereas about 115 mA h g -1 are discharged at 20 °C with excellent capacity retention and high coulombic efficiency. At 40 °C large capacities (125 mA h g -1) are discharged even at medium rates (C/3). Impedance measurements revealed that the overall battery resistance is almost fully located (e.g., above 93%) at the lithium anode/polymer electrolyte interface, which plays a key role in determining the battery performance.

  5. Effects of Large Area Liquid Lithium Limiters on Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; G. Gettelfinger; T. Gray; D. Hoffman; S. Jardin; H. Kugel; P. Marfuta; T. Munsat; C. Neumeyer; S. Raftopoulos; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; L. Delgado-Aparicio; R.P. Seraydarian; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; M. Baldwin; R.W. Conn; R. Maingi; M. Menon; R. Causey; D. Buchenauer; M. Ulrickson; B. Jones; D. Rodgers

    2004-06-07

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium surface as a first wall has significantly improved the plasma performance in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Previous CDX-U experiments with a partially-covered toroidal lithium limiter tray have shown a decrease in impurities and the recycling of hydrogenic species. Improvements in loading techniques have permitted nearly full coverage of the tray surface with liquid lithium. Under these conditions, there was a large drop in the loop voltage needed to sustain the plasma current. The data are consistent with simulations that indicate more stable plasmas having broader current profiles, higher temperatures, and lowered impurities with liquid lithium walls. As further evidence for reduced recycling with a liquid lithium limiter, the gas puffing had to be increased by up to a factor of eight for the same plasma density achieved with an empty toroidal tray limiter.

  6. Effects of Large Area Liquid Lithium Limiters on Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R; Jajeski, R; Boaz, M; Efthimion, P; Gettelfinger, G; Gray, T; Hoffman, D; Jardin, S; Kugel, H; Marfuta, P; Munsat, T; Neumeyer, C; Raftopoulos, S; Soukhanovskii, V; Spaleta, J; Taylor, G; Timberlake, J; Woolley, R; Zakharov, L; Finkenthal, M; Stutman, D; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Seraydarian, R; Antar, G; Doerner, R; Luckhardt, S; Baldwin, M; Conn, R; Maingi, R; Menon, M; Causey, R; Buchenauer, D; Ulrickson, M; Jones, B; Rodgers, D

    2004-06-03

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium surface as a first wall has significantly improved the plasma performance in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Previous CDX-U experiments with a partially-covered toroidal lithium limiter tray have shown a decrease in impurities and the recycling of hydrogenic species. Improvements in loading techniques have permitted nearly full coverage of the tray surface with liquid lithium. Under these conditions, there was a large drop in the loop voltage needed to sustain the plasma current. The data are consistent with simulations that indicate more stable plasmas having broader current profiles, higher temperatures, and lowered impurities with liquid lithium walls. As further evidence for reduced recycling with a liquid lithium limiter, the gas puffing had to be increased by up to a factor of eight for the same plasma density achieved with an empty toroidal tray limiter.

  7. Corrosion resistance investigation of vanadium alloys in liquid lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovitskaya, I. V.; Lyublinskiy, I. E.; Bondarenko, G. G.; Paramonova, V. V.; Korshunov, S. N.; Mansurova, A. N.; Lyakhovitskiy, M. M.; Zharkov, M. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    A major concern in using vanadium alloys for first wall/blanket systems in fusion reactors is their activity with regard to nonmetallic impurities in the coolants. This paper presents the results of studying the corrosion resistance in high-purity liquid lithium (with the nitrogen and carbon content of less than 10-3 wt %) of vanadium and vanadium alloys (V-1.86Ga, V-3.4Ga-0.62Si, V-4.81Ti-4.82Cr) both in the initial state and preliminarily irradiated with Ar+ ions with energy of 20 keV to a dose of 1022 m-2 at an irradiation temperature of 400°C. The degree of corrosion was estimated by measuring the changes in the weight and microhardness. Corrosion tests were carried out under static isothermal conditions at a temperature of 600°C for 400 h. The identity of corrosion mechanisms of materials both irradiated with Ar ions and not irradiated, which consisted in an insignificant penetration of nitrogen into the materials and a substantial escape of oxygen from the materials, causing the formation of a zone with a reduced microhardness near the surface, was established. The influence of the corrosive action of lithium on the surface morphology of the materials under study was found, resulting in the manifestation of grain boundaries and slip lines on the sample surface, the latter being most clearly observed in the case of preliminary irradiation with Ar ions.

  8. Mixed ionic liquid as electrolyte for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, M.; Chagnes, A.; Carré, B.; Willmann, P.; Lemordant, D.

    Ionic liquids like 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (IMIBF 4) or hexafluorophosphate (IMIPF 6) and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (PyBF 4) were mixed with organic solvents such as butyrolactone (BL) and acetonitrile (ACN). A lithium salt (LiBF 4 or LiPF 6) was added to these mixtures for possible application in the field of energy storage (batteries or supercapacitors). Viscosities, conductivities and electrochemical windows at a Pt electrode of these electrolytes were investigated. All studied electrolytes are stable toward oxidation and exhibit a vitreous phase transition, which has been determined by application of the VTF theory to conductivity measurements. Mixtures containing the BF 4- anion exhibit the lowest viscosity and the highest conductivity. Two mixtures have been optimized in terms of conductivity: BL/IMIBF 4 (60/40, v/v) and ACN/IMIBF 4 (70/30, v/v).

  9. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  10. Hydrophobic ionic liquids based on the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation for lithium/seawater batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yancheng; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna

    Two hydrophobic ionic liquids (room temperature molten salts) based on 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation (BMI +), BMI +PF 6- and BMI +Tf 2N -, were used in developing a highly efficient lithium anode system for lithium/seawater batteries. The lithium anode system was composed of lithium metal/ionic liquid/Celgard membrane. Both BMI +PF 6-and BMI +Tf 2N - maintained high apparent anodic efficiency (up to 100%) under potentiostatic polarization (at +0.5 V versus open-circuit potential (OCP)) in a 3% NaCl solution. Eventually, traces of water contaminated the ionic liquid and a bilayer film (LiH and LiOH) on the lithium surface was formed, decreasing the rate of lithium anodic reaction and hence the discharge current density. BMI +Tf 2N - prevented traces of water from reaching the lithium metal surface longer than BMI +PF 6- (60 h versus 7 h). However, BMI +PF 6- was better than BMI +Tf 2N - in keeping a constant current density (˜0.2 mA cm -2) before the traces of water contaminated the lithium surface due to the non-reactivity of BMI +PF 6- with the lithium metal that kept the bare lithium surface. During the discharge process, BMI +PF 6- and BMI +Tf 2N - acted as ion transport media of Li +, Cl -, OH - and H 2O, but did not react with them because of the excellent chemical stability, high conductivity, and high hydrophobicity of these two ionic liquids. Both BMI +PF 6- and BMI +Tf 2N - gels were tentative approaches used to delay the traces of water coming in contact with the lithium surface.

  11. Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Justin; Prausnitz, John M.; Newman, John

    2006-06-01

    In this work, thermal and electrochemical properties of neat and mixed ionic liquid - lithium salt systems have been studied. The presence of a lithium salt causes both thermal and phase-behavior changes. Differential scanning calorimeter DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis TGA were used for thermal analysis for several imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, trifluoromethansulfonate, BF{sub 4}, and PF{sub 6} systems. Conductivities and diffusion coefficient have been measured for some selected systems. Chemical reactions in electrode - ionic liquid electrolyte interfaces were studied by interfacial impedance measurements. Lithium-lithium and lithium-carbon cells were studied at open circuit and a charged system. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazolium systems that are already known to be electrochemically unstable in the presence of lithium metal. In this work the development of interfacial resistance is shown in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell as well as results from some cycling experiments. As the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode the interfacial resistance increases. The results show the magnitude of reactivity due to reduction of the ionic liquid electrolyte that eventually has a detrimental effect on battery performance.

  12. Uptake of tritiated liquids by individual breakfast cereal flakes.

    PubMed

    Medina, Wenceslao T; Laurent, Sophie; Brandan, Enrique; Aguilera, José M

    2010-04-01

    Surface liquid adhesion (SLA) and liquid absorption (LA) of tritiated liquids, including water and skim, low-fat, whole, and fat-enriched milks, by cornflakes (CF) and frosted flakes (FF) were determined by scintillation counting using water-[(3)H] at 0.5 microCi/mL. SLA or the liquid adhering to individual flakes after a short immersion period was the same for CF and FF in the case of water (approximately 0.011 microL mm(-2) of flake) but were always higher for CF than for FF and increased as the fat content in milks augmented. LA of individual flakes, followed for 300 s of soaking, increased with time and was always higher for CF than for FF (for the same liquid), however, data did not follow a regular pattern. Flakes showed quite compact outer surfaces and an internal porous matrix composed of air cells of various sizes separated by dense walls of different thicknesses. This heterogeneous microstructure of individual flakes may be the cause of the lack of a simple kinetics during the soaking process. Previous results obtained by soaking a mass of flakes overestimated the uptake of fluid by individual because they included the liquid occluded between the flakes.

  13. The equilibrium structure of lithium salt solutions in ether-functionalized ammonium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Pedro Henrique; Siqueira, Leonardo J A; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2012-10-11

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for ionic liquids based on a ternary mixture of lithium and ammonium cations and a common anion, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [Tf(2)N](-). We address structural changes resulting from adding Li(+) in ionic liquids with increasing length of an ether-functionalized chain in the ammonium cation. The calculation of static structure factors reveals the lithium effect on charge ordering and intermediate range order in comparison with the neat ionic liquids. The charge ordering is modified in the lithium solution because the coordination of [Tf(2)N](-) toward Li(+) is much stronger than ammonium cations. Intermediate range order is observed in neat ionic liquids based on ammonium cations with a long chain, but in the lithium solutions, there is also a nonhomogenous distribution of Li(+) cations. The presence of Li(+) enhances interactions between the ammonium cations due to correlations between the oxygen atom of the ether chain and the nitrogen atom of another ammonium cation.

  14. Thyroid uptake of liquid versus capsule 131I tracers in hyperthyroid patients treated with liquid 131I.

    PubMed

    Rini, J N; Vallabhajosula, S; Zanzonico, P; Hurley, J R; Becker, D V; Goldsmith, S J

    1999-04-01

    The amount of 131I used to treat hyperthyroid patients is based in part on the 24-hour thyroid uptake of a diagnostic amount of radioiodine (tracer). We compared the 24-hour uptake of an 131I tracer administered in liquid or capsule form to the 24-hour uptake of 131I therapy administered as liquid. Sixty-five hyperthyroid patients with Graves' disease were evaluated and subsequently treated with radioiodine. The liquid group (45 patients) received a liquid 131I tracer (1.85 MBq [0.05 mCi]) and the capsule group (20 patients) received a capsule 131I tracer (1.63 MBq [0.044 mCi]). Probe calibration factors were the same for the liquid and capsule 131I standards. All patients received therapeutic amounts of 131I [114.7-1106.3 MBq [3.1-29.9 mCi]) in liquid form. Therapy uptakes were obtained using the same collimated uptake probe modified with a calibrated lead shield to attenuate the high photon flux. The mean therapeutic uptake was the same for both groups (58%). The mean diagnostic uptake for the capsule group, however, was less than the mean diagnostic uptake for the liquid group (44% vs. 63%). The mean diagnostic uptake for the capsule group was significantly lower than the mean therapeutic uptake for this group (44% vs. 58%), whereas the mean diagnostic and therapeutic uptakes were similar for the group receiving a liquid tracer (63% vs. 58%). In conclusion, diagnostic uptakes performed with a liquid tracer more accurately predicted liquid therapy uptakes than diagnostic uptakes performed with a capsule tracer. This raises concern about the bioavailability of 131I in capsule form and has implications for determining the amount of 131I to administer for therapy. Patients whose 131I therapy was based on the uptake of a capsule tracer received a higher than intended amount of radiation to the thyroid gland.

  15. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1 kt (1,100 st) of contained lithium, a 23-percent decrease from 2009. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium. It remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2010, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 21 kt (22,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 12-percent increase from 2009.

  16. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1.2 kt (1,300 st) of contained lithium, a 40-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium, and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2009, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 18.7 kt (20,600 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds.

  17. Wetting Properties of Liquid Lithium on Stainless Steel and Enhanced Stainless Steel Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, P.; Xu, W.; Raman, P.; Andruczyk, D.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.

    2012-10-01

    Research into lithium as a first wall material has proven its ability to effectively getter impurities and reduce recycling of hydrogen ions at the wall. Current schemes for introducing lithium into a fusion device consist of lithium evaporators, however, as these devices evolve from pulsed to steady state, new methods will need to be employed such as the LIMIT concept of UIUC, or thin flowing film lithium walls. Critical to their implementation is understanding the interactions of liquid lithium with various surfaces. One such interaction is the wetting of materials by lithium, which may be characterized by the contact angle between the lithium and the surface. Experiments have been performed at UIUC into the contact angle of liquid lithium with a given surface, as well as methods to increase it. To reduce the oxidation rate of the droplets, the experiments were performed in vacuum, using a lithium injector to deposit drops on each surface. Among the materials investigated are stainless steel, both untreated and coated with a diamond like carbon (DLC) layer, molybdenum, and boronized molybdenum. The contact angle and its dependence on temperature is measured.

  18. The diffusivity of hydrogen isotopes in liquid lithium and in solid yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxbaum, R. E.; Johnson, E. F.

    1982-12-01

    The separation of tritium from liquid lithium at low concentrations is an important problem for fusion technology. One of the most promising techniques for effecting this separation involves sorbing the tritium on solid yttrium metal. Reliable diffusivity data are essential for a realistic evaluation of this technique. The bodies of relevant experimental diffusivity data, i.e., data on protium diffusion in liquid lithium, protium diffusion in solid yttrium, and the isotope effect in metals, are reviewed.

  19. Corrosion resistance investigation of vanadium alloys in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Borovitskaya, I. V.; Lyublinskiy, I. E.; Bondarenko, G. G.; Paramonova, V. V.; Korshunov, S. N.; Mansurova, A. N.; Lyakhovitskiy, M. M.; Zharkov, M. Yu.

    2016-12-15

    A major concern in using vanadium alloys for first wall/blanket systems in fusion reactors is their activity with regard to nonmetallic impurities in the coolants. This paper presents the results of studying the corrosion resistance in high-purity liquid lithium (with the nitrogen and carbon content of less than 10{sup –3} wt %) of vanadium and vanadium alloys (V–1.86Ga, V–3.4Ga–0.62Si, V–4.81Ti–4.82Cr) both in the initial state and preliminarily irradiated with Ar+ ions with energy of 20 keV to a dose of 10{sup 22} m{sup –2} at an irradiation temperature of ~400°C. The degree of corrosion was estimated by measuring the changes in the weight and microhardness. Corrosion tests were carried out under static isothermal conditions at a temperature of 600°C for 400 h. The identity of corrosion mechanisms of materials both irradiated with Ar ions and not irradiated, which consisted in an insignificant penetration of nitrogen into the materials and a substantial escape of oxygen from the materials, causing the formation of a zone with a reduced microhardness near the surface, was established. The influence of the corrosive action of lithium on the surface morphology of the materials under study was found, resulting in the manifestation of grain boundaries and slip lines on the sample surface, the latter being most clearly observed in the case of preliminary irradiation with Ar ions.

  20. Plasma-wall interactions and plasma behaviour in fusion devices with liquid lithium plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, S.

    2009-06-01

    The application of lithium as a self-recovery and renewable material of plasma facing components (PFC) can be used to solve steady state fusion reactor PFC problems. This paper is a survey of liquid Li use in current tokamaks. Liquid Li as tokamak limiter material has been tested in T-11 M tokamak (TRINITI, RF), in FTU (Italy) and in CDX-U (USA). The idea of T-11 M and FTU liquid Li limiters is based on the Capillary-Pore System (CPS) concept. The main feature of CDX-U toroidal limiter was free liquid Li surface. The crucial issue of tokamak is impurity contamination. Lithium experiments in tokamaks discovered that poor lithium penetration into hot plasma core from its periphery (lithium screening) and the development close to plasma boundary lithium non-coronal irradiative blanket. Lithium screening can be physical ground of lithium 'emitter-collector' limiter concept with irradiated blanket and PFC prevention from a high local power load up to level of ITER parameters.

  1. Plasma Performance Improvements with Liquid Lithium Limiters in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski; M. Boaz; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; R. Kaita; H. Kugel; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Timberlake; L. Zakharov; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R.W. Conn; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; R. Maingi; and M. Ulrickson

    2002-07-12

    The use of flowing liquid lithium as a first wall for a reactor has potentially attractive physics and engineering features. The Current Drive experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has begun experiments with a fully toroidal liquid lithium limiter. CDX-U is a compact [R = 34 cm, a = 22 cm, Btoroidal = 2 kG, IP =100 kA, T(subscript)e(0) {approx} 100 eV, n(subscript)e(0) {approx} 5 x 10{sup 19} m-3] short-pulse (<25 msec) spherical tokamak with extensive diagnostics. The limiter, which consists of a shallow circular stainless steel tray of radius 34 cm and width 10 cm, can be filled with lithium to a depth of a few millimeters, and forms the lower limiting surface for the discharge. Heating elements beneath the tray are used to liquefy the lithium prior to the experiment. The total area of the tray is approximately 2000 cm{sup 2}. The tokamak edge plasma, when operated in contact with the lithium-filled tray, shows evidence of reduced impurities and recycling. The reduction in re cycling and impurities is largest when the lithium is liquefied by heating to 250 degrees Celsius. Discharges which are limited by the liquid lithium tray show evidence of performance enhancement. Radiated power is reduced and there is spectroscopic evidence for increases in the core electron temperature. Furthermore, the use of a liquid lithium limiter reduces the need for conditioning discharges prior to high current operation. The future development path for liquid lithium limiter systems in CDX-U is also discussed.

  2. Development of a lithium liquid metal ion source for MeV ion beam analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Maskrey, J.T.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium liquid metal ion sources are an attractive complement to the existing gaseous ion sources that are extensively used for ion beam analysis. This is due in part to the high brightness of the liquid metal ion source and in part to the availability of a lithium ion beam. High brightness is of particular importance to MeV ion microprobes which are now approaching current density limitations on targets determined by the ion source. The availability of a lithium beam provides increased capabilities for hydrogen profiling and high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. This paper describes the design and performance of a lithium liquid metal ion source suitable for use on a 5MV Laddertron accelerator. Operational experience with the source and some of its uses for ion beam analysis are discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Liquid Cooling of Tractive Lithium Ion Batteries Pack with Nanofluids Coolant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xie, Huaqing; Yu, Wei; Li, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The heat generated from tractive lithium ion batteries during discharge-charge process has great impacts on the performances of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. How to solve the thermal abuse in tractive lithium ion batteries pack becomes more and more urgent and important for future development of electrical vehicles. In this work, TiO2, ZnO and diamond nanofluids are prepared and utilized as coolants in indirect liquid cooling of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. The results show that nanofluids present superior cooling performance to that of pure fluids and the diamond nanofluid presents relatively excellent cooling abilities than that of TiO2 and ZnO nanofluids. During discharge process, the temperature distribution of batteries in batteries pack is uniform and stable, due to steady heat dissipation by indirect liquid cooling. It is expected that nanofluids could be considered as a potential alternative for indirect liquid cooling in electrical vehicles.

  4. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 25 kt (25,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 10-percent increase from 2010. U.S. consumption was estimated to have been about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, a 100-percent increase from 2010. The United States was estimated to be the fourth-ranked consumer of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  5. Safety and diagnostic systems on the Liquid Lithium Test Stand (LLTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. A.; Jaworski, M. A.; Ellis, R.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Liquid Lithium Test Stand (LLTS) is a test bed for development of flowing liquid lithium systems for plasma-facing components at PPPL. LLTS is designed to test operation of liquid lithium under vacuum, including flowing, solidifying (such as would be the case at the end of plasma operations), and re-melting. Constructed of stainless steel, LLTS is a closed loop of pipe with two reservoirs and a pump, as well as diagnostics for temperature, flow rate, and pressure. Since liquid lithium is a highly reactive material, special care must be taken when designing such a system. These include a permanent-magnet MHD pump and MHD flow meter that have no mechanical components in direct contact with the liquid lithium. The LLTS also includes an expandable 24-channel leak-detector interlock system which cuts power to heaters and the pump if any lithium leaks from a pipe joint. Design for the interlock systems and flow meter are presented. This work is supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, lithium consumption in the United States was at 2.5 kt of contained lithium, nearly 32% more than the estimate for 2004. World consumption was 14.1 kt of lithium contained in minerals and compounds in 2003. Exports from the US increased slightly compared with 2004. Due to strong demand for lithium compounds in 2005, both lithium carbonate plants in Chile were operating at or near capacity.

  7. Investigation of tin-lithium eutectic as a liquid plasma facing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, David; Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Shchelkanov, Ivan; Kalathiparambil, Kishor Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Innovative materials and techniques need to be utilized to address the high heat and particle flux incident on plasma facing components in fusion reactors. A liquid metal diverter module developed at UIUC with self circulating lithium has been successfully demonstrated to be capable of handling the relevant heat flux in plasma gun based tests and on operational tokamaks. The proper geometry of the liquid lithium trenches to minimize droplet ejection during transient plasma events have also been identified. Although lithium has proven to be effective in improved plasma performance and contributes to other advantageous factors like reduction in the fuel recycling, impurity gettering and, owing to the low Z, a significantly reduced impact on plasma as compared to the solid wall materials, it still poses several drawbacks related to its high reactivity and high vapor pressure at the relevant tokamak wall temperatures. The evaporation properties of a new eutectic mixture of tin and lithium (20% Sn) shows that lithium segregates to the surface at melting temperatures and hence is an effective replacement for pure lithium. Also, the vapor from the eutectic is dominated by lithium, minimizing the entry of high Z Sn into the plasma. At UIUC experiments for the synthesis and characterization of the eutectic - measurement of the critical wetting parameters and Seebeck coefficients with respect to the trench materials have been performed to ensure lithium wetting and flow in the trenches. The results will be presented. DOE project DEFG02- 99ER54515.

  8. Counterintuitive trends of the wetting behavior of ionic liquid-based electrolytes on modified lithium electrodes.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Paulo; Kolek, Martin; Diddens, Diddo; Stan, Marian Cristian; Jalkanen, Kirsi; Winter, Martin; Bieker, Peter

    2017-07-26

    The demand for high energy densities has brought rechargeable lithium metal batteries back into the research focus. Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered as suitable electrolyte components for these systems. In this work, the wetting behavior of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide ([C2MIm]TFSI), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide ([C4MIm]TFSI), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide ([C6MIm]TFSI), and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide (Pyr14TFSI) on mechanically modified lithium electrodes, with and without lithium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) conducting salt, is investigated and is compared to an organic carbonate-based electrolyte. Three different patterns were chosen for the lithium modification, enabling a surface area increase of 12%, 20%, and 56% for the modified lithium electrodes. Especially for pure ILs, the contact angle on lithium was significantly larger with higher surface areas of the lithium electrodes. Since the addition of LiTFSI remarkably decreased the contact angles of the ILs on the modified lithium surfaces, it could be shown that the effect of LiTFSI can be attributed to a decreased surface tension. This observation could be explained by an interruption of the ordering of ionic liquid cations and anions, which is supported by Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  9. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith

    2002-01-18

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance.

  10. Conceptual design of a pre-loaded liquid lithium divertor target for NSTX-U

    DOE PAGES

    Rindt, P.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; van Dommelen, J. A. W.; ...

    2016-09-03

    In this study, a conceptual design for a pre-filled liquid lithium divertor target for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) is presented. The design is aimed at facilitating experiments with high lithium flux from the plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX-U and investigating the potential of capillary based liquid lithium components. In the design, lithium is supplied from a reservoir in the PFC to the plasma facing surface via capillary action in a wicking structure. This working principle is also demonstrated experimentally. Next, a titanium zirconium molybdenum (TZM) prototype design is presented, required to withstand a steady state heatmore » flux peaking at 10 MW m–2 for 5 s and edge localized modes depositing (130 kJ in 2 ms at 10 Hz). The main challenge is to sufficiently reduce the thermal stresses. This is achieved by dividing the surface into brushes and filling the slots in between with liquid lithium. The principle of using this liquid “interlayer” allows for thermal expansion and simultaneously heat conduction, and could be used to significantly reduce the demands to solids in future PFCs. Lithium flow to the surface is analyzed using a novel analytical model, ideally suited for design purposes. Thermal stresses in the PFC are analyzed using the finite element method. As a result, the requirements are met, and thus a prototype will be manufactured for physical testing.« less

  11. Conceptual design of a pre-loaded liquid lithium divertor target for NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Rindt, P.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; van Dommelen, J. A. W.; Kaita, R.; Jaworski, M. A.

    2016-09-03

    In this study, a conceptual design for a pre-filled liquid lithium divertor target for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) is presented. The design is aimed at facilitating experiments with high lithium flux from the plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX-U and investigating the potential of capillary based liquid lithium components. In the design, lithium is supplied from a reservoir in the PFC to the plasma facing surface via capillary action in a wicking structure. This working principle is also demonstrated experimentally. Next, a titanium zirconium molybdenum (TZM) prototype design is presented, required to withstand a steady state heat flux peaking at 10 MW m–2 for 5 s and edge localized modes depositing (130 kJ in 2 ms at 10 Hz). The main challenge is to sufficiently reduce the thermal stresses. This is achieved by dividing the surface into brushes and filling the slots in between with liquid lithium. The principle of using this liquid “interlayer” allows for thermal expansion and simultaneously heat conduction, and could be used to significantly reduce the demands to solids in future PFCs. Lithium flow to the surface is analyzed using a novel analytical model, ideally suited for design purposes. Thermal stresses in the PFC are analyzed using the finite element method. As a result, the requirements are met, and thus a prototype will be manufactured for physical testing.

  12. Lithium ion conductive behavior of TiO2 nanotube/ionic liquid matrices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of TiO2 nanotube (TNT)/ionic liquid matrices were prepared, and their lithium ion conductive properties were studied. SEM images implied that ionic liquid was dispersed on the whole surface of TNT. Addition of TNT to ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (BMImTFSA)) resulted in significant increase of ionic conductivity. Furthermore, lithium transference number was also largely enhanced due to the interaction of anion with TNT. Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann parameter showed higher carrier ion number for TNT/BMImTFSA in comparison with BMImTFSA. PMID:25313300

  13. Simplified thermochemistry of oxygen in lithium and sodium for liquid metal cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, L. K.

    1972-01-01

    Plots of oxygen chemical potential against composition of lithium-oxygen solutions and sodium-oxygen solutions for a range of temperature were constructed. For each liquid metal two such plots were prepared. For one plot ideal solution behavior was assumed. For the other plot, existing solubility limit data for oxygen in the liquid metal were used to determine a first-order term for departure from ideality. The use of the plots in evaluating the oxygen gettering capability of refractory metals in liquid metal cooling systems is illustrated by a simple example involving lithium, oxygen, and hafnium.

  14. Ionic Liquid-Doped Gel Polymer Electrolyte for Flexible Lithium-Ion Polymer Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruisi; Chen, Yuanfen; Montazami, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Application of gel polymer electrolytes (GPE) in lithium-ion polymer batteries can address many shortcomings associated with liquid electrolyte lithium-ion batteries. Due to their physical structure, GPEs exhibit lower ion conductivity compared to their liquid counterparts. In this work, we have investigated and report improved ion conductivity in GPEs doped with ionic liquid. Samples containing ionic liquid at a variety of volume percentages (vol %) were characterized for their electrochemical and ionic properties. It is concluded that excess ionic liquid can damage internal structure of the batteries and result in unwanted electrochemical reactions; however, samples containing 40–50 vol % ionic liquid exhibit superior ionic properties and lower internal resistance compared to those containing less or more ionic liquids.

  15. Liquid surface skimmer apparatus for molten lithium and method

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Samuel C.; Pollard, Roy E.; Thompson, William F.; Stark, Marshall W.; Currin, Jr., Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for separating two fluids having different specific gravities. The invention also relates to a method for using the separating apparatus of the present invention. This invention particularly relates to the skimming of molten lithium metal from the surface of a fused salt electrolyte in the electrolytic production of lithium metal from a mixed fused salt.

  16. UV cross-linked, lithium-conducting ternary polymer electrolytes containing ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. T.; Appetecchi, G. B.; Carewska, M.; Joost, M.; Balducci, A.; Winter, M.; Passerini, S.

    In this manuscript is reported an attempt to prepare high ionic conductivity lithium polymer electrolytes by UV cross-linking the poly(ethyleneoxide) (briefly called PEO) polymer matrix in presence of the plasticizing lithium salt, lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and an ionic liquid of the pyrrolidinium family (N-alkyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium TFSI) having a common anion with the lithium salt. It is demonstrated that polymer electrolytes with room temperature ionic conductivities of nearly 10 -3 S cm -1 could be obtained as a result of the reduced crystallinity of the ternary electrolytes. The results clearly indicate that the cross-linked ternary electrolyte shows superior mechanical properties with respect to the non-cross-linked electrolytes and higher conductivities with respect to polymer electrolytes containing none or less ionic liquid.

  17. Mixtures of protic ionic liquids and propylene carbonate as advanced electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Vogl, T; Menne, S; Balducci, A

    2014-12-07

    In this study we investigated the chemical-physical properties of mixtures containing the protic ionic liquid (PIL) N-butyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYRH4TFSI), propylene carbonate (PC) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in view of their use as electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We showed that these electrolytic solutions might display conductivity and viscosity comparable to those of conventional electrolytes. Depending on the amount of PIL present inside the mixtures, such mixtures might also display the ability to suppress the anodic dissolution of Al. Furthermore, we showed that the coordination of lithium ions by TFSI in PIL-PC mixtures appears to be different than the one observed for mixtures of PC and aprotic ionic liquids (AILs). When used in combination with a battery electrode, e.g. lithium iron phosphate (LFP), these mixtures allow the achievement of high performance also at a very high C-rate.

  18. A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

    2005-08-29

    Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

  19. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.

    1998-01-01

    The lithium industry can be divided into two sectors: ore concentrate producers and chemical producers. Ore concentrate producers mine lithium minerals. They beneficiate the ores to produce material for use in ceramics and glass manufacturing.

  20. Stabilizing lithium metal using ionic liquids for long-lived batteries

    PubMed Central

    Basile, A.; Bhatt, A. I.; O'Mullane, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Suppressing dendrite formation at lithium metal anodes during cycling is critical for the implementation of future lithium metal-based battery technology. Here we report that it can be achieved via the facile process of immersing the electrodes in ionic liquid electrolytes for a period of time before battery assembly. This creates a durable and lithium ion-permeable solid–electrolyte interphase that allows safe charge–discharge cycling of commercially applicable Li|electrolyte|LiFePO4 batteries for 1,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiencies >99.5%. The tailored solid–electrolyte interphase is prepared using a variety of electrolytes based on the N-propyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide room temperature ionic liquid containing lithium salts. The formation is both time- and lithium salt-dependant, showing dynamic morphology changes, which when optimized prevent dendrite formation and consumption of electrolyte during cycling. This work illustrates that a simple, effective and industrially applicable lithium metal pretreatment process results in a commercially viable cycle life for a lithium metal battery. PMID:27292652

  1. 2-D thermal response calculations of the liquid lithium divertor on NSTX*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, K.; McLean, A. G.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; Maingi, R.

    2011-10-01

    The liquid lithium divertor (LLD) in NSTX was installed for particle and impurity control in NSTX, and its effectiveness was predicted to vary with the lithium surface temperature. It is therefore important to know the temperature evolution of the LLD during plasma discharges. A 2-D implicit finite difference code (``Li_enthalpy'') was written to simulate the lithium temperature with an accurate description of the LLD components, which include a surface lithium layer, a porous molybdenum mesh that is ~ 50% filled with lithium, a thin stainless steel layer, and a thick underlying copper substrate. The heat flux on the graphite was measured with a recently developed dual-band infrared camera; we use the same heat flux profile on the LLD at the same major radius, because of toroidal symmetry. The code ``Li_enthalpy'' computes the LLD thermal response to this heat flux profile; a Gauss-Seidel iterative procedure was implemented to solve the phase-change problem as lithium melted in response to plasma heating. The computed LLD temperature response is then compared and calibrated with the measured surface temperature on the LLD with the dual-band camera. From this the dynamics of the spatially and time varying liquid lithium layer thickness are extracted. Analysis from a number of plasma discharges is presented. *Supported in part by U.S. DoE contracts DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. Stabilizing lithium metal using ionic liquids for long-lived batteries.

    PubMed

    Basile, A; Bhatt, A I; O'Mullane, A P

    2016-06-13

    Suppressing dendrite formation at lithium metal anodes during cycling is critical for the implementation of future lithium metal-based battery technology. Here we report that it can be achieved via the facile process of immersing the electrodes in ionic liquid electrolytes for a period of time before battery assembly. This creates a durable and lithium ion-permeable solid-electrolyte interphase that allows safe charge-discharge cycling of commercially applicable Li|electrolyte|LiFePO4 batteries for 1,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiencies >99.5%. The tailored solid-electrolyte interphase is prepared using a variety of electrolytes based on the N-propyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide room temperature ionic liquid containing lithium salts. The formation is both time- and lithium salt-dependant, showing dynamic morphology changes, which when optimized prevent dendrite formation and consumption of electrolyte during cycling. This work illustrates that a simple, effective and industrially applicable lithium metal pretreatment process results in a commercially viable cycle life for a lithium metal battery.

  3. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, Robert; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlak, John

    2010-02-16

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions. __________________________________________________

  4. Glyme-lithium salt equimolar molten mixtures: concentrated solutions or solvate ionic liquids?

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuhide; Yoshida, Kazuki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Tachikawa, Naoki; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2012-09-13

    To demonstrate a new family of ionic liquids (ILs), i.e., "solvate" ionic liquids, the properties (thermal, transport, and electrochemical properties, Lewis basicity, and ionicity) of equimolar molten mixtures of glymes (triglyme (G3) and tetraglyme (G4)) and nine different lithium salts (LiX) were investigated. By exploring the anion-dependent properties and comparing them with the reported data on common aprotic ILs, two different classes of liquid regimes, i.e., ordinary concentrated solutions and "solvate" ILs, were found in the glyme-Li salt equimolar mixtures ([Li(glyme)]X) depending on the anionic structures. The class a given [Li(glyme)]X belonged to was governed by competitive interactions between the glymes and Li cations and between the counteranions (X) and Li cations. [Li(glyme)]X with weakly Lewis basic anions can form long-lived [Li(glyme)](+) complex cations. Thus, they behaved as typical ionic liquids. The lithium "solvate" ILs based on [Li(glyme)]X have many desirable properties for lithium-conducting electrolytes, including high ionicity, a high lithium transference number, high Li cation concentration, and high oxidative stability, in addition to the common properties of ionic liquids. The concept of "solvate" ionic liquids can be utilized in an unlimited number of combinations of other metal salts and ligands, and will thus open a new field of research on ionic liquids.

  5. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  6. Microstructure evolution of Li uptake/removal in MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles with high lithium storage performance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Pan; Chen, Wenhao; Li, Zhicheng

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • The carbon-coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) ultra fine nanoparticles are synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal method. • MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles have high specific capacity, excellent cycling performance and rate performance. • Phase transformations for lithium ion uptake/removal are examined carefully by TEM. • Phase transformations are highly reversible during the redox process. - Abstract: A facile one pot strategy of a hydrothermal methodology was applied to synthesize the carbon coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) nanostructured particles, which are composed of ultra fine nanoparticles with homogeneous carbon coating about several nanometers. As an electrode in lithium ion batteries, the MoO{sub 2}@C shows a high specific capacity and reversible capacity (730 mA h g{sup −1} after 60 cycles). Microstructure investigations, by using a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, of the MoO{sub 2}@C based electrodes employed at various states during the first discharge/charge cycle were conducted to elucidate the lithium ion uptake/removal mechanism and cycling behavior. In the lithium uptake process, the original MoO{sub 2} phase transfers into Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} through an addition type reaction, and then nanosized metallic Mo emerges as a result of a conversion reaction. In turn, Mo could be oxidized to the intermediate Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} before converting to hyperfine MoO{sub 2} phase on upcoming lithium removal process.

  7. Lithium as an adjuvant of iodine-131 uptake when treating patients with well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, F.; Carrio, I.; Estorch, M.; Ginjaume, M.; Pons, J.; Milian, R.

    1987-08-01

    Differences in the I-131 uptake by 14 metastatic lesions from well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma and 12 local remnants of normal thyroid tissue before and after an adjuvant therapy with lithium carbonate, were observed. After the adjuvant treatment and administration of an I-131 tracer dose, a considerable increase of radioiodine uptake in all metastatic lesions was found (P less than 0.001), but only a slight increase was found in 50% of the normal tissue. The response to lithium carbonate by neoplastic tissue seems to be different than that of the normal thyroid tissue, and produces a lengthening of the average I-131 biologic life that could be helpful when treating well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

  8. Mixed organic compound-ionic liquid electrolytes for lithium battery electrolyte systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanino, M.; Moreno, M.; Carewska, M.; Maresca, G.; Simonetti, E.; Lo Presti, R.; Alessandrini, F.; Appetecchi, G. B.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal, transport, rheological and flammability properties of electrolyte mixtures, proposed for safer lithium-ion battery systems, were investigated as a function of the mole composition. The blends were composed of a lithium salt (LiTFSI), organic solvents (namely EC, DEC) and an ionic liquid (PYR13TFSI). The main goal is to combine the fast ion transport properties of the organic compounds with the safe issues of the non-flammable and non-volatile ionic liquids. Preliminary tests in batteries have evidenced cycling performance approaching that observed in commercial organic electrolytes.

  9. Ionic liquid-based membranes as electrolytes for advanced lithium polymer batteries.

    PubMed

    Navarra, M A; Manzi, J; Lombardo, L; Panero, S; Scrosati, Bruno

    2011-01-17

    Gel-type polymer electrolytes are formed by immobilizing a solution of lithium N,N-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in N-n-butyl-N-ethylpyrrolidinium N,N-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Py₂₄TFSI) ionic liquid (IL) with added mixtures of organic solvents, such as ethylene, propylene and dimethyl carbonates (EC, PC, and DMC, respectively), into a poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) matrix, and their properties investigated. The addition of the organic solvent mixtures results in an improvement of the ionic conductivity and in the stabilization of the interface with the lithium electrode. Conductivity values in the range of 10⁻³-10⁻²  S cm⁻¹ are obtained in a wide temperature range. These unique properties allow the effective use of these membranes as electrolytes for the development of advanced polymer batteries based on a lithium metal anode and an olivine-type lithium iron phosphate cathode.

  10. Existing condition and migration property of ions in lithium electrolytes with ionic liquid solvent.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuria; Umecky, Tatsuya; Niwa, Junichi; Sakai, Tetsuo; Maeda, Seiji

    2007-10-11

    Ionization conditions of each ionic species in lithium ionic liquid electrolytes, LiTFSI/BMI-TFSI and LiTFSI/BDMI-TFSI, were confirmed based on the diffusion coefficients of the species measured by the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR technique. We found that the diffusion coefficient ratios of the cation and anion species D(Li)(obs)/D(F)(obs) of the lithium salt and D(H)(obs)/D(F)(obs) of the ionic liquid solvent were effective guides to evaluate the ionization condition responsible for their mobility. Lithium ions were found to be stabilized, forming the solvated species as Li(TFSI)3(2-). TFSI- anion coordination could be relaxed by the dispersion of silica to form a gel electrolyte, LiTFSI/BDMI-TFSI/silica. It is expected that the oxygen sites on the silica directly attract Li+, releasing the TFSI- coordination. The lithium species, loosing TFSI- anions, kept a random walk feature in the gel without the diffusion restriction attributed from the strong chemical and morphological effect as that in the gel with the polymer. We can conclude that the silica dispersion is a significant approach to provide the appropriate lithium ion condition as a charge-transporting species in the ionic liquid electrolytes.

  11. The effect of lithium salt doping on the nanostructure of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Luis; Völkner, Johannes; Labrador, Ana; Matic, Aleksandar

    2015-10-28

    In this work we report on the evolution of the structure of two model ionic liquid families, N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium (Pyr1n-TFSI) and 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium (CnMIm-TFSI) (n = 3, 4, 6 and 8) both containing the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI) anion, upon the addition of LiTFSI using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The introduction of a lithium salt (Li-salt) tunes the interactions through the substitution of the large cation in the ionic liquid with the small and charge localized lithium ion, thus increasing the coulombic contribution from ion-ion interactions. We find that the introduction of lithium ions results in a restructuring of the polar groups in the ionic liquids. These changes are manifested as an increase in the correlation lengths related to charge alternation of the ions and a more disordered structure. This restructuring is interpreted as a reconfiguration of the anions as they coordinate to the small and ionic lithium. In contrast, the length scale of the mesoscopic heterogeneities related to the clustering of alkyl chains is virtually unchanged with lithium doping. Moreover, the correlation corresponding to alkyl chain domains becomes more well defined with increasing salt concentration, suggesting that Li-salt doping, i.e. an increased columbic interaction in the system, promotes clustering of the alkyl tails.

  12. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I.; Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M.

    2013-12-15

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ∼200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ∼2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ∼4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  13. Higher energy and safety of lithium-ion batteries with ionic liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaba, Shinichi; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Katayama, Yasushi; Miura, Takashi

    2010-04-01

    Ionic liquid has been utilized as safe electrolyte solution for lithium-ion batteries. Reversible charge / discharge cycling of the graphite electrode in the ionic liquid has been achieved with polyacrylic acid polymer binder, which can suppress the organic cation intercalation to the graphite. Cycleability of the graphite-silicon composite electrodes prepared with polyacrylate binder was significantly improved in comparison to the conventional PVdF binder, and it has been demonstrated that the reversible cycling with 1000 mAh g-1 for 30 cycling test is possible in ionic liquid. The possibility of the safe and high-energy lithium-ion battery is discussed through the preliminary study on Li2MnO3-LiCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 based positive electrode and graphite-silicon-polyacrylate composite negative electrode with the ionic liquid electrolyte.

  14. Ionic liquid-based electrolyte with binary lithium salts for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Zhu, Qizhen; Chen, Renjie; Chen, Nan; Chen, Yan; Ye, Yusheng; Qian, Ji; Li, Li

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable Li-S batteries have suffered several technical obstacles, such as rapid capacity fading and low coulombic efficiency. To overcome these problems, we design new electrolytes containing N-methoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide (Pyr1,2O1TFSI) and tri(ethylene glycol)dimethyl ether (TEGDME) in mass ratio of 7:3. Moreover, Lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate (LiODFB) is introduced for the modification. Although the addition of LiODFB as additive lead to extremely high viscosity of electrolyte and inferior performance of the cells, the electrolyte containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI, 0.84 nm) and LiODFB (0.60 nm) mixture with a total molar concentration of 0.4 mol kg-1 as binary lithium salt shows excellent electrochemical performance. The Pyr1,2O1TFSI/TEGDME electrolyte with LiTFSI/LiODFB binary lithium salts in mole ratio of 6:4 is obtained after optimizing ratio. The Li-S cells containing this electrolyte system show excellent capacity and cycle performance, whose initial discharge capacity is 1264.4 mAh g-1, and retains 911.4 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles with the coulombic efficiency more than 95%. It can be attributed the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI)-forming ability of LiODFB which protect Li anode from suffering lithium dendrites and prevent the shuttle phenomenon. The novel electrolytes provide good cycling stability and high coulombic efficiency for the Li-S batteries, which is suggested as a promising electrolyte for Li-S batteries.

  15. Use of Ionic Liquids in Rod-Coil Block Copolyimides for Improved Lithium Ion Conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.; Chapin, Kara; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Solvent-free, solid polymer electrolytes (SPE) have the potential to improve safety, increase design flexibility and enhance performance of rechargeable lithium batteries. Solution based electrolytes are flammable and typically incompatible with lithium metal anodes, limiting energy density. We have previously demonstrated use of polyimide rod coil block copolymers doped with lithium salts as electrolytes for lithium polymer batteries. The polyimide rod blocks provide dimensional stability while the polyethylene oxide (PEO) coil portions conduct ions. Phase separation of the rods and coils in these highly branched polymers provide channels with an order of magnitude improvement in lithium conduction over polyethylene oxide itself at room temperature. In addition, the polymers have been demonstrated in coin cells to be compatible with lithium metal. For practical use at room temperature and below, however, at least an order of magnitude improvement in ion conduction is still required. The addition of nonvolatile, room temperature ionic liquids has been shown to improve the ionic conductivity of high molecular weight PEO. Herein we describe use of these molten salts to improve ionic conductivity in the rod-coil block copolymers.

  16. Decomposition of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids in Contact with Lithium Metal.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Paulo; Jakelski, Rene; Pyschik, Marcelina; Jalkanen, Kirsi; Nowak, Sascha; Winter, Martin; Bieker, Peter

    2017-03-09

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered to be suitable electrolyte components for lithium-metal batteries. Imidazolium cation based ILs were previously found to be applicable for battery systems with a lithium-metal negative electrode. However, herein it is shown that, in contrast to the well-known IL N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([Pyr14 ][TFSI]), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([C2MIm][TFSI]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([C4MIm][TFSI]) are chemically unstable versus metallic lithium. A lithium-metal sheet was immersed in pure imidazolium-based IL samples and aged at 60 °C for 28 days. Afterwards, the aged IL samples were investigated to deduce possible decomposition products of the imidazolium cation. The chemical instability of the ILs in contact with lithium metal and a possible decomposition starting point are shown for the first time. Furthermore, the investigated imidazolium-based ILs can be utilized for lithium-metal batteries through the addition of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) film-forming additive fluoroethylene carbonate. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. CDX-U Operation with a Large Area Liquid Lithium Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski; M. Boaz; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; R. Kaita; H. Kugel; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Timberlake; L. Zakharov; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R.W. Conn; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; R. Maingi; and M. Ulrickson

    2002-07-12

    The Current Drive experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has begun experiments with a fully toroidal liquid lithium limiter. CDX-U is a compact [R = 34 cm, a = 22 cm, B(subscript)toroidal = 2 kG, I(subscript)P = 100 kA, T(subscript)e(0) {approx} 100 eV, n(subscript)e(0) {approx} 5 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}] short-pulse (<25 msec) spherical torus with extensive diagnostics. The limiter, which consists of a shallow circular stainless steel tray of radius 34 cm and width 10 cm, can be filled with lithium to a depth of a few millimeters, and forms the lower limiting surface for the discharge. Heating elements beneath the tray are used to liquefy the lithium prior to the experiment. Surface coatings are evident on part of the lithium. Despite the surface coatings, tokamak discharges operated in contact with the lithium-filled tray show evidence of reduced impurities and recycling. The reduction in recycling is largest when the lithium is liquefied by heating to 250 degrees Celsius.

  18. Lithium Metal Anodes with an Adaptive "Solid-Liquid" Interfacial Protective Layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Pei, Allen; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Kong, Biao; Liu, Nian; Lin, Dingchang; Liu, Yayuan; Liu, Chong; Hsu, Po-Chun; Bao, Zhenan; Cui, Yi

    2017-04-05

    Lithium metal is an attractive anode for the next generation of high energy density lithium-ion batteries due to its high specific capacity (3,860 mAh g(-1)) and lowest overall anode potential. However, the key issue is that the static solid electrolyte interphase cannot match the dynamic volume changes of the Li anode, resulting in side reactions, dendrite growth, and poor electrodeposition behavior, which prevent its practical applications. Here, we show that the "solid-liquid" hybrid behavior of a dynamically cross-linked polymer enables its use as an excellent adaptive interfacial layer for Li metal anodes. The dynamic polymer can reversibly switch between its "liquid" and "solid" properties in response to the rate of lithium growth to provide uniform surface coverage and dendrite suppression, respectively, thereby enabling the stable operation of lithium metal electrodes. We believe that this example of engineering an adaptive Li/electrolyte interface brings about a new and promising way to address the intrinsic problems of lithium metal anodes.

  19. Single-Ion Block Copoly(ionic liquid)s as Electrolytes for All-Solid State Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Porcarelli, Luca; Shaplov, Alexander S; Salsamendi, Maitane; Nair, Jijeesh R; Vygodskii, Yakov S; Mecerreyes, David; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2016-04-27

    Polymer electrolytes have been proposed as replacement for conventional liquid electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to their intrinsic enhanced safety. Nevertheless, the power delivery of these materials is limited by the concentration gradient of the lithium salt. Single-ion conducting polyelectrolytes represent the ideal solution since their nature prevents polarization phenomena. Herein, the preparation of a new family of single-ion conducting block copolymer polyelectrolytes via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization technique is reported. These copolymers comprise poly(lithium 1-[3-(methacryloyloxy)propylsulfonyl]-1-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate blocks. The obtained polyelectrolytes show low Tg values in the range of -61 to 0.6 °C, comparatively high ionic conductivity (up to 2.3 × 10(-6) and 1.2 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 25 and 55 °C, respectively), wide electrochemical stability (up to 4.5 V versus Li(+)/Li), and a lithium-ion transference number close to unity (0.83). Owing to the combination of all mentioned properties, the prepared polymer materials were used as solid polyelectrolytes and as binders in the elaboration of lithium-metal battery prototypes with high charge/discharge efficiency and excellent specific capacity (up to 130 mAh g(-1)) at C/15 rate.

  20. Characterization of Liquid Lithium Wetting and Thermoelectric Properties for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Christenson, Michael; Andruczyk, Daniel; Curreli, Davide; Ruzic, David

    2013-10-01

    Critical to the implementation of flowing liquid lithium plasma facing components is understanding the interactions of liquid lithium with various surfaces. Presented here are experiments investigating the material compatibility, wetting characteristics, and relative thermopower of liquid lithium with a variety of potential substrate candidates for the LiMIT concept. Wetting experiments with lithium used the contact angle as a metric. Among those materials investigated are 316 SS, Mo, Ta, and W. The contact angle, as well as its dependence on temperature was measured. For example, at 200 C, tungsten registers a contact angle of 130°, whereas above its wetting temperature of 350 C, the contact angle is less than 80°. Several methods were found to decrease the critical wetting temperature of various materials and are presented here. The thermopower of W, Mo, Ta, Li, Ga, Wood's metal and Sn has been measured relative to stainless steel, and the Seebeck coefficient of has then been calculated. For molybdenum the Seebeck coefficient has a linear rise with temperature from SMo = 3.9 μVK-1 at 30 °C to 7.5 μVK-1 at 275 °C. On Assignment at PPPL

  1. Kinetics of the degradation of type 316 stainless steel by liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    A forced convection loop is used to study the corrosion of type 316 stainless steel by liquid lithium at temperatures relevant to fusion reactors. Weight loss data are reported for tubular samples located in the hot zone of the loop. Temperatures of 440C and 490C have been used in the hot zone with temperature differences of 100C to 200C between the hot and cold zones. The effect of lithium velocity on local mass transfer rates is examined by simultaneously exposing stainless steel samples to parallel streams of lithium at velocities ranging from 40 to 130 cm/s. The loss rates become essentially steady after one month of exposure. The rates agree substantially with rates reported by previous workers, but are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the rates predicted by boundary layer theory, using an extrapolation of the available solubility data for iron in lithium. It is presumed that particles of iron circulate in the lithium and by their dissolution and precipitation act as a buffer to reduce the wall fluxes. The loss rate increases with lithium velocity in a manner suggestive of liquid-phase controlled mass transfer. The velocity dependence is weaker than expected for flows in the range of Reynolds numbers studied. This may reflect a significant interfacial resistance to the dissolution. The mass loss rates at 440C are reduced when the temperature difference between the hot and cold zones is reduced. The rates during the first 1000 hours are three to four times higher at 490C than at 440C. The dissolution rate at 490C decreases markedly after 1000 hours. The transformation of the steel surface to a ferritic phase may cause the reduction in the rate.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of chromium solubility data in liquid lithium containing nitrogen: Comparison between experimental data and computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasin, Valery P.; Soyustova, Svetlana I.

