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Sample records for liquid rocket combustion

  1. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  2. Engine-Level Simulation of Liquid Rocket Combustion Instabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2013-July 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engine -Level Simulation of Liquid Rocket Combustion Instabilities...ABSTRACT A numerical investigation into combustion instability in liquid rocket engines is undertaken using large eddy simulations (LES). HPCMP resources...have been applied to demonstrate the ability to simulate combustion instability in liquid rocket engines and to gain further understanding of these

  3. Combustion dynamics in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A chemical analysis of the emission and absorption spectra in the combustion chamber of a nitrogen tetroxide/aerozine-50 rocket engine was conducted. Measurements were made under conditions of preignition, ignition, and post combustion operating periods. The cause of severe ignition overpressures sporadically observed during the vacuum startup of the Apollo reaction control system engine was investigated. The extent to which residual propellants or condensed intermediate reaction products remain after the engine has been operated in a pulse mode duty cycle was determined.

  4. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  5. Scaling of Performance in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Combustion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses scaling of combustion and combustion performance in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. In development of new combustors, comparisons are often made between predicted performance in a new combustor and measured performance in another combustor with different geometric and thermodynamic characteristics. Without careful interpretation of some key features, the comparison can be misinterpreted and erroneous information used in the design of the new device. This paper provides a review of this performance comparison, including a brief review of the initial liquid rocket scaling research conducted during the 1950s and 1960s, a review of the typical performance losses encountered and how they scale, a description of the typical scaling procedures used in development programs today, and finally a review of several historical development programs to see what insight they can bring to the questions at hand.

  6. Liquid rocket engine combustion stabilization devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Combustion instability, which results from a coupling of the combustion process and the fluid dynamics of the engine system, was investigated. The design of devices which reduce coupling (combustion chamber baffles) and devices which increase damping (acoustic absorbers) are described. Included in the discussion are design criteria and recommended practices, structural and mechanical design, thermal control, baffle geometry, baffle/engine interactions, acoustic damping analysis, and absorber configurations.

  7. Combustion instability analysis for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Chen, C. P.; Ziebarth, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The multi-dimensional numerical model has been developed to analyze the nonlinear combustion instabilities in liquid-fueled engines. The present pressure-based approach can handle the implicit pressure-velocity coupling in a non-iterative way. The additional scalar conservation equations for the chemical species, the energy, and the turbulent transport quantities can be handled by the same predictor-corrector sequences. This method is time-accurate and it can be applicable to the all-speed, transient, multi-phase, and reacting flows. Special emphasis is given to the acoustic/vaporization interaction which may act as the crucial rate-controlling mechanism in the liquid-fueled rocket engines. The subcritical vaporization is modeled to account for the effects of variable thermophysical properties, non-unitary Lewis number in the gas-film, the Stefan flow effect, and the effect of transient liquid heating. The test cases include the one-dimenisonal fast transient non-reacting and reacting flows, and the multi-dimensional combustion instabilities encountered in the liquid-fueled rocket thrust chamber. The present numerical model successfully demonstrated the capability to simulate the fast transient spray-combusting flows in terms of the limiting-cycle amplitude phenomena, correspondence between combustion and acoustics, and the steep-fronted wave and flame propagation. The investigated parameters include the spray initial conditions, air-fuel mixture ratios, and the engine geometry. Stable and unstable operating conditions are found for the liquid-fueled combustors. Under certain conditions, the limiting cycle behavior of the combusting flowfields is obtained. The numerical results indicate that the spray vaporization processes play an important role in releasing thermal energy and driving the combustion instability.

  8. Comprehensive modeling of a liquid rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, P.-Y.; Fisher, S.; Chang, Y. M.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model for the simulation of detailed three-phase combustion flows inside a liquid rocket combustion chamber is presented. The three phases involved are: a multispecies gaseous phase, an incompressible liquid phase, and a particulate droplet phase. The gas and liquid phases are continuum described in an Eulerian fashion. A two-phase solution capability for these continuum media is obtained through a marriage of the Implicit Continuous Eulerian (ICE) technique and the fractional Volume of Fluid (VOF) free surface description method. On the other hand, the particulate phase is given a discrete treatment and described in a Lagrangian fashion. All three phases are hence treated rigorously. Semi-empirical physical models are used to describe all interphase coupling terms as well as the chemistry among gaseous components. Sample calculations using the model are given. The results show promising application to truly comprehensive modeling of complex liquid-fueled engine systems.

