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Sample records for liquid phase transition

  1. Models for a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Giovambattista, N.; Malescio, G.; Sadr-Lahijany, M. R.; Scala, A.; Skibinsky, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study two- and three-dimensional models with the isotropic double-step potential which in addition to the hard core has a repulsive soft core of larger radius. Our results indicate that the presence of two characteristic repulsive distances (hard core and soft core) is sufficient to explain liquid anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition, but these two phenomena may occur independently. Thus liquid-liquid transitions may exist in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly. For 2D, we propose a model with a specific set of hard core and soft core parameters, that qualitatively reproduces the phase diagram and anomalies of liquid water. We identify two solid phases: a square crystal (high density phase), and a triangular crystal (low density phase) and discuss the relation between the anomalies of liquid and the polymorphism of the solid. Similarly to real water, our 2D system may have the second critical point in the metastable liquid phase beyond the freezing line. In 3D, we find several sets of parameters for which two fluid-fluid phase transition lines exist: the first line between gas and liquid and the second line between high-density liquid (HDL) and low-density liquid (LDL). In all cases, the LDL phase shows no density anomaly in 3D. We relate the absence of the density anomaly with the positive slope of the LDL-HDL phase transition line.

  2. Solid-liquid phase transition in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, a modified cell theory has been used to describe the solid-liquid phase transition in argon. The cell-size variations may be evaluated by a self-consistent condition. With the inclusion of cell-size variations, the transition temperature, the solid and liquid densities, and the liquid-phase radial-distribution functions have been calculated. These ab initio results are in satisfactory agreement with molecular-dynamics calculations as well as experimental data on argon.

  3. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  4. Phase transitions in liquid crystal + aerosil gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, Mehmet Kerim

    Liquid Crystals (LCs) are found in many different phases, the most well-known, basic ones being Isotropic (I), Nematic (N), and Smectic-A (SmA). LCs show a rich variety of phase transitions between these phases. This makes them very interesting materials in which to study the basics of phase transitions and related topics. In the low symmetry phases, LCs show both positional and directional orders. X-ray scattering is an important tool to study these phase transitions as it probes the instantaneous positional correlations in these phases. Random forces have a nontrivial effect on ordering in nature, and the problem of phase transitions in the presence of a random field is a current and not well-understood topic. It has been found that aerosils posses a quenched randomness in the mixture of LC+aerosil samples, forming a gel random network which destroys long-range order (LRO) in the SmA phase. This can be modeled as a random field problem. In the N to SmA phase transition in 4O.8 LC (butyloxybenzlidene octylaniline), orientational order (N ) is modified by a 1-D density wave describing 2-D fluid layer spacing structure (SmA). Likewise the I to Sm A phase transition in 10CB LC (decylcyanobiphenyl), a transitional ordered phase develops without going through an orientational ordered phase. To study these phase transitions with aerosil dispersion carries the opportunity to probe the effect of induced quenched random disorder on phase transitions, which are 2nd order in the first case and 1st order in the second case. A two-component line-shape analysis is developed to define the phases in all temperature ranges. It consists of the thermal and the static structure factors. The reentered nematic (RN) phase of the [6:8]OCB+aerosil gels ([6:8]OCB is a mixture of hexyloxycyanobiphenyl and octyloxcyanobiphenyl) is another interesting case in which to study the quenched random disorder effects. The weak SmA phase of [6:8]OCB+aerosil gels is followed by a RN phase at low

  5. Generic mechanism for generating a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Malescio, Gianpietro; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-02-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus-a single-component system-can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order transition between two liquids of different densities is consistent with experimental data for a variety of materials, including single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon. Molecular dynamics simulations of very specific models for supercooled water, liquid carbon and supercooled silica predict a LDL-HDL critical point, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. Here we show that the presence of a LDL and a HDL can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and two characteristic short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state (in particular, liquid metals), and such potentials are often used to describe systems that exhibit a density anomaly. However, our results show that the LDL and HDL phases can occur in systems with no density anomaly. Our results therefore present an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of a density anomaly.

  6. Liquid-Liquid phase transition in a single component system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-06-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus, a single-component system, can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order LDL-HDL transition line ending in a critical point is consistent with experimental data and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations for a variety of single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. By means of MD, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and with not one but `two' preferred short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state, in particular liquid metals. For the fisrt time, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can occur in systems with no density anomaly, opening an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly.

  7. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses. PMID:21614201

  8. Glass phase and other multiple liquid-to-liquid transitions resulting from two-liquid phase competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2016-11-01

    Melt supercooling leads to glass formation. Liquid-to-liquid phase transitions are observed depending on thermal paths. Viscosity, density and surface tension thermal dependences measured at heating and subsequent cooling show hysteresis below a branching temperature and result from the competition of two-liquid phases separated by an enthalpy difference depending on temperature. The nucleation classical equation of these phases is completed by this enthalpy saving existing at all temperatures. The glass phase thermodynamic parameters and their thermal variation have already been determined in such a two-liquid model. They are used at high temperatures to predict liquid-to-liquid transitions in some metallic glass-forming melts.

  9. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-02-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL).

  10. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  11. Intrinsic response of polymer liquid crystals in photochemical phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Tomiki; Sasaki, Takeo; Kim, Haengboo )

    1991-01-24

    Time-resolved measurements were performed on the photochemically induced isothermal phase transition of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) with mesogenic side chains of phenyl benzoate (PAPB3) and cyanobiphenyl (PACB3) under conditions wherein the photochemical reaction of the doped photoresponsive molecule (4-butyl-4-{prime}-methoxyazobenzene, BMAB) was completed within {approximately} 10 ns, and the subsequent phase transition of the matrix PLC from nematic (N) to isotropic (I) state was followed by time-resolved measurements of the birefringence of the system. Formation of a sufficient amount of the cis isomer of BMAB with a single pulse of a laser lowered the N-I phase transition temperature of the mixture, inducing the N-I phase transition of PLCs isothermally in a time range of {approximately} 200 ms. This time range is comparable to that of low molecular weight liquid crystals, indicating that suppression in mobility of mesogens in PLCs does not affect significantly the thermodynamically controlled process.

  12. Adiabatic nucleation in the liquid-vapor phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sá, Elon M.; Meyer, Erich; Soares, Vitorvani

    2001-05-01

    The fundamental difference between classical (isothermal) nucleation theory (CNT) and adiabatic nucleation theory (ANT) is discussed. CNT uses the concept of isothermal heterophase fluctuations, while ANT depends on common fluctuations of the thermodynamic variables. Applications to the nonequilibrium liquid to vapor transition are shown. However, we cannot yet calculate nucleation frequencies. At present, we can only indicate at what temperatures and pressures copious homogeneous nucleation is expected in the liquid to vapor phase transition. It is also explained why a similar general indication cannot be made for the inverse vapor to liquid transition. Simultaneously, the validity of Peng-Robinson's equation of state [D.-Y. Peng and D. B. Robinson, Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 15, 59 (1976)] is confirmed for highly supersaturated liquids.

  13. D2-D1 phase transition of columnar liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. F.; Swift, J.

    1986-04-01

    The D2-D1 phase transition in columnar liquid crystals of the HAT series [e.g., HAT11 (triphenelene hexa-n-dodecanoate)] is discussed within the framework of Landau theory. The order parameters which describe the transition are abstracted from a tensor density function, and are associated with two irreducible representations of the symmetry group of the high-temperature D2 phase. A mechanism for a first-order transition is then suggested in accordance with both theoretical considerations and the experimental result for the D2-D1 transition. Two possible arrangements of the herringbone structure of the D1 phase are obtained, each of which gives six orientational states in the low-temperature D1 phase.

  14. A superconductor to superfluid phase transition in liquid metallic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Babaev, Egor; Sudbø, Asle; Ashcroft, N W

    2004-10-07

    Although hydrogen is the simplest of atoms, it does not form the simplest of solids or liquids. Quantum effects in these phases are considerable (a consequence of the light proton mass) and they have a demonstrable and often puzzling influence on many physical properties, including spatial order. To date, the structure of dense hydrogen remains experimentally elusive. Recent studies of the melting curve of hydrogen indicate that at high (but experimentally accessible) pressures, compressed hydrogen will adopt a liquid state, even at low temperatures. In reaching this phase, hydrogen is also projected to pass through an insulator-to-metal transition. This raises the possibility of new state of matter: a near ground-state liquid metal, and its ordered states in the quantum domain. Ordered quantum fluids are traditionally categorized as superconductors or superfluids; these respective systems feature dissipationless electrical currents or mass flow. Here we report a topological analysis of the projected phase of liquid metallic hydrogen, finding that it may represent a new type of ordered quantum fluid. Specifically, we show that liquid metallic hydrogen cannot be categorized exclusively as a superconductor or superfluid. We predict that, in the presence of a magnetic field, liquid metallic hydrogen will exhibit several phase transitions to ordered states, ranging from superconductors to superfluids.

  15. Liquid-liquid phase transitions and water-like anomalies in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik

    In this thesis we employ computer simulations and statistical physics to understand the origin of liquid-liquid phase transitions and their relationship with anomalies typical of liquid water. Compared with other liquids, water has many anomalies. For example the density anomaly: when water is cooled below 4 °C the density decreases rather than increases. This and other anomalies have also been found to occur in a few other one-component liquids, sometimes in conjunction with the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between a low-density liquid (LDL) and a high-density liquid (HDL). Using simple models we explain how these anomalies arise from the presence of two competing length scales. As a specific example we investigate the cut ramp potential, where we show the importance of "competition" in this context, and how one length scale can sometimes be zero. When there is a clear energetic preference for either LDL or HDL for all pressures and temperatures, then there is insufficient competition between the two liquid structures and no anomalies occur. From the simple models it also follows that anomalies can occur without the presence of a LLPT and vice versa. It remains therefore unclear if water has a LLPT that ends in a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP), a hypothesis that was first proposed based on simulations of the ST2 water model. We confirm the existence of a LLCP in this model using finite size scaling and the Challa-Landau-Binder parameter, and show that the LLPT is not a liquid-crystal transition, as has recently been suggested. Previous research has indicated the possible existence of a LLCP in liquid silica. We perform a detailed analysis of two different silica models (WAC and BKS) at temperatures much lower than was previously simulated. Within the accessible temperature range we find no LLCP in either model, although in the case of WAC potential it is closely approached. We compare our results with those obtained for other

  16. Effect of dimensionality on vapor-liquid phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Dimensionality play significant role on ‘phase transitions’. Fluids in macroscopic confinement (bulk or 3-Dimensional, 3D) do not show significant changes in their phase transition properties with extent of confinement, since the number of molecules away from the surrounding surfaces is astronomically higher than the number of molecules in close proximity of the confining surfaces. In microscopic confinement (quasi 3D to quasi-2D), however, the number of molecules away from the close proximity of the surface is not as high as is the case with macroscopic (3D) confinement. Hence, under the same thermodynamic conditions ‘phase transition’ properties at microscopic confinement may not remain the same as the macroscopic or 3D values. Phase transitions at extremely small scale become very sensitive to the dimensions as well as the surface characteristics of the system. In this work our investigations reveal the effect of dimensionality on the phase transition from 3D to quasi-2D to 2D behavior. We have used grand canonical transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation to understand the vapor–liquid phase transitions from 3D to quasi-2D behavior. Such studies can be helpful in understanding and controlling the fluid film behaviour confined between solid surfaces of few molecular diameters, for example, in lubrication applications.

  17. Liquid-liquid transition without macroscopic phase separation in a water-glycerol mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-05-01

    The existence of more than two liquid states in a single-component substance and the ensuing liquid-liquid transitions (LLTs) has attracted considerable attention because of its counterintuitive nature and its importance in the fundamental understanding of the liquid state. Here we report direct experimental evidence for a genuine (isocompositional) LLT without macroscopic phase separation in an aqueous solution of glycerol. We show that liquid I transforms into liquid II by way of two types of kinetics: nucleation and growth, and spinodal decomposition. Although liquid II is metastable against crystallization, we could access both its static and dynamical properties experimentally. We find that liquids I and II differ in density, refractive index, structure, hydrogen bonding state, glass transition temperature and fragility, and that the transition between the two liquids is mainly driven by the local structuring of water rather than of glycerol, suggesting a link to a plausible LLT inpure water.

  18. The liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon revealed by snapshots of valence electrons.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Sorgenfrei, Florian; Schlotter, William F; Wurth, Wilfried; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    The basis for the anomalies of water is still mysterious. Quite generally tetrahedrally coordinated systems, also silicon, show similar thermodynamic behavior but lack--like water--a thorough explanation. Proposed models--controversially discussed--explain the anomalies as a remainder of a first-order phase transition between high and low density liquid phases, buried deeply in the "no man's land"--a part of the supercooled liquid region where rapid crystallization prohibits any experimental access. Other explanations doubt the existence of the phase transition and its first-order nature. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the first-order-phase transition in silicon. With ultrashort optical pulses of femtosecond duration we instantaneously heat the electronic system of silicon while the atomic structure as defined by the much heavier nuclear system remains initially unchanged. Only on a picosecond time scale the energy is transferred into the atomic lattice providing the energy to drive the phase transitions. With femtosecond X-ray pulses from FLASH, the free-electron laser at Hamburg, we follow the evolution of the valence electronic structure during this process. As the relevant phases are easily distinguishable in their electronic structure, we track how silicon melts into the low-density-liquid phase while a second phase transition into the high-density-liquid phase only occurs after the latent heat for the first-order phase transition has been transferred to the atomic structure. Proving the existence of the liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon, the hypothesized liquid-liquid scenario for water is strongly supported.

  19. Computer simulations of liquid silica: Equation of state and liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Sciortino, Francesco; Poole, Peter H.

    2001-01-01

    We conduct extensive molecular dynamics computer simulations of two models for liquid silica [the model of Woodcock, Angell and Cheeseman, J. Phys. Chem. 65, 1565 (1976); and that of van Beest, Kramer, and van Santen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1955 (1990)] to determine their thermodynamic properties at low temperature T across a wide density range. We find for both models a wide range of states in which isochores of the potential energy U are a linear function of T3/5, as recently proposed for simple liquids [Rosenfeld and P. Tarazona, Mol. Phys. 95, 141 (1998)]. We exploit this behavior to fit an accurate equation of state to our thermodynamic data. Extrapolation of this equation of state to low T predicts the occurrence of a liquid-liquid phase transition for both models. We conduct simulations in the region of the predicted phase transition, and confirm its existence by direct observation of phase separating droplets of atoms with distinct local density and coordination environments.

  20. String theory, quantum phase transitions, and the emergent Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Cubrović, Mihailo; Zaanen, Jan; Schalm, Koenraad

    2009-07-24

    A central problem in quantum condensed matter physics is the critical theory governing the zero-temperature quantum phase transition between strongly renormalized Fermi liquids as found in heavy fermion intermetallics and possibly in high-critical temperature superconductors. We found that the mathematics of string theory is capable of describing such fermionic quantum critical states. Using the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence to relate fermionic quantum critical fields to a gravitational problem, we computed the spectral functions of fermions in the field theory. By increasing the fermion density away from the relativistic quantum critical point, a state emerges with all the features of the Fermi liquid.

  1. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Ferreira, Fabio F.; Costa, Fanny N.; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  2. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thamires A; Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Ferreira, Fabio F; Costa, Fanny N; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-14

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  3. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Dan, K; Roy, M; Datta, A

    2015-09-07

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min(-1), consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min(-1) and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  4. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min-1, consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min-1 and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  5. Modeling the solid-liquid phase transition in saturated triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Hanna, Charles B.; Sandt, Christophe; MacDonald, Adam J.; MacEachern, Ronald; Corkery, Robert; Rousseau, Dérick

    2010-02-01

    We investigated theoretically two competing published scenarios for the melting transition of the triglyceride trilaurin (TL): those of (1) Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], in which the average state of each TL molecule in the liquid phase is a discotic "Y" conformer whose three chains are dynamically twisted, with an average angle of ˜120° between them, and those of (2) Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid-state conformation of the TL molecule in the liquid phase is a nematic h∗-conformer whose three chains are in a modified "chair" conformation. We developed two competing models for the two scenarios, in which TL molecules are in a nematic compact-chair (or "h") conformation, with extended, possibly all-trans, chains at low-temperatures, and in either a Y conformation or an h∗ conformation in the liquid state at temperatures higher than the phase-transition temperature, T∗=319 K. We defined an h-Y model as a realization of the proposal of Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], and explored its predictions by mapping it onto an Ising model in a temperature-dependent field, performing a mean-field approximation, and calculating the transition enthalpy ΔH. We found that the most plausible realization of the h-Y model, as applied to the solid-liquid phase transition in TL, and likely to all saturated triglycerides, gave a value of ΔH in reasonable agreement with the experiment. We then defined an alternative h-h∗ model as a realization of the proposal of Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid phase exhibits an average symmetry breaking similar to an h conformation, but with twisted chains, to see whether it could describe the TL phase transition. The h-h∗ model gave a value of ΔH that was too small by a factor of ˜3-4. We also predicted the temperature dependence of the 1132 cm-1 Raman band for both models, and performed measurements of the ratios of three TL Raman

  6. Volume phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystalline gels

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2015-05-07

    We present a mean field theory to describe anisotropic deformations of a cholesteric elastomer without solvent molecules and a cholesteric liquid crystalline gel immersed in isotropic solvents at a thermal equilibrium state. Based on the neoclassical rubber theory of nematic elastomers, we derive an elastic energy and a twist distortion energy, which are important to determine the shape of a cholesteric elastomer (or gel). We demonstrate that when the elastic energy dominates in the free energy, the cholesteric elastomer causes a spontaneous compression in the pitch axis and elongates along the director on the plane perpendicular to the pitch axis. Our theory can qualitatively describe the experimental results of a cholesteric elastomer. We also predict the first-order volume phase transitions and anisotropic deformations of a gel at the cholesteric-isotropic phase transition temperature. Depending on a chirality of a gel, we find a prolate or oblate shape of cholesteric gels.

  7. Nature of the first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Yu, Y. J.; Tan, X. M.

    2015-08-01

    The first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled Si is revisited by long-time first-principle molecular dynamics simulations. As the focus of the present paper, its nature is revealed by analyzing the inherent structures of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL). Our results show that it is a transition between a sp3-hybridization LDL and a white-tin-like HDL. This uncovers the origin of the semimetal-metal transition accompanying it and also proves that HDL is the metastable extension of high temperature equilibrium liquid into the supercooled regime. The pressure-temperature diagram of supercooled Si thus can be regarded in some respects as shifted reflection of its crystalline phase diagram.

  8. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and

  9. Cluster Monte Carlo and numerical mean field analysis for the water liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Marco G.; Stokely, Kevin; Strekalova, Elena G.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2009-04-01

    Using Wolff's cluster Monte Carlo simulations and numerical minimization within a mean field approach, we study the low temperature phase diagram of water, adopting a cell model that reproduces the known properties of water in its fluid phases. Both methods allow us to study the thermodynamic behavior of water at temperatures, where other numerical approaches - both Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics - are seriously hampered by the large increase of the correlation times. The cluster algorithm also allows us to emphasize that the liquid-liquid phase transition corresponds to the percolation transition of tetrahedrally ordered water molecules.

  10. Microgravity Studies of Liquid-Liquid Phase Transitions in Alumina-Yttria Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynes, Buddy (Technical Monitor); Weber, Richard; Nordine, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scientific objective of this research is to increase the fundamental knowledge base for liquid- phase processing of technologically important oxide materials. The experimental objective is to define conditions and hardware requirements for microgravity flight experiments to test and expand the experimental hypotheses that: 1. Liquid phase transitions can occur in undercooled melts by a diffusionless process. 2. Onset of the liquid phase transition is accompanied by a large change in the temperature dependence of melt viscosity. Experiments on undercooled YAG (Y3A15012)- and rare earth oxide aluminate composition liquids demonstrated a large departure from an Arrhenian temperature dependence of viscosity. Liquid YAG is nearly inviscid at its 2240 K melting point. Glass fibers were pulled from melts undercooled by ca. 600 K indicating that the viscosity is on the order of 100 Pans (1000 Poise) at 1600 K. This value of viscosity is 500 times greater than that obtained by extrapolation of data for temperatures above the melting point of YAG. These results show that the liquids are extremely fragile and that the onset of the highly non-Arrhenian viscosity-temperature relationship occurs at a temperature considerably below the equilibrium melting point of the solid phases. Further results on undercooled alumina-yttria melts containing 23-42 mole % yttrium oxide indicate that a congruent liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in the undercooled liquids. The rates of transition are inconsistent with a diffusion-limited process. This research is directed to investigation of the scientifically interesting phenomena of polyamorphism and fragility in undercooled rare earth oxide aluminum oxide liquids. The results bear on the technologically important problem of producing high value rare earth-based optical materials.

  11. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolot'ko, A. S.; Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Shvetsov, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitions are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.

  12. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolot’ko, A. S. Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Shvetsov, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitions are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.

  13. Relationship between the liquid liquid phase transition and dynamic behaviour in the Jagla model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Limei; Ehrenberg, Isaac; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2006-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study a spherically symmetric 'two-scale' Jagla potential with both repulsive and attractive ramps. This potential displays a liquid-liquid phase transition with a positively sloped coexistence line ending at a critical point well above the equilibrium melting line. We study the dynamic behaviour in the vicinity of this liquid-liquid critical point. Below the critical point, we find that the dynamics in the more ordered high density liquid (HDL) are much slower then the dynamics in the less ordered low density liquid (LDL). Moreover, the behaviour of the diffusion constant and relaxation time in the HDL phase follows approximately an Arrhenius law, while in the LDL phase the slope of the Arrhenius fit increases upon cooling. Above the critical pressure, as we cool the system at constant pressure, the behaviour of the dynamics smoothly changes with temperature. It resembles the behaviour of the LDL at high temperatures and resembles the behaviour of the HDL at low temperatures. This dynamic crossover happens in the vicinity of the Widom line (the extension of the coexistence line into the one-phase region) which also has a positive slope. Our work suggests a possible general relation between a liquid-liquid phase transition and the change in dynamics.

  14. Acoustic levitation of liquid drops: Dynamics, manipulation and phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Zang, Duyang; Yu, Yinkai; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Wu, Hongjing; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-03-18

    The technique of acoustic levitation normally produces a standing wave and the potential well of the sound field can be used to trap small objects. Since no solid surface is involved it has been widely applied for the study of fluid physics, nucleation, bio/chemical processes, and various forms of soft matter. In this article, we survey the works on drop dynamics in acoustic levitation, focus on how the dynamic behavior is related to the rheological properties and discuss the possibility to develop a novel rheometer based on this technique. We review the methods and applications of acoustic levitation for the manipulation of both liquid and solid samples and emphasize the important progress made in the study of phase transitions and bio-chemical analysis. We also highlight the possible open areas for future research.

  15. Mechanism of phase transition, from vapor to solid: Transient liquid phase is between the two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, A. K.; Wang, Junyong; Zhang, Hongwei; Han, Min

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of phase transition, from vapor to solid, is studied by producing non-stoichiometric ZnO and CdS nanoclusters (NCs) by low-energy cluster beam deposition technique, and examining their morphological and compositional evolution over a long span of time. It is concluded that the transition of vapor to solid goes through a transient liquid phase: coagulation of a large number of atomic clusters first forms liquid NCs which then solidify. The nature of the material and the experimental conditions determine crystallinity and shape of the NCs during the solidification process.

  16. Changes in adsorption and optical properties of liquid crystal langmuir films at structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. B.; Levshin, N. L.; Khlybov, S. V.; Yudin, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption isotherms of water molecules, absorption spectra, and spectra of diffuse scattering and polarization of reflected light are studied for ultrathin Langmuir films prepared based on liquid crystals. A structural phase transition near 70°C is detected. Some specific features of the reflection spectra at the phase transition temperature are found. Suggestions are made regarding the nature of the phase transition.

  17. Determination of the liquid crystals phase transition temperatures using optical rotation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiao-ling; Liu, Wei-guo; Liu, Peng; Cai, Chang-long

    2011-11-01

    Using optical rotation effect, a sensitive, simple optical analytical system is developed for determining the phase transition temperatures of liquid crystals (LCs). When a monochromatic polarized light passes through LCs sample and analyzer, the light intensity changes with temperature. Especially, during the phase transition process, the intensity varies greatly due to optical rotation effect. The variation of light intensity versus variation of temperature curve shows the phase transition temperatures of LCs clearly. The phase transition temperatures of three cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) and a nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) were detected by this method, and compared with those of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized light microscope (PLM) methods.

  18. Bubbles in liquids with phase transition. Part 1. On phase change of a single vapor bubble in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Wolfgang; Duderstadt, Frank; Hantke, Maren; Warnecke, Gerald

    2012-11-01

    In the forthcoming second part of this paper a system of balance laws for a multi-phase mixture with many dispersed bubbles in liquid is derived where phase transition is taken into account. The exchange terms for mass, momentum and energy explicitly depend on evolution laws for total mass, radius and temperature of single bubbles. Therefore in the current paper we consider a single bubble of vapor and inert gas surrounded by the corresponding liquid phase. The creation of bubbles, e.g. by nucleation is not taken into account. We study the behavior of this bubble due to condensation and evaporation at the interface. The aim is to find evolution laws for total mass, radius and temperature of the bubble, which should be as simple as possible but consider all relevant physical effects. Special attention is given to the effects of surface tension and heat production on the bubble dynamics as well as the propagation of acoustic elastic waves by including slight compressibility of the liquid phase. Separately we study the influence of the three phenomena heat conduction, elastic waves and phase transition on the evolution of the bubble. We find ordinary differential equations that describe the bubble dynamics. It turns out that the elastic waves in the liquid are of greatest importance to the dynamics of the bubble radius. The phase transition has a strong influence on the evolution of the temperature, in particular at the interface. Furthermore the phase transition leads to a drastic change of the water content in the bubble. It is shown that a rebounding bubble is only possible, if it contains in addition an inert gas. In Part 2 of the current paper the equations derived are sought in order to close the system of equations for multi-phase mixture balance laws for dispersed bubbles in liquids involving phase change.

  19. Phase transitions and criticality in small systems: vapor-liquid transition in nanoscale spherical cavities.

    PubMed

    Neimark, Alexander V; Vishnyakov, Aleksey

    2006-05-18

    Phase transformations in fluids confined to nanoscale pores, which demonstrate characteristic signatures of first-order phase transitions, have been extensively documented in experiments and molecular simulations. They are characterized by a pronounced hysteresis, which disappears above a certain temperature. A rigorous interpretation of these observations represents a fundamental problem from the point of view of statistical mechanics. Nanoscale systems are essentially small, finite volume systems, in which the concept of the thermodynamic limit is no longer valid, and the statistical ensembles are not equivalent. Here, we present a rigorous approach to the description and molecular simulations of phase transitions and criticality in small confined systems, as illustrated by the example of vapor-liquid transition (capillary condensation) in spherical cavities. The method is based on the analysis of the canonical ensemble isotherms, which can be generated by the gauge cell Monte Carlo simulation method. The method allows one to define the critical temperature of phase transition, conditions of phase equilibrium, limits of stability of metastable states, and nucleation barriers, which determine hysteretic phase transformations.

  20. Paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition in achiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pociecha, Damian; Gorecka, Ewa; Čepič, Mojca; Vaupotič, Nataša; Gomola, Kinga; Mieczkowski, Jozef

    2005-12-01

    Critical freezing of molecular rotation in an achiral smectic phase, which leads to polar ordering through the second order paraelectric-antiferroelectric (Sm-A→Sm-APA) phase transition is studied theoretically and experimentally. Strong softening of the polar mode in the Sm-A phase and highly intensive dielectric mode in the Sm-APA phase are observed due to weak antiferroelectric interactions in the system. In the Sm-APA phase the dielectric response behaves critically upon biasing by a dc electric field. Such a behavior is found general for the antiferroelectric smectic phase with significant quadrupolar interlayer coupling.

  1. Going full circle: phase-transition thermodynamics of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Ulrich; Verevkin, Sergey P; Koslowski, Thorsten; Krossing, Ingo

    2011-05-27

    We present the full enthalpic phase transition cycle for ionic liquids (ILs) as examples of non-classical salts. The cycle was closed for the lattice, solvation, dissociation, and vaporization enthalpies of 30 different ILs, relying on as much experimental data as was available. High-quality dissociation enthalpies were calculated at the G3 MP2 level. From the cycle, we could establish, for the first time, the lattice and solvation enthalpies of ILs with imidazolium ions. For vaporization, lattice, and dissociation enthalpies, we also developed new prediction methods in the course of our investigations. Here, as only single-ion values need to be calculated and the tedious optimization of an ion pair can be circumvented, the computational time is short. For the vaporization enthalpy, a very simple approach was found, using a surface term and the calculated enthalpic correction to the total gas-phase energy. For the lattice enthalpy, the most important constituent proved to be the calculated conductor-like screening model (COSMO) solvation enthalpy in the ideal electric conductor. A similar model was developed for the dissociation enthalpy. According to our assessment, the typical error of the lattice enthalpy would be 9.4 kJ mol(-1), which is less than half the deviation we get when using the (optimized) Kapustinskii equation or the recent volume-based thermodynamics (VBT) theory. In contrast, the non-optimized VBT formula gives lattice enthalpies 20 to 140 kJ mol(-1) lower than the ones we assessed in the cycle, because of the insufficient description of dispersive interactions. Our findings show that quantum-chemical calculations can greatly improve the VBT approaches, which were parameterized for simple, inorganic salts with ideally point-shaped charges. In conclusion, we suggest the term "augmented VBT", or "aVBT", to describe this kind of theoretical approach.

  2. Boson peak, Ioffe-Regel Crossover, and Liquid-Liquid phase transition in Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pradeep

    We have investigated the onset of Boson peak in a model of liquid water which exhibits a clear first-order phase transition between a low-density liquid phase and a high-density liquid phase of water at low temperature and high pressure. We find that the at low pressures, the onset of Boson peak coincides with the Widom-line of the system. At high pressures, the onset occurs at the transition temperature between the two liquids. Furthermore, we show that at both low and high pressure, the frequency of the Boson peak coincides with the Ioffe-Regel crossover of the transverse phonons, suggesting that the breakdown of Debye behavior is a general feature of Ioffe-Regel limit crossover in supercooled water. The frequency of the Boson peak is weakly pressure dependent and decreases with increasing pressure. Our work bridges gap between the experimental results on the Boson peak nanoconfined water and the behavior that one would expect from a bulk system.

  3. Anomalous properties and the liquid-liquid phase transition in gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Limei

    2016-08-01

    A group of materials including water and silicon exhibit many anomalous behaviors, e.g., density anomaly and diffusivity anomaly (increase upon compression). These materials are hypothesized to have a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and the critical fluctuation in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point is considered as the origin of different anomalies. Liquid gallium was also reported to have a LLPT, yet whether it shows similar water-like anomalies is not yet studied. Using molecular dynamics simulations on a modified embedded-atom model, we study the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural properties of liquid gallium as well as its LLPT. We find that, similar to water-like materials predicted to have the LLPT, gallium also shows different anomalous behaviors (e.g., density anomaly, diffusivity anomaly, and structural anomaly). We also find that its thermodynamic and structural response functions are continuous and show maxima in the supercritical region, the loci of which asymptotically approach to the other and merge to the Widom line. These phenomena are consistent with the supercritical phenomenon in a category of materials with a liquid-liquid critical point, which could be common features in most materials with a LLPT.

  4. Supercritical phenomenon of hydrogen beyond the liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Chen, Ji; Li, Xinzheng; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the supercritical phenomenon associated with the liquid-liquid phase transition of hydrogen by studying the isothermal response functions, such as electric conductivity, molecular dissociation coefficient and isothermal compressibility, with respect to pressure. We find that, along each isotherm in the supercritical region, each of these response functions shows a maximum, the location of which is different for different response functions. As temperature decreases, the loci of these maxima asymptotically converge to a line of zero ordering field, known as the Widom line along which the magnitude of the response function maxima becomes larger and larger until it diverges as the critical point is approached. Thus, our study provides a possible way to locate the liquid-liquid critical point of hydrogen from the supercritical region at lower pressures. It also indicates that the supercritical phonomenon near the critical point of hydrogen is a rather general feature of second-order phase transition, it is not only true for classical systems with weak interactions but also true for highly condensed system with strong inter-atomic interactions.

  5. Dynamical and structural heterogeneities close to liquid-liquid phase transitions: The case of gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Alex; Cajahuaringa, Samuel; de Koning, Maurice

    2013-03-01

    Liquid-liquid phase transitions (LLPT) have been proposed in order to explain the thermodynamic anomalies exhibited by some liquids. Recently, it was found, through molecular dynamics simulations, that liquid elemental gallium, described by a modified embedded-atom model, exhibits a LLPT between a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL), about 60 K below the melting temperature. In this work, we studied the dynamics of supercooled liquid gallium close to the LLPT. Our results show a large increase in the plateau of the self-intermediate scattering function (β-relaxation process) and in the non-Gaussian parameter, indicating a pronounced dynamical heterogeneity upon the onset of the LLPT. The dynamical heterogeneity of the LDL is closely correlated to its structural heterogeneity, since the fast diffusing atoms belong to high-density domains of predominantly 9-fold coordinated atoms, whereas the slow diffusing ones are mostly in low-density domains of 8-fold coordinated atoms. The energetics suggests that the reason for the sluggish dynamics of LDL is due to its larger cohesive energy as compared to that of the HDL. Work supported by FAPESP, CNPq, CAPES, and FAEPEX/UNICAMP

  6. Dimensionless ratios: Characteristics of quantum liquids and their phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi-Cong; Chen, Yang-Yang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Römer, Rudolf A.; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Dimensionless ratios of physical properties can characterize low-temperature phases in a wide variety of materials. As such, the Wilson ratio (WR), the Kadowaki-Woods ratio, and the Wiedemann-Franz law capture essential features of Fermi liquids in metals, heavy fermions, etc. Here we prove that the phases of many-body interacting multicomponent quantum liquids in one dimension (1D) can be described by WRs based on the compressibility, susceptibility, and specific heat associated with each component. These WRs arise due to additivity rules within subsystems reminiscent of the rules for multiresistor networks in series and parallel—a novel and useful characteristic of multicomponent Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids (TLL) independent of microscopic details of the systems. Using experimentally realized multispecies cold atomic gases as examples, we prove that the Wilson ratios uniquely identify phases of TLL, while providing universal scaling relations at the boundaries between phases. Their values within a phase are solely determined by the stiffnesses and sound velocities of subsystems and identify the internal degrees of freedom of said phase such as its spin degeneracy. This finding can be directly applied to a wide range of 1D many-body systems and reveals deep physical insights into recent experimental measurements of the universal thermodynamics in ultracold atoms and spins.

  7. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k =km will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k =0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k =km will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C , but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  8. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k=k(m) will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k=0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k=k(m) will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C, but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  9. Quasi-liquid layer theory based on the bulk first-order phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhkin, I. A. Petrenko, V. F.

    2009-01-15

    The theory of the superionic phase transition (bulk first-order transition) proposed in [1] is used to explain the existence of a quasi-liquid layer at an ice surface below its melting point. An analytical expression is derived for the quasi-liquid layer thickness. Numerical estimates are made and compared with experiment. Distinction is made between the present model and other quasi-liquid layer theories.

  10. Toward the observation of a liquid-liquid phase transition in patchy origami tetrahedra: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ciarella, Simone; Gang, Oleg; Sciortino, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    We evaluate the phase diagram of a model of tetrameric particles where the arms of the tetrahedra are made by six hard cylinders. An interacting site is present on each one of the four vertices allowing the particles to form a bonded network. These model particles provide a coarse-grained but realistic representation of recently synthesised DNA origami tetrahedra. We show that the resulting network is sufficiently empty to allow for partial interpenetration and it is sufficiently flexible to avoid crystallisation (at least on the numerical time scale), satisfying both criteria requested for the observation of a liquid-liquid critical point in tetrahedrally coordinated particles. Grand-canonical simulations provide evidence that, in silico, the model is indeed characterised, in addition to the gas-liquid transition, by a transition between two distinct liquid phases. Our results suggest that an experimental observation of a liquid-liquid transition in a colloidal system can be achieved in the near future.

  11. Direct Raman evidence for a weak continuous phase transition in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Natalie K; Dillon, Stephanie R; Dougherty, Ralph C; Galligan, Dawn K; Howard, Louis N

    2006-06-22

    This paper presents the Raman depolarization ratio of degassed ultrapure water as a function of temperature, in the range 303.4-314.4 K (30.2-41.2 degrees C). The pressure of the sample was the vapor pressure of water at the measurement temperature. The data provide a direct indication of the existence of a phase transition in the liquid at 307.7 K, 5.8 kPa (34.6 degrees C, 0.057 atm). The minimum in the heat capacity, C(p)(), of water occurs at 34.5 degrees C, 1.0 atm (J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 1939, 23, 197(1)). The minimum in C(p)() is shallow, and the transition is a weak-continuous phase transition. The pressure coefficient of the viscosity of water changes sign as pressure increases for temperatures below 35 degrees C (Nature 1965, 207, 620(2)). The viscosity minimum tracks the liquid phase transition in the P, T plane where it connects with the minimum in the freezing point of pure water in the same plane (Proc. Am. Acad. Arts Sci. 1911-12, 47, 441(3)). Previously we argued (J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 109, 7379(4)) that the minimum in the pressure coefficient of viscosity signaled the elimination of three-dimensional connectivity in liquid water. These observations coupled with recent measurements of the coordination shell of water near 300 K (Science 2004, 304, 995(5)) suggest that the structural component that changes during the phase transition is tetrahedrally coordinated water. At temperatures above the transition, there is no tetrahedrally coordinated water in the liquid and locally planar water structures dominate the liquid structure. Water is a structured liquid with distinct local structures that vary with temperature. Furthermore, liquid water has a liquid-liquid phase transition near the middle of the normal liquid range.

  12. On the existence of vapor-liquid phase transition in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, M.; Sen, A.; Ganesh, R.; Avinash, K.

    2014-10-15

    The phenomenon of phase transition in a dusty-plasma system (DPS) has attracted some attention in the past. Earlier Farouki and Hamaguchi [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 9876 (1994)] have demonstrated the existence of a liquid to solid transition in DPS where the dust particles interact through a Yukawa potential. However, the question of the existence of a vapor-liquid (VL) transition in such a system remains unanswered and relatively unexplored so far. We have investigated this problem by performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations which show that the VL transition does not have a critical curve in the pressure versus volume diagram for a large range of the Yukawa screening parameter κ and the Coulomb coupling parameter Γ. Thus, the VL phase transition is found to be super-critical, meaning that this transition is continuous in the dusty plasma model given by Farouki and Hamaguchi. We provide an approximate analytic explanation of this finding by means of a simple model calculation.

  13. Influence of the coulomb interaction on the liquid-gas phase transition and nuclear multifragmentation.

    PubMed

    Gulminelli, F; Chomaz, Ph; Raduta, Al H; Raduta, Ad R

    2003-11-14

    The liquid-gas phase transition is analyzed from the topologic properties of the event distribution in the observables space. A multicanonical formalism allows one to directly relate the standard phase transition with neutral particles to the case where the nonsaturating Coulomb interaction is present, and to interpret the Coulomb effect as a deformation of the probability distributions and a rotation of the order parameter. This formalism is applied to a statistical multifragmentation model and consequences for the nuclear multifragmentation phase transitions are drawn.

  14. Field-induced phase transitions in chiral smectic liquid crystals studied by the constant current method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, Dhaouadi; R, Zgueb; O, Riahi; F, Trabelsi; T, Othman

    2016-05-01

    In ferroelectric liquid crystals, phase transitions can be induced by an electric field. The current constant method allows these transition to be quickly localized and thus the (E,T) phase diagram of the studied product can be obtained. In this work, we make a slight modification to the measurement principles based on this method. This modification allows the characteristic parameters of ferroelectric liquid crystal to be quantitatively measured. The use of a current square signal highlights a phenomenon of ferroelectric hysteresis with remnant polarization at null field, which points out an effect of memory in this compound.

  15. Successive disorder to disorder phase transitions in ionic liquid [HMIM][BF4] under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiang; Yuan, Chaosheng; Li, Haining; Zhu, Pinwen; Su, Lei; Yang, Kun; Wu, Jie; Yang, Guoqiang; Liu, Jing

    2016-02-01

    In situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction have been employed to investigate the phase behavior of ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([HMIM][BF4]) under high pressure up to 20 GPa at room temperature. With increasing pressure, some characteristic bands of [HMIM][BF4] disappear, and some characteristic bands of [HMIM][BF4] display non-monotonic pressure-induced frequency shift and non-monotonic variation of full width at half-maximum. Two successive phase transitions at ˜1.7 GPa and 7.3 GPa have been corroborated by the results above. The glass transition pressure (Pg) of [HMIM][BF4] at ˜7.3 GPa has been obtained by ruby R1 line broadening measurements and analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns, and its glass transition mechanism is also analyzed in detail. These facts are suggestive of two successive disorder to disorder phase transitions induced by compression, that is, [HMIM][BF4] serves as a superpressurized glass under the pressure above 7.3 GPa, which is similar to the glassy state at low temperature, and a compression-induced liquid to liquid phase transition in [HMIM][BF4] occurs at ˜1.7 GPa. Besides, the conformational equilibrium of the GAAA conformer and AAAA conformer was converted easily in liquid [HMIM][BF4], while it was difficult to be influenced in glassy state.

  16. Direct measurement of the propagation of the phase-transition region of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    Many types of active matter, such as biological cells, have liquid-crystalline membranes, which are soft and flexible in their interactions with their surroundings and sometimes allow molecular-structural or -orientational changes to extend for long distances, owing to long-range molecular interactions. Despite the technological and fundamental importance of these long-range changes, there is no good physical property with which to express them for the liquid crystal. Here, we show direct measurements of the propagation of structural or orientational changes due to long-range molecular interactions in liquid crystals. We induced a patterned phase transition in a liquid crystal via illumination with a fringe pattern and observed the propagation of the phase-transition region. We determined that the propagation occurred in a ballistic manner with a velocity of 80–110 m/s and that two types of propagation—side-by-side and head-to-tail molecular interactions—were found.

  17. Liquid-crystal-anchoring transitions at surfaces created by polymerization-induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundson, Karl R.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    1998-08-01

    A surface anchoring transition of a nematic at polymer surfaces created by polymerization-induced phase separation is presented. This transition is unusual in that it occurs far from bulk nematic phase transitions and it is tunable across nearly the entire nematic temperature range by modification of the polymer side group. Anchoring behavior is qualitatively understood by considerating enthalpic and entropic contributions to surface energy. Interesting behavior of some polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal films is explained, and observations provide a pathway to control properties.

  18. Liquid-gas phase transitions in a multicomponent nuclear system with Coulomb and surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. J.; Mekjian, A. Z.

    2001-04-01

    The liquid-gas phase transition is studied in a multicomponent nuclear system using a local Skyrme interaction with Coulomb and surface effects. Some features are qualitatively the same as the results of Mu''ller and Serot where a relativistic mean field was used without Coulomb and surface effects. Surface tension brings the coexistence binodal surface to lower pressure. The Coulomb interaction makes the binodal surface smaller and causes another pair of binodal points at low pressure and large proton fraction with fewer protons in the liquid phase and more protons in the gas phase.

  19. Relation between the Widom line and the dynamic crossover in systems with a liquid-liquid phase transition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Limei; Kumar, Pradeep; Buldyrev, S V; Chen, S-H; Poole, P H; Sciortino, F; Stanley, H E

    2005-11-15

    We investigate, for two water models displaying a liquid-liquid critical point, the relation between changes in dynamic and thermodynamic anomalies arising from the presence of the liquid-liquid critical point. We find a correlation between the dynamic crossover and the locus of specific heat maxima C(P)(max) ("Widom line") emanating from the critical point. Our findings are consistent with a possible relation between the previously hypothesized liquid-liquid phase transition and the transition in the dynamics recently observed in neutron scattering experiments on confined water. More generally, we argue that this connection between C(P)(max) and dynamic crossover is not limited to the case of water, a hydrogen bond network-forming liquid, but is a more general feature of crossing the Widom line. Specifically, we also study the Jagla potential, a spherically symmetric two-scale potential known to possess a liquid-liquid critical point, in which the competition between two liquid structures is generated by repulsive and attractive ramp interactions.

  20. Ionic Switch Induced by a Rectangular-Hexagonal Phase Transition in Benzenammonium Columnar Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Soberats, Bartolome; Yoshio, Masafumi; Ichikawa, Takahiro; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Ungar, Goran; Kato, Takashi

    2015-10-21

    We demonstrate switching of ionic conductivities in wedge-shaped liquid-crystalline (LC) ammonium salts. A thermoreversible phase transition between the rectangular columnar (Colr) and hexagonal columnar (Colh) phases is used for the switch. The ionic conductivities in the Colh phase are about four orders of magnitude higher than those in the Colr phase. The switching behavior of conductivity can be ascribed to the structural change of assembled ionic channels. X-ray experiments reveal a highly ordered packing of the ions in the Colr phase, which prevents the ion transport.

  1. The Boson peak in confined water: An experimental investigation of the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-10-01

    The Boson peak (BP) of deeply cooled confined water is studied by using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in a large interval of the ( P, T) phase plane. By taking into account the different behavior of such a collective vibrational mode in both strong and fragile glasses as well as in glass-forming materials, we were able to determine the Widom line that characterizes supercooled bulk water within the frame of the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis. The peak frequency and width of the BP correlated with the water polymorphism of the LLPT scenario, allowing us to distinguish the "low-density liquid" (LDL) and "high-density liquid" (HDL) phases in deeply cooled bulk water.Moreover, the BP properties afford a further confirmation of theWidom line temperature T W as the ( P, T) locus in which the local structure of water transforms from a predominately LDL form to a predominately HDL form.

  2. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  3. Phase Transition and Dynamics in Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid Crystals through a Metastable Highly Ordered Smectic Phase.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Keito; Tomida, Kenji; Taniguchi, Natsumi; Hara, Hironori; Takikawa, Yoshinori; Sadakane, Koichiro; Nakamura, Kenji; Konishi, Takashi; Fukao, Koji

    2016-06-16

    The phase transition behavior and dynamics of ionic liquid crystals, 1-methyl-3-alkylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate with various alkyl chain lengths, were investigated by X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism of their structural and phase changes. A metastable phase was found to appear via a supercooled smectic phase on cooling. In the metastable phase, disorder in the smectic phase is partially frozen; thus, the phase has order higher than that of the smectic phase but lower than that of the crystalline phase. During the subsequent heating process, the frozen disorder activates, and a crystalline phase appears in the supercooled smectic phase before entering the smectic phase. The relationship between the phase behavior and the dynamics of charge carriers such as ions is also discussed.

  4. Simulation of pressure-induced phase transition in liquid and amorphous Al2 O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Vo Van; Oh, Suhk Kun

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the pressure-induced structural transformation in liquid and amorphous Al2O3 by the molecular dynamics (MD) method. Simulations were done in the basic cube under periodic boundary conditions containing 3000 ions with Born-Mayer type pair potentials. The structure of the amorphous Al2O3 model with real density at ambient pressure is in good agreement with Lamparter’s experiment. In order to study the amorphous-amorphous phase transition, 23 models of amorphous alumina at the temperature of 350K and at densities ranging from 2.83to5.0gcm-3 had been built. The microstructure of the Al2O3 systems had been analyzed through pair radial distribution functions, coordination number distributions, interatomic distances, and bond-angle distributions. Here we found clear evidence of a structural transition in amorphous alumina from a tetrahedral to an octahedral network upon compression. According to our results, this transformation occurred at densities ranging from 3.6to4.05gcm-3 . We also presented the amorphous-amorphous phase transition from an octahedral to a tetrahedral network structure upon decompression at densities ranging from 5.00to2.83gcm-3 . Also, the same study was carried out for the liquid state of the system at the temperature of 3500K , and the liquid-liquid phase transition had been discussed.

  5. Finite-time thermodynamics and the gas-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Schön, J. C.; Jansen, M.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we study the application of the concept of finite-time thermodynamics to first-order phase transitions. As an example, we investigate the transition from the gaseous to the liquid state by modeling the liquification of the gas in a finite time. In particular, we introduce, state, and solve an optimal control problem in which we aim at achieving the gas-liquid first-order phase transition through supersaturation within a fixed time in an optimal fashion, in the sense that the work required to supersaturate the gas, called excess work, is minimized by controlling the appropriate thermodynamic parameters. The resulting set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is then solved for three systems, nitrogen N2 , oxygen O2 , and water vapor H2O .

  6. Liquid crystalline phase transitions in virus and virus/polymer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogic, Zvonimir

    Using experimental, theoretical, and simulation methods, we investigate the relationship between the intermolecular interactions of rod-like colloids and the resulting liquid crystalline phase diagrams. As a model system of rod-like particles we use bacteriophage fd, which is a charge stabilized colloid. We are able to engineer complex attractive and repulsive intermolecular interactions by changing the ionic strengths of the suspensions, attaching covalently bound polymers and adding nonadsorbing polymers. Using standard molecular cloning techniques it is also shown that the aspect ratio of the rod-like particle can be manipulated. In the limit of high ionic strength the fd virus quantitatively agrees with the Onsager theory for the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase transition in hard rods. The role of attractive interaction on the nature of the I-N phase transition is investigated. As the strength of the attraction is increased we observe isotropic-smectic (I-S) phase transitions. Using an optical microscope we follow the kinetics of the I-S phase transition and observe a wide range of novel structures of unexpected complexity. We also investigate the influence of adding hard spheres, or polymers on the nematic-smectic phase transition. We conclude that adding small spheres stabilizes the smectic phase and destabilizes the nematic phase.

  7. Investigating the solid-liquid phase transition of water nanofilms using the generalized replica exchange method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Farrell, James D.; Wales, David J.; Straub, John E.