    2015-10-01

    The mathematical formalism for description of solute interactions in dilute solution of chromium and nitrogen in liquid lithium have been applied for calculating of the temperature dependence of the solubility of chromium in liquid lithium with the various nitrogen contents. It is shown that the derived equations are useful to provide understanding of a relationship between thermodynamic properties and local ordering in the Li-Cr-N melt. Comparison between theory and data reported in the literature for solubility of chromium in nitrogen-contaminated liquid lithium, was allowed to explain the reasons of the deviation of the experimental semi-logarithmic plot of chromium content in liquid lithium as a function of the reciprocal temperature from a straight line.

  3. New Polymer and Liquid Electrolytes for Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.; Lee, H. S.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.

    1999-03-29

    All non-aqueous lithium battery electrolytes are Lewis bases that interact with cations. Unlike water, they don't interact with anions. The result is a high degree of ion pairing and the formation of triplets and higher aggregates. This decreases the conductivity and the lithium ion transference and results in polarization losses in batteries. Approaches that have been used to increase ion dissociation in PEO based electrolytes are the use of salts with low lattice energy, the addition of polar plasticizers to the polymer, and the addition of cation completing agents such as crown ethers or cryptands. Complexing of the anions is a more promising approach since it should increase both ion dissociation and the lithium transference. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) we have synthesized two new families of neutral anion completing agents, each based on Lewis acid centers. One is based on electron deficient nitrogen sites on substituted aza-ethers, wherein the hydrogen on the nitrogen is replaced by electron withdrawing groups such as CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3{sup -}}. The other is based on electron deficient boron sites on borane or borate compounds with various fluorinated aryl or alkyl groups. Some of the borane based anion receptors can promote the dissolution of LiF in several solvents. Several of these compounds, when added in equivalent amounts, produce 1.2M LiF solutions in DME, an increase in volubility of LiF by six orders of magnitude. Some of these LiF electrolytes have conductivities as high as 6 x 10{sup -3} Scm{sup -1}. The LiF electrolytes with borane anion acceptors in PC:EC:DEC solvents have excellent electrochemical stability. This has been demonstrated in small Li/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cells.

  4. Structural Investigations on Lithium-Doped Protic and Aprotic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ray, Promit; Vogl, Thomas; Balducci, Andrea; Kirchner, Barbara

    2017-05-25

    Solutions of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiNTf2), in four different [NTf2](-)-based ionic liquids, are extensively investigated as potential electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries. Solvation of the [Li](+) ions in the ionic liquids and its impact on their physicochemical properties are studied herein with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations. The cationic components of the investigated liquids were systematically varied so as to individually evaluate effects of specific structural changes; increase in ring size, the addition of an alkyl chain and absence of an acidic proton, on the solvation and mobility of the [Li](+) cations. The studied cations also allow for a direct comparison between solutions of [Li](+) salt in protic and aprotic ionic liquids. Emphasis is laid on elucidating the interactions between the [Li](+) and [NTf2](-) ions revealing slightly higher coordination numbers for the aprotic solvent, benchmarked against experimental measurements. The study suggests that the ionic liquids largely retain their structure upon salt addition, with interactions within the liquids only slightly perturbed. The rattling motion of the [Li](+) cations within cages formed by the surrounding [NTf2](-) anions is examined by the analysis of [Li](+) autocorrelation functions. Overall, the solvation mechanism of [Li](+) salt, within the hydrogen-bonded network of the ionic liquids, is detailed from classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Yang, Q. X.; Li, J. G.; Zakharov, L. E.; Xie, H.; Chen, Z. X.

    2015-02-01

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a "first," or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak—both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST.

  6. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Yang, Q. X.; Li, J. G.; Xie, H.; Chen, Z. X.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2015-02-15

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a “first,” or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak—both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST.

  7. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Zuo, G Z; Hu, J S; Sun, Z; Yang, Q X; Li, J G; Zakharov, L E; Xie, H; Chen, Z X

    2015-02-01

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a "first," or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak-both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST.

  8. Solvation of lithium salts in protic ionic liquids: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jesús; Cabeza, Óscar; Russina, Olga; Triolo, Alessandro; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2014-01-23

    The structure of solutions of lithium nitrate in a protic ionic liquid with a common anion, ethylammonium nitrate, at room temperature is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Several structural properties, such as density, radial distribution functions, hydrogen bonds, spatial distribution functions, and coordination numbers, are analyzed in order to get a picture of the solvation of lithium cations in this hydrogen-bonded, amphiphilically nanostructured environment. The results reveal that the ionic liquid mainly retains its structure upon salt addition, the interaction between the ammonium group of the cation and the nitrate anion being only slightly perturbed by the addition of the salt. Lithium cations are solvated by embedding them in the polar nanodomains of the solution formed by the anions, where they coordinate with the latter in a solid-like fashion reminiscent of a pseudolattice structure. Furthermore, it is shown that the average coordination number of [Li](+) with the anions is 4, nitrate coordinating [Li](+) in both monodentate and bidentate ways, and that in the second coordination layer both ethylammonium cations and other lithiums are also found. Additionally, the rattling motion of lithium ions inside the cages formed by their neighboring anions, indicative of the so-called caging effect, is confirmed by the analysis of the [Li](+) velocity autocorrelation functions. The overall picture indicates that the solvation of [Li](+) cations in this amphiphilically nanostructured environment takes place by means of a sort of inhomogeneous nanostructural solvation, which we could refer to as nanostructured solvation, and which could be a universal solvation mechanism in ionic liquids.

  9. Ferrous alloy metallurgy - liquid lithium corrosion and welding. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D. L.; Matlock, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth has been used to evaluate the interaction between liquid lithium and an imposed stress. Fatigue crack growth data on type 304L stainless steel at 700C and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel between 500 and 700C show that for all imposed test conditions (i.e. frequency, temperature, and nitrogen content in the lithium) the interaction of lithium with the strain at the crack tip results in enhanced crack growth rates. The enhanced growth rates result from the effects of either enhanced grain boundary penetration or a change in crack propagation mechanism due to liquid metal embrittlement. Auger spectroscopy of grain boundary penetrated specimen shows that a lithium-oxygen compound forms at the grain boundary. Moessbauer evaluations of the ferrite layer of corroded type 304 stainless steel are being used to develop a model for weight loss in liquid lithium. The welding research in progress is directed to characterize the influence of variations of the austenitic weld metal composition on the microstructural and mechanical properties of dissimilar metal weldments. Weldments of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel to 316 stainless steel have been investigated for fusion microstructure, thermal expansion impact strength and characterization of specific long time in-service failures. Modification of weld metal microstructures by microalloy additions is being investigated as a concept to improve weld metal properties. The behavior of a strip electrode in a gas metal arc is being investigated to determine the feasibility of gas metal arc weld strip overlay cladding.

  10. Retention/Diffusivity Studies in Free-Surface Flowing Liquid Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Stubbers; G.H. Miley; M. Nieto; W. Olczak; D.N. Ruzic; A. Hassanein

    2004-12-14

    FLIRE was designed to measure the hydrogen and helium retention and diffusivity in a flowing stream of liquid lithium, and it has accomplished these goals. Retention coefficients for helium in the flowing liquid stream were 0.1-2% for flow speeds of 44 cm/s and implantation energies between 500 and 2000 eV. The energy dependence of retention is linear for the energy range considered, as expected, and the dependence of retention on flow velocity fits the expected square-root of flow speed dependence. Estimates of the helium diffusion coefficient in the flowing lithium stream were {approx} 4 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/s, and are independent of implantation energy. This value is much lower than expected, which could be due to several factors, such as mixing, bubble formation or surface film formation. In the case of hydrogen, long term retention and release mechanisms are of greatest importance, since this relates to tritium inventory in flowing lithium PFCs for fusion applications. The amount of hydride formation was measured for flowing lithium exposed to neutral deuterium gas. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements indicate that the hydride concentration was between 0.1 and 0.2% over a wide range of pressures (6.5 x 10{sup -5} to 1 Torr). This result implies that the deuterium absorption rate is limited by the surface dissociation rate, since deuterium (hydrogen/tritium) is absorbed in its atomic form, not its molecular form.

  11. Experiments on FTU with an actively water cooled liquid lithium limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Crescenzi, F.; Iannone, F.; Maddaluno, G.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Roccella, S.; Reale, M.; Viola, B.; Lyublinski, I.; Vertkov, A.

    2015-08-01

    In order to prevent the overheating of the liquid Li surface and the consequent Li evaporation for T > 500 °C, an advanced version of the liquid lithium limiter has been realized and installed on FTU. This new system, named Cooled Lithium Limiter (CLL), has been optimized to demonstrate the lithium limiter capability to sustain thermal loads as high as 10 MW/m2 with up to 5 s of plasma pulse duration. The CLL operates with an actively cooled system with water circulation at the temperature of about 200 °C, for heating lithium up to the melting point and for the heat removal during the plasma discharges. To characterize CLL during discharges, a fast infrared camera and the spectroscopic signals from Li and D atom emission have been used. The experiments analyzed so far and simulated by ANSYS code, point out that heat loads as high as 2 MW/m2 for 1.5 s have been withstood without problems.

  12. A Spectroscopic Measurement of Recycling on the Surface of a Liquid Lithium Limiter in CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marfuta, P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.

    2003-10-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of lithium plasma-facing surfaces should give a quantitative assessment of the local recycling in CDX-U. We will use both a 1-D CCD camera with an interference filter and a pair of fiber-optic filterscopes focused on different parts of a fully-toroidal liquid lithium limiter tray. Additional filterscope data will be taken along a sightline immediately above the tray, so that the edge plasma emission can be subtracted from the direct views of the lithium surface. The diagnostics will measure the H-alpha line both with and without lithium in the limiter tray to assess the reduction of neutral hydrogen recycling, as well as the Li-I emission to observe the level of lithium introduced into the plasma, and the C-III and O-II lines to measure the effect of the lithium on plasma impurities.

  13. Ternary polymer electrolytes containing pyrrolidinium-based polymeric ionic liquids for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appetecchi, G. B.; Kim, G.-T.; Montanino, M.; Carewska, M.; Marcilla, R.; Mecerreyes, D.; De Meatza, I.

    The electrochemical properties of solvent-free, ternary polymer electrolytes based on a novel poly(diallyldimethylammonium) bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) as polymer host and incorporating PYR 14TFSI ionic liquid and LiTFSI salt are reported. The PIL-LiTFSI-PYR 14TFSI electrolyte membranes were found to be chemically stable even after prolonged storage times in contact with lithium anode and thermally stable up to 300 °C. Particularly, the PIL-based electrolytes exhibited acceptable room temperature conductivity with wide electrochemical stability window, time-stable interfacial resistance values and good lithium stripping/plating performance. Preliminary battery tests have shown that Li/LiFePO 4 solid-state cells are capable to deliver above 140 mAh g -1 at 40 °C with very good capacity retention up to medium rates.

  14. Liquid Metal Walls, Lithium, And Low Recycling Boundary Conditions In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski

    2010-01-15

    At present, the only solid material believed to be a viable option for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a fusion reactor is tungsten. Operated at the lower temperatures typical of present-day fusion experiments, tungsten is known to suffer from surface degradation during long-term exposure to helium-containing plasmas, leading to reduced thermal conduction to the bulk, and enhanced erosion. Existing alloys are also quite brittle at temperatures under 700oC. However, at a sufficiently high operating temperature (700 - 1000 oC), tungsten is selfannealing and it is expected that surface damage will be reduced to the point where tungsten PFCs will have an acceptable lifetime in a reactor environment. The existence of only one potentially viable option for solid PFCs, though, constitutes one of the most significant restrictions on design space for DEMO and follow-on fusion reactors. In contrast, there are several candidates for liquid metal-based PFCs, including gallium, tin, lithium, and tin-lithium eutectics. We will discuss options for liquid metal walls in tokamaks, looking at both high and low recycling materials. We will then focus in particular on one of the candidate liquids, lithium. Lithium is known to have a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, and has been shown in test stands1 and fusion experiments2,3 to produce a low recycling surface, especially when liquid. Because it is also low-Z and is usable in a tokamak over a reasonable temperature range (200 - 400 oC), it has been now been used as a PFC in several confinement experiments (TFTR, T11- M, CDX-U, NSTX, FTU, and TJ-II), with favorable results. The consequences of substituting low recycling walls for the traditional high recycling variety on tokamak equilibria are very extensive. We will discuss some of the expected modifications, briefly reviewing experimental results, and comparing the results to expectations.

  15. Lithium insertion in graphite from ternary ionic liquid-lithium salt electrolytes: II. Evaluation of specific capacity and cycling efficiency and stability at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lux, Simon F.; Schmuck, Martin; Appetecchi, Giovanni B.; Passerini, Stefano; Winter, Martin; Balducci, Andrea

    In this paper we report the results about the use of ternary room temperature ionic liquid-lithium salt mixtures as electrolytes for lithium-ion battery systems. Mixtures of N-methyl- N-propyl pyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl) imide, PYR 13FSI, and N-butyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl) imide, PYR 14TFSI, with lithium hexafluorophosphate, LiPF 6 and lithium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl) imide, LiTFSI, containing 5 wt.% of vinylene carbonate (VC) as additive, have been used in combination with a commercial graphite, KS6 TIMCAL. The performance of the graphite electrodes has been considered in term of specific capacity, cycling efficiency and cycling stability. The results clearly show the advantage of the use of ternary mixtures on the performance of the graphite electrode.

  16. Mapping the Free Energy of Lithium Solvation in the Protic Ionic Liquid Ethylammonuim Nitrate: A Metadynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Kachmar, Ali; Carignano, Marcelo; Laino, Teodoro; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Hutter, Jürg

    2017-08-10

    Understanding lithium solvation and transport in ionic liquids is important due to their possible application in electrochemical devices. Using first-principles simulations aided by a metadynamics approach we study the free-energy landscape for lithium ions at infinite dilution in ethylammonium nitrate, a protic ionic liquid. We analyze the local structure of the liquid around the lithium cation and obtain a quantitative picture in agreement with experimental findings. Our simulations show that the lowest two free energy minima correspond to conformations with the lithium ion being solvated either by three or four nitrate ions with a transition barrier between them of 0.2 eV. Other less probable conformations having different solvation pattern are also investigated. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Reactive uptake of organic compounds by liquid sulfuric acid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Michelsen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The uptake of several organic compounds by laboratory surrogates for tropospheric sulfuric acid particles were investigated by mass spectrometry and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. Among the compounds studied were acetone [(CH_3)_2CO], 2,4-hexanedione [CH_3CO(CH_2)_2COCH_3, MBO], and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol [CH_2CHC(CH_3)_2OH]. Experiments were carried out on ultrathin sulfuric acid films (ca. 10-100 monolayer equivalents thick) as functions of organic partial pressure, temperature, and acid composition. Acetone uptake is irreversible for acids that contain >70 weight percent (wt. %) H_2SO4, with kinetics that are second-order in concentration of dissolved acetone. Hexanedione and MBO are irreversibly taken for all acid compositions investigated (60-96 wt. %), with first-order uptake kinetics. In all cases, the irreversible uptake is a consequence of sulfuric acid catalyzed reactions that lead to the formation of new C-C bonds. Implications of these results for heterogeneous tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  18. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-12-17

    Because of lithium's possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. Here, we predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiD$_{\\beta}$ , $\\beta =0.25$ , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid–solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. Finally, we observed the formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.

  19. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; ...

    2015-12-17

    Because of lithium's possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. Here, we predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiDmore » $$_{\\beta}$$ , $$\\beta =0.25$$ , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid–solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. Finally, we observed the formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.« less

  20. Spectroscopic identification of the lithium ion transporting species in LiTFSI-doped ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Lassègues, Jean-Claude; Grondin, Joseph; Aupetit, Christian; Johansson, Patrik

    2009-01-08

    The solvation of the lithium ion in LiTFSI-doped ionic liquids based on alkyl-substituted imidazolium cations and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anions (TFSI-) was investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The spectral changes occurring for some TFSI- vibrations sensitive to the lithium coordination were analyzed with the help of DFT calculations. In addition, the vibrations of the lithium ion in its solvating cage were found to produce a broad IR absorption band centered at 374 cm(-1). For low to moderate LiTFSI mole fractions, 0.08 < x < 0.2, the [Li(TFSI)2]- solvating cage was found to involve bidentate coordinations of Li+ with two oxygen atoms of one anion in the trans (C2) conformation and two oxygen atoms of the other anion in the cis (C1) conformation. At higher LiTFSI concentration, up to x = 0.5, the lithium ion-TFSI coordination number progressively becomes less than 2, indicating the possible formation of aggregates.

  1. Composite Electrolytes for Lithium Batteries: Ionic Liquids in APTES Crosslinked Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigelaar, Dean M.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Solvent free polymer electrolytes were made consisting of Li(+) and pyrrolidinium salts of trifluoromethanesulfonimide added to a series of hyperbranched poly(ethylene oxide)s (PEO). The polymers were connected by triazine linkages and crosslinked by a sol-gel process to provide mechanical strength. The connecting PEO groups were varied to help understand the effects of polymer structure on electrolyte conductivity in the presence of ionic liquids. Polymers were also made that contain poly(dimethylsiloxane) groups, which provide increased flexibility without interacting with lithium ions. When large amounts of ionic liquid are added, there is little dependence of conductivity on the polymer structure. However, when smaller amounts of ionic liquid are added, the inherent conductivity of the polymer becomes a factor. These electrolytes are more conductive than those made with high molecular weight PEO imbibed with ionic liquids at ambient temperatures, due to the amorphous nature of the polymer.

  2. Highly reversible lithium metal secondary battery using a room temperature ionic liquid/lithium salt mixture and a surface-coated cathode active material.

    PubMed

    Seki, Shiro; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashiro, Hajime; Ohno, Yasutaka; Usami, Akira; Mita, Yuichi; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Terada, Nobuyuki

    2006-02-07

    For the purpose of realizing high-voltage, high-capacity, long-life and safe rechargeable batteries, a lithium secondary battery that uses high-voltage stable ZrO2-coated LiCoO2 cathode powder and a nonvolatile high-safety room temperature ionic liquid was fabricated.

  3. Liquid lithium applications for solving challenging fusion reactor issues and NSTX-U contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Hirooka, Y.; Gray, T. K.

    2016-08-05

    Steady-state fusion reactor operation presents major divertor technology challenges, including high divertor heat flux both steady-state and transients. In addition to those issues, there are unresolved issues of long term dust accumulation and associated tritium inventory and safety issues. It has been suggested that radiative liquid lithium divertor concepts with a modest lithium-loop could provide a possible solution for these outstanding fusion reactor technology issues while potentially improving the reactor plasma performance. The application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and reduction in the divertor peak heat flux while maintaining essentially Li-free core plasma operation even during H-modes. These promising results in NSTX and related modeling calculations motivated the radiative liquid lithium divertor (RLLD) concept and its variant, the active liquid lithium divertor concept (ARLLD), taking advantage of the enhanced Li radiation in relatively poorly confined divertor plasmas. It was estimated that only a few moles/sec of lithium injection would be needed to significantly reduce the divertor heat flux in a tokamak fusion power plant. By operating at lower temperatures ≤ 500°C than the first wall ~ 600 – 700°C, the LL-covered divertor chamber wall surfaces can serve as an effective particle pump, as impurities generally migrate toward lower temperature LL divertor surfaces. To maintain the LL purity, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity of ~ 1 liter/second (l/sec) is envisioned to sustain the steady-state operation of a 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant. By running the Li loop continuously, it can carry the dust particles and impurities generated in the vacuum vessel to outside where the dust / impurities are removed by relatively simple filter and cold/hot trap systems. Using a cold trap system, it can recover in tritium (T) in real time from LL at a

  4. Stationary Flowing Liquid Lithium (SFLiLi) systems for tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Gentile, Charles; Roquemore, Lane

    2013-10-01

    The present approach to magnetic fusion which relies on high recycling plasma-wall interaction has exhausted itself at the level of TFTR, JET, JT-60 devices with no realistic path to the burning plasma. Instead, magnetic fusion needs a return to its original idea of insulation of the plasma from the wall, which was the dominant approach in the 1970s and upon implementations has a clear path to the DEMO device with PDT ~= 100 MW and Qelectric > 1 . The SFLiLi systems of this talk is the technology tool for implementation of the guiding idea of magnetic fusion. It utilizes the unique properties of flowing LiLi to pump plasma particles and, thus, insulate plasma from the walls. The necessary flow rate, ~= 1 g3/s, is very small, thus, making the use of lithium practical and consistent with safety requirements. The talk describes how chemical activity of LiLi, which is the major technology challenge of using LiLi in tokamaks, is addressed by SFLiLi systems at the level of already performed (HT-7) experiment, and in ongoing implementations for a prototype of SFLiLi for tokamak divertors and the mid-plane limiter for EAST tokamak (to be tested in the next experimental campaign). This work is supported by US DoE contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH11466.

  5. Susceptibility of 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel to liquid metal induced embrittlement by lithium-lead solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, B.A.; Edwards, G.R.

    1984-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the liquid metal induced embrittlement susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to lithium and 1a/o lead-lithium at temperatures between 190/sup 0/C and 525/sup 0/C. This research was part of an ongoing effort to evaluate the compatibility of liquid lithium solutions with potential fusion reactor containment materials. Of particular interest was the microstructure present in a weld heat-affected zone, a microstructure known to be highly susceptible to corrosive attack by liquid lead-lithium solutions. Embrittlement susceptibility was determined by conducting tension tests on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to an inert environment as well as to a lead-lithium liquid and observing the change in tensile behavior. The 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was also given a base plate heat treatment to observe its embrittlement susceptibility to 1a/o lead-lithium. The base plate microstructure was severely embrittled at temperatures less than 500/sup 0/C. Tempering the base plate was effective in restoring adequate ductility to the steel.

  6. Synergistic Effects of Mixing Sulfone and Ionic Liquid as Safe Electrolytes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-26

    A strategy of mixing both an ionic liquid and sulfone is reported to give synergistic effects of reducing viscosity, increasing ionic conductivity, reducing polysulfide dissolution, and improving safety. The mixtures of ionic liquids and sulfones also show distinctly different physicochemical properties, including thermal properties and crystallization behavior. By using these electrolytes, lithium sulfur batteries assembled with lithium and mesoporous carbon composites show a reversible specific capacity of 1265 mAhg-1 (second cycle) by using 40% 1.0 M lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in N-methyl-Npropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide with 60% 1.0 M LiTFSI in methylisopropylsulfone in the first cycle. This capacity is slightly lower than that obtained in pure 1.0 M LiTFSI as the sulfone electrolyte; however, it exhibits excellent cycling stability and remains as high as 655 mAhg1 even after 50 cycles. This strategy provides a method to alleviate polysulfide dissolution and redox shuttle phenomena, at the same time, with improved ionic conductivity.

  7. Effect of zwitterion on the lithium solid electrolyte interphase in ionic liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, N.; Howlett, P. C.; MacFarlane, D. R.; Smith, M. E.; Howes, A.; Hollenkamp, A. F.; Bastow, T.; Hale, P.; Forsyth, M.

    An understanding of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that forms on the lithium-metal surface is essential to the further development of rechargeable lithium-metal batteries. Currently, the formation of dendrites during cycling, which can lead to catastrophic failure of the cell, has mostly halted research on these power sources. The discovery of ionic liquids as electrolytes has rekindled the possibility of safe, rechargeable, lithium-metal batteries. The current limitation of ionic liquid electrolytes, however, is that when compared with conventional non-aqueous electrolytes the device rate capability is limited. Recently, we have shown that the addition of a zwitterion such as N-methyl- N-(butyl sulfonate) pyrrolidinium resulted in enhancement of the achievable current densities by 100%. It was also found that the resistance of the SEI layer in the presence of a zwitterion is 50% lower. In this study, a detailed chemical and electrochemical analysis of the SEI that forms in both the presence and absence of a zwitterion has been conducted. Clear differences in the chemical nature and also the thickness of the SEI are observed and these may account for the enhancement of operating current densities.

  8. Synergistic effects of mixing sulfone and ionic liquid as safe electrolytes for lithium sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    A strategy of mixing both an ionic liquid and sulfone is reported to give synergistic effects of reducing viscosity, increasing ionic conductivity, reducing polysulfide dissolution, and improving safety. The mixtures of ionic liquids and sulfones also show distinctly different physicochemical properties, including thermal properties and crystallization behavior. By using these electrolytes, lithium sulfur batteries assembled with lithium and mesoporous carbon composites show a reversible specific capacity of 1265 mAh g(-1) (second cycle) by using 40 % 1.0 M lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide with 60 % 1.0 M LiTFSI in methylisopropylsulfone in the first cycle. This capacity is slightly lower than that obtained in pure 1.0 M LiTFSI as the sulfone electrolyte; however, it exhibits excellent cycling stability and remains as high as 655 mAh g(-1) even after 50 cycles. This strategy provides a method to alleviate polysulfide dissolution and redox shuttle phenomena, at the same time, with improved ionic conductivity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Synergistic Effects of Mixing Sulfone and Ionic Liquid as Safe Electrolytes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Sun, Xiao-Guang; ...

    2014-11-26

    A strategy of mixing both an ionic liquid and sulfone is reported to give synergistic effects of reducing viscosity, increasing ionic conductivity, reducing polysulfide dissolution, and improving safety. The mixtures of ionic liquids and sulfones also show distinctly different physicochemical properties, including thermal properties and crystallization behavior. By using these electrolytes, lithium sulfur batteries assembled with lithium and mesoporous carbon composites show a reversible specific capacity of 1265 mAhg-1 (second cycle) by using 40% 1.0 M lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in N-methyl-Npropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide with 60% 1.0 M LiTFSI in methylisopropylsulfone in the first cycle. This capacity is slightly lower than thatmore » obtained in pure 1.0 M LiTFSI as the sulfone electrolyte; however, it exhibits excellent cycling stability and remains as high as 655 mAhg1 even after 50 cycles. This strategy provides a method to alleviate polysulfide dissolution and redox shuttle phenomena, at the same time, with improved ionic conductivity.« less

  10. Atomistic Simulation and Electronic Structure of Lithium Doped Ionic Liquids: Structure, Transport, and Electrochemical Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Lawson, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Zero-temperature density functional theory (DFT), density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD), and classical molecular dynamics using polarizable force fields (PFF-MD) are employed to evaluate the influence of Lithium ion on the structure, transport, and electrochemical stability of three potential ionic liquid electrolytes: N--methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N--methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3--methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]). We characterize the Lithium ion solvation shell through zero-temperature DFT simulations of [Li(Anion)sub n](exp n-1) -clusters, DFT-MD simulations of isolated lithium ions in small ionic liquid systems, and PFF-MD simulations with high Li-doping levels in large ionic liquid systems. At low levels of Li-salt doping, highly stable solvation shells having 2-3 anions are seen in both [pyr14][TFSI] and [pyr13][FSI], while solvation shells with 4 anions dominate in [EMIM][BF sub 4]. At higher levels of doping, we find the formation of complex Li-network structures that increase the frequency of 4 anion-coordinated solvation shells. A comparison of computational and experimental Raman spectra for a wide range of [Li(Anion) sub n](exp n -1) - clusters shows that our proposed structures are consistent with experiment. We estimate the ion diffusion coefficients and quantify both size and simulation time effects. We find estimates of lithium ion diffusion are a reasonable order of magnitude and can be corrected for simulation time effects. Simulation size, on the other hand, is also important, with diffusion coefficients from long PFF-MD simulations of small cells having 20-40% error compared to large-cell values. Finally, we compute the electrochemical window using differences in electronic energy levels of both isolated cation/anion pairs and small ionic liquid systems with Li-salt doping. The single pair and liquid

  11. TFSI and TDI Anions: Probes for Solvate Ionic Liquid and Disproportionation-Based Lithium Battery Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Piotr; Dranka, Maciej; Wieczorek, Władysław; Johansson, Patrik

    2017-08-03

    Highly concentrated electrolytes based on Li-salts and chelating solvents, such as glymes, are promising as electrolytes for lithium batteries. This is due to their unique properties, such as higher electrochemical stabilities, compliance with high-voltage electrodes, low volatility and flammability, and inertness toward aluminum current collector corrosion. The nature of these properties originates from the molecular-level structure created in either solvate ionic liquids (SILs) or the less common ionic aggregates by disproportionation reactions. The nature of the anion plays a crucial role, and here, we present a computational study using TFSI and TDI anions as probes, revealing increasing differences upon increased salt concentration. TFSI-based electrolytes preferably form SILs, while TDI-based electrolytes form ionic aggregates. The latter lead to an unexpected creation of "free" cationic species even at (very) high salt concentrations and thus promise of ample lithium ion transport.

  12. An advanced lithium-air battery exploiting an ionic liquid-based electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Elia, G A; Hassoun, J; Kwak, W-J; Sun, Y-K; Scrosati, B; Mueller, F; Bresser, D; Passerini, S; Oberhumer, P; Tsiouvaras, N; Reiter, J

    2014-11-12

    A novel lithium-oxygen battery exploiting PYR14TFSI-LiTFSI as ionic liquid-based electrolyte medium is reported. The Li/PYR14TFSI-LiTFSI/O2 battery was fully characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, capacity-limited cycling, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of this extensive study demonstrate that this new Li/O2 cell is characterized by a stable electrode-electrolyte interface and a highly reversible charge-discharge cycling behavior. Most remarkably, the charge process (oxygen oxidation reaction) is characterized by a very low overvoltage, enhancing the energy efficiency to 82%, thus, addressing one of the most critical issues preventing the practical application of lithium-oxygen batteries.

  13. Strong tendency of homeotropic alignment and anisotropic lithium ion conductivity of sulfonate functionalized zwitterionic imidazolium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Rondla, Rohini; Lin, Joseph C Y; Yang, C T; Lin, Ivan J B

    2013-09-17

    Here, we report the first attempt to investigate the liquid crystal (LC) behavior of SO3(-) functionalized imidazolium zwitterionic (SO3(-)ImZI) salts, which display homeotropic alignment on a glass slide without the aid of any aligning approach. Doping lithium salt to ImZI salts lowers the melting temperatures and raises the clearing temperatures substantially to form room temperature ImZILCs. Excellent anisotropic lithium ion conductivity is achieved; which is strengthened by their tendency for homeotropic alignment.

  14. Electrochemical reduction of an anion for ionic-liquid molecules on a lithium electrode studied by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yasunobu; Kawamura, Yoshiumi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Otani, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    We report ab initio molecular dynamics studies with electric field that reveal chemical stability of room temperature ionic liquid for charge transfer from lithium and nickel electrodes. Bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI) is oxidized on the nickel electrode under a high positive bias condition as expected. However, TFSI is reduced on the lithium electrode under both positive and negative bias conditions, because the lithium electrode acts as a strong reductant. The decomposition of TFSI anion might induce the formation of LiF as a solid electrolyte interphase, which could restrain the TFSI reduction. The stability of an cation under reductant conditions is presented.

  15. The effects of carbon and nitrogen on the corrosion resistance of type 316 stainless steel to liquid lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. G.; Frankham, S. A.

    1982-06-01

    Type 316 stainless steel plates have been exposed at 600°C to liquid lithium containing carbon and nitrogen at various chemical activities for periods of up to 672 h. The corrosion products Li 9CrN 5 and M 23C 6 have been identified on the plate surfaces and in the grain boundaries. Scanning electron microscopy has shown preferential nickel and chromium depletion at the steel surface in lithium with high nitrogen content. The diffusion coefficient of carbon in type 316 stainless steel from a lithium source was found to be 6.5 × 10 t 1¯5 m 2/s.

  16. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids and lithium batterymaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Augustsson, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Lithium ion insertion into electrode materials is commonly used in rechargeable battery technology. The insertion implies changes in both the crystal structure and the electronic structure of the electrode material. Side-reactions may occur on the surface of the electrode which is exposed to the electrolyte and form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The understanding of these processes is of great importance for improving battery performance. The chemical and physical properties of water and alcohols are complicated by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Various experimental techniques have been used to study geometrical structures and different models have been proposed to view the details of how these liquids are geometrically organized by hydrogen bonding. However, very little is known about the electronic structure of these liquids, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools. In this thesis examples of studies of lithium battery electrodes and liquid systems using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy will be presented. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been used to accomplish selective excitation, in terms of energy and polarization. The electronic structure of graphite electrodes has been studied, before and after lithium intercalation. Changes in the electronic structure upon lithiation due to transfer of electrons into the graphite π-bands have been observed. Transfer of electrons in to the 3d states of transition metal oxides upon lithiation have been studied, through low energy excitations as dd- and charge transfer-excitations. A SEI was detected on cycled graphite electrodes. By the use of selective excitation different carbon sites were probed in the SEI. The local electronic structure of water, methanol and mixtures of the two have been examined using a special liquid cell, to separate the liquid from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Results from the study of liquid water showed a strong influence on the 3a1 molecular

  17. Liquid lithium loop system to solve challenging technology issues for fusion power plant

    DOE PAGES

    Ono, Masayuki; Majeski, Richard P.; Jaworski, Michael A.; ...

    2017-07-12

    Here, steady-state fusion power plant designs present major divertor technology challenges, including high divertor heat flux both in steady-state and during transients. In addition to these concerns, there are the unresolved technology issues of long term dust accumulation and associated tritium inventory and safety issues. It has been suggested that radiation-based liquid lithium (LL) divertor concepts with a modest lithium-loop could provide a possible solution for these outstanding fusion reactor technology issues, while potentially improving reactor plasma performance. The application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and reduction in the divertor peakmore » heat flux while maintaining essentially Li-free core plasma operation even during H-modes. These promising results in NSTX and related modeling calculations motivated the radiative liquid lithium divertor (RLLD) concept and its variant, the active liquid lithium divertor concept (ARLLD), taking advantage of the enhanced or non-coronal Li radiation in relatively poorly confined divertor plasmas. To maintain the LL purity in a 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity of ~ 1 liter/second (l/sec) is envisioned. We examined two key technology issues: 1) dust or solid particle removal and 2) real time recovery of tritium from LL while keeping the tritium inventory level to an acceptable level. By running the LL-loop continuously, it can carry the dust particles and impurities generated in the vacuum vessel to the outside where the dust / impurities can be removed by relatively simple dust filter, cold trap and/or centrifugal separation systems. With ~ 1 l/sec LL flow, even a small 0.1% dust content by weight (or 0.5 g per sec) suggests that the LL-loop could carry away nearly 16 tons of dust per year. In a 1 GW-electric (or ~ 3 GW fusion power) fusion power plant, about 0.5 g / sec of

  18. Heterogeneous uptake of 8-2 fluorotelomer alcohol on liquid water and 1-octanol droplets.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongquan; Demerjian, Kenneth L; Williams, Leah R; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kolb, Charles E; Davidovits, Paul

    2006-06-01

    The heterogeneous uptake of the 8-2 fluorotelomer alcohol, F(CF2)8CH2CH2OH, on liquid water surfaces over the temperature range 256-273 K and on 1-octanol surfaces over the temperature range 264-295 K has been investigated with a droplet train flow reactor. The uptake coefficient on water droplets is zero within the error of the measurement (+/-0.01) and is independent of droplet temperature. In contrast, significant uptake onto 1-octanol is observed. Measured uptake coefficients for 1-octanol showed a negative temperature dependence, varying from 0.034 +/- 0.005 (1sigma) at 295 K to 0.103 +/- 0.009 at 264 K. The measured uptake coefficients on 1-octanol were independent of gas-liquid contact time, for typical contact times varying between 3 and 15 ms, and independent of the 8-2 fluorotelomer alcohol gas-phase concentration, indicating that the uptake coefficients are equivalent to mass accommodation coefficients. The uptake coefficients on 1-octanol were also independent of relative humidity. These results show that the uptake of FTOHs on or into the aqueous component of cloud/fog droplets or aqueous aerosol particles is not likely to be an important atmospheric sink for these compounds. In these experiments, 1-octanol was used as a model compound for organic-containing atmospheric particles. The larger uptake coefficient measured for 1-octanol surfaces indicates that FTOH partitioning to organic-containing cloud/fog droplets and aerosol particles may be an atmospheric loss mechanism.

  19. Research proposal for development of an electron stripper using a thin liquid lithium film for rare isotope accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Momozaki, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-03-06

    Hydrodynamic instability phenomena in a thin liquid lithium film, which has been proposed for the first stripper in the driver linac of Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), were discussed. Since it was considered that film instability could significantly impair the feasibility of the liquid lithium film stripper concept, potential issues and research tasks in the RIA project due to these instability phenomena were raised. In order to investigate these instability phenomena, a research proposal plan was developed. In the theoretical part of this research proposal, a use of the linear stability theory was suggested. In the experimental part, it was pointed out that the concept of Reynolds number and Weber number scaling may allow conducting a preliminary experiment using inert simulants, hence reducing technical difficulty, complexity, and cost of the experiments. After confirming the thin film formation in the preliminary experiment using simulants, demonstration experiments using liquid lithium were proposed.

  20. Ionic liquid electrolytes for Li-air batteries: lithium metal cycling.

    PubMed

    Grande, Lorenzo; Paillard, Elie; Kim, Guk-Tae; Monaco, Simone; Passerini, Stefano

    2014-05-08

    In this work, the electrochemical stability and lithium plating/stripping performance of N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pyr14TFSI) are reported, by investigating the behavior of Li metal electrodes in symmetrical Li/electrolyte/Li cells. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and galvanostatic cycling at different temperatures are performed to analyze the influence of temperature on the stabilization of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), showing that TFSI-based ionic liquids (ILs) rank among the best candidates for long-lasting Li-air cells.

  1. Ionic Liquid Electrolytes for Li–Air Batteries: Lithium Metal Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Lorenzo; Paillard, Elie; Kim, Guk-Tae; Monaco, Simone; Passerini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the electrochemical stability and lithium plating/stripping performance of N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pyr14TFSI) are reported, by investigating the behavior of Li metal electrodes in symmetrical Li/electrolyte/Li cells. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and galvanostatic cycling at different temperatures are performed to analyze the influence of temperature on the stabilization of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), showing that TFSI-based ionic liquids (ILs) rank among the best candidates for long-lasting Li–air cells. PMID:24815072

  2. Rheological changes and kinetics of water uptake by poly(ionic liquid)-based thin films.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Tânia M; Torresi, Roberto M

    2013-12-17

    Water uptake by thin films composed of the poly(ionic liquid) poly[diallyldimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] (PDDATf2N) and the ionic liquid N,N-butylmethylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pyr1.4Tf2N) was studied with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. The data obtained for films with different compositions during the passage of dry and wet N2 flow through the films were simulated with the Kevin-Voigt viscoelastic model for assessment of the mass of uptake water as well as the viscoelastic parameters. Our results show that the ionic liquid acts as a plasticizer, reducing the rigidity of the film and decreasing the capacity of water uptake. Introduction to a Li salt (LiTf2N) increases the water uptake capacity and also affects both elastic and viscous parameters due to aggregation among the ions from the ionic liquid and Li(+). However, due to the preferable interaction of Li(+) ions with water molecules, these aggregates are broken when the film is hydrated. In short, the presence of water in such films affects their mechanical properties, which can reflect in their performances as solid state electrolytes and ion-conducting membranes for electrochemical applications.

  3. Upgrades toward high-heat flux, liquid lithium plasma-facing components in the NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, M. A.; Brooks, A.; Kaita, R.; Lopes-Cardozo, N.; Ono, M.; Rindt, P.

    2016-08-08

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) provide numerous potential advantages over solid-material components. One critique of the approach is the relatively less developed technologies associated with deploying these components in a fusion plasma-experiment. Exploration of the temperature limits of liquid lithium PFCs in a tokamak divertor and the corresponding consequences on core operation are a high priority informing the possibilities for future liquid lithium PFCs. An all-metal NSTX-U is envisioned to make direct comparison between all high-Z wall operation and liquid lithium PFCs in a single device. By executing the all-metal upgrades incrementally, scientific productivity will be maintained while enabling physics and engineering-science studies to further develop the solid- and liquid-metal components. Six major elements of a flowing liquid-metal divertor system are described and a three-step program for implementing this system is laid out. The upgrade steps involve the first high-Z divertor target upgrade in NSTX-U, pre-filled liquid metal targets and finally, an integrated, flowing liquid metal divertor target. As a result, two example issues are described where the engineering and physics experiments are shown to be closely related in examining the prospects for future liquid metal PFCs.

  4. Upgrades toward high-heat flux, liquid lithium plasma-facing components in the NSTX-U

    DOE PAGES

    Jaworski, M. A.; Brooks, A.; Kaita, R.; ...

    2016-08-08

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) provide numerous potential advantages over solid-material components. One critique of the approach is the relatively less developed technologies associated with deploying these components in a fusion plasma-experiment. Exploration of the temperature limits of liquid lithium PFCs in a tokamak divertor and the corresponding consequences on core operation are a high priority informing the possibilities for future liquid lithium PFCs. An all-metal NSTX-U is envisioned to make direct comparison between all high-Z wall operation and liquid lithium PFCs in a single device. By executing the all-metal upgrades incrementally, scientific productivity will be maintained while enabling physicsmore » and engineering-science studies to further develop the solid- and liquid-metal components. Six major elements of a flowing liquid-metal divertor system are described and a three-step program for implementing this system is laid out. The upgrade steps involve the first high-Z divertor target upgrade in NSTX-U, pre-filled liquid metal targets and finally, an integrated, flowing liquid metal divertor target. As a result, two example issues are described where the engineering and physics experiments are shown to be closely related in examining the prospects for future liquid metal PFCs.« less

  5. Upgrades toward high-heat flux, liquid lithium plasma-facing components in the NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, M. A.; Brooks, A.; Kaita, R.; Lopes-Cardozo, N.; Ono, M.; Rindt, P.

    2016-08-08

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) provide numerous potential advantages over solid-material components. One critique of the approach is the relatively less developed technologies associated with deploying these components in a fusion plasma-experiment. Exploration of the temperature limits of liquid lithium PFCs in a tokamak divertor and the corresponding consequences on core operation are a high priority informing the possibilities for future liquid lithium PFCs. An all-metal NSTX-U is envisioned to make direct comparison between all high-Z wall operation and liquid lithium PFCs in a single device. By executing the all-metal upgrades incrementally, scientific productivity will be maintained while enabling physics and engineering-science studies to further develop the solid- and liquid-metal components. Six major elements of a flowing liquid-metal divertor system are described and a three-step program for implementing this system is laid out. The upgrade steps involve the first high-Z divertor target upgrade in NSTX-U, pre-filled liquid metal targets and finally, an integrated, flowing liquid metal divertor target. As a result, two example issues are described where the engineering and physics experiments are shown to be closely related in examining the prospects for future liquid metal PFCs.

  6. Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Chen, Honghao; Meduri, Praveen; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-05-16

    Li-S battery is a complicated system with many challenges existing before its final market penetration. While most of the reported work for Li-S batteries is focused on the cathode design, we demonstrate in this work that the anode consumption accelerated by corrosive polysulfide solution also critically determines the Li-S cell performance. To validate this hypothesis, ionic liquid (IL) N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Py14TFSI) has been employed to modify the properties of SEI layer formed on Li metal surface in Li-S batteries. It is found that the IL-enhanced passivation film on the lithium anode surface exhibits much different morphology and chemical compositions, effectively protecting lithium metal from continuous attack by soluble polysulfides. Therefore, both cell impedance and the irreversible consumption of polysulfides on lithium metal are reduced. As a result, the Coulombic efficiency and the cycling stability of Li-S batteries have been greatly improved. After 120 cycles, Li-S battery cycled in the electrolyte containing IL demonstrates a high capacity retention of 94.3% at 0.1 C rate. These results unveil another important failure mechanism for Li-S batteries and shin the light on the new approaches to improve Li-S battery performances.

  7. Physics Design Requirements for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Liquid Lithium Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, W.; Bell, M.; Berzak,L.; Brooks, A.; Ellis, R.; Gerhardt, S.; Harjes, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Menard, J.; Nygren,R. E.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stotler, D.; Wakeland, P.; Zakharov L. E.

    2008-09-26

    Recent NSTX high power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on PFC's to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) to achieve density control for inductionless current drive capability (e.g., about a 15-25% ne decrease from present highest non-inductionless fraction discharges which often evolve toward the density limit, ne/nGW~1), to enable ne scan capability (x2) in the H-mode, to test the ability to operate at significantly lower density for future ST-CTF reactor designs (e.g., ne/nGW = 0.25), and eventually to investigate high heat-flux power handling (10 MW/m2) with longpulse discharges (>1.5s). The first step (LLD-1) physics design encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

  8. Polymeric ionic liquid-plastic crystal composite electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhengxi; Li, Sijian; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2016-03-01

    In this work, composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs), that is, 80%[(1-x)PIL-(x)SN]-20%LiTFSI, are successfully prepared by using a pyrrolidinium-based polymeric ionic liquid (P(DADMA)TFSI) as a polymer host, succinonitrile (SN) as a plastic crystal, and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) as a lithium salt. XRD and DSC measurements confirm that the as-obtained CPEs have amorphous structures. The 80%[50%PIL-50%SN]-20%LiTFSI (50% SN) electrolyte reveals a high room temperature ionic conductivity of 5.74 × 10-4 S cm-1, a wide electrochemical window of 5.5 V, as well as good mechanical strength with a Young's modulus of 4.9 MPa. Li/LiFePO4 cells assembled with the 50% SN electrolyte at 0.1C rate can deliver a discharge capacity of about 150 mAh g-1 at 25 °C, with excellent capacity retention. Furthermore, such cells are able to achieve stable discharge capacities of 131.8 and 121.2 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and 1.0C rate, respectively. The impressive findings demonstrate that the electrolyte system prepared in this work has great potential for application in lithium ion batteries.

  9. Compatiblitity of hydrophobic ionic liquids with high performance cathode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnes-Mason, Ezekial Robert

    Lithium batteries are widely seen as the best choice for the future of energy storage but significant improvements are still required. One important area for improvement is searching for new cathode materials that incorporate lithium at higher capacities and voltages. This increases the energy and power available from an individual electrochemical cell, which reduces the number of cells required thereby reducing the size of a battery pack. While several high voltage cathode materials have been discovered, research has been hindered due to safety concerns with current standard electrolytes at high voltages. Ionic liquids are a new class of materials that exhibit excellent electrochemical and thermal stability as well as high ionic conductivity. These qualities make them excellent candidates to replace current battery electrolytes but difficulties in purification and the sheer number of possible chemistries have inhibited their study. In this study four hydrophobic ionic liquids based on pyrrolidinium and piperidinium cations paired with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anions were synthesized using bench top methods. These ionic liquids were successfully incorporated into working half-cells with LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co 1/3O2, a high capacity layered cathode and LiNi0.5Mn 1.5O4, a high voltage spinel type cathode. By comparing the behavior of the ionic liquids a clear relationship between cation size and rate capability was shown. The improved performance and safety at elevated temperatures was also demonstrated showing that ionic liquids are excellent candidates for use as battery electrolytes.

  10. Hydrofluoric Acid-Free Electroless Deposition of Metals on Silicon in Ionic Liquids and Its Enhanced Performance in Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Abhishek; Lu, Tianqi; Behrens, Niklas; Borisenko, Natalia; Li, Guozhu; Endres, Frank

    2017-04-05

    Metal nanoparticles such as Au, Ag, Pt, and so forth have been deposited on silicon by electroless deposition in the presence of hydrofluoric acid (HF) for applications such as oxygen reduction reaction, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, as well as for lithium ion batteries. Here, we show an HF-free process wherein metals such as Sb and Ag could be deposited onto electrodeposited silicon in ionic liquids. We further show that, compared to electrodeposited silicon, Sb-modified Si demonstrates a better performance for lithium storage. The present study opens a new paradigm for the electroless deposition technique in ionic liquids for developing and modifying functional materials.

  11. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling.

  12. Experimental Characterization of Thermo-electric Driven Liquid Lithium Flow in Narrow Trenches for Magnetic Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenyu; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Curreli, Davide; Andruczyk, Daniel; Ruzic, David

    2013-10-01

    The application of liquid metal, especially liquid lithium has become an important topic for plasma facing component (PFC) design. A liquid PFC can effectively eliminate the erosion and thermal stress problems compared to the solid PFC while transferring heat and prolong the lifetime limit of the PFCs. A liquid lithium surface can also suppress the hydrogen isotopes recycling and getter the impurities in fusion reactors. The Lithium/metal infused trench (LiMIT) concept successfully proved that the thermoelectric effect can be utilized to drive liquid lithium flow within horizontally placed metallic open trenches in transverse magnetic field. A limiter based on this concept was tested in HT-7 and gave out positive results. However a broader application of this concept may require the trench be tilted or even placed vertically, for which strong capillary force caused by narrow trenches may be the solution. A new LiMIT design with very narrow trenches have been manufactured and tested in University of Illinois and related results will be presented. Based on this idea new limiters are designed for EAST and LTX and scheduled experiments on both devices will be discussed. This project is supported by DOE/ALPS contract: DEFG02- 99ER54515.

  13. Ionic liquids in lithium battery electrolytes: Composition versus safety and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilken, Susanne; Xiong, Shizhao; Scheers, Johan; Jacobsson, Per; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    Ionic liquids have been highlighted as non-flammable, environmentally friendly, and suggested as possible solvents in lithium ion battery electrolytes. Here, the application of two ionic liquids from the EMIm-family in a state-of-the-art carbonate solvent based electrolyte is studied with a focus on safety improvement. The impact of the composition on physical and safety related properties is investigated for IL concentrations of additive (∼5 wt%) up to co-solvent concentrations (∼60 wt%). Furthermore, the role of the lithium salt concentration is separately addressed by studying a set of electrolytes at 0.5 M, 1 M, and 2 M LiPF6 concentrations. A large impact on the electrolyte properties is found for the electrolytes containing EMImTFSI and high salt concentrations. The composition 2 M LiPF6 EC:DEC:IL (1:1:3 wt%) is found non-flammable for both choices of ILs added. The macroscopic observations are complemented by a Raman spectroscopy analysis whereby a change in the Li+ solvation is detected for IL concentrations >4.5 mol%.