  9. JANNAF liquid rocket combustion instability panel research recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klem, Mark D.

    1990-01-01

    The Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) Liquid Rocket Combustion Instability Panel was formed in 1988, drawing its members from industry, academia, and government experts. The panel was charted to address the needs of near-term engine development programs and to make recommendations whose implementation would provide not only sufficient data but also the analysis capabilities to design stable and efficient engines. The panel was also chartered to make long-term recommendations toward developing mechanistic analysis models that would not be limited by design geometry or operating regime. These models would accurately predict stability and thereby minimize the amount of subscale testing for anchoring. The panel has held workshops on acoustic absorbing devices, combustion instability mechanisms, instability test hardware, and combustion instability computational methods. At these workshops, research projects that would meet the panel's charter were suggested. The JANNAF Liquid Rocket Combustion Instability Panel's conclusions about the work that needs to be done and recommendations on how to approach it, based on evaluation of the suggested research projects, are presented.

  10. JANNAF Liquid Rocket Combustion Instability Panel Research Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klem, Mark D.

    1990-01-01

    The Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) Liquid Rocket Combustion Instability Panel was formed in 1988, drawing its members from industry, academia, and government experts. The panel was chartered to address the needs of near-term engine development programs and to make recommendations whose implementation would provide not only sufficient data but also the analysis capabilities to design stable and efficient engines. The panel was also chartered to make long-term recommendations toward developing mechanistic analysis models that would not be limited by design geometry or operating regime. These models would accurately predict stability and thereby minimize the amount of subscale testing for anchoring. The panel has held workshops on acoustic absorbing devices and combustion instability computational methods. At these workshops, research projects that would meet the panel's charter were suggested. The panel's conclusions about the work that needs to be done and recommendations on how to approach it, based on evaluation of the suggested research projects, are presented.

  11. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Spontaneous Stability and Rough Combustion Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Casiano, Matthew; Fischbach, Sean; Hulka, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid rocket engine combustion stability assessments are traditionally broken into three categories: dynamic stability, spontaneous stability, and rough combustion. This work focuses on comparing the spontaneous stability and rough combustion assessments for several liquid engine programs. The techniques used are those developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator program. Stability assessment data from the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD), FASTRAC, and Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) programs are compared against previously processed J-2X Gas Generator data. Prior metrics for spontaneous stability assessments are updated based on the compilation of all data sets.

  12. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Spontaneous Stability and Rough Combustion Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Casiano, Matthew; Fischbach, Sean; Hulka, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid rocket engine combustion stability assessments are traditionally broken into three categories: dynamic stability, spontaneous stability, and rough combustion. This work focuses on comparing the spontaneous stability and rough combustion assessments for several liquid engine programs. The techniques used are those developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator program. Stability assessment data from the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD), FASTRAC, and Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) programs are compared against previously processed J-2X Gas Generator data. Prior metrics for spontaneous stability assessments are updated based on the compilation of all data sets.

  13. Combustion stability with baffles, absorbers and velocity sensitive combustion. [liquid propellant rocket combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical and computational techniques were developed to predict the stability behavior of liquid propellant rocket combustors using damping devices such as acoustic liners, slot absorbers, and injector face baffles. Models were developed to determine the frequency and decay rate of combustor oscillations, the spatial and temporal pressure waveforms, and the stability limits in terms of combustion response model parameters.