    2014-11-01

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) was applied to study a solid-liquid phase transition in a nanoconfined bilayer water system using the monatomic water (mW) model. Exploiting optimally designed non-Boltzmann sampling weights with replica exchanges, gREM enables an effective sampling of configurations that are metastable or unstable in the canonical ensemble via successive unimodal energy distributions across phase transition regions, often characterized by S-loop or backbending in the statistical temperature. Extensive gREM simulations combined with Statistical Temperature Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (ST-WHAM) for nanoconfined mW water at various densities provide a comprehensive characterization of diverse thermodynamic and structural properties intrinsic to phase transitions. Graph representation of minimized structures of bilayer water systems determined by the basin-hopping global optimization revealed heterogeneous ice structures composed of pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons, consistent with an increasingly ordered solid phase with decreasing density. Apparent crossover from a first-order solid-liquid transition to a continuous one in nanoconfined mW water with increasing density of the system was observed in terms of a diminishing S-loop in the statistical temperature, smooth variation of internal energies and heat capacities, and a characteristic variation of lateral radial distribution functions, and transverse density profiles across transition regions.

  8. Investigating the solid-liquid phase transition of water nanofilms using the generalized replica exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E.; Farrell, James D.; Wales, David J.

    2014-11-14

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) was applied to study a solid-liquid phase transition in a nanoconfined bilayer water system using the monatomic water (mW) model. Exploiting optimally designed non-Boltzmann sampling weights with replica exchanges, gREM enables an effective sampling of configurations that are metastable or unstable in the canonical ensemble via successive unimodal energy distributions across phase transition regions, often characterized by S-loop or backbending in the statistical temperature. Extensive gREM simulations combined with Statistical Temperature Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (ST-WHAM) for nanoconfined mW water at various densities provide a comprehensive characterization of diverse thermodynamic and structural properties intrinsic to phase transitions. Graph representation of minimized structures of bilayer water systems determined by the basin-hopping global optimization revealed heterogeneous ice structures composed of pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons, consistent with an increasingly ordered solid phase with decreasing density. Apparent crossover from a first-order solid-liquid transition to a continuous one in nanoconfined mW water with increasing density of the system was observed in terms of a diminishing S-loop in the statistical temperature, smooth variation of internal energies and heat capacities, and a characteristic variation of lateral radial distribution functions, and transverse density profiles across transition regions.

  9. Pinning quantum phase transition for a Luttinger liquid of strongly interacting bosons.

    PubMed

    Haller, Elmar; Hart, Russell; Mark, Manfred J; Danzl, Johann G; Reichsöllner, Lukas; Gustavsson, Mattias; Dalmonte, Marcello; Pupillo, Guido; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph

    2010-07-29

    Quantum many-body systems can have phase transitions even at zero temperature; fluctuations arising from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, as opposed to thermal effects, drive the system from one phase to another. Typically, during the transition the relative strength of two competing terms in the system's Hamiltonian changes across a finite critical value. A well-known example is the Mott-Hubbard quantum phase transition from a superfluid to an insulating phase, which has been observed for weakly interacting bosonic atomic gases. However, for strongly interacting quantum systems confined to lower-dimensional geometry, a novel type of quantum phase transition may be induced and driven by an arbitrarily weak perturbation to the Hamiltonian. Here we observe such an effect--the sine-Gordon quantum phase transition from a superfluid Luttinger liquid to a Mott insulator--in a one-dimensional quantum gas of bosonic caesium atoms with tunable interactions. For sufficiently strong interactions, the transition is induced by adding an arbitrarily weak optical lattice commensurate with the atomic granularity, which leads to immediate pinning of the atoms. We map out the phase diagram and find that our measurements in the strongly interacting regime agree well with a quantum field description based on the exactly solvable sine-Gordon model. We trace the phase boundary all the way to the weakly interacting regime, where we find good agreement with the predictions of the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model. Our results open up the experimental study of quantum phase transitions, criticality and transport phenomena beyond Hubbard-type models in the context of ultracold gases.

  10. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  11. Quantum phase transition of electron-hole liquid in coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichenko, V. S.; Polishchuk, I. Ya.

    2016-10-01

    Many-component electron-hole plasma is considered in the coupled quantum wells. The electrons are assumed to be localized in one quantum well (QW) while the holes are localized in the other QW. It is found that the homogeneous charge distribution within the QWs is unstable if the carrier density is sufficiently small. The instability results in the breakdown of the homogeneous charge distribution into two coexisting phases—a low-density phase and a high-density phase, which is electron-hole liquid. In turn, the homogeneous state of the electron-hole liquid is stable if the distance between the quantum wells ℓ is sufficiently small. However, as the distance ℓ increases and reaches a certain critical value ℓcr, the plasmon spectrum of the electron-hole liquid becomes unstable. Hereupon, a quantum phase transition occurs, resulting in the appearance of charge-density waves of finite amplitude in both quantum wells. Strong mass renormalization and the strong Z -factor renormalization are found for the electron-hole liquid as the quantum phase transition occurs.

  12. Transitional liquid crystalline phases between the hexagonal and lamellar phases in ternary cesium N-tetradecanoate-water-additive mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.C.; Kilpatrick, P.K. )

    1993-04-01

    The effects of added salt (CsOH, CsCl), long-chain carboxylic acid, and long-chain alcohol on the lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behavior in the cesium n-tetradecanoate (CsTD)-water system is reported. The transitional region between the hexagonal (H) and lamellar (L) phases was the compositional range of focus. Three transitional phases were observed: (i) the ribbon (R) phase, a biaxial phase consisting of cylinders of ellipsoidal cross section; (ii) the viscous isotropic (VI) phase, an isotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on an Ia3d lattice; and (iii) the intermediate (Int) phase, a uniaxial anisotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on a planar lattice. The effect of the additives was to decrease the interfacial curvature of the surfactant head group layer by varying head group repulsion and by varying the surfactant tail volume relative to the surfactant head group area. These changes resulted in formation of transitional phases seeming to possess curvature between that of the cylindrical H phase and the planar L phase. The ionic repulsion between carboxylate head groups was reduced by the addition of CsOH or CsCl, and resulted in destabilization of the VI phase and the formation of the anisotropic Int phase. With the addition of cosurfactants, n-tetradecanoic acid (TDA) and 1-tetradecanol (TDOH), no Int phase was observed. With 7 wt% added TDA the R phase was stabilized up to temperatures of 336 K, above the 330 K temperature limit in the binary CsTD-D[sub 2]O system. In all four systems, sufficient additive (5-10 wt%) resulted in a transition to the L phase, which was stable over a large portion of the compositional range. In order of apparently decreasing mean curvature, the phase sequence is: hexagonal, ribbon, viscous isotropic, intermediate, and lamellar.

  13. Disappearance of Widom Line for Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition with Horizontal Coexistence Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiayuan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey; Angell, Austen; Stanley, Gene

    2012-02-01

    The study of spherically symmetric two-scale Jagla model with both repulsive and attractive ramps has been very successful in demonstrating the anomalous behavior of liquids (especially water) and its relation with respect to the existence of a liquid-liquid (LL) critical point. However, the co-existence line of Jagla model shows a positive slope, which is opposite to what has been found in the simulations of water. To more convincingly link the result of the study on Jagla model with that of water, we applied discrete molecular dynamics to Gibson and Wilding's modified Jagla model and found that by shrinking both the attractive and repulsive ramps, the slope of the coexistence line can be reduced to zero. However, at these values of the parameters, the LL critical point becomes completely unstable with respect to crystal and glass. We further studied the Widom line, defined as extreme of response functions and also continuation of the coexistence line into one phase region, and found Widom line disappeared in the case of zero slope of the coexistence line, due to the equal enthalpy of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL).

  14. Pattern phase transitions of self-propelled particles: gases, crystals, liquids, and mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhao; Chen, Zhiyong; Vicsek, Tamás; Chen, Duxin; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2016-10-01

    To understand the collective behaviors of biological swarms, flocks, and colonies, we investigated the non-equilibrium dynamic patterns of self-propelled particle systems using statistical mechanics methods and H-stability analysis of Hamiltonian systems. By varying the individual vision range, we observed phase transitions between four phases, i.e., gas, crystal, liquid, and mill-liquid coexistence patterns. In addition, by varying the inter-particle force, we detected three distinct milling sub-phases, i.e., ring, annulus, and disk. Based on the coherent analysis for collective motions, one may predict the stability and adjust the morphology of the phases of self-propelled particles, which has promising potential applications in natural self-propelled particles and artificial multi-agent systems.

  15. Direct evidence of the molecular interaction propagation in the phase transition of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Kenji; Sato, Takahiro; Kuwahara, Shota

    2016-09-01

    The molecular interaction sometimes propagates in a collective manner, reaching for a long distance on the order of millimeters. Such interactions have been well known in the field of strongly-correlated electron systems in a beautiful crystal interleaved by donor and acceptor layers, induced by photo-stimulus. The other examples can be found in liquid crystals (LCs), which could be found in many places in nature such as bio-membrane. Different from crystals, LCs features "softness", which enables it to be a curved structure such as a cell. In LCs, even a small molecular change would trigger the overall structural change by the propagation of the molecular interaction. Here we will show, for the first time, how long and how fast the molecular interaction propagates in LCs. The patterned phase transition was induced in a LC, causing the phase transition propagation in a controlled way and the propagation was measured with an time-resolved optical technique, called the transient grating. A LC sample doped with azobenzene was put into a thermally controlled LC cell. A grating pattern of a pulse light with 355 nm was impinged to the LC cell, and the light was absorbed by the dyes, releasing heat or photomechanical motion. We could observe the fringe spacing dependence on the phase transition response, which indicates that phase transition was delayed as the fringe spacing due to the delay by the phase transition propagation. This is the first direct evidence of the molecular interaction propagation of the LC molecules.

  16. Interfacial Phase Transitions at Solid-Fluid and Liquid-Vapor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelisse, P. M. W.; Peters, C. J.; de Swaan Arons, J.

    1998-11-01

    To study the interface between a solid surface and nitrogen vapor, the theory of Cahn was applied. The Peng-Robinson equation of state (PREOS) was incorporated in the theory of Cahn to model the thermodynamic functions of the fluid. In this study the wetting transition, as earlier reported by Cahn, was shown. In addition, wetting transitions occurring at a liquid-vapor interface of the three-phase LLV equilibrium of the binary mixtures hexane/water and benzene/water were examined. It was found that by making use of the gradient theory of van der Waals, in which the PREOS was incorporated, the transitions seem to be of third order. For the case where the PREOS was replaced by the Associated-Perturbed-Anisotropic-Chain-Theory, no wetting region was found. It was argued that, in principle, it should he possible to model first-order wetting transitions with the square gradient theory.

  17. Gradient measurement technique to identify phase transitions in nano-dispersed liquid crystalline compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardhasaradhi, P.; Madhav, B. T. P.; Venugopala Rao, M.; Manepalli, R. K. N. R.; Pisipati, V. G. K. M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization and phase transitions in pure and 0.5% BaTiO3 nano-dispersed liquid crystalline (LC) N-(p-n-heptyloxybenzylidene)-p-n-nonyloxy aniline, 7O.O9, com-pounds are carried out using a polarizing microscope attached with hot stage and camera. We observed that when any of these images are distorted, different local structures suffer from various degradations in a gradient magnitude. So, we examined the pixel-wise gradient magnitude similarity between the reference and distorted images combined with a novel pooling strategy - the standard deviation of the GMS map - to determine the overall phase transition variations. In this regard, MATLAB software is used for gradient measurement technique to identify the phase transitions and transition temperature of the pure and nano-dispersed LC compounds. The image analysis of this method proposed is in good agreement with the standard methods like polarizing microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). 0.5% BaTiO3 nano-dispersed 7O.O9 compound induces cholesteric phase quenching the nematic phase, which the pure compound exhibits.

  18. Surface Specularity as an Indicator of Shock-Induced Solid-Liquid Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Stevens, Stephen Lutz, William Turley, Lynn Veeser

    2007-06-29

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit a number of features that suggest that significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. A familiar manifestation of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in velocimetric measurements typically observed above pressures high enough to melt the free-surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometery, conductivity), changes in the specularity of reflection provide a dramatic, sensitive indicator of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented from multiple diagnostics that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt. These diagnostics include shadowgraphy, infrared imagery, high-magnification surface images, interferometric velocimetry, and most recently scattering angle measurements.

  19. Surface Specularity as an Indicator of Shock-induced Solid-liquid Phase Transitions in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    G. D. Stevens, S. S. Lutz, B. R. Marshall, W.D. Turley, et al.

    2007-12-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. Typical of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) measurements, which usually occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity), that show relatively small (1%-10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive (>10x) indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  20. Metastable liquid-liquid phase transition in a single-component system with only one crystal phase and no density anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, G.; Malescio, G.; Skibinsky, A.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-11-01

    We investigate the phase behavior of a single-component system in three dimensions with spherically-symmetric, pairwise-additive, soft-core interactions with an attractive well at a long distance, a repulsive soft-core shoulder at an intermediate distance, and a hard-core repulsion at a short distance, similar to potentials used to describe liquid systems such as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. We showed [Nature (London) 409, 692 (2001)] that, even with no evidence of the density anomaly, the phase diagram has two first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions, one ending in a gas-low-density-liquid (LDL) critical point, and the other in a gas-high-density-liquid (HDL) critical point, with a LDL-HDL phase transition at low temperatures. Here we use integral equation calculations to explore the three-parameter space of the soft-core potential and perform molecular dynamics simulations in the interesting region of parameters. For the equilibrium phase diagram, we analyze the structure of the crystal phase and find that, within the considered range of densities, the structure is independent of the density. Then, we analyze in detail the fluid metastable phases and, by explicit thermodynamic calculation in the supercooled phase, we show the absence of the density anomaly. We suggest that this absence is related to the presence of only one stable crystal structure.

  1. Phase Transitions of Triflate-Based Ionic Liquids under High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2015-11-05

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to study phase transitions of ionic liquids based on the triflate anion, [TfO](-), as a function of pressure or temperature. Raman spectra of ionic liquids containing the cations 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, [C4C1Im](+), 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium, [C8C1Im](+), 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium, [C4C1C1Im](+), and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium, [C4C1Pyr](+), were compared. Vibrational frequencies and binding energy of ionic pairs were calculated by quantum chemistry methods. The ionic liquids [C4C1Im][TfO] and [C4C1Pyr][TfO] crystallize at 1.0 GPa when the pressure is increased in steps of ∼ 0.2 GPa from the atmospheric pressure, whereas [C8C1Im][TfO] and [C4C1C1Im][TfO] do not crystallize up to 2.3 GPa of applied pressure. The low-frequency range of the Raman spectrum of [C4C1Im][TfO] indicates that the system undergoes glass transition, rather than crystallization, when the pressure applied on the liquid has been increased above 2.0 GPa in a single step. Strong hysteresis of spectral features (frequency shift and bandwidth) of the high-pressure crystalline phase when the pressure was released stepwise back to the atmospheric pressure has been found .

  2. Direct measurement of the propagation of the phase-transition region of liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Many types of active matter, such as biological cells, have liquid-crystalline membranes, which are soft and flexible in their interactions with their surroundings and sometimes allow molecular-structural or -orientational changes to extend for long distances, owing to long-range molecular interactions. Despite the technological and fundamental importance of these long-range changes, there is no good physical property with which to express them for the liquid crystal. Here, we show direct measurements of the propagation of structural or orientational changes due to long-range molecular interactions in liquid crystals. We induced a patterned phase transition in a liquid crystal via illumination with a fringe pattern and observed the propagation of the phase-transition region. We determined that the propagation occurred in a ballistic manner with a velocity of 80–110 m/s and that two types of propagation—side-by-side and head-to-tail molecular interactions—were found. PMID:28317939

  3. Liquid-solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H2 and D2 in an ˜85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid-solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ˜4 K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H2 and D2 confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H2 and D2 are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  4. The accuracy of liquid-liquid phase transition temperatures determined from semiautomated light scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Dean, Kevin M; Babayco, Christopher B; Sluss, Daniel R B; Williamson, J Charles

    2010-08-21

    The synthetic-method determination of liquid-liquid coexistence curves using semiautomated light scattering instrumentation and stirred samples is based on identifying the coexistence curve transition temperatures (T(cx)) from sudden changes in turbidity associated with droplet formation. Here we use a thorough set of such measurements to evaluate the accuracy of several different analysis methods reported in the literature for assigning T(cx). More than 20 samples each of weakly opalescent isobutyric acid+water and strongly opalescent aniline+hexane were tested with our instrumentation. Transmitted light and scattering intensities at 2 degrees , 24 degrees , and 90 degrees were collected simultaneously as a function of temperature for each stirred sample, and the data were compared with visual observations and light scattering theory. We find that assigning T(cx) to the onset of decreased transmitted light or increased 2 degrees scattering has a potential accuracy of 0.01 K or better for many samples. However, the turbidity due to critical opalescence obscures the identification of T(cx) from the light scattering data of near-critical stirred samples, and no simple rule of interpretation can be applied regardless of collection geometry. At best, when 90 degrees scattering is collected along with transmitted or 2 degrees data, the accuracy of T(cx) is limited to 0.05 K for near-critical samples. Visual determination of T(cx) remains the more accurate approach in this case.

  5. Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvan, A. S.

    2012-08-01

    The main thermodynamical properties of the first order phase transition of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic model were explored in the isobaric, the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles on the basis of the method of the thermodynamical potentials and their first derivatives. It was proved that the first order phase transition of the RMF model is the liquid-gas type one associated with the Gibbs free energy G. The thermodynamical potential G is the piecewise smooth function and its first order partial derivatives with respect to variables of state are the piecewise continuous functions. We have found that the energy in the caloric curve is discontinuous in the isobaric and the grand canonical ensembles at fixed values of the pressure and the chemical potential, respectively, and it is continuous, i.e. it has no plateau, in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles at fixed values of baryon density, while the baryon density in the isotherms is discontinuous in the isobaric and the canonical ensembles at fixed values of the temperature. The general criterion for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble was identified.

  6. Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V. A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Avdeyev, S. P.; Botvina, A. S.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Karcz, W.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Skwirczynska, I.; Norbeck, E.

    2008-12-15

    Critical temperature T{sub c} for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is estimated from both the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case, the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the intermediate-mass-fragment yields in p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation. In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited {sup 188}Os is compared with the calculated one with T{sub c} as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 15 MeV.

  7. Macroscopic description of the isotropic to antiferroelectric B2 phase transition in banana-shaped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prabir K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a mean-field description of the phase transitions, which are obtained when cooling from the isotropic liquid to the first liquid crystalline phase in compounds composed of achiral banana-shaped molecules. We put special emphasis on the isotropic to antiferroelectric B2 phase transition. The free energy is written in terms of the coupled order parameters including the antiferroelectric polarization. We present a detailed analysis of the different phases that can occur and analyze the question under which conditions a direct isotropic to antiferroelectric B2 phase transition is possible when compared with other phase transitions. The theoretical results are found to be in qualitative agreement with all published experimental results.

  8. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    DOEpatents

    Blair, Dianna S.; Freye, Gregory C.; Hughes, Robert C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material is contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  9. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. S.; Frye, G. C.; Hughes, R. C.; Martin, S. J.; Ricco, A. J.

    1990-05-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material in contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  10. Liquid crystal alignment at macroscopically isotropic polymer surfaces: Effect of an isotropic-nematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryasova, Natalie; Reznikov, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of an isotropic-nematic (I -N ) phase transition on the liquid crystal alignment at untreated polymer surfaces. We demonstrate that the pattern at the untreated substrate in the planar cell where the other substrate is uniformly rubbed strongly depends on the temperature gradient across the cell during the I -N phase transition, being macroscopically isotropic if the untreated substrate is cooled faster, but becoming almost homogeneous along the rubbing direction in the opposite temperature gradient. We interpret the observed effect using complementary models of heat transfer and nematic elasticity. Based on the heat transfer model we show that the asymmetric temperature conditions in our experiments provide unidirectional propagation of the I -N interface during the phase transition and determine the initial director orientation pattern at the test's untreated surface. Using the Frank-Oseen model of nematic elasticity, we represent the three-dimensional director field in the nematic cell as a two-dimensional (2D) pattern at the untreated surface and perform 2D numeric simulations. The simulations explain the experimental results: Different initial director orientations at the untreated surface evolve into different stationary patterns.

  11. Efficient Light-Induced Phase Transitions in Halogen-Bonded Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a new family of light-responsive, fluorinated supramolecular liquid crystals (LCs) showing efficient and reversible light-induced LC-to-isotropic phase transitions. Our materials design is based on fluorinated azobenzenes, where the fluorination serves to strengthen the noncovalent interaction with bond-accepting stilbazole molecules, and increase the lifetime of the cis-form of the azobenzene units. The halogen-bonded LCs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, hot-stage polarized optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Simultaneous analysis of light-induced changes in birefringence, absorption, and optical scattering allowed us to estimate that <4% of the mesogenic units in the cis-form suffices to trigger the full LC-to-isotropic phase transition. We also report a light-induced and reversible crystal-to-isotropic phase transition, which has not been previously observed in supramolecular complexes. In addition to fundamental understanding of light-responsive supramolecular complexes, we foresee this study to be important in the development of bistable photonic devices and supramolecular actuators. PMID:27917024

  12. Molecular Evolution of Poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) Aqueous Solution during the Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation and Phase Transition Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianjiao; Tang, Hui; Wu, Peiyi

    2015-06-23

    A detailed phase transition process of poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) (PIPOZ) in aqueous solution was investigated by means of DSC, temperature-variable (1)H NMR, Raman, optical micrographs, and FT-IR spectroscopy measurements. Gradual phase separation accompanied by large dehydration degree and big conformational changes above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and facile reversibility were identified. Based on the two-dimensional correlation (2Dcos) and perturbation correlation moving window (PCMW) analyses, the sequence order of chemical group motions in phase transition process was elucidated. Additionally, a newly assigned CH3···O═C intermolecular hydrogen bond at 3008 cm(-1) in the PIPOZ system provides extra information on the interactions between C-H and C═O groups. The formation of cross-linking "bridging" hydrogen bonds C═O···D-O-D···O═C (1631 cm(-1)) is proposed as the key process to induce the liquid-liquid phase separation and polymer-rich phase formation of PIPOZ solution. With slow heating, more and more "bridging" hydrogen bonds were formed and D2O were expelled with an ordered and mostly all-trans conformation adopted in the PIPOZ chains. On the basis of these observations, a physical picture on the molecular evolution of PIPOZ solution during the phase transition process has been derived.

  13. Gas holdup and flow regime transition in spider-sparger bubble column: effect of liquid phase properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besagni, G.; Inzoli, F.; De Guido, G.; Pellegrini, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of the liquid velocity and the liquid phase properties on the gas holdup and the flow regime transition in a large-diameter and large-scale counter-current two-phase bubble column. In particular, we compared and analysed the experimental data obtained in our previous experimental studies. The bubble column is 5.3 m in height, has an inner diameter of 0.24 m, it was operated with gas superficial velocities in the range of 0.004–0.20 m/s and, in the counter-current mode, the liquid was recirculated up to a superficial velocity of -0.09 m/s. Air was used as the dispersed phase and various fluids (tap water, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ethanol and monoethylene glycol) were employed as liquid phases. The experimental dataset consist in gas holdup measurements and was used to investigate the global fluid dynamics and the flow regime transition between the homogeneous flow regime and the transition flow regime. We found that the liquid velocity and the liquid phase properties significantly affect the gas holdup and the flow regime transition. In this respect, a possible relationship (based on the lift force) between the flow regime transition and the gas holdup was proposed.

  14. Microenvironments created by liquid-liquid phase transition control the dynamic distribution of bacterial division FtsZ protein

    PubMed Central

    Monterroso, Begoña; Zorrilla, Silvia; Sobrinos-Sanguino, Marta; Keating, Christine D.; Rivas, Germán

    2016-01-01

    The influence of membrane-free microcompartments resulting from crowding-induced liquid/liquid phase separation (LLPS) on the dynamic spatial organization of FtsZ, the main component of the bacterial division machinery, has been studied using several LLPS systems. The GTP-dependent assembly cycle of FtsZ is thought to be crucial for the formation of the septal ring, which is highly regulated in time and space. We found that FtsZ accumulates in one of the phases and/or at the interface, depending on the system composition and on the oligomerization state of the protein. These results were observed both in bulk LLPS and in lipid-stabilized, phase-separated aqueous microdroplets. The visualization of the droplets revealed that both the location and structural arrangement of FtsZ filaments is determined by the nature of the LLPS. Relocation upon depolymerization of the dynamic filaments suggests the protein may shift among microenvironments in response to changes in its association state. The existence of these dynamic compartments driven by phase transitions can alter the local composition and reactivity of FtsZ during its life cycle acting as a nonspecific modulating factor of cell function. PMID:27725777

  15. Liquid Crystal Phase Transition driven three-dimensional Quantum Dot Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodarte, Andrea L.; Pandolfi, R. J.; Ghosh, S.; Hirst, L. S.

    2013-03-01

    We use a nematic liquid crystal (LC) to create organized assemblies of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs). At the isotropic-nematic LC phase transition, ordered domains of nematic LC expel the majority of dispersed QDs into the isotropic domains. The final LC phase produces a series of three dimensional columnar QD assemblies that are situated at defect points in the LC volume. Within each assembly the QD emission is spectrally-red-shifted due to resonant energy transfer. We use this spectral shift as a measure of the inter-dot separation and find that the QDs are packed uniformly in these assemblies over distances of microns between the glass plates of a standard LC cell. In addition, because the QD clusters form at defects, we can deterministically control the location of the assemblies by seeding the LC cell with defect nucleation points. Funding provided by NSF, UC MERI and UC MEXUS.

  16. First-order transition in confined water between high-density liquid and low-density amorphous phases.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Tanaka, H; Zeng, X C

    2000-11-30

    Supercooled water and amorphous ice have a rich metastable phase behaviour. In addition to transitions between high- and low-density amorphous solids, and between high- and low-density liquids, a fragile-to-strong liquid transition has recently been proposed, and supported by evidence from the behaviour of deeply supercooled bilayer water confined in hydrophilic slit pores. Here we report evidence from molecular dynamics simulations for another type of first-order phase transition--a liquid-to-bilayer amorphous transition--above the freezing temperature of bulk water at atmospheric pressure. This transition occurs only when water is confined in a hydrophobic slit pore with a width of less than one nanometre. On cooling, the confined water, which has an imperfect random hydrogen-bonded network, transforms into a bilayer amorphous phase with a perfect network (owing to the formation of various hydrogen-bonded polygons) but no long-range order. The transition shares some characteristics with those observed in tetrahedrally coordinated substances such as liquid silicon, liquid carbon and liquid phosphorus.

  17. Direct calculation of liquid-vapor phase equilibria from transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errington, Jeffrey R.

    2003-06-01

    An approach for directly determining the liquid-vapor phase equilibrium of a model system at any temperature along the coexistence line is described. The method relies on transition matrix Monte Carlo ideas developed by Fitzgerald, Picard, and Silver [Europhys. Lett. 46, 282 (1999)]. During a Monte Carlo simulation attempted transitions between states along the Markov chain are monitored as opposed to tracking the number of times the chain visits a given state as is done in conventional simulations. Data collection is highly efficient and very precise results are obtained. The method is implemented in both the grand canonical and isothermal-isobaric ensemble. The main result from a simulation conducted at a given temperature is a density probability distribution for a range of densities that includes both liquid and vapor states. Vapor pressures and coexisting densities are calculated in a straightforward manner from the probability distribution. The approach is demonstrated with the Lennard-Jones fluid. Coexistence properties are directly calculated at temperatures spanning from the triple point to the critical point.

  18. Acoustical and optical investigations of the size effect in nematic-isotropic phase transition in liquid crystal microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimochkin, G. I.; Pasechnik, S. V.; Lukin, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The absorption of ultrasound (at a frequency of 2.7 MHz) and the depolarized light transmission and scattering (at a wavelength of 630 nm) in liquid crystal (LC) emulsions have been studied during the nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition in LC droplets with radii ranging from 150 to 2300 nm. The obtained acoustical and optical data are used to determine the influence of the droplet size on characteristics of the N-I phase transition. It is shown that the acoustical and optical characteristics of LC emulsions have good prospects to be used for the investigation of phase transitions in submicron samples.

  19. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail.

  20. Phase transitions and reentrant phenomena in liquid crystals having both rigid and flexible intramolecular joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyżuk, W.; Górecka, E.; Mieczkowski, J.; Przedmojski, J.

    1992-07-01

    Two series of liquid-crystalline compounds having three phenyl rings separated by flexible spacer —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO— and by rigid azo and azoxy group, were studied by DSC, optical and X-ray methods. For esters of dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)-phenylbutyric acid with 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phenylazo-phenol-4 having dodecyloxy or longer terminal chains, as well as for related azoxy compounds, a narrow (even below 5 K) reentrant or inverted nematic phase appearing between partly bilayer and monolayer smectics A was observed. For higher homologues of the azoxy series additional smectic phases appear, leading to the occurrence of new multicritical points, e.g. the critical end point Ad Cd N^re. On each of the lines, which separate nematic from smectic A phases, transitions are of weakly first or second-order and more than one tricritical point can occur. On the A{1} N/A{1} N^re line, a simple N A{1} tricritical point is observed at T_NI/T_AN = 0.834. The presence of further critical points depends on the components of the binary system involved. Four of the azoxy compounds studied undergo a second order phase transition between partly bilayer smectics, Ad and Cd. Such a transition is accompanied by a jumb in the specific heat, varying linearly with the length of the molecular tails. Various temperature dependences of the layer spacing in the Ad phase are observed for subsequent homologues from the azoxy series. Plusieurs cristaux liquides composés de trois groupements phényl séparés par un groupement —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO—, ainsi que par des groupements azo et azoxy, ont été examinés par AED, méthodes optiques et par rayons X. Pour des esters de l'acide dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)phénylbutyrique et de 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phénylazo-phénol-4 ayant comme terminaison une chaîne dodecyloxy ou bien plus longue, ainsi que pour des composés azoxy relatif, on observe (même au-dessous de 5 K) une étroite phase nématique réentrante ou inverse entre les phases smectiques

  1. Studies of molecular monolayers at air-liquid interfaces by second harmonic generation: question of orientational phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Shen, Y.R.; Kim, M.W.; Grubb, S.; Bock, J.

    1985-06-01

    Insoluble molecular monolayers at gas-liquid interfaces provide an insight to the understanding of surfactants, wetting, microemulsions and membrane structures and offer a possibility to study the rich world of 2-dimensional phase transitions. In the interpretation of the observed properties of these systems various assumptions about the molecular orientation are often made, but so far few clear experimental data exist. In this paper we will show how optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be used to measure the molecular orientation of monolayers of surfactant molecules at water-air interfaces. By simultaneously measuring the surface pressure versus surface molecular area we can show for the first time that the observed liquid condensed-liquid expanded transition is an orientational phase transition. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Impact of Liquid-Vapor to Liquid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Transitions on Asphaltene-Rich Nanoaggregate Behavior in Athabasca Vacuum Residue + Pentane Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Bingwen; Chodakowski, Martin; Shaw, John M.

    2013-06-05

    The bulk phase behavior of heavy oil + alkane mixtures and the behavior of the asphaltenes that they contain are topics of importance for the design and optimization of processes for petroleum production, transport, and refining and for performing routine saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes (SARA) analyses. In prior studies, partial phase diagrams and phase behavior models for Athabasca vacuum residue (AVR) comprising 32 wt % pentane asphaltenes + n-alkanes were reported. For mixtures with pentane, observed phase behaviors included single-phase liquid as well as liquid–liquid, liquid–liquid–vapor, and liquid–liquid–liquid–vapor regions. Dispersed solids were detected under some conditions as well but not quantified. In this work, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to study nanostructured materials in liquid phases present in AVR + n-pentane mixtures from 50 to 170 °C at mixture bubble pressure. The investigation focuses on the impact of the transition from a single AVR-rich liquid to co-existing pentane-rich and AVR-rich liquids on the nanostructure and the nanostructures most resistant to aggregation as the pentane composition axis is approached. Background scattering subtraction was performed using global mixture composition. The robustness of this assumption with respect to values obtained for coefficients appearing in a two level Beaucage unified equation fit is demonstrated. The nanostructured material is shown to arise at two length scales from 1 to 100 wt % AVR. Smaller nanostructures possess mean radii less than 50 Å, while the larger nanostructures possess mean radii greater than 250 Å. The addition of pentane to the AVR causes an increasingly large fraction of the large and small nanostructures to grow in size. Only nanostructures resistant to aggregation remain in the pentane-rich phase as the 0 wt % AVR axis is approached. Step changes in aggregation identified from changes in average radius of gyration, scattering

  3. Universality and criticality of a second-order granular solid-liquid-like phase transition.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Gustavo; Mujica, Nicolás; Soto, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the critical properties of the nonequilibrium solid-liquid-like transition that takes place in vibrated granular matter. The critical dynamics is characterized by the coupling of the density field with the bond-orientational order parameter Q(4), which measures the degree of local crystallization. Two setups are compared, which present the transition at different critical accelerations as a result of modifying the energy dissipation parameters. In both setups five independent critical exponents are measured, associated to different properties of Q(4): the correlation length, relaxation time, vanishing wavenumber limit (static susceptibility), the hydrodynamic regime of the pair correlation function, and the amplitude of the order parameter. The respective critical exponents agree in both setups and are given by ν(⊥)=1,ν(∥)=2,γ=1,η≈0.6-0.67, and β=1/2, whereas the dynamical critical exponent is z=ν(∥)/ν(⊥)=2. The agreement on five exponents is an exigent test for the universality of the transition. Thus, while dissipation is strictly necessary to form the crystal, the path the system undergoes toward the phase separation is part of a well-defined universality class. In fact, the local order shows critical properties while density does not. Being the later conserved, the appropriate model that couples both is model C in the Hohenberg and Halperin classification. The measured exponents are in accord with the nonequilibrium extension to model C if we assume that α, the exponent associated in equilibrium to the specific heat divergence but with no counterpart in this nonequilibrium experiment, vanishes.

  4. Effects of Kinetic Roughening and Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition on Lysozyme Crystal Growth Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Konnert, John; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We measured the growth velocities of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme, V (centimeters per second), at four different concentrations, c (milligrams per milliliter), as the solution temperature, T (Centigrade), was reduced. For a broad range of T dependent on c, we find that the growth velocities increased as the solution temperature was reduced. The initial increase in V is well characterized by the 2D nucleation model for crystal growth, yielding the magnitude of an effective barrier for growth, gamma(sub s) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Below certain temperatures, T(sub cr), dependent on c, however, a kinetic roughening hypothesis that considers the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface better describes the observed growth velocities. The application of the continuous growth model, up to the solution cloud-point temperatures, T(sub cl), enabled the determinations of the crossover concentration, c(sub r), from estimated values of T(sub cr). For all conditions presented, we find that the crossover from growth by 2D nucleation to continuous addition occurs at a supersaturation, sigma (sub c), = 2.0 plus or minus 0.1. Moreover, we find the energy barrier for the continuous addition, E(sub c), within the temperature range T(sub cl) less than T less than T less than T (sub cr), to be 6 plus or minus 1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Further reduction of T below approximately 2-3 C of T(sub cl), also revealed a rapid slowing of crystal growth velocities. From quasi-elastic light scattering investigations, we find that the rapid diminishment of crystal growth velocities can be accounted for by the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions. Namely, we find the reversible formation of dense fluid proto-droplets comprised of lysozyme molecules to occur below approximately 0.3 C of T(sub cl). Hence, the rapid slowing of growth velocities may occur as a result of the sudden depletion of "mobile" molecules within crystal growth

  5. Liquid–liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron–ion Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron–ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25–30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization. PMID:27099295

  6. Liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloy observed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Katja; Trampert, Achim

    2016-11-05

    Melting and crystallization dynamics of the multi-component Ge-Sb-Te alloy have been investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Starting point of the phase transition study is an ordered hexagonal Ge1Sb2Te4 thin film on Si(111) where the crystal structure and the chemical composition are verified by scanning TEM and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, respectively. The in-situ observation of the liquid phase at 600°C including the liquid-solid and liquid-vacuum interfaces and their movements was made possible due to an encapsulation of the TEM sample. The solid-liquid interface during melting displays a broad and diffuse transition zone characterized by a vacancy induced disordered state. Although the velocities of interface movements are measured to be in the nanometer per second scale, both, for crystallization and solidification, the underlying dynamic processes are considerably different. Melting reveals linear dependence on time, whereas crystallization exhibits a non-linear time-dependency featuring a superimposed start-stop motion. Our results may provide valuable insight into the atomic mechanisms at interfaces during the liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloys.

  7. Effect of trans-cis photoisomerization on phase equilibria and phase transition of liquid-crystalline azobenzene chromophore and its blends with reactive mesogenic diacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namil; Li, Quan; Kyu, Thein

    2011-03-01

    Photoisomerization-induced phase transition of neat liquid-crystalline azobenzene chromophore (LCAC) and its effect on phase diagrams of its mixtures with reactive mesogenic diacrylate monomer (RM257) have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, the nematic phase of LCAC transformed to isotropic, while the crystal phase showed corrugated textures on the surface (i.e., ripples). The phase-transition temperatures and corresponding morphologies of the blends have been investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy. A theoretical phase diagram of a binary nematic and crystalline system was constructed by self-consistently solving the combined free energies of Flory-Huggins, Maier-Saupe, and phase-field theory. The calculation revealed various coexistence regions such as nematic + liquid (N1 + L2), crystal + liquid (Cr1 + L2), crystal + nematic (Cr1 + N2), and crystal + crystal (Cr1 + Cr2) over a broad range of compositions including the single-phase nematic (N1, N2) of the corresponding constituents. The calculated liquidus lines were in good accord with the depressed mesophase-isotropic transition points. The present paper demonstrates the effect of trans-cis photoisomerization on the mesophase transitions of neat LCAC and the phase diagram of LCAC-RM257 as well as on the ripple formation (i.e., periodic undulation) on the azobenzene crystals.

  8. Effect of trans-cis photoisomerization on phase equilibria and phase transition of liquid-crystalline azobenzene chromophore and its blends with reactive mesogenic diacrylate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namil; Li, Quan; Kyu, Thein

    2011-03-01

    Photoisomerization-induced phase transition of neat liquid-crystalline azobenzene chromophore (LCAC) and its effect on phase diagrams of its mixtures with reactive mesogenic diacrylate monomer (RM257) have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, the nematic phase of LCAC transformed to isotropic, while the crystal phase showed corrugated textures on the surface (i.e., ripples). The phase-transition temperatures and corresponding morphologies of the blends have been investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy. A theoretical phase diagram of a binary nematic and crystalline system was constructed by self-consistently solving the combined free energies of Flory-Huggins, Maier-Saupe, and phase-field theory. The calculation revealed various coexistence regions such as nematic + liquid (N₁ + L₂), crystal + liquid (Cr₁ + L₂), crystal + nematic (Cr₁ + N₂), and crystal + crystal (Cr₁ + Cr₂) over a broad range of compositions including the single-phase nematic (N₁, N₂) of the corresponding constituents. The calculated liquidus lines were in good accord with the depressed mesophase-isotropic transition points. The present paper demonstrates the effect of trans-cis photoisomerization on the mesophase transitions of neat LCAC and the phase diagram of LCAC-RM257 as well as on the ripple formation (i.e., periodic undulation) on the azobenzene crystals.

  9. Colloidal Material Box: In-situ Observations of Colloidal Self-Assembly and Liquid Crystal Phase Transitions in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, WeiBin; Lan, Ding; Sun, ZhiBin; Geng, BaoMing; Wang, XiaoQing; Tian, WeiQian; Zhai, GuangJie; Wang, YuRen

    2016-05-01

    To study the self-assembly behavior of colloidal spheres in the solid/liquid interface and elucidate the mechanism of liquid crystal phase transition under microgravity, a Colloidal Material Box (CMB) was designed which consists of three modules: (i) colloidal evaporation experimental module, made up of a sample management unit, an injection management unit and an optical observation unit; (ii) liquid crystal phase transition experimental module, including a sample management unit and an optical observation unit; (iii) electronic control module. The following two experimental plans will be performed inside the CMB aboard the SJ-10 satellite in space. (i) Self-assembly of colloidal spheres (with and without Au shell) induced by droplet evaporation, allowing observation of the dynamic process of the colloidal spheres within the droplet and the change of the droplet outer profile during evaporation; (ii) Phase behavior of Mg2Al LDHs suspensions in microgravity. The experimental results will be the first experimental observations of depositing ordered colloidal crystals and their self-assembly behavior under microgravity, and will illustrate the influence of gravity on liquid crystal phase transition.

  10. Luminescent transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets through one-step liquid phase exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar Bernal, M.; Álvarez, Lidia; Giovanelli, Emerson; Arnáiz, Adriana; Ruiz-González, Luisa; Casado, Santiago; Granados, Daniel; Pizarro, Ana M.; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Pérez, Emilio M.

    2016-09-01

    Liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) from the bulk is an adequate method for the mass-production of thin nanosheets of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). However, making suspensions in which the extraordinary properties of mechanically exfoliated TMDCs are observable remains a challenge. We describe a mild LPE method to produce luminescent suspensions of MoS2 and WS2 in N-methylpyrrolidone or isopropanol/water mixtures, without the need for a purification step. The key differences in our experimental procedure compared to previously reported LPE methods are the use of mild bath sonication at controlled temperature and the low initial concentration of the parent TMDC. Spectroscopic and AFM data confirm that an overwhelming majority of the sample is composed of ultrathin nanosheets. HREM data support the formation of the luminescent 2H polytype. The ultrathin nanosheets can be transferred to pure water and cell culture medium. Confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments on MCF-7 breast cancer cells exposed to LPE WS2 show that the cells are viable and the photoluminescence of the nanosheets is detectable.

  11. Transition metal doping of GaSe implemented with low temperature liquid phase growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Nuo; Sato, Youhei; Tanabe, Tadao; Maeda, Kensaku; Oyama, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    Our group works on improving the conversion efficiencies of terahertz (THz) wave generation using GaSe crystals. The operating principle is based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which has the advantages such as high output power, a single tunable frequency, and room temperature operation. In this study, GaSe crystals were grown by the temperature difference method under controlled vapor pressure (TDM-CVP). It is a liquid phase growth method with temperature 300 °C lower than that of the Bridgman method. Using this method, the point defects concentration is decreased and the polytype can be controlled. The transition metal Ti was used to dope the GaSe in order to suppress free carrier absorption in the low frequency THz region. As a result, a deep acceptor level of 38 meV was confirmed as being formed in GaSe with 1.4 at% Ti doping. Compared with undoped GaSe, a decrease in carrier concentration ( 1014 cm-3) at room temperature was also confirmed. THz wave transmittance measurements reveal the tendency for the absorption coefficient to increase as the amount of dopant is increased. It is expected that there is an optimum amount of dopant.

  12. Structural characterization on the gel to liquid-crystal phase transition of fully hydrated DSPC and DSPE bilayers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shan-Shan; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Yu, Yang-Xin

    2009-06-11

    The structural properties of fully hydrated distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) and distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) bilayers near the main phase transition were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations on the basis of a united-atom model. Although largely similar in their molecular structures, the two lipids were found with different molecular packing modes at temperatures below the phase transition. For DSPC, three packing modes, namely, cross-tilt, partially interdigitated, and "mixed" gel phases, were observed, while, for DSPE, the lipid tails were almost perpendicular to the lipid surface. Above the main transition temperature, both lipid bilayers transformed into a disordered liquid-crystal phase with marked greater area per lipid and gauche % of the acyl chains and smaller bilayer thickness and order parameter, in comparison with the gel phase. The transformation process of liquid-crystal to gel phase was proved to experience the nucleation and growth stages in a hexagonal manner. The electron density profiles of some major components of both lipid bilayers at various temperatures have been calculated, and the results reveal that both lipid bilayers have less interdigitation around the main transition temperature.

  13. A diffuse-interface modeling for liquid solution-solid gel phase transition of physical hydrogel with nonlinear deformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Wu, Tao

    2016-10-01

    A diffuse-interface model is presented in this paper for simulation of the evolution of phase transition between the liquid solution and solid gel states for physical hydrogel with nonlinear deformation. The present domain covers the gel and solution states as well as a diffuse interface between them. They are indicated by the crosslink density in such a way that the solution phase is identified as the state when the crosslink density is small, while the gel as the state if the crosslink density becomes large. In this work, a novel order parameter is thus defined as the crosslink density, which is homogeneous in each distinct phase and smoothly varies over the interface from one phase to another. In this model, the constitutive equations, imposed on the two distinct phases and the interface, are formulated by the second law of thermodynamics, which are in the same form as those derived by a different approach. The present constitutive equations include a novel Ginzburg-Landau type of free energy with a double-well profile, which accounts for the effect of crosslink density. The present governing equations include the equilibrium of forces, the conservations of mass and energy, and an additional kinetic equation imposed for phase transition, in which nonlinear deformation is considered. The equilibrium state is investigated numerically, where two stable phases are observed in the free energy profile. As case studies, a spherically symmetrical solution-gel phase transition is simulated numerically for analysis of the phase transition of physical hydrogel.

  14. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Butlitsky, M. A.; Zelener, B. V.

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a “shelf Coulomb” model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The “shelf Coulomb” model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ε parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ε and γ = βe{sup 2}n{sup 1/3} (where β = 1/k{sub B}T, n is the particle's density, k{sub B} is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ε and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ε{sub crit}≈13(T{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.076),γ{sub crit}≈1.8(v{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.17),P{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ{sup 3} and reduced temperature T{sup *} = ε{sup −1}.

  15. MAS (1)H NMR Probes Freezing Point Depression of Water and Liquid-Gel Phase Transitions in Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2016-11-01

    The lipid bilayer typical of hydrated biological membranes is characterized by a liquid-crystalline, highly dynamic state. Upon cooling or dehydration, these membranes undergo a cooperative transition to a rigidified, more-ordered, gel phase. This characteristic phase transition is of significant biological and biophysical interest, for instance in studies of freezing-tolerant organisms. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy allows for the detection and characterization of the phase transitions over a wide temperature range. In this study we employ MAS (1)H NMR to probe the phase transitions of both solvent molecules and different hydrated phospholipids, including tetraoleoyl cardiolipin (TOCL) and several phosphatidylcholine lipid species. The employed MAS NMR sample conditions cause a previously noted substantial reduction in the freezing point of the solvent phase. The effect on the solvent is caused by confinement of the aqueous solvent in the small and densely packed MAS NMR samples. In this study we report and examine how the freezing point depression also impacts the lipid phase transition, causing a ssNMR-observed reduction in the lipids' melting temperature (Tm). The molecular underpinnings of this phenomenon are discussed and compared with previous studies of membrane-associated water phases and the impact of membrane-protective cryoprotectants.

  16. Phase transition behavior of hydrogen bonded liquid crystal (6BA)2-(BPy) x as studied by 2H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Tabota, K.; Oigawa, T.; Miyatou, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.

    2016-12-01

    The thermal properties and the orientational order of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals (6BA)2-(BPy)0.4 and (6BA)2-(BPy)0.3 (6BA: 4- n-hexylbenzoicacid, BPy: 4,4'-bipyridine) were investigated by DSC and 2H NMR. On cooling, isotropic liquid - liquid crystal phase transition temperatures were T C= 409 and 405 K for (6BA)2-(BPy)0.4 and (6BA)2-(BPy)0.3, respectively. Thermal anomalies in the liquid crystal phase were observed at T LC1= 402 and T LC2= 375 K for (6BA)2-(BPy)0.4 and at T LC1= 398 and T LC2= 375 K for (6BA)2-(BPy)0.3. For (6BA)2-(BPy)0.4, only the smectic component was created above T LC1. In addition, the nematic component was created below T LC1. The nematic component gradually changed to the smectic component with decreasing temperature and only the smectic component was observed below T LC2. For (6BA)2-(BPy)0.3, only the nematic component was created above T LC2. The phase transition from the nematic phase to the smectic phase took place at around T LC2.

  17. Thermodynamic properties and phase transitions of γ and liquid uranium: QMD and classical MD modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdal, Kirill P.; Pokatashkin, Pavel A.; Yanilkin, Alexey V.

    2017-01-01

    The application of molecular dynamics allows us to take into account the influence of temperature on thermodynamic properties and phase transitions. In this work different uranium phases are investigated at finite temperatures by means of quantum and classical molecular dynamics. The stability of high temperature γ phase is discussed. The boundaries of phase stability are estimated based on quantum molecular results. In order to investigate phase transitions new interatomic potential is developed by force-matching method. The melting curve up to 750 GPa is obtained by Z-modified method. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data and classical molecular dynamics simulation by two phase methods up to 100 GPa.

  18. Light-Driven Liquid Crystalline Materials: From Photo-Induced Phase Transitions and Property Modulations to Applications.

    PubMed

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2016-12-28

    Light-driven phenomena both in living systems and nonliving materials have enabled truly fascinating and incredible dynamic architectures with terrific forms and functions. Recently, liquid crystalline materials endowed with photoresponsive capability have emerged as enticing systems. In this Review, we focus on the developments of light-driven liquid crystalline materials containing photochromic components over the past decade. Design and synthesis of photochromic liquid crystals (LCs), photoinduced phase transitions in LC, and photoalignment and photoorientation of LCs have been covered. Photomodulation of pitch, polarization, lattice constant and handedness inversion of chiral LCs is discussed. Light-driven phenomena and properties of liquid crystalline polymers, elastomers, and networks have also been analyzed. The applications of photoinduced phase transitions, photoalignment, photomodulation of chiral LCs, and photomobile polymers have been highlighted wherever appropriate. The combination of photochromism, liquid crystallinity, and fabrication techniques has enabled some fascinating functional materials which can be driven by ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light irradiation. Nanoscale particles have been incorporated to widen and diversify the scope of the light-driven liquid crystalline materials. The developed materials possess huge potential for applications in optics, photonics, adaptive materials, nanotechnology, etc. The challenges and opportunities in this area are discussed at the end of the Review.