  14. Ionomer-Liquid Electrolyte Hybrid Ionic Conductor for High Cycling Stability of Lithium Metal Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jongchan; Lee, Hongkyung; Choo, Min-Ju; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-01-01

    The inhomogeneous Li electrodeposition of lithium metal electrode has been a major impediment to the realization of rechargeable lithium metal batteries. Although single ion conducting ionomers can induce more homogeneous Li electrodeposition by preventing Li+ depletion at Li surface, currently available materials do not allow room-temperature operation due to their low room temperature conductivities. In the paper, we report that a highly conductive ionomer/liquid electrolyte hybrid layer tightly laminated on Li metal electrode can realize stable Li electrodeposition at high current densities up to 10 mA cm−2 and permit room-temperature operation of corresponding Li metal batteries with low polarizations. The hybrid layer is fabricated by laminating few micron-thick Nafion layer on Li metal electrode followed by soaking 1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC (1/1) electrolyte. The Li/Li symmetric cell with the hybrid layer stably operates at a high current density of 10 mA cm−2 for more than 2000 h, which corresponds to more than five-fold enhancement compared with bare Li metal electrode. Also, the prototype Li/LiCoO2 battery with the hybrid layer offers cycling stability more than 350 cycles. These results demonstrate that the hybrid strategy successfully combines the advantages of bi-ionic liquid electrolyte (fast Li+ transport) and single ionic ionomer (prevention of Li+ depletion). PMID:26411701

  15. Synergistic Effects of Mixing Sulfone and Ionic Liquid as Safe Electrolytes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-26

    Here we report a strategy of mixing both the ionic liquid and sulfone with synergistic effects of reducing viscosity, increasing ionic conductivity, reducing the polysulfide dissolution, and improving the safety. The mixtures of the ionic liquids and sulfones also show distinctly different physicochemical properties, including the thermal properties and crystallization behavior. Using these electrolytes, lithium sulfur batteries assembled with lithium and mesoporous carbon composites show a reversible specific capacity of 1265 mAh g-1 (second cycle) by using 40% 1.0 M LiTFSI in MPPY∙TFSI with 60% 1.0 M LiTFSI in MIPS in the first cycle. This capacity is slightly lower than what was obtained in the pure 1.0 M LiTFSI in the sulfone electrolytes; however, it exhibits an excellent cycling stability and remains as high as 655 mAh g-1 even after 50 cycles. Our strategy provides a method to alleviate the polysulfide dissolution and redox shuttle phenomenon, with an improved ionic conductivity at the same time.

  16. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of high-concentration deuterium implantation in liquid lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, Tyler; Jaworski, Michael; Carter, Emily

    2015-03-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) is performed to study liquid lithium (Li) samples with high-concentration deuterium (D) implantation. First, we validate FPMD against experimental properties of solid and liquid Li and LiD. The calculated properties of both Li and LiD include relative stabilities and bulk moduli of several solid phases, melting temperatures, pair distribution functions, and bond angle distribution functions. Excellent agreement is obtained between FPMD and available experimental data. Next, we randomly implant D atoms at four different concentrations into liquid Li at different temperatures. Specifically, the ratios of D:Li atoms studied are 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00, and the temperatures range from 400 to 1143 K. FPMD reveals several interesting properties of these liquid Li samples with implanted D atoms. For example, we observe fast nucleation of rock-salt structures of LiD for samples at temperatures lower than the melting point of LiD (960 K). We find that the pure Li component is quickly suppressed with increased concentration of D atoms, and that no D clusters form. Finally, because measured diffusivities of D in liquid Li vary by several orders of magnitude, we predict the diffusivities of both Li and D atoms in all samples.

  17. Measurement of hydrogen solubility and desorption rate in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Erck, R.; Park, E.T.

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium was measured at a hydrogen pressure of 9.09 x 10{sup {minus}4} torr at temperatures between 250 and 700{degrees}C. Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium decreased with temperature. The measured desorption rate of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process; the activation energy is 0.067 eV. Oxygen-charged V-4Cr-4Ti specimens were also investigated to determine the effect of oxygen impurity on hydrogen solubility and desorption in the alloy. Oxygen in V-4Cr-4Ti increases hydrogen solubility and desorption kinetics. To determine the effect of a calcium oxide insulator coating on V-4Cr-4Ti, hydrogen solubility in lithium-calcium alloys that contained 0-8.0 percent calcium was also measured. The distribution ratio R of hydrogen between liquid lithium or lithium-calcium and V-4Cr-4Ti increased as temperature decreased (R {approx} 10 and 100 at 700 and 250{degrees}C, respectively). However at <267{degrees}C, solubility data could not be obtained by this method because of the slow kinetics of hydrogen permeation through the vanadium alloy.

  18. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J.; Boysen, Dane A.; Bradwell, David J.; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2014-10-01

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this finding

  19. Liquid lithium applications for solving challenging fusion reactor issues and NSTX-U contributions

    DOE PAGES

    Ono, M.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; ...

    2016-08-05

    Steady-state fusion reactor operation presents major divertor technology challenges, including high divertor heat flux both steady-state and transients. In addition to those issues, there are unresolved issues of long term dust accumulation and associated tritium inventory and safety issues. It has been suggested that radiative liquid lithium divertor concepts with a modest lithium-loop could provide a possible solution for these outstanding fusion reactor technology issues while potentially improving the reactor plasma performance. The application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and reduction in the divertor peak heat flux while maintaining essentially Li-freemore » core plasma operation even during H-modes. These promising results in NSTX and related modeling calculations motivated the radiative liquid lithium divertor (RLLD) concept and its variant, the active liquid lithium divertor concept (ARLLD), taking advantage of the enhanced Li radiation in relatively poorly confined divertor plasmas. It was estimated that only a few moles/sec of lithium injection would be needed to significantly reduce the divertor heat flux in a tokamak fusion power plant. By operating at lower temperatures ≤ 500°C than the first wall ~ 600 – 700°C, the LL-covered divertor chamber wall surfaces can serve as an effective particle pump, as impurities generally migrate toward lower temperature LL divertor surfaces. To maintain the LL purity, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity of ~ 1 liter/second (l/sec) is envisioned to sustain the steady-state operation of a 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant. By running the Li loop continuously, it can carry the dust particles and impurities generated in the vacuum vessel to outside where the dust / impurities are removed by relatively simple filter and cold/hot trap systems. Using a cold trap system, it can recover in tritium (T) in real time from LL

  20. Nanostructure of mixtures of protic ionic liquids and lithium salts: effect of alkyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jesús; Rodríguez, Julio R; Cabeza, Óscar; Gallego, Luis J; Russina, Olga; Varela, Luis M

    2015-02-21

    The bulk structure of mixtures of two protic ionic liquids, propylammonium nitrate and butylammonium nitrate, with a salt with a common anion, is analyzed at room temperature by means of small angle X-ray scattering and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The study of several structural properties, such as density, radial distribution functions, spatial distribution functions, hydrogen bonds, coordination numbers and velocity autocorrelation functions, demonstrates that increasing the alkyl chain length of the alkylammonium cation results in more segregated, better defined polar and apolar domains, the latter having a larger size. This increase, ascribed to the erosion of the H-bond network in the ionic liquid polar regions as salt is added, is confirmed by means of small angle X-ray scattering measurements, which show a clear linear increase of the characteristic spatial sizes of the studied protic ionic liquids with salt concentration, similar to that previously reported for ethylammonium nitrate (J. Phys. Chem. B, 2014, 118, 761-770). In addition, larger ionic liquid cations lead to a lower degree of hydrogen bonding and to more sparsely packed three-dimensional structures, which are more easily perturbed by the addition of lithium salts.

  1. Bicyclic imidazolium ionic liquids as potential electrolytes for rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Shao, Nan; Bell, Jason R; Guo, Bingkun; Luo, Huimin; Jiang, Deen; Dai, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    A bicyclic imidazolium ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-2,3-trimethyleneimidazolium bis(tri fluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([ETMIm][TFSI]), and reference imidazolium compounds, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([EMIm][TFSI]) and 1, 2-dimethyl-3-butylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([DMBIm][TFSI]), were synthesized and investigated as solvents for lithium ion batteries. Although the alkylation at the C-2 position of the imidazolium ring does not affect the thermal stability of the ionic liquids, with or without the presence of 0.5 molar lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI), the stereochemical structure of the molecules has shown profound influences on the electrochemical properties of the corresponding ionic liquids. [ETMIm][TFSI] shows better reduction stability than do [EMIm][TFSI] and [DMBIm][TFSI], as confirmed by both linear sweep voltammery (LSV) and theoretical calculation. The Li||Li cell impedance of 0.5M LiTFSI/[ETMIm][TFSI] is stabilized, whereas that of 0.5M LiTFSI/[DMBIm][TFSI] is still fluctuating after 20 hours, indicating a relatively stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is formed in the former. Furthermore, the Li||graphite half-cell based on 0.5M LiTFSI/[BTMIm][TFSI] exhibits reversible capacity of 250mAh g-1 and 70mAh g-1 at 25 C, which increases to 330 mAh g-1 and 250 mAh g-1 at 50 C, under the current rate of C/20 and C/10, respectively. For comparison, the Li||graphite half-cell based on 0.5M LiTFSI/[DMBIm][TFSI] exhibits poor capacity retention under the same current rate at both temperatures.

  2. Liquid Organic Fertilizers for Sustainable Agriculture: Nutrient Uptake of Organic versus Mineral Fertilizers in Citrus Trees

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Bermejo, Almudena; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of two liquid organic fertilizers, an animal and a plant-based fertilizer, with mineral fertilization on citrus trees. The source of the fertilizer (mineral or organic) had significant effect in the nutritional status of the organic and conventionally managed mandarins. Nutrient uptake, vegetative growth, carbohydrate synthesis and soil characteristics were analyzed. Results showed that plants fertilized with animal based liquid fertilizers exhibited higher total biomass with a more profuse development of new developing organs (leaves and fibrous roots). Liquid organic fertilization resulted in an increased uptake of macro and micronutrients compared to mineral fertilized trees. Moreover, organic fertilization positively affected the carbohydrate content (fructose, glucose and sucrose) mainly in summer flush leaves. Liquid organic fertilization also resulted in an increase of soil organic matter content. Animal-based fertilizer, due to intrinsic composition, increased total tree biomass and carbohydrate leaves content, and led to lower soil nitrate concentration and higher P and Mg exchangeable in soil extract compared to vegetal-based fertilizer. Therefore, liquid organic fertilizers could be used as an alternative to traditional mineral fertilization in drip irrigated citrus trees. PMID:27764099

  3. Liquid Organic Fertilizers for Sustainable Agriculture: Nutrient Uptake of Organic versus Mineral Fertilizers in Citrus Trees.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Bermejo, Almudena; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of two liquid organic fertilizers, an animal and a plant-based fertilizer, with mineral fertilization on citrus trees. The source of the fertilizer (mineral or organic) had significant effect in the nutritional status of the organic and conventionally managed mandarins. Nutrient uptake, vegetative growth, carbohydrate synthesis and soil characteristics were analyzed. Results showed that plants fertilized with animal based liquid fertilizers exhibited higher total biomass with a more profuse development of new developing organs (leaves and fibrous roots). Liquid organic fertilization resulted in an increased uptake of macro and micronutrients compared to mineral fertilized trees. Moreover, organic fertilization positively affected the carbohydrate content (fructose, glucose and sucrose) mainly in summer flush leaves. Liquid organic fertilization also resulted in an increase of soil organic matter content. Animal-based fertilizer, due to intrinsic composition, increased total tree biomass and carbohydrate leaves content, and led to lower soil nitrate concentration and higher P and Mg exchangeable in soil extract compared to vegetal-based fertilizer. Therefore, liquid organic fertilizers could be used as an alternative to traditional mineral fertilization in drip irrigated citrus trees.

  4. Realisation of an all solid state lithium battery using solid high temperature plastic crystal electrolytes exhibiting liquid like conductivity.

    PubMed

    Shekibi, Youssof; Rüther, Thomas; Huang, Junhua; Hollenkamp, Anthony F

    2012-04-07

    Replacement of volatile and combustible electrolytes in conventional lithium batteries is desirable for two reasons: safety concerns and increase in specific energy. In this work we consider the use of an ionic organic plastic crystal material (IOPC), N-ethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium tetrafluoroborate, [C2mpyr][BF(4)], as a solid-state electrolyte for lithium battery applications. The effect of inclusion of 1 to 33 mol% lithium tetrafluoroborate, LiBF(4), into [C2mpyr][BF(4)] has been investigated over a wide temperature range by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and cycling of full Li|LiFePO(4) batteries. The increases in ionic conductivity by orders of magnitude observed at higher temperature are most likely associated with an increase in Li ion mobility in the highest plastic phase. At concentrations >5 mol% LiBF(4) the ionic conductivity of these solid-state composites is comparable to the ionic conductivity of room temperature ionic liquids. Galvanostatic cycling of Li|Li symmetrical cells showed that the reversibility of the lithium metal redox reaction at the interface of this plastic crystal electrolyte is sufficient for lithium battery applications. For the first time we demonstrate an all solid state lithium battery incorporating solid electrolytes based on IOPC as opposed to conventional flammable organic solvents.

  5. Ionic liquid electrodeposition of strain-released Germanium nanowires as stable anodes for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jian; Yang, Yu; Zhao, Jiupeng; Liu, Xusong; Endres, Frank; Chi, Caixia; Wang, Binsheng; Liu, Xiaoxu; Li, Yao

    2017-06-22

    With the growing demand for portable and wearable electronic devices, it is imperative to develop high performance Li-ion batteries with long life times. Germanium-based materials have recently demonstrated excellent lithium-ion storage ability and are being considered as the most promising candidates for the anodes of lithium-ion batteries. Nevertheless, the practical implementation of Ge-based materials to Li-ion batteries is greatly hampered by the poor cycling ability that resulted from the huge volume variation during lithiation/delithiation processes. Herein, we develop a simple and efficient method for the preparation of Ge nanowires without catalyst nanoparticles and templates, using ionic liquid electrodeposition with subsequent annealing treatment. The Ge nanowire anode shows improved electrochemical performance compared with the Ge dense film anode. A capacity of ∼1200 mA h g(-1) after 200 cycles at 0.1 C is obtained, with an initial coulombic efficiency of 81.3%. In addition, the Ge nanowire anode demonstrates superior rate capability with excellent capacity retention and stability (producing highly stable discharge capacities of about 620 mA h g(-1) at 5 C). The improved electrochemical performance is the result of the enhanced electron migration and electron transport paths of the nanowires, and sufficient elasticity to buffer the volume expansion. This approach encompasses a low energy processing method where all the material is electrochemically active and binder free. The improved cycling stability and rate performance characteristics make these anodes highly attractive for the most demanding lithium-ion applications.

  6. Uptake of liquid from wet surfaces by the brush-tipped proboscis of a butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Chul; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the brush-tipped proboscis of the Asian comma (Polygonia c-aureum) on wet-surface feeding. The tip region of this proboscis was observed, especially two microstructures; the intake slits through which liquid passes into the proboscis and the brush-like sensilla styloconica. The sensilla styloconica were connected laterally to the intake slits in the tip region. The liquid-feeding flow between the proboscis and the wet surface was measured by micro-particle image velocimetry. During liquid feeding, the sensilla styloconica region accumulates liquid by pinning the air-liquid interface to the tips of the sensilla styloconica, thus the intake slit region remains immersed. The film flow that passes through the sensilla styloconica region shows a parabolic velocity profile, and the corresponding flow rate is proportional to the cubed length of the sensilla styloconica. Based on these observations, we demonstrated that the sensilla styloconica promotes the uptake of liquid from wet surfaces. This study may inspire the development of a microfluidic device to collect liquid from moist substrates. PMID:25373895

  7. Uptake of liquid from wet surfaces by the brush-tipped proboscis of a butterfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Chul; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of the brush-tipped proboscis of the Asian comma (Polygonia c-aureum) on wet-surface feeding. The tip region of this proboscis was observed, especially two microstructures; the intake slits through which liquid passes into the proboscis and the brush-like sensilla styloconica. The sensilla styloconica were connected laterally to the intake slits in the tip region. The liquid-feeding flow between the proboscis and the wet surface was measured by micro-particle image velocimetry. During liquid feeding, the sensilla styloconica region accumulates liquid by pinning the air-liquid interface to the tips of the sensilla styloconica, thus the intake slit region remains immersed. The film flow that passes through the sensilla styloconica region shows a parabolic velocity profile, and the corresponding flow rate is proportional to the cubed length of the sensilla styloconica. Based on these observations, we demonstrated that the sensilla styloconica promotes the uptake of liquid from wet surfaces. This study may inspire the development of a microfluidic device to collect liquid from moist substrates.

  8. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Parkin, Don M.; Dudey, Norman D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

  9. High velocity proton collision with liquid lithium: a time dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Bi, Gang; Kang, Jun; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2017-03-29

    Liquid lithium is often used as a coating material in fusion reaction chambers, where it is under constant bombardment from high speed neutrons and protons. However, numerous fundamental questions are unanswered, for example whether a single proton impact can cause Li atom sputtering, and what is the electron excitation energy profile after a collision particularly for extremely high energy projectiles. Herein, we use a real-time dependent density functional method to study these questions for proton energies in the range of 30 eV to 1 MeV. The calculated stopping power agrees well with experiment, and it is found that the stopping power cannot be described by the single electron exciting spectrum based on the adiabatic eigen energies, and Li atom sputtering is not observed within our simulation time.

  10. Liquid-lithium cooling for 100-kW ISOL and fragmentation targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J. A.; Reed, C. B.,Hassanein, A.,Gomes, I. C.

    2000-11-10

    Advanced exotic beam facilities that are currently being developed will use powerful driver accelerator for the production of short-lived rare isotopes. Multi-beam-drivers capable of producing high power beams from very light to very heavy ions are now technically feasible. A challenge for such facilities is the development of production targets to be used for a variety of reaction mechanisms with beam powers of about 100 kilowatts. This paper presents engineering concepts that have been developed recently for using liquid lithium coolant for two types of targets, one for use with light-ion beams on high atomic number (Z) targets and the other for heavy-ion beams on low-Z targets.

  11. An aprotic lithium/polyiodide semi-liquid battery with an ionic shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y. X.; Liu, M.; Zhao, T. S.; Zeng, L.; Wu, M. C.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we report a high-energy-density lithium/polyiodide (Li/PI) semi-liquid battery with soluble polyiodide in ether-based solvents as the catholyte. The challenge of shuttle effect is addressed by adopting a hybrid membrane coated with negatively charged sulfonate-ended perfluoroalkyl polymer, which allows for inhibition of polyiodide shuttles due to the electrostatic repulsion. The assembled Li/PI battery demonstrates a superior volumetric energy density (170.5 Wh L-1), a stable cycling performance (>100 cycles, averaged decay < 0.16% at 0.2 C), a high energy efficiency (>84%, 100 cycles at 2 C), and a high coulombic efficiency (>95%, 100 cycles at 2 C). These high performances achieved suggest that the aprotic Li/polyiodide battery with a compact architecture has the potential for various energy storage applications.

  12. Observation of electrodeposited lithium by optical microscope in room temperature ionic liquid-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, H.; Sakaebe, H.; Matsumoto, H.

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) were applied to a lithium (Li) metal battery system, and the behavior of Li electrodeposition on nickel electrodes in RTILs was investigated using in situ optical microscopy with/without an organic additive, vinylene carbonate (VC), in the RTILs. Two RTILs, PP13[TFSA] (N-methyl- N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide) and EMI[FSA] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide), were chosen as the base electrolytes. Dendritic particles were obtained in the case of EMI[FSA] with and without VC, and PP13[TFSA] without VC, while non-dendritic fine particles were obtained in the case of PP13[TFSA] with VC.

  13. Lithium-sulphur battery with activated carbon cloth-sulphur cathode and ionic liquid as electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderska-Mocek, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    In this study a binder-free activated carbon cloth-sulphur (ACC-S) composite cathode is presented. Such a cathode was obtained using the impregnating technique of microporous activated carbon cloth with elemental melted sulphur. The surface morphology of an activated carbon cloth-sulphur electrode was studied using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which was equipped with an EDX spectroscopy attachment. Electrochemical properties of the ACC-S composite cathode was tested in an ionic liquid electrolyte consisting of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl)imide (EtMeImNTf2) and bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl)imide (LiNTf2). The ACC-sulphur cathode working together with lithium anode was tested with the use of cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The capacity and cyclic stability of the ACC-S composite cathode were much better than those for the sulphur cathode (a mixture of sulphur from graphene nanoplatelets and carbon black) tested in the same ionic liquid electrolyte. The ACC-sulphur cathode showed good cyclability and coulombic efficiency (99%) with the ionic liquid electrolyte. The reversible capacity of the ACC-S|electrolyte|Li cell was ca. 830 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles.

  14. Lithium-Ion-Conducting Electrolytes: From an Ionic Liquid to the Polymer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Fernicola, A.; Weise, F. C.; Greenbaum, S. G.; Kagimoto, J.; Scrosati, B.; Soleto, A.

    2009-01-01

    This work concerns the design, the synthesis, and the characterization of the N-butyl-N-ethylpiperidinium N,N-bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (PP24TFSI) ionic liquid (IL). To impart Li-ion transport, a suitable amount of lithium N,N-bis-(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI) is added to the IL. The Li–IL mixture displays ionic conductivity values on the order of 10−4 S cm−1 and an electrochemical stability window in the range of 1.8–4.5 V vs Li+/Li. The voltammetric analysis demonstrates that the cathodic decomposition gives rise to a passivating layer on the surface of the working electrode, which kinetically extends the stability of the Li/IL interface as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The LiTFSI–PP24TFSI mixture is incorporated in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) matrix to form various electrolyte membranes with different LiTFSI–PP24TFSI contents. The ionic conductivity of all the membranes resembles that of the LiTFSI–IL mixture, suggesting an ionic transport mechanism similar to that of the liquid component. NMR measurements demonstrate a reduction in the mobility of all ions following the addition of LiTFSI to the PP24TFSI IL and when incorporating the mixture into the membrane. Finally, an unexpected but potentially significant enhancement in Li transference number is observed in passing from the liquid to the membrane electrolyte system. PMID:20354582

  15. Lithium-Ion-Conducting Electrolytes: From an Ionic Liquid to the Polymer Membrane.

    PubMed

    Fernicola, A; Weise, F C; Greenbaum, S G; Kagimoto, J; Scrosati, B; Soleto, A

    2009-05-05

    This work concerns the design, the synthesis, and the characterization of the N-butyl-N-ethylpiperidinium N,N-bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (PP(24)TFSI) ionic liquid (IL). To impart Li-ion transport, a suitable amount of lithium N,N-bis-(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI) is added to the IL. The Li-IL mixture displays ionic conductivity values on the order of 10(-4) S cm(-1) and an electrochemical stability window in the range of 1.8-4.5 V vs Li(+)/Li. The voltammetric analysis demonstrates that the cathodic decomposition gives rise to a passivating layer on the surface of the working electrode, which kinetically extends the stability of the Li/IL interface as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The LiTFSI-PP(24)TFSI mixture is incorporated in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) matrix to form various electrolyte membranes with different LiTFSI-PP(24)TFSI contents. The ionic conductivity of all the membranes resembles that of the LiTFSI-IL mixture, suggesting an ionic transport mechanism similar to that of the liquid component. NMR measurements demonstrate a reduction in the mobility of all ions following the addition of LiTFSI to the PP(24)TFSI IL and when incorporating the mixture into the membrane. Finally, an unexpected but potentially significant enhancement in Li transference number is observed in passing from the liquid to the membrane electrolyte system.

  16. Understanding and Modeling the Liquid Uptake in Porous Compacted Powder Preparations.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Jesús; Moxon, Thomas E; Simons, Tom A H; Bakalis, Serafim; Fryer, Peter J

    2017-07-18

    Porous solid materials commonly undergo coating processes during their manufacture, where liquids are put in contact with solids for different purposes. The study of liquid penetration in porous substrates is a process of high relevance in activities in several industries. In particular, powder detergents are subject to coating with surfactants that will boost their performance, although this may affect the flowability and even cause caking of the particulate material, which can be detrimental to consumer acceptance. Here we present a methodology to make compacted preparations of powders relevant to detergent making and evaluate the internal structure of such porous substrates by means of X-ray microcomputed tomography. Liquid penetration in the preparation and the total mass uptake of fluid were monitored by a gravimetric technique based on a modified Wilhelmy plate method consisting of consecutive cycles. Taking into account the geometry of the system, two models were proposed to describe the liquid uptake based on the process being driven by mass (model 1) or pressure (model 2) gradients. A comparison between both from statistical and physical points of view led to the conclusion that the latter was more appropriate for describing the process and retrieving values of the permeability of the solid between 0.03 × 10(-12) and 0.95 × 10(-12) m(2). Finally, with the parameters retrieved from model 2, the force balance observed throughout the experiment was simulated satisfactorily.

  17. Effect of water uptake on morphology of polymerized ionic liquid block copolymers and random copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tsen-Shan; Ye, Yuesheng; Elabd, Yossef; Winey, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Dynamic studies of polymer morphology probe how the physical properties of polymerized ionic liquids are affected by the environment, such as temperature or moisture. For a series of poly(methyl methacrylate-b-1-[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-3-Butylimidazolium X^-) block and random copolymers with hydrophilic counterions (X^- = Br^-, HCO3^-, OH^-), the introduction of water vapor to the system can swell the ionic liquid block, causing enlarged hydrophilic domains and swollen channels for ion conduction. This expected expansion of ionic liquid domains in humid environments can be used to intelligently design these copolymers for use in technological applications. The effect of water vapor exposure in these imidazolium-based acrylate polymers is studied by small-angle X-ray scattering. These morphology results will be discussed alongside complementary studies of water uptake and ion conductivity.

  18. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J; Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R

    2014-10-16

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this

  19. Effect of lithium salts addition on the ionic liquid based extraction of essential oil from Farfarae Flos.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Sha-Sha; Jie-Xing; Qin, Xue-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an ionic liquids (ILs) based extraction approach has been successfully applied to the extraction of essential oil from Farfarae Flos, and the effect of lithium chloride was also investigated. The results indicated that the oil yields can be increased by the ILs, and the extraction time can be reduced significantly (from 4h to 2h), compared with the conventional water distillation. The addition of lithium chloride showed different effect according to the structures of ILs, and the oil yields may be related with the structure of cation, while the chemical compositions of essential oil may be related with the anion. The reduction of extraction time and remarkable higher efficiency (5.41-62.17% improved) by combination of lithium salt and proper ILs supports the suitability of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Liquid Lithium Divertor and Scrape-Off-Layer Interactions on the National Spherical Torus Experiment:2010 ₋2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzic, David N.; Andruczyk, Daniel

    2013-08-27

    The implementation of the liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX presented a unique opportunity in plasma-material interactions studies. A high density Langmuir Probe (HDLP) array utilizing a dense pack of triple Langmuir probes was built at PPPL and the electronics designed and built by UIUC. It was shown that the HDLP array could be used to characterize the modification of the EEDF during lithium experiments on NSTX as well as characterize the transient particle loads during lithium experiments as a means to study ELMs. With NSTX being upgraded and a new divertor being installed, the HDLP array will not be used in NSTX-U. However UIUC is currently helping to develop two new systems for depositing lithium into NSTX-U, a Liquid Lithium Pellet Dripper (LLPD) for use with the granular injector for ELM mitigation and control studies as well as an Upward-Facing Lithium Evaporator (U-LITER) based on a flash evaporation system using an electron beam. Currently UIUC has Daniel Andruczyk Stationed at PPPL and is developing these systems as well as being involved in preparing the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP) for use in LTX and NSTX-U. To date the MAPP preparations have been completed. New sample holders were designed by UIUC?s Research Engineer at PPPL and manufactured at PPPL and installed. MAPP is currently being used on LTX to do calibration and initial studies. The LLPD has demonstrated that it can produce pellets. There is still some adjustments needed to control the frequency and particle size. Equipment for the U-LITER has arrived and initial test are being made of the electron beam and design of the U-LITER in progress. It is expected to have these ready for the first run campaign of NSTX-U.

  1. Transport properties and phase behaviour in binary and ternary ionic liquid electrolyte systems of interest in lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Bayley, Paul M; Best, Adam S; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Forsyth, Maria

    2011-03-14

    A binary ionic liquid (IL) system based on a common cation, N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium (C(3) mpyr(+)), and either bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (NTf(2) (-)) or bis(fluorosulfonyl) imide (FSI(-) as the anion is explored over its entire composition range. Phase behavior, determined by DSC, shows the presence of a eutectic temperature at 247 K and composition around an anion ratio of 2:1 (FSI(-) :NTf(2)(-)) with the phase diagram for this system proposed (under the thermal conditions used). Importantly for electrochemical devices, the single phase melting transition at the eutectic is well below ambient temperatures (247 K). To investigate the effect of such anion mixing on the lithium ion speciation, conductivity and PFG-NMR diffusion measurements were performed in both the binary IL system as well as the Li-NTf(2) -containing ternary system. The addition of the lithium salt to the mixed IL system resulted in a decrease in conductivity, as is commonly observed in the single-component IL systems. For a fixed lithium salt composition, both conductivity and ion diffusion have linear behaviour as a function of the anion ratio, however, the rate of change of the diffusion coefficient seems greater in the presence of lithium. From the application point of view, the addition of the FSI(-) to the NTf(2)(-) IL results in a considerable increase in lithium ion diffusivity at room temperature and no evidence of additional complex ion behaviour.

  2. Dissociation of doubly charged clusters of lithium acetate: Asymmetric fission and breakdown of the liquid drop model: Dissociation of doubly charged clusters of lithium acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil

    2016-06-08

    Unimolecular and collision-induced dissociation of doubly charged lithium acetate clusters, (CH3COOLi)nLi22+, demonstrated that Coulomb fission via charge separation is the dominant dissociation process with no contribution from the neutral evaporation processes for all such ions from the critical limit to larger cluster ions, although latter process have normally been observed in all earlier studies. These results are clearly in disagreement with the Rayleigh’s liquid drop model that has been used successfully to predict the critical size and explain the fragmentation behavior of multiply charged clusters.

  3. Lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) as conducting salt for nonaqueous liquid electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries: Physicochemical and electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hong-Bo; Zhou, Si-Si; Zhang, Dai-Jun; Feng, Shao-Wei; Li, Li-Fei; Liu, Kai; Feng, Wen-Fang; Nie, Jin; Li, Hong; Huang, Xue-Jie; Armand, Michel; Zhou, Zhi-Bin

    Lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) has been studied as conducting salt for lithium-ion batteries, in terms of the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the neat LiFSI salt and its nonaqueous liquid electrolytes. Our pure LiFSI salt shows a melting point at 145 °C, and is thermally stable up to 200 °C. It exhibits far superior stability towards hydrolysis than LiPF 6. Among the various lithium salts studied at the concentration of 1.0 M (= mol dm -3) in a mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC)/ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7, v/v), LiFSI shows the highest conductivity in the order of LiFSI > LiPF 6 > Li[N(SO 2CF 3) 2] (LiTFSI) > LiClO 4 > LiBF 4. The stability of Al in the high potential region (3.0-5.0 V vs. Li +/Li) has been confirmed for high purity LiFSI-based electrolytes using cyclic voltammetry, SEM morphology, and chronoamperometry, whereas Al corrosion indeed occurs in the LiFSI-based electrolytes tainted with trace amounts of LiCl (50 ppm). With high purity, LiFSI outperforms LiPF 6 in both Li/LiCoO 2 and graphite/LiCoO 2 cells.

  4. New Ether-functionalized Morpholinium- and Piperidinium-based Ionic Liquids as Electrolyte Components in Lithium and Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Maria Assunta; Fujimura, Kanae; Sgambetterra, Mirko; Tsurumaki, Akiko; Panero, Stefania; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Scrosati, Bruno

    2017-06-09

    Here, two ionic liquids, N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylmorpholinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (M1,2O2 TFSI) and N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (P1,2O2 TFSI) were synthesized and compared. Fundamental relevant properties, such as thermal and electrochemical stability, density, and ionic conductivity were analyzed to evaluate the effects caused by the presence of the ether bond in the side chain and/or in the organic cation ring. Upon lithium salt addition, two electrolytes suitable for lithium batteries applications were found. Higher conducting properties of the piperidinium-based electrolyte resulted in enhanced cycling performances when tested with LiFePO4 (LFP) cathode in lithium cells. When mixing the P1,2O2 TFSI/LiTFSI electrolyte with a tailored alkyl carbonate mixture, the cycling performance of both Li and Li-ion cells greatly improved, with prolonged cyclability delivering very stable capacity values, as high as the theoretical one in the case of Li/LFP cell configurations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid-lithium containment. III. Effect of velocity and lead content. Unabridged final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, B.D.; Edwards, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    The intergranular penetration of specially heat treated 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel by lead-lithium liquids containing 0, 17.6, and 53 w/o lead has been investigated at temperatures ranging from 300 to 600/sup 0/C and for times to 1000 hours. Limited tests using a 99.3 w/o lead-lithium liquid were also conducted.

  6. A 20 kw beam-on-target test of a high-power liquid lithium target for RIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Claude B.; Nolen, Jerry A.; Specht, James R.; Novick, Vincent J.; Plotkin, Perry

    2004-12-01

    The high-power heavy-ion beams produced by the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac have large energy deposition density in solids and in many cases no solid materials would survive the full beam power. Liquid lithium technology has been proposed to solve this problem in RIA. Specifically, a windowless target for the production of radioactive ions via fragmentation, consisting of a jet of about 3 cm thickness of flowing liquid lithium, exposed to the beamline vacuum [1,2] is being developed. To demonstrate that power densities equivalent to a 200-kW RIA uranium beam, deposited in the first 4 mm of a flowing lithium jet, can be handled by the windowless target design, a high power 1 MeV Dynamitron was leased and a test stand prepared to demonstrate the target's capability of absorbing and carrying away a 20kW heat load without disrupting either the 5 mm × 10 mm flowing lithium jet target or the beam line vacuum.

  7. Measurement and modeling of surface temperature dynamics of the NSTX liquid lithium divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, A. G.; Gan, K. F.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; Maingi, R.; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Nygren, R. E.; Skinner, C. H.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Dual-band infrared (IR) measurements of the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) are reported that demonstrate liquid Li is more effective at removing plasma heat flux than Li-conditioned graphite. Extended dwell of the outer strike point (OSP) on the LLD caused an incrementally larger area to be heated above the Li melting point through the discharge leading to enhanced D retention and plasma confinement. Measurement of Tsurface near the OSP demonstrates a significant reduction of the LLD surface temperature compared to that of Li-coated graphite at the same major radius. Modeling of these data with a 2-D simulation of the LLD structure in the DFLUX code suggests that the structure of the LLD was successful at handling up to q⊥,peak = 5 MW/m2 inter-ELM and up to 10 MW/m2 during ELMs from its plasma-facing surface as intended, and provide an innovative method for inferring the Li layer thickness.

  8. Stable silicon-ionic liquid interface for next-generation lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Molina Piper, Daniela; Evans, Tyler; Leung, Kevin; Watkins, Tylan; Olson, Jarred; Kim, Seul Cham; Han, Sang Sub; Bhat, Vinay; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Buttry, Daniel A; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-02-25

    We are currently in the midst of a race to discover and develop new battery materials capable of providing high energy-density at low cost. By combining a high-performance Si electrode architecture with a room temperature ionic liquid electrolyte, here we demonstrate a highly energy-dense lithium-ion cell with an impressively long cycling life, maintaining over 75% capacity after 500 cycles. Such high performance is enabled by a stable half-cell coulombic efficiency of 99.97%, averaged over the first 200 cycles. Equally as significant, our detailed characterization elucidates the previously convoluted mechanisms of the solid-electrolyte interphase on Si electrodes. We provide a theoretical simulation to model the interface and microstructural-compositional analyses that confirm our theoretical predictions and allow us to visualize the precise location and constitution of various interfacial components. This work provides new science related to the interfacial stability of Si-based materials while granting positive exposure to ionic liquid electrochemistry.

  9. New thin lithium-ion batteries using a liquid electrolyte with thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Norio; Sekino, Masahiro; Ohsaki, Takahisa; Kanda, Motoya; Yamamoto, Masao

    New thin lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) using a laminated film bag, an organic liquid electrolyte, and a mesophase-pitch-based carbon fiber (MCF) anode exhibited high discharge performance, a very low swelling under a high-temperature storage, and excellent safety performance. A 1.5 M solution of LiBF 4 in an ethylene carbonate (EC)/γ-butyrolactone (GBL) mixed solvent was found to be a promising liquid electrolyte for the thin LIBs because the electrolyte has a high flame point of 129°C, a high boiling point of 216°C, a low vapor pressure, and a high conductivity of 2.1 mS/cm at -20°C. It was demonstrated that the thin LIB using B-doped MCF anode has a high energy density of 172 Wh/kg, high rate capability, high capacity at -20°C, and a long cycle life of 500 cycles. The safety of thin LIBs under overcharging tests and oven tests was superior to that of conventional prismatic LIBs and PLBs. The very low swelling and the excellent safety performance were attributable to the stability of LiBF 4-EC/GBL electrolyte against LiCoO 2 cathode material.

  10. Protected Lithium-Metal Anodes in Batteries: From Liquid to Solid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunpeng; Fu, Kun; Zhang, Ying; Hitz, Emily; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-09-01

    High-energy lithium-metal batteries are among the most promising candidates for next-generation energy storage systems. With a high specific capacity and a low reduction potential, the Li-metal anode has attracted extensive interest for decades. Dendritic Li formation, uncontrolled interfacial reactions, and huge volume effect are major hurdles to the commercial application of Li-metal anodes. Recent studies have shown that the performance and safety of Li-metal anodes can be significantly improved via organic electrolyte modification, Li-metal interface protection, Li-electrode framework design, separator coating, and so on. Superior to the liquid electrolytes, solid-state electrolytes are considered able to inhibit problematic Li dendrites and build safe solid Li-metal batteries. Inspired by the bright prospects of solid Li-metal batteries, increasing efforts have been devoted to overcoming the obstacles of solid Li-metal batteries, such as low ionic conductivity of the electrolyte and Li-electrolyte interfacial problems. Here, the approaches to protect Li-metal anodes from liquid batteries to solid-state batteries are outlined and analyzed in detail. Perspectives regarding the strategies for developing Li-metal anodes are discussed to facilitate the practical application of Li-metal batteries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. "Ionic liquids-in-salt"--a promising electrolyte concept for high-temperature lithium batteries?

    PubMed

    Marczewski, Maciej J; Stanje, Bernhard; Hanzu, Ilie; Wilkening, Martin; Johansson, Patrik

    2014-06-28

    A novel electrolyte concept for lithium-ion batteries, termed "ionic liquid-in-salt", is introduced. Our feasibility study on (1 - x)EMIMTFSI:(x)LiTFSI, 0.66 ≤ x ≤ 0.97, showed that at elevated temperatures the various dual liquid and solid phase regions are characterized by a wide thermal stability window, high ionic conductivities and appreciable mechanical integrity. The highest conductivity values are obtained for the compositions x = 0.70 and x = 0.75 (σ ≈ 6 × 10(-3) S cm(-1)) and are related to the final melting of the materials. Overall, high conductivities are observed for 0.70 < x < 0.90 while low ones are found for x > 0.90. Raman and NMR spectroscopies reveal the presence of highly mobile Li-containing species, partly identified as [Li(TFSI)2](-), albeit rather unexpected for these high x values, which might explain the high ionic conductivities observed. To prove the general value of our concept in more detail, some first results on BMIMTFSI and PY13TFSI based systems are also presented.

  12. Failure Mechanism of Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries in Liquid Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dongping; Shao, Yuyan; Lozano, Terence J.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, Bryant; Zhang, Jiguang; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saenz, Natalio T.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, lithium anode has re-attracted broad interest because of the necessity of employing lithium metal in the next-generation battery technologies such as lithium sulfur (Li-S) and lithium oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. Fast capacity degradation and safety issue associated with rechargeable lithium metal batteries have been reported, although the fundamental understanding on the failure mechanism of lithium metal at high charge rate is still under debate due to the complicated interfacial chemistry between lithium metal and electrolyte. Herein, we demonstrate that, at high current density, the quick growth of porous solid electrolyte interphase towards bulk lithium, instead of towards the separator, dramatically builds up the cell impedance that directly leads to the cell failure. Understanding the lithium metal failure mechanism is very critical to gauge the various approaches used to address the stability and safety issues associated with lithium metal anode. Otherwise, all cells will fail quickly at high rates before the observation of any positive effects that might be brought from adopting the new strategies to protect lithium.

  13. Vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mun, S.Y.; Lee, H.

    1999-12-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems were measured at 60, 160, 300, and 760 mmHg at temperatures ranging from 315 to 488 K. The apparatus used in this work is a modified still especially designed for the measurement of low-pressure VLE, in which both liquid and vapor are continuously recirculated. For the analysis of salt-containing solutions, a method incorporating refractometry and gravimetry was used. From the experimental measurements, the effect of lithium bromide on the VLE behavior of water + 1,3-propanediol was investigated. The experimental data of the salt-free system were successfully correlated using the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC models. In addition, the extended UNIQUAC model of Sander et al. was applied to the VLE calculation of salt-containing mixtures.

  14. Mesoporous silica/ionic liquid quasi-solid-state electrolytes and their application in lithium metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhengxi; Yin, Kun; Yang, Li; Tachibana, Kazuhiro; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the ordered mesoporous silica, SBA-15, is chosen as the matrix for the first time to prepare quasi-solid-state electrolytes (QSSEs) with an ionic liquid, LiTFSI salt and PVdF-HFP. The as-obtained QSSEs are evaluated by electrochemical methods. Lithium metal batteries containing these QSSEs exhibit high discharge capacity and good cycle performance at room temperature, indicating successful battery operation.

  15. CaO insulator coatings on a vanadium-base alloy in liquid 2 at.% calcium-lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-10-01

    The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-15%Cr-5%Ti by exposure of the alloy (round bottom samples 6-in. long by 0.25-in. dia.) to liquid lithium that contained 2 at.% dissolved calcium was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 300-464{degrees}C. The solute element, calcium in liquid lithium, reacted with the alloy substrate at these temperatures for 17 h to produce a calcium coating {approx}7-8 {mu}m thick. The calcium-coated vanadium alloy was oxidized to form a CaO coating. Resistance of the coating layer on V-15Cr-5Ti, measured in-situ in liquid lithium that contained 2 at.% calcium, was 1.0 x 10{sup 10} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} at 300{degrees}C and 400 h, and 0.9 x 10{sup 10} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} at 464{degrees}C and 300 h. Thermal cycling between 300 and 464{degrees}C changed the resistance of the coating layer, which followed insulator behavior. Examination of the specimen after cooling to room temperature revealed no cracks in the CaO coating. The coatings were evaluated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray analysis. Adhesion between CaO and vanadium alloys was enhanced as exposure time increased.

  16. Gold nanoparticle uptake in whole cells in liquid examined by environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-02-01

    The size of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can influence various aspects of their cellular uptake. Light microscopy is not capable of resolving most AuNPs, while electron microscopy (EM) is not practically capable of acquiring the necessary statistical data from many cells and the results may suffer from various artifacts. Here, we demonstrate the use of a fast EM method for obtaining high-resolution data from a much larger population of cells than is usually feasible with conventional EM. A549 (human lung carcinoma) cells were subjected to uptake protocols with 10, 15, or 30 nm diameter AuNPs with adsorbed serum proteins. After 20 min, 24 h, or 45 h, the cells were fixed and imaged in whole in a thin layer of liquid water with environmental scanning electron microscopy equipped with a scanning transmission electron microscopy detector. The fast preparation and imaging of 145 whole cells in liquid allowed collection of nanoscale data within an exceptionally small amount of time of ~80 h. Analysis of 1,041 AuNP-filled vesicles showed that the long-term AuNP storing lysosomes increased their average size by 80 nm when AuNPs with 30 nm diameter were uptaken, compared to lysosomes of cells incubated with AuNPs of 10 and 15 nm diameter.

  17. Recent Progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U Lithium Program and Prospects for Reactor-Relevant Liquid-Lithium Based Divertor Development

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, et al.

    2012-10-27

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. While tungsten has been identified as the most attractive solid divertor material, the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium (Li) program is investigating the viability of liquid lithium (LL) as a potential reactor compatible divertor plasma facing component (PFC) . In the near term, operation in NSTX-U is projected to provide reactor-like divertor heat loads < 40 MW/m^2 for 5 s. During the most recent NSTX campaign, ~ 0.85 kg of Li was evaporated onto the NSTX PFCs where a ~50% reduction in heat load on the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) was observed, attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. This reduced divertor heat flux through radiation observed in the NSTX LLD experiment is consistent with the results from other lithium experiments and calculations. These results motivate an LL-based closed radiative divertor concept proposed here for NSTX-U and fusion reactors. With an LL coating, the Li is evaporated from the divertor strike point surface due to the intense heat. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energies, and the ionized Li ions can radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. Due to the rapid plasma transport in divertor plasma, the radiation values can be significantly enhanced up to ~ 11 MJ/cc of LL. This radiative process has the desired function of spreading the focused divertor heat load to the entire divertor chamber facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL divertor surface can also provide a "sacrificial" surface to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the ELMs. The closed radiative LLD concept has the advantages of providing some degree of partition in terms of plasma disruption forces on the LL, Li particle divertor retention, and strong divertor pumping action from the

  18. Solid and liquid lithium enthalpy: Experimental investigation near the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, I. I.; Roschupkin, V. V.; Fordeyeva, L. C.

    1983-09-01

    Lithium enthalpy experimental data in the range from 320 to 700 K are obtained by the drop method with use of an ice calorimeter. The lithium enthalpy of fusion calculated from the experimental data is equal to 435.4±3.9 J·g-1. The vacancy formation energy calculated from the solid lithium heat capacity data is equal to 0.6±0.2 eV.

  19. Determination of ginsenoside compound K in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of lithium adducts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunhui; Lu, Youming; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Liang; Zhong, Dafang

    2015-09-01

    Ginsenoside compound K (GCK), the main metabolite of protopanaxadiol constituents of Panax ginseng, easily produces alkali metal adduct ions during mass spectrometry particularly with lithium. Accordingly, we have developed a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for analysis of GCK in human plasma based on formation of a lithium adduct. The analyte and paclitaxel (internal standard) were extracted from 50 µL human plasma using methyl tert-butyl ether. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Phenomenex Gemini C18 column (50 mm×2.0 mm; 5 μm) using stepwise gradient elution with acetonitrile-water and 0.2 mmol/L lithium carbonate at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection was performed in the positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions at m/z 629→449 for the GCK-lithium adduct and m/z 860→292 for the adduct of paclitaxel. The assay was linear in the concentration range 1.00-1000 ng/mL (r (2)>0.9988) with intra- and inter-day precision of ±8.4% and accuracy in the range of -4.8% to 6.5%. Recovery, stability and matrix effects were all satisfactory. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving administration of a single GCK 50 mg tablet to healthy Chinese volunteers.

  20. Study on hydrogen isotopes permeation in fluidized state of liquid lithium-lead

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, S.; Yoshimura, R.; Okada, M.; Fukada, S.; Edao, Y.

    2015-03-15

    Lithium-lead (Li-Pb) is one of the most promising candidate materials for the liquid blanket of fusion reactors. Hydrogen transfer under a fluidized condition of Li-Pb is investigated experimentally to design a Li-Pb blanket system. Li-Pb eutectic alloy flows inside a Ni tube in the experimental system, where H{sub 2} permeates into and out of the forced Li-Pb flow. The overall H{sub 2} permeation rate is analyzed using a mass balance model. Hydrogen atoms diffuse in Ni and Li-Pb. The steady-state H{sub 2} permeation rate obtained by this experiment is smaller than the result of the calculation model. A resistance factor is introduced to the present analysis in order to evaluate the influence of other H{sub 2} transfer mechanisms, such as diffusion in Li-Pb and dissolution reaction between Ni and Li-Pb. The contribution of the resistance to the overall H{sub 2} permeation rate becomes large when the flow rate of Li-Pb is low. This is because the boundary layer thickness between Ni and Li-Pb affects the overall H{sub 2} permeation rate. When the flow velocity of Li-Pb increases, the thickness of the boundary layer becomes thin, and the driving force of H{sub 2} permeation through the Ni wall becomes bigger. (authors)

  1. Lithium-sulfur batteries based on nitrogen-doped carbon and ionic liquid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Xiqing; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (NC) and sulfur were used to prepare an NC/S composite cathode, which was evaluated in an ionic liquid electrolyte of 0.5 M lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in methylpropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (MPPY.TFSI) by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cycle testing. To facilitate the comparison, a C/S composite based on activated carbon (AC) without nitrogen doping was also fabricated under the same conditions as those for the NC/S composite. Compared with the AC/S composite, the NC/S composite showed enhanced activity toward sulfur reduction, as evidenced by the early onset sulfur reduction potential, higher redox current density in the CV test, and faster charge transfer kinetics as indicated by EIS measurement. At room temperature under a current density of 84 mA g-1 (C/20), the battery based on the NC/S composite exhibited higher discharge potential and an initial capacity of 1420 mAh g-1 whereas that based on the AC/S composite showed lower discharge potential and an initial capacity of 1120 mAh g-1. Both batteries showed similar capacity fading with cycling due to the intrinsic polysulfide solubility and the polysulfide shuttle mechanism; the capacity fading can be improved by further modification of the cathode.

  2. How does lithium oxalyldifluoroborate enable the compatibility of ionic liquids and carbon-based capacitors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renjie; Chen, Yan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Rong; He, Zhouying; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2015-02-01

    Lithium oxalyldifluoroborate (LiODFB) has several unique characteristics, such as high ionic conductivity over a wide temperature range and the ability to form and stabilize solid electrolyte interface films on graphite surfaces. A series of binary, room-temperature, molten electrolytes composed of LiODFB and organic compounds with acylamino groups (acetamide, oxazolidinone or OZO) have been synthesized. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy indicates that Cdbnd O and N-H functional groups undergo blue or red shifts upon addition of LiODFB. The electrolytes have excellent thermal stabilities and electrochemical characteristics that allow them to be promising electrolytes for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). Here, we examine 1:5 molar ratio LiODFB and acetamide/OZO ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes in EDLCs. IL compatibility with two types of carbon-based electrodes is investigated theoretically and experimentally. We simulate possible structures and ion diameters for the ILs, which must be compatible with pore sizes of the carbon electrodes. Mesoporous activated carbon AC2, with a pore size similar to the ionic diameter of LiODFB-acetamide, has a specific capacitance of 154.2 Fg-1 at 20 m Ag-1. Additionally, typical capacitive and reversibility behaviors can be seen in the charge-discharge curves over 0-2 V. Finally, the EDLCs exhibit good charging/discharging performances.