  14. Liquid rocket combustion instability analysis by CFD methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenda, J. M.; Venkateswaran, S.; Merkle, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Combustion instability in liquid rocket engines is simulated computationally by using a simple two-parameter model for the combustion response function. The objectives of the study are to assess the capabilities of CFD algorithms for instability studies and to investigate the response to parametric effects such as bombs and distributed combustion. Results indicate that numerical solutions of high accuracy can be obtained if a sufficient number of grid points are used per wavelength of the disturbance. The short-term response to bombs or pulses triggers a large number of modes in the combustor whose faithful resolution requires highly dense grids, although there is evidence that correct long-term solutions can be obtained even if all the short-term frequencies are not resolved. Long-term responses to pulses are shown to decay to the most unstable mode in small amplitude cases, and to exhibit limit cycles in large amplitude cases. Comparison of distributed with concentrated heat release indicates the former is more stable for given values of the combustion response parameters, and that the distributed heat release gives rise to higher frequency disturbances. Wave steepening is observed in the solutions, but its effect is less pronounced in multidimensional waves than in one-dimensional waves.

  15. On Nonlinear Combustion Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    All liquid propellant rocket instability calculations in current use have limited value in the predictive sense and serve mainly as a correlating framework for the available data sets. The well-known n-t model first introduced by Crocco and Cheng in 1956 is still used as the primary analytical tool of this type. A multitude of attempts to establish practical analytical methods have achieved only limited success. These methods usually produce only stability boundary maps that are of little use in making critical design decisions in new motor development programs. Recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of combustion instability in solid propellant rockets"' provides a firm foundation for a new approach to prediction, diagnosis, and correction of the closely related problems in liquid motor instability. For predictive tools to be useful in the motor design process, they must have the capability to accurately determine: 1) time evolution of the pressure oscillations and limit amplitude, 2) critical triggering pulse amplitude, and 3) unsteady heat transfer rates at injector surfaces and chamber walls. The method described in this paper relates these critical motor characteristics directly to system design parameters. Inclusion of mechanisms such as wave steepening, vorticity production and transport, and unsteady detonation wave phenomena greatly enhance the representation of key features of motor chamber oscillatory behavior. The basic theoretical model is described and preliminary computations are compared to experimental data. A plan to develop the new predictive method into a comprehensive analysis tool is also described.

  16. Techniques for Liquid Rocket Combustion Spontaneous Stability and Rough Combustion Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. J.; Giacomoni, C.; Casiano, M. J.; Fischbach, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents techniques for liquid rocket engine combustion stability assessments with respect to spontaneous stability and rough combustion. Techniques covering empirical parameter extraction, which were established in prior works, are applied for three additional programs: the F-1 Gas Generator (F1GG) component test program, the RS-84 preburner component test program, and the Marshall Integrated Test Rig (MITR) program. Stability assessment parameters from these programs are compared against prior established spontaneous stability metrics and updates are identified. Also, a procedure for comparing measured with predicted mode shapes is presented, based on an extension of the Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC).

  17. Prediction of high frequency combustion instability in liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Chen, C. P.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Chen, Y. S.

    1992-01-01

    The present use of a numerical model developed for the prediction of high-frequency combustion stabilities in liquid propellant rocket engines focuses on (1) the overall behavior of nonlinear combustion instabilities (2) the effects of acoustic oscillations on the fuel-droplet vaporization and combustion process in stable and unstable engine operating conditions, oscillating flowfields, and liquid-fuel trajectories during combustion instability, and (3) the effects of such design parameters as inlet boundary conditions, initial spray conditions, and baffle length. The numerical model has yielded predictions of the tangential-mode combustion instability; baffle length and droplet size variations are noted to have significant effects on engine stability.

  18. Prediction of high frequency combustion instability in liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Chen, C. P.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Chen, Y. S.

    1992-07-01

    The present use of a numerical model developed for the prediction of high-frequency combustion stabilities in liquid propellant rocket engines focuses on (1) the overall behavior of nonlinear combustion instabilities (2) the effects of acoustic oscillations on the fuel-droplet vaporization and combustion process in stable and unstable engine operating conditions, oscillating flowfields, and liquid-fuel trajectories during combustion instability, and (3) the effects of such design parameters as inlet boundary conditions, initial spray conditions, and baffle length. The numerical model has yielded predictions of the tangential-mode combustion instability; baffle length and droplet size variations are noted to have significant effects on engine stability.