  19. Stereodynamic control of star-epoxy/anhydride crosslinking actuated by liquid-crystalline phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Pin, Jean-Mathieu; Mija, Alice; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas

    2017-03-08

    The epoxy/anhydride copolymerization kinetics of an original star-epoxy monomer (TriaEP) was explored in dynamic heating mode using a series of isoconversional methods. Negative values of the apparent activation energy (Eα) related to an anti-Arrhenius behavior were observed. The transition from Arrhenius to anti-Arrhenius behavior and vice versa depending on the Eα of polymerization was correlated with the dynamics of mesophasic fall-in/fall-out events, physically induced transition (PIT) and chemically induced transition (CIT). This self-assembly phenomenon induces the generation of an anisotropic crosslinked architecture exhibiting both nematic discotic (ND) and nematic columnar (NC) organization. Particular emphasis was placed on evaluating the juxtaposition/contribution of the liquid-crystalline transitions to crosslinking, considering both the reaction dynamics and the macromolecular vision.

  20. Optical properties of light-sensitive liquid-crystal elastomers in the vicinity of the nematic-paranematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorc, Marko; Li, Hui; Domenici, Valentina; Ambrožič, Gabriela; Čopič, Martin; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena

    2013-02-01

    We investigate light-induced patterning of a monodomain side-chain liquid crystal elastomer (SC-LCE) doped with light-sensitive azobenzene moiety in the temperature region close to the nematic-paranematic phase transition. We show that a strongly nonlinear relationship between the concentration of the cis isomers of the azomesogens and the refractive index modification of the material, which is characteristic for the phase transition region, results in nonmonotonous time dependence of the diffraction efficiency of a probe beam. From this effect we determine the sensitivity of the nematic transition temperature on the molar fraction of the cis isomers. The relation between the cis isomer molar fraction and nematic order also provides a possibility for recording hidden holograms, which can be made visible by cooling the sample from the paranematic to the nematic phase.

  1. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Condensed-Phase Phenomena: The Origin of Biological Homochirality, and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Network-Forming Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Francesco

    This dissertation describes theoretical and computational studies of the origin of biological homochirality, and the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition in pure-component network-forming fluids. A common theme throughout these studies is the use of sophisticated computer simulation and statistical mechanics techniques to study complex condensed-phase phenomena. In the first part of this dissertation, we use an elementary lattice model with molecular degrees of freedom, and satisfying microscopic reversibility, to investigate the effect of reaction reversibility on the evolution of stochastic symmetry breaking via autocatalysis and mutual inhibition in a closed system. We identify conditions under which the system's evolution towards racemic equilibrium becomes extremely slow, allowing for long-time persistence of a symmetry-broken state. We also identify a "monomer purification" mechanism, due to which a nearly homochiral state can persist for long times, even in the presence of significant reverse reaction rates. Order of magnitude estimates show that with reasonable physical parameters a symmetry broken state could persist over geologically-relevant time scales. In the second part of this dissertation, we study a chiral-symmetry breaking mechanism known as Viedma ripening. We develop a Monte Carlo model to gain further insights into the mechanisms capable of reproducing key experimental signatures associated with this phenomenon. We also provide a comprehensive investigation of how the model parameters impact the system's overall behavior. It is shown that size-dependent crystal solubility alone is insufficient to reproduce most experimental signatures, and that some form of a solid-phase chiral feedback mechanism (e.g., agglomeration) must be invoked in our model. In the third part of this dissertation, we perform rigorous free energy calculations to investigate the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in the Stillinger-Weber (SW

  2. Rarely Observed Phase Transitions in a Novel Lyotropic Liquid Crystal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaras, J.; Donaberger, R. L.; Swainson, I. P.; Tennant, D. C.; Tun, Z.; Vold, R. R.; Prosser, R. S.

    1997-02-01

    This Letter presents neutron diffraction data from a novel, biologically relevant, lyotropic membrane system which is highly alignable ( <=1.0° mosaic) in a magnetic field and gives rise to a number of well-defined Bragg reflections. The system, composed of two different phosphorylcholine lipids, undergoes a rare nematic --> smectic phase transition upon doping the system with paramagnetic ions (e.g., 2.7 wt % Tm3+). In addition, the isotropic phase occurs at a lower temperature than the smectic phase, in contrast to other lyotropic systems and in contrast to the phase behavior predicted by the McMillan model [Phys. Rev. A 4, 1238 (1971)] of smectic ordering.

  3. Pretransitional behavior above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of an auxetic trimer liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Kang, D; Mahajan, M P; Zhang, S; Petschek, R G; Rosenblatt, C; He, C; Liu, P; Griffin, A C

    1999-10-01

    Static light scattering and electric field-induced Kerr measurements were performed above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of a terminal-lateral-lateral-terminal negative Poisson ratio trimer. For both measurements the inverse susceptibility was observed to be nearly linear with temperature, a result inconsistent with our previously reported Kerr data [Phys. Rev. E 58, 2041 (1998)].

  4. Free-Surface Optical Scattering as an Indicator of the Shock-Induced Solid-Liquid Phase Transition in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G. D.; Lutz, S. S.; Marshall, B. R.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Hixson, R. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Jensen, B. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Wilke, M. D.

    2008-07-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. A familiar manifestation of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in VISAR measurements, which occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity) that show relatively small (1%–10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  5. Selective Sequence for the Peptide-Triggered Phase Transition of Lyotropic Liquid-Crystalline Structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingtao; Dong, Yao-Da; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-05-24

    A novel concept of using mixed lipids to construct selective peptide-sequence-sensing lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) dispersion systems was investigated. The LLC systems were constructed using a mixture of phytantriol, a lipid that forms lyotropic liquid-crystalline phases, and a novel synthesized peptide-lipid (peplipid) for sensing a target peptide with the RARAR sequence. The internal structure of the dispersed LLC particles was converted from the lamellar structure (liposomes) to the inverse bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes) in the presence of the target peptide. The addition of common human proteins did not induce any structural change, indicating a high selectivity of interaction with the target peptide. The concept has potential for the design of targeted controlled release drug delivery agents.

  6. Investigation of the solid-liquid phase transition of carbon at 150 GPa with spectrally resolved X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfrich, J.; Kraus, D.; Ortner, A.; Frydrych, S.; Schaumann, G.; Hartley, N. J.; Gregori, G.; Kettle, B.; Riley, D.; Carroll, D. C.; Notley, M. M.; Spindloe, C.; Roth, M.

    2015-03-01

    We have resolved the solid-liquid phase transition of carbon at pressures around 150 GPa. High-pressure samples of different temperatures were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and varying the initial density from 1.30 g/cm3 to 2.25 g/cm3. In this way, temperatures from 5700 K to 14,500 K could be achieved for relatively constant pressure according to hydrodynamic simulations. From measuring the elastic X-ray scattering intensity of vanadium K-alpha radiation at 4.95 keV at a scattering angle of 126°, which is very sensitive to the solid-liquid transition, we can determine whether the sample had transitioned to the fluid phase. We find that samples of initial density 1.3 g/cm3 and 1.85 g/cm3 are liquid in the compressed states, whereas samples close to the ideal graphite crystal density of 2.25 g/cm3 remain solid, probably in a diamond-like state.

  7. Dimensional crossover in a spin liquid to helimagnet quantum phase transition.

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Zheludev, Andrey I; Habicht, Klaus; Meissner, Michael; Grenier, B.; Regnault, L.-P.; Ressouche, E.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering is used to study magnetic field induced ordering in the quasi-1D quantum spin-tube compound Sul-Cu2Cl4 that in zero field has a non-magnetic spin-liquid ground state. The experiments reveal an incommensurate chiral high-field phase stabilized by a geometric frustration of the magnetic interactions. The measured critical exponents \\beta= 0.235 and \

  8. Search for the first-order liquid-to-liquid phase transition in low-temperature confined water by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the α-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  9. Effect of fatty acyl chain length and structure on the lamellar gel to liquid-crystalline and lamellar to reversed hexagonal phase transitions of aqueous phosphatidylethanolamine dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.N.A.H.; Mannock, D.A.; McElhaney, R.N.; Turner, D.C.; Gruner, S.M. )

    1989-01-24

    The lamellar gel/liquid-crystalline and the lamellar liquid-crystalline/reversed hexagonal phase transitions of aqueous dispersions of a number of synthetic phosphatidylethanolamines containing linear saturated, branched chain, and alicyclic fatty acyl chains of varying length were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. For any given homologous series of phosphatidylethanolamines containing a single chemical class of fatty acids, the lamellar gel/liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature increases and the lamellar liquid-crystalline/reversed hexagonal phase transition temperature decreases with increases in hydrocarbon chain length. For a series of phosphatidylethanolamines of the same hydrocarbon chain length but with different chemical structures, both the lamellar gel/liquid-crystalline and the lamellar liquid-crystalline/reversed hexagonal phase transition temperatures vary markedly and in the same direction. These results suggest that for any given hydrocarbon chain length, there may be a critical thickness at which the liquid-crystalline phosphatidylethanolamine bilayer becomes unstable with respect to inverted nonbilayer phases such as the H{sub II} phase and that the temperature at which this critical thickness is reached is dependent upon that bilayers proximity to the hydrocarbon chain-melting phase transition temperature.

  10. Effect of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate on the phase transition of starch: dissolution or gelatinization?

    PubMed

    Mateyawa, Sainimili; Xie, David Fengwei; Truss, Rowan W; Halley, Peter J; Nicholson, Timothy M; Shamshina, Julia L; Rogers, Robin D; Boehm, Michael W; McNally, Tony

    2013-04-15

    This work revealed that the interactions between starch, the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([Emim][OAc]), and water might contribute to the phase transition (gelatinization, dissolution, or both) of native starch at reduced temperature. Using mixtures of water and [Emim][OAc] at certain ratios (7.2/1 and 10.8/1 mol/mol), both the gelatinization and dissolution of the starch occur competitively, but also in a synergistic manner. At lower [Emim][OAc] concentration (water/[Emim][OAc] molar ratio≥25.0/1), mainly gelatinization occurs which is slightly impeded by the strong interaction between water and [Emim][OAc]; while at higher [Emim][OAc] concentration (water/[Emim][OAc] molar ratio≤2.8/1), the dissolution of starch is the major form of phase transition, possibly restricted by the difficulty of [Emim][OAc] to interact with starch.

  11. Solid-liquid phase transitions in 3D systems with the inverse-power and Yukawa potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. S.; Koss, X. G.

    2016-03-01

    The melting of face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal lattices was studied analytically and numerically for the systems of particles interacting via the inverse-power-law and Yukawa potentials. New approach is proposed for determination of the solid-liquid phase transitions in these systems. The suggested approach takes into account a nonlinearity (anharmonicity) of pair interaction forces and allows to correctly predict the conditions of melting of the systems with various isotropic pair interaction potentials. The obtained results are compared with the existing theoretical and numerical data.

  12. Nanosecond Ultrasonics to Study Phase Transitions in Solid and Liquid Systems at High Pressure and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B P; Berge, P A; Carlson, S C; Farber, D L; Akella, J

    2007-03-21

    This report describes the development of a high-frequency ultrasonic measurement capability for application to the study of phase transitions at elevated pressure and temperature. We combined expertise in various aspects of static high-pressure technique with recent advances in wave propagation modeling, ultrasonic transducer development, electronic methods and broadband instrumentation to accomplish the goals of this project. The transduction and electronic systems have a demonstrated bandwidth of 400 MHz, allowing investigations of phenomena with characteristic times as short as 2.5 nS. A compact, pneumatically driven moissanite anvil cell was developed and constructed for this project. This device generates a high-pressure environment for mm dimension samples to pressures of 3 GPa. Ultrasonic measurements were conducted in the moissanite cell, an LLNL multi-anvil device and in a modified piston cylinder device. Measurements for water, and elemental tantalum, tin and cerium demonstrate the success of the methods. The {gamma}-{alpha} phase transition in cerium was clearly detected at {approx}0.7 GPa with 75 MHz longitudinal waves. These results have direct application to important problems in LLNL programs, as well as seismology and planetary science.

  13. Experimental research of phase transition's kinetics in a liquid melt of high-purity aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, V. B.; Zhuravlev, D. V.; Cherepanov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    This scientific work is devoted to the studying of the genetic connection structures of solid and liquid phases. Fourier analysis of signals of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying melting high purity aluminum from the melting point up to t = 860°C was performed. Based on the results of previous studies cluster formations in the melt - the micro-regions, those retain crystallinity (areas with short-range order of symmetry) were considered as the source of AE. The experimental data allowed to follow the dynamics of disorder zones range order in the melt with increasing melt temperature up to their complete destruction. The presented results of spectral analysis of the signals were analyzed from the standpoint of the theory of cluster melting metals.

  14. Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds and Ionic Liquids. Sublimation, Vaporization, and Fusion Enthalpies from 1880 to 2015. Part 2. C11-C192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acree, William; Chickos, James S.

    2017-03-01

    The second part of this compendium concludes with a collection of phase change enthalpies of organic molecules inclusive of C11-C192 reported over the period 1880-2015. Also included are phase change enthalpies including fusion, vaporization, and sublimation enthalpies for organometallic, ionic liquids, and a few inorganic compounds. Paper I of this compendium, published separately, includes organic compounds from C1 to C10 and describes a group additivity method for evaluating solid, liquid, and gas phase heat capacities as well as temperature adjustments of phase changes. Paper II of this compendium also includes an updated version of a group additivity method for evaluating total phase change entropies which together with the fusion temperature can be useful in estimating total phase change enthalpies. Other uses include application in identifying potential substances that either form liquid or plastic crystals or exhibit additional phase changes such as undetected solid-solid transitions or behave anisotropically in the liquid state.

  15. Cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. |

    1993-10-01

    If modern ideas about the role of spontaneous symmetry breaking in fundamental physics are correct, then the Universe should have undergone a series of phase transitions early in its history. The study of cosmological phase transitions has become an important aspect of early-Universe cosmology. In this lecture I review some very recent work on three aspects of phase transitions: the electroweak transition, texture, and axions.

  16. Hidden non-Fermi liquid behavior caused by magnetic phase transition in Ni-doped Ba-122 pnictides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seokbae; Choi, Ki-Young; Jung, Eilho; Rho, Seulki; Shin, Soohyeon; Park, Tuson; Hwang, Jungseek

    2015-01-01

    We studied two BaFe2−xNixAs2 (Ni-doped Ba-122) single crystals at two different doping levels (underdoped and optimally doped) using an optical spectroscopic technique. The underdoped sample shows a magnetic phase transition around 80 K. We analyze the data with a Drude-Lorentz model with two Drude components (D1 and D2). It is known that the narrow D1 component originates from electron carriers in the electron-pockets and the broad D2 mode is from hole carriers in the hole-pockets. While the plasma frequencies of both Drude components and the static scattering rate of the broad D2 component show negligible temperature dependencies, the static scattering rate of the D1 mode shows strong temperature dependence for the both samples. We observed a hidden quasi-linear temperature dependence in the scattering rate of the D1 mode above and below the magnetic transition temperature while in the optimally doped sample the scattering rate shows a more quadratic temperature dependence. The hidden non-Fermi liquid behavior in the underdoped sample seems to be related to the magnetic phase of the material. PMID:26184412

  17. A variational approach to the liquid-vapor phase transition for hardcore ions in the bulk and in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubet, Bastien; Manghi, Manoel; Palmeri, John

    2016-07-01

    We employ a field-theoretical variational approach to study the behavior of ionic solutions in the grand canonical ensemble. To describe properly the hardcore interactions between ions, we use a cutoff in Fourier space for the electrostatic contribution of the grand potential and the Carnahan-Starling equation of state with a modified chemical potential for the pressure one. We first calibrate our method by comparing its predictions at room temperature with Monte Carlo results for excess chemical potential and energy. We then validate our approach in the bulk phase by describing the classical "ionic liquid-vapor" phase transition induced by ionic correlations at low temperature, before applying it to electrolytes at room temperature confined to nanopores embedded in a low dielectric medium and coupled to an external reservoir of ions. The ionic concentration in the nanopore is then correctly described from very low bulk concentrations, where dielectric exclusion shifts the transition up to room temperature for sufficiently tight nanopores, to high concentrations where hardcore interactions dominate which, as expected, modify only slightly this ionic "capillary evaporation."

  18. A variational approach to the liquid-vapor phase transition for hardcore ions in the bulk and in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Loubet, Bastien; Manghi, Manoel; Palmeri, John

    2016-07-28

    We employ a field-theoretical variational approach to study the behavior of ionic solutions in the grand canonical ensemble. To describe properly the hardcore interactions between ions, we use a cutoff in Fourier space for the electrostatic contribution of the grand potential and the Carnahan-Starling equation of state with a modified chemical potential for the pressure one. We first calibrate our method by comparing its predictions at room temperature with Monte Carlo results for excess chemical potential and energy. We then validate our approach in the bulk phase by describing the classical "ionic liquid-vapor" phase transition induced by ionic correlations at low temperature, before applying it to electrolytes at room temperature confined to nanopores embedded in a low dielectric medium and coupled to an external reservoir of ions. The ionic concentration in the nanopore is then correctly described from very low bulk concentrations, where dielectric exclusion shifts the transition up to room temperature for sufficiently tight nanopores, to high concentrations where hardcore interactions dominate which, as expected, modify only slightly this ionic "capillary evaporation."

  19. The reversibility and first-order nature of liquid-liquid transition in a molecular liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Mika; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-11-01

    Liquid-liquid transition is an intriguing phenomenon in which a liquid transforms into another liquid via the first-order transition. For molecular liquids, however, it always takes place in a supercooled liquid state metastable against crystallization, which has led to a number of serious debates concerning its origin: liquid-liquid transition versus unusual nano-crystal formation. Thus, there have so far been no single example free from such debates, to the best of our knowledge. Here we show experimental evidence that the transition is truly liquid-liquid transition and not nano-crystallization for a molecular liquid, triphenyl phosphite. We kinetically isolate the reverse liquid-liquid transition from glass transition and crystallization with a high heating rate of flash differential scanning calorimetry, and prove the reversibility and first-order nature of liquid-liquid transition. Our finding not only deepens our physical understanding of liquid-liquid transition but may also initiate a phase of its research from both fundamental and applications viewpoints.

  20. Transition metal-induced degradation of a pharmaceutical compound in reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinggang; He, Brian Lingfeng; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Yande; Kleintop, Brent; Raglione, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug degradation that occurs in HPLC analysis, during either sample preparation or chromatographic separation, can greatly impact method robustness and result accuracy. In this work, we report a case study of drug dimerization in HPLC analysis where proximate causes were attributed to either the LC columns or the HPLC instrument. Solution stress studies indicated that the same pseudo-dimeric degradants could also be formed rapidly when the compound was exposed to certain oxidative transition metal ions, such as Cu(II) and Fe(III). Two pseudo-dimeric degradants were isolated from transition metal stressed samples and their structures were elucidated. A degradation pathway was proposed, whereby the degradation was initiated through transition metal-induced single electron transfer oxidation. Further studies confirmed that the dimerization was induced by trace transition metals in the HPLC flow path, which could arise from either the stainless steel frits in the LC column or stainless steel tubing in the HPLC instrument. Various procedures to prevent transition metal-induced drug degradation were explored, and a general strategy to mitigate such risks is briefly discussed.

  1. Sliding Luttinger liquid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Kane, C. L.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2001-07-01

    We study systems of coupled spin-gapped and gapless Luttinger liquids. First, we establish the existence of a sliding Luttinger liquid phase for a system of weakly coupled parallel quantum wires, with and without disorder. It is shown that the coupling can stabilize a Luttinger liquid phase in the presence of disorder. We then extend our analysis to a system of crossed Luttinger liquids and establish the stability of a non-Fermi-liquid state: the crossed sliding Luttinger liquid phase. In this phase the system exhibits a finite-temperature, long-wavelength, isotropic electric conductivity that diverges as a power law in temperature T as T-->0. This two-dimensional system has many properties of a true isotropic Luttinger liquid, though at zero temperature it becomes anisotropic. An extension of this model to a three-dimensional stack exhibits a much higher in-plane conductivity than the conductivity in a perpendicular direction.

  2. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  3. Pre-Service Primary Science Teachers' Understandings of the Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Solid-Liquid Phase Transition of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalcin, Fatma Aggul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore pre-service primary teachers' understandings of the effect of temperature and pressure on the solid-liquid phase transition of water. In the study a survey approach was used, and the sample consisted of one-hundred and three, third year pre-service primary science teachers. As a tool for data collection, a test…

  4. Phase Transitions in the Nucleus: the functional implications of concentration-dependent assembly of a Liquid-like RNA/Protein Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lian; Weber, Stephanie; Berry, Joel; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford

    2015-03-01

    The nucleolus is a liquid-like membrane-less nuclear body which plays an important role in cell growth and size control. By modulating nucleolar component concentration through RNAi conditions that change C. elegans cell size, we find that nucleoli only assemble above a threshold concentration; moreover, the ripening dynamics of nucleated droplets are consistent with the hypothesis that the assembly of the nucleolus represents an intracellular liquid-liquid phase transition. A key question is how this phase-transition is linked to the primary function of the nucleolus, in transcribing and processing ribosomal RNA. To address this, we characterize the localization of RNA Polymerase I, a key transcriptional enzyme, into nucleolar foci as a function of nucleolar component concentration. Our results suggest that there are a small number of key disordered phosphoproteins that may serve as a link between transcription and assembly. Finally, we present preliminary results using a reduced model system consisting of purified nucleolar proteins to assess the ability of nucleolar proteins to drive liquid-liquid phase separation in vitro. These results lay the foundation for a quantitative understanding of intracellular phase transitions and their impact on biomedically-critical RNA-processing steps.

  5. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  6. Effect of long range order on sheared liquid crystalline materials: flow regimes, transitions, and rheological phase diagrams

    PubMed

    Tsuji; Rey

    2000-12-01

    A generalized theory that includes short-range elasticity, long-range elasticity, and flow effects is used to simulate and characterize the shear flow of liquid crystalline materials as a function of the Deborah (De) and Ericksen (Er) numbers in the presence of fixed planar director boundary conditions; the results are also interpreted as a function of the ratio R between short-range and long-range elasticity. The results are effectively summarized into rheological phase diagrams spanned by De and Er, and also by R and Er, where the stability region of four distinct flow regimes are indicated. The four regimes for planar (two-dimensional orientation) shear flow are (1) the elastic-driven steady state, (2) the composite tumbling-wagging periodic state, (3) the wagging periodic state, and (4) the viscous-driven steady state. The coexistence of the four regimes at a quacritical point is shown to be due to the emergence of a defect structure. The origin, the significant steady and dynamical features, and the transitions between these regimes are thoroughly characterized and analyzed. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons between the present complete model predictions and those obtained from the classical theories of nematodynamics (Leslie-Ericksen and Doi theories) are presented and the main physical mechanisms that drive the observed deviations between the predictions of these models are identified. The presented results fill the previously existing gap between the classical Leslie-Ericksen theory and the Doi theory, and present a unified description of nematodynamics.

  7. Quantum Phase Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Thoery Phase transitions Subir Sachdev Harvard University Office of Sponsored Research 1350...magnetism, and solvable models obtained from string theory. After introducing the basic theory, it moves on to a detailed description of the canonical...students and researchers in condensed matter physics and particle and string theory. Print | Close Quantum Phase Transitions 2nd Edition Subir Sachdev

  8. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements. PMID:27762334

  9. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-10-01

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements.

  10. Orientational transitions in antiferromagnetic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Petrov, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The orientational phases in an antiferromagnetic liquid crystal (ferronematic) based on the nematic liquid crystal with the negative anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility are studied in the framework of the continuum theory. The ferronematic was assumed to be compensated; i.e., in zero field, impurity ferroparticles with the magnetic moments directed parallel and antiparallel to the director are equiprobably distributed in it. It is established that under the action of a magnetic field the ferronematic undergoes orientational transitions compensated (antiferromagnetic) phase-non-uniform phase-saturation (ferrimagnetic) phase. The analytical expressions for threshold fields of the transitions as functions of material parameters are obtained. It is shown that with increasing magnetic impurity segregation parameter, the threshold fields of the transitions significantly decrease. The bifurcation diagram of the ferronematic orientational phases is built in terms of the energy of anchoring of magnetic particles with the liquid-crystal matrix and magnetic field. It is established that the Freedericksz transition is the second-order phase transition, while the transition to the saturation state can be second- or first-order. In the latter case, the suspension exhibits orientational bistability. The orientational and magnetooptical properties of the ferronematic in different applied magnetic fields are studied.

  11. First Examples of de Vries-like Smectic A to Smectic C Phase Transitions in Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kapernaum, Nadia; Müller, Carsten; Moors, Svenja; Schlick, M Christian; Wuckert, Eugen; Laschat, Sabine; Giesselmann, Frank

    2016-12-15

    In ionic liquid crystals, the orthogonal smectic A phase is the most common phase whereas the tilted smectic C phase is rather rare. We present a new study with five novel ionic liquid crystals exhibiting both a smectic A as well as the rare smectic C phase. Two of them have a phenylpyrimidine core whereas the other three are imidazolium azobenzenes. Their phase sequences and tilt angles were studied by polarizing microscopy and their temperature-dependent layer spacing as well as their translational and orientational order parameters were studied by X-ray diffraction. The X-ray tilt angles derived from X-ray studies of the layer contraction and the optically measured tilt angles of the five ionic liquid crystals were compared to obtain their de Vries character. Four of our five mesogens turned out to show de Vries-like behavior with a layer shrinkage that is far less than that expected for conventional materials. These materials can thus be considered as the first de Vries-type materials among ionic liquid crystals.

  12. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency.

  13. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency. PMID:24907992

  14. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  15. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  16. Noise and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C.

    2006-03-01

    Noise is present in many physical systems and is often viewed as a nuisance. Yet it can also be a probe of microscopic fluctuations. There have been indications recently that the noise in the resistivity increases in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition. But what are the characteristics of the noise associated with well-understood first and second order phase transitions? It is well known that critical fluctuations are associated with second order phase transitions, but do these fluctuations lead to enhanced noise? We have addressed these questions using Monte Carlo simulations to study the noise in the 2D Ising model which undergoes a second order phase transition, and in the 5-state Potts model which undergoes a first order phase transition. We monitor these systems as the temperature drops below the critical temperature. At each temperature, after equilibration is established, we obtain the time series of quantities characterizing the properties of the system, i.e., the energy and magnetization per site. We apply different methods, such as the noise power spectrum, the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and the second spectrum of the noise, to analyze the fluctuations in these quantities.

  17. Liquid-liquid transition in a strong bulk metallic glass-forming liquid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kaban, Ivan; Shuleshova, Olga; Meyer, Andreas; Busch, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions are common in crystalline solids. Recent studies suggest that phase transitions may also exist between two liquid forms with different entropy and structure. Such a liquid-liquid transition has been investigated in various substances including water, Al2O3-Y2O3 and network glass formers. However, the nature of liquid-liquid transition is debated due to experimental difficulties in avoiding crystallization and/or measuring at high temperatures/pressures. Here we report the thermodynamic and structural evidence of a temperature-induced weak first-order liquid-liquid transition in a bulk metallic glass-forming system Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni10Be(22.5) characterized by non- (or weak) directional bonds. Our experimental results suggest that the local structural changes during the transition induce the drastic viscosity changes without a detectable density anomaly. These changes are correlated with a heat capacity maximum in the liquid. Our findings support the hypothesis that the 'strong' kinetics (low fragility) of a liquid may arise from an underlying lambda transition above its glass transition.

  18. A flux induced crystal phase transition in the vapor-liquid-solid growth of indium-tin oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Meng, Gang; Yanagida, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hideto; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kanai, Masaki; Zhuge, Fuwei; He, Yong; Klamchuen, Annop; Rahong, Sakon; Fang, Xiaodong; Takeda, Seiji; Kawai, Tomoji

    2014-06-21

    Single crystalline metal oxide nanowires formed via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) route provide a platform not only for studying fundamental nanoscale properties but also for exploring novel device applications. Although the crystal phase variation of metal oxides, which exhibits a variety of physical properties, is an interesting feature compared with conventional semiconductors, it has been difficult to control the crystal phase of metal oxides during the VLS nanowire growth. Here we show that a material flux critically determines the crystal phase of indium-tin oxide nanowires grown via the VLS route, although thermodynamical parameters, such as temperature and pressure, were previously believed to determine the crystal phase. The crystal phases of indium-tin oxide nanowires varied from the rutile structures (SnO2), the metastable fluorite structures (InxSnyO3.5) and the bixbyite structures (Sn-doped In2O3) when only the material flux was varied within an order of magnitude. This trend can be interpreted in terms of the material flux dependence of crystal phases (rutile SnO2 and bixbyite In2O3) on the critical nucleation at the liquid-solid (LS) interface. Thus, precisely controlling the material flux, which has been underestimated for VLS nanowire growths, allows us to design the crystal phase and properties in the VLS nanowire growth of multicomponent metal oxides.

  19. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  20. The Quantum Hall Liquid to Insulator Transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Dan

    Among the stable phases known to exist in a two dimensional electronic system (2DES), the metallic phase is conspicuously missing. Nonetheless, metallic behavior characterized by finite conductivity as the temperature Tto 0, can be observed at local, isolated points. These are the critical points of quantum phase transitions separating the various stable phases. Although these phase transitions occur at T = 0 and are completely governed by quantum mechanical rules, the theoretical understanding of them is mainly in a critical phenomena framework, that is largely analogous to that used to describe traditional, thermodynamic, phase transitions. The purpose of this dissertation is to report on the identification and characterization of a new family of quantum transitions, between the quantum Hall effect and an insulating phase. In these transitions, the system is driven between a quantum Hall liquid and an insulating phase by changing the externally applied magnetic field (B), or the electronic density, n. We conducted a comprehensive, systematic experiment that virtually encompasses the full range of sample quality available to date. In all, 70 samples were prepared and studied, many at very low T ( >20 mK) and high B (<15.5 T). We studied systematically the transport near the transitions both, in the Ohmic, and non-Ohmic, high current, regimes. For each transition studied a clear, temperature independent, transition B field that separates the QHE liquid state and the insulating phase can be unambiguously determined. We find that despite the large disparity in the properties of our samples, the transport behavior near the transition points is virtually indistinguishable from sample to sample. In particular, the resistivity value at the transition point is found to be universal, and close to the quantum unit of resistance, h/e^2. Also, the behavior of the systems upon approaching the transitions obeys scaling rules with the same critical exponents for all the

  1. Pretransitional effects near the smectic-A-smectic-C* phase transition of hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil networks dispersed in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoyiannis, George; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Kutnjak, Zdravko; Zumer, Slobodan

    2007-02-15

    A detailed x-ray scattering and high-resolution ac calorimetric study has been carried out near the smectic-A to chiral smectic-C phase transition of liquid-crystal compounds 4-(2-methyl butyl) phenyl 4-n-octylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate (CE8) and p-(n-decyloxy) benzylidene-p-amino-(2-methylbutyl) cinnamate (DOBAMBC) confined in hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil nanoparticle networks. The character of the transition, which is mean field near a tricritical point in bulk, is changed dramatically with an increase of aerosil-induced disorder. X-ray measurements revealed pretransitional behavior and compression of the smectic layers, phenomena that are strongly pronounced in high aerosil concentrations. A theoretical model that takes into account the interplay of relevant mechanisms is proposed to explain the observed phenomena. The effect of chirality on the interaction of liquid crystals with aerosils is discussed.

  2. The determination of the phase transition temperatures of a semifluorinated liquid crystalline biphenyl ester by impedance spectroscopy as an alternative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Alptekin; Canli, Nimet Yilmaz; Karanlık, Gürkan; Ocak, Hale; Okutan, Mustafa; Eran, Belkız Bilgin

    2016-12-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy (DS) is a very powerful and important for better understanding of the molecular dynamics and relaxation phenomena in liquid crystals. The dielectric and impedance characteristics Ethyl 4-(7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,10-nonafluorodecyloxy)biphenyl-4‧-carboxylate (ENBC) liquid crystal have been analyzed over the frequency range of 100 Hz to MHz in the temperature region from room temperature to 180 °C. The compound ENBC shows enantiotropic a smectic mesophase in a wide temperature range. The phase transition temperatures T (°C) of the liquid crystal ENBC, which were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), have been verified by the dielectric measurements and conductivity mechanisms of the ENBC. The activation energies for some selected angular frequencies have also been calculated.

  3. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  4. Frustration of crystallisation by a liquid-crystal phase.

    PubMed

    Syme, Christopher D; Mosses, Joanna; González-Jiménez, Mario; Shebanova, Olga; Walton, Finlay; Wynne, Klaas

    2017-02-17

    Frustration of crystallisation by locally favoured structures is critically important in linking the phenomena of supercooling, glass formation, and liquid-liquid transitions. Here we show that the putative liquid-liquid transition in n-butanol is in fact caused by geometric frustration associated with an isotropic to rippled lamellar liquid-crystal transition. Liquid-crystal phases are generally regarded as being "in between" the liquid and the crystalline state. In contrast, the liquid-crystal phase in supercooled n-butanol is found to inhibit transformation to the crystal. The observed frustrated phase is a template for similar ordering in other liquids and likely to play an important role in supercooling and liquid-liquid transitions in many other molecular liquids.

  5. Effects of nanoparticle doping on the phase transitional behaviour of ferroelectric liquid crystal Langmuir-Blodgett composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett films of ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) doped with a low concentration of functionalized Al: ZnO (AZO) nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. Pressure-area isotherms show that the nanoparticles as well as FLC composite systems have the capability to form stable monolayers at the air-water interface. The molecular interaction between nanoparticles and FLC molecules increased during barrier compression, which resulted in increased surface pressure. We observed various phases in isotherms with increasing concentration of nanoparticles in the FLC matrix. An X-ray diffraction profile at a low angle confirmed that FLCs retain their layer structure at a low concentration doping of AZO nanoparticles in the FLC matrix. Atomic force microscopy images indicate that low wt% composites are uniformly deposited without disturbing the translation behaviour of SmC* liquid crystals.

  6. Impact of surface roughness on liquid-liquid transition.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2017-02-01

    Liquid-liquid transition (LLT) in single-component liquids is one of the most mysterious phenomena in condensed matter. So far, this problem has attracted attention mainly from the fundamental viewpoint. We report the first experimental study on an impact of surface nanostructuring on LLT by using a surface treatment called rubbing, which is the key technology for the production of liquid crystal displays. We find that this rubbing treatment has a significant impact on the kinetics of LLT of an isotropic molecular liquid, triphenyl phosphite. For a liquid confined between rubbed surfaces, surface-induced barrierless formation of the liquid II phase is observed even in a metastable state, where there should be a barrier for nucleation of the liquid II phase in bulk. Thus, surface rubbing of substrates not only changes the ordering behavior but also significantly accelerates the kinetics. This spatiotemporal pattern modulation of LLT can be explained by a wedge-filling transition and the resulting drastic reduction of the nucleation barrier. However, this effect completely disappears in the unstable (spinodal) regime, indicating the absence of the activation barrier even for bulk LLT. This confirms the presence of nucleation-growth- and spinodal decomposition-type LLT, supporting the conclusion that LLT is truly a first-order transition with criticality. Our finding also opens up a new way to control the kinetics of LLT of a liquid confined in a solid cell by structuring its surface on a mesoscopic length scale, which may contribute to making LLT useful for microfluidics and other industrial applications.

  7. Impact of surface roughness on liquid-liquid transition

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Ken-ichiro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transition (LLT) in single-component liquids is one of the most mysterious phenomena in condensed matter. So far, this problem has attracted attention mainly from the fundamental viewpoint. We report the first experimental study on an impact of surface nanostructuring on LLT by using a surface treatment called rubbing, which is the key technology for the production of liquid crystal displays. We find that this rubbing treatment has a significant impact on the kinetics of LLT of an isotropic molecular liquid, triphenyl phosphite. For a liquid confined between rubbed surfaces, surface-induced barrierless formation of the liquid II phase is observed even in a metastable state, where there should be a barrier for nucleation of the liquid II phase in bulk. Thus, surface rubbing of substrates not only changes the ordering behavior but also significantly accelerates the kinetics. This spatiotemporal pattern modulation of LLT can be explained by a wedge-filling transition and the resulting drastic reduction of the nucleation barrier. However, this effect completely disappears in the unstable (spinodal) regime, indicating the absence of the activation barrier even for bulk LLT. This confirms the presence of nucleation-growth– and spinodal decomposition–type LLT, supporting the conclusion that LLT is truly a first-order transition with criticality. Our finding also opens up a new way to control the kinetics of LLT of a liquid confined in a solid cell by structuring its surface on a mesoscopic length scale, which may contribute to making LLT useful for microfluidics and other industrial applications. PMID:28232957

  8. Characterization of flow pattern transitions for horizontal liquid-liquid pipe flows by using multi-scale distribution entropy in coupled 3D phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Zong, Yan-Bo; Wang, Hong-Mei; Yan, Cong; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De

    2017-03-01

    Horizontal oil-water two-phase flows often exist in many industrial processes. Uncovering the dynamic mechanism of the flow pattern transition is of great significance for modeling the flow parameters. In this study we propose a method called multi-scale distribution entropy (MSDE) in a coupled 3D phase space, and use it to characterize the flow pattern transitions in horizontal oil-water two-phase flows. Firstly, the proposed MSDE is validated with Lorenz system and ARFIMA processes. Interestingly, it is found that the MSDE is dramatically associated with the cross-correlations of the coupled time series. Then, through conducting the experiment of horizontal oil-water two-phase flows, the upstream and downstream flow information is collected using a conductance cross-correlation velocity probe. The coupled cross-correlated signals are investigated using the MSDE method, and the results indicate that the MSDE is an effective tool uncovering the complex dynamic behaviors of flow pattern transitions.

  9. Experimental Study of Gravitation Effects on Liquid Crystal Phase Transitions in Polydisperse Aqueous Suspensions of Mg 2Al Layered Double Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Sun, Dejun; Sun, Zhiwei; Xu, Shenghua

    2016-05-01

    Effects of gravity on liquid crystal phase transitions (LCPT) in polydisperse aqueous suspensions of Mg 2Al layered double hydroxide (LDHs) were studied under normal gravity condition. Samples with different suspension concentration (SC) were tested for 15 days and the relevant changes in samples were observed through crossed polarizers. Our results showed: (a) the samples were still isotropic (I) when SC < 23 wt%; (b) when 23 wt% < SC < 30 wt%, a shear-induced birefringence appeared after preparation, and finally coexistence of four phases was reached, including an opaque isotropic top phase, a birefringent middle phase, a faint birefringence phase and a sediment layer of larger platelets resulting from the high polydispersity; (c) when SC > 30 wt%, the suspensions were in a gel state, and the gel network slowed down the LCPT. The above different behavior of phase transitions is apparently due to the concentration gradient and fractionation caused by gravity. This study provides guidance on how to select samples of LDHs suspensions for LCPT used in the upcoming experiment in the space program SJ-10 satellite.

  10. Prospects of detecting the QCD phase transition in the Galactic supernova neutrino burst with 20-kton scale liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, V. B.

    2016-06-01

    The supernova explosion in the Galaxy is a rare event; that is why the comprehensive study of the next one has absolute priority for the low-energy neutrino astronomy. Because the detailed explosion mechanism has not been unambiguously identified yet and the surrounding matter envelope is opaque for photons, the neutrinos only can give information about physical conditions, dynamics of the collapse, and the SN mechanism. Furthermore, neutrinos could potentially reveal new physics (e.g. QCD phase transition) operating deep in the stellar core.

  11. Surface-induced solid-liquid phase transitions in ultra-thin water films at T > 0 ^oC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Animesh; Gellman, Andrew; Baker, Layton; Broitman, Estebahn

    2008-03-01

    We report here the measurements of both the adsorption isotherms and the dissipation in ultra-thin films of water adsorbed on the surfaces of SiO2 . The measurements were made in a small high vacuum chamber in which we have mounted a QCM. The chamber was evacuated to ˜10-8 Torr and then filled with water vapor at pressures ranging from 10-3 -- 40 Torr (the vapor pressure of water at room temperature is ˜22 Torr). In addition the temperature of the apparatus can be varied in the range 10 -- 60^oC. This is sufficient to measure the adsorption isotherm and to probe the phase of adsorbed water films over the range of conditions. Recently published work studying the adsorption of water on the SiO2 layer formed on Si single crystals has suggested that the phase of the water at temperatures well above 0^oC is actually that of a solid, ice-like structure rather than liquid water [1]. That work is based on the comparison of the vibrational spectrum of thin water films with those of liquid water and ice. In our study we are using the QCM to investigate the possibility of formation of Ice-like structures on SiO2. [1] Asay, D. B. and Kim, S.H., Evolution of the Adsorbed Water Layer Structure on Silicon Oxide at Room Temperature. J. Phys. Chem. B. 2005, 109, 16760-16763

  12. A model for self-sustained potential oscillation of lipid bilayer membranes induced by the gel-liquid crystal phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, K; Naito, M; Gondaira, K I; Kambara, T

    1993-05-01

    To clarify the mechanism of self-sustained oscillation of the electric potential between the two solutions divided by a lipid bilayer membrane, a microscopic model of the membrane system is presented. It is assumed, on the basis of the observed results (Yoshikawa, K., T. Omachi, T. Ishii, Y. Kuroda, and K. liyama. 1985. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 133:740-744; Ishii, T., Y. Kuroda, T. Omochi, and K. Yoshikawa. 1986. Langmuir. 2:319-321; Toko, K., N. Nagashima, S. liyama, K. Yamafuji, and T. Kunitake. Chem. Lett. 1986:1375-1378), that the gel-liquid crystal phase transition of the membrane drives the potential oscillation. It is studied, by using the model, how and under what condition the repetitive phase transition may occur and induce the potential oscillation. The transitions are driven by the repetitive adsorption and desorption of proton by the membrane surface, actions that are induced the periodic reversal of the direction of protonic current. The essential conditions for the periodic reversal are (a) at least one kind of cations such as Na+ or K+ are included in the system except for proton, and the variation of their permeability across the membrane due to the phase transition is noticeably larger than that of proton permeability; and (b) the phase transition has a hysteresis. When these conditions are fulfilled, the self-sustained potential oscillation may be brought about by adjusting temperature, pH, and the cation concentration in the solutions on both sides of the membrane. Application of electric current across the membrane also induces or modifies the potential oscillation. Periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic oscillations appear especially, depending on the value of frequency of the applied alternating current.

  13. Synthesis and phase transition studies on non-symmetric liquid crystal dimers: N-(4-(n-(4-(benzothiazol-2-yl)phenoxy)alkyloxy)-benzylidene)-4-chloroanilines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, Guan-Yeow; Al-Taifi, Elham A.; Ong, Chin-Hin; Kamil Mahmood, Wan Ahmad; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Ito, Masato M.

    2012-06-01

    A new series of non-symmetric liquid crystal dimers N-(4-(n-(4-(benzothiazol-2-yl)phenoxy)alkyloxy)benzylidene)-4-chloroaniline containing benzothiazole and benzylideneimine units connected by a flexible alkyl spacer, -(CH2) n -, with n ranging from 4 to 12 in even parity have been prepared. All five members of this homologous series exhibit an enantiotropic nematic phase. The compounds with greater n of 8-12 exhibit both nematic and smectic phases upon cooling. A notable feature among this series is that for the member with n = 10, the smectic-nematic transition is also present. The nematic-isotropic transition temperatures and associated entropy changes with respect to all compounds in this series exhibit a dramatic dependence on the length of the flexible spacer. A comparison of the transitional properties of this series with those of α-(4-benzylidenechloroaniline-4‧-oxy)-ω-[4-(thiophene-2-carboxyl)benzylideneaniline-4‧-oxy]alkanes reveals that replacing benzothiazole moiety at one side of the flexible alkyl spacer reduces the nematic-isotropic transition temperature.

  14. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremy C; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-06-19

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in

  15. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy C.; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in

  16. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Study Liquid Crystal Phase Transition Using Coarse-Grained Gay-Berne Anisotropic Potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenduo; Zhu, Youliang; Cui, Fengchao; Liu, Lunyang; Sun, Zhaoyan; Chen, Jizhong; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Berne (GB) potential is regarded as an accurate model in the simulation of anisotropic particles, especially for liquid crystal (LC) mesogens. However, its computational complexity leads to an extremely time-consuming process for large systems. Here, we developed a GPU-accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with coarse-grained GB potential implemented in GALAMOST package to investigate the LC phase transitions for mesogens in small molecules, main-chain or side-chain polymers. For identical mesogens in three different molecules, on cooling from fully isotropic melts, the small molecules form a single-domain smectic-B phase, while the main-chain LC polymers prefer a single-domain nematic phase as a result of connective restraints in neighboring mesogens. The phase transition of side-chain LC polymers undergoes a two-step process: nucleation of nematic islands and formation of multi-domain nematic texture. The particular behavior originates in the fact that the rotational orientation of the mesogenes is hindered by the polymer backbones. Both the global distribution and the local orientation of mesogens are critical for the phase transition of anisotropic particles. Furthermore, compared with the MD simulation in LAMMPS, our GPU-accelerated code is about 4 times faster than the GPU version of LAMMPS and at least 200 times faster than the CPU version of LAMMPS. This study clearly shows that GPU-accelerated MD simulation with GB potential in GALAMOST can efficiently handle systems with anisotropic particles and interactions, and accurately explore phase differences originated from molecular structures.

  17. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Study Liquid Crystal Phase Transition Using Coarse-Grained Gay-Berne Anisotropic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fengchao; Liu, Lunyang; Sun, Zhaoyan; Chen, Jizhong; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Berne (GB) potential is regarded as an accurate model in the simulation of anisotropic particles, especially for liquid crystal (LC) mesogens. However, its computational complexity leads to an extremely time-consuming process for large systems. Here, we developed a GPU-accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with coarse-grained GB potential implemented in GALAMOST package to investigate the LC phase transitions for mesogens in small molecules, main-chain or side-chain polymers. For identical mesogens in three different molecules, on cooling from fully isotropic melts, the small molecules form a single-domain smectic-B phase, while the main-chain LC polymers prefer a single-domain nematic phase as a result of connective restraints in neighboring mesogens. The phase transition of side-chain LC polymers undergoes a two-step process: nucleation of nematic islands and formation of multi-domain nematic texture. The particular behavior originates in the fact that the rotational orientation of the mesogenes is hindered by the polymer backbones. Both the global distribution and the local orientation of mesogens are critical for the phase transition of anisotropic particles. Furthermore, compared with the MD simulation in LAMMPS, our GPU-accelerated code is about 4 times faster than the GPU version of LAMMPS and at least 200 times faster than the CPU version of LAMMPS. This study clearly shows that GPU-accelerated MD simulation with GB potential in GALAMOST can efficiently handle systems with anisotropic particles and interactions, and accurately explore phase differences originated from molecular structures. PMID:26986851

  18. Fragile-to-fragile liquid transition at Tg and stable-glass phase nucleation rate maximum at the Kauzmann temperature TK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2014-12-01

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Δp accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm×Δp at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at T≤Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atom, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at Tg without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition.

  19. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    PubMed Central

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W.-G.; Wu, L.; Xin, H.; Wen, J. G.; Luo, W.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations. PMID:27874069

  20. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    DOE PAGES

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W. -G.; ...

    2016-11-22

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here, we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Furthermore,more » our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.« less

  1. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W.-G.; Wu, L.; Xin, H.; Wen, J. G.; Luo, W.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-11-01

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.

  2. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Sun, K; Yin, W-G; Wu, L; Xin, H; Wen, J G; Luo, W; Pennycook, S J; Tranquada, J M; Zhu, Y

    2016-11-22

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.

  3. Quantum phase transitions in disordered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozadze, David

    We study the effects of quenched weak disorder on quantum phase transitions in disordered magnets. The presence of disorder in the system can lead to a variety of exotic phenomena, e.g., the smearing of transitions or quantum Griffiths singularities. Phase transitions are smeared if individual spatial regions can order independently of the bulk system. In paper I, we study smeared quantum phase transitions in binary alloys A1-xBx that are tuned by changing the composition x. We show that in this case the ordered phase is extended over all compositions x < 1. We also study the composition dependence of observables. In paper II, we investigate the influence of spatial disorder correlations on smeared phase transitions. As an experimental example, we demonstrate in paper III, that the composition-driven ferromagnetic-toparamagnetic quantum phase transition in Sr1-xCaxRuO3 is smeared. When individual spatial regions cannot order but fluctuate slowly, the phase transition is characterized by strong singularities in the quantum Griffiths phase. In paper IV, we develop a theory of the quantum Griffiths phases in disordered ferromagnetic metals. We show that the quantum Griffiths singularities are stronger than the usual power-law quantum Griffiths singularities in insulating magnets. In paper V, we present an efficient numerical method for studying quantum phase transitions in disordered systems with O(N) order parameter symmetry in the large-N limit. Our algorithm solves iteratively the large-N self-consistent equations for the renormalized distances from criticality. Paper VI is devoted to the study of transport properties in the quantum Griffiths phase associated with the antiferromagnetic quantum phase transition in a metal. We find unusual behavior of transport properties which is in contrast to the normal Fermi-liquid behavior.