  3. Two-Dimensional Optical Measurement of Waves on Liquid Lithium Jet Simulating IFMIF Target Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuhiro Itoh; Hiroyuki Koterazawa; Taro Itoh; Yutaka Kukita; Hiroo Kondo; Nobuo Yamaoka; Hiroshi Horiike; Mizuho Ida; Hideo Nakamura; Hiroo Nakamura; Takeo Muroga

    2006-07-01

    Waves on a liquid-lithium jet flow, simulating a proposed high-energy beam target design, have been measured using an optical technique based on specular reflection of a single laser beam on the jet surface. The stream-wise and spanwise fluctuations of the local free-surface slope were least-square fitted with a sinusoidal curve to makeup the signals lost due to the constriction in the optical arrangement. The waveform was estimated with an assumption that wave phase speed can be calculated using the dispersion relation for linear capillary-gravity waves. The direction of propagation on the jet surface was also evaluated so that the wave amplitudes, calculated by integral of slope angle signal, agree consistently in stream-wise and spanwise direction. These measurements and analyses show that the waves at the measurement location for a jet velocity of 1.2 m/s can best be represented by oblique waves with an inclination of 1.23 rad, a wavelength of 3.8 mm and a wave amplitude of about 0.05 mm. (authors)

  4. Validation of liquid lithium target stability for an intense neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, H.; Kanemura, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hirakawa, Y.; Wakai, E.; Knaster, J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports on validation results for the stability of a liquid lithium (Li) target intended for use as an intense fusion neutron source such as for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), an advanced fusion neutron source (A-FNS), and a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO)-oriented neutron source (DONES). The variation in the thickness of a Li target must be suppressed to within  ±1 mm inside a deuteron beam footprint to both maintain the integrity of the Li target and guarantee the desired level of neutron flux. We achieved a stable Li target with an average thickness variation of just 0.17 mm inside the beam footprint under standard IFMIF operating conditions (target speed: 15 m s-1 vacuum pressure: 10-3 Pa; and Li temperature: 250 °C). Moreover, the mean and maximum wave amplitudes at the beam center under such conditions were found to be 0.26 mm and 1.46 mm, respectively; these are small enough to satisfy operational requirements. Finally, it was determined that the stability of the Li target remained unchanged despite using it for an extended period of 1561 h. This finding is regarded as a significant step toward the realization of the IFMIF and the potential use of relevant neutron sources such as A-FNS and DONES.

  5. Ether and siloxane functionalized ionic liquids and their mixtures as electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Santosh N; Tiwari, Aarti; Nagaiah, Tharamani C; Mandal, Debaprasad

    2016-06-28

    The present study deals with an investigation of two novel imidazolium ionic liquids bearing ether-ether (1O2O2-Im-2O1) or ether-siloxane (1O2O2-Im-1SiOSi) functionalities with TFSI anion and their mixtures with propylene carbonate as electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries. The electrochemical stability and conductivity of these novel ILs were analyzed by electrochemical studies, such as cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry and impedance measurements. The applicability of these ILs as electrolytes in Li-ion batteries was studied in the presence of a high concentration of LiTFSI (1 mol kg(-1) electrolyte) and the ether-ether IL was shown to possess a high electrochemical stability window (ESW) of 5.9 V and good conductivity of 2.2 mS cm(-1). The electrochemical stability and conductivity were further complimented by self-diffusion of different ions using pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR, viscosity and thermal properties like TGA and DSC analysis. More importantly, we explored the effect of temperature on the electrochemical stability and conductivity of these ILs by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  6. Solid-state supercapacitors with ionic liquid based gel polymer electrolyte: Effect of lithium salt addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, G. P.; Hashmi, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Performance characteristics of the solid-state supercapacitors fabricated with ionic liquid (IL) incorporated gel polymer electrolyte and acid treated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) electrodes have been studied. The effect of Li-salt (LiPF6) addition in the IL (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate, EMImFAP) based gel electrolyte on the performance of supercapacitors has been specifically investigated. The LiPF6/IL/poly(vinylidine fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) gel electrolyte film possesses excellent electrochemical window of 4 V (from -2.0 to 2.0 V), high ionic conductivity ˜2.6 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 20 °C and high enough thermal stability. The comparative performance of supercapacitors employing electrolytes with and without lithium salt has been evaluated by impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric studies. The acid-treated MWCNT electrodes show specific capacitance of ˜127 F g-1 with IL/LiPF6 containing gel polymer electrolyte as compared to that with the gel polymer electrolyte without Li-salt, showing the value of ˜76 F g-1. The long cycling stability of the solid state supercapacitor based on the Li-salt containing gel polymer electrolyte confirms the electrochemical stability of the electrolyte.

  7. The feasibility of low-dose oral lithium therapy and its effect on thyroidal radioiodine uptake, retention, and hormonal parameters in various subcategories of hyperthyroid patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Arun; Abhyankar, Amit; Basu, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (I) (RAI) is used widely for the treatment of hyperthyroidism either as a first-line treatment or following relapse after antithyroid drug treatment. Intrathyroidal retention of RAI is considered an important determinant of its effectiveness, which is believed to be prolonged by lithium. To study the impact of low-dose oral lithium therapy on RAI uptake and retention parameters in different subgroups of hyperthyroidism patients, and thus explore its potential role in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of RAI in these groups of patients. A total of 28 patients (age range=18-70 years) who were being considered for RAI therapy were included in this prospective pilot study. The patients were divided into two groups: (i) those who had not received any RAI therapy before were included in 'group I' (n=22), whereas (ii) 'group II' (n=6) included patients who were found to be persistently hyperthyroid on biochemical and clinical follow-up despite previous RAI therapy for hyperthyroidism. Patients in group I were further divided into four subgroups on the basis of the underlying etiopathology: (a) subgroup Ia - diffuse toxic goiter (n=15), (b) subgroup Ib - autonomous functioning module (n=2), (c) subgroup Ic - toxic multinodular goiter (n=4), and (d) subgroup Id - nontoxic multinodular goiter (n=1) on the basis of scintigraphic and clinical findings. All patients first underwent 25 μCi I uptake estimation at 2, 24, and 48 h and values thus obtained were considered the baseline for further evaluation. After biochemical assessment of normal renal and liver functions, patients received 900 mg lithium per day in three divided doses orally, and on the fourth day after starting tab lithium, the serum lithium level was estimated with continued lithium administration. On the fifth, sixth, and seventh day, patients underwent lithium-primed 25 μCi I uptake estimation at 2, 24, and 48 h. Retention index (RI) was calculated using the formula [RI=(48

  8. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, Robert F.; Meadows, George E.

    1985-01-01

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  9. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, R.F.; Meadows, G.E.

    1984-01-10

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  10. SO{sub 2} uptake on ice spheres: Liquid nature of the ice-air interface

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, M.H.; Bales, R.C.

    1993-09-20

    The amount of SO{sub 2} gas absorbed by ice of known surface area at equilibrium was used to estimate the volume of liquid water present at the ice-air interface at temperatures from {minus}1 to {minus}60{degrees}C. Calculations were based on Henry`s law and acid dissociation equilibrium. The liquid volume is lowest at lower temperatures and ionic strength and under most conditions was greater than the volumes calculated based on freezing-point depression. The equivalent layer thickness, assuming that liquid water is uniformly distributed around the grains, ranged from 3-30 nm at {minus}60{degrees}C to 500-3000 nm at {minus}1{degrees}C. Corresponding ionic strengths for the two temperatures were 1.7-0.0012 M and 0.005-0.00009 M. Lower values were for ice made from distilled water, and higher values were for ice made from 10{sup {minus}3} M NaCl. Estimated pH values were from 2.9 at {minus}60{degrees}C to 4.1 at {minus}1{degrees}C. Results demonstrate that gas absorption can be used to estimate an equivalent liquid volume and thickness for the ice-air interfacial region. While not directly comparable to physical measurements, the estimated values should be directly applicable to modeling uptake of SO{sub 2} and other trace gases by ice. Lack of good thermodynamic data for temperature below 0{degrees}C is the main limitation to applying this method. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Electron Solvation in Liquid Ammonia: Lithium, Sodium, Magnesium, and Calcium as Electron Sources.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-03-10

    A free electron in solution, known as a solvated electron, is the smallest possible anion. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms serve as electron donors in solvents that mediate outer-sphere electron transfer. We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of lithium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium in liquid ammonia at 250 K. By analyzing the electronic properties and the ionic and solvation structures and dynamics, we systematically characterize these metals as electron donors and ammonia molecules as electron acceptors. We show that the solvated metal strongly modifies the properties of its solvation shells and that the observed effect is metal-specific. Specifically, the radius and charge exhibit major impacts. The single solvated electron present in the alkali metal systems is distributed more uniformly among the solvent molecules of each metal's two solvation shells. In contrast, alkaline earth metals favor a less uniform distribution of the electron density. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms are coordinated by four and six NH3 molecules, respectively. The smaller atoms, Li and Mg, are stronger electron donors than Na and Ca. This result is surprising, as smaller atoms in a column of the periodic table have higher ionization potentials. However, it can be explained by stronger electron donor-acceptor interactions between the smaller atoms and the solvent molecules. The structure of the first solvation shell is sharpest for Mg, which has a large charge and a small radius. Solvation is weakest for Na, which has a small charge and a large radius. Weak solvation leads to rapid dynamics, as reflected in the diffusion coefficients of NH3 molecules of the first two solvation shells and the Na atom. The properties of the solvated electrons established in the present study are important for radiation chemistry, synthetic chemistry, condensed-matter charge transfer, and energy sources.

  12. Lithium-doped MOF impregnated with lithium-coated fullerenes: a hydrogen storage route for high gravimetric and volumetric uptakes at ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rao, Dewei; Lu, Ruifeng; Xiao, Chuanyun; Kan, Erjun; Deng, Kaiming

    2011-07-21

    We theoretically demonstrated that by the impregnation of Li-decorated IRMOF-10 with Li-coated C(60), the hydrogen storage capacity is improved to be 6.3 wt% and 42 g L(-1) at 100 bar and 243 K. Both the gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen uptakes reach the 2015 DOE target at near ambient conditions.

  13. Effects of compatibility of polymer binders with solvate ionic liquid electrolytes on discharge and charge reactions of lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Toshitada; Ikoma, Ai; Kido, Ryosuke; Ueno, Kazuhide; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2016-03-01

    Electrochemical reactions in Li-S cells with a solvate ionic liquid (SIL) electrolyte composed of tetraglyme (G4) and Li[TFSA] (TFSA: bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide) are studied. The sulfur cathode (S cathode) comprises sulfur, carbon powder, and a polymer binder. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA-x) with different degrees of saponification (x%) are used as binders to prepare the composite cathodes. For the Li-S cell containing PEO binder, lithium polysulfides (Li2Sm, 2 ≤ m ≤ 8), reaction intermediates of the S cathode, dissolve into the electrolyte, and Li2Sm acts as a redox shuttle in the Li-S cell. In contrast, in the Li-S cell with PVA-x binder, the dissolution of Li2Sm is suppressed, leading to high columbic efficiencies during charge-discharge cycles. The compatibility of the PVA-x binder with the SIL electrolyte changes depending on the degree of saponification. Decreasing the degree of saponification leads to increased electrolyte uptake by the PVA-x binder, increasing the charge and discharge capacities of Li-S cell. The rate capability of Li-S cell is also enhanced by the partial swelling of the PVA-x binder. The enhanced performance of Li-S cell containing PVA-x is attributed to the lowering of resistance of Li+ ion transport in the composite cathode.

  14. Liquid-phase plasma synthesis of silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix for lithium battery anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Ying; Yu, Hang; Li, Haitao; Ming, Hai; Pan, Keming; Huang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) were fabricated. • SiQDs/C exhibits excellent battery performance as anode materials with high specific capacity. • The good performance was attributed to the marriage of small sized SiQDs and carbon. - Abstract: Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) nanocomposites were prepared by a novel liquid-phase plasma assisted synthetic process. The SiQDs/C nanocomposites were demonstrated to show high specific capacity, good cycling life and high coulmbic efficiency as anode materials for lithium-ion battery.

  15. A Long-Life Lithium Ion Battery with Enhanced Electrode/Electrolyte Interface by Using an Ionic Liquid Solution.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Ulissi, Ulderico; Mueller, Franziska; Reiter, Jakub; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Passerini, Stefano; Hassoun, Jusef

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, we report an advanced long-life lithium ion battery, employing a Pyr14 TFSI-LiTFSI non-flammable ionic liquid (IL) electrolyte, a nanostructured tin carbon (Sn-C) nanocomposite anode, and a layered LiNi1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 (NMC) cathode. The IL-based electrolyte is characterized in terms of conductivity and viscosity at various temperatures, revealing a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) trend. Lithium half-cells employing the Sn-C anode and NMC cathode in the Pyr14 TFSI-LiTFSI electrolyte are investigated by galvanostatic cycling at various temperatures, demonstrating the full compatibility of the electrolyte with the selected electrode materials. The NMC and Sn-C electrodes are combined into a cathode-limited full cell, which is subjected to prolonged cycling at 40 °C, revealing a very stable capacity of about 140 mAh g(-1) and retention above 99 % over 400 cycles. The electrode/electrolyte interface is further characterized through a combination of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations upon cell cycling. The remarkable performances reported here definitively indicate that IL-based lithium ion cells are suitable batteries for application in electric vehicles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Influence of Polar Organic Solvents in an Ionic Liquid Containing Lithium Bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide: Effect on the Cation-Anion Interaction, Lithium Ion Battery Performance, and Solid Electrolyte Interphase.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Abhishek; Li, Guozhu; Olschewski, Mark; Endres, Frank

    2016-12-14

    Ionic liquid-organic solvent mixtures have recently been investigated as potential battery electrolytes. However, contradictory results with these mixtures have been shown for battery performance. In this manuscript, we studied the influence of the addition of polar organic solvents into the ionic liquid electrolyte 1 M lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide (LiFSI)-1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide ([Py1,4]FSI) and tested it for lithium ion battery applications. From infrared and Raman spectroscopy, clear changes in the lithium solvation and cation-anion interactions in the ionic liquid were observed on addition of organic solvents. From the lithiation/delithiation studies on electrodeposited Ge, the storage capacity for the ionic liquid-highly polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) mixture was found to be the highest at low C-rates (0.425 C) compared to using an ionic liquid alone and ionic liquid-less polar solvent (dimethyl carbonate) mixtures. Furthermore, XPS and AFM were used to evaluate the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and to correlate its stability with Li storage capacity.

  17. Determination of ginsenoside compound K in human plasma by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry of lithium adducts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunhui; Lu, Youming; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Liang; Zhong, Dafang

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenoside compound K (GCK), the main metabolite of protopanaxadiol constituents of Panax ginseng, easily produces alkali metal adduct ions during mass spectrometry particularly with lithium. Accordingly, we have developed a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric method for analysis of GCK in human plasma based on formation of a lithium adduct. The analyte and paclitaxel (internal standard) were extracted from 50 µL human plasma using methyl tert-butyl ether. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Phenomenex Gemini C18 column (50 mm×2.0 mm; 5 μm) using stepwise gradient elution with acetonitrile–water and 0.2 mmol/L lithium carbonate at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection was performed in the positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions at m/z 629→449 for the GCK-lithium adduct and m/z 860→292 for the adduct of paclitaxel. The assay was linear in the concentration range 1.00–1000 ng/mL (r2>0.9988) with intra- and inter-day precision of ±8.4% and accuracy in the range of −4.8% to 6.5%. Recovery, stability and matrix effects were all satisfactory. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving administration of a single GCK 50 mg tablet to healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:26579476

  18. Enhanced low-temperature lithium storage performance of multilayer graphene made through an improved ionic liquid-assisted synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccichini, Rinaldo; Varzi, Alberto; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Kübel, Christian; Balducci, Andrea; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    The electrochemical properties of graphene are strongly depending on its synthesis. Between the different methods proposed so far, liquid phase exfoliation turns out to be a promising method for the production of graphene. Unfortunately, the low yield of this technique, in term of solid material obtained, still limit its use to small scale applications. In this article we propose a low cost and environmentally friendly method for producing multilayer crystalline graphene with high yield. Such innovative approach, involving an improved ionic liquid assisted, microwave exfoliation of expanded graphite, allows the production of graphene with advanced lithium ion storage performance, for the first time, at low temperatures (<0 °C), as low as -30 °C, with respect to commercially available graphite.

  19. Thermally-responsive, nonflammable phosphonium ionic liquid electrolytes for lithium metal batteries: operating at 100 degrees celsius.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Kavian, R; Lu, Y; Hu, Q; Shao-Horn, Y; Grinstaff, M W

    2015-11-13

    Rechargeable batteries such as Li ion/Li metal batteries are widely used in the electronics market but the chemical instability of the electrolyte limits their use in more demanding environmental conditions such as in automotive, oil exploration, or mining applications. In this study, a series of alkyl phosphonium ionic liquid electrolyte are described with high thermal stability and solubility for LiTFSI. A lithium metal battery (LMB) containing a tailored phosphonium ionic liquid/LiTFSI electrolyte operates at 100 °C with good specific capacities and cycling stability. Substantial capacity is maintained during 70 cycles or 30 days. Instant on-off battery operation is realized via the significant temperature dependence of the electrolyte material, demonstrating the robustness and potential for use at high temperature.

  20. Bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BFMB) anion based ionic liquid as an additive for lithium-ion battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liao, Chen; Baggetto, Loïc; Guo, Bingkun; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng

    2014-02-21

    Propylene carbonate (PC) is a good solvent for lithium ion battery applications due to its low melting point and high dielectric constant. But, PC is easily intercalated into graphite causing it to exfoliate, killing its electrochemical performance. We report on the synthesis of a new ionic liquid electrolyte based on partially fluorinated borate anion, 1-butyl-1,2-dimethylimidazolium bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BDMIm.BFMB), which can be used as an additive in 1 M LiPF6/PC electrolyte to suppress graphite exfoliation and improve cycling performance. Additionally, both PC and BDMIm.BFMB can be used synergistically as additive to 1.0M LiPF6/methyl isopropyl sulfone (MIPS) to dramatically improve its cycling performance. It is also found that the chemistry nature of the ionic liquids has dramatic effect on their role as additive in PC based electrolyte.

  1. Enhanced energy capacity of lithium-oxygen batteries with ionic liquid electrolytes by addition of ammonium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shoichi; Uosaki, Kohei; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2017-07-01

    Lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries with ionic liquid-based electrolytes have attracted much attention because of their superior battery performance and high safety. However, the practical energy capacities achieved to date are markedly lower than those of Li-ion batteries. A dominant factor that limits the energy capacities of Li-O2 batteries is the insulating characteristics and insolubility of lithium peroxide (Li2O2), which gradually accumulates on the positive electrode as a discharge product. Herein, we report that ammonium ions function as a promoter for the solution-route formation of Li2O2, which results in a significant improvement of the energy capacity of Li-O2 cells. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that the structure of Li2O2 changed from spherical particles to toroidal particles with an increase in the ammonium ions concentration. Ionic additives that have been reported to function as promoters the solution-route formation of Li2O2 in ether-based electrolyte systems do not exhibit a promoting effect in ionic liquid-based electrolytes.

  2. Analysis of the solid electrolyte interphase formed with an ionic liquid electrolyte for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shizhao; Xie, Kai; Blomberg, Erik; Jacobsson, Per; Matic, Aleksandar

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on lithium electrodes in the presence of an ionic liquid electrolyte with a particular focus on the influence of polysulfides present in the electrolyte on the SEI. The electrochemical performance of symmetric cells with lithium electrodes and electrolytes composed of N-Methyl-(n-butyl)pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR14-TFSI) and LiTFSI, with and without the addition of polysulfides, were analyzed as well as the chemical composition of the SEI, before and after cycling. The cycling behavior of the symmetrical cells shows that the SEI films are relatively stable in the ionic liquid electrolyte, also in the presence of polysulfides. However, the presence of polysulfides results in a higher SEI layer resistance (RSEI) and a higher activation energy. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra (XPS), with argon-ion sputtering for depth profiling, we find that the SEI is formed by decomposition products from both cations and anions of the electrolyte. The XPS spectra show that the presence of polysulfides alters the decomposition process of the electrolyte, resulting in a SEI film with different chemical composition and structure, in line with the results from the electrochemical performance.

  3. Cycling performance and thermal stability of lithium polymer cells assembled with ionic liquid-containing gel polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Ye Sun; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Sang-Young; Shim, Eun-Gi; Kim, Dong-Won

    Gel polymer electrolytes containing 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and a small amount of additive (vinylene carbonate, fluoroethylene carbonate, and ethylene carbonate) are prepared, and their electrochemical properties are investigated. The cathodic limit of the gel polymer electrolytes can be extended to 0 V vs. Li by the formation of a protective solid electrolyte interphase on the electrode surface. Using these gel polymer electrolytes, lithium metal polymer cells composed of a lithium anode and a LiNi 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 cathode are assembled, and their cycling performances are evaluated at room temperature. The cells show good cycling performance, comparable to that of a cell assembled with gel polymer electrolyte containing standard liquid electrolyte (1.0 M LiPF 6 in ethylene carbonate/diethylene carbonate). Flammability tests and differential scanning calorimetry studies show that the presence of the ionic liquid in the gel polymer electrolyte considerably improves the safety and thermal stability of the cells.

  4. Synthesis and Compatibility of Ionic Liquid Containing Rod-Coil Polyimide Gel Electrolytes with Lithium Metal Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigelaar, Dean M.; Palker, Allyson E.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Bennett, William R.

    2008-01-01

    A highly cross-linked polyimide-polyethylene oxide copolymer has been synthesized that is capable of holding large volumes of liquid component, simultaneously maintaining good dimensional stability. An amine end capped oligomer was made that was imidized in solution, followed by reaction with a triisocyanate in the presence of desired additives at ambient temperature. Polymer films are able to hold over 4 times their weight in room temperature ionic liquid RTIL or carbonate solvent. Electrolytes were studied that contained varying amounts of RTIL, lithium trifluoromethanesulfonimide LiTFSi, and alumina nanoparticles. Electrochemical stability of these electrolytes with lithium metal electrodes was studied by galvanic cycling and impedance spectroscopy. Improved cycling stability and decreased interfacial resistance were observed when increasing amounts of RTIL and LiTFSi were added. The addition of small amounts of alumina further decreased interfacial resistance by nearly an order of magnitude. During the course of the study, cycling stability increased from less than 3 to greater than 1000 h at 60 C and 0.25 mA/cm2 current density.

  5. Synthesis and Compatibility of Ionic Liquid Containing Rod-Coil Polyimide Gel Electrolytes with Lithium Metal Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigelaar, Dean M.; Palker, Allyson E.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Bennett, William R.

    2008-01-01

    A highly cross-linked polyimide-polyethylene oxide copolymer has been synthesized that is capable of holding large volumes of liquid component, simultaneously maintaining good dimensional stability. An amine end capped oligomer was made that was imidized in solution, followed by reaction with a triisocyanate in the presence of desired additives at ambient temperature. Polymer films are able to hold over 4 times their weight in room temperature ionic liquid RTIL or carbonate solvent. Electrolytes were studied that contained varying amounts of RTIL, lithium trifluoromethanesulfonimide LiTFSi, and alumina nanoparticles. Electrochemical stability of these electrolytes with lithium metal electrodes was studied by galvanic cycling and impedance spectroscopy. Improved cycling stability and decreased interfacial resistance were observed when increasing amounts of RTIL and LiTFSi were added. The addition of small amounts of alumina further decreased interfacial resistance by nearly an order of magnitude. During the course of the study, cycling stability increased from less than 3 to greater than 1000 h at 60 C and 0.25 mA/cm2 current density.

  6. Reactive Uptake of Ammonia and Formation of Organic Nitrogen Species for Non-Liquid/Liquid Secondary Organic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Li, Y.; Liu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Formation of ammonium and organic nitrogen (ON) species was studied for secondary organic material (SOM) of variable viscosity, ranging from non-liquid to liquid physical states. The SOM was produced as particles of 50 to 150 nm in diameter in aerosol form from six precursors, including three terpenoid and three aromatic species. The viscosity of the hygroscopic SOM was adjusted by exposure to relative humidity (RH) from <5% to >90% RH in steps of 10% at 293 ± 2 K. The aerosol was subsequently exposed to 5 ppm NH3 for mean reaction times of 30, 370, or 5230 s. Ammonium and ON were characterized by high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS). The ammonium-to-organic ratio of mass concentrations (MNH4/MOrg) in the particles increased monotonically from <5% RH to a limiting value at a threshold RH, implicating a switchover in the reaction kinetics from a system limited by diffusivity within the SOM for low RH to one limited by other factors, such as saturated uptake, at higher RH. Formation of ON was observed for aromatic-derived SOMs, but not significant for terpenoid-derived SOMs. For aromatic-derived SOMs, the ON-to-organic ratio of mass concentrations (MON/MOrg) was negligible for RH <20%, increased monotonically from 20% to 60% RH, and stayed constant for RH >60%. The threshold RH for the switchover from kinetically controlled regime to a non-kinetically-controlled one was thus different between formation of ammonium and ON. This difference suggests that water may play a role in the slow reactions of ON formation as a reactant or a catalyst, in addition to affecting the reactant diffusion as in the fast reaction of ammonium formation. The implication is that formation of ammonium salts and organic nitrogen species by certain SOMs should be treated separately in chemical transport models to reflect the different roles of water that may affect the phase state of the SOMs or may act as a reactant or a catalyst.

  7. Lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide-PYR 14TFSI ionic liquid electrolyte compatible with graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nádherná, Martina; Reiter, Jakub; Moškon, Jože; Dominko, Robert

    Lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR 14TFSI) was successfully tested as an electrolyte for graphite composite anodes at elevated temperature of 55 °C. The graphite anode showed a good cyclability during the galvanostatic testing at C/10 rate and 55 °C with the capacity close to theoretical. The formation of SEI in different electrolytes was the subject of study using impedance spectroscopy on symmetrical cells containing two lithium electrodes. The 0.7 m LiFSI in PYR 14TFSI exhibits a good ionic conductivity (5.9 mS cm -1 at 55 °C) along with high electrochemical stability and high thermal stability. These properties allow their potential application in large-scale lithium ion batteries with improved safety.

  8. Study of the corrosion behaviors of 304 austenite stainless steel specimens exposed to static liquid lithium at 600 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiancai; Zuo, Guizhong; Ren, Jun; Xu, Wei; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Ming; Hu, Wangyu; Hu, Jiansheng; Deng, Huiqiu

    2016-11-01

    Investigation of corrosion behavior of stainless steel served as one kind of structure materials exposed to liquid lithium (Li) is one of the keys to apply liquid Li as potential plasma facing materials (PFM) or blanket coolant in the fusion device. Corrosion experiments of 304 austenite stainless steel (304 SS) were carried out in static liquid Li at 600 K and up to1584 h at high vacuum with pressure less than 4 × 10-4 Pa. After exposure to liquid Li, it was found that the weight of 304 SS slightly decreased with weight loss rate of 5.7 × 10-4 g/m2/h and surface hardness increased by about 50 HV. Lots of spinel-like grains and holes were observed on the surface of specimens measured by SEM. By further EDS, XRD and metallographic analyzing, it was confirmed that the main compositions of spinel-like grains were M23C6 carbides, and 304 SS produced a non-uniform corrosion behavior by preferential grain boundary attack, possibly due to the easy formation of M23C6 carbides and/or formation of Li compound at grain boundaries.

  9. Method of forming single crystals of beta silicon carbide using liquid lithium as a solvent

    DOEpatents

    Lundberg, Lynn B.

    1982-01-01

    A method of growing single crystals of beta SiC from solution using molten lithium as a solvent for polycrystalline SiC feed material. Reasonable growth rates are accomplished at temperatures in the range of about 1330.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C.

  10. Effect of ion structure on conductivity in lithium-doped ionic liquid electrolytes: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjun; Maginn, Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine the role cation and anion structure have on the performance of ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes for lithium conduction over the temperature range of 320-450 K. Two model ionic liquids were studied: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([bmim][Tf2N]) and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium pyrrolide ([bmpyr][pyl]) doped with Li[Tf2N] and Li[pyl], respectively. The results have demonstrated that the Li+ doped IL containing the planar [bmpyr] cation paired with the planar [pyl] anion significantly outperformed the [bmim][Tf2N] IL. The different coordination of Li+ with the [Tf2N]- or [pyl]- anions produces a remarkable change in IL structure with a concomitant effect on the transport of all ions. For the doped [bmim][Tf2N], each Li+ is coordinated by four oxygen atoms from [Tf2N]- anions. Formation of a rigid structure between Li+ and [Tf2N]- induces a decrease in the mobility of all ions. In contrast, for the doped [bmpyr][pyl], each Li+ is coordinated by two nitrogen atoms from [pyl]- anions. The original alternating structure cation|anion|cation in the neat [bmpyr][pyl] is replaced by another alternating structure cation|anion|Li+|anion|cation in the doped [bmpyr][pyl]. Increases of Li+ mole fraction in doped [bmpyr][pyl] affects the dynamics to a much lesser extent compared with [bmim][Tf2N] and leads to reduced diffusivities of cations and anions, but little change in the dynamics of Li+. More importantly, the calculations predict that the Li+ ion conductivity of doped [bmpyr][pyl] is comparable to that observed in organic liquid electrolytes and is about an order of magnitude higher than that of doped [bmim][Tf2N]. Such Li+ conductivity improvement suggests that this and related ILs may be promising candidates for use as electrolytes in lithium ion batteries and capacitors.

  11. Sulfonic Acid- and Lithium Sulfonate-Grafted Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride) Electrospun Mats As Ionic Liquid Host for Electrochromic Device and Lithium-Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Liu, Wanshuang; Leong, Yew Wei; Xu, Jianwei; Lu, Xuehong

    2015-08-05

    Electrospun polymer nanofibrous mats loaded with ionic liquids (ILs) are promising nonvolatile electrolytes with high ionic conductivity. The large cations of ILs are, however, difficult to diffuse into solid electrodes, making them unappealing for application in some electrochemical devices. To address this issue, a new strategy is used to introduce proton conduction into an IL-based electrolyte. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VDF-HFP)) copolymer is functionalized with sulfonic acid through covalent attachment of taurine. The sulfonic acid-grafted P(VDF-HFP) electrospun mats consist of interconnected nanofibers, leading to remarkable improvement in dimensional stability of the mats. IL-based polymer electrolytes are prepared by immersing the modified mats in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM(+)BF4(-)). It is found that the SO3(-) groups can have Lewis acid-base interactions with the cations (BMIM(+)) of IL to promote the dissociation of ILs, and provide additional proton conduction, resulting in significantly improved ionic conductivity. Using this novel electrolyte, polyaniline-based electrochromic devices show higher transmittance contrast and faster switching behavior. Furthermore, the sulfonic acid-grafted P(VDF-HFP) electrospun mats can also be lithiated, giving additional lithium ion conduction for the IL-based electrolyte, with which Li/LiCoO2 batteries display enhanced C-rate performance.

  12. Lithium-functionalized metal-organic frameworks that show >10 wt% H2 uptake at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Dong Hyun; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Heo, Jiyoung

    2013-08-26

    We have used grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations with a first-principles-based force field to show that metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with Li functional groups (i.e. C-Li bonds) allow for exceptional H2 uptake at ambient temperature. For example, at 298 K and 100 bar, IRMOF-1-4Li shows a total H2 uptake of 5.54 wt% and MOF-200-27Li exhibits a total H2 uptake of 10.30 wt%, which are much higher than the corresponding values with pristine MOFs. Li-functionalized MOF-200 (MOF-200-27Li) shows 11.84 wt% H2 binding at 243 K and 100 bar. These hydrogen-storage capacities exceed the 2015 DOE target of 5.5 wt% H2. Moreover, the incorporation of Li functional groups into MOFs provides more benefits, such as higher delivery amount, for H2 uptake than previously reported Li-doped MOFs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A binary ionic liquid system composed of N-methoxyethyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide: A new promising electrolyte for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, S.; Quartarone, E.; Mustarelli, P.; Magistris, A.; Protti, S.; Lazzaroni, S.; Fagnoni, M.; Albini, A.

    Room temperature ionic liquids are nowadays the most appealing research target in the field of liquid electrolytes for lithium batteries, due to their high thermal stability, ionic conductivity and wide electrochemical windows. The cation structure of such solvents strictly influences their physical and chemical properties, in particular the viscosity and conductivity. In this paper we report on the preparation and characterization of a complete series of solutions between lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and the promising N-methoxyethyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide (PY 1,2O1) ionic liquid. A wide molality range has been explored in order to identify the optimal compositions in terms of conductivity and electrochemical stability. Our thermal results show that the solutions are amorphous independently on the LiTFSI content. Up to salt concentration of 0.4 mol kg -1 the solutions have a very low viscosity (η ∼ 36 cP), a high ionic conductivity, even at temperatures below 0 °C, and a good electrochemical stability. Cations transport numbers ranging between 0.05 and 0.39 have been determined as a function of LiTFSI content. The combination of these properties makes the PY 1,2O1-based solutions potentially attractive liquid electrolytes for lithium batteries.

  14. Lithium-modulated conduction band edge shifts and charge-transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized solar cells based on a dicyanamide ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Min; Wang, Peng

    2011-04-19

    Lithium ions are known for their potent function in modulating the energy alignment at the oxide semiconductor/dye/electrolyte interface in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), offering the opportunity to control the associated multichannel charge-transfer dynamics. Herein, by optimizing the lithium iodide content in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide-based ionic liquid electrolytes, we present a solvent-free DSC displaying an impressive 8.4% efficiency at 100 mW cm(-2) AM1.5G conditions. We further scrutinize the origins of evident impacts of lithium ions upon current density-voltage characteristics as well as photocurrent action spectra of DSCs based thereon. It is found that, along with a gradual increase of the lithium content in ionic liquid electrolytes, a consecutive diminishment of the open-circuit photovoltage arises, primarily owing to a noticeable downward movement of the titania conduction band edge. The conduction band edge displacement away from vacuum also assists the formation of a more favorable energy offset at the titania/dye interface, and thereby leads to a faster electron injection rate and a higher exciton dissociation yield as implied by transient emission measurements. We also notice that the adverse influence of the titania conduction band edge downward shift arising from lithium addition upon photovoltage is partly compensated by a concomitant suppression of the triiodide involving interfacial charge recombination. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Novel choline-based ionic liquids as safe electrolytes for high-voltage lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Tianqiao; Zhang, Lingzhi; Wang, Jinglun; Mai, Yongjin; Yan, Xiaodan; Zhao, Xinyue

    2016-10-01

    Three choline-based ionic liquids functionalized with trimethylsilyl, allyl, and cynoethyl groups are synthesized in an inexpensive route as safe electrolytes for high-voltage lithium-ion batteries. The thermal stabilities, viscosities, conductivities, and electrochemical windows of these ILs are reported. Hybrid electrolytes were formulated by doping with 0.6 M LiPF6/0.4 M lithium oxalydifluoroborate (LiODFB) as salts and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) as co-solvent. By using 0.6 M LiPF6/0.4 M LiODFB trimethylsilylated choline-based IL (SN1IL-TFSI)/DMC as electrolyte, LiCoO2/graphite full cell showed excellent cycling performance with a capacity of 152 mAh g-1 and 99% capacity retention over 90 cycles at a cut-off voltage of 4.4 V. The propagation rate of SN1IL-TFSI)/DMC electrolyte is only one quarter of the commercial electrolyte (1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC/DMC, v/v/v = 1/1/1), suggesting a better safety feature.

  16. A high performance ceramic-polymer separator for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Kichambare, Padmakar; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Rodrigues, Stanley; Subramanyam, Guru

    2016-01-01

    A three-layered (ceramic-polymer-ceramic) hybrid separator was prepared by coating ceramic electrolyte [lithium aluminum germanium phosphate (LAGP)] over both sides of polyethylene (PE) polymer membrane using electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technique. Ionic conductivities of membranes were evaluated after soaking PE and LAGP/PE/LAGP membranes in a 1 Molar (1M) lithium hexafluroarsenate (LiAsF6) electrolyte in ethylene carbonate (EC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) in volume ratio (1:1:1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were employed to evaluate morphology and structure of the separators before and after cycling performance tests to better understand structure-property correlation. As compared to regular PE separator, LAGP/PE/LAGP hybrid separator showed: (i) higher liquid electrolyte uptake, (ii) higher ionic conductivity, (iii) lower interfacial resistance with lithium and (iv) lower cell voltage polarization during lithium cycling at high current density of 1.3 mA cm-2 at room temperature. The enhanced performance is attributed to higher liquid uptake, LAGP-assisted faster ion conduction and dendrite prevention. Optimization of density and thickness of LAGP layer on PE or other membranes through manipulation of PVD deposition parameters will enable practical applications of this novel hybrid separator in rechargeable lithium batteries with high energy, high power, longer cycle life, and higher safety level.

  17. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z.; Paul, M. Tessler, M.

    2014-05-15

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (∼2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ∼27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  18. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Steinberg, D; Nagler, A; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Polacheck, I; Srebnik, M

    2009-07-01

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  19. Nano-Sponge Ionic Liquid-Polymer Composite Electrolytes for Solid-State Lithium Power Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    images of these solid thin films indicate that these polymer gel electrolytes have the structure of nano-sponges, with a sub-micron pore size. For these... thin film batteries, 150 charge–discharge cycles are run for LixCoO2 where x is cycled between 0.95 down to 0.55. Minimal internal resistance effects...9702;C; exhibiting a significant advancement in the safety of lithium batteries. Atomic force microscopy images of these solid thin films indicate

  20. Modelling of lithium erosion and transport in FTU lithium experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, R.; Maddaluno, G.; Apicella, M. L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Kirschner, A.; Chen, J. L.; Li, J. G.; Luo, G.-N.

    2013-07-01

    The ERO code has been used to simulate lithium erosion, transport and re-deposition from liquid lithium limiter experiments in FTU. Two different operational cases from LLL experiments with different plasma parameters and surface temperature are modelled. According to the effective lithium sputtering yields, for both cases the lithium erosion is mainly due to physical sputtering rather than evaporation. Furthermore, the modelled re-deposition fraction of evaporated lithium is much higher than that of sputtered lithium, which is due to the shorter ionisation mean free path of thermal lithium atoms. Therefore, the evaporation erosion effect can be neglected compared to physical sputtering when the surface temperature is below 450 °C. According to the simulations, most of the lithium impurities exist in the form of Li+, and the main plasma contamination by lithium ions is low because most of eroded lithium particles are not transported into the core plasma and stay outside of the LCFS.

  1. Hydrogen Retention and Helium Pumping by Flowing Liquid Lithium: A Path to a Compact (and therefore less costly) Magnetic Fusion Power Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, David

    2004-11-01

    The cost of a fusion power plant scales roughly as the volume of the torus. Scaling to a larger size typically allows almost any magnetic confinement concept to reach ignition, but also leads to a higher cost. The need for a larger size plasma results from the need to support a high core temperature while still preserving an edge temperature consistent with the requirements of the confinement scheme and the limitations of the wall material. Recent work has shown that a wall that has near-zero recycling will have very high edge plasma temperatures and can therefore support a high core temperature in a smaller volume.[1] The perceived difficulty with such concepts is that the only known low-Z, low-recycling surface is one composed of lithium, and lithium melts at 180C, has a very high vapor pressure at elevated temperatures, and is highly corrosive. The very fact that it is a low-recycling surface could be its downfall: what if it attracts so much tritium as to make the inventories untenable? In addition, a wall completely covered with lithium and a divertor protected by flowing lithium leaves no exit for the helium in a reactor concept. This talk will show results from the Flowing Illinois Lithium Retention Experiment[2] (FLIRE) which show that (1) the lithium adsorption of D (and by extension, T) is manageable, (2) the helium retention coefficient in flowing lithium may be high enough for He to be pumped, and (3) the corrosiveness of molten lithium is not beyond the technological capabilities of the fusion program. [1] L.E. Zakharov, N.N. Gorelenkov, R.B. White, S.I. Krasheninnikov, G.V. Pereverzev, Ignited spherical tokamaks and plasma regimes with Li walls, Fusion Engineering and Design, Sept. 2004. [2] J.P. Allain, M. Nieto, M.D. Coventry, R. Stubbers, D.N. Ruzic, "Studies of liquid-metal erosion and free surface flowing liquid-lithium retention of helium at the University of Illinois", Fusion Engineering and Design, Sept. 2004.

  2. New approaches to the design of polymer and liquid electrolytes for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBreen, J.; Lee, H. S.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.

    All non-aqueous lithium battery electrolytes are Lewis bases that interact with cations. Unlike water, they do not interact with anions. The result is a high degree of ion pairing and the formation of triplets and higher aggregates. This decreases the conductivity and the lithium ion transference, and results in polarization losses in batteries. Approaches that have been used to increase ion dissociation in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based electrolytes are the use of salts with low lattice energy, the addition of polar plasticizers to the polymer, and the addition of cation complexing agents such as crown ethers or cryptands. Complexing of the anions is a more promising approach, since it should increase both ion dissociation and the lithium transference. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) we have synthesized two new families of neutral anion complexing agents, each based on Lewis acid centers. One is based on electron deficient nitrogen sites on substituted aza-ethers, wherein the hydrogen on the nitrogen is replaced by electron withdrawing groups such as CF 3SO 3-. The other is based on electron deficient boron sites on borane or borate compounds with various fluorinated aryl or alkyl groups. Some of the borane-based anion receptors can promote the dissolution of LiF in several solvents. Several of these compounds, when added in equivalent amounts, produce 1.2 M LiF solutions in DME, an increase in solubility of LiF by six orders of magnitude. Some of these LiF electrolytes have conductivities as high as 6×10 -3 S cm -1. The LiF electrolytes with borane anion acceptors in PC:EC:DEC solvents have excellent electrochemical stability. This has been demonstrated in small Li/LiMn 2O 4 cells.

  3. Rapid and simple pretreatment of human body fluids using electromembrane extraction across supported liquid membrane for capillary electrophoretic determination of lithium.

    PubMed

    Strieglerová, Lenka; Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2011-05-01

    Electromembrane extraction was used for simultaneous sample cleanup and preconcentration of lithium from untreated human body fluids. The sample of a body fluid was diluted 100 times with 0.5 mM Tris solution and lithium was extracted by electromigration through a supported liquid membrane composed of 1-octanol into 100 mM acetic acid acceptor solution. Matrix compounds, such as proteins, red blood cells, and other high-molecular-weight compounds were efficiently retained on the supported liquid membrane. The liquid membrane was anchored in pores of a short segment of a polypropylene hollow fiber, which represented a low cost, single use, disposable extraction unit and was discarded after each use. Acceptor solutions were analyzed using capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D) and baseline separation of lithium was achieved in a background electrolyte solution consisting of 18 mM L-histidine and 40 mM acetic acid at pH 4.6. Repeatability of the electromembrane extraction-CE-C(4) D method was evaluated for the determination of lithium in standard solutions and real samples and was better than 0.6 and 8.2% for migration times and peak areas, respectively. The concentration limit of detection of 9 nM was achieved. The developed method was applied to the determination of lithium in urine, blood serum, blood plasma, and whole blood at both endogenous and therapeutic concentration levels. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Liquid oxygen LOX compatibility evaluations of aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys: Investigation of the Alcoa 2090 and MMC weldalite 049 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of liquid oxygen (LOX) compatibility of aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys is investigated. Alloy systems of Alcoa 2090, vintages 1 to 3, and of Martin Marietta Corporation (MMC) Weldalite 049 were evaluated for their behavior related to the LOX compatibility employing liquid oxygen impact test conditions under ambient pressures and up to 1000 psi. The developments of these aluminum lithium alloys are of critical and significant interest because of their lower densities and higher specific strengths and improved mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. Of the different LOX impact tests carried out at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), it is seen that in certain test conditions at higher pressures, not all Al-Li alloys are LOX compatible. In case of any reactivity, it appears that lithium makes the material more sensitive at grain boundaries due to microstructural inhomogeneities and associated precipitate free zones (PFZ). The objectives were to identify and rationalize the microstructural mechanisms that could be relaxed to LOX compatibility behavior of the alloy system in consideration. The LOX compatibility behavior of Al-Li 2090 and Weldalite 049 is analyzed in detail using microstructural characterization techniques with light optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis, and surface studies using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), electron spectroscopy in chemical analysis (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Differences in the behavior of these aluminum lithium alloys are assessed and related to their chemistry, heat treatment conditions, and microstructural effects.

  5. Electrochemical characterisation of a lithium-ion battery electrolyte based on mixtures of carbonates with a ferrocene-functionalised imidazolium electroactive ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Forgie, John C; El Khakani, Soumia; MacNeil, Dean D; Rochefort, Dominic

    2013-05-28

    Electrolytic solutions of lithium-ion batteries can be modified with additives to improve their stability and safety. Electroactive molecules can be used as such additives to act as an electron (redox) shuttle between the two electrodes to prevent overcharging. The electroactive ionic liquid, 1-ferrocenylmethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (TFSI), was synthesised and its electrochemical properties were investigated when diluted with ethylene carbonate-diethyl carbonate solvent at various concentrations. Cyclic voltammetry data were gathered to determine the redox potential, diffusion coefficient and heterogeneous rate constants of the electroactive imidazolium TFSI ionic liquid in the carbonate solution. The properties of this molecule as an additive in lithium battery electrolytes were studied in standard coin cells with a metallic Li anode and a Li4Ti5O12 cathode.

  6. Addition of a thin-film inorganic solid electrolyte (Lipon) as a protective film in lithium batteries with a liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudney, Nancy J.

    Three rechargeable lithium cells have been fabricated using thin films of Li and sputter-deposited Li xMn 2- yO 4 as the electrodes, and a LiPF 6 organic liquid electrolyte. Cells were cycled up to 18 times between 4.5 and 2.5 V at 25°C both with and without the addition of the thin-film lithium phosphorus oxynitride solid electrolyte, known as Lipon. Of the cells tested, the Lipon film was most effective in maximizing the capacity and cycling efficiency when deposited in direct contact with the cathode; however, a significant improvement over the Lipon-free cell was also observed with Lipon sandwiched between layers of the liquid electrolyte. In the latter case, the Lipon was deposited onto a microporous polypropylene separator membrane.

  7. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  8. Method and Apparatus to Produce and Maintain a thick, flowing, Liquid Lithium first wall for Toroidal Magnetic Confinement DT Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-10-21

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fission reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  9. Ionic liquid based lithium battery electrolytes: fundamental benefits of utilising both TFSI and FSI anions?

    PubMed

    Kerner, M; Plylahan, N; Scheers, J; Johansson, P

    2015-07-15

    Several IL based electrolytes with an imidazolium cation (EMI) have been investigated trying to elucidate a possible beneficial effect of mixing FSI and TFSI anions in terms of physico-chemical properties and especially Li(+) solvation. All electrolytes were evaluated in terms of phase transitions, densities and viscosities, thermal stabilities, ionic conductivities and local structure, i.e. charge carriers. The electrolytes with up to 20% of Li-salts showed to be promising for high temperature lithium ion battery application (ca. 100 °C) and a synergetic effect of having mixed anions is discernible with the LiTFSI0.2EMIFSI0.8 electrolyte giving the best overall performance. The determination of the charge carriers revealed the SN to be ca. 2 for all analysed electrolytes, and proved the analysis of the mixed anion electrolytes to be challenging and inherently leads to an ambiguous picture of the Li(+) solvation.

  10. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  11. Structures and Electronic Properties of Lithium Chelate-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Si, Dawei; Chen, Kexian; Yao, Jia; Li, Haoran

    2016-04-28

    The conformations, electronic properties, and interaction energies of four chelate-based ionic liquids [Li(EA)][Tf2N], [Li(HDA)][Tf2N], [Li(DEA)][Tf2N], and [Li(DOBA)][Tf2N] have been theoretically explored. The reliability of the located conformers has been confirmed via the comparison between the simulated and experimental infrared spectra. Our results show that the N-Li and O-Li coordinate bonds in cation are elongated as the numbers of coordinate heteroatoms of alkanolamine ligands to Li(+) increased. Also the binding energies between Li(+) and ligands are increased and the interaction energies between cations and Tf2N anion are decreased. The cation-anion interaction energies follow the order of [Li(DOBA)][Tf2N] < [Li(HDA)][Tf2N] < [Li(DEA)][Tf2N] < [Li(EA)][Tf2N], which fall within the energetic ranges of conventional ionic liquids. Interestingly, the strongest stabilization orbital interactions in these ionic liquids and their cations revealed by the natural bond orbital analysis lie in the interaction between the lone pair (LP) of the coordinate heteroatoms in ligands or anion as donors and the vacant valence shell nonbonding orbital (LP*) of Li(+) as acceptors, which are very different from that of conventional ionic liquids. Moreover, the charges transferred from cations to anion are quite similar, and the charge of Li(+) is proposed for possibly predicting the order of the interaction energies of ionic liquids in series. The present study allows for the deeper understanding the differences between chelate-based ionic liquids and conventional ionic liquids.

  12. Ionic liquid enabled FeS2 for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler; Piper, Daniela Molina; Kim, Seul Cham; Han, Sang Sub; Bhat, Vinay; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Se-Hee

    2014-11-19

    High-energy-density FeS2 cathodes en-abled by a bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI-) anion-based room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolyte are demonstrated. A TFSI-based ionic liquid (IL) significantly mitigates polysulfide dissolution, and therefore the parasitic redox shuttle mechanism, that plagues sulfur-based electrode chemistries. FeS2 stabilization with a TFSI(-) -based IL results in one of the highest energy density cathodes, 542 W h kg(-1) (normalized to cathode composite mass), reported to date.

  13. Lithium ion solvation in room-temperature ionic liquids involving bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide anion studied by Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsugi, Takushi; Fukuda, Shuhei; Fujimori, Takao; Fujii, Kenta; Kanzaki, Ryo; Takeuchi, Munetaka; Ishiguro, Shin-Ichi

    2007-11-15

    The solvation structure of the lithium ion in room-temperature ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (EMI(+)TFSI(-)) and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (BMP(+0TFSI(-)) has been studied by Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Raman spectra of EMI(+)TFSI(-) and BMP(+)TFSI(-) containing Li(+)TFSI(-) over the range 0.144-0.589 and 0.076-0.633 mol dm(-3), respectively, were measured at 298 K. A strong 744 cm-1 band of the free TFSI(-) ion in the bulk weakens with increasing concentration of the lithium ion, and it revealed by analyzing the intensity decrease that the two TFSI(-) ions bind to the metal ion. The lithium ion may be four-coordinated through the O atoms of two bidentate TFSI(-) ions. It has been established in our previous work that the TFSI(-) ion involves two conformers of C(1) (cis) and C(2) (trans) symmetries in equilibrium, and the dipole moment of the C(1) conformer is significantly larger than that of the C(2) conformer. On the basis of these facts, the geometries and SCF energies of possible solvate ion clusters [Li(C(1)-TFSI(-))(2)](-), [Li(C(1)-TFSI(-))(C(2)-TFSI(-))](-), and [Li(C(2)-TFSI(-))(2)](-) were examined using the theoretical DFT calculations. It is concluded that the C(1) conformer is more preferred to the C(2) conformer in the vicinity of the lithium ion.