  19. Performance and Stability Analyses of Rocket Combustion Devices Using Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James R.; Jones, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in flight-qualified engine systems, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented programs with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations on these programs. This paper summarizes these analyses. Test and analysis results of impinging and coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants are included. Several cases with gaseous methane are included for reference. Several different thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element like-on-like and swirl coax element injectors tested at NASA MSFC, and a unielement chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods.

  20. Performance and Stability Analyses of Rocket Combustion Devices Using Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James R.; Jones, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in flight-qualified engine systems, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented programs with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations on these programs. This paper summarizes these analyses. Test and analysis results of impinging and coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants are included. Several cases with gaseous methane are included for reference. Several different thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element like-on-like and swirl coax element injectors tested at NASA MSFC, and a unielement chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods.

  1. Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

  2. Progress and Challenges in Liquid Rocket Combustion Stability Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    P.R. Spalart , W.H. Jou, M. Strelets, and S.R. Allmaras . Comments on the feasibility of LES for wings on a hybrid RANS-LES approach. In 1st U.S. Air...anchor the predictions. A further issue is the importance of turbulence and combustion phenomena. Combustion instability involves inherently unsteady uid...combustion typically occurs at sub-grid scales, appropriate turbulent combustion closure models may be needed for capturing the relationship between the

  3. Liquid propellant rockets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipprey, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    A brief overview of the state of knowledge in liquid rocket technology is presented and examples are provided of instances where some fundamental principles of chemistry, fluid mechanics, and mathematics can be applied. A liquid propellant rocket classification is discussed together with rocket system performance, applications for liquid propellants, the effective exhaust velocity, aspects of simplified nozzle expansion, questions about theoretical propellant performance, the effect of chamber pressure on equilibrium performance, and the kinetic recombination in nozzles. Details of propellant combustion are examined, giving attention to propellant injection, evaporation-controlled combustion, combustion instability, and monopropellant decomposition.

  4. A Unified Approach on Combustion Instability in Cryogenic Liquid Rockets (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-08

    Combustion Instability in Cryogenic Liquid Rockets (Preprint) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Bruce Chehroudi (AFRL/RZSA...AIAA-2009-237   A Unified Approach on Combustion Instability in Cryogenic Liquid...nature/strength between the chamber acoustics and injectors or near-injector processes in cryogenic liquid rocket engines. II. Discussion In Davis

  5. Liquid rocket combustion computer model with distributed energy release. DER computer program documentation and user's guide, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combs, L. P.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing rocket engine performance was developed. The program is concerned with the formation, distribution, flow, and combustion of liquid sprays and combustion product gases in conventional rocket combustion chambers. The capabilities of the program to determine the combustion characteristics of the rocket engine are described. Sample data code sheets show the correct sequence and formats for variable values and include notes concerning options to bypass the input of certain data. A seperate list defines the variables and indicates their required dimensions.

  6. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Shiwa, M.; Moriya, S.

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber.

  7. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines.

    PubMed

    He, D F; Zhang, Y Z; Shiwa, M; Moriya, S

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber.

  8. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  9. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  10. Combustion performance of bipropellant liquid rocket engine combustors with fuel-impingement cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tsung Leo; Chiang, Wei-Tang; Jang, Shyh-Dihng

    1995-05-01

    In order to obtain an accurate combustion analyses which are important in the thruster design of modern advanced liquid rocket engine, flow analysis should be conducted from the injector phase down to the propulsive nozzle throat. Thus, in the present study, flow analysis for the axisymmetric thrust chamber of an OMV(exp 3) installed with a pintle-type ring-shaped injector and a conical convergent nozzle is conducted. Liquid monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) storable bipropellants are used as fuel and oxidizer sources. An optimum injected fuel and oxidizer droplet-size combination is proposed. Finally, the results obtained are presented.

  11. Combustion performance of bipropellant liquid rocket engine combustors with fuel-impingement cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, T.L.; Chiang, W.; Jang, S.