  4. The reversibility and first-order nature of liquid–liquid transition in a molecular liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Mika; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Liquid–liquid transition is an intriguing phenomenon in which a liquid transforms into another liquid via the first-order transition. For molecular liquids, however, it always takes place in a supercooled liquid state metastable against crystallization, which has led to a number of serious debates concerning its origin: liquid–liquid transition versus unusual nano-crystal formation. Thus, there have so far been no single example free from such debates, to the best of our knowledge. Here we show experimental evidence that the transition is truly liquid–liquid transition and not nano-crystallization for a molecular liquid, triphenyl phosphite. We kinetically isolate the reverse liquid-liquid transition from glass transition and crystallization with a high heating rate of flash differential scanning calorimetry, and prove the reversibility and first-order nature of liquid–liquid transition. Our finding not only deepens our physical understanding of liquid–liquid transition but may also initiate a phase of its research from both fundamental and applications viewpoints. PMID:27841349

  5. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    2011-05-15

    Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative

  6. Phase transitions in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrahsheh, Fawaz Y.

    Disorder can have a wide variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this thesis we study the effects of disorder on several classical and quantum phase transitions in condensed matter systems. After a brief introduction, we study the ferromagnetic phase transition in a randomly layered Heisenberg magnet using large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results provide numerical evidence for the exotic infinite-randomness scenario. We study classical and quantum smeared phase transitions in substitutional alloys A1-xBx. Our results show that the disorder completely destroys the phase transition with a pronounced tail of the ordered phase developing for all compositions x < 1. In addition, we find that short-ranged disorder correlations can have a dramatic effect on the transition. Moreover, we show an experimental realization of the composition-tuned ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic quantum phase transition in Sr1-xCa xRuO3. We investigate the effects of disorder on first-order quantum phase transitions on the example of the N-color quantum Ashkin-Teller model. By means of a strong disorder renormalization group, we demonstrate that disorder rounds the first-order transition to a continuous one for both weak and strong coupling between the colors. Finally, we investigate the superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition of one-dimensional bosons with off-diagonal disorder by means of large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Beyond a critical disorder strength, we find nonuniversal, disorder dependent critical behavior.

  7. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  8. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: I. Transitions in the one-phase liquid region.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    The phase field theory (PFT) has been applied to predict equilibrium interfacial properties and nucleation barrier in the binary eutectic system Ag-Cu using double well and interpolation functions deduced from a Ginzburg-Landau expansion that considers fcc (face centered cubic) crystal symmetries. The temperature and composition dependent free energies of the liquid and solid phases are taken from CALculation of PHAse Diagrams-type calculations. The model parameters of PFT are fixed so as to recover an interface thickness of approximately 1 nm from molecular dynamics simulations and the interfacial free energies from the experimental dihedral angles available for the pure components. A nontrivial temperature and composition dependence for the equilibrium interfacial free energy is observed. Mapping the possible nucleation pathways, we find that the Ag and Cu rich critical fluctuations compete against each other in the neighborhood of the eutectic composition. The Tolman length is positive and shows a maximum as a function of undercooling. The PFT predictions for the critical undercooling are found to be consistent with experimental results. These results support the view that heterogeneous nucleation took place in the undercooling experiments available at present. We also present calculations using the classical droplet model [classical nucleation theory (CNT)] and a phenomenological diffuse interface theory (DIT). While the predictions of the CNT with a purely entropic interfacial free energy underestimate the critical undercooling, the DIT results appear to be in a reasonable agreement with the PFT predictions.

  9. Liquid Phase Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Industry spends billions of dollars each year on machine tools to manufacture products out of metal. This includes tools for cutting every kind of metal part from engine blocks to Shuttle main engine components. Cutting tool tips often break because of weak spots or defects in their composition. Based on a new concept called defect trapping, space offers a novel environment to study defect formation in molten metal materials as they solidify. After the return of these materials from space, researchers can evaluate the source of the defect and seek ways to eliminate them in products prepared on Earth. A widely used process for cutting tip manufacturing is liquid phase sintering. Compared to Earth-sintered samples which slump due to buoyancy induced by gravity, space samples are uniformly shaped and defects remain where they are formed. By studying metals sintered in space the US tool industry can potentially enhance its worldwide competitiveness. The Consortium for Materials Development in Space along with Wyle Labs, Teledyne Advanced Materials, and McDornell Douglas have conducted experiments in space.

  10. PHASE CHANGE LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    2006-03-01

    Work is being performed to develop a new shipping system for frozen environmental samples (or other materials) that uses an optimal phase change liquid (PCL) formulation and an insulated shipping container with an on-board digital temperature data logger to provide a history of the temperature profile within the container during shipment. In previous work, several PCL formulations with temperatures of fusion ranging from approximately -14 to -20 C were prepared and evaluated. Both temperature of fusion and heat of fusion of the formulations were measured, and an optimal PCL formulation was selected. The PCL was frozen in plastic bags and tested for its temperature profile in a cooler using a digital temperature data logger. This testing showed that the PCL formulation can maintain freezer temperatures (< -7 to -20 C) for an extended period, such as the time for shipping samples by overnight courier. The results of the experiments described in this report provide significant information for use in developing an integrated freezer system that uses a PCL formulation to maintain freezer temperatures in coolers for shipping environmental samples to the laboratory. Experimental results show the importance of the type of cooler used in the system and that use of an insulating material within the cooler improves the performance of the freezer system. A new optimal PCL formulation for use in the system has been determined. The new formulation has been shown to maintain temperatures at < -7 to -20 C for 47 hours in an insulated cooler system containing soil samples. These results are very promising for developing the new technology.

  11. Liquid-liquid transition in supercooled water suggested by microsecond simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaping; Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2013-07-23

    The putative liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled water has been used to explain many anomalous behaviors of water. However, no direct experimental verification of such a phase transition has been accomplished, and theoretical studies from different simulations contradict each other. We investigated the putative liquid-liquid phase transition using the Water potential from Adaptive Force Matching for Ice and Liquid (WAIL). The simulation reveals a first-order phase transition in the supercooled regime with the critical point at ~207 K and 50 MPa. Normal water is high-density liquid (HDL). Low-density liquid (LDL) emerges at lower temperatures. The LDL phase has a density only slightly larger than that of the ice-Ih and shows more long-range order than HDL. However, the transformation from LDL to HDL is spontaneous across the first-order phase transition line, suggesting the LDL configuration is not poorly formed nanocrystalline ice. It has been demonstrated in the past that the WAIL potential provides reliable predictions of water properties such as melting temperature and temperature of maximum density. Compared with other simple water potentials, WAIL is not biased by fitting to experimental properties, and simulation with this potential reflects the prediction of a high-quality first-principle potential energy surface.

  12. Phase transition of a binary room-temperature ionic liquid composed of bis(pentafluoroethanesulfonyl)amide salts of tetraheptylammonium and N-tetradecylisoquinolinium and its surface properties at the ionic liquid|water interface.

    PubMed

    Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Kitazumi, Yuki; Nishi, Naoya; Kakiuchi, Takashi

    2009-07-09

    A binary room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) composed of bis(pentafluoroethanesulfonyl)amide (C(2)C(2)N(-)) salts of tetraheptylammonium (THpA(+)) and N-tetradecylisoquinolinium (C(14)Iq(+)) undergoes a phase transition upon increasing the mole fraction of C(14)Iq(+) (x) in the bulk RTIL. The initial decrease with x of the interfacial tension (gamma) at the interface between water (W) and the binary RTIL reaches a break point at x approximately 0.2 irrespective of the values of the phase-boundary potential. The surface tension at RTIL|air interface and the conductivity of the binary RTIL support that the break point at x = 0.2 at the RTIL|W interface is attributable to the change of the bulk property. However, unlike the micelle formation of a surfactant solution, a further increase in x gives rise to a further change in gamma. Whereas the phase transition at x = 0.2 does not depend on the applied potential (E) across the RTIL|W interface, the mode of the change in gamma at x > 0.2 strongly depends on E and the apparent deficit of C(14)Iq(+) at the interface is more pronounced when E is closer to the point of zero charge.

  13. Phase transition in Liouville theory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D. )

    1989-11-15

    We suggest that the vortices arising in a Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in Liouville theory correspond to transitions between different genera, producing the plumber's nightmare'' and other phases that have been predicted in fluid membrane theory from energetic considerations. This transition has previously been invoked by Cates to explain the degeneration of numerical simulations of Gaussian random surfaces into branched polymers. The difficulty in quantizing Liouville theory for {ital d}{gt}1 is conjectured to be due to our insistence on working at a fixed genus.

  14. Phase transition in Liouville theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, D.

    1989-11-01

    We suggest that the vortices arising in a Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in Liouville theory correspond to transitions between different genera, producing the ``plumber's nightmare'' and other phases that have been predicted in fluid membrane theory from energetic considerations. This transition has previously been invoked by Cates to explain the degeneration of numerical simulations of Gaussian random surfaces into branched polymers. The difficulty in quantizing Liouville theory for d>1 is conjectured to be due to our insistence on working at a fixed genus.

  15. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II

    SciTech Connect

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2013-06-07

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys.135, 134503 (2011) and preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

  16. Liquid-liquid transition in ST2 water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Palmer, Jeremy C.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2012-12-01

    We use the weighted histogram analysis method [S. Kumar, D. Bouzida, R. H. Swendsen, P. A. Kollman, and J. M. Rosenberg, J. Comput. Chem. 13, 1011 (1992), 10.1002/jcc.540130812] to calculate the free energy surface of the ST2 model of water as a function of density and bond-orientational order. We perform our calculations at deeply supercooled conditions (T = 228.6 K, P = 2.2 kbar; T = 235 K, P = 2.2 kbar) and focus our attention on the region of bond-orientational order that is relevant to disordered phases. We find a first-order transition between a low-density liquid (LDL, ρ ≈ 0.9 g/cc) and a high-density liquid (HDL, ρ ≈ 1.15 g/cc), confirming our earlier sampling of the free energy surface of this model as a function of density [Y. Liu, A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, and P. G. Debenedetti, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 104508 (2009), 10.1063/1.3229892]. We demonstrate the disappearance of the LDL basin at high pressure and of the HDL basin at low pressure, in agreement with independent simulations of the system's equation of state. Consistency between directly computed and reweighted free energies, as well as between free energy surfaces computed using different thermodynamic starting conditions, confirms proper equilibrium sampling. Diffusion and structural relaxation calculations demonstrate that equilibration of the LDL phase, which exhibits slow dynamics, is attained in the course of the simulations. Repeated flipping between the LDL and HDL phases in the course of long molecular dynamics runs provides further evidence of a phase transition. We use the Ewald summation with vacuum boundary conditions to calculate long-ranged Coulombic interactions and show that conducting boundary conditions lead to unphysical behavior at low temperatures.

  17. Diffuse X-ray scattering near a two-dimensional solid-liquid phase transition at the n-hexane-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    According to experimental data on X-ray scattering and reflectometry with synchrotron radiation, a twodimensional crystallization phase transition in a monolayer of melissic acid at the n-hexane-water interface with a decrease in the temperature occurs after a wetting transition.

  18. Diffuse X-ray scattering near a two-dimensional solid–liquid phase transition at the n-hexane–water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    According to experimental data on X-ray scattering and reflectometry with synchrotron radiation, a twodimensional crystallization phase transition in a monolayer of melissic acid at the n-hexane–water interface with a decrease in the temperature occurs after a wetting transition.

  19. ALS/FTD Mutation-Induced Phase Transition of FUS Liquid Droplets and Reversible Hydrogels into Irreversible Hydrogels Impairs RNP Granule Function

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Tetsuro; Qamar, Seema; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Schierle, Gabriele S. Kaminski; Rees, Eric; Miyashita, Akinori; Costa, Ana R.; Dodd, Roger B.; Chan, Fiona T.S.; Michel, Claire H.; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Li, Yi; Yang, Seung-Pil; Wakutani, Yosuke; Meadows, William; Ferry, Rodylyn Rose; Dong, Liang; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Favrin, Giorgio; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dickson, Dennis W.; Zhen, Mei; Ron, David; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E.; Shneider, Neil A.; Holt, Christine; Vendruscolo, Michele; Kaminski, Clemens F.; St George-Hyslop, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which mutations in FUS and other RNA binding proteins cause ALS and FTD remain controversial. We propose a model in which low-complexity (LC) domains of FUS drive its physiologically reversible assembly into membrane-free, liquid droplet and hydrogel-like structures. ALS/FTD mutations in LC or non-LC domains induce further phase transition into poorly soluble fibrillar hydrogels distinct from conventional amyloids. These assemblies are necessary and sufficient for neurotoxicity in a C. elegans model of FUS-dependent neurodegeneration. They trap other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components and disrupt RNP granule function. One consequence is impairment of new protein synthesis by cytoplasmic RNP granules in axon terminals, where RNP granules regulate local RNA metabolism and translation. Nuclear FUS granules may be similarly affected. Inhibiting formation of these fibrillar hydrogel assemblies mitigates neurotoxicity and suggests a potential therapeutic strategy that may also be applicable to ALS/FTD associated with mutations in other RNA binding proteins. PMID:26526393

  20. ALS/FTD Mutation-Induced Phase Transition of FUS Liquid Droplets and Reversible Hydrogels into Irreversible Hydrogels Impairs RNP Granule Function.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tetsuro; Qamar, Seema; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Schierle, Gabriele S Kaminski; Rees, Eric; Miyashita, Akinori; Costa, Ana R; Dodd, Roger B; Chan, Fiona T S; Michel, Claire H; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Li, Yi; Yang, Seung-Pil; Wakutani, Yosuke; Meadows, William; Ferry, Rodylyn Rose; Dong, Liang; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Favrin, Giorgio; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dickson, Dennis W; Zhen, Mei; Ron, David; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E; Shneider, Neil A; Holt, Christine; Vendruscolo, Michele; Kaminski, Clemens F; St George-Hyslop, Peter

    2015-11-18

    The mechanisms by which mutations in FUS and other RNA binding proteins cause ALS and FTD remain controversial. We propose a model in which low-complexity (LC) domains of FUS drive its physiologically reversible assembly into membrane-free, liquid droplet and hydrogel-like structures. ALS/FTD mutations in LC or non-LC domains induce further phase transition into poorly soluble fibrillar hydrogels distinct from conventional amyloids. These assemblies are necessary and sufficient for neurotoxicity in a C. elegans model of FUS-dependent neurodegeneration. They trap other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components and disrupt RNP granule function. One consequence is impairment of new protein synthesis by cytoplasmic RNP granules in axon terminals, where RNP granules regulate local RNA metabolism and translation. Nuclear FUS granules may be similarly affected. Inhibiting formation of these fibrillar hydrogel assemblies mitigates neurotoxicity and suggests a potential therapeutic strategy that may also be applicable to ALS/FTD associated with mutations in other RNA binding proteins.

  1. Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper is a literature evaluation focusing on DNAPLs and provides an overview from a conceptual fate and transport point of view of DNAPL phase distribution, monitoring, site characterization, remediation, and modeling.

  2. Phase Transitions in Brownian Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierl, Marcel; Dieterich, Wolfgang; Einax, Mario; Maass, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    We study stochastic particle transport between two reservoirs along a channel, where the particles are pumped against a bias by a traveling wave potential. It is shown that phase transitions of period-averaged densities or currents occur inside the channel when exclusion interactions between the particles are taken into account. These transitions reflect those known for the asymmetric simple exclusion process. We argue that their occurrence is a generic feature of Brownian motors operating in open systems.

  3. Transitions between paraelectric and ferroelectric phases of bent-core smectic liquid crystals in the bulk and in thin freely suspended films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Alexey; Floegel, Martin; Kornek, Ulrike; Stern, Stephan; Stannarius, Ralf; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang; Zhu, Chenhui; Shen, Yongqiang; Park, Cheol Soo; Maclennan, Joseph; Clark, Noel

    2012-11-01

    We report on the contrasting phase behavior of a bent-core liquid crystal with a large opening angle between the mesogenic units in the bulk and in freely suspended films. Second-harmonic generation experiments and direct observation of director inversion walls in films in an applied electric field reveal that the nonpolar smectic C phase observed in bulk samples becomes a ferroelectric “banana” phase in films, showing that a mesogen with a small steric moment can give a phase with polar order in freely suspended films even when the corresponding bulk phase is paraelectric.

  4. Phase transitions in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1984-11-01

    The rather general circumstances under which a phase transition in hadronic matter at finite temperature to an abnormal phase in which baryon effective masses become small and in which copious baryon-antibaryon pairs appear is emphasized. A preview is also given of a soliton model of dense matter, in which at a density of about seven times nuclear density, matter ceases to be a color insulator and becomes increasingly color conducting. 22 references.

  5. Magnetic fields from phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Everett, Allen

    1998-11-01

    The generation of primordial magnetic fields from cosmological phase transitions is discussed, paying particular attention to the electroweak transition and to the various definitions of the ``average'' field that have been put forward. It is emphasized that only the volume average has dynamical significance as a seed for galactic dynamos. On rather general grounds of causality and energy conservation, it is shown that, in the absence of MHD effects that transfer power in the magnetic field from small to large scales, processes occurring at the electroweak transition cannot generate fields stronger than 10-20 G on a scale of 0.5 Mpc. However, it is implausible that this upper bound could ever be reached, as it would require all the energy in the Universe to be turned into a magnetic field coherent at the horizon scale. Non-linear MHD effects seem therefore to be necessary if the electroweak transition is to create a primordial seed field.

  6. Two Phase Flow Mapping and Transition Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, Masood; Chao, David F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, recent microgravity two-phase flow data for air-water, air-water-glycerin, and air- water-Zonyl FSP mixtures are analyzed for transition from bubbly to slug and from slug to annular flow. It is found that Weber number-based maps are inadequate to predict flow-pattern transition, especially over a wide range of liquid flow rates. It is further shown that slug to annular flow transition is dependent on liquid phase Reynolds number at high liquid flow rate. This effect may be attributed to growing importance of liquid phase inertia in the dynamics of the phase flow and distribution. As a result a new form of scaling is introduced to present data using liquid Weber number based on vapor and liquid superficial velocities and Reynolds number based on liquid superficial velocity. This new combination of the dimensionless parameters seem to be more appropriate for the presentation of the microgravity data and provides a better flow pattern prediction and should be considered for evaluation with data obtained in the future. Similarly, the analysis of bubble to slug flow transition indicates a strong dependence on both liquid inertia and turbulence fluctuations which seem to play a significant role on this transition at high values of liquid velocity. A revised mapping of data using a new group of dimensionless parameters show a better and more consistent description of flow transition over a wide range of liquid flow rates. Further evaluation of the proposed flow transition mapping will have to be made after a wider range of microgravity data become available.

  7. Contact resistivity decrease at a metal/semiconductor interface by a solid-to-liquid phase transitional metallo-organic silver.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Seo, Jun-Young; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-eun

    2014-09-24

    We present a new approach to ensure the low contact resistivity of a silver paste at a metal/semiconductor interface over a broad range of peak firing temperatures by using a solid-to-liquid phase transitional metallo-organic silver, that is, silver neodecanoate. Silver nanoclusters, thermally derived from silver neodecanoate, are readily dissolved into the melt of metal oxide glass frit even at low temperatures, at which point the molten metal oxide glass frit lacks the dissociation capability of bulk silver into Ag(+) ions. In the presence of O(2-) ions in the melt of metal oxide glass frit, the redox reaction from Ag(+) to Ag(0) augments the noble-metal-assisted etching capability to remove the passivation layer of silicon nitride. Moreover, during the cooling stage, the nucleated silver atoms enrich the content of silver nanocolloids in the solidified metal oxide glass layer. The resulting contact resistivity of silver paste with silver neodecanoate at the metal/semiconductor interface thus remains low-between 4.12 and 16.08 mΩ cm(2)-whereas without silver neodecanoate, the paste exhibits a contact resistivity between 2.61 and 72.38 mΩ cm(2) in the range of peak firing temperatures from 750 to 810 °C. The advantage of using silver neodecanoate in silver paste becomes evident in that contact resistivity remains low over the broad range of peak firing temperatures, thus providing greater flexibility with respect to the firing temperature required in silicon solar cell applications.

  8. A Demonstration of the Continuous Phase (Second-Order) Transition of a Binary Liquid System in the Region around Its Critical Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    In most general chemistry and introductory physical chemistry classes, critical point is defined as that temperature-pressure point on a phase diagram where the liquid-gas interface disappears, a phenomenon that generally occurs at relatively high temperatures or high pressures. Two examples are: water, with a critical point at 647 K (critical…

  9. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  10. From channel-forming ionic liquid crystals exhibiting humidity-induced phase transitions to nanostructured ion-conducting polymer membranes (adv. Mater. 26/2013).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Li, Lei; Möller, Martin; Zhu, Xiaomin; Rueda, Jaime J Hernandez; Rosenthal, Martin; Ivanov, Dimitri A

    2013-07-12

    A novel wedge-shaped amphiphilic molecule bearing a sulfonate group at the tip displays humidity-induced phase transitions from a hexagonal columnar structure to a bicontinuous cubic phase. The mesophases can be frozen by photopolymerization of acrylic end-groups resulting in free-standing membranes with different topology of ionic nanochannels. The obtained membranes with a well-ordered ionic channel structure hold promise for applications in separation and catalysis.

  11. Comparative Investigations of Light Transmission in Aligned and Non-aligned Textures of Homogeneous Mixtures of 4-n-alkyl-4'-Cyanibiphenyl Mesogens at Direct and Reverse smectic A ↔ isotropic liquid Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesrullajev, Arif

    2017-03-01

    The thermo-optical properties of various types of textures (the homeotropic, planar, and tilted aligned and non-aligned textures) in liquid crystalline materials with smectic A mesophase have been investigated. Investigations have been carried out for large temperature interval and at the direct smectic A mesophase-isotropic liquid (SmA-I) and isotropic liquid-smectic A mesophase (I-SmA) phase transitions that have been carried out. Homogeneous mixtures of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl with 4-n-decyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl were the objects of the investigations. Temperature dependences of the optical transmission for aligned and non-aligned textures have been measured. Temperature widths of the heterophase regions for the SmA-I and I-SmA phase transitions have been determined. The temperature shift in the optical transmission dependences to low temperatures for the reverse I-SmA phase transition temperatures and the thermal hysteresis has been found for the aligned and non-aligned textures.

  12. Interplay between micelle formation and waterlike phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzelmann, G.; Figueiredo, W.; Girardi, M.

    2010-02-01

    A lattice model for amphiphilic aggregation in the presence of a structured waterlike solvent is studied through Monte Carlo simulations. We investigate the interplay between the micelle formation and the solvent phase transition in two different regions of temperature-density phase diagram of pure water. A second order phase transition between the gaseous (G) and high density liquid (HDL) phases that occurs at very high temperatures, and a first order phase transition between the low density liquid (LDL) and (HDL) phases that takes place at lower temperatures. In both cases, we find the aggregate size distribution curve and the critical micellar concentration as a function of the solvent density across the transitions. We show that micelle formation drives the LDL-HDL first order phase transition to lower solvent densities, while the transition G-HDL is driven to higher densities, which can be explained by the markedly different degrees of micellization in both cases. The diffusion coefficient of surfactants was also calculated in the LDL and HDL phases, changing abruptly its behavior due to the restructuring of waterlike solvent when we cross the first order LDL-HDL phase transition. To understand such behavior, we calculate the solvent density and the number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule close to micelles. The curves of the interfacial solvent density and the number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in the first hydration signal a local phase change of the interfacial water, clarifying the diffusion mechanism of free surfactants in the solvent.

  13. Liquid-vapor flow regime transitions for use in design of heat transfer loops in spacecraft: An investigation of two-phase flow in zero gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, T. W.

    1985-05-01

    The behavior of viscous (or low velocity) two-phase vapor-liquid flow under zero gravity was simulated in the laboratory by using two immiscible fluids of equal density flowing together in a one inch diameter glass tube. The fluids used were Polypropylene Glycol (PPG) which simulated the liquid phase and water which simulated the vapor phase. Various tests were conducted varying flow rates and entrance conditions. Four existing flow regime models were analyzed, modeled on a computer, and extrapolated to predict zero-gravity conditions. The flow regimes were the Horizontal Dukler-Taitel, Vertical Dukler-Taitel, Vertical Weisman and Horizontal Weisman. None of these models when extrapolated to zero-g conditions agreed well with the lab data, and some of the observed flow regimes were not predicted at all.

  14. Sliding Over a Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatti, Erio; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Santoro, Giuseppe E.

    2011-03-01

    The frictional response experienced by a stick-slip slider when a phase transition occurs in the underlying solid substrate is a potentially exciting, poorly explored problem. We show, based on 2-dimensional simulations modeling the sliding of a nanotip, that indeed friction may be heavily affected by a continuous structural transition. First, friction turns nonmonotonic as temperature crosses the transition, peaking at the critical temperature Tc where fluctuations are strongest. Second, below Tc friction depends upon order parameter directions, and is much larger for those where the frictional slip can cause a local flip. This may open a route towards control of atomic scale friction by switching the order parameter direction by an external field or strain, with possible application to e.g., displacive ferroelectrics such as BaTi O3 , as well as ferro- and antiferro-distortive materials. Supported by project ESF FANAS/AFRI sponsored by the Italian Research Council (CNR).

  15. Miscibility studies of two twist-bend nematic liquid crystal dimers with different average molecular curvatures. A comparison between experimental data and predictions of a Landau mean-field theory for the NTB-N phase transition.

    PubMed

    López, D O; Robles-Hernández, B; Salud, J; de la Fuente, M R; Sebastián, N; Diez-Berart, S; Jaen, X; Dunmur, D A; Luckhurst, G R

    2016-02-14

    We report a calorimetric study of a series of mixtures of two twist-bend liquid crystal dimers, the 1'',7''-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl)-4'-yl heptane (CB7CB) and 1''-(2',4-difluorobiphenyl-4'-yloxy)-9''-(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yloxy) nonane (FFO9OCB), the molecules of which have different effective molecular curvatures. High-resolution heat capacity measurements in the vicinity of the NTB-N phase transition for a selected number of binary mixtures clearly indicate a first order NTB-N phase transition for all the investigated mixtures, the strength of which decreases when the nematic range increases. Published theories predict a second order NTB-N phase transition, but we have developed a self-consistent mean field Landau model using two key order parameters: a symmetric and traceless tensor for the orientational order and a short-range vector field which is orthogonal to the helix axis and rotates around of the heliconical structure with an extremely short periodicity. The theory, in its simplified form, depends on two effective elastic constants and explains satisfactorily our heat capacity measurements and also predicts a first-order NTB-N phase transition. In addition, as a complementary source of experimental measurements, the splay (K1) and bend (K3) elastic constants in the conventional nematic phase for the pure compounds and some selected mixtures have been determined.

  16. Continuous transitions between composite Fermi liquid and Landau Fermi liquid: A route to fractionalized Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkeshli, Maissam; McGreevy, John

    2012-08-01

    One of the most successful theories of a non-Fermi-liquid metallic state is the composite Fermi-liquid (CFL) theory of the half-filled Landau level. In this paper, we study continuous quantum phase transitions out of the CFL state and into a Landau Fermi liquid, in the limit of no disorder and fixed particle number. This transition can be induced by tuning the bandwidth of the Landau level relative to the interaction energy, for instance through an externally applied periodic potential. We find a transition to the Landau Fermi liquid through a gapless Mott insulator with a Fermi surface of neutral fermionic excitations. In the presence of spatial symmetries, we also find a direct continuous transition between the CFL and the Landau Fermi liquid. The transitions have a number of characteristic observable signatures, including the presence of two crossover temperature scales, resistivity jumps, and vanishing compressibility. When the composite fermions are paired instead, our results imply quantum critical points between various non-Abelian topological states, including the ν=1/2 Moore-Read Pfaffian [Ising × U(1) topological order], a version of the Kitaev B phase (Ising topological order), and paired electronic superconductors. To study such transitions, we use a projective construction of the CFL, which goes beyond the conventional framework of flux attachment to include a broader set of quantum fluctuations. These considerations suggest a possible route to fractionalized Mott insulators by starting with fractional quantum Hall states and tuning the Landau-level bandwidth.

  17. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    PubMed

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent.

  18. Unconventional phase transitions in a constrained single polymer chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klushin, L. I.; Skvortsov, A. M.

    2011-11-01

    Phase transitions were recognized among the most fascinating phenomena in physics. Exactly solved models are especially important in the theory of phase transitions. A number of exactly solved models of phase transitions in a single polymer chain are discussed in this review. These are three models demonstrating the second order phase transitions with some unusual features: two-dimensional model of β-structure formation, the model of coil-globule transition and adsorption of a polymer chain grafted on the solid surface. We also discuss models with first order phase transitions in a single macromolecule which admit not only exact analytical solutions for the partition function with explicit finite-size effects but also the non-equilibrium free energy as a function of the order parameter (Landau function) in closed analytical form. One of them is a model of mechanical desorption of a macromolecule, which demonstrates an unusual first order phase transition with phase coexistence within a single chain. Features of first and second order transitions become mixed here due to phase coexistence which is not accompanied by additional interfacial free energy. Apart from that, there exist several single-chain models belonging to the same class (adsorption of a polymer chain tethered near the solid surface or liquid-liquid interface, and escape transition upon compressing a polymer between small pistons) that represent examples of a highly unconventional first order phase transition with several inter-related unusual features: no simultaneous phase coexistence, and hence no phase boundary, non-concave thermodynamic potential and non-equivalence of conjugate ensembles. An analysis of complex zeros of partition functions upon approaching the thermodynamic limit is presented for models with and without phase coexistence.

  19. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  20. APPARATUS FOR LIQUID PHASE EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hicks, T.R.; Lehman, H.R.; Rubin, B.

    1958-09-16

    operation is described. It comprises a tubular colunm having upper and lower enlarged terminal portions, and a constricted central section containing fluid dispersal packing. Pulsing means are coupled to the upper portion of the column. The inlet for the less dense phase is located above the inlet for the denser phase and both are positioned so that liquids enter the constricted packingfilled central section. The apparatos also includes an interfacing level control, and means fer sensing the level of the interface actuate apparatus for controlling the rate of flow of input or discharge. The outlet for the less dense phase is located in the upper packing free portion of the colunm and that of the denser phase in the lower portion.

  1. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1983-11-08

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

  2. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, Edward G.; Winefordner, James D.; Jurgensen, Arthur R.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprising a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focussing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof.

  3. Surface-functionalized ionic liquid crystal-supported ionic liquid phase materials: ionic liquid crystals in mesopores.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Florian T U; Morain, Bruno; Weiss, Alexander; Laurin, Mathias; Libuda, Jörg; Wagner, Valentin; Melcher, Berthold U; Wang, Xinjiao; Meyer, Karsten; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2011-12-23

    The influence of confinement on the ionic liquid crystal (ILC) [C(18)C(1)Im][OTf] is studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscopy (POM), and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The ILC studied is supported on Si-based powders and glasses with pore sizes ranging from 11 to 50 nm. The temperature of the solid-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition seems mostly unaffected by the confinement, whereas the temperature of the liquid-crystalline-to-liquid phase transition is depressed for smaller pore sizes. A contact layer with a thickness in the order of 2 nm is identified. The contact layer exhibits a phase transition at a temperature 30 K lower than the solid-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition observed for the neat ILC. For applications within the "supported ionic liquid phase (SILP)" concept, the experiments show that in pores of diameter 50 nm a pore filling of α>0.4 is sufficient to reproduce the phase transitions of the neat ILC.

  4. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transformation in Silicon: Evidence from First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2007-11-01

    We report results of first principles molecular dynamics simulations that confirm early speculations on the presence of liquid-liquid phase transition in undercooled silicon. However, we find that structural and electronic properties of both low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL) phases are quite different from those obtained by empirical calculations, the difference being more pronounced for the HDL phase. The discrepancy between quantum and classical simulations is attributed to the inability of empirical potentials to describe changes in chemical bonds induced by density and temperature variations.

  5. Nuclear Binding Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Li, Ning; Rokash, Alexander; Alarcón, Jose Manuel; Du, Dechuan; Klein, Nico; Lu, Bing-nan; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam

    2016-09-01

    How do protons and neutrons bind to form nuclei? This is the central question of ab initio nuclear structure theory. While the answer may seem as simple as the fact that nuclear forces are attractive, the full story is more complex and interesting. In this work we present numerical evidence from ab initio lattice simulations showing that nature is near a quantum phase transition, a zero-temperature transition driven by quantum fluctuations. Using lattice effective field theory, we perform Monte Carlo simulations for systems with up to twenty nucleons. For even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons, we discover a first-order transition at zero temperature from a Bose-condensed gas of alpha particles (4He nuclei) to a nuclear liquid. Whether one has an alpha-particle gas or nuclear liquid is determined by the strength of the alpha-alpha interactions, and we show that the alpha-alpha interactions depend on the strength and locality of the nucleon-nucleon interactions. This insight should be useful in improving calculations of nuclear structure and important astrophysical reactions involving alpha capture on nuclei. Our findings also provide a tool to probe the structure of alpha cluster states such as the Hoyle state responsible for the production of carbon in red giant stars and point to a connection between nuclear states and the universal physics of bosons at large scattering length.

  6. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, A. K.; You, Y.; Renbaum-Wolff, L.; Carreras-Sospedra, M.; Hiranuma, N.; Smith, M.; Zhang, X.; Weber, R.; Shilling, J. E.; Dabdub, D.; Martin, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric particles contain both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid-liquid phase separation. If liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semi-volatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and the uptake of reactive gas species on atmospheric particles may be affected. Here, using optical and fluorescence microscopy, we present images that show the coexistence of two non-crystalline phases in particles generated from samples collected on multiple days in Atlanta, Georgia, and in particles generated in the laboratory using simulated atmospheric conditions. These results show that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations.

  7. Theoretical Predictions of Phase Transitions at Ultra-high Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boates, Brian

    2013-06-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the high-pressure phase diagrams of important planetary materials such as CO2, MgSiO3, and MgO. For CO2, we predict a series of distinct liquid phases over a wide pressure (P) and temperature (T) range, including a first-order transition to a dense polymer liquid. We have computed finite-temperature free energies of liquid and solid CO2 phases to determine the melting curve beyond existing measurements and investigate possible phase separation transitions. The interaction of these phase boundaries with the mantle geotherm will also be discussed. Furthermore, we find evidence for a vast pressure-temperature regime where molten MgSiO3 decomposes into liquid SiO2 and solid MgO, with a volume change of approximately 1.2 percent. The demixing transition is driven by the crystallization of MgO ? the reaction only occurs below the high-pressure MgO melting curve. The predicted transition pressure at 10,000 K is in close proximity to an anomaly reported in recent laser-driven shock experiments of MgSiO3. We also present new results for the high-pressure melting curve of MgO and its B1-B2 solid phase transition, with a triple point near 364 GPa and 12,000 K.

  8. Capillary Condensation in Polymer Blends: an Analysis of Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina C.; Jira, Nicholas C.; Evans, Ian R.; Cohen, Matthew; D'Rozario, Julia R.; Romano, Marie T.; Sabirianov, Ildar

    We explore herein the capillary condensation for various geometries. Capillary condensation is studied in the presence of van der Waals forces. We derive the grand free energy, and we analyze the phase transitions, the absorption isotherms and the triple point. Phase transitions between full, empty and two films are investigated and the shape of the liquid is calculated. We also analyze an important application of wetting phenomena and capillary condensation in binary polymer blends and investigate the type of wetting transitions presented and the phase diagram. SUNY Oswego SCAC Grant, NSF Noyce Grant.

  9. Application of liquid dynamics theory to the glass transition.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D C

    1999-12-01

    In monatomic liquid dynamics theory, the system moves among a large number of intersecting nearly harmonic valleys in the many-particle potential energy surface. The same potential surface underlies the motion of atoms in the supercooled liquid. As temperature is decreased below the melting temperature, the motion among the potential valleys will begin to freeze out, and the system will pass out of equilibrium. It is therefore necessary to develop a nonequilibrium theory, based on the Hamiltonian motion. The motion is separated into two distinct parts, and idealized as follows: (a) the vibrational motion within a single valley is assumed to be purely harmonic, and remaining in equilibrium; and (b) the transit motion, which carries the system from one valley to another, is assumed to be instantaneous, and energy and momentum conserving. This idealized system is capable of exhibiting a glass transition behavior. An elementary model, incorporating the idealized motion, is the independent atom model, originally developed to treat self diffusion in monatomic liquids. For supercooled liquids, in the independent atom model, the vanishing of self diffusion at a finite temperature implies the same property for the transit probability. The vanishing of the transit probability at a finite temperature supports the view that transits are not merely thermally activated, but are controlled by phase-space correlations. For supercooled liquid sodium, the transit probability has Vogel-Tamann-Fulcher temperature dependence. The independent atom model is shown to be capable of exhibiting all the essential glass transition properties, including rate dependence of the glass transition temperature, and both exponential and nonexponential relaxation.

  10. Phases and phase transitions in disordered quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    These lecture notes give a pedagogical introduction to phase transitions in disordered quantum systems and to the exotic Griffiths phases induced in their vicinity. We first review some fundamental concepts in the physics of phase transitions. We then derive criteria governing under what conditions spatial disorder or randomness can change the properties of a phase transition. After introducing the strong-disorder renormalization group method, we discuss in detail some of the exotic phenomena arising at phase transitions in disordered quantum systems. These include infinite-randomness criticality, rare regions and quantum Griffiths singularities, as well as the smearing of phase transitions. We also present a number of experimental examples.

  11. Work and quantum phase transitions: quantum latency.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, E; Bragança, H; Dorner, R; França Santos, M; Vedral, V; Modi, K; Goold, J

    2014-06-01

    We study the physics of quantum phase transitions from the perspective of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. For first-order quantum phase transitions, we find that the average work done per quench in crossing the critical point is discontinuous. This leads us to introduce the quantum latent work in analogy with the classical latent heat of first order classical phase transitions. For second order quantum phase transitions the irreversible work is closely related to the fidelity susceptibility for weak sudden quenches of the system Hamiltonian. We demonstrate our ideas with numerical simulations of first, second, and infinite order phase transitions in various spin chain models.

  12. Entropy Calculations for a Supercooled Liquid Crystalline Blue Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, U.

    2007-01-01

    We observed, using polarized light microscopy, the supercooling of the blue phase (BPI) of cholesteryl proprionate and measured the corresponding liquid crystalline phase transition temperatures. From these temperatures and additional published data we have provided, for the benefit of undergraduate physics students, a nontraditional example…

  13. Solid–solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    PubMed Central

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid–solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid–solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a ‘real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  14. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  15. Multiple liquid crystal phases of DNA at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Strzelecka, T E; Davidson, M W; Rill, R L

    1988-02-04

    DNA packaging in vivo is very tight, with volume concentrations approaching 70% w/v in sperm heads, virus capsids and bacterial nucleoids. The packaging mechanisms adopted may be related to the natural tendency of semi-rigid polymers to form liquid crystalline phases in concentrated solutions. We find that DNA forms at least three distinct liquid crystalline phases at concentrations comparable to those in vivo, with phase transitions occurring over relatively narrow ranges of DNA concentration. A weakly birefringent, dynamic, 'precholesteric' mesophase with microscopic textures intermediate between those of a nematic and a true cholesteric phase forms at the lowest concentrations required for phase separation. At slightly higher DNA concentrations, a second mesophase forms which is a strongly birefringent, well-ordered cholesteric phase with a concentration-dependent pitch varying from 2 to 10 micron. At the highest DNA concentrations, a phase forms which is two-dimensionally ordered and resembles smectic phases of thermotropic liquid crystals observed with small molecules.

  16. Vapors-liquid phase separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Brown, G. S.; Chuang, C.; Kamioka, Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1980-10-01

    The use of porous plugs, mostly with in the form of passive devices with constant area were considered as vapor-liquid phase separators for helium 2 storage vessels under reduced gravity. The incorporation of components with variable cross sectional area as a method of flow rate modification was also investigated. A particular device which uses a shutter-type system for area variation was designed and constructed. This system successfully permitted flor rate changes of up to plus or minus 60% from its mean value.

  17. QCD Phase Transitions, Volume 15

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, T.; Shuryak, E.

    1999-03-20

    The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theorists working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.

  18. Kinetics of the barotropic ripple (P beta')/lamellar liquid crystal (L alpha) phase transition in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) monitored by time-resolved x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, M; Hogan, J; Mencke, A

    1991-01-01

    We present here the first study of the use of a pressure-jump to induce the ripple (P beta')/lamellar liquid crystal (L alpha) phase transition in fully hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). The transition was monitored by using time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD). Applying a pressure-jump from atmospheric to 11.3 MPa (1640 psig, 111.6 atm) in 2.5 s induces the L alpha to P beta' phase transition which takes place in two stages. The lamellar repeat spacing initially increases from a value of 66.0 +/- 0.1 A (n = 4) to a maximum value of 70.3 +/- 0.8 A (n = 4) after 10 s and after a further 100-150 s decreases slightly to 68.5 +/- 0.3 A (n = 4). The reverse transition takes place following a pressure jump in 5.5 s from 11.3 MPa to atmospheric pressure. Again, the transition occurs in two stages with the repeat spacing steadily decreasing from an initial value of 68.5 +/- 0.3 A (n = 3) to a minimum value of 66.6 +/- 0.3 A (n = 3) after 50 s and then increasing by approximately 0.5 A over a period of 100 s. The transition temperature increases linearly with pressure up to 14.1 MPa in accordance with the Clapeyron relation, giving a dT/dP value of 0.285 degrees C/MPa (28.5 degrees C/kbar) and an associated volume change of 40 microliters/g. A dynamic compressibility of 0.13 +/- 0.01 A/MPa has been determined for the L alpha phase. This value is compared with the equilibrium compressibilities of bilayer and nonbilayer phases reported in the literature. The results suggest testable mechanisms for the pressure-induced transition involving changes in periodicity, phase hydration, chain order, and orientation. A more complete understanding of the transition mechanism will require improvement in detector spatial resolution and sensitivity, and data on the pressure sensitivity of phase hydration. PMID:1912281

  19. Dynamics of a Quantum Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Dorner, Uwe; Zoller, Peter

    2005-09-02

    We present two approaches to the dynamics of a quench-induced phase transition in the quantum Ising model. One follows the standard treatment of thermodynamic second order phase transitions but applies it to the quantum phase transitions. The other approach is quantum, and uses Landau-Zener formula for transition probabilities in avoided level crossings. We show that predictions of the two approaches of how the density of defects scales with the quench rate are compatible, and discuss the ensuing insights into the dynamics of quantum phase transitions.

  20. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  1. Glass–liquid transition of water at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ove

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of the existence of liquid water under extreme conditions and its concomitant properties are important in many fields of science. Glassy water has previously been prepared by hyperquenching micron-sized droplets of liquid water and vapor deposition on a cold substrate (ASW), and its transformation to an ultraviscous liquid form has been reported on heating. A densified amorphous solid form of water, high-density amorphous ice (HDA), has also been made by collapsing the structure of ice at pressures above 1 GPa and temperatures below approximately 140 K, but a corresponding liquid phase has not been detected. Here we report results of heat capacity Cp and thermal conductivity, in situ, measurements, which are consistent with a reversible transition from annealed HDA to ultraviscous high-density liquid water at 1 GPa and 140 K. On heating of HDA, the Cp increases abruptly by (3.4 ± 0.2) J mol-1 K-1 before crystallization starts at (153 ± 1) K. This is larger than the Cp rise at the glass to liquid transition of annealed ASW at 1 atm, which suggests the existence of liquid water under these extreme conditions. PMID:21690361

  2. Liquid-Phase Beam Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Xie, Zhuang; Park, Daniel J; Liao, Xing; Brown, Keith A; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-02-24

    Beam pen lithography (BPL) in the liquid phase is evaluated. The effect of tip-substrate gap and aperture size on patterning performance is systematically investigated. As a proof-of-concept experiment, nanoarrays of nucleotides are synthesized using BPL in an organic medium, pointing toward the potential of using liquid phase BPL to perform localized photochemical reactions that require a liquid medium.

  3. Cloud regimes as phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Hottovy, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Clouds are repeatedly identified as a leading source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Of particular importance are stratocumulus clouds, which can appear as either (i) closed cells that reflect solar radiation back to space or (ii) open cells that allow solar radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Here we show that these clouds regimes -- open versus closed cells -- fit the paradigm of a phase transition. In addition, this paradigm characterizes pockets of open cells as the interface between the open- and closed-cell regimes, and it identifies shallow cumulus clouds as a regime of higher variability. This behavior can be understood using an idealized model for the dynamics of atmospheric water as a stochastic diffusion process. With this new conceptual viewpoint, ideas from statistical mechanics could potentially be used for understanding uncertainties related to clouds in the climate system and climate predictions.

  4. Effect of liquid-liquid structure transition on solidification of Sn57Bi43 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyang; Zhang, Yongxing; Wu, Chen; Geng, Haoran

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of the liquid-liquid structure transition (L-LST) on the solidification behaviors and morphologies of Sn57Bi43 alloy was further studied. The liquid structure of Sn57Bi43 was studied with resistivity, thermal analysis and viscosity method. The obvious turning point is observed on resistivity-temperature, DSC and viscosity-temperature curves of Sn57Bi43 alloy. The resistivity increases linearly with increasing temperature before the turning point. These results indicate that temperature-induced liquid-liquid structure transition occurs at 943-1093 K and is reversible, which may be formed by large cooperative motions for molecular rearrangements. What is more, the results show that the undercooling of the eutectic phase increases and the microstructure becomes finer after solidifying from the melt experiencing L-LST. The spacing of eutectic phase decreases markedly. Based on these results explored the melt structure from different aspects, the nature of discontinuity of structural phase transition can be explored and the effect of L-LST on solidification of Sn57Bi43 alloy is studied.

  5. Phase transitions in the assembly of multivalent signalling proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pilong; Banjade, Sudeep; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Baoyu; Guo, Liang; Llaguno, Marc; Hollingsworth, Javoris V.; King, David S.; Banani, Salman F.; Russo, Paul S.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Nixon, B. Tracy; Rosen, Michael K.

    2013-04-08

    Cells are organized on length scales ranging from angstrom to micrometers. However, the mechanisms by which angstrom-scale molecular properties are translated to micrometer-scale macroscopic properties are not well understood. Here we show that interactions between diverse synthetic, multivalent macromolecules (including multi-domain proteins and RNA) produce sharp liquid-liquid-demixing phase separations, generating micrometer-sized liquid droplets in aqueous solution. This macroscopic transition corresponds to a molecular transition between small complexes and large, dynamic supramolecular polymers. The concentrations needed for phase transition are directly related to the valency of the interacting species. In the case of the actin-regulatory protein called neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) interacting with its established biological partners NCK and phosphorylated nephrin1, the phase transition corresponds to a sharp increase in activity towards an actin nucleation factor, the Arp2/3 complex. The transition is governed by the degree of phosphorylation of nephrin, explaining how this property of the system can be controlled to regulatory effect by kinases. The widespread occurrence of multivalent systems suggests that phase transitions may be used to spatially organize and biochemically regulate information throughout biology.

  6. Hunting liquid micro-pockets in snow and ice: Phase transition in salt solutions at the bulk and interface with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Orlando, Fabrizio; Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Huthwelker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sea salt, and in particular chloride, is an important reactant in the atmosphere. Chloride in air-borne sea salt aerosol is - once chemically converted to a molecular halogen (Cl2, BrCl) and released to the atmosphere - well known as important atmospheric reactant, driving large-scale changes to the atmospheric composition and in particular to ozone levels in remote areas, but also in coastal mega cities. Similar chemistry has been proposed for sea salt deposits in polar snow covers. A crucial factor determining the overall reactivity is the local physical environment of the chloride ion. For example, the reactivity of liquid aerosols decreases significantly upon crystallization. Surprisingly, the phases of NaCl-containing systems are still under debate, partially due to the limited availability of in situ measurements directly probing the local environment at the surface of frozen NaCl-water binary systems. Using core electron spectroscopy of the oxygen atoms in water, we previously showed that these systems follow the phase rules at the air-ice interface. This finding contrasts some earlier observations, where the presence of liquid below the eutectic point of bulk solutions was postulated. In the present study, we present new electron yield near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) data obtained at near-ambient pressures up to 20 mbar of NaCl frozen solutions. The method is sensitive to small changes in the local environment of the chlorine atom. The measurements were performed at the PHOENIX beamline at SLS. The study indicates frapant differences in the phases of NaCl - water mixtures at temperatures blow the freezing point for the surface of the ice vs. the bulk. This has significant impact on modelling chemical reactions in snow or ice and it's environmental consequences.

  7. Aspects of the electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Huet, P.

    1992-11-01

    The electroweak phase transition is reviewed in light of some recent developments. Emphasis is on the issue whether the transition is first or second order and its possible role in the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe.

  8. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-08-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  9. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water.

    PubMed

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2014-08-21

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  10. Current fluctuations at a phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerschenfeld, A.; Derrida, B.

    2011-10-01

    The ABC model is a simple diffusive one-dimensional non-equilibrium system which exhibits a phase transition. Here we show that the cumulants of the currents of particles through the system become singular near the phase transition. At the transition, they exhibit an anomalous dependence on the system size (an anomalous Fourier's law). An effective theory for the dynamics of the single mode which becomes unstable at the transition allows one to predict this anomalous scaling.

  11. Model of High Temperature Phase Transitions in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, E. S.

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of the assumption of the electron density fluctuation at the band degradation, a calculation parameter (the radius R) of the half-width of the probability distribution over the coordinate R is identified at the level of the maximum electron density fluctuation (at a maximum of the Gaussian function). Based on an analysis of the crystallization process and high polymorphic transformations bcc → fcc, the reasons for the formation of bcc, fcc, hexagonal, and tetragonal structures from the liquid phase, as well as for the high temperature bcc → hcp transition in the solid phase are established using the calculated parameter (the radius R) in the solid and liquid phases.

  12. Structural Transitions at Ionic Liquid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Benjamin; Salanne, Mathieu

    2015-12-17

    Recent advances in experimental and computational techniques have allowed for an accurate description of the adsorption of ionic liquids on metallic electrodes. It is now well-established that they adopt a multilayered structure and that the composition of the layers changes with the potential of the electrode. In some cases, potential-driven ordering transitions in the first adsorbed layer have been observed in experiments probing the interface on the molecular scale or by molecular simulations. This perspective gives an overview of the current understanding of such transitions and of their potential impact on the physical and (electro)chemical processes at the interface. In particular, peaks in the differential capacitance, slow dynamics at the interface, and changes in the reactivity have been reported in electrochemical studies. Interfaces between ionic liquids and metallic electrodes are also highly relevant for their friction properties, the voltage-dependence of which opens the way to exciting applications.