  14. Innovative application of ionic liquid to separate Al and cathode materials from spent high-power lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianlai; Li, Jinhui

    2014-04-30

    Because of the increasing number of electric vehicles, there is an urgent need for effective recycling technologies to recapture the significant amount of valuable metals contained in spent lithium-ion batteries (LiBs). Previous studies have indicated, however, that Al and cathode materials were quite difficult to separate due to the strong binding force supplied by the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), which was employed to bind cathode materials and Al foil. This research devoted to seek a new method of melting the PVDF binder with heated ionic liquid (IL) to separate Al foil and cathode materials from the spent high-power LiBs. Theoretical analysis based on Fourier's law was adopted to determine the heat transfer mechanism of cathode material and to examine the relationship between heating temperature and retention time. All the experimental and theoretic results show that peel-off rate of cathode materials from Al foil could reach 99% when major process parameters were controlled at 180°C heating temperature, 300 rpm agitator rotation, and 25 min retention time. The results further imply that the application of IL for recycling Al foil and cathode materials from spent high-power LiBs is highly efficient, regardless of the application source of the LiBs or the types of cathode material. This study endeavors to make a contribution to an environmentally sound and economically viable solution to the challenge of spent LiB recycling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel polymer electrolytes based on thermoplastic polyurethane and ionic liquid/lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide/propylene carbonate salt system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavall, R. L.; Ferrari, S.; Tomasi, C.; Marzantowicz, M.; Quartarone, E.; Magistris, A.; Mustarelli, P.; Lazzaroni, S.; Fagnoni, M.

    Polymer electrolytes were prepared from thermoplastic polyurethane with addition of mixture of ionic liquid N-ethyl(methylether)-N-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonimmide (PYRA 12O1TFSI), lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfoneimide) salt and propylene carbonate. The electrolytes characterization was performed by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties were investigated in detail by impedance spectroscopy with the aid of equivalent circuit fitting of the impedance spectra. A model describing temperature evolution of ionic conductivity and the properties of electrolyte/blocking electrode interface was developed. The electrochemical stability of the electrolytes was studied by linear voltammetry. Our results indicate that the studied electrolytes have good self-standing characteristics, and also a sufficient level of thermal stability and a fairly good electrochemical window. The ionic conductivity increases with increasing amount of mixture, and the character of temperature dependence of conductivity indicates decoupling of ion transport from polymer matrix. For studied system, the highest value of ionic conductivity measured at room temperature was 10 -4 S cm -1.

  16. The influence of cations on lithium ion coordination and transport in ionic liquid electrolytes: a MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Volker; Li, Zhe; Bedrov, Dmitry; Borodin, Oleg; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-01-07

    The dynamical and structural properties in two ionic liquid electrolytes (ILEs) based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide ([emim][TFSI]) and N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide([pyr13][TFSI]) were compared as a function of lithium bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide (LiTFSI) salt concentrations using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The many-body polarizable APPLE&P force field has been utilized. The influence of anion polarization on the structure of the first coordination shell of Li(+) was examined. In particular, the reduction of the oxygen of the TFSI anion (OTFSI) polarizability from 1.36 Å(3) to 1.00 Å(3) resulted in an increased fraction of the TFSI anion bidentate coordination to the Li(+). While the overall dynamics in [pyr13][TFSI]-based ILEs was slower than in [emim][TFSI]-based ILEs, the exchange of TFSI anions in and out of the first coordination shell of Li(+) was found to be faster in pyr13-based systems. The Li(+) ion transference number is higher for these systems as well. These trends can be related to the difference in interaction of TFSI with the IL cation which is stronger for pyr13 than for emim.

  17. The requirements for processing tritium recovered from liquid lithium blankets: The blanket interface

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Grimm, T.L.; Sze, D.K.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse

    1988-03-01

    We have initiated a study to define a blanket processing mockup for Tritium Systems Test Assembly. Initial evaluation of the requirements of the blanket processing system have been started. The first step of the work is to define the condition of the gaseous tritium stream from the blanket tritium recovery system. This report summarizes this part of the work for one particular blanket concept, i.e., a self-cooled lithium blanket. The total gas throughput, the hydrogen to tritium ratio, the corrosive chemicals, and the radionuclides are defined. The key discoveries are: the throughput of the blanket gas stream (including the helium carrier gas) is about two orders of magnitude higher than the plasma exhaust stream;the protium to tritium ratio is about 1, the deuterium to tritium ratio is about 0.003;the corrosion chemicals are dominated by halides;the radionuclides are dominated by C-14, P-32, and S-35;their is high level of nitrogen contamination in the blanket stream. 77 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs.

  18. Li+ solvation and transport properties in ionic liquid/lithium salt mixtures: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Smith, Grant D; Bedrov, Dmitry

    2012-10-25

    Molecular dynamics simulations of N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium (pyr(13)) bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Ntf(2)) ionic liquid [pyr(13)][Ntf(2)] mixed with [Li][Ntf(2)] salt have been conducted using a polarizable force field. Mixture simulations with lithium salt mole fractions between 0% and 33% at 363 and 423 K yield densities, ion self-diffusion coefficients, and ionic conductivities in very good agreement with available experimental data. In all investigated electrolytes, each Li(+) cation was found to be coordinated, on average, by 4.1 oxygen atoms from surrounding anions. At lower concentrations (x ≤ 0.20), the Li(+) cation was found to be, on average, coordinated by slightly more than three Ntf(2) anions with two anions contributing a single oxygen atom and one anion contributing two oxygen atoms to Li(+) coordination. At the highest [Li][Ntf(2)] concentration, however, there were, on average, 3.5 anions coordinating each Li(+) cation, corresponding to fewer bidendate and more monodentate anions in the Li(+) coordination sphere. This trend is due to increased sharing of anions by Li(+) at higher salt concentrations. In the [pyr(13)][Ntf(2)]/[Li][Ntf(2)] electrolytes, the ion diffusivity is significantly smaller than that in organic liquid electrolytes due to not only the greater viscosity of the solvent but also the formation of clusters resulting from sharing of anions by Li(+) cations. The ionic conductivity of the electrolytes was found to decrease with increasing salt concentration, with the effect being greater at the higher temperature. Finally, we found that the contribution of Li(+) to ionic conductivity does not increase proportionally to Li(+) concentration but saturates at higher doping levels.

  19. Passivation of Lithium Metal Anode via Hybrid Ionic Liquid Electrolyte toward Stable Li Plating/Stripping.

    PubMed

    Li, Nian-Wu; Yin, Ya-Xia; Li, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Chang-Huan; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2017-02-01

    Hybrid electrolyte of ionic liquid and ethers is used to passivate the surface of Li metal surface via modification of the as-formed solid electrolyte interphase with N-propyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (Py13TFSI), thereby reducing the side reactions between the Li metal and electrolyte, leading to remarkably suppressed Li dendrite growth and mitigating Li metal corrosion.

  20. An approach of ionic liquids/lithium salts based microwave irradiation pretreatment followed by ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction for two coumarins preparation from Cortex fraxini.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zaizhi; Gu, Huiyan; Yang, Lei

    2015-10-23

    Ionic liquids/lithium salts solvent system was successfully introduced into the separation technique for the preparation of two coumarins (aesculin and aesculetin) from Cortex fraxini. Ionic liquids/lithium salts based microwave irradiation pretreatment followed by ultrasound-microwave synergy extraction (ILSMP-UMSE) procedure was developed and optimized for the sufficient extraction of these two analytes. Several variables which can potentially influence the extraction yields, including pretreatment time and temperature, [C4mim]Br concentration, LiAc content, ultrasound-microwave synergy extraction (UMSE) time, liquid-solid ratio, and UMSE power were optimized by Plackett-Burman design. Among seven variables, UMSE time, liquid-solid ratio, and UMSE power were the statistically significant variables and these three factors were further optimized by Box-Behnken design to predict optimal extraction conditions and find out operability ranges with maximum extraction yields. Under optimum operating conditions, ILSMP-UMSE showed higher extraction yields of two target compounds than those obtained by reference extraction solvents. Method validation studies also evidenced that ILSMP-UMSE is credible for the preparation of two coumarins from Cortex fraxini. This study is indicative of the proposed procedure that has huge application prospects for the preparation of natural products from plant materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Visualizing gold nanoparticle uptake in live cells with liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-04-13

    The intracellular uptake of 30 nm diameter gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) was studied at the nanoscale in pristine eukaryotic cells. Live COS-7 cells were maintained in a microfluidic chamber and imaged using scanning transmission electron microscopy. A quantitative image analysis showed that Au-NPs bound to the membranes of vesicles, possibly lysosomes, and occupied 67% of the available surface area. The vesicles accumulated to form a micrometer-sized cluster after 24 h of incubation. Two clusters were analyzed and found to consist of 117 ± 9 and 164 ± 4 NP-filled vesicles.

  2. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  3. Preparation and electrochemical characterization of ionic-conducting lithium lanthanum titanate oxide/polyacrylonitrile submicron composite fiber-based lithium-ion battery separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yinzheng; Ji, Liwen; Guo, Bingkun; Lin, Zhan; Yao, Yingfang; Li, Ying; Alcoutlabi, Mataz; Qiu, Yiping; Zhang, Xiangwu

    Lithium lanthanum titanate oxide (LLTO)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) submicron composite fiber-based membranes were prepared by electrospinning dispersions of LLTO ceramic particles in PAN solutions. These ionic-conducting LLTO/PAN composite fiber-based membranes can be directly used as lithium-ion battery separators due to their unique porous structure. Ionic conductivities were evaluated after soaking the electrospun LLTO/PAN composite fiber-based membranes in a liquid electrolyte, 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF 6) in ethylene carbonate (EC)/ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (1:1 vol). It was found that, among membranes with various LLTO contents, 15 wt.% LLTO/PAN composite fiber-based membranes provided the highest ionic conductivity, 1.95 × 10 -3 S cm -1. Compared with pure PAN fiber membranes, LLTO/PAN composite fiber-based membranes had greater liquid electrolyte uptake, higher electrochemical stability window, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. In addition, lithium//1 M LiPF 6/EC/EMC//lithium iron phosphate cells containing LLTO/PAN composite fiber-based membranes as the separator exhibited high discharge specific capacity of 162 mAh g -1 and good cycling performance at 0.2 C rate at room temperature.

  4. Optimization of Pore Structure of Cathodic Carbon Supports for Solvate Ionic Liquid Electrolytes Based Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiguo; Ikoma, Ai; Li, Zhe; Ueno, Kazuhide; Ma, Xiaofeng; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2016-10-04

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are a promising energy-storage technology owing to their high theoretical capacity and energy density. However, their practical application remains a challenge because of the serve shuttle effect caused by the dissolution of polysulfides in common organic electrolytes. Polysulfide-insoluble electrolytes, such as solvate ionic liquids (ILs), have recently emerged as alternative candidates and shown great potential in suppressing the shuttle effect and improving the cycle stability of Li-S batteries. Redox electrochemical reactions in polysulfide-insoluble electrolytes occur via a solid-state process at the interphase between the electrolyte and the composite cathode; therefore, creating an appropriate interface between sulfur and a carbon support is of great importance. Nevertheless, the porous carbon supports established for conventional organic electrolytes may not be suitable for polysulfide-insoluble electrolytes. In this work, we investigated the effect of the porous structure of carbon materials on the Li-S battery performance in polysulfide-insoluble electrolytes using solvate ILs as a model electrolyte. We determined that the pore volume (rather than the surface area) exerts a major influence on the discharge capacity of S composite cathodes. In particular, inverse opal carbons with three-dimensionally ordered interconnected macropores and a large pore volume deliver the highest discharge capacity. The battery performance in both polysulfide-soluble electrolytes and solvate ILs was used to study the effect of electrolytes. We propose a plausible mechanism to explain the different porous structure requirements in polysulfide-soluble and polysulfide-insoluble electrolytes.

  5. Crosslinked polymer gel electrolytes based on polyethylene glycol methacrylate and ionic liquid for lithium battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Gel polymer electrolytes were synthesized by copolymerization polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate with polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of a room temperature ionic liquid, methylpropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (MPPY TFSI). The physical properties of gel polymer electrolytes were characterized by thermal analysis, impedance spectroscopy, and electrochemical tests. The ionic conductivities of the gel polymer electrolytes increased linearly with the amount of MPPY TFSI and were mainly attributed to the increased ion mobility as evidenced by the decreased glass transition temperatures. Li||LiFePO4 cells were assembled using the gel polymer electrolytes containing 80 wt% MPPY TFSI via an in situ polymerization method. A reversible cell capacity of 90 mAh g 1 was maintained under the current density of C/10 at room temperature, which was increased to 130 mAh g 1 by using a thinner membrane and cycling at 50 C.

  6. Oxygen-selective immobilized liquid membranes for operation of lithium-air batteries in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Liu, Wei

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, nonaqueous-electrolyte-based Li-air batteries with O2-selective immobilized liquid membranes have been developed and operated in ambient air with 20~30% relative humidity(RH). Continuous anhydrous O2 can be supplied from the ambient through a membrane barrier layer at interface of the cathode and ambient air. The membranes allow O2 permeate through while blocking moisture. These membranes were prepared by loading O2-selective liquid fluids such as silicone oils into porous supports such as porous metal sheets and Teflon (PTFE) films. It was found that silicone oil of high viscosity shows better performance. The membrane performance was not affected by the oil loading temperature. The immobilized silicone oil (viscosity 100,000cst) membrane in porous PTFE film enabled the Li-air batteries with Ketjen black carbon air electrodes to operate in ambient air (with 20% RH) for 16.3 days with a specific capacity of 789 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 2182 Wh/kg carbon. Its performance is much better than reference battery assembled with the same battery material but by use of a commercial, porous PTFE diffusion membranes as the moisture barrier layer on the cathode, which only had a discharge time of 5.5 days corresponding to a specific capacity of 267 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 704 Wh/kg carbon. The Li-air battery with the present selective membrane barrier layer even showed better performance in ambient air operation (20% RH) than the reference battery tested in the dry air box (< 1% RH).

  7. Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prodip K.; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-09-23

    Management of liquid water is critical for optimal fuel-cell operation, especially at low temperatures. It is therefore important to understand the wetting properties and water holdup of the various fuel-cell layers. While the gas-diffusion layer is relatively hydrophobic and exhibits a strong intermediate wettability, the catalyst layer is predominantly hydrophilic. In addition, the water content of the ionomer in the catalyst layer is lower than that of the bulk membrane, and is affected by platinum surfaces. Liquid-water removal occurs through droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. In order to predict droplet instability and detachment, a force balance is used. While the pressure or drag force on the droplet can be derived, the adhesion or surface-tension force requires measurement using a sliding-angle approach. It is shown that droplets produced by forcing water through the gas-diffusion layer rather than placing them on top of it show much stronger adhesion forces owing to the contact to the subsurface water.

  8. Effect of LiNO3 additive and pyrrolidinium ionic liquid on the solid electrolyte interphase in the lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghamadi, Marzieh; Best, Adam S.; Bhatt, Anand I.; Hollenkamp, Anthony F.; Mahon, Peter J.; Musameh, Mustafa; Rüther, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery in which the ionic liquid (IL) C4mpyr-TFSI is a major component of the electrolyte has attracted much attention by researchers due to the ability of the IL to suppress the polysulfide shuttle effect, combined with advantageous properties of thermal, chemical and electrochemical stability. In a largely parallel stream of research, LiNO3 has come to be known as an additive for improving Li-S battery performance through its influence on protecting the lithium anode and beneficial interaction with the polysulfide shuttle. In this work a deeper understanding is sought of the combined effects of LiNO3 and C4mpyr-TFSI on the factors that impact Li-S cell performance. Specifically, we investigate the formation of the protective surface film on lithium anode and results are compared with those for a typical organic electrolyte for the Li-S battery, DOL:DME. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirms that the LiNO3 additive is vital to achieving acceptable levels of performance with the organic electrolyte. Although LiNO3 improves the performance of a battery assembled with IL containing electrolyte, it shows a higher impact in the organic electrolyte based battery. Furthermore X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra confirm the participation of C4mpyr-TFSI on the formation of the interphase layer on the anode.

  9. Failure Mechanism for Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries with Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Dongping; Shao, Yuyan; Lozano, Terence; Bennett, Wendy D.; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, B; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saenz, Natalio T.; Liu, Jun; Xiao, J

    2015-02-04

    In recent years, the Li metal anode has regained a position of paramount research interest because of the necessity for employing Li metal in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O2. Severely limiting this utilization, however, are the rapid capacity degradation and safety issues associated with rechargeable Li metal anodes. A fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of Li metal at high charge rates has remained elusive due to the complicated interfacial chemistry that occurs between Li metal and liquid electrolytes. Here, it is demonstrated that at high current density the quick formation of a highly resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) entangled with Li metal, which grows towards the bulk Li, dramatically increases up the cell impedance and this is the actual origin of the onset of cell degradation and failure. This is instead of dendritic or mossy Li growing outwards from the metal surface towards/through the separator and/or the consumption of the Li and electrolyte through side reactions. Interphase, in this context, refers to a substantive layer rather than a thin interfacial layer. Discerning the mechanisms and consequences for this interphase formation is crucial for resolving the stability and safety issues associated with Li metal anodes.

  10. Failure Mechanism for Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries with Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, DP; Shao, YY; Lozano, T; Bennett, WD; Graff, GL; Polzin, B; Zhang, JG; Engelhard, MH; Saenz, NT; Henderson, WA; Bhattacharya, P; Liu, J; Xiao, J

    2014-09-11

    In recent years, the Li metal anode has regained a position of paramount research interest because of the necessity for employing Li metal in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O-2. Severely limiting this utilization, however, are the rapid capacity degradation and safety issues associated with rechargeable Li metal anodes. A fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of Li metal at high charge rates has remained elusive due to the complicated interfacial chemistry that occurs between Li metal and liquid electrolytes. Here, it is demonstrated that at high current density the quick formation of a highly resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) entangled with Li metal, which grows towards the bulk Li, dramatically increases up the cell impedance and this is the actual origin of the onset of cell degradation and failure. This is instead of dendritic or mossy Li growing outwards from the metal surface towards/through the separator and/or the consumption of the Li and electrolyte through side reactions. Interphase, in this context, refers to a substantive layer rather than a thin interfacial layer. Discerning the mechanisms and consequences for this interphase formation is crucial for resolving the stability and safety issues associated with Li metal anodes.

  11. Violent oxidation of lithium-containing aluminum alloys in liquid oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalins, Ilmars; Karimi, Majid; Ila, Daryush

    1991-06-01

    A strong exothermic and quite well known thermite reaction involving aluminum, oxygen and transition metals (Fe, Cr, Ni, etc.) has apparently been initiated during impact testing of Alcoa aluminum alloy #2090 in liquid oxygen at NASA-MSFC. In some instances, this reaction, essentially an oxidation process, has been so intense that the Inconel 718 cup containing the aluminum alloy disk and associated impacter has melted raising certain safety concerns in the use of this alloy. Reaction products as well as the test specimen surfaces have been studied with surface science techniques like XPS/ESCA, SIMS and AES. Typically, in order to initiate the thermite reaction a temperature of approximately 1000°C is necessary. The mechanism responsible for this oxidation is of great interest. The analysis of the reaction products together with a theoretical analysis, including digital modeling has been pursued. There is strong evidence that the large relaxation energy of the aluminum oxide coating, formed during the aluminum alloy cleaning process, is causing a highly localized energy release during fracture or lattice deformation which is enhancing the oxidation process to a runaway condition. The presence of alkali atoms (Li) enhances the likelihood and intensity of the oxidation reaction. The details of the surface studies will be discussed.

  12. Natural abundance 17O nuclear magnetic resonance and computational modeling studies of lithium based liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  13. Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  14. Biotite weathering and nutrient uptake by ectomycorrhizal fungus, Suillus tomentosus, in liquid-culture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Kent Keller, C.; Thomas Dickinson, J.; Stevens, Forrest; Li, C. Y.; Bormann, Bernard T.

    2008-06-01

    Ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi (EMF) alter the nutrient-acquisition capabilities of vascular plants, and may play an important role in mineral weathering and the partitioning of products of weathering in soils under nutrient-limited conditions. In this study, we isolated the weathering function of Suillus tomentosus in liquid-cultures with biotite micas incubated at room temperature. We hypothesized that the fungus would accelerate weathering by hyphal attachment to biotite surfaces and transmission of nutrient cations via direct exchange into the fungal biomass. We combined a mass-balance approach with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to estimate weathering rates and study dissolution features on biotite surfaces. Weathering of biotite flakes was about 2-3 orders of magnitude faster in shaken liquid-cultures with fungus compared to shaken controls without fungus, but with added inorganic acids. Adding fungus in nonshaken cultures caused a higher dissolution rate than in inorganic pH controls without fungus, but it was not significantly faster than organic pH controls without fungus. The K +, Mg 2+ and Fe 2+ from biotite were preferentially partitioned into fungal biomass in the shaken cultures, while in the nonshaken cultures, K + and Mg 2+ was lost from biomass and Fe 2+ bioaccumulated much less. Fungal hyphae attached to biotite surfaces, but no significant surface changes were detected by SEM. When cultures were shaken, the AFM images of basal planes appeared to be rougher and had abundant dissolution channels, but such channel development was minor in nonshaken conditions. Even under shaken conditions the channels only accounted for only 1/100 of the total dissolution rate of 2.7 × 10 -10 mol of biotite m -2 s -1. The results suggest that fungal weathering predominantly occurred not by attachment and direct transfer of nutrients via hyphae, but because of the acidification of the bulk liquid by organic acids, fungal

  15. Pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids doped with lithium salts: how does Li(+) coordination affect its diffusivity?

    PubMed

    Castiglione, Franca; Famulari, Antonino; Raos, Guido; Meille, Stefano V; Mele, Andrea; Appetecchi, Giovanni Battista; Passerini, Stefano

    2014-11-26

    We present the characterization of LiX-doped room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) based on the N-butyl-N-methyl pyrrolidinium (PYR14) cation with two fluorinated anions: (trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-(nonafluorobutanesulfonyl)imide (X═IM14) and bis(pentafluoroethanesulfonyl)imide (X═BETI). The new data are also compared with previous results on PYR14TFSI (bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide). Their local organization has been investigated via NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) experiments for {(1)H-(19)F} and {(1)H-(7)Li} that give us details on PYR14(+)/X(-) and PYR14(+)/Li(+) contacts. We confirm the presence of [Li(X)2](-) coordinated species in all systems. The long-range, intermolecular NOEs have been detected and provide information on the ions' organization beyond the first solvation sphere. The ionic conductivity, viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients of the ionic mixtures have also been measured. The activation energies for the diffusion of the individual ions and for the fluidity are compared with those for the pure ILs. Finally, density functional calculations on [Li(BETI)2](-), [Li(IM14)2](-), and [Li(TFSI)2](-) complexes demonstrate that the minimum energy structures for all systems correspond to a tetrahedral coordination of the Li-ion by four oxygen atoms of the anions. Assuming very simple key steps for the Li(+) diffusion process (i.e., the concerted breaking and formation of Li-O bonds or the rearrangement around a tetrahedrally coordinated Li(+)), we calculate activation barriers that agree well with the experimental results (approximately 46 kJ/mol, in all systems).

  16. A long life 4 V class lithium-ion polymer battery with liquid-free polymer electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Shono, Kumi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ohno, Yasutaka; Tabuchi, Masato; Oka, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Miyashiro, Hajime

    2017-02-01

    Ether-based solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) is one of the most well-known lithium ion conductors. Unlike the other inorganic electrolytes, SPE exhibits advantages of flexibility and large-area production, enabling low cost production of large size batteries. However, because the ether group is oxidized at 4 V versus Li/Li+ cathode, and due to its high irreversibility with the carbon anode, ether-based SPE was believed to be inapplicable to 4 V class lithium-ion batteries with carbon anode. Here we report a remarkably stable SPE in combination with a 4 V class cathode and carbon anode achieved by the proper design at the interface. The introduced boron-based lithium salt prohibits further oxidation of SPE at the cathode interface. The surface modification of graphite by the annealing of polyvinyl chloride mostly prohibits the continuous consumption of lithium at the graphite anode. Using above interface design, we achieved 60% capacity retention after 5400 cycles. The proposed battery provides a possible approach for realizing flammable electrolyte-free lithium-ion batteries, which achieve innovative safety improvements of large format battery systems for stationary use.

  17. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  18. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  19. Colostrum protein uptake in neonatal lambs examined by descriptive and quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo E; Argüello, Anastasio; Almeida, André M; Castro, Noemí; Bendixen, Emøke

    2015-01-01

    Colostrum intake is a key factor for newborn ruminant survival because the placenta does not allow the transfer of immune components. Therefore, newborn ruminants depend entirely on passive immunity transfer from the mother to the neonate, through the suckling of colostrum. Understanding the importance of specific colostrum proteins has gained significant attention in recent years. However, proteomics studies of sheep colostrum and their uptake in neonate lambs has not yet been presented. The aim of this study was to describe the proteomes of sheep colostrum and lamb blood plasma, using sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE for protein separation and in-gel digestion, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of resulting tryptic peptides for protein identification. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomics approach was subsequently used to provide relative quantification of how neonatal plasma protein concentrations change as an effect of colostrum intake. The results of this study describe the presence of 70 proteins in the ovine colostrum proteome. Furthermore, colostrum intake resulted in an increase of 8 proteins with important immune functions in the blood plasma of lambs. Further proteomic studies will be necessary, particularly using the selected reaction monitoring approach, to describe in detail the role of specific colostrum proteins for immune transfer to the neonate.

  20. Ionic liquids-lithium salts pretreatment followed by ultrasound-assisted extraction of vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside and vitexin from Phyllostachys edulis leaves.

    PubMed

    Hou, Kexin; Chen, Fengli; Zu, Yuangang; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-29

    An efficient method for the extraction of vitexin, vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside from Phyllostachys edulis leaves comprises heat treatment using an ionic liquid-lithium salt mixture (using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as the solvent and lithium chloride as the additive), followed by ultrasound-assisted extraction. To obtain higher extraction yields, the effects of the relevant experimental parameters (including heat treatment temperature and time, relative amounts of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide and lithium chloride, power and time of the ultrasound irradiation, and the liquid-solid ratio) are evaluated and response surface methodology is used to optimize the significant factors. The morphologies of the treated and untreated P. edulis leaves are studied by scanning electron microscopy. The improved extraction method proposed provides high extraction yield, good repeatability and precision, and has wide potential applications in the analysis of plant samples.

  1. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors.

  2. Towards Li(Ni0.33Mn0.33Co0.33)O2/graphite batteries with ionic liquid-based electrolytes. I. Electrodes' behavior in lithium half-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetti, E.; Maresca, G.; Appetecchi, G. B.; Kim, G.-T.; Loeffler, N.; Passerini, S.

    2016-11-01

    Lithium cells based on NMC cathodes or graphite anodes and ionic liquid-based electrolyte mixtures are investigated. The electrode tapes, using water-soluble natural binders, as well as the ionic liquid materials, are prepared through eco-friendly routes involving H2O as the only processing solvent. The Li/NMC and Li/graphite half-cells are studied by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic cycling tests at different temperatures. The results herein reported, demonstrate the performance improvement in terms of cycling behavior and ageing resistance, granted by the ionic liquid mixtures with respect to the electrolytes reported in literature based on a single ionic liquid.

  3. Towards quantification of toxicity of lithium ion battery electrolytes - development and validation of a liquid-liquid extraction GC-MS method for the determination of organic carbonates in cell culture materials.

    PubMed

    Strehlau, Jenny; Weber, Till; Lürenbaum, Constantin; Bornhorst, Julia; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-08-03

    A novel method based on liquid-liquid extraction with subsequent gas chromatography separation and mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) for the quantification of organic carbonates in cell culture materials is presented. Method parameters including the choice of extraction solvent, of extraction method and of extraction time were optimised and the method was validated. The setup allowed for determination within a linear range of more than two orders of magnitude. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.0002 and 0.002 mmol/L and the repeatability precisions were in the range of 1.5-12.9%. It could be shown that no matrix effects were present and recovery rates between 98 and 104% were achieved. The methodology was applied to cell culture models incubated with commercial lithium ion battery (LIB) electrolytes to gain more insight into the potential toxic effects of these compounds. The stability of the organic carbonates in cell culture medium after incubation was studied. In a porcine model of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier, it could be shown that a transfer of organic carbonates into the brain facing compartment took place. Graphical abstract Schematic setup for the investigation of toxicity of lithium ion battery electrolytes.

  4. Effects and uptake of gold nanoparticles deposited at the air-liquid interface of a human epithelial airway model.

    PubMed

    Brandenberger, C; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Mühlfeld, C; Schmid, O; Ferron, G A; Maier, K L; Gehr, P; Lenz, A-G

    2010-01-01

    The impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine and biology has increased rapidly in recent years. Gold NPs have advantageous properties such as chemical stability, high electron density and affinity to biomolecules, making them very promising candidates as drug carriers and diagnostic tools. However, diverse studies on the toxicity of gold NPs have reported contradictory results. To address this issue, a triple cell co-culture model simulating the alveolar lung epithelium was used and exposed at the air-liquid interface. The cell cultures were exposed to characterized aerosols with 15 nm gold particles (61 ng Au/cm2 and 561 ng Au/cm2 deposition) and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. Experiments were repeated six times. The mRNA induction of pro-inflammatory (TNFalpha, IL-8, iNOS) and oxidative stress markers (HO-1, SOD2) was measured, as well as protein induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, GM-CSF, TNFalpha, INFgamma). A pre-stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was performed to further study the effects of particles under inflammatory conditions. Particle deposition and particle uptake by cells were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and design-based stereology. A homogeneous deposition was revealed, and particles were found to enter all cell types. No mRNA induction due to particles was observed for all markers. The cell culture system was sensitive to LPS but gold particles did not cause any synergistic or suppressive effects. With this experimental setup, reflecting the physiological conditions more precisely, no adverse effects from gold NPs were observed. However, chronic studies under in vivo conditions are needed to entirely exclude adverse effects.

  5. Effects and uptake of gold nanoparticles deposited at the air-liquid interface of a human epithelial airway model

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, C.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Muehlfeld, C.; Schmid, O.; Ferron, G.A.; Maier, K.L.; Gehr, P.; Lenz, A.-G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine and biology has increased rapidly in recent years. Gold NPs have advantageous properties such as chemical stability, high electron density and affinity to biomolecules, making them very promising candidates as drug carriers and diagnostic tools. However, diverse studies on the toxicity of gold NPs have reported contradictory results. To address this issue, a triple cell co-culture model simulating the alveolar lung epithelium was used and exposed at the air-liquid interface. The cell cultures were exposed to characterized aerosols with 15 nm gold particles (61 ng Au/cm{sup 2} and 561 ng Au/cm{sup 2} deposition) and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. Experiments were repeated six times. The mRNA induction of pro-inflammatory (TNFalpha, IL-8, iNOS) and oxidative stress markers (HO-1, SOD2) was measured, as well as protein induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, GM-CSF, TNFalpha, INFgamma). A pre-stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was performed to further study the effects of particles under inflammatory conditions. Particle deposition and particle uptake by cells were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and design-based stereology. A homogeneous deposition was revealed, and particles were found to enter all cell types. No mRNA induction due to particles was observed for all markers. The cell culture system was sensitive to LPS but gold particles did not cause any synergistic or suppressive effects. With this experimental setup, reflecting the physiological conditions more precisely, no adverse effects from gold NPs were observed. However, chronic studies under in vivo conditions are needed to entirely exclude adverse effects.

  6. Compatibility of poly(bisAEA4)-LiTFSI-MPPipTFSI ionic liquid gel polymer electrolyte with Li4Ti5O12 lithium ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepniak, Izabela

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the use of Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as anode with ionic liquid gel polymer electrolyte (IL-GPE) for application in lithium ion batteries. IL-GPE was obtained by in situ photopolymerization method of a mixture of ethoxylated bisphenol A diacrylate (bis(AEA4) and 0.4 M solution of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (MPPipTFSI). The surface morphology of the IL-GPE was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Stable, porous and flexible gel polymer electrolyte characterized high ionic conductivity (0.64 mS cm-1 at 25 °C) and a wide electrochemical stability window (ESW) (4.8 V). The performances of LTO/IL-GPE/Li cell were tested by using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and galvanostatic charge/discharge. Good charge/discharge capacities and low capacity loss at medium C rates preliminary cycling was obtained.

  7. Functional Hybrid Materials Based on Manganese Dioxide and Lignin Activated by Ionic Liquids and Their Application in the Production of Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Klapiszewski, Łukasz; Szalaty, Tadeusz J.; Kurc, Beata; Stanisz, Małgorzata; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2017-01-01

    Kraft lignin (KL) was activated using selected ionic liquids (ILs). The activated form of the biopolymer, due to the presence of carbonyl groups, can be used in electrochemical tests. To increase the application potential of the system in electrochemistry, activated lignin forms were combined with manganese dioxide, and the most important physicochemical and morphological-microstructural properties of the novel, functional hybrid systems were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis (EA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), zeta potential analysis, thermal stability (TGA/DTG) and porous structure analysis. An investigation was also made of the practical application of the hybrid materials in the production of lithium ion batteries. The capacity of the anode (MnO2/activated lignin), working at a low current regime of 50 mA·g−1, was ca. 610 mAh·g−1, while a current of 1000 mA·g−1 resulted in a capacity of 570 mAh·g−1. Superior cyclic stability and rate capability indicate that this may be a promising electrode material for use in high-performance lithium ion batteries. PMID:28704933

  8. Allylic ionic liquid electrolyte-assisted electrochemical surface passivation of LiCoO2 for advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Junyoung; Yim, Taeeun; Park, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Ji Heon; Lee, Sang Young; Kim, Young Gyu; Oh, Seung M.

    2014-08-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolytes have attracted much attention for use in advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries (LIB) owing to their nonvolatility, high conductivity, and great thermal stability. However, LIBs containing RTIL-electrolytes exhibit poor cyclability because electrochemical side reactions cause problematic surface failures of the cathode. Here, we demonstrate that a thin, homogeneous surface film, which is electrochemically generated on LiCoO2 from an RTIL-electrolyte containing an unsaturated substituent on the cation (1-allyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, AMPip-TFSI), can avert undesired side reactions. The derived surface film comprised of a high amount of organic species from the RTIL cations homogenously covered LiCoO2 with a <25 nm layer and helped suppress unfavorable thermal reactions as well as electrochemical side reactions. The superior performance of the cell containing the AMPip-TFSI electrolyte was further elucidated by surface, electrochemical, and thermal analyses.

  9. Allylic ionic liquid electrolyte-assisted electrochemical surface passivation of LiCoO2 for advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Junyoung; Yim, Taeeun; Park, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Ji Heon; Lee, Sang Young; Kim, Young Gyu; Oh, Seung M.

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolytes have attracted much attention for use in advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries (LIB) owing to their nonvolatility, high conductivity, and great thermal stability. However, LIBs containing RTIL-electrolytes exhibit poor cyclability because electrochemical side reactions cause problematic surface failures of the cathode. Here, we demonstrate that a thin, homogeneous surface film, which is electrochemically generated on LiCoO2 from an RTIL-electrolyte containing an unsaturated substituent on the cation (1-allyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, AMPip-TFSI), can avert undesired side reactions. The derived surface film comprised of a high amount of organic species from the RTIL cations homogenously covered LiCoO2 with a <25 nm layer and helped suppress unfavorable thermal reactions as well as electrochemical side reactions. The superior performance of the cell containing the AMPip-TFSI electrolyte was further elucidated by surface, electrochemical, and thermal analyses. PMID:25168309

  10. Imidazolium ionic liquid induced one-step synthesis of 𝜶 -Fe2O3 nanorods and nanorod assemblies for lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuting; Lu, Fei; Liu, Shaojie; Zheng, Liqiang; Jin, Mingliang; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-12-01

    α -Fe2O3 nanorods and nanorod assemblies are prepared via a facile one-step method with the assistance of imidazolium-based ionic liquid. The aspect ratio of synthesized nanorods is determined by the alkyl chain length of [Cnmim]+. The inter-molecular π -π interaction and intra-molecular dipole-dipole interaction among imidazole rings of [C4mim]+[PhCOO]- play critical roles in both nucleation and assembly processes of α -Fe2O3 nanorods. The α -Fe2O3 nanorod assemblies show an excellent performance in lithium-ion batteries with a reversible capacity of 1007.3 mA h g-1 at the rate of 500 mA g-1 after 150 cycles.

  11. Application of bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide-based ionic liquid electrolyte to silicon-nickel-carbon composite anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Toshinori; Atsumi, Yosuke; Kono, Michiyuki; Kikuta, Manabu; Ishiko, Eriko; Yamagata, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masashi

    An ionic liquid electrolyte containing bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (FSI) anion without any solvent is applied to a silicon-nickel-carbon (Si-Ni-carbon) composite anode for rechargeable lithium (Li)-ion batteries. The FSI-based ionic liquid electrolyte successfully provides a stable, reversible capacity for the Si-Ni-carbon anode, which is comparable to the performance observed in a typical commercialized solvent-based electrolyte, while a common ionic liquid electrolyte containing bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI) anion without FSI presents no reversible capacity to the anode at all. Ac impedance analysis reveals that the FSI-based electrolyte provides very low interfacial and charge-transfer resistances at the Si-based composite anode, even when compared to the corresponding resistances observed in a typical solvent-based electrolyte. Galvanostatic cycling of the Si-based composite anode in the FSI-based electrolyte with a charge limitation of 800 mAh g -1 is stable and provides a discharge capacity of 790 mAh g -1 at the 50th cycle, corresponding to a cycle efficiency of 98.8%.

  12. Lithium ion conducting PVdF-HFP composite gel electrolytes based on N-methoxyethyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, S.; Quartarone, E.; Mustarelli, P.; Magistris, A.; Fagnoni, M.; Protti, S.; Gerbaldi, C.; Spinella, A.

    Blends of PVdF-HFP and ionic liquids (ILs) are interesting for application as electrolytes in plastic Li batteries. They combine the advantages of the gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) swollen by conventional organic liquid electrolytes with the nonflammability, and high thermal and electrochemical stability of ILs. In this work we prepared and characterized PVdF-HFP composite membranes swollen with a solution of LiTFSI in ether-functionalized pyrrolidinium-imide ionic liquid (PYRA 12O1TFSI). The membranes were filled in with two different types of silica: (i) mesoporous SiO 2 (SBA-15) and (ii) a commercial nano-size one (HiSil™ T700). The ionic conductivity and the electrochemical properties of the gel electrolytes were studied in terms of the nature of the filler. The thermal and the transport properties of the composite membranes are similar. In particular, room temperature ionic conductivities higher than 0.25 mS cm -1 are easily obtained at defined filler contents. However, the mesoporous filler guarantees higher lithium transference numbers, a more stable electrochemical interface and better cycling performances. Contrary to the HiSil™-based membrane, the Li/LiFePO 4 cells with PVdF-HFP/PYRA 12O1TFSI-LiTFSI films containing 10 wt% of SBA-15 show good charge/discharge capacity, columbic efficiency close to unity, and low capacity losses at medium C-rates during 180 cycles.

  13. The Effects of Temperature and Oxidation on Deuterium Retention in Solid and Liquid Lithium Films on Molybdenum Plasma-Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capece, Angela

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) enable in-situ renewal of the surface, thereby offering a solution to neutron damage, erosion, and thermal fatigue experienced by solid PFCs. Lithium in particular has a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, which has resulted in reduced recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices including TFTR, T11-M, FTU, CDX-U, LTX, TJ-II, and NSTX. A key component to the improvement in plasma performance is deuterium retention in Li; however, this process is not well understood in the complex tokamak environment. Recent surface science experiments conducted at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have used electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption to understand the mechanisms for D retention in Li coatings on Mo substrates. The experiments were designed to give monolayer-control of Li films and were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum under controlled environments. An electron cyclotron resonance plasma source was used to deliver a beam of deuterium ions to the surface over a range of ion energies. Our work shows that D is retained as LiD in metallic Li films. However, when oxygen is present in the film, either by diffusion from the subsurface at high temperature or as a contaminant during the deposition process, Li oxides are formed that retain D as LiOD. Experiments indicate that LiD is more thermally stable than LiOD, which decomposes to liberate D2 gas and D2O at temperatures 100 K lower than the LiD decomposition temperature. Other experiments show how D retention varies with substrate temperature to provide insight into the differences between solid and liquid lithium films. This work was supported by DOE Contract No. DE AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Investigation of electronic and local structural changes during lithium uptake and release of nano-crystalline NiFe2O4 by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong; Permien, Stefan; Rana, Jatinkumar; Krengel, Markus; Sun, Fu; Schumacher, Gerhard; Bensch, Wolfgang; Banhart, John

    2017-02-01

    Nano-crystalline NiFe2O4 particles were synthesized and used as active electrode material for a lithium ion battery that showed a high discharge capacity of 1534 mAh g-1 and charge capacity of 1170 mAh g-1 during the 1st cycle. X-ray absorption spectroscopy including XANES and EXAFS were used to investigate electronic and local structural changes of NiFe2O4 during the 1st lithiation and de-lithiation process. As lithium is inserted into the structure, tetrahedral site Fe3+ ions are reduced to Fe2+ and moved from tetrahedral sites to empty octahedral sites, while Ni2+ ions are unaffected. As a consequence, the matrix spinel structure collapses and transforms to an intermediate rock-salt monoxide phase. Meanwhile, the inserted Li is partially consumed by the formation of SEI and other side reactions during the conversion reaction. With further lithiation, the monoxide phase is reduced to highly disordered metallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles with a number of nearest neighbors of 6.0(8) and 8.1(4) for Fe and Ni, respectively. During subsequent de-lithiation, the metal particles are individually re-oxidized to Fe2O3 and NiO phases instead to the original NiFe2O4 spinel phase.

  15. Lithium-ion batteries having conformal solid electrolyte layers

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Gi-Heon; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2014-05-27

    Hybrid solid-liquid electrolyte lithium-ion battery devices are disclosed. Certain devices comprise anodes and cathodes conformally coated with an electron insulating and lithium ion conductive solid electrolyte layer.

  16. Motion-induced alterations in 2-deoxyglucose uptake in brainstem nuclei of squirrel monkeys: autoradiographic and liquid scintillation studies.

    PubMed

    Brizzee, K R; Dunlap, W P

    1983-01-01

    Each of 8 young adult female squirrel monkeys were injected via a femoral vein cannula with 167 microCi/100 g body weight of 2-(1,2-3H)-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) (New England Nuclear, 37.3 Ci/mmol) in 0.5 ml sterile saline. 4 additional female squirrel monkeys were injected in the same manner with 100 microCi/100 g body weight of the (3H)-2-DG. 2 h after this initial injection the original 8 animals were injected with 16.7 microCi/100 g body weight of 2-(1-14C)-deoxy-D-glucose (51.3 mCi/mmol) in 0.5 ml sterile saline. The 4 additional animals were injected with 25 microCi/100 g body weight of the (14C)-2-DG. Half of the animals each dose level were restrained in the upright position with Velcro straps and a nontraumatic moulded plastic head holder on a modified animal restraint board [Withrow and Devine, 1972] with the head in the sagittal plane but tilted forward about 20 degrees. They were then subjected to horizontal rotary motion at 25 rpm together with a vertical movement of 6 inches at 0.5 Hz for 1 h in a lighted room. The other half of the animals at each dose were restrained in the same manner and maintained in a quiescent state. At the end of this period each animal was anesthetized with ketamine, and the brain was quickly dissected out and frozen in isopentane cooled to -60 degrees C with dry ice. Transverse cryostat sections (-15 degrees C) of the brainstem were cut alternately at 200 and 20 microns from the nucleus gracilis caudally through the superior vestibular nucleus rostrally. Micropunch samples of the individual vestibular nuclei, and other brainstem nuclei and areas were obtained from the 200-microns sections with a modification of the method of Eik-Nes and Brizzee with a small stainless steel punch measuring 850 microns in diameter. The frozen punch samples were prepared for liquid scintillation counting (Beckman LS7500 system). Differential (3H) and (14C) counts (cpm) were made employing external standards. The 20-microns sections were prepared

  17. Recent advances in lithium ion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    Lithium ion technology is based on the use of lithium intercalating electrodes. Carbon is the most commonly used anode material, while the cathode materials of choice have been layered lithium metal chalcogenides (LiMX{sub 2}) and lithium spinel-type compounds. Electrolytes may be either organic liquids or polymers. Although the first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds as battery anodes was reported in 1981 for molten salt cells (1) and in 1983 for ambient temperature systems (2) it was not until Sony Energytech announced a new lithium ion rechargeable cell containing a lithium ion intercalating carbon anode in 1990, that interest peaked. The reason for this heightened interest is that these cells have the high energy density, high voltage and fight weight of metallic lithium systems plus a very long cycle life, but without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge and the safety considerations associated with metallic lithium.

  18. Analysis of secondary cells with lithium anodes and immobilized fused-salt electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Rogers, G. L.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Secondary cells with liquid lithium anodes, liquid bismuth or tellurium cathodes, and fused lithium halide electrolytes immobilized as rigid pastes operate between 380 and 485 degrees. Applications include power sources in space, military vehicle propulsion and special commercial vehicle propulsion.

  19. A mixture of triethylphosphate and ethylene carbonate as a safe additive for ionic liquid-based electrolytes of lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalia, Boor Singh; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Egashira, Minato; Morita, Masayuki

    A binary mixture of triethylphosphate (TEP) and ethylene carbonate (EC) has been examined as a new non-flammable additive for ionic liquid-based electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries. The optimized electrolyte composition consists of 0.6 mol dm -3 (=M) LiTFSI in PP13TFSI mixed with TEP and EC in volume ratio of 80:10:10, where TFSI and PP13 denote bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and N-methyl- N-propylpiperidinium, respectively. The ionic conductivity of PP13TFSI dissolving 0.4 M LiTFSI was improved from 8.2 × 10 -4 S cm -1 to 3.5 × 10 -3 S cm -1 (at 20 °C) with the addition of TEP and EC. The electrochemical behavior of 0.4 M LiTFSI/PP13TFSI with and without TEP and EC was studied by cyclic voltammetry, which showed no deteriorating effect by the addition of TEP and EC on the electrochemical window of PP13TFSI. The flammability of the electrolyte was tested by a direct flame test. The proposed ionic liquid-based electrolyte revealed significant improvements in the electrochemical charge-discharge characteristics for both graphite negative and LiMn 2O 4 positive electrodes.

  20. Influence of the structure of the anion in an ionic liquid electrolyte on the electrochemical performance of a silicon negative electrode for a lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Domi, Yasuhiro; Usui, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Kuninobu; Nokami, Toshiki; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the anions in ionic liquid electrolytes on the electrochemical performance of a silicon (Si) negative electrode for a lithium-ion battery. While the electrode exhibited poor cycle stability in tetrafluoroborate-based and propylene carbonate-based electrolytes, better cycle performance was achieved in bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide (FSA-)- and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (TFSA-)-based electrolytes, in which the discharge capacity of a Si electrode was more than 1000 mA h g-1 at the 100th cycle. It is considered that a surface film derived from FSA-- and TFSA--based electrolytes effectively suppressed continuous decomposition of the electrolyte. In a capacity limitation test, a discharge capacity of 1000 mA h g-1 was maintained even after about the 1600th cycle in the FSA--based electrolyte, which corresponds to a cycle life almost twice as long as that in TFSA--based electrolyte. This result should be explained by the high structural stability of FSA--derived surface film. In addition, better rate capability with a discharge capacity of 700 mA h g-1 was obtained at a high current rate of 6 C (21 A g-1) in FSA--based electrolyte, which was 7-fold higher than that in TFSA--based electrolyte. These results clarified that FSA--based ionic liquid electrolyte is the most promising candidate for Si-based negative electrodes.

  1. Ionic Liquid-Organic Carbonate Electrolyte Blends To Stabilize Silicon Electrodes for Extending Lithium Ion Battery Operability to 100 °C.

    PubMed

    Ababtain, Khalid; Babu, Ganguli; Lin, Xinrong; Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Grinstaff, Mark W; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy

    2016-06-22

    Fabrication of lithium-ion batteries that operate from room temperature to elevated temperatures entails development and subsequent identification of electrolytes and electrodes. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) can address the thermal stability issues, but their poor ionic conductivity at room temperature and compatibility with traditional graphite anodes limit their practical application. To address these challenges, we evaluated novel high energy density three-dimensional nano-silicon electrodes paired with 1-methyl-1-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pip) ionic liquid/propylene carbonate (PC)/LiTFSI electrolytes. We observed that addition of PC had no detrimental effects on the thermal stability and flammability of the reported electrolytes, while largely improving the transport properties at lower temperatures. Detailed investigation of the electrochemical properties of silicon half-cells as a function of PC content, temperature, and current rates reveal that capacity increases with PC content and temperature and decreases with increased current rates. For example, addition of 20% PC led to a drastic improvement in capacity as observed for the Si electrodes at 25 °C, with stability over 100 charge/discharge cycles. At 100 °C, the capacity further increases by 3-4 times to 0.52 mA h cm(-2) (2230 mA h g(-1)) with minimal loss during cycling.

  2. Large lithium loop experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Owen, T.J.; Berg, J.D.; Atwood, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    An engineering design and operating experience of a large, isothermal, lithium-coolant test loop are presented. This liquid metal coolant loop is called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) and has operated safely and reliably for over 6500 hours through September 1981. The loop is used for full-scale testing of components for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Main system parameters include coolant temperatures to 430/sup 0/C and flow to 0.038 m/sup 3//s (600 gal/min). Performance of the main pump, vacuum system, and control system is discussed. Unique test capabilities of the ELS are also discussed.

  3. Lithium battery technology

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasetty, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the use of lithium in electric batteries. Topics considered include solvents for lithium battery technology, transport properties and structure of nonaqueous electrolyte solutions, primary lithium batteries, lithium sulfur dioxide batteries, lithium oxyhalide batteries, medical batteries, ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium cells, high-temperature lithium batteries, and lithium ion-conducting solid electrolytes.

  4. An imidazolium-based polymerized ionic liquid via novel synthetic strategy as polymer electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kun; Zhang, Zhengxi; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-Ichi

    2014-07-01

    An imidazolium-based polymerized ionic liquid (PIL), poly(1-ethyl-3-vinylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonylimide)) is successfully synthesized via a new three-step process comprising the direct radical polymerization of the 1-vinylimidazole monomer, and subsequent quaternization reaction followed by an anion exchange procedure. Furthermore, polymer electrolytes are prepared by blending as-obtained PIL as the polymer host with an ionic liquid and LiTFSI salt. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that compared with polymer electrolytes containing the PIL host synthesized by the conventional route, polymer electrolytes containing the PIL host obtained by new synthetic process exhibit significantly improved capacity and cycling performance, which is due to higher ionic liquid content.