    1995-05-01

    In order to obtain an accurate combustion analyses which are important in the thruster design of modern advanced liquid rocket engine, flow analysis should be conducted from the injector phase down to the propulsive nozzle throat. Thus, in the present study, flow analysis for the axisymmetric thrust chamber of an OMV(exp 3) installed with a pintle-type ring-shaped injector and a conical convergent nozzle is conducted. Liquid monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) storable bipropellants are used as fuel and oxidizer sources. An optimum injected fuel and oxidizer droplet-size combination is proposed. Finally, the results obtained are presented. 4 refs.

  12. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Stability Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Lee, Erik; Hulka, James R.; Casiano, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The J2X Gas Generator engine design specifications include dynamic, spontaneous, and broadband combustion stability requirements. These requirements are verified empirically based high frequency chamber pressure measurements and analyses. Dynamic stability is determined with the dynamic pressure response due to an artificial perturbation of the combustion chamber pressure (bomb testing), and spontaneous and broadband stability are determined from the dynamic pressure responses during steady operation starting at specified power levels. J2X Workhorse Gas Generator testing included bomb tests with multiple hardware configurations and operating conditions, including a configuration used explicitly for engine verification test series. This work covers signal processing techniques developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to help assess engine design stability requirements. Dynamic stability assessments were performed following both the CPIA 655 guidelines and a MSFC in-house developed statistical-based approach. The statistical approach was developed to better verify when the dynamic pressure amplitudes corresponding to a particular frequency returned back to pre-bomb characteristics. This was accomplished by first determining the statistical characteristics of the pre-bomb dynamic levels. The pre-bomb statistical characterization provided 95% coverage bounds; these bounds were used as a quantitative measure to determine when the post-bomb signal returned to pre-bomb conditions. The time for post-bomb levels to acceptably return to pre-bomb levels was compared to the dominant frequency-dependent time recommended by CPIA 655. Results for multiple test configurations, including stable and unstable configurations, were reviewed. Spontaneous stability was assessed using two processes: 1) characterization of the ratio of the peak response amplitudes to the excited chamber acoustic mode amplitudes and 2) characterization of the variability of the peak response

  13. Spread Across Liquids: The World's First Microgravity Combustion Experiment on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Spread Across Liquids (SAL) experiment characterizes how flames spread over liquid pools in a low-gravity environment in comparison to test data at Earth's gravity and with numerical models. The modeling and experimental data provide a more complete understanding of flame spread, an area of textbook interest, and add to our knowledge about on-orbit and Earthbound fire behavior and fire hazards. The experiment was performed on a sounding rocket to obtain the necessary microgravity period. Such crewless sounding rockets provide a comparatively inexpensive means to fly very complex, and potentially hazardous, experiments and perform reflights at a very low additional cost. SAL was the first sounding-rocket-based, microgravity combustion experiment in the world. It was expected that gravity would affect ignition susceptibility and flame spread through buoyant convection in both the liquid pool and the gas above the pool. Prior to these sounding rocket tests, however, it was not clear whether the fuel would ignite readily and whether a flame would be sustained in microgravity. It also was not clear whether the flame spread rate would be faster or slower than in Earth's gravity.

  14. The prediction of nonlinear three dimensional combustion instability in liquid rockets with conventional nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, E. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical technique is developed to solve nonlinear three-dimensional, transverse and axial combustion instability problems associated with liquid-propellant rocket motors. The Method of Weighted Residuals is used to determine the nonlinear stability characteristics of a cylindrical combustor with uniform injection of propellants at one end and a conventional DeLaval nozzle at the other end. Crocco's pressure sensitive time-lag model is used to describe the unsteady combustion process. The developed model predicts the transient behavior and nonlinear wave shapes as well as limit-cycle amplitudes and frequencies typical of unstable motor operation. The limit-cycle amplitude increases with increasing sensitivity of the combustion process to pressure oscillations. For transverse instabilities, calculated pressure waveforms exhibit sharp peaks and shallow minima, and the frequency of oscillation is within a few percent of the pure acoustic mode frequency. For axial instabilities, the theory predicts a steep-fronted wave moving back and forth along the combustor.