  13. Disclination Unbinding Transition in Quantum Hall Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Carlos

    2002-03-01

    Recent experiments [1] in the transitional region between plateaus of the quantum Hall effect have revealed a plæthora of unusual behavior in the low-temperature magnetotransport: in particular large anisotropies of the longitudinal resistivities are observed at temperatures lower than ca. 150 mK for near half filling of high (N>= 2) Landau levels (LL). the long-wavelength elastic theory for the quantum Hall smectic state starting from the Hartree-Fock approximation. Dislocations and phonons lead to an effective nematic model for T>0. This model undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless disclination unbinding transition from a phase with algebraic orientational order into an isotropic phase. Without the use of any fitting parameter, we obtain transition temperatures which are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments which have observed large anisotropies of the longitudinal resistivities in half-filled Landau levels, lending credence to the liquid crystal interpretation [3] of experiments. [[1

  14. Liquid phase chromatography on microchips.

    PubMed

    Kutter, Jörg P

    2012-01-20

    Over the past twenty years, the field of microfluidics has emerged providing one of the main enabling technologies to realize miniaturized chemical analysis systems, often referred to as micro-Total Analysis Systems (uTAS), or, more generally, Lab-on-a-Chip Systems (LOC) [1,2]. While microfluidics was driven forward a lot from the engineering side, especially with respect to ink jet and dispensing technology, the initial push and interest from the analytical chemistry community was through the desire to develop miniaturized sensors, detectors, and, very early on, separation systems. The initial almost explosive development of, in particular, chromatographic separation systems on microchips, has, however, slowed down in recent years. This review takes a closer, critical look at how liquid phase chromatography has been implemented in miniaturized formats over the past several years, what is important to keep in mind when developing or working with separations in a miniaturized format, and what challenges and pitfalls remain.

  15. Surface alignment, anchoring transitions, optical properties, and topological defects in the nematic phase of thermotropic bent-core liquid crystal A131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, B.; Wonderly, H.; Mathews, M.; Li, Q.; Shiyanovskii, S. V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2010-10-01

    We study optical, structural, and surface anchoring properties of thermotropic nematic bent-core material A131. The focus is on the features associated with orientational order as the material has been reported to exhibit not only the usual uniaxial nematic but also the biaxial nematic phase. We demonstrate that A131 experiences a surface anchoring transition from a perpendicular to tilted alignment when the temperature decreases. The features of the tilted state are consistent with surface-induced birefringence associated with smectic layering near the surface and a molecular tilt that changes along the normal to the substrates. The surface-induced birefringence is reduced to zero by a modest electric field that establishes a uniform uniaxial nematic state. Both refractive and absorptive optical properties of A131 are consistent with the uniaxial order. We found no evidence of the “polycrystalline” biaxial behavior in the cells placed in crossed electric and magnetic fields. We observe stable topological point defects (boojums and hedgehogs) and nonsingular “escaped” disclinations pertinent only to the uniaxial order. Finally, freely suspended films of A131 show uniaxial nematic and smectic textures; a decrease in the film thickness expands the temperature range of stability of smectic textures, supporting the idea of surface-induced smectic layering. Our conclusion is that A131 features only a uniaxial nematic phase and that the apparent biaxiality is caused by subtle surface effects rather than by the bulk biaxial phase.

  16. Combined lyotropic and thermotropic phase transitions of deoxycholic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuc˜elić, V.; Vũcelić, D.

    1980-02-01

    Phase transitions of deoxycholic acid have been examined by studying systems which form a clathrate during crystallization. It has been shown that, depending upon the type of solvent molecule present, the deoxycholic acid clathrate may or may not form a thermotropic liquid crystal. In this manner, the simultaneous occurrence of both lyotropic and thermotropic effects was observed.

  17. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  18. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  19. Glass transition of aqueous solutions involving annealing-induced ice recrystallization resolves liquid-liquid transition puzzle of water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Shan; Cao, Ze-Xian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-10-27

    Liquid-liquid transition of water is an important concept in condensed-matter physics. Recently, it was claimed to have been confirmed in aqueous solutions based on annealing-induced upshift of glass-liquid transition temperature, T(g) . Here we report a universal water-content, X(aqu) , dependence of T(g) for aqueous solutions. Solutions with X(aqu)>X(cr)(aqu)vitrify/devitrify at a constant temperature, ~T(g) , referring to freeze-concentrated phase with X(aqu)left behind ice crystallization. Those solutions with X(aqu)phase of solutions instead of 'liquid II phase of water'. Our work also provides a reliable method to determine hydration formula and to scrutinize solute-solvent interaction in solution.

  20. Rescuing a Quantum Phase Transition with Quantum Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gu; Novais, E.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2017-02-01

    We show that placing a quantum system in contact with an environment can enhance non-Fermi-liquid correlations, rather than destroy quantum effects, as is typical. The system consists of two quantum dots in series with two leads; the highly resistive leads couple charge flow through the dots to the electromagnetic environment, the source of quantum noise. While the charge transport inhibits a quantum phase transition, the quantum noise reduces charge transport and restores the transition. We find a non-Fermi-liquid intermediate fixed point for all strengths of the noise. For strong noise, it is similar to the intermediate fixed point of the two-impurity Kondo model.

  1. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W. -G.; Wu, L.; Xin, H.; Wen, J. G.; Luo, W.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-11-22

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here, we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Furthermore, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.

  2. Application of ionic liquid in liquid phase microextraction technology.

    PubMed

    Han, Dandan; Tang, Baokun; Lee, Yu Ri; Row, Kyung Ho

    2012-11-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are novel nonmolecular solvents. Their unique properties, such as high thermal stability, tunable viscosity, negligible vapor pressure, nonflammability, and good solubility for inorganic and organic compounds, make them excellent candidates as extraction media for a range of microextraction techniques. Many physical properties of ILs can be varied, and the structural design can be tuned to impart the desired functionality and enhance the analyte extraction selectivity, efficiency, and sensitivity. This paper provides an overview of the applications of ILs in liquid phase microextraction technology, such as single-drop microextraction, hollow fiber based liquid phase microextraction, and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The sensitivity, linear calibration range, and detection limits for a range of target analytes in the methods were analyzed to determine the advantages of ILs in liquid phase microextraction.

  3. Recent development of ionic liquid stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianzhe; Qiao, Lizhen; Xu, Guowang

    2015-11-13

    Based on their particular physicochemical characteristics, ionic liquids have been widely applied in many fields of analytical chemistry. Many types of ionic liquids were immobilized on a support like silica or monolith as stationary phases for liquid chromatography. Moreover, different approaches were developed to bond covalently ionic liquids onto the supporting materials. The obtained ionic liquid stationary phases show multi-mode mechanism including hydrophobic, hydrophilic, hydrogen bond, anion exchange, π-π, and dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, they could be used in different chromatographic modes including ion-exchange, RPLC, NPLC and HILIC to separate various classes of compounds. This review mainly summarizes the immobilized patterns and types of ionic liquid stationary phases, their retention mechanisms and applications in the recent five years.

  4. Local bias-induced phase transitions

    DOE PAGES

    Seal, Katyayani; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2008-11-27

    Electrical bias-induced phase transitions underpin a wide range of applications from data storage to energy generation and conversion. The mechanisms behind these transitions are often quite complex and in many cases are extremely sensitive to local defects that act as centers for local transformations or pinning. Furthermore, using ferroelectrics as an example, we review methods for probing bias-induced phase transitions and discuss the current limitations and challenges for extending the methods to field-induced phase transitions and electrochemical reactions in energy storage, biological and molecular systems.

  5. Phase transitions in the web of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    The Internet age is changing the structure of science, and affecting interdisciplinary interactions. Publication profiles connecting mathematics with molecular biology and condensed matter physics over the last 40 years exhibit common phase transitions indicative of the critical role played by specific interdisciplinary interactions. The strengths of the phase transitions quantify the importance of interdisciplinary interactions.

  6. Phase transition in a super superspin glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, R.; De Toro, J. A.; Salazar, D.; Lee, S. S.; Cheong, J. L.; Nordblad, P.

    2013-06-01

    We here confirm the occurrence of spin glass phase transition and extract estimates of associated critical exponents of a highly monodisperse and densely compacted system of bare maghemite nanoparticles. This system has earlier been found to behave like an archetypal spin glass, with, e.g., a sharp transition from paramagnetic to non-equilibrium behavior, suggesting that this system undergoes a spin glass phase transition at a relatively high temperature, Tg ∼ 140 K.

  7. Analysis of Nuclear Quantum Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Meng, J.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    A microscopic analysis, based on nuclear energy density functionals, is presented for shape phase transitions in Nd isotopes. Low-lying excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian, with parameters determined by constrained relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data, and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N = 90, that corresponds to a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.

  8. Cancer as a dynamical phase transition.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paul Cw; Demetrius, Lloyd; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2011-08-25

    This paper discusses the properties of cancer cells from a new perspective based on an analogy with phase transitions in physical systems. Similarities in terms of instabilities and attractor states are outlined and differences discussed. While physical phase transitions typically occur at or near thermodynamic equilibrium, a normal-to-cancer (NTC) transition is a dynamical non-equilibrium phenomenon, which depends on both metabolic energy supply and local physiological conditions. A number of implications for preventative and therapeutic strategies are outlined.

  9. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  10. Possible quantum liquid crystal phases of helium monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S.; Matsui, K.; Matsui, T.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    The second-layer phase diagrams of 4He and 3He adsorbed on graphite are investigated. Intrinsically rounded specific-heat anomalies are observed at 1.4 and 0.9 K, respectively, over extended density regions in between the liquid and incommensurate solid phases. They are identified to anomalies associated with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young type two-dimensional melting. The prospected low temperature phase (C2 phase) is a commensurate phase or a quantum hexatic phase with quasi-bond-orientational order, both containing zero-point defectons. In either case, this would be the first atomic realization of the quantum liquid crystal, a new state of matter. From the large enhancement of the melting temperature over 3He, we propose to assign the observed anomaly of 4He-C 2 phase at 1.4 K to the hypothetical supersolid or superhexatic transition.

  11. Microscopic Description of Nuclear Quantum Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2007-08-31

    The relativistic mean-field framework, extended to include correlations related to restoration of broken symmetries and to fluctuations of the quadrupole deformation, is applied to a study of shape transitions in Nd isotopes. It is demonstrated that the microscopic self-consistent approach, based on global effective interactions, can describe not only general features of transitions between spherical and deformed nuclei, but also the singular properties of excitation spectra and transition rates at the critical point of quantum shape phase transition.

  12. Thermodynamic geometry, phase transitions, and the Widom line.

    PubMed

    Ruppeiner, G; Sahay, A; Sarkar, T; Sengupta, G

    2012-11-01

    A microscopic characterization, based on the thermodynamic curvature R, is proposed for first-order liquid-gas phase transitions. Near the critical point, where R is proportional to the correlation volume ξ(3), we propose that R takes the same value in the coexisting phases. This proposal allows a determination of the liquid-gas coexistence curve with no use of the problematic Maxwell equal area construction. Furthermore, |R| ~ ξ(3) allows a direct determination of the Widom line in the supercritical regime. We illustrate with input from the van der Waals model and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook.

  13. Astrophysical Implications of the QCD Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner-Bielich, J.; Sagert, I.; Hempel, M.; Pagliara, G.; Fischer, T.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl W.; Liebendoerfer, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The possible role of a first order QCD phase transition at nonvanishing quark chemical potential and temperature for cold neutron stars and for supernovae is delineated. For cold neutron stars, we use the NJL model with a nonvanishing color superconducting pairing gap, which describes the phase transition to the 2SC and the CFL quark matter phases at high baryon densities. We demonstrate that these two phase transitions can both be present in the core of neutron stars and that they lead to the appearance of a third family of solution for compact stars. In particular, a core of CFL quark matter can be present in stable compact star configurations when slightly adjusting the vacuum pressure to the onset of the chiral phase transition from the hadronic model to the NJL model. We show that a strong first order phase transition can have a strong impact on the dynamics of core collapse supernovae. If the QCD phase transition sets in shortly after the first bounce, a second outgoing shock wave can be generated which leads to an explosion. The presence of the QCD phase transition can be read off from the neutrino and antineutrino signal of the supernova.

  14. Electroweak phase transition in ultraminimal technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Ryttov, Thomas A.

    2009-05-01

    We unveil the temperature-dependent electroweak phase transition in new extensions of the standard model in which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken via strongly coupled, nearly conformal dynamics achieved by the means of multiple matter representations. In particular, we focus on the low energy effective theory introduced to describe ultra minimal walking technicolor at the phase transition. Using the one-loop effective potential with ring improvement, we identify regions of parameter space, which yield a strong first-order transition. A striking feature of the model is the existence of a second phase transition associated to the electroweak-singlet sector. The interplay between these two transitions leads to an extremely rich phase diagram.

  15. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Benedek, George B.

    2013-09-01

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ˜100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to

  16. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F; Laubach, Jacob P; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Benedek, George B

    2013-09-28

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ~100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to

  17. Phase behavior and dynamics of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Fragiadakis, D.; Roland, C. M.; Dabrowski, R.; Dziaduszek, J.; Urban, S.

    2014-02-21

    The synthesis, equation of state, phase diagram, and dielectric relaxation properties are reported for a new liquid crystal, 4{sup ′}-butyl-4-(2-methylbutoxy)azoxybenzene (4ABO5*), which exhibits a cholesteric phase at ambient temperature. The steepness of the intermolecular potential was characterized from the thermodynamic potential parameter, Γ = 4.3 ± 0.1 and the dynamic scaling exponent, γ = 3.5 ± 0.2. The difference between them is similar to that seen previously for nematic and smectic liquid crystals, with the near equivalence of Γ and γ consistent with the near constancy of the relaxation time of 4ABO5* at the cholesteric to isotropic phase transition (i.e., the clearing line). Thus, chirality does not cause deviations from the general relationship between thermodynamics and dynamics in the ordered phase of liquid crystals. The ionic conductivity of 4ABO5* shows strong coupling to the reorientational dynamics.

  18. Layer thinning transition in an achiral four-ring hockey stick shaped liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoj Kr.; Nath, Rahul K.; Moths, Brian; Pan, LiDong; Wang, Shun; Deb, Rajdeep; Shen, Yongqiang; Rao, Nandiraju V. S.; Huang, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    Depolarized reflected light microscopy and high resolution optical reflectivity measurements have been conducted on free-standing films of an achiral four-ring hockey stick shaped liquid crystal exhibiting SmA-B2-SmX* transition sequence. A layer thinning transition above the bulk isotropic-SmA phase transition has been observed. This behaviour was highly irreproducible, indicating an irregular layer thinning transition. From optical reflectivity data, both thickness of the free-standing films and the smectic interlayer spacing were determined. This is the first report of the layer thinning transition in a hockey stick shaped liquid crystal.

  19. More is the Same; Phase Transitions and Mean Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadanoff, Leo P.

    2009-12-01

    This paper is the first in a series that will look at the theory of phase transitions from the perspectives of physics and the philosophy of science. The series will consider a group of related concepts derived from condensed matter and statistical physics. The key technical ideas go under the names of "singularity", "order parameter", "mean field theory", "variational method", "correlation length", "universality class", "scale changes", and "renormalization". The first four of these will be considered here. In a less technical vein, the question here is how can matter, ordinary matter, support a diversity of forms. We see this diversity each time we observe ice in contact with liquid water or see water vapor (steam) come up from a pot of heated water. Different phases can be qualitatively different in that walking on ice is well within human capacity, but walking on liquid water is proverbially forbidden to ordinary humans. These differences have been apparent to humankind for millennia, but only brought within the domain of scientific understanding since the 1880s. A phase transition is a change from one behavior to another. A first order phase transition involves a discontinuous jump in some statistical variable. The discontinuous property is called the order parameter. Each phase transition has its own order parameter. The possible order parameters range over a tremendous variety of physical properties. These properties include the density of a liquid-gas transition, the magnetization in a ferromagnet, the size of a connected cluster in a percolation transition, and a condensate wave function in a superfluid or superconductor. A continuous transition occurs when the discontinuity in the jump approaches zero. This article is about statistical mechanics and the development of mean field theory as a basis for a partial understanding of phase transition phenomena. Much of the material in this review was first prepared for the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and

  20. Generalized Entanglement and Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Rolando; Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel; Ortiz, Gerardo; Viola, Lorenzo

    2006-07-01

    Quantum phase transitions in matter are characterized by qualitative changes in some correlation functions of the system, which are ultimately related to entanglement. In this work, we study the second-order quantum phase transitions present in models of relevance to condensed-matter physics by exploiting the notion of generalized entanglement [Barnum et al., Phys. Rev. A 68, 032308 (2003)]. In particular, we focus on the illustrative case of a one-dimensional spin-1/2 Ising model in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. Our approach leads to tools useful for distinguishing between the ordered and disordered phases in the case of broken-symmetry quantum phase transitions. Possible extensions to the study of other kinds of phase transitions as well as of the relationship between generalized entanglement and computational efficiency are also discussed.

  1. Generalized Entanglement and Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Rolando; Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel; Ortiz, Gerardo; Viola, Lorenzo

    Quantum phase transitions in matter are characterized by qualitative changes in some correlation functions of the system, which are ultimately related to entanglement. In this work, we study the second-order quantum phase transitions present in models of relevance to condensed-matter physics by exploiting the notion of generalized entanglement [Barnum et al., Phys. Rev. A 68, 032308 (2003)]. In particular, we focus on the illustrative case of a one-dimensional spin-1/2 Ising model in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. Our approach leads to tools useful for distinguishing between the ordered and disordered phases in the case of broken-symmetry quantum phase transitions. Possible extensions to the study of other kinds of phase transitions as well as of the relationship between generalized entanglement and computational efficiency are also discussed.

  2. Phase transitions in QCD and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campell, Bruce A.; Ellis, John; Kalara, S.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Olive, Keith A.

    1991-02-01

    We develop a unified effective field theory approach to the high-temperature phase transitions in QCD and string theory, incorporating winding modes (time-like Polyakov loops, vortices) as well as low-mass states (pseudoscalar mesons and glueballs, matter and dilaton supermultiplets). Anomalous scale invariance and the Z3 structure of the centre of SU(3) decree a first-order phase transition with simultaneous deconfinement and Polyakov loop condensation in QCD, whereas string vortex condensation is a second-order phase transition breaking a Z2 symmetry. We argue that vortex condensation is accompanied by a dilaton phase transition to a strong coupling regime, and comment on the possible role of soliton degrees of freedom in the high-temperature string phase. On leave of absence from the School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

  3. Phase transition of aragonite in abalone nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yuanlin; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian

    2013-04-01

    Nacre is composed of about 95 vol.% aragonite and 5 vol.% biopolymer and famous for its "brick and mortar" microstructure. The phase transition temperature of aragonite in nacre is lower than the pure aragonite. In situ XRD was used to identify the phase transition temperature from aragonite to calcite in nacre, based on the analysis of TG-DSC of fresh nacre and demineralized nacre. The results indicate that the microstructure and biopolymer are the two main factors that influence the phase transition temperature of aragonite in nacre.

  4. Randomized Grain Boundary Liquid Crystal Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Wang, H.; Li, M.; Glaser, M.; Maclennan, J.; Clark, N.

    2012-02-01

    The formation of macroscopic, chiral domains, in the B4 and dark conglomerate phases, for example, is a feature of bent-core liquid crystals resulting from the interplay of chirality, molecular bend and molecular tilt. We report a new, chiral phase observed in a hockey stick-like liquid crystal molecule. This phase appears below a smectic A phase and cools to a crystal phase. TEM images of the free surface of the chiral phase show hundreds of randomly oriented smectic blocks several hundred nanometers in size, similar to those seen in the twist grain boundary (TGB) phase. However, in contrast to the TGB phase, these blocks are randomly oriented. The characteristic defects in this phase are revealed by freeze-fracture TEM images. We will show how these defects mediate the randomized orientation and discuss the intrinsic mechanism driving the formation of this phase. This work is supported by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR0820579 and NSF Grant DMR0606528.

  5. Discovering phase transitions with unsupervised learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Unsupervised learning is a discipline of machine learning which aims at discovering patterns in large data sets or classifying the data into several categories without being trained explicitly. We show that unsupervised learning techniques can be readily used to identify phases and phases transitions of many-body systems. Starting with raw spin configurations of a prototypical Ising model, we use principal component analysis to extract relevant low-dimensional representations of the original data and use clustering analysis to identify distinct phases in the feature space. This approach successfully finds physical concepts such as the order parameter and structure factor to be indicators of a phase transition. We discuss the future prospects of discovering more complex phases and phase transitions using unsupervised learning techniques.

  6. Optical Sensor for Characterizing the Phase Transition in Salted Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Claverie, Rémy; Fontana, Marc D.; Duričković, Ivana; Bourson, Patrice; Marchetti, Mario; Chassot, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new optical sensor to characterize the solid-liquid phase transition in salted solutions. The probe mainly consists of a Raman spectrometer that extracts the vibrational properties from the light scattered by the salty medium. The spectrum of the O – H stretching band was shown to be strongly affected by the introduction of NaCl and the temperature change as well. A parameter SD defined as the ratio of the integrated intensities of two parts of this band allows to study the temperature and concentration dependences of the phase transition. Then, an easy and efficient signal processing and the exploitation of a modified Boltzmann equation give information on the phase transition. Validations were done on solutions with varying concentration of NaCl. PMID:22319327

  7. Phase transition phenomenon: A compound measure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bo Soo; Park, Chanhi; Ryu, Doojin; Song, Wonho

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the well-documented phenomenon of phase transition in financial markets using combined information from both return and volume changes within short time intervals. We suggest a new measure for the phase transition behaviour of markets, calculated as a return distribution conditional on local variance in volume imbalance, and show that this measure successfully captures phase transition behaviour under various conditions. We analyse the intraday trade and quote dataset from the KOSPI 200 index futures, which includes detailed information on the original order size and the type of each initiating investor. We find that among these two competing factors, the submitted order size yields more explanatory power on the phenomenon of market phase transition than the investor type.

  8. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ^{4} lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  9. Transition pathways between solid and liquid state in suspensions.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Lutz; Aksel, Nuri

    2007-02-01

    Suspensions containing rigid monodisperse spherical particles in a Newtonian carrier liquid are investigated experimentally, providing evidence for solid and liquid states in a transient shear rate from rest. Between these two states a transition takes place; the transition pathways from solid to liquid and from liquid to solid being different. The dynamics of the transition are shown, with the material in this regime reacting as a highly nonlinear system. This involves inverting the input to output and vice versa and comparing them. A key feature of the transition regime is a material instability caused by the collapse of the particle network structure.

  10. Consistent lattice Boltzmann equations for phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, D. N.; Philippi, P. C.; Mattila, K. K.

    2014-11-01

    Unlike conventional computational fluid dynamics methods, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) describes the dynamic behavior of fluids in a mesoscopic scale based on discrete forms of kinetic equations. In this scale, complex macroscopic phenomena like the formation and collapse of interfaces can be naturally described as related to source terms incorporated into the kinetic equations. In this context, a novel athermal lattice Boltzmann scheme for the simulation of phase transition is proposed. The continuous kinetic model obtained from the Liouville equation using the mean-field interaction force approach is shown to be consistent with diffuse interface model using the Helmholtz free energy. Density profiles, interface thickness, and surface tension are analytically derived for a plane liquid-vapor interface. A discrete form of the kinetic equation is then obtained by applying the quadrature method based on prescribed abscissas together with a third-order scheme for the discretization of the streaming or advection term in the Boltzmann equation. Spatial derivatives in the source terms are approximated with high-order schemes. The numerical validation of the method is performed by measuring the speed of sound as well as by retrieving the coexistence curve and the interface density profiles. The appearance of spurious currents near the interface is investigated. The simulations are performed with the equations of state of Van der Waals, Redlich-Kwong, Redlich-Kwong-Soave, Peng-Robinson, and Carnahan-Starling.

  11. Using Peltier Cells to Study Solid-Liquid-Vapour Transitions and Supercooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torzo, Giacomo; Soletta, Isabella; Branca, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We propose an apparatus for teaching experimental thermodynamics in undergraduate introductory courses, using thermoelectric modules and a real-time data acquisition system. The device may be made at low cost, still providing an easy approach to the investigation of liquid-solid and liquid-vapour phase transitions and of metastable states…

  12. Liquid-phase chlorination of perchloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Levanova, S.V.; Evstigneev, O.V.; Rodova, R.M.; Berlin, E.R.; Ul'yanov, A.A.

    1988-06-01

    The relationships in the liquid-phase chlorination of perchloroethylene to hexachlorethane in a thermal process and in the presence of an initiator have been studied. The rate constants and the activation parameters of the process have been determined.

  13. Phenomena of solid state grain boundaries phase transition in technology

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, Y. A.

    2015-03-30

    The results of study the phenomenon, discovered by author (1971), of the phase transition of grain boundary by the formation of two-dimensional liquid or quasi-liquid films have been done. The described phenomena of the first order phase transition (two-dimensional melting) at temperatures 0.6 – 0.9 T{sub S0} (of the solid state melting point) is a fundamental property of solid crystalline materials, which has allowed to revise radically scientific representations about a solid state of substance. Using the mathematical tools of the film thermodynamics it has been obtained the generalized equation of Clausius - Clapeyron type for two-dimensional phase transition. The generalized equation has been used for calculating grain boundary phase transition temperature T{sub Sf} of any metal, which value lies in the range of (0.55…0.86) T{sub S0}. Based on these works conclusions the develop strategies for effective forming of coatings (by thermo-chemical processing) on surface layers of functional alloys and hard metals have been made. The short overview of the results of some graded alloys characterization has been done.

  14. Geometrical clusterization and deconfinement phase transition in SU(2) gluodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanytskyi, A.; Bugaev, K.; Nikonov, E.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Oliinychenko, D.; Sagun, V.; Mishustin, I.; Zinovjev, G.; Petrov, V.

    2017-03-01

    A novel approach to identify the geometrical (anti)clusters formed by the Polyakov loops of the same sign and to study their properties in the lattice SU(2) gluodynamics is developed. The (anti)cluster size distributions are analyzed for the lattice coupling constant β ∈ 2 [2:3115; 3]. The found distributions are similar to the ones existing in 2- and 3-dimensional Ising systems. Using the suggested approach, we explain the phase transition in SU(2) gluodynamics at β = 2.52 as a transition between two liquids during which one of the liquid droplets (the largest cluster of a certain Polyakov loop sign) experiences a condensation, while another droplet (the next to the largest cluster of opposite Polyakov loop sign) evaporates. The clusters of smaller sizes form two accompanying gases, which behave oppositely to their liquids. The liquid drop formula is used to analyze the distributions of the gas (anti)clusters and to determine their bulk, surface and topological parts of free energy. Surprisingly, even the monomer multiplicities are reproduced with high quality within such an approach. The behavior of surface tension of gaseous (anti)clusters is studied. It is shown that this quantity can serve as an order parameter of the deconfinement phase transition in SU(2) gluodynamics. Moreover, the critical exponent β of surface tension coefficient of gaseous clusters is found in the upper vicinity of critical temperature. Its value coincides with the one found for 3-dimensional Ising model within error bars. The Fisher topological exponent τ of (anti)clusters is found to have the same value 1:806±0:008, which agrees with an exactly solvable model of the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition and disagrees with the Fisher droplet model, which may evidence for the fact that the SU(2) gluodynamics and the model are in the same universality class.

  15. Correlation of three-liquid-phase equilibria involving ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escontrela, I; Arce, A; Soto, A; Marcilla, A; Olaya, M M; Reyes-Labarta, J A

    2016-08-03

    The difficulty in achieving a good thermodynamic description of phase equilibria is finding a model that can be extended to a large variety of chemical families and conditions. This problem worsens in the case of systems containing more than two phases or involving complex compounds such as ionic liquids. However, there are interesting applications that involve multiphasic systems, and the promising features of ionic liquids suggest that they will play an important role in many future processes. In this work, for the first time, the simultaneous correlation of liquid-liquid and liquid-liquid-liquid equilibrium data for ternary systems involving ionic liquids has been carried out. To that end, the phase diagram of the water + [P6 6 6 14][DCA] + hexane system has been determined at 298.15 K and 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. The importance of this system lies in the possibility of using the surface active ionic liquid to improve surfactant enhanced oil recovery methods. With those and previous measurements, thirteen sets of equilibrium data for water + ionic liquid + oil ternary systems have been correlated. The isoactivity equilibrium condition, using the NRTL model, and some pivotal strategies are proposed to correlate these complex systems. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data in all the regions (one triphasic and two biphasic) of the diagrams. The geometric aspects related to the Gibbs energy of mixing function obtained using the model, together with the minor common tangent plane equilibrium condition, are valuable tools to check the consistency of the obtained correlation results.

  16. Vapor-liquid phase separator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, Y. I.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1983-01-01

    Porous plugs serve as both entropy rejection devices and phase separation components separating the vapor phase on the downstream side from liquid Helium 2 upstream. The liquid upstream is the cryo-reservoir fluid needed for equipment cooling by means of Helium 2, i.e Helium-4 below its lambda temperature in near-saturated states. The topics outlined are characteristic lengths, transport equations and plug results.

  17. Contemporary research of dynamically induced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamically induced phase transitions in metals, within the present discussion, are those that take place within a time scale characteristic of the shock waves and any reflections or rarefactions involved in the loading structure along with associated plastic flow. Contemporary topics of interest include the influence of loading wave shape, the effect of shear produced by directionality of the loading relative to the sample dimensions and initial velocity field, and the loading duration (kinetic effects, hysteresis) on the appearance and longevity of a transformed phase. These topics often arise while considering the loading of parts of various shapes with high explosives, are typically two or three-dimensional, and are often selected because of the potential of the transformed phase to significantly modify the motion. In this paper, we look at current work on phase transitions in metals influenced by shear reported in the literature, and relate recent work conducted at Los Alamos on iron's epsilon phase transition that indicates a significant response to shear produced by reflected elastic waves. A brief discussion of criteria for the occurrence of stress induced phase transitions is provided. Closing remarks regard certain physical processes, such as fragmentation and jet formation, which may be strongly influenced by phase transitions.

  18. Contemporary Research of Dynamically Induced Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Lawrence

    2015-06-01

    Dynamically induced phase transitions in metals, within the present discussion, are those that take place within a time scale characteristic of the shock waves and any reflections or rarefactions involved in the loading structure along with associated plastic flow. Contemporary topics of interest include the influence of loading wave shape, the effect of shear produced by directionality of the loading relative to the sample dimensions and initial velocity field, and the loading duration (kinetic effects, hysteresis) on the appearance and longevity of a transformed phase. These topics often arise while considering the loading of parts of various shapes with high explosives, are typically two or three-dimensional, and are often selected because of the potential of the transformed phase to significantly modify the motion. In this paper, we look at current work on phase transitions in metals influenced by shear reported in the literature, and relate recent work conducted at Los Alamos on iron's epsilon phase transition that indicates a significant response to shear produced by reflected elastic waves. A brief discussion of criteria for the occurrence of stress induced phase transitions is provided. Closing remarks regard certain physical processes, such as fragmentation and jet formation, which may be strongly influenced by phase transitions. Supported by the DoD/DOE Joint Munitions Technology Development Program.

  19. Supercooling and phase coexistence in cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Megevand, Ariel; Sanchez, Alejandro D.

    2008-03-15

    Cosmological phase transitions are predicted by particle physics models, and have a variety of important cosmological consequences, which depend strongly on the dynamics of the transition. In this work we investigate in detail the general features of the development of a first-order phase transition. We find thermodynamical constraints on some quantities that determine the dynamics, namely, the latent heat, the radiation energy density, and the false-vacuum energy density. Using a simple model with a Higgs field, we study numerically the amount and duration of supercooling and the subsequent reheating and phase coexistence. We analyze the dependence of the dynamics on the different parameters of the model, namely, the energy scale, the number of degrees of freedom, and the couplings of the scalar field with bosons and fermions. We also inspect the implications for the cosmological outcomes of the phase transition.

  20. Electroweak phase transition in nearly conformal technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, James M.; Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2008-10-01

    We examine the temperature-dependent electroweak phase transition in extensions of the standard model in which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken via strongly coupled, nearly conformal dynamics. In particular, we focus on the low energy effective theory used to describe minimal walking technicolor at the phase transition. Using the one-loop effective potential with ring improvement, we identify significant regions of parameter space which yield a sufficiently strong first-order transition for electroweak baryogenesis. The composite particle spectrum corresponding to these regions can be produced and studied at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. We note the possible emergence of a second phase transition at lower temperatures. This occurs when the underlying technicolor theory possesses a nontrivial center symmetry.

  1. Is there a third order phase transition for supercritical fluids?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jinglong; Zhang, Pingwen; Wang, Han Site, Luigi Delle

    2014-01-07

    We prove that according to Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures of Lennard-Jones (L-J) particles, there is no third order phase transition in the supercritical regime beyond Andrew's critical point. This result is in open contrast with recent theoretical studies and experiments which instead suggest not only its existence but also its universality regarding the chemical nature of the fluid. We argue that our results are solid enough to go beyond the limitations of MD and the generic character of L-J models, thus suggesting a rather smooth liquid-vapor thermodynamic behavior of fluids in supercritical regime.

  2. Dynamics of a discotic liquid crystal in the isotropic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Fruchey, Kendall; Fayer, M. D.

    2006-11-01

    Optically heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments are conducted to study the orientational dynamics of a discotic liquid crystal 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakis(pentyloxy)triphenylene (HPT) in the isotropic phase near the columnar-isotropic (C-I) phase transition. The OHD-OKE signal of HPT is characterized by an intermediate power law t-0.76±0.02 at short times (a few picoseconds), a von Schweidler power law t-0.26±0.01 at intermediate times (hundreds of picoseconds), and an exponential decay at long times (tens of nanoseconds). The exponential decay has Arrhenius temperature dependence. The functional form of the total time dependent decay is identical to the one observed previously for a large number of molecular supercooled liquids. The mode coupling theory schematic model based on the Sjögren [Phys. Rev. A 33, 1254 (1986)] model is able to reproduce the HPT data over a wide range of times from <1ps to tens of nanoseconds. The studies indicate that the HPT C-I phase transition is a strong first order transition, and the dynamics in the isotropic phase display a complex time dependent profile that is common to other molecular liquids that lack mesoscopic structure.

  3. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr. ); Cochran, H.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Theory of smeared quantum phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, José A; Vojta, Thomas

    2008-06-20

    We present an analytical strong-disorder renormalization group theory of the quantum phase transition in the dissipative random transverse-field Ising chain. For Ohmic dissipation, we solve the renormalization flow equations analytically, yielding asymptotically exact results for the low-temperature properties of the system. We find that the interplay between quantum fluctuations and Ohmic dissipation destroys the quantum critical point by smearing. We also determine the phase diagram and the behavior of observables in the vicinity of the smeared quantum phase transition.

  5. Ionic liquid expedites partition of curcumin into solid gel phase but discourages partition into liquid crystalline phase of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Elsy D; Patra, Digambara

    2013-08-22

    The hydrolysis of curcumin in alkaline and neutral buffer conditions is of interest because of the therapeutic applicability of curcumin. We show that hydrolysis of curcumin can be remarkably suppressed in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) liposomes. The fluorescence of curcumin sensitively detects the phase transition temperature of liposomes. However, at greater concentrations, curcumin affects the phase transition temperature, encouraging fusion of two membrane phases. The interaction of curcumin with DMPC is found to be strong, with a partition coefficient value of Kp = 2.78 × 10(5) in the solid gel phase, which dramatically increases in the liquid crystalline phase to Kp = 1.15 × 10(6). The importance of ionic liquids as green solvents has drawn interest because of their toxicological effect on human health; however, the impact of ionic liquids (ILs) on liposomes is not yet understood. The present study establishes that ILs such as 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium chloride (moic) affect the permeability and fluidity of liposomes and thus influence parition of curcumin into DMPC liposomes, helping in the solid gel phase but diminishing in the liquid crystalline phase. The Kp value of curcumin does not change appreciably with moic concentration in the solid gel state but decreases with moic concentration in the liquid crystalline phase. Curcumin, a rotor sensitive to detect phase transition temperature, is applied to investigate the influence of ionic liquids such as 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium chloride, 1-buytl-3-methyl imadazolium tetrafluoroborate, and 1-benzyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate on DMPC liposome properties. 1-Methyl-3-octylimidazolium chloride lowers the phase transition temperature, but 1-buytl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate and 1-benzyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate do not perceptibly modify the phase transition temperature; rather, they broaden the phase transition.

  6. Random fields at a nonequilibrium phase transition.

    PubMed

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas

    2012-10-26

    We study nonequilibrium phase transitions in the presence of disorder that locally breaks the symmetry between two equivalent macroscopic states. In low-dimensional equilibrium systems, such random-field disorder is known to have dramatic effects: it prevents spontaneous symmetry breaking and completely destroys the phase transition. In contrast, we show that the phase transition of the one-dimensional generalized contact process persists in the presence of random-field disorder. The ultraslow dynamics in the symmetry-broken phase is described by a Sinai walk of the domain walls between two different absorbing states. We discuss the generality and limitations of our theory, and we illustrate our results by large-scale Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Optical Properties in Non-equilibrium Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Price, D F; Lee, E; Tam, H; Springer, P T; Ng, A

    2006-01-05

    An open question about the dynamical behavior of materials is how phase transition occurs in highly non-equilibrium systems. One important class of study is the excitation of a solid by an ultrafast, intense laser. The preferential heating of electrons by the laser field gives rise to initial states dominated by hot electrons in a cold lattice. Using a femtosecond laser pump-probe approach, we have followed the temporal evolution of the optical properties of such a system. The results show interesting correlation to non-thermal melting and lattice disordering processes. They also reveal a liquid-plasma transition when the lattice energy density reaches a critical value.

  8. Mesoscopic aspects of phase transitions in a solvent extraction system.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J; Audras, Matthieu; Antonio, Mark R

    2012-11-06

    In liquid-liquid extraction, organic phase splitting arises when high concentrations of polar solutes (acids/metal ions) are extracted. Herein, we investigate the mesoscopic roots that underpin phase splitting in alkane phases containing mixed amphiphiles, of contemporary interest in solvent extraction separation systems, by extracting various oxoacids. The oxoacids exhibited individual macroscopic (extractive and physical) behaviors, inducing phase splitting into heavy and light domains under markedly different conditions. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data analyzed using the generalized indirect Fourier transform (GIFT) method, we showed that, in all cases, acid extraction drove the self-assembly of reverse micelles into rods. These grew with increased acid extraction until reaching a critical length of 20 nm, at which point interactions produced interconnected cylinders or lamellar sheets that prelude phase splitting into heavy and light domains. In all cases, the heavy phase contained the same surfactant ratio-TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate) and CMPO (octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide)-even though the concentrations of acid, water, and amphiphiles were markedly different. The remarkable similarities in structure and amphiphile stoichiometries underpinning phase splitting across the macroscopically different acid extraction series allude to the mesoscopic roots of organic phase behavior in solvent extraction. Our studies show that the structures underpinning phase splitting in solvent extraction systems are more complex than previously thought and are reminiscent of phase transitions in soft matter.

  9. Defects and order in liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shilpa

    This thesis investigates the partial destruction of ordering in liquid crystalline systems due to the influence of defects and thermal fluctuations. The systems under consideration are hexagonal columnar crystals with crystalline order perpendicular to the columns, and two-dimensional smectics with order perpendicular to the layers. We first study the possibility of reentrant melting of a hexagonal columnar crystal of flexible charged polymers at high enough densities. The Lindemann criterion is employed in determining the melting point. Lattice fluctuations are calculated in the Debye model, and an analogy with the Abrikosov vortex lattice in superconductors is exploited in estimating both the elastic constants of the hexagonal lattice, and the appropriate Lindemann constant. We also discuss the unusual functional integral describing the statistical mechanics of a single polymer in an Einstein cage model using the path-integral formulation. A crossover as a function of an external field along the column axis is discussed as well. Next, we study defects in a columnar crystal in the form of vacancy/interstitial loops or strings of vacancies and interstitials bounded by column "heads" and "tails". These defect strings are oriented by the columnar lattice and can change size and shape by movement of the ends and forming kinks along the length. Hence an analysis in terms of directed living polymers is appropriate to study their size and shape distribution, volume fraction, etc. If the entropy of transverse fluctuations overcomes the string line tension in the crystalline phase, a string proliferation transition occurs, leading to a "supersolid" phase with infinitely long vacancy or interstitial strings. We estimate the wandering entropy and examine the behaviour in the transition regime. We also calculate numerically the line tension of various species of vacancies and interstitials in a triangular lattice for power-law potentials as well as for a modified Bessel

  10. Microgravity Two-Phase Flow Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, M.; Chao, D.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase flows under microgravity condition find a large number of important applications in fluid handling and storage, and spacecraft thermal management. Specifically, under microgravity condition heat transfer between heat exchanger surfaces and fluids depend critically on the distribution and interaction between different fluid phases which are often qualitatively different from the gravity-based systems. Heat transfer and flow analysis in two-phase flows under these conditions require a clear understanding of the flow pattern transition and development of appropriate dimensionless scales for its modeling and prediction. The physics of this flow is however very complex and remains poorly understood. This has led to various inadequacies in flow and heat transfer modeling and has made prediction of flow transition difficult in engineering design of efficient thermal and flow systems. In the present study the available published data for flow transition under microgravity condition are considered for mapping. The transition from slug to annular flow and from bubbly to slug flow are mapped using dimensionless variable combination developed in a previous study by the authors. The result indicate that the new maps describe the flow transitions reasonably well over the range of the data available. The transition maps are examined and the results are discussed in relation to the presumed balance of forces and flow dynamics. It is suggested that further evaluation of the proposed flow and transition mapping will require a wider range of microgravity data expected to be made available in future studies.

  11. Phase transitions in Abelian lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheluvaraja, Srinath

    2000-02-01

    We study the phase transition in the U (1) lattice gauge theory using the Wilson-Polyakov line as the order parameter. The Wilson-Polyakov line remains very small at strong coupling and becomes non-zero at weak coupling, signalling a confinement-to-deconfinement phase transition. The decondensation of monopole loops is responsible for this phase transition. A finite size scaling analysis of the susceptibility of the Wilson line gives a ratio for icons/Journals/Common/gamma" ALT="gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/> /icons/Journals/Common/nu" ALT="nu" ALIGN="TOP"/> which is quite close to the corresponding value in the three-dimensional planar model. A scaling behaviour of the monopole loop distribution function is also established at the point of the second-order phase transition. A measurement of the plaquette susceptibility at the transition point shows that it does not scale with the four-dimensional volume as is expected of a first-order bulk transition.

  12. Binary Solid-Liquid Phase Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Herbert R.

    1978-01-01

    Indicates some of the information that may be obtained from a binary solid-liquid phase equilibria experiment and a method to write a computer program that will plot an ideal phase diagram to which the experimental results may be compared. (Author/CP)

  13. Fidelity at Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Kolezhuk, A. K.; Vekua, T.

    2015-01-01

    We clarify the long-standing controversy concerning the behavior of the ground-state fidelity in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type in one-dimensional systems. Contrary to the prediction based on the Gaussian approximation of the Luttinger-liquid approach, it is shown that the fidelity susceptibility does not diverge at the transition but has a cusplike peak χc-χ (λ ) ˜√{| λc-λ | } , where λ is a parameter driving the transition and χc is the peak value at the transition point λ =λc . Numerical claims of the logarithmic divergence of fidelity susceptibility with the system size (or temperature) are explained by logarithmic corrections due to marginal operators, which is supported by numerical calculations for large systems.

  14. Thermodynamic precursors, liquid-liquid transitions, dynamic and topological anomalies in densified liquid germania

    SciTech Connect

    Pacaud, F.; Micoulaut, M.

    2015-08-14

    The thermodynamic, dynamic, structural, and rigidity properties of densified liquid germania (GeO{sub 2}) have been investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulation. We construct from a thermodynamic framework an analytical equation of state for the liquid allowing the possible detection of thermodynamic precursors (extrema of the derivatives of the free energy), which usually indicate the possibility of a liquid-liquid transition. It is found that for the present germania system, such precursors and the possible underlying liquid-liquid transition are hidden by the slowing down of the dynamics with decreasing temperature. In this respect, germania behaves quite differently when compared to parent tetrahedral systems such as silica or water. We then detect a diffusivity anomaly (a maximum of diffusion with changing density/volume) that is strongly correlated with changes in coordinated species, and the softening of bond-bending (BB) topological constraints that decrease the liquid rigidity and enhance transport. The diffusivity anomaly is finally substantiated from a Rosenfeld-type scaling law linked to the pair correlation entropy, and to structural relaxation.

  15. Tuning the Liquid-Liquid Transition by Modulating the Hydrogen-Bond Angular Flexibility in a Model for Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Sciortino, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    We propose a simple extension of the well known ST2 model for water [F. H. Stillinger and A. Rahman, J. Chem. Phys. 60, 1545 (1974)] that allows for a continuous modification of the hydrogen-bond angular flexibility. We show that the bond flexibility affects the relative thermodynamic stability of the liquid and of the hexagonal (or cubic) ice. On increasing the flexibility, the liquid-liquid critical point, which in the original ST2 model is located in the no-man's land (i.e., the region where ice is the thermodynamically stable phase) progressively moves to a temperature where the liquid is more stable than ice. Our study definitively proves that the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model is a genuine phenomenon, of high relevance in all tetrahedral network-forming liquids, including water.

  16. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M D

    2017-02-07

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ∼10(5) times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  17. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ˜105 times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  18. Shaping Crystal-Crystal Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiyu; van Anders, Greg; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon

    Previous computational and experimental studies have shown self-assembled structure depends strongly on building block shape. New synthesis techniques have led to building blocks with reconfigurable shape and it has been demonstrated that building block reconfiguration can induce bulk structural reconfiguration. However, we do not understand systematically how this transition happens as a function of building block shape. Using a recently developed ``digital alchemy'' framework, we study the thermodynamics of shape-driven crystal-crystal transitions. We find examples of shape-driven bulk reconfiguration that are accompanied by first-order phase transitions, and bulk reconfiguration that occurs without any thermodynamic phase transition. Our results suggest that for well-chosen shapes and structures, there exist facile means of bulk reconfiguration, and that shape-driven bulk reconfiguration provides a viable mechanism for developing functional materials.

  19. Magnetic-field induced orientational transition in a helicoidal liquid-crystalline antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Kuznetsova, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic-field induced orientational transition in helicoidal liquid-crystalline antiferromagnets representing compensated suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles in cholesteric liquid crystals is theoretically studied. The untwisting of a helicoidal structure and the behavior of mean magnetization as a function of the field strength and material parameters are investigated. It is shown that the magnetic subsystems in the field-untwisted ferronematic phase are not completely compensated, and the ferronematic phase is ferrimagnetic.

  20. 4He glass phase: A model for liquid elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.; Bossy, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The specific heat of liquid helium confined under pressure in nanoporous material and the formation, in these conditions, of a glass phase accompanied by latent heat are known. These properties are in good agreement with a recent model predicting, in liquid elements, the formation of ultrastable glass having universal thermodynamic properties. The third law of thermodynamics involves that the specific heat decreases at low temperatures and consequently the effective transition temperature of the glass increases up to the temperature where the frozen enthalpy becomes equal to the predicted value. The glass residual entropy is about 23.6% of the melting entropy.

  1. Effect of electric field on reentrance transition in a binary mixture of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Sunita; Singh, S.

    2015-12-01

    Employing a phenomenological mean field theory, we analyze the effect of an electric field on the N - SmA phase transition for pure liquid crystal and on the reentrant nematic phase in a binary mixture of liquid crystals exhibiting the phase sequence I - N - SmA - NR on cooling. The basic idea of the work is to explain the phase transition behavior of the system by assuming that certain Landau coefficients associated with the order parameters coupling terms of the free-energy density expansion are field dependent. These parameters play a crucial role and show a rapid variation at the SmA - NR transition as compared to the SmA - N transition.

  2. Tools for Studying Quantum Emergence near Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Masatoshi; Onoda, Shigeki; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Shinji

    2003-12-01

    We review recent studies on developing tools for quantum complex phenomena. The tools have been applied for clarifying the perspective of the Mott transitions and the phase diagram of metals, Mott insulators and magnetically ordered phases in the two-dimensional Hubbard model. The path-integral renormalization-group (PIRG) method has made it possible to numerically study correlated electrons even with geometrical frustration effects without biases . It has numerically clarified the phase diagram at zero temperature, T = 0, in the parameter space of the onsite Coulomb repulsion, the geometrical frustration amplitude and the chemical potential. When the bandwidth is controlled at half filling, the first-order transition between insulating and metallic phases is evidenced. In contrast, the filling-control transition shows diverging critical fluctuations for spin and charge responses with decreasing doping concentration. Near the Mott transition, a nonmagnetic spin-liquid phase appears in a region with large frustration effects. The phase is characterized remarkably by gapless spin excitations and the vanishing dispersion of spin excitations. Magnetic orders quantum mechanically melt through diverging magnon mass. The correlator projection method (CPM) is formulated as an extension of the operator projection theory. This method also allows an extension of the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) with systematic inclusion of the momentum dependence in the self-energy. It has enabled determining the phase diagram at T > 0, where the boundary surface of the first-order metal-insulator transition at half filling terminates on the critical end curve at T = Tc. The critical end curve is characterized by the diverging compressibility. The single particle spectra show strong renormalization of low-energy spectra, generating largely momentum dependent and flat dispersion. The results of two tools consistently suggest that the strong competitions of various phases with underlying

  3. Extended ensemble theory, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ming-wen

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, as a personal review, we suppose a possible extension of Gibbs ensemble theory so that it can provide a reasonable description of phase transitions and spontaneous symmetry breaking. The extension is founded on three hypotheses, and can be regarded as a microscopic edition of the Landau phenomenological theory of phase transitions. Within its framework, the stable state of a system is determined by the evolution of order parameter with temperature according to such a principle that the entropy of the system will reach its minimum in this state. The evolution of order parameter can cause a change in representation of the system Hamiltonian; different phases will realize different representations, respectively; a phase transition amounts to a representation transformation. Physically, it turns out that phase transitions originate from the automatic interference among matter waves as the temperature is cooled down. Typical quantum many-body systems are studied with this extended ensemble theory. We regain the Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer solution for the weak-coupling superconductivity, and prove that it is stable. We find that negative-temperature and laser phases arise from the same mechanism as phase transitions, and that they are unstable. For the ideal Bose gas, we demonstrate that it will produce Bose Einstein condensation (BEC) in the thermodynamic limit, which confirms exactly Einstein's deep physical insight. In contrast, there is no BEC either within the phonon gas in a black body or within the ideal photon gas in a solid body. We prove that it is not admissible to quantize the Dirac field by using Bose Einstein statistics. We show that a structural phase transition belongs physically to the BEC happening in configuration space, and that a double-well anharmonic system will undergo a structural phase transition at a finite temperature. For the O(N)-symmetric vector model, we demonstrate that it will yield spontaneous symmetry breaking and produce

  4. Phase transitions in multiplicative competitive processes.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Niebur, Ernst

    2005-07-01

    We introduce a discrete multiplicative process as a generic model of competition. Players with different abilities successively join the game and compete for finite resources. Emergence of dominant players and evolutionary development occur as a phase transition. The competitive dynamics underlying this transition is understood from a formal analogy to statistical mechanics. The theory is applicable to bacterial competition, predicting novel population dynamics near criticality.