  5. Molecular dynamics analysis of the effect of electronic polarization on the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of ionic liquids and lithium salts.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Volker; Montes-Campos, Hadrián; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Gallego, Luis Javier; Heuer, Andreas; Schröder, Christian; Varela, Luis M

    2016-11-28

    We report a molecular dynamics study on the effect of electronic polarization on the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of the aprotic ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ([EMIM][TFSI]) doped with a lithium salt with the same anion at 298 K and 1 bar. In particular, we analyze the effect of electron density fluctuations on radial distribution functions, velocity autocorrelation functions, cage correlation functions, mean-squared displacements, and vibrational densities of states, comparing the predictions of the quantum-chemistry-based Atomistic Polarizable Potential for Liquids, Electrolytes, & Polymers (APPLE&P) with those of its nonpolarizable version and those of the standard non-polarizable Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations-All Atom (OPLS-AA). We found that the structure of the mixture is scarcely modified by the fluctuations in electron charge of their constituents, but their transport properties are indeed quite drastically changed, with larger mobilities being predicted for the different species in the bulk mixtures with the polarizable force field. Specifically, the mean-squared displacements are larger for the polarizable potentials at identical time intervals and the intermediate subdiffusive plateaus are greatly reduced, so the transition to the diffusive regime takes place much earlier than in the non-polarizable media. Moreover, the correlations of the added cations inside their cages are weakened out earlier and their vibrational densities of states are slightly red-shifted, reflecting the weakening effect of the electronic polarization on the Coulomb coupling in these dense ionic media. The comparison of OPLS-AA with non-polarizable APPLE&P indicates that adding polarization to OPLS-AA is not sufficient to achieve results close to experiments.

  6. Molecular dynamics analysis of the effect of electronic polarization on the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of ionic liquids and lithium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesch, Volker; Montes-Campos, Hadrián; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Gallego, Luis Javier; Heuer, Andreas; Schröder, Christian; Varela, Luis M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a molecular dynamics study on the effect of electronic polarization on the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of the aprotic ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ([EMIM][TFSI]) doped with a lithium salt with the same anion at 298 K and 1 bar. In particular, we analyze the effect of electron density fluctuations on radial distribution functions, velocity autocorrelation functions, cage correlation functions, mean-squared displacements, and vibrational densities of states, comparing the predictions of the quantum-chemistry-based Atomistic Polarizable Potential for Liquids, Electrolytes, & Polymers (APPLE&P) with those of its nonpolarizable version and those of the standard non-polarizable Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations-All Atom (OPLS-AA). We found that the structure of the mixture is scarcely modified by the fluctuations in electron charge of their constituents, but their transport properties are indeed quite drastically changed, with larger mobilities being predicted for the different species in the bulk mixtures with the polarizable force field. Specifically, the mean-squared displacements are larger for the polarizable potentials at identical time intervals and the intermediate subdiffusive plateaus are greatly reduced, so the transition to the diffusive regime takes place much earlier than in the non-polarizable media. Moreover, the correlations of the added cations inside their cages are weakened out earlier and their vibrational densities of states are slightly red-shifted, reflecting the weakening effect of the electronic polarization on the Coulomb coupling in these dense ionic media. The comparison of OPLS-AA with non-polarizable APPLE&P indicates that adding polarization to OPLS-AA is not sufficient to achieve results close to experiments.

  7. Fabrication and performance testing of CaO insulator coatings on V-5%Cr-5%Ti in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, G.

    1995-04-01

    Corrosion resistance of structural materials, and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force and its influence on thermal hydraulics and corrosion, are major concerns in the design of liquid-metal blankets for magnetic fusion reactors (MFRs). The objective of this study is to develop in-situ stable coatings at the liquid-metal/structural-material interface, with emphasis on coatings that can be converted to an electrically insulating film to prevent adverse currents that are generated by the MHD force from passing through the structural walls. The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on V-5Cr-5Ti by exposure of the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5 - 8.5 wt.% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degree}C. The solute element, Ca in liquid Li, reacted with the alloy substrate at 400-420{degree}C to produce a CaO coating.

  8. Transfers of iodine in the soil-plant-air system: Solid-liquid partitioning, migration, plant uptake adn volatilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human exposure to soil iodine depends upon the partitioning of the iodine into the, mobile, liquid and gaseous soil phases. From the liquid phase, iodine can be transported into surface- and ground-waters, plant roots, and, consequently, into the human diet. From the gaseous phase, iodine can be tra...

  9. CaO insulator coatings and self-healing of defects on V-Cr-Ti alloys in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-02-01

    Electrically insulating and corrosion-resistant coatings are required at the liquid metal/structural interface in fusion first-wall/blanket applications. The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposure of the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5--85 wt.% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. The solute element, Ca in liquid Li, reacted with the alloy substrate at 400--420{degrees}C to produce a CaO coating. Resistance of the coating layer measured in-situ in liquid Li was {approx}10{sup 6} {Omega} at 400{degrees}C. Thermal cycling between 300 and 700{degrees}C changed the coating layer resistance. which followed insulator behavior. These results suggest that thin homogeneous coatings can be produced on variously shaped surfaces by controlling the exposure time, temperature, and composition of the liquid metal. The technique can be applied to various shapes(e.g., inside/outside of tubes, complex geometrical shapes) because the coating is formed by liquid-phase reaction. Examination of the specimens after cooling to room temperature revealed no spallation, but homogeneous crazing cracks were present in the CaO coating. Additional tests to investigate the in-situ self-healing behavior of the cracks indicated that rapid healing occurred at {ge}360{degrees}C.

  10. Electrospun Nanofiber-Coated Membrane Separators for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hun

    Lithium-ion batteries are widely used as a power source for portable electronic devices and hybrid electric vehicles due to their excellent energy and power densities, long cycle life, and enhanced safety. A separator is considered to be the critical component in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. The separator is placed between the positive and negative electrodes in order to prevent the physical contact of electrodes while allowing the transportation of ions. In most commercial lithium-ion batteries, polyolefin microporous membranes are commonly used as the separator due to their good chemical stability and high mechanical strength. However, some of their intrinsic natures, such as low electrolyte uptake, poor adhesion property to the electrodes, and low ionic conductivity, can still be improved to achieve higher performance of lithium-ion batteries. In order to improve these intrinsic properties, polyolefin microporous membranes can be coated with nanofibers by using electrospinning technique. Electrospinning is a simple and efficient method to prepare nanofibers which can absorb a significant amount of liquid electrolyte to achieve low internal resistance and battery performance. This research presents the preparation and investigation of composite membrane separators prepared by coating nanofibers onto polyolefin microporous membranes via electrospinning technique. Polyvinylidene fluoride polymers and copolymers were used for the preparation of electrospun nanofiber coatings because they have excellent electrochemical stability, good adhesion property, and high temperature resistance. The nanofiber coatings prepared by electrospinning form an interconnected and randomly orientated structure on the surface of the polyolefin microporous membranes. The size of the nanofibers is on a scale that does not interfere with the micropores in the membrane substrates. The resultant nanofiber-coated membranes have the potential to combine advantages of both the polyolefin

  11. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  12. CaO insulator and Be intermetallic coatings on V-base alloys for liquid-lithium fusion blanket applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop (a) stable CaO insulator coatings at the Liquid-Li/structural-material interface, with emphasis on electrically insulating coating that prevent adverse MHD-generated currents from passing through the V-alloy wall, and (b) stable Be-V intermetallic coating for first-wall components that face the plasma. Electrically insulating and corrosion-resistant coatings are required at the liquid-Li/structural interface in fusion first-wall/blanket application. The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on oxygen-enriched surface layers of V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposing the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5-85 wt% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. Crack-free Be{sub 2}V intermetallic coatings were also produced by exposing V-alloys to liquid Li that contained Be as a solute. These techniques can be applied to various shapes (e.g., inside/outside of tubes, complex geometrical shapes) because the coatings are formed by liquid-phase reactions.

  13. Heat Transfer to Liquid Lithium in a Straight Duct in the Presence of a Transverse Magnetic Field and a Gravity Field

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, Asad

    2000-03-15

    Heat transfer to liquid lithium in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and a gravity field was analyzed in a square cross-section duct. The duct had conducting vanadium walls. Magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions in the Cartesian coordinate system were solved. First, the Nusselt number was calculated with no magnetic field and a gravity field. Second, the Nusselt number was calculated for the case of a transverse magnetic field acting on the fluid. Third, the Nusselt number was calculated for the case of a transverse magnetic field and a gravity field acting on the fluid. Only one face of the channel was heated. It was found that the Nusselt number is not sensitive to application of a gravity field and is sensitive to application of a transverse magnetic field and it decreases when a transverse magnetic field is applied. It is observed that when the intensity of the transverse magnetic field reaches 0.11 T, further reduction in the value of the Nusselt number almost stops.

  14. Pseudocapacitive behavior of manganese oxide in lithium-ion-doped butylmethylpyrrolidinium-dicyanamide ionic liquid investigated using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Li, Yun-Shan; Sun, I.-Wen; Chang, Jeng-Kuei

    2014-01-01

    Ideal pseudocapacitive behavior of α-MnO2 electrodes over a potential range of 3 V is found in lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI)-doped butylmethylpyrrolidinium-dicyanamide (BMP-DCA) ionic liquid (IL), which is non-flammable and has a decomposition temperature of as high as ∼300 °C. Accordingly, this electrolyte is promising for high-energy, high-power, and high-safety supercapacitor applications. The addition of 0.01 M LiTFSI in the IL improves the oxide capacitance from 90 F g-1 to 120 F g-1, which is due to the incorporated Li+ ions promoting Mn valent state variation (between trivalent and tetravalent) during charge-discharge. However, excessive LiTFSI doping causes a capacitance decay due to reduced electrolyte ionic conductivity. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the energy storage mechanism. A capacitance activation process of α-MnO2 in the Li+-doped BMP-DCA IL is found.

  15. Infrared studies of PVC-based electrolytes incorporated with lithium triflate and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate as ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkepeli, Nik A. S. Nik; Winie, Tan; Subban, R. H. Y.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BMIMCF3SO3) is employed as ionic liquid in PVC-based polymer electrolyte system with lithium triflate (LiCF3SO3) as doping salt. The samples in film form were prepared by quantitatively varying the concentration of BMIMCF3SO3 to a fixed ratio of PVC-LiCF3SO3 using solution cast technique. The highest room temperature ionic conductivity of 1.120 × 10-7 Scm-1 was exhibited by PVC-LiCF3SO3-BMIMCF3SO3 containing 3 wt. % BMIMCF3SO3. FTIR spectra of the polymer electrolytes were examined to study the complexation of the PVC-based polymer electrolytes. Intensity of free ions, ion pairs, and ion aggregates were obtained from FTIR deconvolution in an attempt to correlate with ionic conductivity results. The intensity of free ions was found to be high for sample with 3 wt. % BMIMCF3SO3.

  16. One-pot synthesis of SnO{sub 2}/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite in ionic liquid-based solution and its application for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Changdong Zhang, Heng; Wang, Xiuli; Tu, Jiangping

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile and low-temperature method is developed for SnO{sub 2}/graphene composite. • Synthesis performed in a choline chloride-based ionic liquid. • The composite shows an enhanced cycling stability as anode for Li-ion batteries. • 4 nm SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles mono-dispersed on the surface of reduced graphene oxide. - Abstract: A facile and low-temperature method is developed for SnO{sub 2}/graphene composite which involves an ultrasonic-assistant oxidation–reduction reaction between Sn{sup 2+} and graphene oxide in a choline chloride–ethylene glycol based ionic liquid under ambient conditions. The reaction solution is non-corrosive and environmental-friendly. Moreover, the proposed technique does not require complicated infrastructures and heat treatment. The SnO{sub 2}/graphene composite consists of about 4 nm sized SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles with cassiterite structure mono-dispersed on the surface of reduced graphene oxide. As anode for lithium-ion batteries, the SnO{sub 2}/graphene composite shows a satisfying cycling stability (535 mAh g{sup −1} after 50 cycles @100 mA g{sup −1}), which is significantly prior to the bare 4 nm sized SnO{sub 2} nanocrsytals. The graphene sheets in the hybrid nanostructure could provide a segmentation effect to alleviate the volume expansion of the SnO{sub 2} and restrain the small and active Sn-based particles aggregating into larger and inactive clusters during cycling.

  17. Ionic liquid and plastic crystalline phases of pyrazolium imide salts as electrolytes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Lebdeh, Yaser; Abouimrane, Ali; Alarco, Pierre-Jean; Armand, Michel

    A new member of the plastic crystal, pyrazolium imide family, N, N‧-diethyl-3-methylpyrazolium bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (DEMPyr123) was prepared. It showed a single, plastic crystalline phase that extends from 4.2 °C to its melting at 11.3 °C. When 10 mol% LiTFSI salt was added, the mixture showed ionic conductivities reaching 1.7 × 10 -3 S cm -1 at 20 °C, in the liquid state and 6.9 × 10 -4 S cm -1 at 5 °C, in the solid, plastic phase. A wide electrochemical stability window's of 5.5 V was observed by cyclic voltammetry of the molten salt mixture. Batteries were assembled with LiFePO 4/Li 4Ti 5O 12 electrodes and the salt mixture as an electrolyte. They showed a charge/discharge efficiency of 93% and 87% in the liquid and the plastic phase, respectively. The capacity retention was very good in both states with 90% of the initial capacity still available after 40 cycles. In general, the batteries showed good rate capability and cycle life performance in the ionic liquid phase that were sustained when the electrolyte transformed to the plastic phase. Comparison of the battery results with those of a classic (non-plastic crystal) ionic liquid has proven the advantage of the dual state of matter character in this electrolyte.

  18. Ab Initio Simulations and Electronic Structure of Lithium-Doped Ionic Liquids: Structure, Transport, and Electrochemical Stability.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Justin B; Bauschlicher, Charles W; Lawson, John W

    2015-11-19

    Density functional theory (DFT), density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD), and classical molecular dynamics using polarizable force fields (PFF-MD) are employed to evaluate the influence of Li(+) on the structure, transport, and electrochemical stability of three potential ionic liquid electrolytes: N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]). We characterize the Li(+) solvation shell through DFT computations of [Li(Anion)n]((n-1)-) clusters, DFT-MD simulations of isolated Li(+) in small ionic liquid systems, and PFF-MD simulations with high Li-doping levels in large ionic liquid systems. At low levels of Li-salt doping, highly stable solvation shells having two to three anions are seen in both [pyr14][TFSI] and [pyr13][FSI], whereas solvation shells with four anions dominate in [EMIM][BF4]. At higher levels of doping, we find the formation of complex Li-network structures that increase the frequency of four anion-coordinated solvation shells. A comparison of computational and experimental Raman spectra for a wide range of [Li(Anion)n]((n-1)-) clusters shows that our proposed structures are consistent with experiment. We then compute the ion diffusion coefficients and find measures from small-cell DFT-MD simulations to be the correct order of magnitude, but influenced by small system size and short simulation length. Correcting for these errors with complementary PFF-MD simulations, we find DFT-MD measures to be in close agreement with experiment. Finally, we compute electrochemical windows from DFT computations on isolated ions, interacting cation/anion pairs, and liquid-phase systems with Li-doping. For the molecular-level computations, we generally find the difference between ionization energy and electron affinity from isolated ions and interacting cation/anion pairs to

  19. Dendrite-Free Electrodeposition and Reoxidation of Lithium-Sodium Alloy for Metal-Anode Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    Results and Discussion The initial ionic liquid selection was driven by the need to electrodeposit sodium and lithium from the same electrolyte...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Two ionic liquids , EMI-AlCl4 and N1114-TFSI, that support both lithium and sodium deposition/dissolution were studied as... ionic liquids , EMI-AlCl4 and N1114-TFSI, that support both lithium and sodium deposition/dissolution were studied as potential electrolytes for lithium

  20. Liquid-like ionic conduction in solid lithium and sodium monocarba-closo-decaborates near or at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Wan Si; Matsuo, Motoaki; Wu, Hui; ...

    2016-02-05

    Both LiCB9H10 and NaCB9H10 exhibit liquid-like cationic conductivities (≥0.03 S cm–1) in their disordered hexagonal phases near or at room temperature. Furthermore, these unprecedented conductivities and favorable stabilities enabled by the large pseudoaromatic polyhedral anions render these materials in their pristine or further modified forms as promising solid electrolytes in next-generation, power devices.

  1. Janus Solid-Liquid Interface Enabling Ultrahigh Charging and Discharging Rate for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Hou, Yuyang; Duan, Yandong; Song, Xiaohe; Wei, Yi; Liu, Tongchao; Hu, Jiangtao; Guo, Hua; Zhuo, Zengqing; Liu, Lili; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Xiaowei; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Fang, Yanyan; Lin, Yuan; Xu, Kang; Wang, Lin-Wang; Wu, Yuping; Pan, Feng

    2015-09-09

    LiFePO4 has long been held as one of the most promising battery cathode for its high energy storage capacity. Meanwhile, although extensive studies have been conducted on the interfacial chemistries in Li-ion batteries,1-3 little is known on the atomic level about the solid-liquid interface of LiFePO4/electrolyte. Here, we report battery cathode consisted with nanosized LiFePO4 particles in aqueous electrolyte with an high charging and discharging rate of 600 C (3600/600 = 6 s charge time, 1 C = 170 mAh g(-1)) reaching 72 mAh g(-1) energy storage (42% of the theoretical capacity). By contrast, the accessible capacity sharply decreases to 20 mAh g(-1) at 200 C in organic electrolyte. After a comprehensive electrochemistry tests and ab initio calculations of the LiFePO4-H2O and LiFePO4-EC (ethylene carbonate) systems, we identified the transient formation of a Janus hydrated interface in the LiFePO4-H2O system, where the truncated symmetry of solid LiFePO4 surface is compensated by the chemisorbed H2O molecules, forming a half-solid (LiFePO4) and half-liquid (H2O) amphiphilic coordination environment that eases the Li desolvation process near the surface, which makes a fast Li-ion transport across the solid/liquid interfaces possible.

  2. Ozone uptake and formation of reactive oxygen intermediates on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S.; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols (Abbatt, Lee and Thornton, 2012). The effects of particle phase state on the reaction kinetics are still not fully elucidated and cannot be described by classical models assuming a homogeneous condensed phase (Berkemeier et al., 2013). We apply a kinetic multi-layer model, explicitly resolving gas adsorption, condensed phase diffusion and condensed phase chemistry (Shiraiwa et al., 2010), to systematic measurements of ozone uptake onto proxies for secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our findings show how moisture-induced phase changes affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter through change in the physicochemical properties of the substrate: the diffusion coefficients are found to be low under dry conditions, but increase by several orders of magnitude toward higher relative humidity (RH). The solubility of ozone in the dry organic matrix is found to be one order of magnitude higher than in the dilute aqueous solution. The model simulations reveal that at high RH, ozone uptake is mainly controlled by reaction throughout the particle bulk, whereas at low RH, bulk diffusion is retarded severely and reaction at the surface becomes the dominant pathway, with ozone uptake being limited by replenishment of unreacted organic molecules from the bulk phase. The experimental results can only be reconciled including a pathway for ozone self-reaction, which becomes especially important under dry and polluted conditions. Ozone self-reaction can be interpreted as formation and recombination of long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates at the aerosol surface, which could also explain several kinetic parameters and has implications for the health effects of organic aerosol particles. This study hence outlines how kinetic modelling can be used to gain mechanistic insight into the coupling of mass transport, phase changes, and chemical

  3. In situ STM investigation of the lithium underpotential deposition on Au(111) in the air- and water-stable ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto, L H S; Borisenko, N; Bocchi, N; El Abedin, S Zein; Endres, F

    2009-12-21

    In the present paper the underpotential deposition (UPD) of lithium on Au(111) from 0.5 mol L(-1) LiTFSA in the air- and water stable ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, [Py(1,4)]TFSA, has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The pure [Py(1,4)]TFSA was found to be inert in the potential regime investigated. The results show that the lithium UPD on Au(111) in [Py(1,4)]TFSA begins at potentials considerably positive to the electrode potential of bulk deposition and follows a layer-by-layer mechanism with the formation of at least two monolayers. A large number of monoatomically deep pits appear when the potential reaches positive values, which is an indication that a Li-Au alloy was formed.

  4. Lithium nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jobson Lopes de; Silva Júnior, Geraldo Bezerra da; Abreu, Krasnalhia Lívia Soares de; Rocha, Natália de Albuquerque; Franco, Luiz Fernando Leonavicius G; Araújo, Sônia Maria Holanda Almeida; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Lithium has been widely used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Its renal toxicity includes impaired urinary concentrating ability and natriuresis, renal tubular acidosis, tubulointerstitial nephritis progressing to chronic kidney disease and hypercalcemia. The most common adverse effect is nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which affects 20-40% of patients within weeks of lithium initiation. Chronic nephropathy correlates with duration of lithium therapy. Early detection of renal dysfunction should be achieved by rigorous monitoring of patients and close collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists. Recent experimental and clinical studies begin to clarify the mechanisms by which lithium induces changes in renal function. The aim of this study was to review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, histopathological aspects and treatment of lithium-induced nephrotoxicity.

  5. Henry's law solubilities and Śetchenow coefficients for biogenic reduced sulfur species obtained from gas-liquid uptake measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruyn, W. J.; Swartz, E.; Hu, J. H.; Shorter, Jeffrey A.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Kolb, C. E.

    1995-04-01

    Biogenically produced reduced sulfur compounds, including dimethylsulfide (DMS, CH3SCH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS), are a major source of sulfur in the marine atmosphere. This source is estimated to contribute 25-40% of global sulfur emissions. These species and their oxidation products, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2), and methane sulfonic acid (MSA), dominate the production of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the clean marine atmosphere. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion-produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. Using a newly developed bubble column apparatus, a series of aqueous phase uptake studies have been completed for the reduced sulfur species DMS, H2S, CS2, CH3SH, and OCS. Aqueous phase uptake has been studied as a function of temperature (278-298 K), pH (1-14), H2O2 concentration (0-1 M), NaCl concentration (0-5 M), and (NH4)2SO4 concentration (0-4 M). The Henry's law coefficients for CH3SH and CS2 were determined for the first time, as were the Setchenow coefficients for all the species studied.

  6. Self-healing of defects in CaO coatings on V-5%Cr-5%Ti in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1994-11-01

    In-situ electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposure of the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5-85 wt % dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. Examination of the specimens after cooling to room temperature revealed no spallation, but homogeneous crazing cracks were present in the CaO coating. Additional tests to investigate the in-situ self-healing behavior of the cracks indicated that rapid healing occurred at >360{degrees}C.

  7. Femtosecond laser patterning of lithium-ion battery separator materials: impact on liquid electrolyte wetting and cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pröll, J.; Schmitz, B.; Niemöeller, A.; Robertz, B.; Schäfer, M.; Torge, M.; Smyrek, P.; Seifert, H. J.; Pfleging, W.

    2015-03-01

    High capacity Li-ion batteries are composed of alternating stacked cathode and anode layers with thin separator membranes in between for preventing internal shorting. Such batteries can suffer from insufficient cell reliability, safety and electrochemical performance due to poor liquid electrolyte wetting properties. Within the electrolyte filling process, homogeneous wetting of cathode, separator and anode layers is strongly requested due to the fact that insufficient electrolyte wetting of battery components can cause limited capacity under challenging operation or even battery failure. The capacity of the battery is known to be limited by the quantity of wetting of the electrode and separator layers. Therefore, laser structuring processes have recently been developed for forming capillary micro-structures into cathode and anode layers leading to improved wetting properties. Additionally, many efforts have been undertaken to enhance the wettability and safety issues of separator layers, e.g. by applying thin coatings to polymeric base materials. In this paper, we present a rather new approach for ultrafast femtosecond laser patterning of surface coated separator layers. Laser patterning allows the formation of micro-vias and micro-channel structures into thin separator membranes. Liquid electrolyte wetting properties were investigated before and after laser treatment. The electrochemical cyclability of batteries with unstructured and laser-structured separators was tested in order to determine an optimal combination with respect to separator material, functional coating and laser-induced surface topography.

  8. Henry`s law solubilities and Setchenow coefficients for biogenic reduced sulfur species obtained from gas-liquid uptake measurements

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, W.J.; Swartz, E.; Hu, J.H.

    1995-04-20

    Biogenically produced reduced sulfur compounds, including dimethylsulfide (DMS, CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 3}), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}SH), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS), are a major source of sulfur in the marine atmosphere. This source is estimated to contribute 25-40% of global sulfur emissions. These species and their oxidation products, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}), and methane sulfonic acid (MSA), dominate the production of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the clean marine atmosphere. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion-produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. Using a newly developed bubble column apparatus, a series of aqueous phase uptake studies have been completed for the reduced sulfur species DMS, H{sub 2}S, CS{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}SH, and OCS. Aqueous phase uptake has been studied as a function of temperature (278-298 K), pH (1-14), H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration (0-1 M), NaCl concentration (0-5 M), and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration (0-4 M). The Henry`s law coefficients for CH{sub 3}SH and CS{sub 2} were determined for the first time, as were the Setchenow coefficients for all the species studied. 33 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Additive effect of ionic liquids on the electrochemical property of a sulfur composite electrode for all-solid-state lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Shunji; Okuda, Kazuya; Machida, Nobuya; Shigematsu, Toshihiko

    2014-12-01

    We investigated additive effect of five kinds of ionic liquids, such as 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide [EMI][TFSI], 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate [EMI][BF4], 1-buthyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethane- sulfonyl) imide [BMI][TFSI], 1-buthyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate [BMI][BF4], and/or 1-buthyl-3-methyl-imidazolium iodide [BMI][I], on electrochemical properties of the sulfur composite electrode for all-solid-state lithium-sulfur batteries. The sulfur composite electrode that was composed of sulfur (29.9 wt%), vapor-grown carbon fiber (VGCF, 9.9 wt%), solid electrolyte (amorphous Li3PS4, 60.0 wt%), and [EMI][TFSI] (0.2 wt%) showed high initial specific capacity of 1270 mAh g-1 at 25 °C, which was calculated on the base of the weight of sulfur. To construct a laboratory-scale all-solid-state battery, amorphous Li3PS4 and meta-stable Li4.4Si alloy were used as solid electrolyte and as negative electrode materials, respectively. The laboratory-scale all-solid-state battery showed good discharge-charge cycle performance under a constant current density of 0.1 mA cm-2 (24 mA g-1) at room temperature and retained the large specific capacity more than 1230 mAh g-1 even after 50 cycles at 25 °C. The capacity after 50 cycles was about 97% of the initial capacity of the test cell.

  10. A Lithium/Polysulfide Battery with Dual-Working Mode Enabled by Liquid Fuel and Acrylate-Based Gel Polymer Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Ren, Yuxun; Zhou, Dong; Jiang, Haoran; Kang, Feiyu; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-01-25

    The low density associated with low sulfur areal loading in the solid-state sulfur cathode of current Li-S batteries is an issue hindering the development of this type of battery. Polysulfide catholyte as a recyclable liquid fuel was proven to enhance both the energy density and power density of the battery. However, a critical barrier with this lithium (Li)/polysulfide battery is that the shuttle effect, which is the crossover of polysulfides and side deposition on the Li anode, becomes much more severe than that in conventional Li-S batteries with a solid-state sulfur cathode. In this work, we successfully applied an acrylate-based gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) to the Li/polysulfide system. The GPE layer can effectively block the detrimental diffusion of polysulfides and protect the Li metal from the side passivation reaction. Cathode-static batteries utilizing 2 M catholyte (areal sulfur loading of 6.4 mg cm(-2)) present superior cycling stability (727.4 mAh g(-1) after 500 cycles at 0.2 C) and high rate capability (814 mAh g(-1) at 2 C) and power density (∼10 mW cm(-2)), which also possess replaceable and encapsulated merits for mobile devices. In the cathode-flow mode, the Li/polysulfide system with catholyte supplied from an external tank demonstrates further improved power density (∼69 mW cm(-2)) and stable cycling performance. This novel and simple Li/polysulfide system represents a significant advancement of high energy density sulfur-based batteries for future power sources.

  11. Ionic Liquid Hybrid Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Batteries: A Key Role of the Separator-Electrolyte Interface in Battery Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Huie, Matthew M; DiLeo, Roberta A; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2015-06-10

    Batteries are multicomponent systems where the theoretical voltage and stoichiometric electron transfer are defined by the electrochemically active anode and cathode materials. While the electrolyte may not be considered in stoichiometric electron-transfer calculations, it can be a critical factor determining the deliverable energy content of a battery, depending also on the use conditions. The development of ionic liquid (IL)-based electrolytes has been a research area of recent reports by other researchers, due, in part, to opportunities for an expanded high-voltage operating window and improved safety through the reduction of flammable solvent content. The study reported here encompasses a systematic investigation of the physical properties of IL-based hybrid electrolytes including quantitative characterization of the electrolyte-separator interface via contact-angle measurements. An inverse trend in the conductivity and wetting properties was observed for a series of IL-based electrolyte candidates. Test-cell measurements were undertaken to evaluate the electrolyte performance in the presence of functioning anode and cathode materials, where several promising IL-based hybrid electrolytes with performance comparable to that of conventional carbonate electrolytes were identified. The study revealed that the contact angle influenced the performance more significantly than the conductivity because the cells containing IL-tetrafluoroborate-based electrolytes with higher conductivity but poorer wetting showed significantly decreased performance relative to the cells containing IL-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide electrolytes with lower conductivity but improved wetting properties. This work contributes to the development of new IL battery-based electrolyte systems with the potential to improve the deliverable energy content as well as safety of lithium-ion battery systems.

  12. Charge carrier dynamics and relaxation in (polyethylene oxide-lithium-salt)-based polymer electrolyte containing 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide as ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, A; Ghosh, A

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we report the dynamics of charge carriers and relaxation in polymer electrolytes based on polyethylene oxide (PEO), lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPTFSI) ionic liquid prepared by solution cast technique. It has been observed that the incorporation of BMPTFSI into PEO-LiTFSI electrolyte is an effective way for increasing the amorphous phase to a large extent. It has also been observed that both the glass transition and melting temperatures decrease with the increase of BMPTFSI concentration. The ionic conductivity of these polymer electrolytes increases with the increase of BMPTFSI concentration. The highest ionic conductivity obtained at 25 °C is ~3×10(-4) S cm(-1) for the electrolyte containing 60 wt % BMPTFSI and ethylene oxide (EO)/Li ratio of 20. The temperature dependence of the dc conductivity and the hopping frequency show Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher type behavior indicating a strong coupling between the ionic and the polymer chain segmental motions. The frequency dependence of the ac conductivity exhibits a power law with an exponent n which decreases with the increase of temperature. The scaling of the ac conductivity indicates that relaxation dynamics of charge carriers follows a common mechanism for all temperatures and BMPTFSI concentrations. We have also presented the electric modulus data which have been analyzed in the framework of a Havriliak-Negami equation and the shape parameters obtained by the analysis show slight temperature dependence, but change sharply with BMPTFSI concentration. The stretched exponent β obtained from Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts fit to the modulus data is much lower than unity signifying that the relaxation is highly nonexponential. The decay function obtained from analysis of experimental modulus data is highly asymmetric with time.

  13. Li+ transport in lithium sulfonylimide-oligo(ethylene oxide) ionic liquids and oligo(ethylene oxide) doped with LiTFSI.

    PubMed

    Borodin, Oleg; Smith, G D; Geiculescu, Olt; Creager, Stephen E; Hallac, Boutros; DesMarteau, Darryl

    2006-11-30

    The Li+ environment and transport in an ionic liquid (IL) comprised of Li+ and an anion of bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion (TFSI-) tethered to oligoethylene oxide (EO) (EO(12)TFSI-/Li+) were determined and compared to those in a binary solution of the oligoethylene oxide with LiTFSI salt (EO(12)/LiTFSI) by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and AC conductivity measurements. The latter revealed that the AC conductivity is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude less in the IL compared to the oligoether/salt binary electrolyte with greater differences being observed at lower temperatures. The conductivity of these electrolytes was accurately predicted by MD simulations, which were used in conjunction with a microscopic model to determine mechanisms of Li+ transport. It was discerned that structure-diffusion of the Li+ cation in the binary electrolyte (EO(12)/LiTFSI-) was similar to that in EO(12)TFSI-/Li+ IL at high temperature (>363 K), thus, one can estimate conductivity of IL at this temperature range if one knows the structure-diffusion of Li+ in the binary electrolyte. However, the rate of structure-diffusion of Li+ in IL was found to slow more dramatically with decreasing temperature than in the binary electrolyte. Lithium motion together with EO(12) solvent accounted for 90% of Li+ transport in EO(12)/LiTFSI-, while the Li+ motion together with the EO(12)TFSI- anion contributed approximately half to the total Li+ transport but did not contribute to the charge transport in IL.

  14. Charge carrier dynamics and relaxation in (polyethylene oxide-lithium-salt)-based polymer electrolyte containing 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide as ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we report the dynamics of charge carriers and relaxation in polymer electrolytes based on polyethylene oxide (PEO), lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPTFSI) ionic liquid prepared by solution cast technique. It has been observed that the incorporation of BMPTFSI into PEO-LiTFSI electrolyte is an effective way for increasing the amorphous phase to a large extent. It has also been observed that both the glass transition and melting temperatures decrease with the increase of BMPTFSI concentration. The ionic conductivity of these polymer electrolytes increases with the increase of BMPTFSI concentration. The highest ionic conductivity obtained at 25 °C is ˜3×10-4 S cm-1 for the electrolyte containing 60 wt % BMPTFSI and ethylene oxide (EO)/Li ratio of 20. The temperature dependence of the dc conductivity and the hopping frequency show Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher type behavior indicating a strong coupling between the ionic and the polymer chain segmental motions. The frequency dependence of the ac conductivity exhibits a power law with an exponent n which decreases with the increase of temperature. The scaling of the ac conductivity indicates that relaxation dynamics of charge carriers follows a common mechanism for all temperatures and BMPTFSI concentrations. We have also presented the electric modulus data which have been analyzed in the framework of a Havriliak-Negami equation and the shape parameters obtained by the analysis show slight temperature dependence, but change sharply with BMPTFSI concentration. The stretched exponent β obtained from Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts fit to the modulus data is much lower than unity signifying that the relaxation is highly nonexponential. The decay function obtained from analysis of experimental modulus data is highly asymmetric with time.

  15. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  16. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  17. Liquid formulation containing doxorubicin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules: Cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cell line and in vitro uptake mechanism.

    PubMed

    Antonow, Michelli B; Asbahr, Ana Carolina C; Raddatz, Paula; Beckenkamp, Aline; Buffon, Andréia; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is a major public health problem in the world, being breast cancer the most frequent cancer affecting women. Despite advances in detection and treatment, mortality rates remain high. Therefore, new approaches for breast cancer treatments are necessary. In this study, our objective was to develop a liquid formulation containing doxorubicin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (DOX-LNC), to evaluate the in vitro antiproliferative activity and to determine the nanocapsules uptake by MCF-7 cells. Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), blank formulation, and DOX-LNC, proposed treatment, were prepared by self-assembling using the solvent displacement method. Hydrodynamic mean diameters (z-average) were respectively 191±31nm and 230±23nm presenting narrow size distributions. Drug content was 0.102±0.029mgmL(-1) with an encapsulation efficiency higher than 90%. Formulations were applied to semiconfluent MCF-7 cells. After 24h, LNC showed no cytotoxicity, while DOX-LNC showed an IC50 of 4.49 micromolar. After 72h of incubation, DOX-LNC showed an IC50 of 1.60 micromolar demonstrating a sustained effect. The nanocapsules were internalized by endocytosis mediated by caveolin and by fluid phase endocytosis, which are active transport mechanisms. In conclusion, the liquid formulation containing DOX-LNC showed to be a promising product for the breast cancer treatment opening new avenues for further in vivo studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Smart multifunctional fluids for lithium ion batteries: enhanced rate performance and intrinsic mechanical protection.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Tian, Tongfei; Meng, Qing; Guo, Zaiping; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Peng; Ciacchi, Fabio T; Huang, Jewel; Yang, Wenrong

    2013-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries are attractive power sources for the consumer electronics market and are being aggressively developed for road transportation. Nevertheless, issues with safety and reliability need to be solved prior to the large-scale uptake of these batteries. There have recently been significant development and assessment of materials with resistance to mechanical abuse, with the aims of reinforcing the battery and preventing puncturing during a crash. Most of the work on battery mechanical safety has concentrated on the external packaging of batteries, with little attention being paid to the enclosed electrolyte. We report on smart multifunctional fluids that act as both highly conductive electrolytes and intrinsic mechanical protectors for lithium ion batteries. These fluids exhibit a shear thickening effect under pressure or impact and thus demonstrate excellent resistance to crushing. Also, the fluids show higher ionic conductivities and comparable redox stability windows to the commercial liquid electrolytes.

  19. [Lithium nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Ireneusz; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    Lithium salts are the first-line drug therapy in the treatment of uni- and bipolar disorder since the sixties of the twentieth century. In the mid-70s, the first information about their nephrotoxicity appeared. Lithium salts have a narrow therapeutic index. Side effects during treatment are polyuria, polydipsia and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Accidental intoxication can cause acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy while receiving long-term lithium salt can lead to the development of chronic kidney disease. The renal biopsy changes revealed a type of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy. The imaging studies revealed the presence of numerous symmetric microcysts. Care of the patient receiving lithium should include regular determination of serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and monitoring of urine volume. In case of deterioration of renal function reducing the dose should be considered.

  20. Lithium toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lithonate Note: Lithium is also commonly found in batteries, lubricants, high performance metal alloys, and soldering supplies. ... Kidney failure Memory problems Movement disorders Problems ... your body Psychosis (disturbed thought processes, unpredictable ...

  1. Non-volatile polymer electrolyte based on poly(propylene carbonate), ionic liquid, and lithium perchlorate for electrochromic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Chuanxiang; Yee, Wu-Aik; Kong, Junhua; Ding, Guoqiang; Lu, Xuehong

    2013-06-27

    A series of solvent-free ionic liquid (IL)-based polymer electrolytes composed of amorphous and biodegradable poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) host, LiClO4, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM(+)BF4(-)) were prepared and characterized for the first time. FTIR studies reveal that the interaction between PPC chains and imidazolium cations weakens the complexation between PPC chains and Li(+) ions. Thermal analysis (DSC and TGA) results show that the incorporation of BMIM(+)BF4(-) into PPC/LiClO4 remarkably decreases the glass transition temperature and improves the thermal stability of the electrolytes. AC impedance results show that the ionic conductivities of the electrolytes are significantly increased with the increase of BMIM(+)BF4(-) amount, the ambient ionic conductivity of the electrolyte at a PPC/LiClO4/BMIM(+)BF4(-) weight ratio of 1/0.2/3 is 1.5 mS/cm, and the ionic transport behavior follows the Arrhenius equation. Both PPC/LiClO4/BMIM(+)BF4(-) and PPC/BMIM(+)BF4(-) electrolytes were applied in electrochromic devices with polyaniline as the electrochromic layer. The PPC/LiClO4/BMIM(+)BF4(-)-based device exhibits much better electrochromic performance in terms of optical contrast and switching time due to the presence of much smaller cations.

  2. Low-polarization lithium oxygen battery using N,N-diethyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)-N-methylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl) imide (DEMETFSI) ionic liquid electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Ulissi, Ulderico; Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Jeong, Sangsik; Mueller, Franziska; Reiter, Jakub; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Passerini, Stefano; Hassoun, Jusef

    2017-09-29

    The room temperature molten salt mixture of N,N-diethyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)-N-methylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (DEMETFSI) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt is herein reported as electrolyte for application in lithium oxygen batteries. The DEMETFSI-LITFSI solution is studied in terms of ionic conductivity, viscosity, electrochemical stability and compatibility with lithium metal at 30°C, 40°C and 60°C. The electrolyte shows suitable properties for application in lithium oxygen battery, allowing a reversible, low-polarization discharge-charge performance with a capacity of about 13 Ah per gram of carbon in the positive electrode and coulombic efficiency approaching 100%. The reversibility of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR)/oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is demonstrated by ex situ XRD and SEM studies. Furthermore, the study of the cycling behavior of the lithium oxygen cell using the DEMETFSI-LITFSI electrolyte at increasing temperatures (from 30°C to 60°C) evidences enhanced energy efficiency together with morphology changes of the deposit. In addition, the use of carbon-coated Zn0.9Fe0.1O (TMO-C) lithium-conversion anode in an IL-based Li-ion oxygen configuration is preliminarily demonstrated. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias [Westmont, IL; Amine, Khalil [Downers Grove, IL

    2012-01-31

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  4. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2008-06-24

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell system. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plastized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  5. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias [Bolingbrook, IL; Amine, Khalil [Oak Brook, IL

    2011-04-05

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the rotational and translational motions of ionic liquids composed of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts.

    PubMed

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2011-08-28

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium (EMIm, EMI) is a popular and important cation that produces thermally stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoro-methanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO(2)CF(3))(2), TFSA, TFSI, NTf(2), or Tf(2)N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [(N(SO(2)F)(2), FSA, or FSI] were investigated by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. In addition to EMIm-TFSA and EMIm-FSA, lithium-salt-doped binary systems were prepared (EMIm-TFSA-Li and EMIm-FSA-Li). The spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) were measured by (1)H, (19)F, and (7)Li NMR spectroscopy and the correlation times of (1)H NMR, τ(c)(EMIm) (8 × 10(-10) to 3 × 10(-11) s) for the librational molecular motion of EMIm and those of (7)Li NMR, τ(c)(Li) (5 × 10(-9) to 2 × 10(-10) s) for a lithium jump were evaluated in the temperature range between 253 and 353 K. We found that the bulk viscosity (η) versus τ(c)(EMIm) and cation diffusion coefficient D(EMIm) versus the rate 1/τ(c)(EMIm) have good relationships. Similarly, linear relations were obtained for the η versus τ(c)(Li) and the lithium diffusion coefficient D(Li) versus the rate 1∕τ(c)(Li). The mean one-jump distances of Li were calculated from τ(c)(Li) and D(Li). The experimental values for the diffusion coefficients, ionic conductivity, viscosity, and density in our previous paper were analyzed by the Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein, and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations for the neat and binary ILs to clarify the physicochemical properties and mobility of individual ions. The deviations from the classical equations are discussed.

  7. Navy Lithium Battery Safety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-14

    lithium -sulfur dioxide (Li-SO2), lithium - thionyl chloride (Li- SOCL2), and lithium -sulfuryl chloride (Li-S02CL2...and 1980’s with active primary cells: Lithium -sulfur dioxide (Li-SO2) Lithium - thionyl chloride (Li-SOCL2) Lithium -sulfuryl chloride (Li-S0 CL ) 2 2...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. NAVY LITHIUM BATTERY SAFETY John Dow1 and Chris Batchelor2 Naval

  8. Structure, ion transport, and relaxation dynamics of polyethylene oxide/poly (vinylidene fluoride co-hexafluoropropylene)—lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl) imide blend polymer electrolyte embedded with ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Ghosh, A.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied structure, ion transport, and relaxation dynamics in polyethylene oxide/poly (vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene)-lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide blend polymer electrolytes embedded with 1-propyl-3-methyleimidazoliuum bis(trifluromethyle-sulfonyl)imide ionic liquid. Structural property and ion-polymer interaction of polymer electrolytes have been studied using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The addition of ionic liquid decreases glass transition temperature and reduces crystalline phase in the polymer matrix. It is also observed that surface becomes smooth with increase of ionic liquid content. The temperature dependence of the Li ion conductivity follows Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher type behaviour when a sufficient amount of ionic liquid is added to polymer matrix. The electric modulus has been studied using Havriliak-Negami function for the understanding of ion dynamics. The modulus data have been analyzed using non-exponential Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function. It is observed that the non-exponential parameter β is quite lower than unity, suggesting existence of a non-exponential relaxation. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time also follows Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher relation for compositions with higher ionic liquid content.

  9. Lithium nitrate and lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate ammoniates for electrolytes in lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahys, B.; Herlem, M.

    1991-03-01

    The liquid ammonia solutions of lithium nitrate and lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate) have been found to be highly conductive inorganic electrolytes with low vapor pressures. The important phases of the LiNO3-xNH3 solutions (x between values of 1.5 and 3.1) those of the LiSO3CF3-yNH3 solutions (y between values of 1.5 and 3.5) are documented. In addition, the temperature dependence of their conductivities, their electrical stability windows, and their NH3 vapor pressures were determined. In summary, the lithium triflate ammoniate (LiCF3SO3-2NH3) pressures were determined. In summary, the lithium triflate ammoniate (LiCF3SO3-2NH3) remains a liquid down to -10 C. It has an electroactivity range of 3.8 V and a conductivity of 0.0006/ohm per cm at -10 C. The NH3 vapor pressure is less than 1 bar at 60 C. The lithium nitrate ammoniate (LiNO3-2NH3) has an electroactivity range of 3.5 V and a conductivity of 0.025/ohm per cm at 20 C. The freezing point of the nitrate ammoniate is between 3 C and -10 C depending on the stoichiometry. Its NH3 vapor pressure remains below 1 bar up to 40 C. Li/MnO2 batteries were constructed and tested using the above mentioned electrolytes.

  10. Novel polymer electrolyte from poly(carbonate-ether) and lithium tetrafluoroborate for lithium-oxygen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Gao, Yonggang; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Ji; Wang, Xianhong; Wang, Fosong

    2013-11-01

    Novel polymer electrolyte based on low-molecular weight poly(carbonate-ether) and lithium tetrafluoroborate has been prepared and used in lithium-oxygen battery for the first time, the electrolyte with approximate 17% of LiBF4 showed ionic conductivity of 1.57 mS cm-1. Infrared spectra analysis indicates that obvious interaction between the lithium ions and partial oxygen atoms in the host polymer exists, and the lithium salt and the host polymer have good miscibility. The lithium-oxygen battery from this polymer electrolyte shows similar cyclic stability to traditional liquid electrolyte observed by FT-IR, AFM and electrochemical measurements, which may provide a new choice for fabrication of all-solid-state high-capacity rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery with better safety.

  11. A lithium superionic conductor.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-07-31

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10(-2) S cm(-1)) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li(10)GeP(2)S(12) that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window).

  12. A lithium superionic conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-09-01

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10-2 S cm-1) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li10GeP2S12 that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm-1 at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window).

  13. Stable Lithium Deposition Generated from Ceramic-Cross-Linked Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Anode.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chih-Hao; Hsiao, Yang-Hung; Hsu, Chun-Han; Kuo, Ping-Lin

    2016-06-22

    In this work, a composite gel electrolyte comprising ceramic cross-linker and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) matrix is shown to have superior resistance to lithium dendrite growth and be applicable to gel polymer lithium batteries. In contrast to pristine gel electrolyte, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes show good compatibility with liquid electrolytes, wider electrochemical window, and a superior rate and cycling performance. These silica cross-linkers allow the PEO to form the lithium ion pathway and reduce anion mobility. Therefore, the gel not only features lower polarization and interfacial resistance, but also suppresses electrolyte decomposition and lithium corrosion. Further, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes increase the lithium transference number to 0.5, and exhibit superior electrochemical stability up to 5.0 V. Moreover, the lithium cells feature long-term stability and a Coulombic efficiency that can reach 97% after 100 cycles. The SEM image of the lithium metal surface after the cycling test shows that the composite gel electrolyte with 20% silica cross-linker forms a uniform passivation layer on the lithium surface. Accordingly, these features allow this gel polymer electrolyte with ceramic cross-linker to function as a high-performance lithium-ionic conductor and reliable separator for lithium metal batteries.

  14. Space-charge at the lithium-lithium chloride interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamnik, J.; Gaberscek, M.; Meden, A.; Pejovnik, S.

    1991-06-01

    The electrical properties of the passive layer formed on lithium as the product of the corrosion reaction in thionyl chloride are discussed. The passive layer is regarded as a thin layer of an ionic crystal placed between two party blocking electrodes (i.e., lithium and liquid electrolyte). After a short review of thermodynamic properties of the system, a model for description of the electric properties of the static space-charge regions is presented. On this basis, a comment on and partial reinterpretation of impedance measurements of the passive layer is given. The suggested approach leads to the conclusion that the quality of Li/SOCl2 batteries decisively depends on the properties of the lithium passive layer interface. Finally, experiments to confirm the model are suggested.

  15. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-20

    The Early Flight Fission -- Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  16. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  17. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper will discuss the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  18. Hydrogen trapping by yttrium in low-temperature lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Katsuta, H.

    1983-01-01

    A test to determine the lithium compatibility and impurity gettering capabilities of various materials including yttrium was performed in Beryllium-7 Experimental Lithium Loop (7BELL) at 270/sup 0/C. Yttrium coupons were exposed in liquid lithium for a total of 3718 hours. X-ray diffraction and bulk chemical analysis data indicated that yttrium absorbs hydrogen from liquid lithium at 270/sup 0/C and transforms to yttrium dihydride (YH/sub 2/). The transformation of yttrium to YH/sub 2/ resulted in embrittlement of the coupons and subsequent fragmentation to small pieces. Additional analysis, based on the equilibrium hydrogen pressures for the transition of yttrium to HY/sub 2/, and Sievert's relationship for hydrogen in equilibrium with hydrogen in lithium, indicates that the temperature of yttrium cannot exceed 280/sup 0/C to control the hydrogen concentration in lithium at below 1 wt ppM.

  19. Ambient temperature secondary lithium cells containing inorganic electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaikjer, Carl R.

    The history and current status of rechargeable lithium cells using electrolytes based on liquid sulfur dioxide are reviewed. Three separate approaches currently under development include lithium/lithium dithionite/carbon cells with a supporting electrolyte salt; lithium/cupric chloride cells using sulfur dioxide/lithium tetrachloroaluminate; and several adaptations of a lithium/carbon cell using sulfur dioxide/lithium tetrachloroaluminate in which the discharge reaction involves the incorporation of aluminum into the positive electrode. The latter two chemistries have been studied in prototype hardware. For AA size cells with cupric chloride, 157 Whr/1 at 24 W/1 for 230 cycles was reported. For AA size cells containing 2LiCl-CaCl2-4AlCl3-12SO2, energy densities as high as 265 Whr/liter and 100 Whr/kg have been observed, but, at 26 W/1, for only 10 cycles. The advantages and remaining problems are discussed.