  5. Phase transitions in multiplicative competitive processes

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Niebur, Ernst

    2005-07-01

    We introduce a discrete multiplicative process as a generic model of competition. Players with different abilities successively join the game and compete for finite resources. Emergence of dominant players and evolutionary development occur as a phase transition. The competitive dynamics underlying this transition is understood from a formal analogy to statistical mechanics. The theory is applicable to bacterial competition, predicting novel population dynamics near criticality.

  6. Thermogeometric phase transition in a unified framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan; Samanta, Saurav

    2017-04-01

    Using geomterothermodynamics (GTD), we investigate the phase transition of black hole in a metric independent way. We show that for any black hole, curvature scalar (of equilibrium state space geometry) is singular at the point where specific heat diverges. Previously such a result could only be shown by taking specific examples on a case by case basis. A different type of phase transition, where inverse specific heat diverges, is also studied within this framework. We show that in the latter case, metric (of equilibrium state space geometry) is singular instead of curvature scalar. Since a metric singularity may be a coordinate artifact, we propose that GTD indicates that it is the singularity of specific heat and not inverse specific heat which indicates a phase transition of black holes.

  7. Quantum phase transitions with dynamical flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bea, Yago; Jokela, Niko; Ramallo, Alfonso V.

    2016-07-01

    We study the properties of a D6-brane probe in the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena (ABJM) background with smeared massless dynamical quarks in the Veneziano limit. Working at zero temperature and nonvanishing charge density, we show that the system undergoes a quantum phase transition in which the topology of the brane embedding changes from a black hole to a Minkowski embedding. In the unflavored background the phase transition is of second order and takes place when the charge density vanishes. We determine the corresponding critical exponents and show that the scaling behavior near the quantum critical point has multiplicative logarithmic corrections. In the background with dynamical quarks the phase transition is of first order and occurs at nonzero charge density. In this case we compute the discontinuity of several physical quantities as functions of the number Nf of unquenched quarks of the background.

  8. Friction forces on phase transition fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel

    2013-07-01

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, the microscopic interaction of the phase transition fronts with non-equilibrium plasma particles manifests itself macroscopically as friction forces. In general, it is a nontrivial problem to compute these forces, and only two limits have been studied, namely, that of very slow walls and, more recently, ultra-relativistic walls which run away. In this paper we consider ultra-relativistic velocities and show that stationary solutions still exist when the parameters allow the existence of runaway walls. Hence, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the fronts to actually run away. We also propose a phenomenological model for the friction, which interpolates between the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic values. Thus, the friction depends on two friction coefficients which can be calculated for specific models. We then study the velocity of phase transition fronts as a function of the friction parameters, the thermodynamic parameters, and the amount of supercooling.

  9. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z approx. greater than 5), structures existing on scales of 100 M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ((Delta)T/T) (approx. less than 10(exp -5)) can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random Gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of approx. 100 M pc for large scale structure as well as approx. 1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition.

  10. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z {approx gt} 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ({Delta}T/T) {approx lt} 10{sup {minus}5} can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of {approximately}100M pc for large-scale structure as well as {approximately}1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Quantum phase diagrams and phase transitions in frustrated two-dimensional Heisenberg models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Donna

    2014-03-01

    The quantum spin liquid is an emergent state of matter, which has attracted a lot of recent attention. I will review recent numerical progress based on the density matrix renormalization calculations in identifying gapped spin liquid in two-dimensional frustrated spin systems. I will first focus on extended model with Heisenberg exchange couplings on kagome lattice and demonstrate a topological state with fractionalized spinon and emergent gauge field clearly shown in numerical simulations. I will present concrete results on the quantum phase diagram of the extended kagome Heisenberg model, and compare that with the phase diagrams of the square and honeycomb lattice models with the dominant plaquette valence bond phase in nonmagnetic region. I will discuss numerical effort and theoretical challenge in fully pinning down the nature of the gapped topological phase, and also the nature of the quantum phase transitions in these Heisenberg systems. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation grant DMR-0906816.

  12. Shape phase transitions and critical points

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2009-05-04

    We investigate different aspects connected with shape phase transitions in nuclei and the possible occurrence of dynamical symmetries at the critical points. We discuss in particular the behaviour of the neighbour odd nuclei at the vicinity of the critical points in the even nuclei. We consider both the case of the transition from the vibrational behaviour to the gamma-unstable deformation (characterized within the collective Bohr hamiltonian by the E(5) critical point symmetry) and the case of the transition from the vibrational behaviour to the stable axial deformation (characterized by the X(5) symmetry). The odd particle is assumed to be moving in the three single particle orbitals j = 1/2,3/2,5/2, a set of orbitals that is known to lead to possible supersymmetric cases. The coupling of the odd particle to the Bohr hamiltonian does lead in fact in the former case at the critical point to the E(5/12) boson-fermion dynamical symmetry. An alternative approach to the two shape transitions is based on the Interacting Boson Fermion Model. In this case suitably parametrized boson-fermion hamiltonians can describe the evolution of the odd system along the shape transitions. At the critical points both energy spectra and electromagnetic transitions were found to display characteristic patterns similar to those displayed by the even nuclei at the corresponding critical point. The behaviour of the odd nuclei can therefore be seen as necessary complementary signatures of the occurrence of the phase transitions.

  13. Phase separation in transparent liquid-liquid miscibility gap systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Bhat, B. N.; Laub, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A program to be carried out on transparent liquid-phase miscibility gap materials was developed for the purpose of acquiring additional insight into the separation process occurring in these systems. The transparency feature allows the reaction to be viewed directly through light scattering and holographic methods.

  14. Jumping phase control in interband photonic transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jiang; Gao, Zhuoyang; Zhu, Haibin; Jiang, Chun

    2014-03-10

    Indirect interband photonic transition provides a nonmagnetic and linear scheme to achieve optical isolation in integrated photonics. In this paper, we demonstrate that the nonreciprocal transition can be induced through two pathways respectively by different modulation designs. At the end of those pathways, the two final modes have π phaseshift. We call this phenomenon jumping phase control since this approach provides a method to control the mode phase after the conversion. This approach also yields a novel way to generate nonreciprocal phaseshift and may contribute to chip-scale optoelectronic applications.

  15. Metamagnetic Anomalies near Dynamic Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riego, P.; Vavassori, P.; Berger, A.

    2017-03-01

    We report the existence of anomalous metamagnetic fluctuations in the vicinity of the dynamic phase transition (DPT) that do not occur for the corresponding thermodynamic behavior of simple ferromagnets. Our results demonstrate that key characteristics associated with the DPT are qualitatively different from conventional thermodynamic phase transitions. We also provide evidence that these differences are tunable by showing that the presence of metamagnetic fluctuations and the size of the critical scaling regime depend strongly on the amplitude of the oscillating field that is driving the DPT in the first place.

  16. Entangled states and superradiant phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aparicio Alcalde, M.; Cardenas, A. H.; Svaiter, N. F.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2010-03-15

    The full Dicke model is composed of a single bosonic mode and an ensemble of N identical two-level atoms. In the model, the coupling between the bosonic mode and the atoms generates resonant and nonresonant processes. We also consider a dipole-dipole interaction between the atoms, which is able to generate entangled states in the atomic system. By assuming thermal equilibrium with a reservoir at temperature {beta}{sup -1}, the transition from fluorescent to superradiant phase and the quantum phase transition are investigated. It is shown that the critical behavior of the full Dicke model is not modified by the introduction of the dipole-dipole interaction.

  17. Phase transition in sarcosine phosphite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemanov, V. V.; Popov, S. N.; Pankova, G. A.

    2011-06-01

    Single crystals of sarcosine phosphite (SarcH3PO3) have been grown. The amino acid sarcosine is an isomer of the protein amino acid alanine. Both amino acids are described by the same chemical formula but have different structures; or, more specifically, in contrast to the alanine molecule, the sarcosine molecule has a symmetric structure. It has been found that the sarcosine phosphite compound undergoes a structural phase transition at a temperature of approximately 200 K. This result has demonstrated that compounds of achiral amino acids are more susceptible to structural phase transitions.

  18. Microrheology close to an equilibrium phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, J.; Scacchi, A.; Brader, J. M.

    2014-04-14

    We investigate the microstructural and microrheological response to a tracer particle of a two-dimensional colloidal suspension under thermodynamic conditions close to a liquid-gas phase boundary. On the liquid side of the binodal, increasing the velocity of the (repulsive) tracer leads to the development of a pronounced cavitation bubble, within which the concentration of colloidal particles is strongly depleted. The tendency of the liquid to cavitate is characterized by a dimensionless “colloidal cavitation” number. On the gas side of the binodal, a pulled (attractive) tracer leaves behind it an extended trail of colloidal liquid, arising from downstream advection of a wetting layer on its surface. For both situations the velocity dependent friction is calculated.

  19. Electromechanical phase transition in dielectric elastomers under uniaxial tension and electrical voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui; Suo, Zhigang

    2012-02-01

    Subject to forces and voltage, a dielectric elastomer may undergo electromechanical phase transition. A phase diagram is constructed for an ideal dielectric elastomer membrane under uniaxial force and voltage, reminiscent of the phase diagram for liquid-vapor transition of a pure substance. We identify a critical point for the electromechanical phase transition. Two states of deformation (thick and thin) may coexist during the phase transition, with the mismatch in lateral stretch accommodated by wrinkling of the membrane in the thin state. The processes of electromechanical phase transition under various conditions are discussed. A reversible cycle is suggested for electromechanical energy conversion using the dielectric elastomer membrane, analogous to the classical Carnot cycle for a heat engine. The amount of energy conversion, however, is limited by failure of the dielectric elastomer due to electrical breakdown. With a particular combination of material properties, the electromechanical energy conversion can be significantly extended by taking advantage of the phase transition without electrical breakdown.

  20. Phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Lee H.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of phase separation in the succinonitrile-water system are being investigated. Experiments involve initial physical mixing of the two immiscible liquids at a temperature above the consolute, decreasing the temperature into the miscibility gap, followed by iamging of the resultant microstructure as it evolves with time. Refractive index differences allow documentation of the changing microstructures by noninvasive optical techniques without the need to quench the liquid structures for analysis.

  1. Phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of phase separation in the succinonitrile-water system are being investigated. Experiments involve initial physical mixing of the two immiscible liquids at a temperature above the consolute, decreasing the temperature into the miscibility gap, followed by imaging of the resultant microstructure as it evolves with time. Refractive index differences allow documentation of the changing microstructures by noninvasive optical techniques without the need to quench the liquid structures for analysis.

  2. Predictions of Phase Distribution in Liquid-Liquid Two-Component Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xia; Sun, Xiaodong; Duval, Walter M.

    2011-06-01

    Ground-based liquid-liquid two-component flow can be used to study reduced-gravity gas-liquid two-phase flows provided that the two liquids are immiscible with similar densities. In this paper, we present a numerical study of phase distribution in liquid-liquid two-component flows using the Eulerian two-fluid model in FLUENT, together with a one-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) that takes into account fluid particle interactions, such as coalescence and disintegration. This modeling approach is expected to dynamically capture changes in the interfacial structure. We apply the FLUENT-IATE model to a water-Therminol 59® two-component vertical flow in a 25-mm inner diameter pipe, where the two liquids are immiscible with similar densities (3% difference at 20°C). This study covers bubbly (drop) flow and bubbly-to-slug flow transition regimes with area-averaged void (drop) fractions from 3 to 30%. Comparisons of the numerical results with the experimental data indicate that for bubbly flows, the predictions of the lateral phase distributions using the FLUENT-IATE model are generally more accurate than those using the model without the IATE. In addition, we demonstrate that the coalescence of fluid particles is dominated by wake entrainment and enhanced by increasing either the continuous or dispersed phase velocity. However, the predictions show disagreement with experimental data in some flow conditions for larger void fraction conditions, which fall into the bubbly-to-slug flow transition regime. We conjecture that additional fluid particle interaction mechanisms due to the change of flow regimes are possibly involved.

  3. Simple solvable energy-landscape model that shows a thermodynamic phase transition and a glass transition.

    PubMed

    Naumis, Gerardo G

    2012-06-01

    When a liquid melt is cooled, a glass or phase transition can be obtained depending on the cooling rate. Yet, this behavior has not been clearly captured in energy-landscape models. Here, a model is provided in which two key ingredients are considered in the landscape, metastable states and their multiplicity. Metastable states are considered as in two level system models. However, their multiplicity and topology allows a phase transition in the thermodynamic limit for slow cooling, while a transition to the glass is obtained for fast cooling. By solving the corresponding master equation, the minimal speed of cooling required to produce the glass is obtained as a function of the distribution of metastable states.

  4. The Influence of Disorder on Thermotropic Nematic Liquid Crystals Phase Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Nita, Vlad; Gerlič, Ivan; Kralj, Samo

    2009-01-01

    We review the theoretical research on the influence of disorder on structure and phase behavior of condensed matter system exhibiting continuous symmetry breaking focusing on liquid crystal phase transitions. We discuss the main properties of liquid crystals as adequate systems in which several open questions with respect to the impact of disorder on universal phase and structural behavior could be explored. Main advantages of liquid crystalline materials and different experimental realizations of random field-type disorder imposed on liquid crystal phases are described. PMID:19865529

  5. Phase transitions in chlorobenzene-cis-decalin mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansingh, Abhai; Agarwal, C. B.; Singh, Ramadhar

    1980-01-01

    The dielectric constant ɛ' and loss tangent tan δ of chlorobenzene-cis-decalin mixtures have been measured in the temperature range 77 K to 330 K and frequency range 0.1 to 100 kHz. On cooling, ɛ' increases with decreasing temperature upto about 135 K, after which it drops rapidly with decreasing T followed by a slow decrease. This indicates that the liquid mixture goes to an amorphous phase which transforms to a glass phase of restricted dipole rotation below T g; however, the peak in ɛ' is due to relaxation in the amorphous phase (α relaxation) and does not give an exact T g. On heating, the behaviour of the cooling curve is retraced upto 160 K, after which ɛ' drops suddenly to a value lower than that at 77 K in the glass phase. This indicates the transition to a crystalline phase in which dipole rotational freedom is completely lost. The crystalline phase changes to a eutectic liquid phase of high ɛ' at a temperature (200 K) lower than the melting point of chlorobenzene and cis-decalin. Dielectric dispersion is observed only in the glass and amorphous phases. The dielectric relaxation time is independent of the concentration of chlorobenzene.

  6. Transition from Orbital Liquid to Jahn-Teller Insulator in Orthorhombic Perovskites RTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Sui, Y.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Su, W. H.

    2008-08-01

    Following the same strategy used for RVO3, thermal conductivity measurements have been made on a series of single-crystal perovskites RTiO3 (R=La,Nd,…,Yb). Results reveal explicitly a transition from an orbital liquid to an orbitally ordered phase at a magnetic transition temperature, which is common for both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic phases in the phase diagram of RTiO3. This spin/orbital transition is consistent with the mode softening at TN in antiferromagnetic LaTiO3 and is supported by an anomalous critical behavior at Tc in ferromagnetic YTiO3.

  7. Turbulent transition modification in dispersed two-phase pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Kyle; Longmire, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    In a pipe flow, transition to turbulence occurs at some critical Reynolds number, Rec , and transition is associated with intermittent swirling structures extending over the pipe cross section. Depending on the magnitude of Rec , these structures are known either as puffs or slugs. When a dispersed second liquid phase is added to a liquid pipe flow, Rec can be modified. To explore the mechanism for this modification, an experiment was designed to track and measure these transitional structures. The facility is a pump-driven circuit with a 9m development and test section of diameter 44mm. Static mixers are placed upstream to generate an even dispersion of silicone oil in a water-glycerine flow. Pressure signals were used to identify transitional structures and trigger a high repetition rate stereo-PIV system downstream. Stereo-PIV measurements were obtained in planes normal to the flow, and Taylor's Hypothesis was employed to infer details of the volumetric flow structure. The presentation will describe the sensing and imaging methods along with preliminary results for the single and two-phase flows. Supported by Nanodispersions Technology.

  8. Optical characterization of phase transitions in pure polymers and blends

    SciTech Connect

    Mannella, Gianluca A.; Brucato, Valerio; La Carrubba, Vincenzo

    2015-12-17

    To study the optical properties of polymeric samples, an experimental apparatus was designed on purpose and set up. The sample is a thin film enclosed between two glass slides and a PTFE frame, with a very thin thermocouple placed on sample for direct temperature measurement. This sample holder was placed between two aluminum slabs, equipped with a narrow slit for optical measurements and with electrical resistances for temperature control. Sample was enlightened by a laser diode, whereas transmitted light was detected with a photodiode. Measurements were carried out on polyethylene-terephtalate (PET) and two different polyamides, tested as pure polymers and blends. The thermal history imposed to the sample consisted in a rapid heating from ambient temperature to a certain temperature below the melting point, a stabilization period, and then a heating at constant rate. After a second stabilization period, the sample was cooled. The data obtained were compared with DSC measurements performed with the same thermal history. In correspondence with transitions detected via DSC (e.g. melting, crystallization and cold crystallization), the optical signal showed a steep variation. In particular, crystallization resulted in a rapid decrease of transmitted light, whereas melting gave up an increase of light transmitted by the sample. Further variations in transmitted light were recorded for blends, after melting: those results may be related to other phase transitions, e.g. liquid-liquid phase separation. All things considered, the apparatus can be used to get reliable data on phase transitions in polymeric systems.

  9. Optical characterization of phase transitions in pure polymers and blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, Gianluca A.; Brucato, Valerio; La Carrubba, Vincenzo

    2015-12-01

    To study the optical properties of polymeric samples, an experimental apparatus was designed on purpose and set up. The sample is a thin film enclosed between two glass slides and a PTFE frame, with a very thin thermocouple placed on sample for direct temperature measurement. This sample holder was placed between two aluminum slabs, equipped with a narrow slit for optical measurements and with electrical resistances for temperature control. Sample was enlightened by a laser diode, whereas transmitted light was detected with a photodiode. Measurements were carried out on polyethylene-terephtalate (PET) and two different polyamides, tested as pure polymers and blends. The thermal history imposed to the sample consisted in a rapid heating from ambient temperature to a certain temperature below the melting point, a stabilization period, and then a heating at constant rate. After a second stabilization period, the sample was cooled. The data obtained were compared with DSC measurements performed with the same thermal history. In correspondence with transitions detected via DSC (e.g. melting, crystallization and cold crystallization), the optical signal showed a steep variation. In particular, crystallization resulted in a rapid decrease of transmitted light, whereas melting gave up an increase of light transmitted by the sample. Further variations in transmitted light were recorded for blends, after melting: those results may be related to other phase transitions, e.g. liquid-liquid phase separation. All things considered, the apparatus can be used to get reliable data on phase transitions in polymeric systems.

  10. Granular Solid-liquid Transition: Experiment and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, M.; Xu, X.; Sun, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Granular media are amorphous materials, which differs from traditional solid or liquid. In different circumstance, granular behavior varies from solid-like to liquid-like, and the transitions between these regimes are always related to many complex natural progresses such as the failure of soil foundation and the occurrence of landslide and debris flow. The mechanic of elastic instability during the transition from solid-like to liquid-like regime, and the quantitative description of irreversible deformation during flow are the key problems to interpret these transition phenomena. In this work, we developed a continuum model with elastic stable condition and irreversible flow rule of granular material based on a thermal dynamical model, the Two-Granular-Temperature model (TGT). Since infinitesimal elastic deformation in solid-like regime and significant plastic large deformation in liquid-like regime can coexist in the granular solid-liquid transition process, the material point method (MPM) was used to build an effective numerical model. Collapse of rectangular granular pile contains both the transition from granular solid to granular liquid and the inverse process, thus in this work we carried out collapse experiment with clay particles, and simulated the experiment with our continuum model and an open-source DEM model YADE to study the transition processes. Results between experiment and simulations were compared and good agreements on collapse shape and velocity profiles were achieved, and the new model proposed in this work seems to work well on the description of granular solid-liquid transition.

  11. Ultrasonic atomization: effect of liquid phase properties.

    PubMed

    Avvaru, Balasubrahmanyam; Patil, Mohan N; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2006-02-01

    Experiments have been conducted to understand the mechanism by which the ultrasonic vibration at the gas liquid interface causes the atomization of liquid. For this purpose, aqueous solutions having different viscosities and liquids showing Newtonian (aqueous solution of glycerin) and non-Newtonian behavior (aqueous solution of sodium salt of carboxy methyl cellulose) were employed. It has been found that the average droplet size produced by the pseudo-plastic liquid is less than that produced by the viscous Newtonian liquid having viscosity equal to zero-shear rate viscosity of the shear thinning liquid. The droplet size was found to increase initially with an increase in the viscosity up to a certain threshold viscosity after which the droplet size was found to decrease again. Also droplet size distribution is found to be more compact (uniform sizes) with an increasing viscosity of the atomizing liquid. The presence of the cavitation and its effect on the atomization has been semi quantitatively confirmed using energy balance and by the measurement of the droplet ejection velocities and validated on the basis of the decomposition of the aqueous KI solution. A correlation has been proposed for the prediction of droplet size for aqueous Newtonian fluids and fluids showing non-Newtonian behavior based on the dimensionless numbers incorporating the operating parameters of the ultrasonic atomizer and the liquid phase physico-chemical properties.

  12. Phase transitions in ammonium perchlorate to 26 GPA and 700 K in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, M.F.; Maienschein, J.L.

    1995-07-10

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) showed previously unreported phase behavior when studied in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high temperature (to 693 K) and high pressure (to {approximately}26 GPa). Liquid droplets, observed above the known 513 K orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transition, are interpreted as the onset to melting. The melting point decreased with increasing pressure. Mid-infrared FTIR spectra of the residue showed only AP. The AP melt may contribute to shock insensitivity of AP-based propellants. Gas formation was seen at higher temperatures. A phase diagram was constructed using the appearance of liquid and gas as solid-liquid and liquid-gas transitions. Preliminary pressurized differential scanning calorimetry data showed a weak pressure dependence (to {approximately}6.9 MPa) for the orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transition.

  13. Phase transitions in ammonium perchlorate to 26 GPA and 700 K in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, M.F.; Maienschein, J.L.

    1996-05-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) showed previously unreported phase behavior when studied in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high temperature (to 693 K) and high pressure (to {approximately}26 GPa). Liquid droplets, observed above the known 513 K orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transition, are interpreted as the onset to melting. The melting point decreased with increasing pressure. Mid-infrared FTIR spectra of the residue showed only AP. The AP melt may contribute to shock insensitivity of AP-based propellants. Gas formation was seen at higher temperatures. A phase diagram was constructed using the appearance of liquid and gas as solid-liquid and liquid-gas transitions. Preliminary pressurized differential scanning calorimetry data showed a weak pressure dependence (to {approximately}6.9MPa) for the orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. THE ROLE OF METASTABLE STATES IN POLYMER PHASE TRANSITIONS: Concepts, Principles, and Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.; Keller, Andrew

    1998-08-01

    Polymer phases can be described in the same way as phases in other condensed matter using a number density operator and its correlation functions. This description requires the understanding of symmetry operations and order at different atomic and molecular levels. Statistical mechanics provides a link between the microscopic description of the structure and motion and the macroscopic thermodynamic properties. Within the limits of the laws of thermodynamics, polymers exhibit a rich variety of phase transition behaviors. By definition, a first-order phase transition describes a transformation that involves a sudden change of thermodynamic properties at its transition temperature, whereas higher-order phase transitions are classified as critical phenomena. Of special interest is the role of metastability in phase and phase transition behaviors. Although a metastable state possesses a local free energy minimum, it is not at the global equilibrium. Furthermore, metastable states can also be associated with phase sizes. Metastable behavior is also observed in phase transformations that are impeded by kinetic limitations along the pathway to thermodynamic equilibrium. This is illustrated in structural and morphological investigations of crystallization and mesophase transitions, liquid-liquid phase separation, vitrification, and gel formation, as well as combinations of transformation processes. In these cases, the metastable state often becomes the dominant state for the entire system and is observed over a range of time and size scales. This review describes the general principles of metastability in polymer phases and phase transitions and provides illustrations from current experimental works in selected areas.

  15. Hysteresis in the phase transition of chocolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ruilong; Lu, Qunfeng; Lin, Sihua; Dong, Xiaoyan; Fu, Hao; Wu, Shaoyi; Wu, Minghe; Teng, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    We designed an experiment to reproduce the hysteresis phenomenon of chocolate appearing in the heating and cooling process, and then established a model to relate the solidification degree to the order parameter. Based on the Landau-Devonshire theory, our model gave a description of the hysteresis phenomenon in chocolate, which lays the foundations for the study of the phase transition behavior of chocolate.

  16. Caloric materials near ferroic phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Moya, X; Kar-Narayan, S; Mathur, N D

    2014-05-01

    A magnetically, electrically or mechanically responsive material can undergo significant thermal changes near a ferroic phase transition when its order parameter is modified by the conjugate applied field. The resulting magnetocaloric, electrocaloric and mechanocaloric (elastocaloric or barocaloric) effects are compared here in terms of history, experimental method, performance and prospective cooling applications.

  17. Chaos: Butterflies also Generate Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leplaideur, Renaud

    2015-10-01

    We exhibit examples of mixing subshifts of finite type and of continuous potentials such that there are phase transitions but the pressure is always strictly convex. More surprisingly, we show that the pressure can be analytic on some interval although there exist several equilibrium states.

  18. Phase Transitions with Semi-Diffuse Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, James M.

    2003-07-16

    In this paper we examine new ''phase-field'' models with semi-diffuse interfaces. These models have the property that the -1/+1 planar phase transitions take place over a finite interval. The models also support multiple interface solutions with interfaces centered at arbitrary points L{sub 1} < L{sub 2} < ... < L{sub N}. These solutions correspond to local minima of an entropy functional rather than saddle points and are dynamically stable. The classical models have no such exact solutions but they do support solutions with N equally spaced transition points where the order parameter transitions between valves p{sub min}(N) and p{sub max}(N) satisfying -1 < p{sub min}(N) < 0 < p{sub max} (N) < 1. These solutions of the classical model are saddle points of the entropy functional associated with those models and are not dynamically stable.

  19. Double-Diffusive Layers and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dude, Sabine; Hansen, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Researching the thermal evolution of the Earth's mantle on numerical base is very challenging. During the last decade different approaches are put forward in oder to understand the picture of the today's Earth's mantle. One way is to incorporate all the known features and physics (plate tectonics, phase transitions, CMB-topography, ...) into numerical models and make them as complex (or 'complete') as possible to capture Earth's mantle processes and surface signals. Another way is, to take a step back and look at less complex models which account for single processes and their interaction and evolution. With these 'simpler' models one is able look in detail into the physical processes and dependencies on certain parameters. Since the knowledge of slab stagnation in the transitions zone of the Earth's mantle the question whether the mantle is or at least has been layered to some degree is still under debate. On this basis we address two important features that lead to layered mantle convection and may affect each other and with this the thermal evolution of the mantle. It is commonly known the main mantle mineral olivine pass through various phase changes with depth [1]. Detailed numerical studies had been carried out to ascertain the influence on convective motion and planetary evolution [2]. It is still heavily discussed whether the endothermic phase change at 660km depth can lead an isolated lower mantle. Most of the numerical studies favour a model which has phases of layering that are disrupted by catastrophic events. In the last years double-diffusive convection has also been intensively studied with regard to planetary mantle evolution such as pile formation and core-mantle boundary topography [3]. However, another striking feature still posing open questions are evolving layers self-organised from a previous non layered state. Considering a chemical component that influences the density of a fluid in addition to the temperature leads to dynamical phenomena

  20. Terraces in the cholesteric phase of DNA liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, D.H. ); Davidson, M.W. ); Rill, R.L. )

    1992-10-15

    Near the transition to the columnar phase, the cholesteric liquid crystal phase in an aqueous solution of DNA fragments with contour lengths approximating the persistence length undergoes an unwinding of the cholesteric pitch. Unwinding of the cholesteric with planar alignment of the fragments was studied by polarized light microscopy. Terraces or Grandjean planes'' of cholesteric are seen as uniformly birefringent fields of distinct hues (typically blue), bounded by lines which moved as the local concentration of DNA increased. These lines are interpreted as disclination lines, bounding regions of different total twist, which move as the intrinsic pitch of the cholesteric varies with concentration.

  1. Physical model of the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) transition in an exciton gas

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a simple physical model describing the transition of an exciton gas to a conducting exciton liquid. The transition occurs due to cohesive coupling of excitons in the vicinity of the critical point, which is associated with transformation of the exciton ground state to the conduction band and the emergence of conduction electrons. We calculate the cohesion binding energy for the exciton gas and, using it, derive the equations of state, critical parameters, and binodal. The computational method is analogous to that used by us earlier [5] for predicting the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) phase transition in atomic (hypothetical, free of molecules) hydrogen and alkali metal vapors. The similarity of the methods used for hydrogen and excitons makes it possible to clarify the physical nature of the transition in the exciton gas and to predict more confidently the existence of a new phase transition in atomic hydrogen.

  2. Nonuniversal surface behavior of dynamic phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riego, Patricia; Berger, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the dynamic phase transition (DPT) of the kinetic Ising model in systems with surfaces within the mean-field approximation. Varying the surface exchange coupling strength Js, the amplitude of the externally applied oscillating field h0, and its period P , we explore the dynamic behavior of the layer-dependent magnetization and the associated DPTs. The surface phase diagram shows several features that resemble those of the equilibrium case, with an extraordinary bulk transition and a surface transition for high Js values, independent from the value of h0. For low Js, however, h0 is found to be a crucial parameter that leads to nonuniversal surface behavior at the ordinary bulk transition point. Specifically, we observed here a bulk-supported surface DPT for high field amplitudes h0 and correspondingly short critical periods Pc, whereas this surface transition simultaneous to the bulk one is suppressed for slow critical dynamics occurring for low values of h0. The suppression of the DPT for low h0 not only occurs for the topmost surface layer, but also affects a significant number of subsurface layers. We find that the key physical quantity that explains this nonuniversal behavior is the time correlation between the dynamic surface and bulk magnetizations at the bulk critical point. This time correlation has to pass a threshold value to trigger a bulk-induced DPT in the surface layers. Otherwise, dynamic phase transitions are absent at the surface in stark contrast to the equilibrium behavior of the corresponding thermodynamic Ising model. Also, we have analyzed the penetration depth of the dynamically ordered phase for the surface DPT that occurs for large Js values. Here we find that the penetration depth depends strongly on Js and behaves identically to the corresponding equilibrium Ising model.

  3. Rescuing a Quantum Phase Transition with Quantum Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gu; Novais, Eduardo; Baranger, Harold

    We show that placing a quantum system in contact with an environment can enhance non-Fermi-liquid correlations, rather than destroying quantum effects as is typical. The system consists of two quantum dots in series with two leads; the highly resistive leads couple charge flow through the dots to the electromagnetic environment (noise). The similarity to the two impurity Kondo model suggests that there will be a quantum phase transition between a Kondo phase and a local singlet phase. However, this transition is destabilized by charge tunneling between the two leads. Our main result is that sufficiently strong quantum noise suppresses this charge transfer and leads to stabilization of the quantum phase transition. We present the phase diagram, the ground state degeneracy at the four fixed points, and the leading temperature dependence of the conductance near these points. Partially supported by (1) the U.S. DOE, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Grant No. DE-SC0005237 and (2) FAPESP (BRAZIL) under Grant 2014/26356-9.

  4. Geometry-induced phase transition in fluids: capillary prewetting.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Savva, Nikos; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2013-02-01

    We report a new first-order phase transition preceding capillary condensation and corresponding to the discontinuous formation of a curved liquid meniscus. Using a mean-field microscopic approach based on the density functional theory we compute the complete phase diagram of a prototypical two-dimensional system exhibiting capillary condensation, namely that of a fluid with long-ranged dispersion intermolecular forces which is spatially confined by a substrate forming a semi-infinite rectangular pore exerting long-ranged dispersion forces on the fluid. In the T-μ plane the phase line of the new transition is tangential to the capillary condensation line at the capillary wetting temperature T(cw). The surface phase behavior of the system maps to planar wetting with the phase line of the new transition, termed capillary prewetting, mapping to the planar prewetting line. If capillary condensation is approached isothermally with T>T(cw), the meniscus forms at the capping wall and unbinds continuously, making capillary condensation a second-order phenomenon. We compute the corresponding critical exponent for the divergence of adsorption.

  5. The phase diagram of molybdenum at extreme conditions and the role of local liquid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M

    2008-08-15

    Recent DAC measurements made of the Mo melting curve by the x-ray diffraction studies confirms that, up to at least 110 GPa (3300K) melting is directly from bcc to liquid, evidence that there is no basis for a speculated bcc-hcp or fcc transition. An examination of the Poisson Ratio, obtained from shock sound speed measurements, provides evidence that the 210 GPa (4100K) transition detected from shock experiments is a continuation of the bcc-liquid melting, but is from a bcc-to a solid-like mixed phase rather than to liquid. Calculations, modeled to include the free energy of liquid local structures, predict that the transition from the liquid to the mixed phase is near 150 GPa(3500K). The presence of local structures provides the simplest and most direct explanation for the Mo phase diagram, and the low melting slopes.

  6. Holographic phase transitions at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, David; Matsuura, Shunji; Myers, Robert C.; Thomson, Rowan M.

    2007-11-01

    Recently, holographic techniques have been used to study the thermal properties of Script N = 2 super-Yang-Mills theory, with gauge group SU(Nc) and coupled to Nf << Nc flavours of fundamental matter, at large Nc and large 't Hooft coupling. Here we consider the phase diagram as a function of temperature and baryon chemical potential μb. For fixed μb < NcMq there is a line of first order thermal phase transitions separating a region with vanishing baryon density and one with nonzero density. For fixed μb>Nc Mq there is no phase transition as a function of the temperature and the baryon density is always nonzero. We also compare the present results for the grand canonical ensemble with those for canonical ensemble in which the baryon density is held fixed [1].

  7. Solid-liquid transition in polydisperse Lennard-Jones systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sarmistha; Biswas, Rajib; Santra, Mantu; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-08-01

    We study melting of a face-centered crystalline solid consisting of polydisperse Lennard-Jones spheres with Gaussian polydispersity in size. The phase diagram reproduces the existence of a nearly temperature invariant terminal polydispersity (δt ≃ 0.11), with no signature of reentrant melting. The absence of reentrant melting can be attributed to the influence of the attractive part of the potential upon melting. We find that at terminal polydispersity the fractional density change approaches zero, which seems to arise from vanishingly small compressibility of the disordered phase. At constant temperature and volume fraction the system undergoes a sharp transition from crystalline solid to the disordered amorphous or fluid state with increasing polydispersity. This has been quantified by second- and third-order rotational invariant bond orientational order, as well as by the average inherent structure energy. The translational order parameter also indicates a similar sharp structural change at δ ≃ 0.09 in case of T* = 1.0, ϕ = 0.58. The free energy calculation further supports the sharp nature of the transition. The third-order rotationally invariant bond order shows that with increasing polydispersity, the local cluster favors a more icosahedral arrangement and the system loses its local crystalline symmetry. Interestingly, the value of structure factor S(k) of the amorphous phase at δ ≃ 0.10 (just beyond the solid-liquid transition density at T* = 1) becomes 2.75, which is below the value of 2.85 required for freezing given by the empirical Hansen-Verlet rule of crystallization, well known in the theory of freezing.

  8. Solid-liquid transition in polydisperse Lennard-Jones systems.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sarmistha; Biswas, Rajib; Santra, Mantu; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-08-01

    We study melting of a face-centered crystalline solid consisting of polydisperse Lennard-Jones spheres with Gaussian polydispersity in size. The phase diagram reproduces the existence of a nearly temperature invariant terminal polydispersity (δ(t) =/~ 0.11), with no signature of reentrant melting. The absence of reentrant melting can be attributed to the influence of the attractive part of the potential upon melting. We find that at terminal polydispersity the fractional density change approaches zero, which seems to arise from vanishingly small compressibility of the disordered phase. At constant temperature and volume fraction the system undergoes a sharp transition from crystalline solid to the disordered amorphous or fluid state with increasing polydispersity. This has been quantified by second- and third-order rotational invariant bond orientational order, as well as by the average inherent structure energy. The translational order parameter also indicates a similar sharp structural change at δ =/~ 0.09 in case of T(*) = 1.0, φ = 0.58. The free energy calculation further supports the sharp nature of the transition. The third-order rotationally invariant bond order shows that with increasing polydispersity, the local cluster favors a more icosahedral arrangement and the system loses its local crystalline symmetry. Interestingly, the value of structure factor S(k) of the amorphous phase at δ =/~ 0.10 (just beyond the solid-liquid transition density at T(*) = 1) becomes 2.75, which is below the value of 2.85 required for freezing given by the empirical Hansen-Verlet rule of crystallization, well known in the theory of freezing.

  9. The comfortable driving model revisited: traffic phases and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Florian; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2013-07-01

    We study the spatiotemporal patterns resulting from different boundary conditions for a microscopic traffic model and contrast them with empirical results. By evaluating the time series of local measurements, the local traffic states are assigned to the different traffic phases of Kerner’s three-phase traffic theory. For this classification we use the rule-based FOTO-method, which provides ‘hard’ rules for this assignment. Using this approach, our analysis shows that the model is indeed able to reproduce three qualitatively different traffic phases: free flow (F), synchronized traffic (S), and wide moving jams (J). In addition, we investigate the likelihood of transitions between the three traffic phases. We show that a transition from free flow to a wide moving jam often involves an intermediate transition: first from free flow to synchronized flow and then from synchronized flow to a wide moving jam. This is supported by the fact that the so-called F → S transition (from free flow to synchronized traffic) is much more likely than a direct F → J transition. The model under consideration has a functional relationship between traffic flow and traffic density. The fundamental hypothesis of the three-phase traffic theory, however, postulates that the steady states of synchronized flow occupy a two-dimensional region in the flow-density plane. Due to the obvious discrepancy between the model investigated here and the postulate of the three-phase traffic theory, the good agreement that we found could not be expected. For a more detailed analysis, we also studied vehicle dynamics at a microscopic level and provide a comparison of real detector data with simulated data of the identical highway segment.

  10. Efficient separation of transition metals from rare earths by an undiluted phosphonium thiocyanate ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-06-21

    The ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium thiocyanate has been used for the extraction of the transition metal ions Co(ii), Ni(ii), Zn(ii), and the rare-earth ions La(iii), Sm(iii) and Eu(iii) from aqueous solutions containing nitrate or chloride salts. The transition metal ions showed a high affinity for the ionic liquid phase and were efficiently extracted, while the extraction efficiency of the rare-earth ions was low. This difference in extraction behavior enabled separation of the pairs Co(ii)/Sm(iii), Ni(ii)/La(iii) and Zn(ii)/Eu(iii). These separations are relevant for the recycling of rare earths and transition metals from samarium cobalt permanent magnets, nickel metal hydride batteries and lamp phosphors, respectively. The extraction of metal ions from a chloride or nitrate solution with a thiocyanate ionic liquid is an example of "split-anion extraction", where different anions are present in the aqueous and ionic liquid phase. Close to 100% loading was possible for Co(ii) and Zn(ii) up to a concentration of 40 g L(-1) of the transition metal salt in the initial aqueous feed solution, whereas the extraction efficiency for Ni(ii) gradually decreased with increase in the initial feed concentration. Stripping of Co(ii), Zn(ii) and Ni(ii) from the loaded ionic liquid phase was possible by a 15 wt% NH3 solution. The ionic liquid could reused after extraction and stripping.

  11. Diffraction from a liquid crystal phase grating.

    PubMed

    Kashnow, R A; Bigelow, J E

    1973-10-01

    The diffraction of light by a sinusoidal perturbation of the optic axis in a nematic liquid crystal is discussed. This corresponds to experiments at the electrohydrodynamic instability thresholds. An interesting qualitative feature appears: The diffraction pattern exhibits a contribution at half of the expected spatial frequency, corresponding to nonorthogonal traversals of the thick phase grating.

  12. Liquid phase sintered compacts in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T. K.; Mcanelly, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    A model that will explain the effect of gravity on liquid phase sintering was developed. Wetting characteristics and density segregation which are the two important phenomena in liquid phase sintering are considered in the model development. Experiments were conducted on some selected material combinations to study the gravity effects on liquid phase sintering, and to verify the validity of the model. It is concluded that: (1) The surface tension forces acting on solid particles in a one-g environment are not appreciably different from those anticipated in a 0.00001g/g sub 0 (or lower) environment. (2) The capillary forces are dependent on the contact angle, the quantity of the liquid phase, and the distance between solid particles. (3) The pores (i.e., bubbles) do not appear to be driven to the surface by gravity-produced buoyancy forces. (4) The length of time to produce the same degree of settling in a low-gravity environment will be increased significantly. (5) A low gravity environment would appear to offer a unique means of satisfactorily infiltrating a larger and/or complex shaped compact.

  13. Improved Boat For Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid-phase epitaxial (LPE) growth boat redesigned. Still fabricated from ultra-high-purity graphite, but modified to permit easy disassembly and cleaning, along with improved wiping action for more complete removal of melt to reduce carry-over of gallium. Larger substrates and more uniform composition obtained.

  14. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  15. Pattern-induced anchoring transitions in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Gómez, Óscar A.; Romero-Enrique, José M.; Silvestre, Nuno M.; Telo da Gama, Margarida M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we revisit the problem of a nematic liquid crystal in contact with patterned substrates. The substrate is modelled as a periodic array of parallel infinite grooves of well-defined cross-section sculpted on a chemically homogeneous substrate which favours local homeotropic anchoring of the nematic. We consider three cases: a sawtooth, a crenellated and a sinusoidal substrate. We analyse this problem within the modified Frank-Oseen formalism. We argue that, for substrate periodicities much larger than the extrapolation length, the existence of different nematic textures with distinct far-field orientations, as well as the anchoring transitions between them, are associated with the presence of topological defects either on or close to the substrate. For the sawtooth and sinusoidal cases, we observe a homeotropic to planar anchoring transition as the substrate roughness increases. On the other hand, a homeotropic to oblique anchoring transition is observed for crenellated substrates. In this case, the anchoring phase diagram shows a complex dependence on the substrate roughness and substrate anchoring strength.

  16. Pattern-induced anchoring transitions in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Gómez, Óscar A; Romero-Enrique, José M; Silvestre, Nuno M; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we revisit the problem of a nematic liquid crystal in contact with patterned substrates. The substrate is modelled as a periodic array of parallel infinite grooves of well-defined cross-section sculpted on a chemically homogeneous substrate which favours local homeotropic anchoring of the nematic. We consider three cases: a sawtooth, a crenellated and a sinusoidal substrate. We analyse this problem within the modified Frank-Oseen formalism. We argue that, for substrate periodicities much larger than the extrapolation length, the existence of different nematic textures with distinct far-field orientations, as well as the anchoring transitions between them, are associated with the presence of topological defects either on or close to the substrate. For the sawtooth and sinusoidal cases, we observe a homeotropic to planar anchoring transition as the substrate roughness increases. On the other hand, a homeotropic to oblique anchoring transition is observed for crenellated substrates. In this case, the anchoring phase diagram shows a complex dependence on the substrate roughness and substrate anchoring strength.

  17. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W .L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Zhai, W.; Zhang, X. M.; Wei, B.

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate. PMID:26552711

  18. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, W L; Wu, Y H; Li, L H; Zhai, W; Zhang, X M; Wei, B

    2015-11-10

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate.

  19. Determining computational complexity from characteristic `phase transitions'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monasson, Rémi; Zecchina, Riccardo; Kirkpatrick, Scott; Selman, Bart; Troyansky, Lidror

    1999-07-01

    Non-deterministic polynomial time (commonly termed `NP-complete') problems are relevant to many computational tasks of practical interest-such as the `travelling salesman problem'-but are difficult to solve: the computing time grows exponentially with problem size in the worst case. It has recently been shown that these problems exhibit `phase boundaries', across which dramatic changes occur in the computational difficulty and solution character-the problems become easier to solve away from the boundary. Here we report an analytic solution and experimental investigation of the phase transition in K -satisfiability, an archetypal NP-complete problem. Depending on the input parameters, the computing time may grow exponentially or polynomially with problem size; in the former case, we observe a discontinuous transition, whereas in the latter case a continuous (second-order) transition is found. The nature of these transitions may explain the differing computational costs, and suggests directions for improving the efficiency of search algorithms. Similar types of transition should occur in other combinatorial problems and in glassy or granular materials, thereby strengthening the link between computational models and properties of physical systems.

  20. Fragile-to-strong transition in liquid silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geske, Julian; Drossel, Barbara; Vogel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We investigate anomalies in liquid silica with molecular dynamics simulations and present evidence for a fragile-to-strong transition at around 3100 K-3300 K. To this purpose, we studied the structure and dynamical properties of silica over a wide temperature range, finding four indicators of a fragile-to-strong transition. First, there is a density minimum at around 3000 K and a density maximum at 4700 K. The turning point is at 3400 K. Second, the local structure characterized by the tetrahedral order parameter changes dramatically around 3000 K from a higher-ordered, lower-density phase to a less ordered, higher-density phase. Third, the correlation time τ changes from an Arrhenius behavior below 3300 K to a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behavior at higher temperatures. Fourth, the Stokes-Einstein relation holds for temperatures below 3000 K, but is replaced by a fractional relation above this temperature. Furthermore, our data indicate that dynamics become again simple above 5000 K, with Arrhenius behavior and a classical Stokes-Einstein relation.

  1. Fluctuational shift of nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we discuss a macroscopic counterpart to the microscopic mechanism of the straightening dimer mesogens conformations, proposed recently by S.M. Saliti, M.G.Tamba, S.N. Sprunt, C.Welch, G.H.Mehl, A. Jakli, J.T. Gleeson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217801 (2016)) to explain their experimental observation of the unprecedentedly large shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our interpretation is based on singular longitudinal fluctuations of the nematic order parameter. Since these fluctuations are governed by the Goldstone director fluctuations they exist only in the nematic state. External magnetic field suppresses the singular longitudinal fluctuations of the order parameter (similarly as it is the case for the transverse director fluctuations, although with a different scaling over the magnetic field). The reduction of the fluctuations changes the equilibrium value of the modulus of the order parameter in the nematic state. Therefore it leads to additional (with respect to the mean field contribution) fluctuational shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our mechanism works for any nematic liquid crystals, however the magnitude of the fluctuational shift increases with decrease of the Frank elastic moduli. Since some of these moduli supposed to be anomalously small for so-called bent-core or dimer nematic liquid crystals, just these liquid crystals are promising candidates for the observation of the predicted fluctuational shift of the phase transition temperature.

  2. Molecular-Scale Remnants of the Liquid-Gas Transition in Supercritical Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, V. P.; Jones, A.; Cipcigan, F. S.; Crain, J.; Martyna, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    An electronically coarse-grained model for water reveals a persistent vestige of the liquid-gas transition deep into the supercritical region. A crossover in the density dependence of the molecular dipole arises from the onset of nonpercolating hydrogen bonds. The crossover points coincide with the Widom line in the scaling region but extend farther, tracking the heat capacity maxima, offering evidence for liquidlike and gaslike state points in a "one-phase" fluid. The effect is present even in dipole-limit models, suggesting that it is common for all molecular liquids exhibiting dipole enhancement in the liquid phase.

  3. Percolation quantum phase transitions in diluted magnets.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas; Schmalian, Jörg

    2005-12-02

    We show that the interplay of geometric criticality and quantum fluctuations leads to a novel universality class for the percolation quantum phase transition in diluted magnets. All critical exponents involving dynamical correlations are different from the classical percolation values, but in two dimensions they can nonetheless be determined exactly. We develop a complete scaling theory of this transition, and we relate it to recent experiments in La2Cu(1-p)(Zn,Mg)(p)O4. Our results are also relevant for disordered interacting boson systems.

  4. Phase Transition of DNA Coated Nanogold Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa; Sun, Young; Harris, Nolan; Wickremasinghe, Nissanka

    2004-03-01

    Melting and hybridization of DNA-coated gold nanoparticle networks are investigated with optical absorption spectroscopy and tansmission electron microscopy. Single-stranded DNA-coated nanogold are linked with complementary, single-stranded linker DNA to form particle networks. Network formation results in a solution color change, which can be used for DNA detection. Compared to free DNA, networked DNA-nanoparticle systems result in a sharp melting transition. Melting curves calculated from percolation theory agree with our experimental results(1). (1) C.-H. Kiang, ``Phase Transition of DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticles,'' Physica A, 321 (2003) 164--169.

  5. A Transition to Metallic Hydrogen: Evidence of the Plasma Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    The insulator-metal transition in hydrogen is one of the most outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. The high-pressure metallic phase is now predicted to be liquid atomic from T =0 K to very high temperatures. We have conducted measurements of optical properties of hot dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K in a diamond anvil cell using pulsed laser heating of the sample. We present evidence in two forms: a plateau in the heating curves (average laser power vs temperature) characteristic of a first-order phase transition with latent heat, and changes in transmittance and reflectance characteristic of a metal for temperatures above the plateau temperature. For thick films the reflectance saturates at ~0.5. The phase line of this transition has a negative slope in agreement with theories of the so-called plasma phase transition. The NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H supported this research.

  6. Phase transitions in Pareto optimal complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoane, Luís F.; Solé, Ricard

    2015-09-01

    The organization of interactions in complex systems can be described by networks connecting different units. These graphs are useful representations of the local and global complexity of the underlying systems. The origin of their topological structure can be diverse, resulting from different mechanisms including multiplicative processes and optimization. In spatial networks or in graphs where cost constraints are at work, as it occurs in a plethora of situations from power grids to the wiring of neurons in the brain, optimization plays an important part in shaping their organization. In this paper we study network designs resulting from a Pareto optimization process, where different simultaneous constraints are the targets of selection. We analyze three variations on a problem, finding phase transitions of different kinds. Distinct phases are associated with different arrangements of the connections, but the need of drastic topological changes does not determine the presence or the nature of the phase transitions encountered. Instead, the functions under optimization do play a determinant role. This reinforces the view that phase transitions do not arise from intrinsic properties of a system alone, but from the interplay of that system with its external constraints.

  7. Dimensional phase transition in small Yukawa clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.; Wells, K. D.

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the one- to two-dimensional zigzag transition in clusters consisting of a small number of particles interacting through a Yukawa (Debye) potential and confined in a two-dimensional biharmonic potential well. Dusty (complex) plasma clusters with n<=19 monodisperse particles are characterized experimentally for two different confining wells. The well anisotropy is accurately measured, and the Debye shielding parameter is determined from the longitudinal breathing frequency. Debye shielding is shown to be important. A model for this system is used to predict equilibrium particle configurations. The experiment and model exhibit excellent agreement. The critical value of n for the zigzag transition is found to be less than that predicted for an unshielded Coulomb interaction. The zigzag transition is shown to behave as a continuous phase transition from a one-dimensional to a two-dimensional state, where the state variables are the number of particles, the well anisotropy and the Debye shielding parameter. A universal critical exponent for the zigzag transition is identified for transitions caused by varying the Debye shielding parameter.

  8. Density Affects the Nature of the Hexatic-Liquid Transition in Two-Dimensional Melting of Soft-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Mengjie; Liu, Jun; Tong, Hua; Xu, Ning

    2016-08-01

    We find that both continuous and discontinuous hexatic-liquid transitions can happen in the melting of two-dimensional solids of soft-core disks. For three typical model systems, Hertzian, harmonic, and Gaussian-core models, we observe the same scenarios. These systems exhibit reentrant crystallization (melting) with a maximum melting temperature Tm happening at a crossover density ρm. The hexatic-liquid transition at a density smaller than ρm is discontinuous. Liquid and hexatic phases coexist in a density interval, which becomes narrower with increasing temperature and tends to vanish approximately at Tm. Above ρm, the transition is continuous, in agreement with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory. For these soft-core systems, the nature of the hexatic-liquid transition depends on density (pressure), with the melting at ρm being a plausible transition point from discontinuous to continuous hexatic-liquid transition.

  9. Liquid crystal display for phase shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Mendoza, B.; Granados-Agustín, F. S.; Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Cornejo-Rodríguez, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work arises based on the idea proposed by Millered et al. in 2004, where they show how to get in one shot interferograms with phase shift using a mask with micro-polarizers, in this work we pretend to obtain phase shift in localized areas of an interferogram using the properties of polarization and the pixelated configuration of a liquid crystal display (LCD) for testing optical surfaces. In this work we describes the process of characterization of a liquid crystal display CRL Opto and XGA2P01 model, which is introduced in one arm of a Twyman Green interferometer. Finally we show the experimental interferograms with phase shifts which are caused by different gray levels displayed in the LCD.

  10. Gravitational Role in Liquid Phase Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upadhyaya, Anish; Iacocca, Ronald G.; German, Randall M.

    1998-01-01

    To comprehensively understand the gravitational effects on the evolution of both the microstructure and the macrostructure during liquid phase sintering, W-Ni-Fe alloys with W content varying from 35 to 98 wt.% were sintered in microgravity. Compositions that slump during ground-based sintering also distort when sintered under microgravity. In ground-based sintering, low solid content alloys distort with a typical elephant-foot profile, while in microgravity, the compacts tend to spheroidize. This study shows that microstructural segregation occurs in both ground-based as well as microgravity sintering. In ground-based experiments, because of the density difference between the solid and the liquid phase, the solid content increases from top to the bottom of the sample. In microgravity, the solid content increases from periphery to the center of the samples. This study also shows that the pores during microgravity sintering act as a stable phase and attain anomalous shapes.

  11. Liquid Crystalline Phases of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Kiana; Abukhdeir, Nasser; Matsen, Mark

    The phase behavior of liquid-crystal polymeric brushes in solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory. The polymers are modeled as freely-jointed chain consisting of N rigid segments. The isotropic interactions between the polymer and the solvent are treated using the standard Flory-Huggins theory, while the anisotropic liquid-crystalline (LC) interactions between rigid segments are taken into account using the Mayer-Saupe theory. For weak LC interactions, the brush exhibits the conventional parabolic-like profile, while for strong LC interactions, the polymers crystallize into a dense brush with a step-like profile. At intermediate interaction strengths, we find the microphase-segregated phase observed previously for lattice-model calculations. In this phase, the brush exhibits a crystalline layer next to the grafting surface with an external layer similar to the conventional brush. This work was supported by NSERC of Canada.

  12. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences. Current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets. Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Due to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles. Reference: Cheng, Y. et al. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles. Nature Communications. 5:5923 doi: 10.1038/ncomms6850 (2015).

  13. Phase Transitions in Models of Bird Flocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulidi, H.; van der Weele, K.; Antonopoulos, Ch. G.; Bountis, T.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present paper is to elucidate the transition from collective to random behavior exhibited by various mathematical models of bird flocking. In particular, we compare Vicsek's model [Vicsek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226-1229 (1995)] with one based on topological considerations. The latter model is found to exhibit a first order phase transition from flocking to decoherence, as the "noise parameter" of the problem is increased, whereas Vicsek's model gives a second order transition. Refining the topological model in such a way that birds are influenced mostly by the birds in front of them, less by the ones at their sides and not at all by those behind them (because they do not see them), we find a behavior that lies in between the two models. Finally, we propose a novel mechanism for preserving the flock's cohesion, without imposing artificial boundary conditions or attractive forces.

  14. The gravitational effects on liquid phase sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipphut, C. M.; German, Randall M.; Bose, A.; Kishi, T.

    1989-01-01

    The liquid-phase sintering of heavy-metal PM alloys containing 78, 83, 88, 93, or 98 wt pct W plus Ni and Fe in a 7:3 ratio is investigated experimentally. The focus is on the potential role of gravity in phenomena such as specimen slumping and distortion, liquid migration, and microstructural coarsening. The results are presented in extensive graphs and micrographs and discussed in detail, and a preliminary grain-growth model is developed which accounts for the effects of contiguity and the volume fraction of solid.

  15. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU (N ) dark sectors with nf flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios.

  16. Phase transition in the countdown problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Lucas; Luque, Bartolo

    2012-07-01

    We present a combinatorial decision problem, inspired by the celebrated quiz show called Countdown, that involves the computation of a given target number T from a set of k randomly chosen integers along with a set of arithmetic operations. We find that the probability of winning the game evidences a threshold phenomenon that can be understood in the terms of an algorithmic phase transition as a function of the set size k. Numerical simulations show that such probability sharply transitions from zero to one at some critical value of the control parameter, hence separating the algorithm's parameter space in different phases. We also find that the system is maximally efficient close to the critical point. We derive analytical expressions that match the numerical results for finite size and permit us to extrapolate the behavior in the thermodynamic limit.

  17. Phase transition in the countdown problem.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Luque, Bartolo

    2012-07-01

    We present a combinatorial decision problem, inspired by the celebrated quiz show called Countdown, that involves the computation of a given target number T from a set of k randomly chosen integers along with a set of arithmetic operations. We find that the probability of winning the game evidences a threshold phenomenon that can be understood in the terms of an algorithmic phase transition as a function of the set size k. Numerical simulations show that such probability sharply transitions from zero to one at some critical value of the control parameter, hence separating the algorithm's parameter space in different phases. We also find that the system is maximally efficient close to the critical point. We derive analytical expressions that match the numerical results for finite size and permit us to extrapolate the behavior in the thermodynamic limit.

  18. Phase transitions: An overview with a view

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.

    1997-10-01

    The dynamics of phase transitions plays a crucial role in the so- called interface between high energy particle physics and cosmology. Many of the interesting results generated during the last fifteen years or so rely on simplified assumptions concerning the complex mechanisms typical of nonequilibrium field theories. After reviewing well-known results concerning the dynamics of first and second order phase transitions, I argue that much is yet to be understood, in particular in situations where homogeneous nucleation theory does not apply. I present a method to deal with departures from homogeneous nucleation, and compare its efficacy with numerical simulations. Finally, I discuss the interesting problem of matching numerical simulations of stochastic field theories with continuum models.

  19. A nonequilibrium phase transition in immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, An-Shen

    2004-07-01

    The dynamics of immune response correlated to signal transduction in immune thymic cells (T cells) is studied. In particular, the problem of the phosphorylation of the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) is explored. A nonlinear model is established on the basis of experimental observations. The behaviours of the model can be well analysed using the concepts of nonequilibrium phase transitions. In addition, the Riemann-Hugoniot cusp catastrophe is demonstrated by the model. Due to the application of the theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions, the biological phenomena can be clarified more precisely. The results can also be used to further explain the signal transduction and signal discrimination of an important type of immune T cell.

  20. Structural phase transitions in layered perovskitelike crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.

    1995-03-01

    Possible symmetry changes due to small tilts of octahedra are considered for layered perovskite-like crystals containing slabs of several ({ell}) layers of comer-sharing octahedra. In the crystals with {ell} > 1, four types of distortions are possible; as a rule, these distortions correspond to the librational modes of the parent lattice. Condensation of these soft modes is the reason for structural phase transitions or sequences of phase transitions. The results obtained are compared with the known experimental data for a number of layered ferroelectric and ferroelastic perovskite-like compounds. An application of the results to the initial stage of determining unknown structures is discussed with particular attention paid to high-temperature superconductors. 76 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Evolution of structure during phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Wilcoxon, J.P.; Anderson, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Nanostructured materials can be synthesized by utilizing the domain growth that accompanies first-order phase separation. Structural control can be achieved by appropriately selecting the quench depth and the quench time, but in order to do this in a mindful fashion one must understand the kinetics of domain growth. The authors have completed detailed light scattering studies of the evolution of structure in both temperature- and field-quenched phase transitions in two and three dimensional systems. They have studied these systems in the quiescent state and in shear and have developed theoretical models that account for the experimental results.

  2. Phase transitions in unstable cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé, R. V.

    2003-09-01

    The dynamics of cancer evolution is studied by means of a simple quasispecies model involving cells displaying high levels of genetic instability. Both continuous, mean-field and discrete, bit-string models are analysed. The string model is simulated on a single-peak landscape. It is shown that a phase transition exists at high levels of genetic instability, thus separating two phases of slow and rapid growth. The results suggest that, under a conserved level of genetic instability the cancer cell population will be close to the threshold level. Implications for therapy are outlined.

  3. On Antiferroelectric Smectics Exhibiting Successive Phase Transitions in the Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Mamoru; Tanaka, Satoshi

    1998-05-01

    The phase diagram of the axial next nearest neighbour Ising model with the third nearest neighbour interaction in an electric filed is obtained to study the phase transitions occurring in antiferroelectric smectic liquid crystals. Under suitable conditions, the jumps of the order parameters are small, though the transitions are necessarily of the first order in the absence of the electric field. The instability line of the ferroelectric phase, showing instability of the uniform phase with respect to periodic perturbation is also tested. The phase diagrams strongly suggest that the structure of the intermediate ferrielectric phase FIH has the wave number 2/7, and are also consistent with the previous result on FIL.

  4. Structural phase transitions in monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha June; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has provided opportunities to develop ultimate thin channel devices. In contrast to graphene, the existence of moderate band gap and strong spin-orbit coupling gives rise to exotic electronic properties which vary with layer thickness, lattice structure, and symmetry. TMDs commonly appear in two structures with distinct symmetries, trigonal prismatic 2H and octahedral 1T phases which are semiconducting and metallic, respectively. In this work, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides (MoX2, where X = S, Se, Te) through first-principles density functional calculations. We find a tendency that the semiconducting 2H phase is more stable than the metallic 1T phase. We show that a spontaneous symmetry breaking of 1T phase leads to various distorted octahedral (1T') phases, thus inducing a metal-to-semiconductor transition. We discuss the effects of carrier doping on the structural stability and the modification of the electronic structure. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under Grant No. NRF-2005-0093845 and Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Grant No. SSTFBA1401-08.

  5. Topological phase transitions in frustrated magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southern, B. W.; Peles, A.

    2006-06-01

    The role of topological excitations in frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnets between two and three spatial dimensions is considered. In particular, the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular geometry with a finite number of layers is studied using Monte Carlo methods. A phase transition that is purely topological in nature occurs at a finite temperature for all film thicknesses. The results indicate that topological excitations are important for a complete understanding of the critical properties of the model between two and three dimensions.

  6. Phase transitions in Nowak Sznajd opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołoszyn, Maciej; Stauffer, Dietrich; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2007-05-01

    The Nowak modification of the Sznajd opinion dynamics model on the square lattice assumes that with probability β the opinions flip due to mass-media advertising from down to up, and vice versa. Besides, with probability α the Sznajd rule applies that a neighbour pair agreeing in its two opinions convinces all its six neighbours of that opinion. Our Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field theory find sharp phase transitions in the parameter space.

  7. Hexagonal and nematic phases of chains. I - Correlation functions. II - Phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinger, Jonathan V.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.

    1991-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of a system of semiflexible chains, which can represent polymer liquid crystals, long-chain biomolecules, stiff wormlike micelles, or columns of discotic liquid crystals, are examined. A continuum theory is used to calculate static correlation functions in the hexagonal and nematic phases. Two correlation functions are considered: (1) the structure factor which describes fluctuations in the density; and (2) the director fluctuation spectrum, which describes fluctuations in the local optical axis. In addition, a model is developed for the phase transitions of a system of infinitely long, semiflexible chains which interact through a steric, excluded-volume repulsion. The model yields generic phase diagrams in terms of pressure or density vs. persistence length or temperature.

  8. Dynamical quantum phase transitions (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagin, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    During recent years the interest to dynamics of quantum systems has grown considerably. Quantum many body systems out of equilibrium often manifest behavior, different from the one predicted by standard statistical mechanics and thermodynamics in equilibrium. Since the dynamics of a many-body quantum system typically involve many excited eigenstates, with a non-thermal distribution, the time evolution of such a system provides an unique way for investigation of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. Last decade such new subjects like quantum quenches, thermalization, pre-thermalization, equilibration, generalized Gibbs ensemble, etc. are among the most attractive topics of investigation in modern quantum physics. One of the most interesting themes in the study of dynamics of quantum many-body systems out of equilibrium is connected with the recently proposed important concept of dynamical quantum phase transitions. During the last few years a great progress has been achieved in studying of those singularities in the time dependence of characteristics of quantum mechanical systems, in particular, in understanding how the quantum critical points of equilibrium thermodynamics affect their dynamical properties. Dynamical quantum phase transitions reveal universality, scaling, connection to the topology, and many other interesting features. Here we review the recent achievements of this quickly developing part of low-temperature quantum physics. The study of dynamical quantum phase transitions is especially important in context of their connection to the problem of the modern theory of quantum information, where namely non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body quantum system plays the major role.

  9. Recent theoretical advances on superradiant phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksic, Alexandre; Nataf, Pierre; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2013-03-01

    The Dicke model describing a single-mode boson field coupled to two-level systems is an important paradigm in quantum optics. In particular, the physics of ``superradiant phase transitions'' in the ultrastrong coupling regime is the subject of a vigorous research activity in both cavity and circuit QED. Recently, we explored the rich physics of two interesting generalizations of the Dicke model: (i) A model describing the coupling of a boson mode to two independent chains A and B of two-level systems, where chain A is coupled to one quadrature of the boson field and chain B to the orthogonal quadrature. This original model leads to a quantum phase transition with a double symmetry breaking and a fourfold ground state degeneracy. (ii) A generalized Dicke model with three-level systems including the diamagnetic term. In contrast to the case of two-level atoms for which no-go theorems exist, in the case of three-level system we prove that the Thomas-Reich-Kuhn sum rule does not always prevent a superradiant phase transition.

  10. Entropic description of gas hydrate ice/liquid equilibrium via enhanced sampling of coexisting phases

    DOE PAGES

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Kim, Jaegil; Keyes, Tom

    2015-04-28

    Metastable β ice holds small guest molecules in stable gas hydrates, so its solid/liquid equilibrium is of interest. However, aqueous crystal/liquid transitions are very difficult to simulate. A new MD algorithm generates trajectories in a generalized NPT ensemble and equilibrates states of coexisting phases with a selectable enthalpy. Furthermore, with replicas spanning the range between β ice and liquid water we find the statistical temperature from the enthalpy histograms and characterize the transition by the entropy, introducing a general computational procedure for first-order transitions.

  11. Assessment of the thermal-hydraulic technology of the transition phase of a core-disruptive accident in a LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Ginsberg, T.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1982-11-01

    The technology of thermal hydraulic aspects of the transition phase accident sequence in liquid metal fast breeder reactors has been reviewed. Previous analyses of the transition phase accident sequence have been reviewed and the current understanding of major thermal hydraulic phenomenology has been assessed. As a result of the foregoing, together with a scoping analysis of the transition phase accident sequence, major transition phase issues have been defined and research needs have been identified. The major conclusion of transition phase scoping analysis is that fuel dispersal cannot be relied upon to rule out the possibility of recriticalities during this stage of the accident.

  12. Phase transitions in complex network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Shane

    Two phase transitions in complex networks are analyzed. The first of these is a percolation transition, in which the network develops a macroscopic connected component as edges are added to it. Recent work has shown that if edges are added "competitively" to an undirected network, the onset of percolation is abrupt or "explosive." A new variant of explosive percolation is introduced here for directed networks, whose critical behavior is explored using numerical simulations and finite-size scaling theory. This process is also characterized by a very rapid percolation transition, but it is not as sudden as in undirected networks. The second phase transition considered here is the emergence of instability in Boolean networks, a class of dynamical systems that are widely used to model gene regulation. The dynamics, which are determined by the network topology and a set of update rules, may be either stable or unstable, meaning that small perturbations to the state of the network either die out or grow to become macroscopic. Here, this transition is analytically mapped onto a well-studied percolation problem, which can be used to predict the average steady-state distance between perturbed and unperturbed trajectories. This map applies to specific Boolean networks with few restrictions on network topology, but can only be applied to two commonly used types of update rules. Finally, a method is introduced for predicting the stability of Boolean networks with a much broader range of update rules. The network is assumed to have a given complex topology, subject only to a locally tree-like condition, and the update rules may be correlated with topological features of the network. While past work has addressed the separate effects of topology and update rules on stability, the present results are the first widely applicable approach to studying how these effects interact. Numerical simulations agree with the theory and show that such correlations between topology and update

  13. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-02-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  14. Nematic - isotropic phase transition in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Guenter; Weiss, Stephan

    2013-11-01

    The nematic-isotropic transition of a liquid crystal (LC) at a temperature TNI is an example of a soft phase transition, where fluid properties, although discontinuous, change only very little and where the latent heat is small. Understanding thermal convection in the presence of such a phase change is relevant to convection in Earth's mantle where discontinuous changes of the crystalline structure occur. We report on turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection of a nematic LC while it undergoes a transition from the nematic to the isotropic phase in a cylindrical convection cell with aspect ratio Γ (height over diameter) of 0.50. The difference between the top- and the bottom-plate temperature ΔT =Tb -Tt was held constant, while the average temperature Tm = (Tb +Tt) / 2 was varied. There was a significant increase of heat transport when TNI was between Tb and Tt. Measurements of the temperatures along the side wall as a function of Tm showed several ranges with qualitatively different behavior of quantities such as the time-averaged side-wall temperature, temperature gradient, or temperature fluctuations. We interpret these different ranges in terms of processes in the thermal boundary layers close to the top and bottom plates. SW acknowledges support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation through Grant No. DMR11-58514.

  15. Liquid-phase electroepitaxy - Dopant segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented which accounts for the dopant segregation in liquid-phase electroepitaxy in terms of dopant transport in the liquid phase (by electromigration and diffusion), the growth velocity, and the Peltier effect at the substrate-solution interface. The contribution of dopant electromigration to the magnitude of the effective segregation coefficient is dominant in the absence of convection; the contribution of the Peltier effect becomes significant only in the presence of pronounced convection. Quantitative expressions which relate the segregation coefficient to the growth parameters also permit the determination of the diffusion constant and electromigration mobility of the dopant in the liquid phase. The model was found to be in good agreement with the measured segregation characteristics of Sn in the electroepitaxial growth of GaAs from Ga-As solutions. For Sn in Ga-As solution at 900 C the diffusion constant was found to be 4 x 10 to the -5 sq cm/s and the electromigration velocity (toward the substrate with a positive polarity 2 x 10 to the -5 cm/s current density of 10 A/sq cm.

  16. Phase Segregation at the Liquid-Air Interface Prior to Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Salguero, Carolina; Gracia-Fadrique, Jesús

    2015-08-13

    Binary systems with partial miscibility segregate into two liquid phases when their overall composition lies within the interval defined by the saturation points; out of this interval, there is one single phase, either solvent-rich or solute-rich. In most systems, in the one-phase regions, surface tension decreases with increasing solute concentration due to solute adsorption at the liquid-air interface. Therefore, the solute concentration at the surface is higher than in the bulk, leading to the hypothesis that phase segregation starts at the liquid-air interface with the formation of two surface phases, before the liquid-liquid equilibrium. This phenomenon is called surface segregation and is a step toward understanding liquid segregation at a molecular level and detailing the constitution of fluid interfaces. Surface segregation of aqueous binary systems of alkyl acetates with partial miscibility was theoretically demonstrated by means of a thermodynamic stability test based on energy minimization. Experimentally, the coexistence of two surface regions was verified through Brewster's angle microscopy. The observations were further interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations, which show the diffusion of the acetates from the bulk toward the liquid-air interface, where acetates aggregate into acetate-rich domains.

  17. Partitioning of transition metals between diopside and coexisting silicate liquids. I - Nickel, cobalt, and manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Weill, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Distribution coefficients have been found for the partitioning of Ni, Co, and Mn between calcium-rich clinopyroxenes and coexisting silicate liquids. Values are found for the 1110-1360 C temperature range. The breakdown of Henry's Law was not observed. The measured clinopyroxene/liquid distribution coefficients ranged from 1.5-14.0 for Ni, 0.5-2.0 for Co, and 0.3-1.2 for Mn. Analyses of pyroxenes grown from charges differing in the amounts of transition metals indicate that Ni and Co occupy the M1 site of diopside and that Mn occupies the M1 and M2 sites. Equilibrium constants were found in terms of the activities of the components in the liquid and solid phases. These activities are based on the mole fractions. An activity/concentration model was used for the liquid phase in order to explain the variations in the clinopyroxene/liquid coefficients due to bulk composition.

  18. Windows open for highly tunable magnetostructural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wei, Z. Y.; Zhang, H. G.; Liu, E. K.; Luo, H. Z.; Liu, G. D.; Xi, X. K.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W. H.; Yue, M.; Wu, G. H.; Zhang, X. X.

    2016-07-01

    An attempt was made to tailor the magnetostructural transitions over a wide temperature range under the principle of isostructural alloying. A series of wide Curie-temperature windows (CTWs) with a maximal width of 377 K between 69 and 446 K were established in the Mn1-yCoyNiGe1-xSix system. Throughout the CTWs, the magnetic-field-induced metamagnetic behavior and giant magnetocaloric effects are obtained. The (Mn,Co)Ni(Ge,Si) system shows great potential as multifunctional phase-transition materials that work in a wide range covering liquid-nitrogen and above water-boiling temperatures. Moreover, general understanding of isostructural alloying and CTWs constructed in (Mn,Co)Ni(Ge,Si) as well as (Mn,Fe)Ni(Ge,Si) is provided.

  19. Dicke phase transition without total spin conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.; Shchadilova, Yulia; Wilner, Eli Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Demler, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    We develop a fermionic path-integral formalism to analyze the phase diagram of open nonequilibrium systems. The formalism is applied to analyze an ensemble of two-level atoms interacting with a single-mode optical cavity, described by the Dicke model. While this model is often used as the paradigmatic example of a phase transition in driven-dissipative systems, earlier theoretical studies were limited to the special case when the total spin of the atomic ensemble is conserved. This assumption is not justified in most experimental realizations. Our approach allows us to analyze the problem in a more general case, including the experimentally relevant case of dissipative processes that act on each atom individually and do not conserve the total spin. We obtain a general expression for the position of the transition, which contains as special cases the two previously known regimes: (i) nonequilibrium systems with losses and conserved spin and (ii) closed systems in thermal equilibrium and with the Gibbs-ensemble averaging over the values of the total spin. We perform a detailed study of different types of baths and point out the possibility of a surprising nonmonotonic dependence of the transition on the baths' parameters.

  20. Quantum Phase Transitions in Antiferromagnets and Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    2000-03-01

    A general introduction to the non-zero temperature dynamic and transport properties of low-dimensional systems near a quantum phase transition shall be presented. Basic results will be reviewed in the context of experiments on the spin-ladder compounds. Recent large N computations (M. Vojta and S. Sachdev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83), 3916 (1999) on an extended t-J model motivate a global scenario of the quantum phases and transitions in the high temperature superconductors, and connections will be made to numerous experiments. A universal theory (S. Sachdev, C. Buragohain, and M. Vojta, Science, in press M. Vojta, C. Buragohain, and S. Sachdev, cond- mat/9912020) of quantum impurities in spin-gap antiferromagnets near a magnetic ordering transition will be compared quantitatively to experiments on Zn doped Y Ba2 Cu3 O7 (Fong et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1939 (1999)

  1. Analysis Of Phase Transitions In Quasi-Two-Dimensional Dusty Systems In RF-Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, X. G.; Vaulina, O. S.; Khrustalev, Yu. V.; Nekhaevsky, Yu. Yu.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work, we investigate the phase transitions in quasi-two-dimensional systems of dusty plasma in RF discharge. The quasi-2D systems are considered, where the areas with different phase states (dusty liquid and dusty crystal) coexist. The parameters of these areas of dusty subsystem are estimated, the obtained results are analysed and compared with theoretical predictions.

  2. Nature and measure of entanglement in quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Rolando; Ortiz, Gerardo; Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel; Viola, Lorenza

    2003-03-01

    Characterizing and quantifying entanglement of quantum states in many-particle systems is at the core of a full understanding of the nature of quantum phase transitions in matter. Entanglement is a relative notion and, although many measures of entanglement have been defined in the literature, assessing the utility of those measures to characterize quantum phase transitions is still an open problem. We introduce a new measure, based on a different concept of entanglement, which allows us to identify the transition. The traditional concept of entanglement refers to the property of many-parties states which cannot be expressed as a product of states of each party. We have recently [1] introduced a different concept of entanglement which makes no reference to the subsystem decomposition of the total Hilbert space and which reduces to the traditional concept in the case of two parties. In our framework an extremal (pure) quantum state is unentangled with respect to an algebra of observables if it induces an extremal state (set of expectation values) on that algebra. This identifies pure unentangled states with generalized coherent states of the algebra (mixed states will be unentangled if they are convex combinations of pure unentangled states). For example, a Slater determinant, i.e., a state of free spinless fermions (Fermi liquid), is unentangled with respect to the algebra generated by the bilinear fermionic operators c^i cj (algebra U(N)) but it is, in general, entangled with respect to the Pauli (spin 1/2) algebra. This concept leads to the definition of a "Purity" relative to a given subalgebra as a measure of entanglement. We will show how this measure applies to the study of different types of phase transitions. In particular, we will apply this concept to Ising-like and Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions in models of interest in condensed matter physics. [1] H. Barnum, E. Knill, G. Ortiz, and L. Viola (2002), quant-ph/0207149.

  3. Order parameter free enhanced sampling of the vapor-liquid transition using the generalized replica exchange method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E

    2013-03-14

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) is extended into the isobaric-isothermal ensemble, and applied to simulate a vapor-liquid phase transition in Lennard-Jones fluids. Merging an optimally designed generalized ensemble sampling with replica exchange, gREM is particularly well suited for the effective simulation of first-order phase transitions characterized by "backbending" in the statistical temperature. While the metastable and unstable states in the vicinity of the first-order phase transition are masked by the enthalpy gap in temperature replica exchange method simulations, they are transformed into stable states through the parameterized effective sampling weights in gREM simulations, and join vapor and liquid phases with a succession of unimodal enthalpy distributions. The enhanced sampling across metastable and unstable states is achieved without the need to identify a "good" order parameter for biased sampling. We performed gREM simulations at various pressures below and near the critical pressure to examine the change in behavior of the vapor-liquid phase transition at different pressures. We observed a crossover from the first-order phase transition at low pressure, characterized by the backbending in the statistical temperature and the "kink" in the Gibbs free energy, to a continuous second-order phase transition near the critical pressure. The controlling mechanisms of nucleation and continuous phase transition are evident and the coexistence properties and phase diagram are found in agreement with literature results.

  4. Order parameter free enhanced sampling of the vapor-liquid transition using the generalized replica exchange method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E.

    2013-03-01

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) is extended into the isobaric-isothermal ensemble, and applied to simulate a vapor-liquid phase transition in Lennard-Jones fluids. Merging an optimally designed generalized ensemble sampling with replica exchange, gREM is particularly well suited for the effective simulation of first-order phase transitions characterized by "backbending" in the statistical temperature. While the metastable and unstable states in the vicinity of the first-order phase transition are masked by the enthalpy gap in temperature replica exchange method simulations, they are transformed into stable states through the parameterized effective sampling weights in gREM simulations, and join vapor and liquid phases with a succession of unimodal enthalpy distributions. The enhanced sampling across metastable and unstable states is achieved without the need to identify a "good" order parameter for biased sampling. We performed gREM simulations at various pressures below and near the critical pressure to examine the change in behavior of the vapor-liquid phase transition at different pressures. We observed a crossover from the first-order phase transition at low pressure, characterized by the backbending in the statistical temperature and the "kink" in the Gibbs free energy, to a continuous second-order phase transition near the critical pressure. The controlling mechanisms of nucleation and continuous phase transition are evident and the coexistence properties and phase diagram are found in agreement with literature results.

  5. Monodomain Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Layers for Phase Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Oton, E.; Netter, E.; Nakano, T.; D.-Katayama, Y.; Inoue, F.

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal “Blue Phases” (BP) have evolved, in the last years, from a scientific curiosity to emerging materials for new photonic and display applications. They possess attractive features over standard nematic liquid crystals, like submillisecond switching times and polarization- independent optical response. However, BPs still present a number of technical issues that prevent their use in practical applications: their phases are only found in limited temperature ranges, thus requiring stabilization of the layers; stabilized BP layers are inhomogeneous and not uniformly oriented, which worsen the optical performance of the devices. It would be essential for practical uses to obtain perfectly aligned and oriented monodomain BP layers, where the alignment and orientation of the cubic lattice are organized in a single 3D structure. In this work we have obtained virtually perfect monodomain BP layers and used them in devices for polarization independent phase modulation. We demonstrate that, under applied voltage, well aligned and oriented layers generate smoother and higher values of the phase shift than inhomogeneous layers, while preserving polarization independency. All BP devices were successfully stabilized in BPI phase, maintaining the layer monodomain homogeneity at room temperature, covering the entire area of the devices with a unique BP phase. PMID:28281691

  6. Monodomain Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Layers for Phase Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oton, E.; Netter, E.; Nakano, T.; D.-Katayama, Y.; Inoue, F.

    2017-03-01

    Liquid crystal “Blue Phases” (BP) have evolved, in the last years, from a scientific curiosity to emerging materials for new photonic and display applications. They possess attractive features over standard nematic liquid crystals, like submillisecond switching times and polarization- independent optical response. However, BPs still present a number of technical issues that prevent their use in practical applications: their phases are only found in limited temperature ranges, thus requiring stabilization of the layers; stabilized BP layers are inhomogeneous and not uniformly oriented, which worsen the optical performance of the devices. It would be essential for practical uses to obtain perfectly aligned and oriented monodomain BP layers, where the alignment and orientation of the cubic lattice are organized in a single 3D structure. In this work we have obtained virtually perfect monodomain BP layers and used them in devices for polarization independent phase modulation. We demonstrate that, under applied voltage, well aligned and oriented layers generate smoother and higher values of the phase shift than inhomogeneous layers, while preserving polarization independency. All BP devices were successfully stabilized in BPI phase, maintaining the layer monodomain homogeneity at room temperature, covering the entire area of the devices with a unique BP phase.

  7. Phase transitions of nuclear matter beyond mean field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tran Huu Phat; Nguyen Tuan Anh; Nguyen Van Long; Le Viet Hoa

    2007-10-15

    The Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis (CJT) effective action approach is applied to study the phase transition of nuclear matter modeled by the four-nucleon interaction. It is shown that in the Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA) a first-order phase transition takes place at low temperature, whereas the phase transition is of second order at higher temperature.

  8. Kuramoto-type phase transition with metronomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boda, Sz; Ujvári, Sz; Tunyagi, A.; Néda, Z.

    2013-11-01

    Metronomes placed on the perimeter of a disc-shaped platform, which can freely rotate in a horizontal plane, are used for a simple classroom illustration of the Kuramoto-type phase transition. The rotating platform induces a global coupling between the metronomes, and the strength of this coupling can be varied by tilting the metronomes’ swinging plane relative to the radial direction on the disc. As a function of the tilting angle, a transition from spontaneously synchronized to unsynchronized states is observable. By varying the number of metronomes on the disc, finite-size effects are also exemplified. A realistic theoretical model is introduced and used to reproduce the observed results. Computer simulations of this model allow a detailed investigation of the emerging collective behaviour in this system.

  9. Dynamical phase transitions in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, Ingrid

    2012-02-01

    The nucleus is described as an open many-body quantum system with a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator the eigenvalues of which are complex, in general. The eigenvalues may cross in the complex plane (exceptional points), the phases of the eigenfunctions are not rigid in approaching the crossing points and the widths bifurcate. By varying only one parameter, the eigenvalue trajectories usually avoid crossing and width bifurcation occurs at the critical value of avoided crossing. An analog spectroscopic redistribution takes place for discrete states below the particle decay threshold. By this means, a dynamical phase transition occurs in the many-level system starting at a critical value of the level density. Hence the properties of the low-lying nuclear states (described well by the shell model) and those of highly excited nuclear states (described by random ensembles) differ fundamentally from one another. The statement of Niels Bohr on the collective features of compound nucleus states at high level density is therefore not in contradiction to the shell-model description of nuclear (and atomic) states at low level density. Dynamical phase transitions are observed experimentally in different quantum mechanical systems by varying one or two parameters.

  10. Phase transition behaviour of sodium oleate aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nájera, Juan J.

    Field measurements have shown that organic surfactants are significant components of atmospheric aerosols. While fatty acids, among other surfactants, are prevalent in the atmosphere, the influence of these species on the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols remains not fully characterized. In order to assess the phase in which particles may exist, a detailed study of the deliquescence of a model surfactant aerosol has been carried out. Sodium oleate was chosen as a surfactant proxy relevant in atmospheric aerosol. Sodium oleate micelle aerosol particles were generated nebulizing a sodium oleate aqueous solution. In this study, the water uptake and phase transition of sodium oleate aerosol particles have been studied in a room temperature aerosol flow tube system (AFT) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Aerosol morphology and elemental composition were also analysed using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX) techniques. The particles are homogeneously distributed as ellipsoidal-shape aggregates of micelles particles with an average size of ˜1.1 μm. The deliquescence by the sodium oleate aerosol particles was monitored by infrared extinction spectroscopy, where the dried aerosol particles were exposed to increasing relative humidity as they passed through the AFT. Observations of the infrared absorption features of condensed phase liquid water enable to determine the sodium oleate deliquescence phase transition at 88±2%.

  11. Glass and liquid phase diagram of a polyamorphic monatomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, Shaina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a monatomic system with Fermi-Jagla (FJ) pair potential interactions. This model system exhibits polyamorphism both in the liquid and glass state. The two liquids, low-density (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL), are accessible in equilibrium MD simulations and can form two glasses, low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid, upon isobaric cooling. The FJ model exhibits many of the anomalous properties observed in water and other polyamorphic liquids and thus, it is an excellent model system to explore qualitatively the thermodynamic properties of such substances. The liquid phase behavior of the FJ model system has been previously characterized. In this work, we focus on the glass behavior of the FJ system. Specifically, we perform systematic isothermal compression and decompression simulations of LDA and HDA at different temperatures and determine "phase diagrams" for the glass state; these phase diagrams varying with the compression/decompression rate used. We obtain the LDA-to-HDA and HDA-to-LDA transition pressure loci, PLDA-HDA(T) and PHDA-LDA(T), respectively. In addition, the compression-induced amorphization line, at which the low-pressure crystal (LPC) transforms to HDA, PLPC-HDA(T), is determined. As originally proposed by Poole et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 4605 (1993)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.48.4605 simulations suggest that the PLDA-HDA(T) and PHDA-LDA(T) loci are extensions of the LDL-to-HDL and HDL-to-LDL spinodal lines into the glass domain. Interestingly, our simulations indicate that the PLPC-HDA(T) locus is an extension, into the glass domain, of the LPC metastability limit relative to the liquid. We discuss the effects of compression/decompression rates on the behavior of the PLDA-HDA(T), PHDA-LDA(T), PLPC-HDA(T) loci. The competition between glass polyamorphism and crystallization is also addressed. At our "fast rate," crystallization can be partially suppressed and the

  12. Phases and phase transitions in the algebraic microscopic shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. I.; Drumev, K. P.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the dynamical symmetries of the shell model number conserving algebra, which define three types of pairing and quadrupole phases, with the aim to obtain the prevailing phase or phase transition for the real nuclear systems in a single shell. This is achieved by establishing a correspondence between each of the pairing bases with the Elliott's SU(3) basis that describes collective rotation of nuclear systems. This allows for a complete classification of the basis states of different number of particles in all the limiting cases. The probability distribution of the SU(3) basis states within theirs corresponding pairing states is also obtained. The relative strengths of dynamically symmetric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in respect to the isoscalar, isovector and total pairing interactions define a control parameter, which estimates the importance of each term of the Hamiltonian in the correct reproduction of the experimental data for the considered nuclei.

  13. Swarms, phase transitions, and collective intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    A model of the collective behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The model is intended to be realistic, but turns out to fit naturally into the category of connectionist models, Like all connectionist models, its properties can be divided into the categories of structure, dynamics, and learning. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell hag a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, but with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding constitutes of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters. It is hoped that the present mode; might serve as a paradigmatic example of a complex cooperative system in nature. In particular this model can be used to explore the relation of phase transitions to at least three important issues encountered in artificial life. Firstly, that of emergence as complex adaptive behavior. Secondly, as an exploration of second order phase transitions in biological systems. Lastly, to derive behavioral criteria for the evolution of collective behavior in social organisms. The model is then applied to the specific case of ants moving on a lattice. The local behavior of the ants is inspired by the actual behavior observed in the laboratory, and analytic results for the collective behavior are compared to the corresponding laboratory results. Monte carlo simulations are used as illustrations.

  14. Swarms, phase transitions, and collective intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M.

    1992-12-31

    A model of the collective behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The model is intended to be realistic, but turns out to fit naturally into the category of connectionist models, Like all connectionist models, its properties can be divided into the categories of structure, dynamics, and learning. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell hag a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, but with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding constitutes of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters. It is hoped that the present mode; might serve as a paradigmatic example of a complex cooperative system in nature. In particular this model can be used to explore the relation of phase transitions to at least three important issues encountered in artificial life. Firstly, that of emergence as complex adaptive behavior. Secondly, as an exploration of second order phase transitions in biological systems. Lastly, to derive behavioral criteria for the evolution of collective behavior in social organisms. The model is then applied to the specific case of ants moving on a lattice. The local behavior of the ants is inspired by the actual behavior observed in the laboratory, and analytic results for the collective behavior are compared to the corresponding laboratory results. Monte carlo simulations are used as illustrations.

  15. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation of Oil Bodies from Seeds.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Fundamentally, oil bodies are discrete storage organelles found in oilseeds, comprising a hydrophobic triacylglycerol core surrounded by a half-unit phospholipid membrane and an outer shell of specialized proteins known as oleosins. Oil bodies possess a number of attributes that were exploited by SemBioSys Genetics to isolate highly enriched fractions of oil bodies through liquid-liquid phase separation for a number of commercial applications. The current chapter provides a general guide for the isolation of oil bodies from Arabidopsis and/or safflower seed, from which protocols can be refined for different oilseed sources. For SemBioSys Genetic's recombinant technology, therapeutic proteins were covalently attached to oleosins or fused in-frame with ligands which bound oil bodies, facilitating their recovery to high levels of purity during "upstream processing" of transformed seed. Core to this technology was oil body isolation consisting of simple manipulation including homogenization of seeds to free the oil bodies, followed by the removal of insoluble fractions, and phase separation to recover the oil bodies. During oil body enrichment (an increase in oil body content concomitant with removal of impurities), a number of options and tips are provided to aid researchers in the manipulation and monitoring of these robust organelles.

  16. Quantum coherence and quantum phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Chao; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2016-01-01

    We study the connections between local quantum coherence (LQC) based on Wigner-Yanase skew information and quantum phase transitions (QPTs). When applied on the one-dimensional Hubbard, XY spin chain with three-spin interaction, and Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models, the LQC and its derivatives are used successfully to detect different types of QPTs in these spin and fermionic systems. Furthermore, the LQC is effective as the quantum discord (QD) in detecting QPTs at finite temperatures, where the entanglement has lost its effectiveness. We also demonstrate that the LQC can exhibit different behaviors in many forms compared with the QD. PMID:27193057

  17. Phase transition of physically confined 2-decanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Harrisonn; Amanuel, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    We have studied phase transition of physically confined 2-decanol in nano porous silica using power compensated differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Like bulk, the physically confined also exhibit hysteresis between its melting and freezing temperature. However, its thermal history plays significant role in determining its freezing temperature. The melting temperature, on the other hand, did not show similar changes with respect to thermal history, suggesting that it is truly driven thermodynamically rather than kinetically. In addition, there seems to be a cutoff in size where crystallization front could not proceed.

  18. Dependence of phase transitions on small changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, R.

    1993-06-01

    In this contribution, the generalized thermodynamic formalism is applied to a nonhyperbolic dynamical system in two comparable situations. The change from one situation to the other is small in the sense that the grammar and the singularities of the system are preserved. For the discussion of the effects generated by this change, the generalized entropy functions are calculated and the sets of the specific scaling functions which reflect the phase transition of the system are investigated. It is found that even under mild variations, this set is not invariant.

  19. Chiral phase transition from string theory.

    PubMed

    Parnachev, Andrei; Sahakyan, David A

    2006-09-15

    The low energy dynamics of a certain D-brane configuration in string theory is described at weak t'Hooft coupling by a nonlocal version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We study this system at finite temperature and strong t'Hooft coupling, using the string theory dual. We show that for sufficiently low temperatures chiral symmetry is broken, while for temperatures larger then the critical value, it gets restored. We compute the latent heat and observe that the phase transition is of the first order.

  20. Early Work on Defect Driven Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosterlitz, J. Michael; Thouless, David J.

    2016-12-01

    This article summarizes the early history of the theory of phase transitions driven by topological defects, such as vortices in superfluid helium films or dislocations and disclinations in two-dimensional solids. We start with a review of our two earliest papers, pointing out their errors and omissions as well as their insights. We then describe the work, partly done by Kosterlitz but mostly done by other people, which corrected these oversights, and applied these ideas to experimental systems, and to numerical and experimental simulations.

  1. Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, Gregory G.

    2004-02-19

    Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid or "NPAL" is a term that most environmental professionals are familiar with because NAPL has been recognized in the literature as a significant source of groundwater contamination. There are two types of NAPL: DNAPL and LNAPL. DNAPL is a ‘dense’ non-aqueous phase liquid. In this context, dense means having a density greater than water (1.0 kg/L). Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachioroethylene (PCE) are examples of DNAPL compounds. A compound that is heaver than water means this type of NAPL will sink in an aquifer. Conversely, LNAPL is a ‘light’ non-aqueous phase liquid with a density less than water, and will float on top of the aquifer. Examples of LNAPL’s are benzene and toluene. LNAPL or DNAPL often manifest as a complex, multi-component mixture of organic compounds that can occur in environmental media. Complex multi-component mixtures distributed in soil pore-air, pore-water, soil particles and in free phase complicate residual saturation of single and multi component NAPL compounds in soil samples. The model output also includes estimates of the NAPL mass and volume and other physical and chemical properties that may be useful for characterization, modeling, and remedial system design and operation. The discovery of NAPL in the aquifer usually leads to a focused characterization for possible sources of NAPL in the vadose zone using a variety of innovative technologies and characterization methods. Often, the analytical data will indicated the presence of NAPL, yet, the NAPL will go unrecognized. Failure to recognize the NAPL can be attributed to the complicated processes of inter-media transfer or a general lack of knowledge about the physical characteristics of complex organic mixtures in environmental samples.

  2. The glass-liquid transition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2008-09-28

    Interactions of thin water films with surfaces of graphite and vitrified room-temperature ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF(6)])] were investigated using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a function of temperature and annealing time to elucidate the glass-liquid transition of water at the molecular level. Surface diffusion of water occurs at temperatures higher than 120 K, thereby forming three-dimensional clusters (a two-dimensional layer) on the [bmim][PF(6)] (graphite) surface. The hydrophobic effect of the surface decreases with increasing coverage of water; the bulklike properties evolve up to 40 ML, as evidenced by the occurrence of film dewetting at around the conventional glass transition temperature (140 K). Results also showed that aging is necessary for the water monolayer (a 40 ML water film) to dewet the graphite ([bmim][PF(6)]) surface. The occurrence of aging is explainable by the successive evolution of two distinct liquids during the glass-liquid transition: low density liquid is followed by supercooled liquid water. The water monolayer on graphite is characterized by the preferred orientation of unpaired OH groups toward the surface; this structure is arrested during the aging time despite the occurrence of surface diffusion. However, the water monolayer formed on the [bmim][PF(6)] surface agglomerates immediately after the commencement of surface diffusion. The structure of low density liquid tends to be arrested by the attractive interaction with the neighbors.

  3. Chiral liquid crystals: the vestigial chiral phases of T, O, I matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissinen, Jaakko; Liu, Ke; Slager, Robert-Jan; Wu, Kai; Zaanen, Jan

    We show how chiral order develops in vestigial isotropic phases of T , O and I liquid crystalline systems in three dimensions. The liquid crystal phases are realized in a lattice model of orientational degrees of freedom with point group symmetries G ⊂ O (3) , represented as O (3) -rotors coupled to G gauge fields. The model incorporates also disclinations via the gauge fields, features an ordered nematic phase with unbroken G rotations at low temperatures and a high temperature isotropic liquid phase. We observe an intermediate phase with spontaneous chirality but isotropic SO (3) symmetry (a liquid) for the gauge groups T, O, and I, the proper symmetry groups of the tetrahedron, cube and icosahedron, respectively. For the other subgroups of SO (3) , Cn <= ∞ and Dn <= ∞, there is generically only a single phase transition from the nematic phase to the isotropic liquid. We discuss the nature of the phase transitions and conditions under which the chiral phase is stabilized by the nematic order parameter fluctuations. The nature of the vestigial chiral phase is reminiscent of the so-called Ising nematic phase in iron based superconductors. Research supported by the Netherlands foundation for Fundamental Research of Matter (FOM).

  4. Study of cerium phase transitions in shock wave experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhernokletov, M. V. Kovalev, A. E.; Komissarov, V. V.; Novikov, M. G.; Zocher, M. A. Cherne, F. J.

    2011-02-15

    Cerium has a complex phase diagram that is explained by the presence of structural phase transitions. Experiments to measure the sound velocities in cerium by two methods were carried out to determine the onset of cerium melting on the Hugoniot. In the pressure range 4-37 GPa, the sound velocity in cerium samples was measured by the counter release method using manganin-based piezoresistive gauges. In the pressure range 35-140 GPa, the sound velocity in cerium was measured by the overtaking release method using carbogal and tetrachloromethane indicator liquids. The samples were loaded with plane shock wave generators using powerful explosive charges. The onset of cerium melting on the Hugoniot at a pressure of about 13 GPa has been ascertained from the measured elastic longitudinal and bulk sound velocities.

  5. Quantum Phase Transition in Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, K.; Girvin, S. M.

    1997-03-01

    One-dimensional Josephson junction arrays of SQUIDS exhibit a novel superconductor-insulator phase transition. The critical regime can be accessed by tuning the effective Josephson coupling energy using a weak magnetic field applied to the SQUIDS. The role of instantons induced by quantum fluctuations will be discussed. One novel feature of these systems which can be explained in terms of quantum phase slips is that in some regimes, the array resistance decreases with increasing length of the array. We calculate the finite temperature crossover function for the array resistance and compare our theoretical results with the recent experiments by D. Haviland and P. Delsing at Chalmers. This work is supported by DOE grant #DE-FG02-90ER45427 and by NSF DMR-9502555.