  20. Uptake of strontium by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) shrub plants growing over a former liquid waste disposal site at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Foxx, T.S.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    A major concern of managers at low-level waste burial site facilities is that plant roots may translocate contaminants up to the soil surface. This study investigates the uptake of strontium ({sup 90}Sr), a biologically mobile element, by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), a deep-rooted shrub plant, growing in a former liquid waste disposal site (Solid Waste Management Unit [SWMU] 10-003[c]) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Surface soil samples were also collected from below (understory) and between (interspace) shrub canopies. Both chamisa plants growing over SWMU 10-003(c) contained significantly higher concentrations of {sup 90}Sr than a control plant--one plant, in particular, contained 3.35 x 10{sup 6} Bq kg{sup {minus}1} ash (9.05 x 10{sup 4} pCi g{sup {minus}1} ash) in top-growth material. Similarly, soil surface samples collected underneath and between plants contained {sup 90}Sr concentrations above background and LANL screening action levels (> 218 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} dry [5.90 pCi g{sup {minus}1} dry]); this probably occurred as a result of chamisa plant leaf fall contaminating the soil understory area followed by water and/or winds moving {sup 90}Sr to the soil interspace areas. Although some soil surface migration of {sup 90}Sr from SWMU 10-003(c) has occurred, the level of {sup 90}Sr in sediments collected downstream of SWMU 10-003(c) at the LANL boundary was still within regional (background) concentrations.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Lithium Reactions with Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, Roman; Skinner, C. H.; Koel, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Liquid lithium plasma facing components (PFCs) are being developed to handle long pulse, high heat loads in tokamaks. Wetting by lithium of its container is essential for this application, but can be hindered by lithium oxidation by residual gases or during tokamak maintenance. Lithium PFCs will experience elevated temperatures due to plasma heat flux. This work presents measurements of lithium reactions at elevated temperatures (298-373 K) when exposed to natural air. Cylindrical TZM wells 300 microns deep with 1 cm2 surface area were filled with metallic lithium in a glovebox containing argon with less than 1.6 ppm H20, O2, and N2. The wells were transferred to a hot plate in air, and then removed periodically for mass gain measurements. Changes in the surface topography were recorded with a microscope. The mass gain of the samples at elevated temperatures followed a markedly different behavior to that at room temperature. One sample at 373 K began turning red indicative of lithium nitride, while a second turned white indicative of lithium carbonate formation. Data on the mass gain vs. temperature and associated topographic changes of the surface will be presented. Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship funded by Department of Energy.

  2. The Impact Of Lithium Wall Coatings On NSTX Discharges And The Engineering Of The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski, H. Kugel and R. Kaita

    2010-03-18

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown the benefits of solid lithium coatings on carbon PFC's to diverted plasma performance, in both Land H- mode confinement regimes. Better particle control, with decreased inductive flux consumption, and increased electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate were observed. Successive increases in lithium coverage resulted in the complete suppression of ELM activity in H-mode discharges. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD), which will employ the porous molybdenum surface developed for the LTX shell, is being installed on NSTX for the 2010 run period, and will provide comparisons between liquid walls in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) and liquid divertor targets in NSTX. LTX, which recently began operations at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is the world's first confinement experiment with full liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs). All materials and construction techniques in LTX are compatible with liquid lithium. LTX employs an inner, heated, stainless steel-faced liner or shell, which will be lithium-coated. In order to ensure that lithium adheres to the shell, it is designed to operate at up to 500 - 600 oC to promote wetting of the stainless by the lithium, providing the first hot wall in a tokamak to operate at reactor-relevant temperatures. The engineering of LTX will be discussed.

  3. Lithium in 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, estimated world lithium consumption was about 28 kt (31,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, an 8 percent increase from that of 2011. Estimated U.S. consumption was about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, the same as that of 2011. The United States was thought to rank fourth in consumption of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Rockwood Lithium Inc., produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  4. Development of a bipolar cell for electrochemical production of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Mack, G.; Peterman, K.; Weinland, S.; McKenzie, P.

    1995-02-22

    Lithium metal can be electrolytically refined from aqueous solutions of its compounds by partial reduction to form a lithium amalgam, followed by reduction of the amalgam to liquid lithium in a molten salt cell at 225 C. A bipolar cell (with a continuous, amalgam electrode circulating between the aqueous and salt cells) was designed, constructed and successfully tested on the bench scale, as a proof of principle of an efficient, safe and low-temperature alternative to existing processes.

  5. Silica/polyacrylonitrile hybrid nanofiber membrane separators via sol-gel and electrospinning techniques for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanilmaz, Meltem; Lu, Yao; Zhu, Jiadeng; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2016-05-01

    Silica/polyacrylonitrile (SiO2/PAN) hybrid nanofiber membranes were fabricated by using sol-gel and electrospinning techniques and their electrochemical performance was evaluated for use as separators in lithium-ion batteries. The aim of this study was to design high-performance separator membranes with enhanced electrochemical performance and good thermal stability compared to microporous polyolefin membranes. In this study, SiO2 nanoparticle content up to 27 wt% was achieved in the membranes by using sol-gel technique. It was found that SiO2/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes had superior electrochemical performance with good thermal stability due to their high SiO2 content and large porosity. Compared with commercial microporous polyolefin membranes, SiO2/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes had larger liquid electrolyte uptake, higher electrochemical oxidation limit, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. SiO2/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes with different SiO2 contents (0, 16, 19 and 27 wt%) were also assembled into lithium/lithium iron phosphate cells, and high cell capacities and good cycling performance were demonstrated at room temperature. In addition, cells using SiO2/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes with high SiO2 contents showed superior C-rate performance compared to those with low SiO2 contents and commercial microporous polyolefin membrane.

  6. Liquid cathode primary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaikjer, Carl R.

    1985-03-01

    Lithium/liquid cathode/carbon primary batteries offer from 3 to 6 times the volumetric energy density of zinc/alkaline manganese cells, improved stability during elevated temperature storage, satisfactory operation at temperatures from -40 to +150 °C, and efficient discharge at moderate rates. he lithium/sulfur dioxide cell is the most efficient system at temperatures below 0 °C. Although chemical reactions leading to electrolyte degradation and lithium corrosion are known, the rates of these reactions are slow. While the normal temperature cell reaction produces lithium dithionite, discharge at 60 °C leads to a reduction in capacity due to side reactions involving sulfur dioxide and discharge intermediates. Lithium/thionyl chloride and lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells have the highest practical gravimetric and volumetric energy densities when compared with aqueous and most other nonaqueous systems. For thionyl chloride, discharge proceeds through a series of intermediates to sulfur, sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride. Catalysis, leading to improved rate capability and capacity, has been achieved. The causes of rapid reactions leading to thermal runaway are thought to be chemical in nature. Lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells, which produce sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride on discharge, experience more extensive anode corrosion. An inorganic cosolvent and suitable salt are capable of alleviating this corrosion. Calcium/oxyhalide cells have been studied because of their promise of increased safety without substantial sacrifice of energy density relative to lithium cells. Anode corrosion, particularly during discharge, has delayed practical development.

  7. LiTFSI in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide: a possible electrolyte for ionic liquid based lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Abhishek; Schubert, Thomas J S; Iliev, Boyan; Endres, Frank

    2015-05-07

    In this communication, we show that the combination of 1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide (LiTFSI/[Py1,4]FSI) can be regarded as a possible stable electrolyte for IL based lithium ion batteries. We compare the charge-discharge results with the electrolyte 1 M LiTFSI in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([Py1,4]TFSI) on an electrodeposited Ge electrode and show using a charge-discharge analysis and Raman spectroscopy that 1 M LiTFSI/[Py1,4]FSI is advantageous in maintaining the charge capacity as well as electrolyte stability at high current densities.

  8. Poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) separator for improving the heat resistance and power density of lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yin; Xu, Tiange; John, Angelin Ebanezar; Li, Yang; Li, Weishan; Zhu, Baoku

    2016-10-01

    A microporous poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) (PMIA) separator with high safety (high-heat resistance and self extinguishing), high porosity and excellent liquid electrolyte wettability was prepared by the traditional nonsolvent introduced phase separation process. Due to the high-heat resistance of PMIA material, the as-prepared separator exhibited a negligible thermal shrank ratio at 160 °C for 1 h. Meanwhile, benefiting from its high porosity and excellent wettability in liquid electrolyte, the liquid electrolyte uptake and the ionic conductivity of the separator were higher than that of the commercial PP-based separators. Furthermore, the cell assembled with this separator showed better cycling performance and superior rate capacity compared to those with PP-based separators. These results suggested that the PMIA separator is very attractive for high-heat resistance and high-power density lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Decoupling of dynamic processes in surfactant-based liquid mixtures: the case of lithium-containing bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid/bis(2-ethylhexyl)amine systems.

    PubMed

    Nicotera, Isabella; Oliviero Rossi, Cesare; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo; Calandra, Pietro

    2014-07-22

    Pure surfactant liquids and their binary mixtures, because of the amphiphilic nature of the molecules involved, can exhibit nanosegregation and peculiar transport properties. The idea that inspired this work is that the possibility of including in such media salts currently used for technological applications should lead to a synergy between the properties of the salt and those of the medium. Therefore, the dynamic features of bis(2-ethylhexyl)amine (BEEA) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) liquid mixtures were investigated as a function of composition and temperature by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and rheometry. Inclusion of litium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiT) has been investigated by infrared spectroscopy, pulsed field gradient NMR, and conductimetry methods to highlight the solubilizing and confining properties of these mixtures as well as the lithium conductivity. It was found that BEEA/HDEHP binary liquid mixtures show zero-threshold percolating self-assembly with a maximum in viscosity and a minimum in molecular diffusion at a 1:1 composition. Dissolution of LiT in such system can occur via confinement in the locally self-assembled polar domains. Despite this confinement, Li(+) conduction is scarcely dependent on the medium composition because of the possibility of a field-induced hopping decoupled by the structural and dynamical features of the medium.

  10. Studies on the translational and rotational motions of ionic liquids composed of N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13) cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts.

    PubMed

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Fujii, Kenta; Suenaga, Masahiko; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2010-11-21

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL, IL) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P(13), Py(13), PYR(13), or mppy) is an important cation and produces stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO(2)CF(3))(2), TFSA, TFSI, NTf(2), or Tf(2)N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [N(SO(2)F)(2), FSA, or FSI], were investigated. In addition to P(13)-TFSA and P(13)-FSA, lithium salt doped samples were prepared (P(13)-TFSA-Li and P(13)-FSA-Li). The individual ion diffusion coefficients (D) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) were measured by (1)H, (19)F, and (7)Li NMR. At the same time, the ionic conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and density (ρ) were measured over a wide temperature range. The van der Waals volumes of P(13), TFSA, FSA, Li(TFSA)(2), and Li(FSA)(3) were estimated by molecular orbital calculations. The experimental values obtained in this study were analyzed by the classical Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein (NE), and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations and Walden plots were also made for the neat and binary ILs to clarify physical and mobile properties of individual ions. From the temperature-dependent velocity correlation coefficients for neat P(13)-TFSA and P(13)-FSA, the NE parameter 1-ξ was evaluated. The ionicity (electrochemical molar conductivity divided by the NE conductivity from NMR) and the 1-ξ had exactly the same values. The rotational and translational motions of P(13) and jump of a lithium ion are also discussed.

  11. Studies on the translational and rotational motions of ionic liquids composed of N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13) cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Fujii, Kenta; Suenaga, Masahiko; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL, IL) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13, Py13, PYR13, or mppy) is an important cation and produces stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO2CF3)2, TFSA, TFSI, NTf2, or Tf2N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [N(SO2F)2, FSA, or FSI], were investigated. In addition to P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, lithium salt doped samples were prepared (P13-TFSA-Li and P13-FSA-Li). The individual ion diffusion coefficients (D) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured by H1, F19, and L7i NMR. At the same time, the ionic conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and density (ρ) were measured over a wide temperature range. The van der Waals volumes of P13, TFSA, FSA, Li(TFSA)2, and Li(FSA)3 were estimated by molecular orbital calculations. The experimental values obtained in this study were analyzed by the classical Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein (NE), and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations and Walden plots were also made for the neat and binary ILs to clarify physical and mobile properties of individual ions. From the temperature-dependent velocity correlation coefficients for neat P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, the NE parameter 1-ξ was evaluated. The ionicity (electrochemical molar conductivity divided by the NE conductivity from NMR) and the 1-ξ had exactly the same values. The rotational and translational motions of P13 and jump of a lithium ion are also discussed.

  12. Hybrid Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with a Solid Electrolyte Membrane and Lithium Polysulfide Catholyte.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xingwen; Bi, Zhonghe; Zhao, Feng; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-08-05

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are receiving great attention as the most promising next-generation power source with significantly high charge-storage capacity. However, the implementation of Li-S batteries is hampered by a critical challenge because of the soluble nature of the intermediate polysulfide species in the liquid electrolyte. The use of traditional porous separators unavoidably allows the migration of the dissolved polysulfide species from the cathode to the lithium-metal anode and results in continuous loss of capacity. In this study, a LiSICON (lithium super ionic conductor) solid membrane is used as a cation-selective electrolyte for lithium-polysulfide (Li-PS) batteries to suppress the polysulfide diffusion. Ionic conductivity issue at the lithium metal/solid electrolyte interface is successfully addressed by insertion of a "soft", liquid-electrolyte integrated polypropylene interlayer. The solid LiSICON lithium-ion conductor maintains stable ionic conductivity during the electrochemical cycling of the cells. The Li-PS battery system with a hybrid solid/liquid electrolyte exhibits significantly enhanced cyclability relative to the cells with the traditional liquid-electrolyte integrated porous separator.

  13. Medium-Sized Mammals around a Radioactive Liquid Waste Lagoon at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Uptake of Contaminants and Evaluation of Radio-Frequency Identification Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie A. Hansen; Phil R. Fresquez; Rhonda J. Robinson; John D. Huchton; Teralene S. Foxx

    1999-11-01

    Use of a radioactive liquid waste lagoon by medium-sized mammals and levels of tritium, other selected radionuclides, and metals in biological tissues of the animals were documented at Technical Area 53 (TA-53) of Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1997 and 1998. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegates), raccoon (Procyon lotor), striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) were captured at TA-53 and at a control site on the Santa Fe National Forest. Captured animals were anesthetized and marked with radio-frequency identification (RFD) tags and/or ear tags. We collected urine and hair samples for tritium and metals (aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium) analyses, respectively. In addition, muscle and bone samples from two rock squirrels collected from each of TA-53, perimeter, and regional background sites were tested for tritium, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and total uranium. Animals at TA-53 were monitored entering and leaving the lagoon area using a RFID monitor to read identification numbers from the RFID tags of marked animals and a separate camera system to photograph all animals passing through the monitor. Cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus spp.), rock squirrel, and raccoon were the species most frequently photographed going through the RFID monitor. Less than half of all marked animals in the lagoon area were detected using the lagoon. Male and female rock squirrels from the lagoon area had significantly higher tritium concentrations compared to rock squirrels from the control area. Metals tested were not significantly higher in rock squirrels from TA-53, although there was a trend toward increased levels of lead in some individuals at TA-53. Muscle and bone samples from squirrels in the lagoon area appeared to have higher levels of tritium, total uranium, and {sup 137}Cs than samples collected from perimeter and

  14. Thermally-responsive, nonflammable phosphonium ionic liquid electrolytes for lithium metal batteries: operating at 100 degrees celsius† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed ionic liquids synthesis, characterization, conductivity, cyclic voltammetry, battery cycling and those of other compositions; SEM images; energy density calculation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc01518a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, X.; Kavian, R.; Lu, Y.; Hu, Q.; Shao-Horn, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable batteries such as Li ion/Li metal batteries are widely used in the electronics market but the chemical instability of the electrolyte limits their use in more demanding environmental conditions such as in automotive, oil exploration, or mining applications. In this study, a series of alkyl phosphonium ionic liquid electrolyte are described with high thermal stability and solubility for LiTFSI. A lithium metal battery (LMB) containing a tailored phosphonium ionic liquid/LiTFSI electrolyte operates at 100 °C with good specific capacities and cycling stability. Substantial capacity is maintained during 70 cycles or 30 days. Instant on-off battery operation is realized via the significant temperature dependence of the electrolyte material, demonstrating the robustness and potential for use at high temperature. PMID:28757963

  15. Lithium-associated hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Siyam, Fadi F; Deshmukh, Sanaa; Garcia-Touza, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Goiters and hypothyroidism are well-known patient complications of the use of lithium for treatment of bipolar disease. However, the occurrence of lithium-induced hyperthyroidism is a more rare event. Many times, the condition can be confused with a flare of mania. Monitoring through serial biochemical measurement of thyroid function is critical in patients taking lithium. Hyperthyroidism induced by lithium is a condition that generally can be controlled medically without the patient having to discontinue lithium therapy, although in some circumstances, discontinuation of lithium therapy may be indicated. We report on a patient case of lithium-associated hyperthyroidism that resolved after discontinuation of the medication.

  16. Honeycomb-like porous gel polymer electrolyte membrane for lithium ion batteries with enhanced safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Huang, Xiaodan; Chen, Shuangqiang; Wang, Guoxiu

    2014-08-01

    Lithium ion batteries have shown great potential in applications as power sources for electric vehicles and large-scale energy storage. However, the direct uses of flammable organic liquid electrolyte with commercial separator induce serious safety problems including the risk of fire and explosion. Herein, we report the development of poly(vinylidene difluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) polymer membranes with multi-sized honeycomb-like porous architectures. The as-prepared polymer electrolyte membranes contain porosity as high as 78%, which leads to the high electrolyte uptake of 86.2 wt%. The PVDF-HFP gel polymer electrolyte membranes exhibited a high ionic conductivity of 1.03 mS cm-1 at room temperature, which is much higher than that of commercial polymer membranes. Moreover, the as-obtained gel polymer membranes are also thermally stable up to 350°C and non-combustible in fire (fire-proof). When applied in lithium ion batteries with LiFePO4 as cathode materials, the gel polymer electrolyte demonstrated excellent electrochemical performances. This investigation indicates that PVDF-HFP gel polymer membranes could be potentially applicable for high power lithium ion batteries with the features of high safety, low cost and good performance.

  17. Honeycomb-like porous gel polymer electrolyte membrane for lithium ion batteries with enhanced safety

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Huang, Xiaodan; Chen, Shuangqiang; Wang, Guoxiu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have shown great potential in applications as power sources for electric vehicles and large-scale energy storage. However, the direct uses of flammable organic liquid electrolyte with commercial separator induce serious safety problems including the risk of fire and explosion. Herein, we report the development of poly(vinylidene difluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) polymer membranes with multi-sized honeycomb-like porous architectures. The as-prepared polymer electrolyte membranes contain porosity as high as 78%, which leads to the high electrolyte uptake of 86.2 wt%. The PVDF-HFP gel polymer electrolyte membranes exhibited a high ionic conductivity of 1.03 mS cm−1 at room temperature, which is much higher than that of commercial polymer membranes. Moreover, the as-obtained gel polymer membranes are also thermally stable up to 350°C and non-combustible in fire (fire-proof). When applied in lithium ion batteries with LiFePO4 as cathode materials, the gel polymer electrolyte demonstrated excellent electrochemical performances. This investigation indicates that PVDF-HFP gel polymer membranes could be potentially applicable for high power lithium ion batteries with the features of high safety, low cost and good performance. PMID:25168687

  18. Honeycomb-like porous gel polymer electrolyte membrane for lithium ion batteries with enhanced safety.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Huang, Xiaodan; Chen, Shuangqiang; Wang, Guoxiu

    2014-08-29

    Lithium ion batteries have shown great potential in applications as power sources for electric vehicles and large-scale energy storage. However, the direct uses of flammable organic liquid electrolyte with commercial separator induce serious safety problems including the risk of fire and explosion. Herein, we report the development of poly(vinylidene difluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) polymer membranes with multi-sized honeycomb-like porous architectures. The as-prepared polymer electrolyte membranes contain porosity as high as 78%, which leads to the high electrolyte uptake of 86.2 wt%. The PVDF-HFP gel polymer electrolyte membranes exhibited a high ionic conductivity of 1.03 mS cm(-1) at room temperature, which is much higher than that of commercial polymer membranes. Moreover, the as-obtained gel polymer membranes are also thermally stable up to 350 °C and non-combustible in fire (fire-proof). When applied in lithium ion batteries with LiFePO4 as cathode materials, the gel polymer electrolyte demonstrated excellent electrochemical performances. This investigation indicates that PVDF-HFP gel polymer membranes could be potentially applicable for high power lithium ion batteries with the features of high safety, low cost and good performance.

  19. Recent developments and future prospects for lithium rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, A. G.

    Possible future developments of lithium rechargeable batteries are discussed. Lithium ion liquid electrolyte batteries are now well established, with energy densities of up to around 150 Wh kg -1. There are prospects of increases in the energy density to perhaps 200-250 Wh kg -1 by using new cathode materials (lithium nickel cobalt oxide) and light weight construction. High power cells make it possible for these batteries to find new uses, e.g. in military applications. Some new materials could reduce the cost, which might make lithium rechargeable batteries economic for electric vehicles.

  20. Heteroaromatic-based electrolytes for lithium and lithium-ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Gang; Abraham, Daniel P.

    2017-04-18

    The present invention provides an electrolyte for lithium and/or lithium-ion batteries comprising a lithium salt in a liquid carrier comprising heteroaromatic compound including a five-membered or six-membered heteroaromatic ring moiety selected from the group consisting of a furan, a pyrazine, a triazine, a pyrrole, and a thiophene, the heteroaromatic ring moiety bearing least one carboxylic ester or carboxylic anhydride substituent bound to at least one carbon atom of the heteroaromatic ring. Preferred heteroaromatic ring moieties include pyridine compounds, pyrazine compounds, pyrrole compounds, furan compounds, and thiophene compounds.

  1. Selective Recovery of Lithium from Cathode Materials of Spent Lithium Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Akitoshi; Ankei, Naoki; Nishihama, Syouhei; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu

    2016-10-01

    Selective recovery of lithium from four kinds of cathode materials, manganese-type, cobalt-type, nickel-type, and ternary-type, of spent lithium ion battery was investigated. In all cathode materials, leaching of lithium was improved by adding sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) as an oxidant in the leaching solution, while the leaching of other metal ions (manganese, cobalt, and nickel) was significantly suppressed. Optimum leaching conditions, such as pH, temperature, amount of Na2S2O8, and solid/liquid ratio, for the selective leaching of lithium were determined for all cathode materials. Recovery of lithium from the leachate as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) was then successfully achieved by adding sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) to the leachate. Optimum recovery conditions, such as pH, temperature, and amount of Na2CO3, for the recovery of lithium as Li2CO3 were determined for all cases. Purification of Li2CO3 was achieved by lixiviation in all systems, with purities of the Li2CO3 higher than 99.4%, which is almost satisfactory for the battery-grade purity of lithium.

  2. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  3. Thermal and structural study of the crystal phases and mesophases in the lithium and thallium(i) propanoates and pentanoates binary systems: formation of mixed salts and stabilization of the ionic liquid crystal phase.

    PubMed

    Martínez Casado, F J; Ramos Riesco, M; da Silva, I; Labrador, A; Redondo, M I; García Pérez, M V; López-Andrés, S; Rodríguez Cheda, J A

    2010-08-12

    The temperature and enthalpy vs composition phase diagrams of the binary systems [xC(2)H(5)CO(2)Li + (1 - x)C(2)H(5)CO(2)Tl], and [x(n-C(4)H(9)CO(2)Li) + (1 - x)n-C(4)H(9)CO(2)Tl], where x is the mole fraction, were determined by DSC. Both binary systems display the formation of one 2:1 mixed salt each (at x = 0.667) that appear as a peritectic (incongruent melting) at T(fus) = 512.0 K, and T(fus) = 461.1 K, with Delta(fus)H(m) = 13.76 and 8.08 kJ.mol(-1) for Li-Tl (I) propanoates, and n-pentanoate mixed salts, respectively. The thermotropic liquid crystal of the thallium(I) n-pentanoate transforms into a more stable liquid-crystal phase, which appears in the phase diagram between 380 and 488 K and for x = 0 up to x = 0.56. The crystal structure of thallium(I) propanoate and of the two mixed salts were obtained via X-ray synchrotron radiation diffraction measurements. These compounds present a bilayered structure similar to the two pure lithium salts previously found by our group.

  4. Mechanisms of enhanced lithium intercalation into thin film V2O5 in ionic liquids investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Luis; Światowska, Jolanta; Lair, Virginie; Zanna, Sandrine; Seyeux, Antoine; Melendez-Ceballos, Arturo; Tran-Van, Pierre; Cassir, Michel; Marcus, Philippe

    2017-10-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) attract much attention as a new type of environmentally benign electrolytes for Li-ion batteries due to their numerous interesting physicochemical properties. Here, in this paper, Li intercalation/deintercalation in presence of the N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (PYR14TFSI) and N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (PYR13FSI) containing 0.3 M LiTFSI, was evaluated in a thin 100 nm layer of V2O5 deposited on Al substrate by atomic layer deposition. Potentiodynamic tests performed in LiTFSI/Pyr14TFSI show a quasi-reversible Li intercalation during 10 cycles (between 2.4 and 5 V) with an average coulombic efficiency of 99%. The capacity, calculated from the 1st cycle, is found to be 182 mAh g-1, about 19% (±2%) higher than the theoretical capacity reported for V2O5 (147 mAh g-1). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirms that the intercalation of more than 1 mol of Li+ per V2O5 is achieved as also the possible presence of a solid permeable interface (SPI) layer on the V2O5 surface. Likewise, the Li+ in-depth distribution on the V2O5 layer after intercalation in RTILs measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry ion depth profiles, show small irreversible electrode modifications with the presence of lithium through the entire V2O5 layer with significant lithium trapping at the V2O5 layer/Al substrate interface.

  5. Thermochemistry of tantalum-wall cooling system with lithium and sodium working fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, L. K.

    1972-01-01

    Plots are presented which show the distribution of oxygen between liquid lithium and tantalum or niobium, and between liquid sodium and tantalum at elevated temperatures. Additional plots showing the composition of the gas phase above the solutions of oxygen and alkali metal are presented. The use of the plots is illustrated by an example tantalum heat pipe filled with lithium.

  6. Acetazolamide Attenuates Lithium-Induced Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Theun; Sinke, Anne P; Kortenoeven, Marleen L A; Alsady, Mohammad; Baumgarten, Ruben; Devuyst, Olivier; Loffing, Johannes; Wetzels, Jack F; Deen, Peter M T

    2016-07-01

    To reduce lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (lithium-NDI), patients with bipolar disorder are treated with thiazide and amiloride, which are thought to induce antidiuresis by a compensatory increase in prourine uptake in proximal tubules. However, thiazides induced antidiuresis and alkalinized the urine in lithium-NDI mice lacking the sodium-chloride cotransporter, suggesting that inhibition of carbonic anhydrases (CAs) confers the beneficial thiazide effect. Therefore, we tested the effect of the CA-specific blocker acetazolamide in lithium-NDI. In collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells, acetazolamide reduced the cellular lithium content and attenuated lithium-induced downregulation of aquaporin-2 through a mechanism different from that of amiloride. Treatment of lithium-NDI mice with acetazolamide or thiazide/amiloride induced similar antidiuresis and increased urine osmolality and aquaporin-2 abundance. Thiazide/amiloride-treated mice showed hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypercalcemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased serum lithium concentrations, adverse effects previously observed in patients but not in acetazolamide-treated mice in this study. Furthermore, acetazolamide treatment reduced inulin clearance and cortical expression of sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 and attenuated the increased expression of urinary PGE2 observed in lithium-NDI mice. These results show that the antidiuresis with acetazolamide was partially caused by a tubular-glomerular feedback response and reduced GFR. The tubular-glomerular feedback response and/or direct effect on collecting duct principal or intercalated cells may underlie the reduced urinary PGE2 levels with acetazolamide, thereby contributing to the attenuation of lithium-NDI. In conclusion, CA activity contributes to lithium-NDI development, and acetazolamide attenuates lithium-NDI development in mice similar to thiazide/amiloride but with fewer adverse effects.

  7. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  8. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  9. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  10. Liquid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, J.; Mizuhashi, M.; Kamimori, T.

    1990-12-31

    In contrast to lithium batteries, the electrochromic windows are used under the sunlight, which requires the stability against UV-light, in addition to the usual electrochemical and thermal stabilities. Thus, the selection of the electrode materials and the combination with the electrolytes should be carefully performed in terms of stability requirements. Recently many reports in relation to those subjects were published. Therefore only fundamental properties of liquid electrolytes required for the electrochromic research are reviewed in this chapter.

  11. Stabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2000-08-07

    The stabilization theory of free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks by liquid lithium streams driven by magnetic propulsion is formulated. While the conventional, wall-locked, resistive wall mode can be well suppressed by the flow, a new, stream-locked mode determines the limits of the flow stabilization.

  12. CaO insulator coatings and self-healing of defects on V-Cr-Ti alloys in liquid lithium system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1995-09-01

    Electrically insulating and corrosion-resistant coatings are required at the liquid metal/structural interface in fusion first-wall/blanket applications. Electrical resistance of CaO coatings that were produced on V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposure of the alloy to liquid Li containing 0.5-85 wt.% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. The solute element, Ca in liquid Li, reacted with the alloy substrate at 400-420{degrees}C to produce a CaO coating. Resistance of the coating layer measured in-situ in liquid Li was {approx}10{sup 6} {Omega} at 400{degrees}C. Thermal cycling between 300 and 700{degrees}C changed the coating layer resistance, which followed insulator behavior. These results suggest that thin homogeneous coatings can be produced on variously shaped surfaces by controlling the exposure time, temperature, and composition of the liquid metal. The technique can be applied to various shapes (e.g., inside/outside of tubes, complex geometrical shapes) because the coating is formed by liquid-phase reaction. Examination of the specimens after cooling to room temperature revealed no spallation, but homogeneous crazing cracks were present in the CaO coating. Additional tests to investigate the in-situ self-healing behavior of the cracks indicated that rapid healing occurred at {>=}360{degrees}C.

  13. Initial Lithium Capabilities for NSTX-U and Plans for Mitigating Associated Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaita, R.; Blanchard, W.; Cai, D.; Jaworski, M.; Lunsford, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Schneider, H.; Cadwallader, L.

    2015-11-01

    The effect on plasma performance of lithium plasma-facing components (PFCs) is an important research focus on NSTX-U. Lithium evaporators (LITERs) are mounted at two upper dome locations to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region. The introduction of lithium into NSTX-U will also be conducted by the injection of small granules from a lithium granule injector (LGI). The main risk for the LITERs and the LGI is commensurate to the state of the lithium. The lithium used in the LGI is in the form of solid, micron-sized granules, and relatively few granules would enter NSTX-U should any possible failure modes occur. Each LITER, however, can operate with up to 80 grams of liquid lithium. The PFC water-cooling lines will thus be emptied during lithium operations, to prevent exposure of liquid lithium to water if there is a simultaneous LITER structural failure and a water leak. If there is a simultaneous LITER structural failure and a large air leak, the graphite PFCs could then be subject to high heat from rapid lithium oxidation. The likelihood that it would cause serious PFC damage is being evaluated. A mitigation scheme is a gas purge system that fills the vacuum vessel with argon should there be a significant pressure excursion when the lithium is at elevated temperature. Work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separate experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.

  15. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; ...

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separatemore » experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.« less

  16. Lithium and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Lithium and Pregnancy Saturday, 20 September 2014 In every ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to lithium may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  17. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  18. A review of lithium and non-lithium based solid state batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Gon; Son, Byungrak; Mukherjee, Santanu; Schuppert, Nicholas; Bates, Alex; Kwon, Osung; Choi, Moon Jong; Chung, Hyun Yeol; Park, Sam

    2015-05-01

    Conventional lithium-ion liquid-electrolyte batteries are widely used in portable electronic equipment such as laptop computers, cell phones, and electric vehicles; however, they have several drawbacks, including expensive sealing agents and inherent hazards of fire and leakages. All solid state batteries utilize solid state electrolytes to overcome the safety issues of liquid electrolytes. Drawbacks for all-solid state lithium-ion batteries include high resistance at ambient temperatures and design intricacies. This paper is a comprehensive review of all aspects of solid state batteries: their design, the materials used, and a detailed literature review of various important advances made in research. The paper exhaustively studies lithium based solid state batteries, as they are the most prevalent, but also considers non-lithium based systems. Non-lithium based solid state batteries are attaining widespread commercial applications, as are also lithium based polymeric solid state electrolytes. Tabular representations and schematic diagrams are provided to underscore the unique characteristics of solid state batteries and their capacity to occupy a niche in the alternative energy sector.

  19. Quantification of new antiepileptic drugs by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and its application to cellular uptake experiment using human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Ayako; Kobayashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Ayako; Takamura, Shigeo; Narumi, Katsuya; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-10-01

    A method for quantification of new antiepileptic drugs, including lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM), in cellular samples, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed to better understand the membrane transport mechanisms of these drugs. Cell lysate was deproteinized by methanol containing LEV-d3 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with methanol-water-formic acid (10:90:0.1, v/v/v) and methanol-formic acid (100:0.1, v/v). Analytes were detected in positive ion electrospray mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM). This method was applicable for a linear range of 5 to 500pmol for LTG; 5 to 1000pmol for LEV; 10 to 10,000pmol for GBP; and 5 to 5000pmol for TPM. The intra-day precision, inter-day precision, and accuracy data were assessed and found to be acceptable. This developed and validated method was then successfully applied to the investigation of uptake of the new antiepileptic drugs in placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells. The intracellular concentration of these drugs in BeWo cells, accumulating over 30min at 37°C was in the order of GBP>LTG>LEV≈TPM. Furthermore, the uptake of GBP at 4°C was much lower than that at 37°C. The uptake of GBP was saturated at high concentrations. The kinetic parameters calculated for GBP uptake in BeWo cells were determined as Km of 105.4±6.4μM and Vmax at 8153±348pmol/mg protein/min. The novel method described here should enable investigators to elucidate the transport mechanisms of these antiepileptic drugs in BeWo cells.

  20. Magnetic diagnostics for the lithium tokamak experiment.

    PubMed

    Berzak, L; Kaita, R; Kozub, T; Majeski, R; Zakharov, L

    2008-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R(0)=0.4 m, a=0.26 m, B(TF) approximately 3.4 kG, I(P) approximately 400 kA, and pulse length approximately 0.25 s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions.

  1. Lithium Cell Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Page 1. INVESTIGATION OF CHEMICAL, ELECTROCHEMICAL AND PARASITIC REACTIONS IN LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLS ....... ................. 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION...OF LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLS. ................ 56 1.4.1 Carbon Limited Overdischarge...............56 1.4.1.1 Background... LITHIUM THIONYL - CHLORIDE CELLS. .. ............ ...... 101 1.5.1 Background. ....... ............ .... 101 1.5.2 Microphotography

  2. Reversible uptake of COS, CS2 and SO2; Ionic liquids with O-alkylxanthate, O-alkylthiocarbonate, and O-alkylsulfite anions

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Yonker, Clement R.; Jessop, Philip G.; Phan, Lam

    2009-08-14

    Further development of CO2 binding organic liquids to capture and release carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide and sulfur dioxide. This paper investigates a brand new class of ionic liquids which have potential as chemical sensors for acid gas capture. Applications to flue gas scrubbing are discussed with an emphasis on capture and release of COS, CS2 and SO2 with amidine and guanidine bases with alcohols. Formal spectroscopic characterization is presented.

  3. Lithium Batteries: A Practical Application of Chemical Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treptow, Richard S.

    2003-09-01

    In recent years batteries have emerged in the marketplace that take advantage of the unique properties of lithium. Lithium metal is an attractive choice to serve as a battery anode because it is easily oxidized and it produces an exceptionally high amount of electrical charge per unit-weight. The electrolytes used in lithium batteries contain lithium salts dissolved in polar organic solvents. A variety of substances can serve as the battery cathode. They include inorganic solids, liquids, and dissolved gas. The cell potentials of lithium-metal batteries can be calculated from thermodynamic principles. These open-circuit voltages can be compared to the operating voltages of batteries delivering a current. Some lithium batteries employ intercalation compounds as their cathodes. These solids have layered or tunneled crystal structures into which lithium ions insert during the reduction process. When an intercalation cathode is paired with a lithiated-graphite anode, the resulting battery has the advantage of being rechargeable. It is known as a lithium-ion battery because no lithium metal is present.

  4. Lithium use in batteries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection for the quantification of fluoride in lithium ion battery electrolytes and in ionic liquids-A comparison to the results gained with a fluoride ion-selective electrode.

    PubMed

    Pyschik, Marcelina; Klein-Hitpaß, Marcel; Girod, Sabrina; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-02-01

    In this study, an optimized method using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with a direct contactless conductivity detector (C(4) D) for a new application field is presented for the quantification of fluoride in common used lithium ion battery (LIB) electrolyte using LiPF6 in organic carbonate solvents and in ionic liquids (ILs) after contacted to Li metal. The method development for finding the right buffer and the suitable CE conditions for the quantification of fluoride was investigated. The results of the concentration of fluoride in different LIB electrolyte samples were compared to the results from the ion-selective electrode (ISE). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) and recovery rates for fluoride were obtained with a very high accuracy in both methods. The results of the fluoride concentration in the LIB electrolytes were in very good agreement for both methods. In addition, the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values were determined for the CE method. The CE method has been applied also for the quantification of fluoride in ILs. In the fresh IL sample, the concentration of fluoride was under the LOD. Another sample of the IL mixed with Li metal has been investigated as well. It was possible to quantify the fluoride concentration in this sample. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. High Voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li4Ti5O12 Lithium Ion Cells at Elevated Temperatures: Carbonate- versus Ionic Liquid-Based Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xia; He, Xin; Wang, Jun; Liu, Haidong; Röser, Stephan; Rad, Babak Rezaei; Evertz, Marco; Streipert, Benjamin; Li, Jie; Wagner, Ralf; Winter, Martin; Cekic-Laskovic, Isidora

    2016-10-05

    Thanks to its high operating voltage, the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) spinel represents a promising next-generation cathode material candidate for Lithium ion batteries. However, LNMO-based full-cells with organic carbonate solvent electrolytes suffer from severe capacity fading issues, associated with electrolyte decomposition and concurrent degradative reactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface, especially at elevated temperatures. As promising alternatives, two selected LiTFSI/pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based electrolytes with inherent thermal stability were investigated in this work. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) profiles of the investigated LiTFSI/RTIL electrolytes display much higher oxidative stability compared to the state-of-the-art LiPF6/organic carbonate based electrolyte at elevated temperatures. Cycling performance of the LNMO/Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) full-cells with LiTFSI/RTIL electrolytes reveals remarkable improvements with respect to capacity retention and Coulombic efficiency. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate maintained pristine morphology and structure of LNMO particles after 50 cycles at 0.5C. The investigated LiTFSI/RTIL based electrolytes outperform the LiPF6/organic carbonate-based electrolyte in terms of cycling performance in LNMO/LTO full-cells at elevated temperatures.

  7. Development of non-flammable lithium secondary battery with room-temperature ionic liquid electrolyte: Performance of electroplated Al film negative electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ui, Koichi; Yamamoto, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kohei; Minami, Takuto; Takeuchi, Ken; Itagaki, Masayuki; Watanabe, Kunihiro; Koura, Nobuyuki

    The negative electrode performance of the electroplated Al film electrode in the LiCl saturated AlCl 3-1-ethyl-3-methylimizadolium chloride (EMIC) + SOCl 2 melt as the electrolyte for use in non-flammable lithium secondary batteries was evaluated. In the cyclic voltammogram of the electroplated Al film electrode in the melt, the oxidation and reduction waves corresponding to the electrochemical insertion/extraction reactions of the Li + ion were observed at 0-0.80 V vs. Li +/Li, which suggested that the electroplated Al film electrode operated well in the electrolyte. The almost flat potential profiles at about 0.40 V vs. Li +/Li on discharging were shown. The discharge capacity and charge-discharge efficiency was 236 mAh g -1 and 79.2% for the 1st cycle and it maintained 232 mAh g -1 and 77.9% after the 10th cycle. In addition, the initial charge-discharge efficiencies of the electroplated Al film electrode were higher than that of carbon electrodes. The main cathodic polarization reaction was the insertion of Li + ions, and side reactions hardly occurred due to the decomposition reaction of the melt because the Li content corresponding to the electricity was almost totally inserted into the film after charging.

  8. High performance batteries with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen [Littleton, CO

    2012-08-07

    The present invention is directed to lithium-ion batteries in general and more particularly to lithium-ion batteries based on aligned graphene ribbon anodes, V.sub.2O.sub.5 graphene ribbon composite cathodes, and ionic liquid electrolytes. The lithium-ion batteries have excellent performance metrics of cell voltages, energy densities, and power densities.

  9. Phase behavior and ionic conductivity in lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-doped ionic liquids of the pyrrolidinium cation and Bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Anna; Matic, Aleksandar; Jacobsson, Per; Börjesson, Lars; Fernicola, Alessandra; Scrosati, Bruno

    2009-08-13

    The phase behavior and the ionic conductivity of ionic liquids (ILs) of the N-alkyl-N-alkylpyrrolidinium (PYR(xy)) cation and the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI) anion are investigated upon addition of LiTFSI salt. We compare the case of two new ILs of the PYR(2y) cation (where 2 is ethyl and y is butyl or propyl) with that of the PYR(14) (where 1 is methyl and 4 is butyl). We find that the addition of LiTFSI increases the glass transition temperature, decreases the melting temperature and the heat of fusion and, in the ILs of the PYR(2y) family, suppresses crystallization. In the solid state, significant ionic conductivities are found, being as high as 10(-5) S cm(-1), strongly increasing with Li(+) concentration. The opposite trend is found in the liquid state, where the conductivity is on the order of 10(-3)-10(-2) S cm(-1) at room temperature. A T(g)-scaled Arrhenius plot shows that the liquid-state ionic conductivity in these systems is mainly governed by viscosity and that the fragility of the liquids is slightly influenced by the structural modifications on the cation.

  10. Construction of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, Thomas; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Berzak, Laura; Lundberg, Daniel; Strickler, Trevor; Woolley, Robert; Zakharov, Leonid

    2008-11-01

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)* will investigate the low recycling operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas using liquid lithium plasma facing surfaces. The engineering design and machine fabrication process will be presented. The most significant new feature of the LTX machine is the installation of a heated copper toroidal shell that will be operated at 300 C to 500 C. Its stainless steel plasma-facing liner will be internally coated with an evaporated layer of liquid lithium. The shell is comprised of four quadrants that have been fabricated in-house from explosively bonded stainless steel on copper to conform closely to the outer plasma flux surface. All internal components of the LTX machine have been designed and built to meet the simultaneous requirements for liquid lithium compatibility, high temperature operation, and electrical isolation. These requirements have led to unique design features, such as the method of supporting the shell quadrants, and construction of the new internal poloidal field coils. *Supported by US DOE contract #DE-AC02-76CH-03073

  11. Corrosion of oxygen-doped tantalum by lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    The increase in the penetration of tantalum by liquid lithium with increasing oxygen content of tantalum results from the ability of lithium to extract oxygen from tantalum oxides and/or from regions of high oxygen concentrations, accompanied by the creation of minute channels. At low oxygen concentration, oxides are present primarily at the grain boundaries and the lithium penetration is primarily intergranular. At high oxygen concentration, oxides and/or regions of high oxygen concentration are present both at the grain boundaries and within the grains; lithium penetration is both intergranular and transgranular. For a specific oxygen concentration, the severity of corrosion decreases with increasing temperature because (1) the oxygen solubility increases with temperature, decreasing the number of oxide particles and/or regions of high oxygen concentration, and (2) the diffusivity of oxygen in tantalum increases, allowing more rapid oxygen removal at the tantalum lithium interface.

  12. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, J. P.; Rokusek, D. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Nieto-Perez, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Kugel, H. W.; Heim, B.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2009-06-01

    Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, T-11 M, and NSTX. Lithium in the solid and liquid state has been studied extensively in laboratory experiments including its erosion and hydrogen-retaining properties. Reductions in physical sputtering up to 40-60% have been measured for deuterated solid and liquid lithium surfaces. Computational modeling indicates that up to a 1:1 deuterium volumetric retention in lithium is possible. This paper presents the results of systematic in situ laboratory experimental studies on the surface chemistry evolution of ATJ graphite under lithium deposition. Results are compared to post-mortem analysis of similar lithium surface coatings on graphite exposed to deuterium discharge plasmas in NSTX. Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components in NSTX have shown substantial reduction of hydrogenic recycling. Questions remain on the role lithium surface chemistry on a graphite substrate has on particle sputtering (physical and chemical) as well as hydrogen isotope recycling. This is particularly due to the lack of in situ measurements of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bonding state on ATJ graphite is lithium peroxide and with sufficient exposure to ambient air conditions, lithium carbonate is generated. Correlation between both results is used to assess the role of lithium chemistry on the state of lithium bonding and implications on hydrogen pumping and lithium sputtering. In addition, reduction of factors between 10 and 30 reduction in physical sputtering from lithiated graphite compared to pure lithium or carbon is also measured.

  13. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-01

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes.

  14. Conference report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzitelli, Guiseppe; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. Furthermore, this international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  15. Conference Report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-02-01

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  16. From ionic-liquid@metal-organic framework composites to heteroatom-decorated large-surface area carbons: superior CO2 and H2 uptake.

    PubMed

    Aijaz, Arshad; Akita, Tomoki; Yang, Hui; Xu, Qiang

    2014-06-21

    For the first time, high surface area uniformly nitrogen (N)- and boron-nitrogen (BN)-decorated nanoporous carbons have been successfully fabricated by impregnation of ionic liquids (ILs) within a metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-100(Al), followed by carbonization, which exhibit remarkable CO2 and H2 adsorption capacities.

  17. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  18. Lithium-system corrosion/erosion studies for the FMIT project

    SciTech Connect

    Bazinet, G D

    1983-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment has been studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. The liquid lithium test resources and the capabilities of several laboratories were used to study specific concerns associated with the overall objective. Testing conditions ranged from approx. 3700 hours to approx. 6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/C to 270/sup 0/C and static lithium at temperatures from 200/sup 0/C to 500/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects of FMIT lithium system materials (largely Type 304 and Type 304L austenitic stainless steels) and candidate materials for major system components.

  19. DNA Based Electrolyte/Separator for Lithium Battery Application (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-07

    electronics to hybrid and electric vehicles . Two general categories of secondary batteries are mainly explored: the first are liquid electrolyte metal-ion...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0302 DNA BASED ELECTROLYTE/SEPARATOR FOR LITHIUM BATTERY APPLICATION (POSTPRINT) Jitendra Kumar1, Fahima...BASED ELECTROLYTE/SEPARATOR FOR LITHIUM BATTERY APPLICATION (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-15-D-5405-0001 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  20. Exophthalmos and elevated thyroxine levels in association with lithium therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, P.L.; Evans, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Although goiter formation and hypothyroidism are not infrequent following lithium therapy, the association of exophthalmos and/or elevated thyroxine levels with lithium is uncommon. We describe a 62 year old man who rapidly developed exophthalmos, elevated circulating thyroxine, elevated TSH levels and elevated radioiodine uptake within six weeks of reexposure to lithium carbonate. When the medication was stopped, all indices of thyroid function returned to normal and the proptosis receded from 22 to 17mm. Lithium decreases secretion of preformed thyroid hormone and the secondary elevation of TSH levels usually restores euthyroid status. We propose that in our patient, because triiodothyronine levels remained normal, the pituitary was refractory to the normal inhibitory feedback effect of thyroxine and that continued hypersecretion of TSH resulted in hyperthyroidism

  1. Ceramic and polymeric solid electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    Lithium-ion batteries are important for energy storage in a wide variety of applications including consumer electronics, transportation and large-scale energy production. The performance of lithium-ion batteries depends on the materials used. One critical component is the electrolyte, which is the focus of this paper. In particular, inorganic ceramic and organic polymer solid-electrolyte materials are reviewed. Solid electrolytes provide advantages in terms of simplicity of design and operational safety, but typically have conductivities that are lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. This paper provides a comparison of the conductivities of solid-electrolyte materials being used or developed for use in lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Liquid-like ionic conduction in solid lithium and sodium monocarba-closo-decaborates near or at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wan Si; Matsuo, Motoaki; Wu, Hui; Stavila, Vitalie; Zhou, Wei; Talin, Albert Alec; Soloninin, Alexei V.; Skoryunov, Roman V.; Babanova, Olga A.; Skripov, Alexander V.; Unemoto, Atsushi; Orimo, Shin -Ichi; Udovic, Terrence J.

    2016-02-05

    Both LiCB9H10 and NaCB9H10 exhibit liquid-like cationic conductivities (≥0.03 S cm–1) in their disordered hexagonal phases near or at room temperature. Furthermore, these unprecedented conductivities and favorable stabilities enabled by the large pseudoaromatic polyhedral anions render these materials in their pristine or further modified forms as promising solid electrolytes in next-generation, power devices.

  3. Ternary mixtures of ionic liquids for better salt solubility, conductivity and cation transference number improvement

    PubMed Central

    Karpierz, E.; Niedzicki, L.; Trzeciak, T.; Zawadzki, M.; Dranka, M.; Zachara, J.; Żukowska, G. Z.; Bitner-Michalska, A.; Wieczorek, W.

    2016-01-01

    We hereby present the new class of ionic liquid systems in which lithium salt is introduced into the solution as a lithium cation−glyme solvate. This modification leads to the reorganisation of solution structure, which entails release of free mobile lithium cation solvate and hence leads to the significant enhancement of ionic conductivity and lithium cation transference numbers. This new approach in composing electrolytes also enables even three-fold increase of salt concentration in ionic liquids. PMID:27767069

  4. Particle Control and Plasma Performance in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Majeski, et. al.

    2013-02-21

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a small, low aspect ratio tokamak, which is fitted with a stainless steel-clad copper liner, conformal to the last closed flux surface. The liner can be heated to 350{degree}C. Several gas fueling systems, including supersonic gas injection, and molecular cluster injection have been studied, and produce fueling efficiencies up to 35%. Discharges are strongly affected by wall conditioning. Discharges without lithium wall coatings are limited to plasma currents of order 10 kA, and discharge durations of order 5 msec. With solid lithium coatings discharge currents exceed 70 kA, and discharge durations exceed 30 msec. Heating the lithium wall coating, however, results in a prompt degradation of the discharge, at the melting point of lithium. These results suggest that the simplest approach to implementing liquid lithium walls in a tokamak - thin, evaporated, liquefied coatings of lithium - does not produce an adequately clean surface.

  5. Microencapsulation of Lithium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    SPILLED With dry rubber gloves. Rick up t.- lithium ingot and return to steel container and store under oil : label or tag , Keep away from moisture or...was in a 30% solids dispersion of mineral oil . Thus, the dispersion was purchased and the lithium metal was cleaned by extracting the mineral oil with... oil could be eliminated. Unfortunately, the manufacturer was unable to meet product specifications. Of the micronized lithium metal supplied to SwRI

  6. Tailor-made pore controlled poly (arylene ether ketone) membranes as a lithium-ion battery separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mong, Anh; Kim, Dukjoon

    2016-02-01

    Porous poly(arylene ether ketone) (PAEK) membranes are prepared by selective removal of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) molecules from self-assembled PAEK-PLA block copolymers. The pore size and porosity of the membranes are precisely controlled by adjusting PLA concentration. The synthesis of the PAEK-PLA copolymer is confirmed by FTIR and NMR spectroscopies and the morphology of the membrane is examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several important properties such as liquid electrolyte uptake, contact angle, thermal and mechanical stability, and lithium ion conductivity are measured and compared with those of commercial poly(propylene) (PP) membranes to investigate their application feasibility as a separator. The porous PAEK membrane shows improved thermal and dimensional stability compared to the PP membrane. The EC/DEC/EMC (1:1:1, v/v/v) soaked PAEK membrane with a pore diameter of 50 nm shows the highest lithium ion conductivity, higher than that of PP membrane. More importantly, the porous PAEK membranes show superior liquid electrolyte holding capacity to the PP membrane.