  6. Phase transitions in fluids and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Maksim

    metric to 16S rRNA metagenomic studies of 6 vertebrate gastrointestinal microbiomes and find that they assembled through a highly non-neutral process. I then consider a phase transition that may occur in nutrient-poor environments such as ocean surface waters. In these systems, I find that the experimentally observed genome streamlining, specialization and opportunism may well be generic statistical phenomena.

  7. Surface rheology and phase transitions of monolayers of phospholipid/cholesterol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vrânceanu, Marcel; Winkler, Karin; Nirschl, Hermann; Leneweit, Gero

    2008-05-15

    The dynamic surface elasticity and the surface dilational viscosity of three binary phospholipid/cholesterol mixtures were determined with axisymmetric drop shape analysis on a harmonically oscillating pendent drop. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine were used to explore the rheological properties and phase transitions of mixtures of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids with cholesterol. The growth rates for surface dilational viscosity and dynamic elasticity are parallel for all film pressures studied. Characteristic breaks and plateaus could be found for these growth rates, indicating phase transitions. For dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol mixtures, phase diagrams with six regions separated by phase boundaries were found, which are in good agreement with phase transitions reported in the literature for static measurements of isotherms and isobars on a Langmuir film balance and from fluorescence microscopy. Some phase boundaries were only found by dynamic, but not by static, elasticity measurements. Imaging methods revealed phase separations produced by the formation of condensed stoichiometric complexes leading to micron-sized and mostly circular domains. The effects of these complexes on monolayer rheology in liquid/liquid phases is described. Furthermore, liquid/solid and solid phase transitions are discussed.

  8. Surface Rheology and Phase Transitions of Monolayers of Phospholipid/Cholesterol Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Vrânceanu, Marcel; Winkler, Karin; Nirschl, Hermann; Leneweit, Gero

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic surface elasticity and the surface dilational viscosity of three binary phospholipid/cholesterol mixtures were determined with axisymmetric drop shape analysis on a harmonically oscillating pendent drop. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine were used to explore the rheological properties and phase transitions of mixtures of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids with cholesterol. The growth rates for surface dilational viscosity and dynamic elasticity are parallel for all film pressures studied. Characteristic breaks and plateaus could be found for these growth rates, indicating phase transitions. For dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol mixtures, phase diagrams with six regions separated by phase boundaries were found, which are in good agreement with phase transitions reported in the literature for static measurements of isotherms and isobars on a Langmuir film balance and from fluorescence microscopy. Some phase boundaries were only found by dynamic, but not by static, elasticity measurements. Imaging methods revealed phase separations produced by the formation of condensed stoichiometric complexes leading to micron-sized and mostly circular domains. The effects of these complexes on monolayer rheology in liquid/liquid phases is described. Furthermore, liquid/solid and solid phase transitions are discussed. PMID:18234814

  9. A universal reduced glass transition temperature for liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Data on the dependence of the glass transition temperature on the molecular structure for low-molecular-weight liquids are analyzed in order to determine whether Boyer's reduced glass transition temperature (1952) is a universal constant as proposed. It is shown that the Boyer ratio varies widely depending on the chemical nature of the molecule. It is pointed out that a characteristic temperature ratio, defined by the ratio of the sum of the melting temperature and the boiling temperature to the sum of the glass transition temperature and the boiling temperature, is a universal constant independent of the molecular structure of the liquid. The average value of the ratio obtained from data for 65 liquids is 1.15.

  10. Hysteresis and Kinetic Effects During Liquid-Solid Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Streitz, F H; Chau, R

    2009-02-17

    We address the fundamental issue of phase transition kinetics in dynamically compressed materials. Focusing on solid bismuth (Bi) as a prototype material, we used a variety of time-resolved experiments including electrical conductivity and velocimetry to study the phase transition kinetics of the solid-solid phase transitions. Simple single shock experiments performed on several low-lying high pressure phases of Bi, revealed surprisingly complex behavior and slow dynamics. Strong hysteresis effects were observed in the transition behavior in experiments where the compressed Bi was allowed to release back across a phase line. These experiments represent the first reported simultaneous use of resistivity and velocimetry in a shock compression experiment, and the first observation of hysteresis effects occurring during dynamic compression and release.

  11. A Crossed Sliding Luttinger Liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Kane, C. L.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2001-03-01

    It was recently demonstrated [1] that a stack of weakly coupled 2D planar XY-models can exhibit a sliding phase characterized by correlations that die off as a power-law with distance within a plane and exponentially with distance in the perpendicular direction. In this talk we investigate how these ideas can be extended to two-dimensional arrays of coupled quantam wires. In particular, we will focus on a crossed array of wires and demonstrate the existence of the so-called "crossed sliding Luttinger liquid" phase [2]. This phase is characterized by power-law correlations, and a two-dimensional isotropic in-plane conductivity that diverges as a power-law in temperature T as T goes to 0. It thus represents a nearly isotropic non-Fermi liquid state in two dimensions. 1. C.S. O'Hern, T.C. Lubensky, and J.Toner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2745 (1999). 2. Ranjan Mukhopadhyay, C.L. Kane, and T.C. Lubensky, condmat/0007039.

  12. Phase transition in the ABC model.

    PubMed

    Clincy, M; Derrida, B; Evans, M R

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that one-dimensional driven systems can exhibit phase separation even if the dynamics is governed by local rules. The ABC model, which comprises three particle species that diffuse asymmetrically around a ring, shows anomalous coarsening into a phase separated steady state. In the limiting case in which the dynamics is symmetric and the parameter q describing the asymmetry tends to one, no phase separation occurs and the steady state of the system is disordered. In the present work, we consider the weak asymmetry regime q=exp(-beta/N), where N is the system size, and study how the disordered state is approached. In the case of equal densities, we find that the system exhibits a second-order phase transition at some nonzero beta(c). The value of beta(c)=2pi square root 3 and the optimal profiles can be obtained by writing the exact large deviation functional. For nonequal densities, we write down mean-field equations and analyze some of their predictions.

  13. Phase transitions of monolayers on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Joshua; Dzyubenko, Boris; Vilches, Oscar; Cobden, David

    We have studied physisorbed layers of monatomic and diatomic gases on graphene. We used devices in which few-layer graphene, ranging from monolayer to trilayer, is suspended across a trench between two platinum contacts and are cleaned by thermal and current annealing. We found that the density of adsorbates is revealed by the conductance, similar to the case with nanotubes. The conductance change for a monolayer can be large. On trilayer graphene the adsorbed gases can be seen to exhibit transitions between two-dimensional phases identical to those on bulk graphite, including incommensurate and commensurate solid, fluid and vapor and multiple layers. New features appear in the conductance at the boundaries of the commensurate phase of Kr. We are able to measure single-particle binding energies very accurately and see how it depends on thickness; investigate the effects of changing disorder by gradually current annealing; and search for new phases in the case of monolayer graphene where atoms adsorbed on both sides can interact. We can map out the 2d phase diagrams very quickly by ohmic heating, which gives nearly instantaneous control of the temperature.

  14. Phase transition in the ABC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clincy, M.; Derrida, B.; Evans, M. R.

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that one-dimensional driven systems can exhibit phase separation even if the dynamics is governed by local rules. The ABC model, which comprises three particle species that diffuse asymmetrically around a ring, shows anomalous coarsening into a phase separated steady state. In the limiting case in which the dynamics is symmetric and the parameter q describing the asymmetry tends to one, no phase separation occurs and the steady state of the system is disordered. In the present work, we consider the weak asymmetry regime q=exp(-β/N), where N is the system size, and study how the disordered state is approached. In the case of equal densities, we find that the system exhibits a second-order phase transition at some nonzero βc. The value of βc=2π(3) and the optimal profiles can be obtained by writing the exact large deviation functional. For nonequal densities, we write down mean-field equations and analyze some of their predictions.

  15. Phase transitions and doping in semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Ayaskanta

    impurities (or doping) allows further control over the electrical and optical properties of nanocrystals. However, while impurity doping in bulk semiconductors is now routine, doping of nanocrystals remains challenging. In particular, evidence for electronic doping, in which additional electrical carriers are introduced into the nanocrystals, has been very limited. Here, we adopt a new approach to electronic doping of nanocrystals. We utilize a partial cation exchange to introduce silver impurities into cadmium selenide (CdSe) and lead selenide (PbSe) nanocrystals. Results indicate that the silver-doped CdSe nanocrystals show a significant increase in fluorescence intensity, as compared to pure CdSe nanocrystals. We also observe a switching from n- to p-type doping in the silver-doped CdSe nanocrystals with increased silver amounts. Moreover, the silver-doping results in a change in the conductance of both PbSe and CdSe nanocrystals and the magnitude of this change depends on the amount of silver incorporated into the nanocrystals. In the bulk, silver chalcogenides (Ag2E, E=S, Se, and Te) possess a wide array of intriguing properties, including superionic conductivity. In addition, they undergo a reversible temperature-dependent phase transition which induces significant changes in their electronic and ionic properties. While most of these properties have been examined extensively in bulk, very few studies have been conducted at the nanoscale. We have recently developed a versatile synthesis that yields colloidal silver chalcogenide nanocrystals. Here, we study the size dependence of their phase-transition temperatures. We utilize differential scanning calorimetry and in-situ X-ray diffraction analyses to observe the phase transition in nanocrystal assemblies. We observe a significant deviation from the bulk alpha (low-temperature) to beta (high-temperature) phase-transition temperature when we reduce their size to a few nanometers. Hence, these nanocrystals provide great

  16. Multifractality and Network Analysis of Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yang, Chunbin; Han, Jihui; Su, Zhu; Zou, Yijiang

    2017-01-01

    Many models and real complex systems possess critical thresholds at which the systems shift dramatically from one sate to another. The discovery of early-warnings in the vicinity of critical points are of great importance to estimate how far the systems are away from the critical states. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) and visibility graph method have been employed to investigate the multifractal and geometrical properties of the magnetization time series of the two-dimensional Ising model. Multifractality of the time series near the critical point has been uncovered from the generalized Hurst exponents and singularity spectrum. Both long-term correlation and broad probability density function are identified to be the sources of multifractality. Heterogeneous nature of the networks constructed from magnetization time series have validated the fractal properties. Evolution of the topological quantities of the visibility graph, along with the variation of multifractality, serve as new early-warnings of phase transition. Those methods and results may provide new insights about the analysis of phase transition problems and can be used as early-warnings for a variety of complex systems. PMID:28107414

  17. Phase Transition Dynamics of Three Types of Water within Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yuki; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2016-11-01

    Water in hydrogels has been classified into three types: bound, intermediate, and free water. To investigate the individual phase transition dynamics for each type of water, differential scanning calorimetic (DSC) curves and Raman spectra of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) hydrogels were measured with heating from 130 to 310 K. Bound and intermediate water showed glassy initial states at 130 K, whereas free water became hexagonal ice (Ih) structure. Intermediate water in glassy state undergoes four phase transition steps: glass-to-liquid transition (at 160-190 K), crystallization from liquid state to cubic ice (Ic) (at 200-230 K), Ic-Ih transition (at 240-250 K), and melting (at 250-273 K). It is concluded that pre-melting of ice, which has been observed in various polymer hydrogels, results from the exothermic Ic-Ih transition of intermediate water.

  18. Phase diagrams of mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external field

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2014-11-14

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase behaviors in mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external magnetic or electric field. Taking into account a chiral coupling between a polymer and a liquid crystal under the external field, we examine twist-untwist phase transitions and phase separations in the mixtures. It is found that a cholesteric-nematic phase transition can be induced by not only the external field but also concentration and temperature. Depending on the strength of the external field, we predict cholesteric-paranematic (Ch+pN), nematic-paranematic (N+pN), cholesteric-nematic (Ch+N) phase separations, etc., on the temperature-concentration plane. We also discuss mixtures of a non-chiral nematic liquid crystal and a chiral dopant.

  19. New approach to the first-order phase transition of Lennard-Jones fluids.

    PubMed

    Muguruma, Chizuru; Okamoto, Yuko; Mikami, Masuhiro

    2004-04-22

    The multicanonical Monte Carlo method is applied to a bulk Lennard-Jones fluid system to investigate the liquid-solid phase transition. We take the example of a system of 108 argon particles. The multicanonical weight factor we determined turned out to be reliable for the energy range between -7.0 and -4.0 kJ/mol, which corresponds to the temperature range between 60 and 250 K. The expectation values of the thermodynamic quantities obtained from the multicanonical production run by the reweighting techniques exhibit the characteristics of first-order phase transitions between liquid and solid states around 150 K. The present study reveals that the multicanonical algorithm is particularly suitable for analyzing the transition state of the first-order phase transition in detail.

  20. Quark-hadron phase transition in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atazadeh, K.

    2016-11-01

    We study the quark-hadron phase transition in the framework of massive gravity. We show that the modification of the FRW cosmological equations leads to the quark-hadron phase transition in the early massive Universe. Using numerical analysis, we consider that a phase transition based on the chiral symmetry breaking after the electroweak transition, occurred at approximately 10 μs after the Big Bang to convert a plasma of free quarks and gluons into hadrons.

  1. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  2. Does sex induce a phase transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; Cebrat, S.; Pękalski, A.

    2008-05-01

    We discovered a dynamic phase transition induced by sexual reproduction. The dynamics is a pure Darwinian rule applied to diploid bit-strings with both fundamental ingredients to drive Darwin's evolution: (1) random mutations and crossings which act in the sense of increasing the entropy (or diversity); and (2) selection which acts in the opposite sense by limiting the entropy explosion. Selection wins this competition if mutations performed at birth are few enough, and thus the wild genotype dominates the steady-state population. By slowly increasing the average number m of mutations, however, the population suddenly undergoes a mutational degradation precisely at a transition point mc. Above this point, the “bad” alleles (represented by 1-bits) spread over the genetic pool of the population, overcoming the selection pressure. Individuals become selectively alike, and evolution stops. Only below this point, m < mc, evolutionary life is possible. The finite-size-scaling behaviour of this transition is exhibited for large enough “chromosome” lengths L, through lengthy computer simulations. One important and surprising observation is the L-independence of the transition curves, for large L. They are also independent on the population size. Another is that mc is near unity, i.e. life cannot be stable with much more than one mutation per diploid genome, independent of the chromosome length, in agreement with reality. One possible consequence is that an eventual evolutionary jump towards larger L enabling the storage of more genetic information would demand an improved DNA copying machinery in order to keep the same total number of mutations per offspring.

  3. Polarons and Mobile Impurities Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkhoo, Shahriar

    derives the effective Euclidean action from the classical equation of motion. We calculate the effective mass of the polaron in the model polar liquid at zero and finite temperatures. The self-trapping transition of this polaron turns out to be discontinuous in certain regions of the phase diagram. In order to systematically investigate the role of quantum fluctuations on the polaron properties, we adopt a quantum field theory which supports nearly-critical local modes: the quantum Landau-Brazovskii (QLB) model, which exhibits fluctuation-induced first order transition (weak crystallization). In the vicinity of the phase transition, the quantum fluctuations are strongly correlated; one can in principle tune the strength of these fluctuations, by adjusting the parameters close to or away from the transition point. Furthermore, sufficiently close to the transition, the theory accommodates "soliton'' solutions, signaling the nonlinear response of the system. Therefore, the model seems to be a promising candidate for studying the effects of strong quantum fluctuations and also failure of linear response theory, in the polaron problem. We observe that at zero temperature, and away from the Brazovskii transition where the linear response approximation is valid, the localization transition of the polaron is discontinuous. Upon enhancing fluctuations---of either thermal or quantum nature---the gap of the effective mass closes at distinct second-order critical points. Sufficiently close to the Brazovskii transition where the nonlinear contributions of the field are significantly large, a new state appears in addition to extended and self-trapped polarons: an impurity-induced soliton. We interpret this as the break-down of linear response, reminiscent of what we observe in a polar liquid. Quantum LB model has been proposed to be realizable in ultracold Bose gases in cavities. We thus discuss the experimental feasibility, and propose a setup which is believed to exhibit the

  4. Order Parameter and Kinetics of Non-Equilibrium Phase Transition Stimulated by the Impact of Volumetric Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slyadnikov, E. E.; Turchanovskii, I. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    The authors formulated an understanding of the order parameter and built a kinetic model for the nonequilibrium first-order "solid body - liquid" phase transition stimulated by the impact of the volumetric heat source. Analytical solutions for kinetic equations were found, and it was demonstrated that depending on the phase transition rate "surface" and "bulk" melting mechanisms are implemented.

  5. The puzzling first-order phase transition in water–glycerol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Ivan; Greenbaum , Anna; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Feldman, Yuri

    2015-06-05

    Over the last decade, discussions on a possible liquid-liquid transition (LLT) have strongly intensified. The LLT proposed by several authors focused mostly on explaining the anomalous properties of water in a deeply supercooled state. However, there have been no direct experimental observations yet of LLT in bulk water in the so-called 'no man's land', where water exists only in the crystalline states. Recently, a novel experimental strategy to detect LLT in water has been employed using water-glycerol (W-G) mixtures, because glycerol can generate a strong hindrance for water crystallization. As a result, the observed first-order phase transition at a concentration of glycerol around c(g) approximate to 20 mol% was ascribed to the LLT. Here we show unambiguously that the first order phase transition in W-G mixtures is caused by the ice formation. We provide additional dielectric measurements, applying specific annealing temperature protocols in order to reinforce this conclusion. We also provide an explanation, why such a phase transition occurs only in the narrow glycerol concentration range. These results clearly demonstrate the danger of analysis of phase-separating liquids to gain better insights into water dynamics. These liquids have complex phase behavior that is affected by temperature, phase stability and segregation, viscosity and nucleation, and finally by crystallization, that might lead to significant misinterpretations.

  6. The puzzling first-order phase transition in water–glycerol mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Popov, Ivan; Greenbaum; Sokolov, Alexei P.; ...

    2015-06-05

    Over the last decade, discussions on a possible liquid-liquid transition (LLT) have strongly intensified. The LLT proposed by several authors focused mostly on explaining the anomalous properties of water in a deeply supercooled state. However, there have been no direct experimental observations yet of LLT in bulk water in the so-called 'no man's land', where water exists only in the crystalline states. Recently, a novel experimental strategy to detect LLT in water has been employed using water-glycerol (W-G) mixtures, because glycerol can generate a strong hindrance for water crystallization. As a result, the observed first-order phase transition at a concentrationmore » of glycerol around c(g) approximate to 20 mol% was ascribed to the LLT. Here we show unambiguously that the first order phase transition in W-G mixtures is caused by the ice formation. We provide additional dielectric measurements, applying specific annealing temperature protocols in order to reinforce this conclusion. We also provide an explanation, why such a phase transition occurs only in the narrow glycerol concentration range. These results clearly demonstrate the danger of analysis of phase-separating liquids to gain better insights into water dynamics. These liquids have complex phase behavior that is affected by temperature, phase stability and segregation, viscosity and nucleation, and finally by crystallization, that might lead to significant misinterpretations.« less

  7. Weyl semimetals and topological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shuichi

    Weyl semimetals are semimetals with nondegenerate 3D Dirac cones in the bulk. We showed that in a transition between different Z2 topological phases, i.e. between the normal insulator (NI) and topological insulator (TI), the Weyl semimetal phase necessarily appears when inversion symmetry is broken. In the presentation we show that this scenario holds for materials with any space groups without inversion symmetry. Namely, let us take any band insulator without inversion symmetry, and assume that the gap is closed by a change of an external parameter. In such cases we found that the system runs either into (i) a Weyl semimetal or (ii) a nodal-line semimetal, but no insulator-to-insulator transition happens. This is confirmed by classifying the gap closing in terms of the space groups and the wavevector. In the case (i), the number of Weyl nodes produced at the gap closing ranges from 2 to 12 depending on the symmetry. In (ii) the nodal line is protected by mirror symmetry. In the presentation, we explain some Weyl semimetal and nodal-line semimetals which we find by using this classification. As an example, we explain our result on ab initio calculation on tellurium (Te). Tellurium consists of helical chains, and therefore lacks inversion and mirror symmetries. At high pressure the band gap of Te decreases and finally it runs into a Weyl semimetal phase, as confirmed by our ab initio calculation. In such chiral systems as tellurium, we also theoretically propose chiral transport in systems with such helical structures; namely, an orbital magnetization is induced by a current along the chiral axis, in analogy with a solenoid.

  8. Electrostatic levitation studies of supercooled liquids and metastable solid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustan, Gustav Errol

    been carried out to study the metastable phase formation in an Fe83B17 near eutectic alloy. Initial supercooling measurements using the ISU-ESL identified the formation of three metastable phases: a precipitate phase that shows stable coexistence with the deeply supercooled liquid, and two distinct bulk solidification phases. To identify the structure of the metastable phases, the Washington University Beamline ESL (WU-BESL) has been used to perform in-situ high energy x-ray diffraction measurements of the metastable phases. Based on the x-ray results, the precipitate phase has been identified as bcc-Fe, and the more commonly occurring bulk solidification product has been found to be a two-phase mixture of Fe23B6 plus fcc-Fe, which appears, upon cooling, to transform into a three phase mixture of Fe23B6, bcc-Fe, and an as-yet unidentified phase, with the transformation occurring at approximately the expected fcc-to-bcc transformation temperature of pure Fe. To further characterize the multi-phase metastable alloy, the ISU-ESL has been used to perform measurements of volume thermal expansion via the videographic technique, as well as RF susceptibility via the TDO technique. The results of the thermal expansion and susceptibility data have been found to be sensitive indicators of additional structural changes that may be occurring in the metastable solid at temperatures below 1000 K, and the susceptibility data has revealed that three distinct ferromagnetic phase transitions take place within the multi-phase mixture. Based on these results, it has been hypothesized that there may be an additional transformation taking place that leads to the formation of either bct- or o-Fe3B in addition to the Fe23B6 phase, although further work is required to test this hypothesis.

  9. Empty liquid phase of colloidal ellipsoids: the role of shape and interaction anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Varga, Szabolcs; Meneses-Júarez, Efrain; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2014-04-07

    We study the effect of anisotropic excluded volume and attractive interactions on the vapor-liquid phase transition of colloidal ellipsoids. In our model, the hard ellipsoid is embedded into an ellipsoidal well, where both the shape of the hard ellipsoid and that of the added enclosing ellipsoidal well can be varied independently. The bulk properties of these particles are examined by means of a van der Waals type perturbation theory and validated with replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that both the critical volume fraction (ηc) and the critical temperature (Tc) of the vapor-liquid phase transition vanish with increasing shape anisotropy for oblate shapes, while ηc → 0 and Tc ≠ 0 are obtained for very elongated prolate shapes. These results suggest that the chance to stabilize empty liquids (a liquid phase with vanishing density) is higher in suspensions of rod-like colloidal ellipsoids than in those of plate-like ones.

  10. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  11. QCD PHASE TRANSITIONS-VOLUME 15.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFER,T.

    1998-11-04

    The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theorists working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some. efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.

  12. Nematic liquid crystals doped with nanoparticles: Phase behavior and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Mikhail A.; Gorkunov, Maxim V.

    Thermodynamics and dielectric properties of nematic liquid crystals doped with various nanoparticles have been studied in the framework of a molecular mean-field theory. It is shown that spherically isotropic nanoparticles effectively dilute the liquid crystal material and cause a decrease of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature, while anisotropic nanoparticles are aligned by the nematic host and, in turn, may significantly improve the liquid crystal alignment. In the case of strong interaction between spherical nanoparticles and mesogenic molecules, the nanocomposite possesses a number of unexpected properties: The nematic-isotropic co-existence region appears to be very broad, and the system either undergoes a direct transition from the isotropic phase into the phase-separated state, or undergoes first a transition into the homogeneous nematic phase and then phase-separates at a lower temperature. The phase separation does not occur for sufficiently low nanoparticle concentrations, and, in certain cases, the separation takes place only within a finite region of the nanoparticle concentration. For nematics doped with strongly polar nanoparticles, the theory predicts the nanoparticle aggregation in linear chains that make a substantial contribution to the static dielectric anisotropy and optical birefringence of the nematic composite. The theory clarifies the microscopic origin of important phenomena observed in nematic composites including a shift of the isotropic-nematic phase transition and improvement of the nematic order; a considerable softening of the first order nematic-isotropic transition; a complex phase-separation behavior; and a significant increase of the dielectric anisotropy and the birefringence.

  13. An improved model for the transit entropy of monatomic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Duane C; Chisolm, Eric D; Bock, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    In the original formulation of V-T theory for monatomic liquid dynamics, the transit contribution to entropy was taken to be a universal constant, calibrated to the constant-volume entropy of melting. This model suffers two deficiencies: (a) it does not account for experimental entropy differences of {+-}2% among elemental liquids, and (b) it implies a value of zero for the transit contribution to internal energy. The purpose of this paper is to correct these deficiencies. To this end, the V-T equation for entropy is fitted to an overall accuracy of {+-}0.1% to the available experimental high temperature entropy data for elemental liquids. The theory contains two nuclear motion contributions: (a) the dominant vibrational contribution S{sub vib}(T/{theta}{sub 0}), where T is temperature and {theta}{sub 0} is the vibrational characteristic temperature, and (b) the transit contribution S{sub tr}(T/{theta}{sub tr}), where {theta}{sub tr} is a scaling temperature for each liquid. The appearance of a common functional form of S{sub tr} for all the liquids studied is a property of the experimental data, when analyzed via the V-T formula. The resulting S{sub tr} implies the correct transit contribution to internal energy. The theoretical entropy of melting is derived, in a single formula applying to normal and anomalous melting alike. An ab initio calculation of {theta}{sub 0}, based on density functional theory, is reported for liquid Na and Cu. Comparison of these calculations with the above analysis of experimental entropy data provides verification of V-T theory. In view of the present results, techniques currently being applied in ab initio simulations of liquid properties can be employed to advantage in the further testing and development of V-T theory.

  14. Brewster Angle Microscope Investigations of Two Dimensional Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuman, Adam William

    The liquid-liquid interface is investigated by microscopic and thermodynamic means to image and measure interfacial properties when the system undergoes a two-dimensional (2D) phase transition of a Gibbs monolayer by varying the sample temperature. An in-house Brewster angle microscope (BAM) is constructed to visualize the interface during this transition while a quasi-elastic light scattering technique is used to determine the interfacial tension. These results complement x-ray investigations of the same systems. Evidence of interfacial micro-separated structure, microphases, comes from observations across a hexane-water interface with the inclusion of a long-chain fluorinated alcohol surfactant into the bulk hexane. Microphases take the form of spatially modulated structure to the density of the surfactant as it spans laterally across the interface. The surfactant monolayer exhibits microphase morphology over a range of a couple degrees as the temperature of the system is scanned through the 2D gas-solid phase transition. Microphase structure was observed for heating and cooling the hexane-water system and structural comparisons are given when the temperature step and quench depth of the cooling process is varied. A complete sequence of morphological structure was observed from 2D gas to cluster to labyrinthine stripe to a 2D solid mosaic pattern. Two characteristic length scales emerge giving rise to speculation of an elastic contribution to the standard repulsive and attractive competitive forces stabilizing the microphase. The benefit of BAM to laterally image very thin films across the surface of an interface on the micrometer length scale nicely complements x-ray reflectivity methods that average structural data transverse to the liquid interface on a molecular scale. To properly analyze x-ray reflectivity data, the interface is required to be laterally homogeneous. BAM can sufficiently characterize the interface for this purpose as is done for a Langmuir

  15. New Density Functional Approach for Solid-Liquid-Vapor Transitions in Pure Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, Gabriel; Provatas, Nikolas

    2015-04-01

    A new phase field crystal (PFC) type theory is presented, which accounts for the full spectrum of solid-liquid-vapor phase transitions within the framework of a single density order parameter. Its equilibrium properties show the most quantitative features to date in PFC modeling of pure substances, and full consistency with thermodynamics in pressure-volume-temperature space is demonstrated. A method to control either the volume or the pressure of the system is also introduced. Nonequilibrium simulations show that 2- and 3-phase growth of solid, vapor, and liquid can be achieved, while our formalism also allows for a full range of pressure-induced transformations. This model opens up a new window for the study of pressure driven interactions of condensed phases with vapor, an experimentally relevant paradigm previously missing from phase field crystal theories.

  16. Exotic quantum phase transitions of strongly interacting topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagle, Kevin; You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke

    2015-03-01

    Using determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that an extended Hubbard model on a bilayer honeycomb lattice has two novel quantum phase transitions. The first is a quantum phase transition between the weakly interacting gapless Dirac fermion phase and a strongly interacting fully gapped and symmetric trivial phase, which cannot be described by the standard Gross-Neveu model. The second is a quantum critical point between a quantum spin Hall insulator with spin Sz conservation and the previously mentioned strongly interacting fully gapped phase. At the latter quantum critical point the single-particle excitations remain gapped, while spin and charge gaps both close. We argue that the first quantum phase transition is related to the Z16 classification of the topological superconductor 3He-B phase with interactions, while the second quantum phase transition is a topological phase transition described by a bosonic O (4 ) nonlinear sigma model field theory with a Θ term.

  17. Information Dynamics at a Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowinski, Damian; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new way of investigating phase transitions in the context of information theory. We use an information-entropic measure of spatial complexity known as configurational entropy (CE) to quantify both the storage and exchange of information in a lattice simulation of a Ginzburg-Landau model with a scalar order parameter coupled to a heat bath. The CE is built from the Fourier spectrum of fluctuations around the mean-field and reaches a minimum at criticality. In particular, we investigate the behavior of CE near and at criticality, exploring the relation between information and the emergence of ordered domains. We show that as the temperature is increased from below, the CE displays three essential scaling regimes at different spatial scales: scale free, turbulent, and critical. Together, they offer an information-entropic characterization of critical behavior where the storage and fidelity of information processing is maximized at criticality.

  18. Scaling theory of topological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Topologically ordered systems are characterized by topological invariants that are often calculated from the momentum space integration of a certain function that represents the curvature of the many-body state. The curvature function may be Berry curvature, Berry connection, or other quantities depending on the system. Akin to stretching a messy string to reveal the number of knots it contains, a scaling procedure is proposed for the curvature function in inversion symmetric systems, from which the topological phase transition can be identified from the flow of the driving energy parameters that control the topology (hopping, chemical potential, etc) under scaling. At an infinitesimal operation, one obtains the renormalization group (RG) equations for the driving energy parameters. A length scale defined from the curvature function near the gap-closing momentum is suggested to characterize the scale invariance at critical points and fixed points, and displays a universal critical behavior in a variety of systems examined.

  19. Switchable Metal-Insulator Phase Transition Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Hajisalem, Ghazal; Nezami, Mohammadreza S; Gordon, Reuven

    2017-04-06

    We investigate the switching of a gap plasmon tunnel junction between conducting and insulating states. Hysteresis is observed in the second and the third harmonic generation power dependence, which arises by thermally induced disorder ("melting") of a two-carbon self-assembled monolayer between an ultraflat gold surface and metal nanoparticles. The hysteresis is observed for a variety of nanoparticle sizes, but not for larger tunnel junctions where there is no appreciable tunneling. By combining quantum corrected finite-difference time-domain simulations with nonlinear scattering theory, we calculate the changes in the harmonic generation between the tunneling and the insulating states, and good agreement is found with the experiments. This paves the way to a new class of metal-insulator phase transition switchable metamaterials, which may provide next-generation information processing technologies.

  20. MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM QCD PHASE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tevzadze, Alexander G.; Kisslinger, Leonard; Kahniashvili, Tina; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-11-01

    We study the evolution of QCD phase transition-generated magnetic fields (MFs) in freely decaying MHD turbulence of the expanding universe. We consider an MF generation model that starts from basic non-perturbative QCD theory and predicts stochastic MFs with an amplitude of the order of 0.02 {mu}G and small magnetic helicity. We employ direct numerical simulations to model the MHD turbulence decay and identify two different regimes: a 'weakly helical' turbulence regime, when magnetic helicity increases during decay, and 'fully helical' turbulence, when maximal magnetic helicity is reached and an inverse cascade develops. The results of our analysis show that in the most optimistic scenario the magnetic correlation length in the comoving frame can reach 10 kpc with the amplitude of the effective MF being 0.007 nG. We demonstrate that the considered model of magnetogenesis can provide the seed MF for galaxies and clusters.

  1. Valleytronics and phase transition in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab, Tayyaba

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic and transport properties of silicene in the presence of perpendicular electromagnetic fields and a ferromagnetic material are studied. It is shown that for small exchange field, the magnetic moment associated with each valley is opposite for the other and it gives a shift in band energy, by a Zeeman-like coupling term. Thus opening a new horizon for valley-orbit coupling. Magnetic proximity effect is seen to adjust the spintronics of each valley. Valley polarization is calculated using the semi classical formulation of electron dynamics. It can be modified and measured due to its contribution in Hall conductivity. Quantum phase transitions are observed in silicene, providing a tool to control the topological state experimentally. The strong dependence of the physical properties on valley degree of freedom is an important step towards valleytronics.

  2. On the transition between two-phase and single-phase interface dynamics in multicomponent fluids at supercritical pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Rainer N.; Oefelein, Joseph C.

    2013-09-01

    A theory that explains the operating pressures where liquid injection processes transition from exhibiting classical two-phase spray atomization phenomena to single-phase diffusion-dominated mixing is presented. Imaging from a variety of experiments have long shown that under certain conditions, typically when the pressure of the working fluid exceeds the thermodynamic critical pressure of the liquid phase, the presence of discrete two-phase flow processes become diminished. Instead, the classical gas-liquid interface is replaced by diffusion-dominated mixing. When and how this transition occurs, however, is not well understood. Modern theory still lacks a physically based model to quantify this transition and the precise mechanisms that lead to it. In this paper, we derive a new model that explains how the transition occurs in multicomponent fluids and present a detailed analysis to quantify it. The model applies a detailed property evaluation scheme based on a modified 32-term Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state that accounts for the relevant real-fluid thermodynamic and transport properties of the multicomponent system. This framework is combined with Linear Gradient Theory, which describes the detailed molecular structure of the vapor-liquid interface region. Our analysis reveals that the two-phase interface breaks down not necessarily due to vanishing surface tension forces, but due to thickened interfaces at high subcritical temperatures coupled with an inherent reduction of the mean free molecular path. At a certain point, the combination of reduced surface tension, the thicker interface, and reduced mean free molecular path enter the continuum length scale regime. When this occurs, inter-molecular forces approach that of the multicomponent continuum where transport processes dominate across the interfacial region. This leads to a continuous phase transition from compressed liquid to supercritical mixture states. Based on this theory, a regime diagram for

  3. Phase transitions in Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John; Lathouwers, Emma

    In Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), a Markov process is not directly accessible. In the simplest case, a two-state Markov model ``emits'' one of two ``symbols'' at each time step. We can think of these symbols as noisy measurements of the underlying state. With some probability, the symbol implies that the system is in one state when it is actually in the other. The ability to judge which state the system is in sets the efficiency of a Maxwell demon that observes state fluctuations in order to extract heat from a coupled reservoir. The state-inference problem is to infer the underlying state from such noisy measurements at each time step. We show that there can be a phase transition in such measurements: for measurement error rates below a certain threshold, the inferred state always matches the observation. For higher error rates, there can be continuous or discontinuous transitions to situations where keeping a memory of past observations improves the state estimate. We can partly understand this behavior by mapping the HMM onto a 1d random-field Ising model at zero temperature. We also present more recent work that explores a larger parameter space and more states. Research funded by NSERC, Canada.

  4. Phase Transitions in Living Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Garcia, Rashid Vladimir

    Our nervous systems are composed of intricate webs of interconnected neurons interacting in complex ways. These complex interactions result in a wide range of collective behaviors with implications for features of brain function, e.g., information processing. Under certain conditions, such interactions can drive neural network dynamics towards critical phase transitions, where power-law scaling is conjectured to allow optimal behavior. Recent experimental evidence is consistent with this idea and it seems plausible that healthy neural networks would tend towards optimality. This hypothesis, however, is based on two problematic assumptions, which I describe and for which I present alternatives in this thesis. First, critical transitions may vanish due to the influence of an environment, e.g., a sensory stimulus, and so living neural networks may be incapable of achieving "critical" optimality. I develop a framework known as quasicriticality, in which a relative optimality can be achieved depending on the strength of the environmental influence. Second, the power-law scaling supporting this hypothesis is based on statistical analysis of cascades of activity known as neuronal avalanches, which conflate causal and non-causal activity, thus confounding important dynamical information. In this thesis, I present a new method to unveil causal links, known as causal webs, between neuronal activations, thus allowing for experimental tests of the quasicriticality hypothesis and other practical applications.

  5. Where the electroweak phase transition ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürtler, M.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Schiller, A.

    1997-10-01

    We give a more precise characterization of the end of the electroweak phase transition in the framework of the effective three-dimensional SU(2)-Higgs lattice model than has been given before. The model has now been simulated at gauge couplings βG=12 and 16 for Higgs boson masses M*H=70, 74, 76, and 80 GeV up to lattices 963 and the data have been used for reweighting. The breakdown of finite volume scaling of the Lee-Yang zeroes indicates the change from a first order transition to a crossover at λ3/g23=0.102(2) in rough agreement with results of Karsch, Neuhaus, Patkós, and Rank at βG=9 and smaller lattices. The infinite volume extrapolation of the discontinuity Δ<φ+φ>/g23 turns out to be zero at λ3/g23=0.107(2) being an upper limit. We comment on the limitations of the second method.

  6. Topological and geometrical aspects of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, F. A. N.; Rehn, J. A.; Coutinho-Filho, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    In the first part of this review, we use a topological approach to describe the frustration- and field-induced phase transitions exhibited by the infinite-range XY model on the AB2 chain, including noncollinear spin structures. For this purpose, we have computed the Euler characteristic, χ, as well as other topological invariants, which are found to behave similarly as a function of the energy level in the context of Morse theory. Our findings and those available in the literature suggest that the cusp-like singularity exhibited by χ at the critical energy, Ec, put together with the divergence of the density of Jacobian's critical points emerge as necessary and sufficient conditions for the occurrence of finite-temperature topology-induced phase transitions. In the second part, we present an alternative solution of the Ising chain in a field under free and periodic boundary conditions, in the microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical ensembles, from a unified combinatorial and topological perspective. In particular, the computation of the per-site entropy as a function of the energy unveils a residual value for critical values of the magnetic field, a phenomenon for which we provide a topological interpretation and a connection with the Fibonacci sequence. We also show that, in the thermodynamic limit, the per-site microcanonical entropy is equal to the logarithm of the per-site Euler characteristic. Finally, we emphasize that our combinatorial approach to the canonical ensemble allows exact computation of the thermally averaged value <χ>(T) of the Euler characteristic; our results show that the conjecture <χ>(Tc)= 0, where Tc is the critical temperature, is valid for the Ising chain.

  7. Global quantum discord and quantum phase transition in XY model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Yu-Ran; Yang, Wen-Li; Fan, Heng

    2015-11-15

    We study the relationship between the behavior of global quantum correlations and quantum phase transitions in XY model. We find that the two kinds of phase transitions in the studied model can be characterized by the features of global quantum discord (GQD) and the corresponding quantum correlations. We demonstrate that the maximum of the sum of all the nearest neighbor bipartite GQDs is effective and accurate for signaling the Ising quantum phase transition, in contrast, the sudden change of GQD is very suitable for characterizing another phase transition in the XY model. This may shed lights on the study of properties of quantum correlations in different quantum phases.

  8. A one-dimensional model with water-like anomalies and two phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckmann, Lotta; Drossel, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional model that shows several properties of water. The model combines the long-range attraction of the van der Waals model with the nearest-neighbor interaction potential by Ben-Naim, which is a step potential that includes a hard core and a potential well. Starting from the analytical expression for the partition function, we determine numerically the Gibbs energy and other thermodynamic quantities. The model shows two phase transitions, which can be interpreted as the liquid-gas transition and a transition between a high-density and a low-density liquid. At zero temperature, the low-density liquid goes into the crystalline phase. Furthermore, we find several anomalies that are considered characteristic for water. We explore a wide range of pressure and temperature values and the dependence of the results on the depth and width of the potential well.

  9. Bubbles in liquids with phase transition—part 2: on balance laws for mixture theories of disperse vapor bubbles in liquid with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Wolfgang; Hantke, Maren; Warnecke, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    We study averaging methods for the derivation of mixture equations for disperse vapor bubbles in liquids. The carrier liquid is modeled as a continuum, whereas simplified assumptions are made for the disperse bubble phase. An approach due to Petrov and Voinov is extended to derive mixture equations for the case that there is a phase transition between the carrier liquid and the vapor bubbles in water. We end up with a system of balance laws for a multi-phase mixture, which is completely in divergence form. Additional non-differential source terms describe the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the phases. The sources depend explicitly on evolution laws for the total mass, the radius and the temperature of single bubbles. These evolution laws are derived in a prior article (Dreyer et al. in Cont Mech Thermodyn. doi:10.1007/s00161-0225-6, 2011) and are used to close the system. Finally, numerical examples are presented.

  10. On liquid phases in cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Richard; Faillace, George A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we review the relevant literature and investigate conditions likely to lead to melting of H2O ice, methanol (CH3OH) ice, ethane (C2H6) ice and other volatile ices in cometary nuclei. On the basis of a heat balance model which takes account of volatiles loss, we predict the formation of occasional aqueous and hydrocarbon liquid phases in subsurface regions at heliocentric distances, rh of 1-3 AU, and 5-12 AU, respectively. Low triple-point temperatures and low vapour pressures of C2H6, C3H8, and some higher-order alkanes and alkenes, favour liquid phase formation in cometary bodies at high rh. Microporosity and the formation of a stabilization crust occluding the escape of volatiles facilitate liquid-phase formation. Characteristics of the near-surface which favour subsurface melting include; low effective surface emissivity (at low rh), high amorphous carbon content, average pore sizes of ˜10 μm or less, presence of solutes (e.g. CH3OH), mixtures of C2-C6 hydrocarbons (for melting at high rh), diurnal thermal cycling, and slow rotation rate. Applying the principles of soil mechanics, capillary forces are shown to initiate pre-melting phenomena and subsequent melting, which is expected to impart considerable strength of ˜104 Pa in partially saturated layers, reducing porosity and permeability, enhancing thermal conductivity and heat transfer. Diurnal thermal cycling is expected to have a marked effect on the composition and distribution of H2O ice in the near-surface leading to frost heave-type phenomena even where little if any true melting occurs. Where melting does take place, capillary suction in the wetted zone has the potential to enhance heat transfer via capillary wetting in a low-gravity environment, and to modify surface topography creating relatively smooth flat-bottomed features, which have a tendency to be located within small depressions. An important aspect of the "wetted layer" model is the prediction that diurnal melt-freeze cycles

  11. Membrane lipid phase transitions and phase organization studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ruthven N A H; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2013-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a powerful yet relatively inexpensive and convenient technique for studying the structure and organization of membrane lipids in their various polymorphic phases. This spectroscopic technique yields information about the conformation and dynamics of all regions of the lipid molecule simultaneously without the necessity of introducing extrinsic probes. In this review, we summarize some relatively recent FTIR spectroscopic studies of the structure and organization primarily of fully hydrated phospholipids in their biologically relevant lamellar crystalline, gel and liquid-crystalline phases, and show that interconversions between these bilayer phases can be accurately monitored by this technique. We also briefly discuss how the structure and organization of potentially biologically relevant nonlamellar micellar or reversed hexagonal lipid phases can be studied and how phase transitions between lamellar and nonlamellar phases, or between various nonlamellar phases, can be followed as well. In addition, we discuss the potential for FTIR spectroscopy to yield fairly high resolution structural information about phospholipid packing in lamellar crystalline or gel phases. Finally, we show that many, but not all of these FTIR approaches can also yield valuable information about lipid-protein interactions in membrane protein- or peptide-containing lipid membrane bilayer model or even in biological membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: FTIR in membrane proteins and peptide studies.

  12. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH’s above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  13. A continuous tri-phase transition effect for HIFU-mediated intravenous drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Hangrong; Li, Faqi; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Shuguang; Xu, Huixiong; Ma, Ming; Jia, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yu; Mou, Juan; Wang, Xia; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-07-01

    Aiming at substantially enhanced efficacy and biosafety of clinical HIFU therapy, a natural solid medium, L-menthol (LM), characteristic of mild and controllable "solid-liquid-gas" (SLG) tri-phase transition, was adopted, instead of those conventional explosive liquid-gas (LG) bi-phase transitional media, in constructing a multifunctional theranostic system. Owing to the continuous and controllable characteristics of SLG tri-phase transition, such a novel tri-phase transition-based theranostic system has been demonstrated of the repeatedly enhanced HIFU efficacy ex vivo and in vivo under once intravenous injection and the significantly improved treatment precision, controllability and biosafety when comparing to the traditional bi-phase transition medium, perfluorohexane (PFH), thus promising great application potential in clinical HIFU treatment. Moreover, this theranostic system has been demonstrated a long blood-circulation lifetime and continuous accumulation in tumor in 24 h, which is very beneficial for the enhanced tumor ablation in vivo along with SLG tri-phase transition. More importantly, after loading multiple model drugs and real drug, such a theranostic system presents a HIFU-mediated temperature-responsive drug release property, and depending on the versatile miscibility of LM, co-loadings with hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs are also achieved, which provides the possibility of synergistic treatment combining HIFU therapy and chemotherapy.

  14. Magnetically ordered phase near transition to Bose-glass phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syromyatnikov, A. V.; Sizanov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a magnetically ordered ("superfluid") phase near quantum transition to the Bose-glass phase in a simple modeling system, a Heisenberg antiferromagnet with spatial dimension d >2 in an external magnetic field with disorder in exchange coupling constants. Our analytical consideration is based on hydrodynamic description of long-wavelength excitations. Results obtained are valid in the entire critical region near the quantum critical point (QCP), allowing us to describe a possible crossover from one critical behavior to another. We demonstrate that the system behaves in full agreement with predictions by M. P. Fisher et al. [Phys. Rev. B 40, 546 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevB.40.546] in close vicinity to the QCP. We find as an extension to that analysis that the anomalous dimension η =2 -d and β =ν d /2 , where β and ν are critical exponents of the order parameter and the correlation length, respectively. The density of states per spin of low-energy localized excitations is found to be independent of d ("superuniversal"). We show that many recent experimental and numerical results obtained in various three-dimensional (3D) systems can be described by our formulas using percolation critical exponents. Then, it is a possibility that a percolation critical regime arises in the ordered phase in some 3D systems not very close to the QCP.

  15. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  16. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  17. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  18. Transient liquid phase bonding of intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yimin

    The present work was undertaken to examine the applicability of transient liquid phase bonding to structural intermetallics. This research was based on an investigation of the mechanisms governing microstructural development in the joint and adjacent substrates during the joining process. The bonding systems investigated included polycrystalline NiAl/Cu/Ni, polycrystalline NiAl/Cu/superalloys (Martin-Marietta (MM)-247, Inconel (IN) 718 and Nimonic 90), single-crystal NiAl (with 1.5 at % Hf) joined to MM-247 using different filler metals (Cu foil, powder filler metal and electro-plated thin Cu film), and martensitic NiAl joined with martensitic NiTi using Cu foil and specially designed powder filler metals. In polycrystalline NiAl/Cu/Ni bonds, the mechanism of isothermal solidification is considered. Changes in the microstructure of the bond centerline due to element redistribution are discussed. The precipitation of both L1sb2 type gammasp' and B2 type beta phase at the joint centerline is investigated. The formation of martensitic L1sb0 type NiAl is also examined. The mechanical properties of the joints are investigated using shear strength and microhardness tests. In TLP bonding of polycrystalline NiAl with MM-247, both the epitaxial growth of the beta phase NiAl into the joint and the formation of non-epitaxial beta-phase layers are considered. The formation of second-phases, including the gammasp' phase, carbides, and sigma-phase intermetallics is also examined. Bond-line and adjacent substrate microstructures for the NiAl/Cu/MM-247 bonds are correlated with joint mechanical properties determined by room temperature shear testing. Single-crystal NiAl (1.5 at % Hf)/Cu/MM-247 joints are examined and compared with polycrystalline NiAl/Cu/MM247 joints. The effect of Hf on the microstructure of joints is investigated. The influence of different filler metals (i.e., wide-gap powder filler metal and electro-plated thin film filler metal) on the joining process is also

  19. Confinement effect on the adsorption from a binary liquid system near liquid/liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rother, Gernot; Woywod, Dirk; Schoen, Martin; Findenegg, Gerhard H.

    2004-06-01

    The preferential adsorption of one component of a binary system at the inner surfaces of mesoporous silica glasses was studied in a wide composition range at temperatures close to liquid/liquid phase separation. Confinement effects on the adsorption were investigated by using three controlled-pore glass (CPG-10) materials of different mean pore size (10 to 50 nm). For the experimental system (2-butoxyethanol+water), which exhibits an upper miscibility gap, strong preferential adsorption of water occurs, as the coexistence curve is approached at bulk compositions, at which water is the minority component. In this strong adsorption regime the area-related surface excess amount of adsorbed water decreases with decreasing pore width, while the shift in the volume-related mean composition of the pore liquid shows an opposite trend, i.e., greatest deviation from bulk composition occurring in the most narrow pores. A simple mean-field lattice model of a liquid mixture confined by parallel walls is adopted to rationalize these experimental findings. This model reproduces the main findings of the confinement effect on the adsorption near liquid/liquid phase separation.

  20. Detecting phase transitions and crossovers in Hubbard models using the fidelity susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Lei; Werner, Philipp

    2016-12-01

    A generalized version of the fidelity susceptibility of single-band and multiorbital Hubbard models is systematically studied using single-site dynamical mean-field theory in combination with a hybridization expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver. We find that the fidelity susceptibility is extremely sensitive to changes in the state of the system. It can be used as a numerically inexpensive tool to detect and characterize a broad range of phase transitions and crossovers in Hubbard models, including (orbital-selective) Mott metal-insulator transitions, magnetic phase transitions, high-spin to low-spin transitions, Fermi-liquid to non-Fermi-liquid crossovers, and spin-freezing crossovers.