  7. Stellar 30-keV neutron capture in 94, 96Zr and the 90Zr (γ , n)89Zr photonuclear reaction with a high-power liquid-lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessler, M.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Feinberg, G.; Friedman, M.; Halfon, S.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A high-power Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was used for the first time for neutron production via the thick-target 7Li (p , n)7Be reaction and quantitative determination of neutron capture cross sections. Bombarded with a 1-2 mA proton beam at 1.92 MeV from the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), the setup yields a 30-keV quasi-Maxwellian neutron spectrum with an intensity of 3- 5 ×1010 n /s, more than one order of magnitude larger than present near-threshold 7Li (p , n) neutron sources. The setup was used here to determine the 30-keV Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS) of 94Zr and 96Zr as 28.0 ± 0.6 mb and 12.4 ± 0.5 mb respectively, based on activation measurements. The precision of the cross section determinations results both from the high neutron yield and from detailed simulations of the entire experimental setup. We plan to extend our experimental studies to low-abundance and radioactive targets. In addition, we show here that the setup yields intense high-energy (17.6 and 14.6 MeV) prompt capture γ rays from the 7Li (p , γ)8Be reaction with yields of ∼ 3 ×108 γs-1mA-1 and ∼ 4 ×108 γs-1mA-1, respectively, evidenced by the 90Zr (γ , n)89Zr photonuclear reaction.

  8. [Parkinsonism during lithium use].

    PubMed

    Walrave, T R W M; Bulens, C

    2009-01-01

    Two patients with bipolar disorder had been treated for years with lithium without any complications but began to develop symptoms of rigidity and an altered gait, namely symptoms compatible with a diagnosis of Parkinsonism with an action tremor. In both patients lithium levels were within the therapeutic range. Medication-induced Parkinsonism occurs frequently in patients using antipsychotic medication, but is a rare complication in patients receiving long term treatment with lithium. The lithium dosage was reduced gradually and within a few months all neurological symptoms subsided completely.

  9. Lithium and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, R. D.; Galbraith, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Some of lithium's effects on blood cell formation suggest that the element may be of value in treating hematologic disorders. Lithium enhances granulopoiesis and thereby induces neutrophilia. Two possible mechanisms of action are suggested: a direct action on the pluripotent stem cells, or an inhibition of the suppressor cells (thymus-dependent lymphocytes) that limit hematopoiesis. Lithium also inhibits erythropoiesis. Although most studies use concentrations at or above pharmacologic levels there is evidence that lithium plays a role in normal cell metabolism. PMID:6336655

  10. Lithium nephrotoxicity revisited.

    PubMed

    Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Rossier, Bernard C

    2009-05-01

    Lithium is widely used to treat bipolar disorder. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is the most common adverse effect of lithium and occurs in up to 40% of patients. Renal lithium toxicity is characterized by increased water and sodium diuresis, which can result in mild dehydration, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and renal tubular acidosis. The concentrating defect and natriuretic effect develop within weeks of lithium initiation. After years of lithium exposure, full-blown nephropathy can develop, which is characterized by decreased glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease. Here, we review the clinical and experimental evidence that the principal cell of the collecting duct is the primary target for the nephrotoxic effects of lithium, and that these effects are characterized by dysregulation of aquaporin 2. This dysregulation is believed to occur as a result of the accumulation of cytotoxic concentrations of lithium, which enters via the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) on the apical membrane and leads to the inhibition of signaling pathways that involve glycogen synthase kinase type 3beta. Experimental and clinical evidence demonstrates the efficacy of the ENaC inhibitor amiloride for the treatment of lithium-induced NDI; however, whether this agent can prevent the long-term adverse effects of lithium is not yet known.

  11. Research on lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, I. R.; Goledzinowski, M.; Dore, R.

    1993-12-01

    Research was conducted on two types of lithium batteries. The first is a rechargeable Li-SO2 system using an all-inorganic electrolyte. A Li/liquid cathode system was chosen to obtain a relatively high discharge rate capability over the +20 to -30 C range. The fabrication and cycling performance of research cells are described, including the preparation and physical properties of porous polytetra fluoroethylene bonded carbon electrodes. Since the low temperature performance of the standard electrolyte was unsatisfactory, studies of electrolytes containing mixed salts were made. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the species present in these electrolytes and to identify discharge products. Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure electrolyte impurities. Film growth on the LiCl was also monitored. The second battery is a Li-thionyl chloride nonrechargeable system. Research cells were fabricated containing cobalt phthalo cyanine in the carbon cathode. The cathode was heat treated at different temperatures and the effect on cell discharge rate and capacity evaluated. Commercially obtained cells were used in an investigation of a way to identify substandard cells. The study also involved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cell discharging at various rates. The results are discussed in terms of LiCl passivation.

  12. Heat transfer of TEMHD driven lithium flow in stainless steel trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Curreli, D.; Andruczyk, D.; Mui, T.; Switts, R.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2013-07-01

    The Lithium/Metal Infused Trenches (LiMITs) concept, which utilizes the thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) driven flowing liquid lithium to cool the divertor surface, has been successfully demonstrated at the University of Illinois. The IR camera results show that such self-driven flowing liquid lithium in the open surface stainless steel trench structure can withstand heat fluxes of up to 10 MW/m2 for 10 s without significant evaporation. A clear asymmetric temperature distribution was observed from the IR result and such asymmetry can be affected by the direction of the driven magnetic field. Thermocouples are embedded in different positions to monitor the temperature within the lithium. These direct measurements also reveal that flowing liquid lithium can effectively bring the heat from the direct heating area and the efficiency can be influenced by magnetic field and heating power.

  13. Volumetric Properties of Lithium-Lead Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairulin, R. A.; Abdullaev, R. N.; Stankus, S. V.; Agazhanov, A. S.; Savchenko, I. V.

    2017-02-01

    The density of liquid lithium and lithium-lead alloys (10.02 at.% Pb, 14.98 at.% Pb, 18.06 at.% Pb, 20.02 at.% Pb, 22.24 at.% Pb, 23.09 at.% Pb, 25.10 at.% Pb, 30.15 at.% Pb, 38.21 at.% Pb, 40.11 at.% Pb, 43.08 at.% Pb, 46.65 at.% Pb, 50.15 at.% Pb, 60.23 at.% Pb, 70.01 at.% Pb, 83.00 at.% Pb, and 84.30 at.% Pb) has been measured using the gamma-ray attenuation technique over the temperature range from the liquidus line to 1050 K. The position of the liquidus curve in the Li-Pb phase diagram has been clarified. The compositional dependencies of molar volume and volumetric thermal expansion coefficient of the Li-Pb liquid system have been constructed and discussed.

  14. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D; Hammel, C J

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EVs). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  15. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbus, D.; Hammel, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EV's). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  16. Electrolyte compositions for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Liao, Chen

    2016-03-29

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to an ionic liquid of the general formula Y.sup.+Z.sup.-, wherein Y.sup.+ is a positively-charged component of the ionic liquid and Z.sup.- is a negatively-charged component of the ionic liquid, wherein Z.sup.- is a boron-containing anion of the following formula: ##STR00001## The invention is also directed to electrolyte compositions in which the boron-containing ionic liquid Y.sup.+Z.sup.- is incorporated into a lithium ion battery electrolyte, with or without admixture with another ionic liquid Y.sup.+X.sup.- and/or non-ionic solvent and/or non-ionic solvent additive.

  17. Mitigation of plasma–material interactions via passive Li efflux from the surface of a flowing liquid lithium limiter in EAST

    DOE PAGES

    Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Maingi, R.; ...

    2017-03-02

    Here, a new flowing liquid Li limiter (FLiLi) based on the concept of a thin flowing film has been successfully designed and tested in the EAST device in 2014. A bright Li radiative mantle at the plasma edge was observed during discharges using FLiLi, resulting from passive Li injection and transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma. Li particle efflux from the FLiLi surface into the plasma was estimated at >5 × 1020 atom s–1, due to surface evaporation and sputtering, and accompanied with a few small Li droplets ~1 mm diameter that were ejected from FLiLi. The Li effluxmore » from FLiLi was ionized by the SOL plasma and formed a Li radiation band that originated from the FLiLi surface, and then spread toroidally by SOL plasma flow. The Li radiative mantle appeared to partly isolate the plasma from the wall, reducing impurity release from the wall materials, and possibly leading to a modest improvement in confinement. In addition, strong Li radiation reduced the particle and heat fluxes impacting onto the divertor plate, with certain similarities to heat flux reduction and detachment onset via low-Z impurity injection.« less

  18. Mitigation of plasma–material interactions via passive Li efflux from the surface of a flowing liquid lithium limiter in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Maingi, R.; Ren, J.; Sun, Z.; Yang, Q. X.; Chen, Z. X.; Xu, H.; Tritz, K.; Zakharov, L. E.; Gentile, C.; Meng, X. C.; Huang, M.; Xu, W.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.; Yan, N.; Mao, S. T.; Yang, Z. D.; Li, J. G.; EAST Team

    2017-04-01

    A new flowing liquid Li limiter (FLiLi) based on the concept of a thin flowing film has been successfully designed and tested in the EAST device in 2014. A bright Li radiative mantle at the plasma edge was observed during discharges using FLiLi, resulting from passive Li injection and transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma. Li particle efflux from the FLiLi surface into the plasma was estimated at  >5  ×  1020 atom s‑1, due to surface evaporation and sputtering, and accompanied with a few small Li droplets ~1 mm diameter that were ejected from FLiLi. The Li efflux from FLiLi was ionized by the SOL plasma and formed a Li radiation band that originated from the FLiLi surface, and then spread toroidally by SOL plasma flow. The Li radiative mantle appeared to partly isolate the plasma from the wall, reducing impurity release from the wall materials, and possibly leading to a modest improvement in confinement. In addition, strong Li radiation reduced the particle and heat fluxes impacting onto the divertor plate, with certain similarities to heat flux reduction and detachment onset via low-Z impurity injection.

  19. High Cyclability of Ionic Liquid-Produced TiO2 Nanotube Arrays As an Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaqing; Martha, Surendra K; Unocic, Raymond R; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs) are considered as a potential SEI-free anode material for Li-ion batteries to offer enhanced safety. Organic solutions, dominatingly ethylene glycol (EG)-based, have widely been used for synthesizing TiO{sub 2} NTs via anodization because of their ability to generate long tubes and well-aligned structures. However, it has been revealed that the EG-produced NTs are composited with carbonaceous decomposition products of EG, release of which during the tube crystallization process inevitably causes nano-scale porosity and cracks. These microstructural defects significantly deteriorate the NTs charge transport efficiency and mechanical strength/toughness. Here we report using ionic liquids (ILs) to anodize titanium to grow low-defect TiO{sub 2} NTs by reducing the electrolyte decomposition rate (less IR drop due to higher electrical conductivity) as well as the chance of the decomposition products mixing into the TiO{sub 2} matrix (organic cations repelled away). Promising electrochemical results have been achieved when using the IL-produced TiO{sub 2} NTs as an anode for Li-ion batteries. The ILNTs demonstrated excellent capacity retention without microstructural damage for nearly 1200 cycles of charge-discharge, while the NTs grown in a conventional EG solution totally pulverized in cycling, resulting in significant capacity fade.

  20. Electrochemical analysis of lithium polymer batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong-Bong

    Lithium batteries consist of lithium anode, polymer electrolyte separator, and the porous, composite cathode. Lithium batteries have been very attractive to the battery industries because lithium metal has an extremely high energy density. The use of lithium metal can cause dendrite formation by uneven electro-deposition during charge. The lithium battery can explode in a liquid electrolyte when it is shorted by the dendrite. It has been reported that the mechanical properties of a polymer electrolyte can retard the dendrite initiation. We have attempted to study the dendrite initiation quantitatively by developing a mathematical model that evaluates the behavior of the interface and by performing dendrite-initiation experiments with the use of cross-linked polymer electrolytes to vary the mechanical properties of the electrolyte. Cross-linking the polymer backbone may decrease the transport properties of the polymer electrolyte. The transport properties are diffusion coefficient, ionic conductivity, and transference number of the electrolyte. When poor transport properties of the polymer electrolyte cause salt depletion at the cathode at low salt concentrations, side reactions and dendrite initiation can be accelerated. In order to study how cross-linking the polymer backbone affects the transport properties, the transport properties are measured experimentally by LBNL method which is based on concentrated solution theory. Porous electrodes are commonly used as the cathode in lithium battery systems. Because the electrochemical reaction occurs at the active particles in the porous, composite cathode during charge and discharge, the kinetics of the electrochemical reaction at the active particles in the cathode affects the battery performance. AC impedance has been broadly used to study the kinetics of the electrochemical reaction in the cathode. However, the AC impedance spectra have been analyzed by regarding the porous cathode as a planar electrode by most

  1. In-situ measurement of the lithium distribution in Li-ion batteries using micro-IBA techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, A.; Orikasa, Y.; Chen, K.; Uchimoto, Y.; Kamiya, T.; Koka, M.; Satoh, T.; Mima, K.; Kato, Y.; Fujita, K.

    2016-03-01

    Direct observation of lithium concentration distribution in lithium-ion battery composite electrodes has been performed for the first time. Lithium-ion battery model cells for particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) measurements were designed and fabricated. Two dimensional images of lithium concentration in LiFePO4 composite electrodes were obtained with PIXE and PIGE by scanning the proton microbeam for various charged states of the electrodes. Lithium concentration in LiFePO4 composite electrodes was decreased from the contact interface between LiFePO4 electrode and liquid electrolyte during the charge reaction.

  2. Properties of the lithium and graphite-lithium anodes in N-methyl- N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Andrzej; Świderska-Mocek, Agnieszka

    The ternary [Li +] 0.09[MePrPyr +] 0.41[NTf 2 -] 0.50 room temperature ionic liquid was obtained by dissolution of solid lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiNTf 2) in liquid N-methyl- N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([MePrPyr +][NTf 2 -]), and studied as an electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries. The graphite-lithium (C 6Li) anode, working together with vinylene carbonate as an additive showed ca. 90% of its initial discharge capacity after 50 cycles. The addition of vinylene carbonate to the neat ionic liquid results in the formation of the protective coating (SEI) on both the lithium and graphite anodes. The SEI formation increases the rate of the charge transfer reaction as well as protects the anode from chemical passivation (corrosion). The graphite-lithium (C 6Li) anode shows good cyclability and Coulombic efficiency in the presence of 10 wt.% of vinylene carbonate as an additive to the ionic liquid.

  3. LITHIUM AND RENAL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, N.; Trivedi, J.K.; Sethi, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty patients of affective disorder who were on lithium for a year and thirty patients on antidepressant were studied in detail for renal functions. Our observation is that lithium therapy does not lead to any deterioration in kidney functions. The results are discussed. PMID:21927211

  4. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  5. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  6. [Intoxication with lithium].

    PubMed

    Fiegler, K; Liechti, M E; Bodmer, M; Bruggisser, M

    2009-06-24

    We report a case of a 75-year-old male patient who presented to the emergency room with arterial hypotension and impaired vigilance. The patient was on lithium therapy due to mood disorder. One month earlier medication with a betablocker, a loop-diuretic and an ACE-inhibitor had been started due to heart failure. Findings at admission included renal insufficiency, pneumonia and a slightly increased serum level of lithium. Three days later his Glasgow Coma Scale Score was 7, he showed gaze deviation, increased muscle tonus and cloni. The patient fully recovered after volume substitution and normalization of his renal function. Diagnosis of chronic intoxication with lithium was made due to the clinical picture and after exclusion of neurological pathologies. The pharmacokinetic characteristics of lithium is described and the risk factors leading to lithium intoxication and treatment of intoxication are discussed.

  7. An investigation of voids formation mechanisms and their effects on freeze and thaw processes of lithium and lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Yang, Jae-Young

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of void formation during the cooldown and freezing of lithium coolant within the primary loop of SP-100 type systems are investigated. These mechanisms are: (1) homogeneous nucleation; (2) heterogeneous nucleation; (3) normal segregation of helium gas dissolved in liquid lithium; and (4) shrinkage of lithium during freezing. To evaluate the void formation potential due to segregation, a numerical scheme that couples the freezing and mass diffusion processes in both the solid and liquid regions is developed. The results indicated that the formation of He bubbles is unlikely by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation during the cooldown process. However, homogeneous nucleation of He bubbles following the segregation of dissolved He in liquid lithium ahead of the solid-liquid interface is likely to occur. Results also show that total volume of He void is insignificant when compared to that of shrinkage voids. In viewing this, the subsequent research focuses on the effects of shrinkage void forming during freezing of lithium on subsequent thaw processes are investigated using a numerical scheme that is based on a single (solid/liquid) cell approach. The cases of lithium-fluoride are also investigated to show the effect of larger volume shrinkage upon freezing on the freeze and thaw processes. Results show that a void forming at the wall appreciably reduces the solid-liquid interface velocity, during both freeze and thaw, and causes a substantial rise in the wall temperature during thaw. However, in the case of Li, the maximum wall temperature was much lower than the melting temperature of PWC-11, which is used as the structure material in the SP-100 system. Hence, it is included that a formation of hot spots is unlikely during the startup or restart of the SP-100 system.

  8. Conference Report on the 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M. G.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Mazzitelli, G.; Menard, J. E.; Mirnov, S. V.; Shimada, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Tabares, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    The 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices (ISLA-2011) was held on 27-29 April 2011 at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) with broad participation from the community working on aspects of lithium research for fusion energy development. This community is expanding rapidly in many areas including experiments in magnetic confinement devices and a variety of lithium test stands, theory and modeling and developing innovative approaches. Overall, 53 presentations were given representing 26 institutions from 10 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were given in 24 presentations, from NSTX (PPPL, USA), LTX (PPPL, USA), FT-U (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (TRINITY, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST (ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), and RFX (Padova, Italy). Sessions were devoted to: I. Lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), II. Lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), III. Special session on liquid lithium technology, IV. Lithium laboratory test stands, V. Lithium theory/modeling/comments, VI. Innovative lithium applications and VII. Panel discussion on lithium PFC viability in magnetic fusion reactors. There was notable participation from the fusion technology communities, including the IFE, IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchanges with the physics oriented magnetic confinement lithium research groups. It was agreed to continue future exchanges of ideas and data to help develop attractive liquid lithium solutions for very challenging magnetic fusion issues, such as development of a high heat flux steady-state divertor concept and acceptable plasma disruption mitigation techniques while improving plasma performance with lithium. The next workshop will be held at ENEA, Frascati, Italy in 2013.

  9. High Temperature Stable Separator for Lithium Batteries Based on SiO2 and Hydroxypropyl Guar Gum

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diogo Vieira; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    A novel membrane based on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) as binder is presented and tested as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The separator is made with renewable and low cost materials and an environmentally friendly manufacturing processing using only water as solvent. The separator offers superior wettability and high electrolyte uptake due to the optimized porosity and the good affinity of SiO2 and guar gum microstructure towards organic liquid electrolytes. Additionally, the separator shows high thermal stability and no dimensional-shrinkage at high temperatures due to the use of the ceramic filler and the thermally stable natural polymer. The electrochemical tests show the good electrochemical stability of the separator in a wide range of potential, as well as its outstanding cycle performance. PMID:26512701

  10. Neuropsychologic effects of lithium discontinuation.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, J H; Shaw, E D; Stokes, P E; Wilner, P; Elliot, A S; Sikes, C; Myers, B; Manevitz, A; Parides, M

    1993-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of blind lithium discontinuation and resumption on measures of cognition, creativity, and fine motor performance in 46 lithium-maintained euthymic outpatients. Scores on memory measures, tests of tapping speed, and associative productivity all improved significantly during the time off of lithium. In an effort to further explain these results, analyses were undertaken with six possible intervening variables: age, sex, lithium concentration in plasma, thyroid function, duration of lithium maintenance, and depressive symptoms. Significant group and interactive effects are reported and discussed. A multiple regression analysis suggested that lithium has a greater neuropsychologic effect in younger, less-depressed patients having higher lithium concentrations in plasma.

  11. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kim, Jeom-Soo; Johnson, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  12. Techniques for lithium removal from 1040 C aged tantalum alloy, T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    The liquid ammonia and vacuum distillation techniques were found to be satisfactory for removing lithium from 1040 C aged T-111 (tantalum - 8-percent tungsten- 2-percent hafnium). Results of ductility tests and chemical analysis show that these two methods are adequate for removing lithium without embrittlement or contamination of the T-111. Moist air exposure of T-111 with traces of lithium on the surface produced mixed results. Some specimens were ductile; others were brittle. Brittle T-111 had an increased hydrogen content. Water removal of lithium from T-111 caused brittleness and an increased hydrogen concentration.

  13. Mechanisms of voids formation during cooldown and freezing of lithium in SP-100 type systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jae Y.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of void formation during the cooldown and freezing of lithium coolant within the primary loop of SP-100 type systems are investigated. These mechanisms are: (a) homogeneous nucleation, (b) heterogeneous nucleation, (c) normal segregation of helium gas dissolved in liquid lithium, and (d) shrinkage of lithium during freezing. To evaluate the void formation potential due to segregation, a numerical scheme that couples the freezing and mass diffusion processes in both the solid and liquid regions is developed. The results indicated that the formation of He bubbles is unlikely by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation during the cooldown process. However, homogeneous nucleation of He bubbles following the segregation of dissolved He in liquid Lithium ahead of the solid-liquid interface is likely to occur. Results also show that total volume of He void is insignificant when compared to that of shrinkage voids.

  14. Nanoscale Nucleation and Growth of Electrodeposited Lithium Metal.

    PubMed

    Pei, Allen; Zheng, Guangyuan; Shi, Feifei; Li, Yuzhang; Cui, Yi

    2017-02-08

    Lithium metal has re-emerged as an exciting anode for high energy lithium-ion batteries due to its high specific capacity of 3860 mAh g(-1) and lowest electrochemical potential of all known materials. However, lithium has been plagued by the issues of dendrite formation, high chemical reactivity with electrolyte, and infinite relative volume expansion during plating and stripping, which present safety hazards and low cycling efficiency in batteries with lithium metal electrodes. There have been a lot of recent studies on Li metal although little work has focused on the initial nucleation and growth behavior of Li metal, neglecting a critical fundamental scientific foundation of Li plating. Here, we study experimentally the morphology of lithium in the early stages of nucleation and growth on planar copper electrodes in liquid organic electrolyte. We elucidate the dependence of lithium nuclei size, shape, and areal density on current rate, consistent with classical nucleation and growth theory. We found that the nuclei size is proportional to the inverse of overpotential and the number density of nuclei is proportional to the cubic power of overpotential. Based on this understanding, we propose a strategy to increase the uniformity of electrodeposited lithium on the electrode surface.

  15. Nanoscale Nucleation and Growth of Electrodeposited Lithium Metal

    DOE PAGES

    Pei, Allen; Zheng, Guangyuan; Shi, Feifei; ...

    2017-01-10

    Lithium metal has re-emerged as an exciting anode for high energy lithium-ion batteries due to its high specific capacity of 3860 mAh g-1 and lowest electrochemical potential of all known materials. However, lithium has been plagued by the issues of dendrite formation, high chemical reactivity with electrolyte, and infinite relative volume expansion during plating and stripping, which present safety hazards and low cycling efficiency in batteries with lithium metal electrodes. There have been a lot of recent studies on Li metal although little work has focused on the initial nucleation and growth behavior of Li metal, neglecting a critical fundamentalmore » scientific foundation of Li plating. Here, we study experimentally the morphology of lithium in the early stages of nucleation and growth on planar copper electrodes in liquid organic electrolyte. We elucidate the dependence of lithium nuclei size, shape, and areal density on current rate, consistent with classical nucleation and growth theory. We found that the nuclei size is proportional to the inverse of overpotential and the number density of nuclei is proportional to the cubic power of overpotential. Finally, based on this understanding, we propose a strategy to increase the uniformity of electrodeposited lithium on the electrode surface.« less

  16. Benzimidazole-derived anion for lithium-conducting electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzicki, Leszek; Oledzki, Piotr; Bitner, Anna; Bukowska, Maria; Szczecinski, Przemyslaw

    2016-02-01

    In this work we announce new lithium salt of 5,6-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzimidazolide (LiTDBI) designed for application in lithium conductive electrolytes. It was synthesized and completely characterized by NMR techniques. Studies show salt's thermal stability up to 270 °C and electrochemical stability in liquid solvents up to +4.7 V vs. metallic lithium anode. Basic characterization of electrolytes made with this salt show conductivity over 1 mS cm-1 and unusually high transference number at high concentrations (0.74 in EC:DMC 1:2 ratio mixture) along with low onset of conductivity peak. As a final proof of concept, cycling in half-cell was performed and electrolyte based on LiTDBI showed perfect capacity retention. Such properties show remarkable progress in creating efficient lithium-conducting electrolytes with use of weakly-coordinating anions.

  17. Interphase Evolution of a Lithium-Ion/Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Bresser, Dominic; Reiter, Jakub; Oberhumer, Philipp; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Passerini, Stefano; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-10-14

    A novel lithium-ion/oxygen battery employing Pyr14TFSI-LiTFSI as the electrolyte and nanostructured LixSn-C as the anode is reported. The remarkable energy content of the oxygen cathode, the replacement of the lithium metal anode by a nanostructured stable lithium-alloying composite, and the concomitant use of nonflammable ionic liquid-based electrolyte result in a new and intrinsically safer energy storage system. The lithium-ion/oxygen battery delivers a stable capacity of 500 mAh g(-1) at a working voltage of 2.4 V with a low charge-discharge polarization. However, further characterization of this new system by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveals the progressive decrease of the battery working voltage, because of the crossover of oxygen through the electrolyte and its direct reaction with the LixSn-C anode.

  18. Modified natural graphite as anode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Jiang, C.; Wan, C.; Holze, R.

    A concentrated nitric acid solution was used as an oxidant to modify the electrochemical performance of natural graphite as anode material for lithium ion batteries. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, thermogravimmetry, differential thermal analysis, high resolution electron microscopy, and measurement of the reversible capacity suggest that the surface structure of natural graphite was changed, a fresh dense layer of oxides was formed. Some structural imperfections were removed, and the stability of the graphite structure increased. These changes impede decomposition of electrolyte solvent molecules, co-intercalation of solvated lithium ions and movement of graphene planes along the a-axis direction. Concomitantly, more micropores were introduced, and thus, lithium intercalation and deintercalation were favored and more sites were provided for lithium storage. Consequently, the reversible capacity and the cycling behavior of the modified natural graphite were much improved by the oxidation. Obviously, the liquid-solid oxidation is advantageous in controlling the uniformity of the products.

  19. Novel Approach for in Situ Recovery of Lithium Carbonate from Spent Lithium Ion Batteries Using Vacuum Metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiefeng; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2017-09-27

    Lithium is a rare metal because of geographical scarcity and technical barrier. Recycling lithium resource from spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs) is significant for lithium deficiency and environmental protection. A novel approach for recycling lithium element as Li2CO3 from spent LIBs is proposed. First, the electrode materials preobtained by mechanical separation are pyrolyzed under enclosed vacuum condition. During this process the Li is released as Li2CO3 from the crystal structure of lithium transition metal oxides due to the collapse of the oxygen framework. An optimal Li recovery rate of 81.90% is achieved at 973 K for 30 min with a solid-to-liquid ratio of 25 g L(-1), and the purity rate of Li2CO3 is 99.7%. The collapsed mechanism is then presented to explain the release of lithium element during the vacuum pyrolysis. Three types of spent LIBs including LiMn2O4, LiCoO2, and LiCoxMnyNizO2 are processed to prove the validity of in situ recycling Li2CO3 from spent LIBs under enclosed vacuum condition. Finally, an economic assessment is taken to prove that this recycling process is positive.

  20. Influence of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscatter system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X H; Liu, A D; Zhou, C; Hu, J Q; Wang, M Y; Yu, C X; Liu, W D; Li, H; Lan, T; Xie, J L

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the first investigation of the effect of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscattering. A liquid lithium limiter has been applied in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), and a Doppler backscattering has been installed in the EAST. A parabolic mirror and a flat mirror located in the vacuum vessel are polluted by lithium. An identical optical system of the Doppler backscattering is set up in laboratory. The power distributions of the emission beam after the two mirrors with and without lithium coating (cleaned before and after), are measured at three different distances under four incident frequencies. The results demonstrate that the influence of the lithium coating on the power distributions are very slight, and the Doppler backscattering can work normally under the dosage of lithium during the 2014 EAST campaign.

  1. Influence of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscatter system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. H.; Liu, A. D. Zhou, C.; Hu, J. Q.; Wang, M. Y.; Yu, C. X.; Liu, W. D.; Li, H.; Lan, T.; Xie, J. L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents the first investigation of the effect of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscattering. A liquid lithium limiter has been applied in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), and a Doppler backscattering has been installed in the EAST. A parabolic mirror and a flat mirror located in the vacuum vessel are polluted by lithium. An identical optical system of the Doppler backscattering is set up in laboratory. The power distributions of the emission beam after the two mirrors with and without lithium coating (cleaned before and after), are measured at three different distances under four incident frequencies. The results demonstrate that the influence of the lithium coating on the power distributions are very slight, and the Doppler backscattering can work normally under the dosage of lithium during the 2014 EAST campaign.

  2. Sealed Lithium Inorganic Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    MuWrn , 1,ad iw..am m4 IdM.D to We"L406W) Inorganic Electrolyte lattery Carbon Cathode Evaluation Thionyl Chloride Gas Generation Lithium C ell sign...hardware surface to carry the reductIon of thionyl chloride when in contact with lithium (self discharge) and the corro,’ion of hardware materials... Lithium - Aluminum Chloride 10) AOSTSAC? (Cmawl/e o ade H .m.eewr W MWO, AV 600 nwe w) Stdies were continued of the effects of hardware materials on the

  3. Lithium Combustion: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    lithium vapors generated with air formed an intense white flame that produced branched- chain condensation aerosol particles, of concentrations 򓆄 mg/im3...generated chain -aggregate lithium combustion aerosols in dry, COg-free air prior to reaction with 0, 0.10, 0.50, 1.0, 1.75, or 5.0% CO in air at a...In order to burn in gaseous chlorine or in bromine or iodine vapor, lithium needs to be heated. With iodine vapor, the reaction is accompanied by

  4. Lithium and Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed

    Sípek, A

    1989-01-01

    The article deals with Ebstein's anomaly, lithium and their relationship. Some studies suggest that lithium might be involved as a teratogen increasing the incidence of Ebstein's anomaly in the offspring of female patients with manio-depressive psychosis and lithium-administered during pregnancy. The second part of the article contains data on the incidence of Ebstein's anomaly in the Czech Socialist Republic between 1960 and 1985. The results indicate a steady rise in the incidence of this congenital malformation over the above period of time.

  5. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  6. Dendrite Suppression by Synergistic Combination of Solid Polymer Electrolyte Crosslinked with Natural Terpenes and Lithium Powder Anode for Lithium Metal Batteries.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jimin; Lee, Jae Won; Bae, Ki Yoon; Kim, Hee Joong; Yoon, Woo Young; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2017-04-03

    Lithium metal anode has fundamental problems concerning formation and growth of lithium dendrites which prevents practical applications of next generation of high-capacity lithium metal batteries. The synergistic combination of solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) crosslinked with naturally occurring terpenes and lithium powder anode is promising solution to resolve the dendrite issues by substituting conventional liquid electrolyte/separator and lithium foil anode system. A series of SPEs based on polysiloxane crosslinked with natural terpenes are prepared by facile thiol-ene click reaction under mild condition and structural effect of terpene crosslinkers on electrochemical properties is studied. Lithium powder with large surface area is prepared by droplet emulsion technique (DET) and used as anode materials. The effect of physical state of electrolyte (solid/liquid) and morphology of lithium metal anode (powder/foil) on dendrite growth behavior is systematically studied. The synergistic combination of SPE and lithium powder anode suggests effective solution to suppress the dendrite growth due to formation of stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer and delocalized current density.

  7. A reversible dendrite-free high-areal-capacity lithium metal electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Matsui, Masaki; Kuwata, Hiroko; Sonoki, Hidetoshi; Matsuda, Yasuaki; Shang, Xuefu; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Osamu; Imanishi, Nobuyuki

    2017-04-01

    Reversible dendrite-free low-areal-capacity lithium metal electrodes have recently been revived, because of their pivotal role in developing beyond lithium ion batteries. However, there have been no reports of reversible dendrite-free high-areal-capacity lithium metal electrodes. Here we report on a strategy to realize unprecedented stable cycling of lithium electrodeposition/stripping with a highly desirable areal-capacity (12 mAh cm-2) and exceptional Coulombic efficiency (>99.98%) at high current densities (>5 mA cm-2) and ambient temperature using a diluted solvate ionic liquid. The essence of this strategy, that can drastically improve lithium electrodeposition kinetics by cyclic voltammetry premodulation, lies in the tailoring of the top solid-electrolyte interphase layer in a diluted solvate ionic liquid to facilitate a two-dimensional growth mode. We anticipate that this discovery could pave the way for developing reversible dendrite-free metal anodes for sustainable battery chemistries.

  8. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  9. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  10. The Importance of Detecting Lithium on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia, A.; Colín-García, M.; Valdivia Silva, J.; Beraldi, H.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Durand-Manterola, H.; García-Martínez, J. L.; Ramos, S.; Ortega, F.

    2012-09-01

    Lithium (Li) is the third element of the periodic table and was created in the Big Bang together with hydrogen and helium. In water solution it exhibits low vapor pressure and freezing point, and other colligative properties enhancing the range of liquid water availability. With organic compounds, it forms organo-lithium reagents with direct covalent bond allowing for organic complexity. Lithium accreted with the Sun and planets in minor amounts and later it originated by nuclear fission processes due to highenergy cosmic rays. Here, we suggest that detecting Li in the surface of Mars by instruments bound to Curiosity rover may provide crucial evidence for the potential chemical evolution in the red planet in the presence of liquid water.

  11. Lithium Sulfuryl Chloride Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Primary batteries , Electrochemistry, Ionic current, Electrolytes, Cathodes(Electrolytic cell), Anodes(Electrolytic cell), Thionyl chloride ...Phosphorus compounds, Electrical conductivity, Calibration, Solutions(Mixtures), Electrical resistance, Performance tests, Solvents, Lithium compounds

  12. Lithium Mining, Nevada

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the once-abandoned mining town of Silver Peak, Nevada, which began to thrive again when Foote Mineral Company began extracting lithium from brine below the floor of Clayton Valley in 1966.

  13. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  14. Lithium and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, a drug used to treat bipolar disorders, has a variety of neuroprotective mechanisms, including autophagy regulation, in various neuropsychiatric conditions. In neurodegenerative diseases, lithium enhances degradation of aggregate-prone proteins, including mutated huntingtin, phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein, and causes damaged mitochondria to degrade, while in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer’s disease autophagy downregulation by lithium is observed. The signaling pathway of lithium as an autophagy enhancer might be associated with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent pathway, which is involved in myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in Huntington’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. However, the mTOR-dependent pathway might be involved in inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in other diseases. Lithium’s autophagy-enhancing property may contribute to the therapeutic benefit of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24738557

  15. Safer Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kejha, Joe; Smith, Novis; McCloseky, Joel

    2004-01-01

    A number of nonvolatile, low-flammability liquid oligomers and polymers based on aliphatic organic carbonate molecular structures have been found to be suitable to be blended with ethylene carbonate to make electrolytes for lithium-ion electrochemical cells. Heretofore, such electrolytes have often been made by blending ethylene carbonate with volatile, flammable organic carbonates. The present nonvolatile electrolytes have been found to have adequate conductivity (about 2 mS/cm) for lithium ions and to remain liquid at temperatures down to -5 C. At normal charge and discharge rates, lithiumion cells containing these nonvolatile electrolytes but otherwise of standard design have been found to operate at current and energy densities comparable to those of cells now in common use. They do not perform well at high charge and discharge rates -- an effect probably attributable to electrolyte viscosity. Cells containing the nonvolatile electrolytes have also been found to be, variously, nonflammable or at least self-extinguishing. Hence, there appears to be a basis for the development of safer high-performance lithium-ion cells.

  16. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  17. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  18. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  19. Atmospheric corrosion of lithium electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.

    1981-10-01

    Atmospheric corrosion of lithium during lithium-cell assembly and the dry storage of cells prior to electrolyte fill has been found to initiate lithium corrosion pits and to form corrosion products. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate lithium pitting and the white floccullent corrosion products. Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and Auger spectroscopy in combination with X-ray diffraction were used to characterize lithium surfaces. Lithium surfaces with corrosion products were found to be high in carbonate content indicating the presence of lithium carbonate. Lithium electrodes dry stored in unfilled batteries were found to contain high concentration of lithium flouride a possible corrosion product from gaseous materials from the carbon monofluoride cathode. Future investigations of the corrosion phenomena will emphasize the effect of the corrosion products on the electrolyte and ultimate battery performance. The need to protect lithium electrodes from atmospheric exposure is commonly recognized to minimize corrosion induced by reaction with water, oxygen, carbon dioxide or nitrogen (1). Manufacturing facilities customarily limit the relative humidity to less than two percent. Electrodes that have been manufactured for use in lithium cells are typically stored in dry-argon containers. In spite of these precautions, lithium has been found to corrode over a long time period due to residual gases or slow diffusion of the same into storage containers. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the nature of the lithium corrosion.

  20. Reliability and Maintainability Data for Lead Lithium Cooling Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Cadwallader, Lee

    2016-12-01

    This article presents component failure rate data for use in assessment of lead lithium cooling systems. Best estimate data applicable to this liquid metal coolant is presented. Repair times for similar components are also referenced in this work. These data support probabilistic safety assessment and reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability analyses.

  1. Reliability and Maintainability Data for Lead Lithium Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee

    2016-11-16

    This article presents component failure rate data for use in assessment of lead lithium cooling systems. Best estimate data applicable to this liquid metal coolant is presented. Repair times for similar components are also referenced in this work. These data support probabilistic safety assessment and reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability analyses.

  2. Novel Nanofiber-based Membrane Separators for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanilmaz, Meltem

    of the resultant composite membranes is restricted because these nanoparticles are not exposed to liquid electrolytes and have limited effect on improving the cell performance. Hence, we introduced new nanoparticle-on-nanofiber hybrid membrane separators by combining electrospraying with electrospinning techniques. Electrochemical properties were enhanced due to the increased surface area caused by the unique hybrid structure of SiO2 nanoparticles and PVDF nanofibers. To design a high-performance separator with enhanced mechanical properties and good thermal stability, electrospun SiO2/nylon 6,6 nanofiber membranes were fabricated. It was found that SiO2/nylon 6,6 nanofiber membranes had superior thermal stability and mechanical strength. Electrospinning has serious drawbacks such as low spinning rate and high production cost. Centrifugal spinning is a fast, cost-effective and safe alternative to the electrospinning. SiO2/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes were produced by using centrifugal spinning. Compared with commercial microporous polyolefin membranes, SiO2/PAN membranes had larger liquid electrolyte uptake, higher electrochemical oxidation limit, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. SiO2/PAN membrane separators were assembled into lithium/lithium iron phosphate cells and these cells exhibited good cycling and C-rate performance.

  3. A new class of Solvent-in-Salt electrolyte for high-energy rechargeable metallic lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Suo, Liumin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Armand, Michel; Chen, Liquan

    2013-01-01

    Liquid electrolyte plays a key role in commercial lithium-ion batteries to allow conduction of lithium-ion between cathode and anode. Traditionally, taking into account the ionic conductivity, viscosity and dissolubility of lithium salt, the salt concentration in liquid electrolytes is typically less than 1.2 mol l(-1). Here we show a new class of 'Solvent-in-Salt' electrolyte with ultrahigh salt concentration and high lithium-ion transference number (0.73), in which salt holds a dominant position in the lithium-ion transport system. It remarkably enhances cyclic and safety performance of next-generation high-energy rechargeable lithium batteries via an effective suppression of lithium dendrite growth and shape change in the metallic lithium anode. Moreover, when used in lithium-sulphur battery, the advantage of this electrolyte is further demonstrated that lithium polysulphide dissolution is inhibited, thus overcoming one of today's most challenging technological hurdles, the 'polysulphide shuttle phenomenon'. Consequently, a coulombic efficiency nearing 100% and long cycling stability are achieved.

  4. US Navy lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of lithium systems that are already in the fleet are discussed. The approach that the Navy is taking in the control of the introduction of lithium batteries into the fleet is also discussed.

  5. Lithium: for harnessing renewable energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, which has the chemical symbol Li and an atomic number of 3, is the first metal in the periodic table. Lithium has many uses, the most prominent being in batteries for cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid vehicles. Worldwide sources of lithium are broken down by ore-deposit type as follows: closed-basin brines, 58%; pegmatites and related granites, 26%; lithium-enriched clays, 7%; oilfield brines, 3%; geothermal brines, 3%; and lithium-enriched zeolites, 3% (2013 statistics). There are over 39 million tons of lithium resources worldwide. Of this resource, the USGS estimates there to be approximately 13 million tons of current economically recoverable lithium reserves. To help predict where future lithium supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where identified resources are concentrated in the Earth’s crust, and they use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered resources also exist.

  6. Rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    The cycling performance of a secondary lithium cell with a 2-methyl THF lithium hectofluorarsenate electrolyte is discussed. Stripping efficiency, dendritization, passivation on standing, and discharge efficiency are considered.

  7. Lithium Inorganic Electrolyte Battery Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-01-01

    rjp 3.2 PRISMATIC CELLS This subsection presents the results of the investigations conducted on large prismatic lithium thionyl chloride cells, both...91 5.0 PASSIVATION 5.1 INTRODUCTION Passivation in Li/SOC12 cells consists of the surface reaction of lithium directly with thionyl chloride to...produce a film of lithium chloride (LiCI). This film prevents the complete and rapid reaction of lithium and thionyl chloride at moderate temperatures. On

  8. Magnetic Diagnostics for the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berzak, L.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Zakharov, L.

    2008-06-20

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R0 = 0.4m, a = 0.26m, BTF ~ 3.4kG, IP ~ 400kA, and pulse length ~ 0.25s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel, low-recycling Lithium Wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double-axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions.

  9. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-15

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  10. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interfacea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-01

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  11. Equilibrium lithium-ion transport between nanocrystalline lithium-inserted anatase TiO2 and the electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Swapna; van Eck, Ernst R H; Kentgens, Arno P M; Mulder, Fokko M; Wagemaker, Marnix

    2011-12-23

    The power density of lithium-ion batteries requires the fast transfer of ions between the electrode and electrolyte. The achievable power density is directly related to the spontaneous equilibrium exchange of charged lithium ions across the electrolyte/electrode interface. Direct and unique characterization of this charge-transfer process is very difficult if not impossible, and consequently little is known about the solid/liquid ion transfer in lithium-ion-battery materials. Herein we report the direct observation by solid-state NMR spectroscopy of continuous lithium-ion exchange between the promising nanosized anatase TiO(2) electrode material and the electrolyte. Our results reveal that the energy barrier to charge transfer across the electrode/electrolyte interface is equal to or greater than the barrier to lithium-ion diffusion through the solid anatase matrix. The composition of the electrolyte and in turn the solid/electrolyte interface (SEI) has a significant effect on the electrolyte/electrode lithium-ion exchange; this suggests potential improvements in the power of batteries by optimizing the electrolyte composition.

  12. A compact self-flowing lithium system for use in an industrial neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor Kumar; Szott, Matthew; Jurczyk, Brian; Ahn, Chisung; Ruzic, David

    2016-10-01

    A compact trench module to flow liquid lithium in closed loops for handling high heat and particle flux have been fabricated and tested at UIUC. The module was designed to demonstrate the proof of concept in utilizing liquid metals for two principal objectives: i) as self-healing low Z plasma facing components, which is expected to solve the issues facing the current high Z components and ii) using flowing lithium as an MeV-level neutron source. A continuously flowing lithium loop ensures a fresh lithium interface and also accommodate a higher concentration of D, enabling advanced D-Li reactions without using any radioactive tritium. Such a system is expected to have a base yield of 10e7 n/s. For both the applications, the key success factor of the module is attaining the necessary high flow velocity of the lithium especially over the impact area, which will be the disruptive plasma events in fusion reactors and the incident ion beam for the neutron beam source. This was achieved by the efficient shaping of the trenches to exploit the nozzle effect in liquid flow. The compactness of the module, which can also be scaled as desired, was fulfilled by the use of high Tc permanent magnets and air cooled channels attained the necessary temperature gradient for driving the lithium. The design considerations and parameters, experimental arrangements involving lithium filling and attaining flow, data and results obtained will be elaborated. DOE SBIR project DE-SC0013861.

  13. A revolution in electrodes: recent progress in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-04-01

    As a promising candidate for future batteries, the lithium-sulfur battery is gaining increasing interest due to its high capacity and energy density. However, over the years, lithium-sulfur batteries have been plagued by fading capacities and the low Coulombic efficiency derived from its unique electrochemical behavior, which involves solid-liquid transition reactions. Moreover, lithium-sulfur batteries employ metallic lithium as the anode, which engenders safety vulnerability of the battery. The electrodes play a pivotal role in the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries. A leap forward in progress of lithium-sulfur batteries is always accompanied by a revolution in the electrode technology. In this review, recent progress in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries is summarized in accordance with the evolution of the electrodes, including the diversified cathode design and burgeoning metallic-lithium-free anodes. Although the way toward application has still many challenges associated, recent progress in lithium-sulfur battery technology still paints an encouraging picture of a revolution in rechargeable batteries. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Electrochemical in situ investigations of SEI and dendrite formation on the lithium metal anode.

    PubMed

    Bieker, Georg; Winter, Martin; Bieker, Peter

    2015-04-14

    This comparative work studies the self-enforcing heterogeneity of lithium deposition and dissolution as the cause for dendrite formation on the lithium metal anode in various liquid organic solvent based electrolytes. In addition, the ongoing lithium corrosion, its rate and thus the passivating quality of the SEI are investigated in self-discharge measurements. The behavior of the lithium anode is characterized in two carbonate-based standard electrolytes, 1 M LiPF6 in EC/DEC (3 : 7) and 1 M LiPF6 in EC/DMC (1 : 1), and in two alternative electrolytes 1 M LiPF6 in TEGDME and 1 M LiTFSI in DMSO, which have been proposed in the literature as promising electrolytes for lithium metal batteries, more specifically for lithium/air batteries. As a result, electrolyte decomposition, SEI and dendrite formation at the lithium electrode as well as their mutual influences are understood in the development of overpotentials, surface resistances and lithium electrode surface morphologies in subsequent lithium deposition and dissolution processes. A general model of different stages of these processes could be elaborated.

  15. Leaching Characteristics of Lithium Adsorbents in Seawater and its Implication of Marine Environmental Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H. O.; Kim, J. A.; Jeong, S.; Chung, K. S.; Ryu, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    The lithium-manganese oxide adsorbent material have been developed by KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources) to recovery the lithium from seawater and pilot plant was conducted in Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea. There is the possibility of release toxic substances to marine environments from lithium recovery adsorbents during the operation of lithium recovery process on the marine station. Therefore, the changes in marine environmental impact should be predicted to assure marine environmental integrity for application of lithium recovery adsorbents in real sea. In this study, the batch-scale experiments was conducted using natural seawater (NSW) and artificial seawater (ASW) to determine the leaching characteristics of lithium recovery adsorbents. Solid-liquid ratio was determine by considering the unit area of exposing lithium recovery adsorbents in pilot plant, NSW and ASW were exchanged every two days for 14 days to simulate the real marine environment. After agitating with 30 rpm to simulate water movement under 10 and 25°C (average seawater temperature in winter and summer in Okgye Harbor, respectively), dynamic leached substances (heavy metals) and their leaching rate were determined. This study provides the practical design factors, maximum dose of lithium recovery adsorbents, duration, and frequency, for lithium recovery from seawater based on marine environmental risk. Acknowledgments: This research was supported by the national research project titled "The Development of Technology for Extraction of Resources Dissolved in Seawater" of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries.

  16. Conference report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Mazzitelli, Guiseppe; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; ...

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy),more » T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. Furthermore, this international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.« less

  17. Reversibility of anodic lithium in rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jiang-Lan; Okasinski, John S; Kenesei, Peter; Dobbs, Howard A; Zhao, Dan; Almer, Jonathan D; Liu, Di-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Non-aqueous lithium-air batteries represent the next-generation energy storage devices with very high theoretical capacity. The benefit of lithium-air batteries is based on the assumption that the anodic lithium is completely reversible during the discharge-charge process. Here we report our investigation on the reversibility of the anodic lithium inside of an operating lithium-air battery using spatially and temporally resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction and three-dimensional micro-tomography technique. A combined electrochemical process is found, consisting of a partial recovery of lithium metal during the charging cycle and a constant accumulation of lithium hydroxide under both charging and discharging conditions. A lithium hydroxide layer forms on the anode separating the lithium metal from the separator. However, numerous microscopic 'tunnels' are also found within the hydroxide layer that provide a pathway to connect the metallic lithium with the electrolyte, enabling sustained ion-transport and battery operation until the total consumption of lithium.

  18. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main

  19. Novel approach to recover cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion battery using oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianlai; Li, Jinhui; Shen, Bingyu

    2015-09-15

    With the booming of consumer electronics (CE) and electric vehicle (EV), a large number of spent lithium-ion battery (LIBs) have been generated worldwide. Resource depletion and environmental concern driven from the sustainable industry of CE and EV have motivated spent LIBs should be recovered urgently. However, the conventional process combined with leaching, precipitating, and filtering was quite complicated to recover cobalt and lithium from spent LIBs. In this work, we developed a novel recovery process, only combined with oxalic acid leaching and filtering. When the optimal parameters for leaching process is controlled at 150 min retention time, 95 °C heating temperature, 15 g L(-1) solid-liquid ratio, and 400 rpm rotation rate, the recovery rate of lithium and cobalt from spent LIBs can reach about 98% and 97%, respectively. Additionally, we also tentatively discovered the leaching mechanism of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) using oxalic acid, and the leaching order of the sampling LiCoO2 of spent LIBs. All the obtained results can contribute to a short-cut and high-efficiency process of spent LIBs recycling toward a sound closed-loop cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of poly(ethylene oxide) on ionic conductivity and electrochemical properties of poly(vinylidenefluoride) based polymer gel electrolytes prepared by electrospinning for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, Raghavan; Shubha, Nageswaran; Hng, Huey Hoon; Srinivasan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Effect of poly(ethylene oxide) on the electrochemical properties of polymer electrolyte based on electrospun, non-woven membrane of PVdF is demonstrated. Electrospinning process parameters are controlled to get a fibrous membrane consisting of bead-free, uniformly dispersed thin fibers with diameter in the range of 1.5-1.9 μm. The membrane with good mechanical strength and porosity exhibits high uptake when activated with the liquid electrolyte of lithium salt in a mixture of organic solvents. The polymer gel electrolyte shows ionic conductivity of 4.9 × 10-3 S cm-1 at room temperature. Electrochemical performance of the polymer gel electrolyte is evaluated in Li/polymer electrolyte/LiFePO4 coin cell. Good performance with low capacity fading on charge-discharge cycling is demonstrated.