  15. Self-oscillations of an unstable fuel combustion in the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    The form of the self-oscillations of a vibrating combustion of a fuel in the combustion chamber of a liquidpropellant rocket engine, caused by the fuel-combustion lag and the heat release, was determined. The character of change in these self-oscillations with increase in the time of the fuel-combustion lag was investigated.

  16. Experimental determination of the turbulence in a liquid rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, J.; Smith, L. O.; Partus, F. P.

    1972-01-01

    The intensity of turbulence and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient for a liquid rocket combustion chamber were determined experimentally using the tracer gas diffusion method. The results indicate that the turbulent diffusion process can be adequately modeled by the one-dimensional Taylor theory; however, the numerical values show significant disagreement with previously accepted values. The intensity of turbulence is higher by a factor of about two, while the Lagrangian correlation coefficient which was assumed to be unity in the past is much less than unity.

  17. Control-oriented modeling of combustion and flow processes in liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentsman, Joseph; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Wilcutts, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a control-oriented model of the flow, reaction, and transport processes in liquid propellant rocket combustion chambers, based on the multicomponent conservation laws of gas dynamics. This model provides a framework for the inclusion of detailed chemical kinetic relations, viscous and other dissipative effects, a variety of actuators and sensors, as well as process and measurement disturbances. In addition to its potential usefulness to the designer in understanding the dynamical complexity of the system and the sources of model uncertainty, the model provides a rigorous basis for control system design. An appraisal of current and feasible actuators and sensors, and their mathematical representation are included.

  18. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines require materials that can meet high temperatures while resisting the corrosive oxidation-reduction reaction of combustion known as blanching, the main cause of engine failure. A project was initiated at NASA-Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) to combine three existing technologies to build and demonstrate an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber that would provide a 100 mission life. Technology developed in microgravity research to build cartridges for space furnaces was utilized to vacuum plasma spray (VPS) a functional gradient coating on the hot wall of the combustion liner as one continuous operation, eliminating any bondline between the coating and the liner. The coating was NiCrAlY, developed previously as durable protective coatings on space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine blades. A thermal model showed that 0.03 in. NiCrAlY applied to the hot wall of the combustion liner would reduce the hot wall temperature 200 F, a 20% reduction, for longer life. Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy, which was developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), and which possesses excellent high temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability, was utilized as the liner material in place of NARloy-Z. The Cu-8Cr-4Nb material exhibits better mechanical properties at 650 C (1200 F) than NARloy-Z does at 538 C (1000 F). VPS formed Cu-8Cr-4Nb combustion chamber liners with a protective NiCrAlY functional gradient coating have been hot fire tested, successfully demonstrating a durable coating for the first time. Hot fire tests along with tensile and low cycle fatigue properties of the VPS formed combustion chamber liners and witness panel specimens are discussed.

  19. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines require materials that can meet high temperatures while resisting the corrosive oxidation-reduction reaction of combustion known as blanching, the main cause of engine failure. A project was initiated at NASA-Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) to combine three existing technologies to build and demonstrate an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber that would provide a 100 mission life. Technology developed in microgravity research to build cartridges for space furnaces was utilized to vacuum plasma spray (VPS) a functional gradient coating on the hot wall of the combustion liner as one continuous operation, eliminating any bondline between the coating and the liner. The coating was NiCrAlY, developed previously as durable protective coatings on space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine blades. A thermal model showed that 0.03 in. NiCrAlY applied to the hot wall of the combustion liner would reduce the hot wall temperature 200 F, a 20% reduction, for longer life. Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy, which was developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), and which possesses excellent high temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability, was utilized as the liner material in place of NARloy-Z. The Cu-8Cr-4Nb material exhibits better mechanical properties at 650 C (1200 F) than NARloy-Z does at 538 C (1000 F). VPS formed Cu-8Cr-4Nb combustion chamber liners with a protective NiCrAlY functional gradient coating have been hot fire tested, successfully demonstrating a durable coating for the first time. Hot fire tests along with tensile and low cycle fatigue properties of the VPS formed combustion chamber liners and witness panel specimens are discussed.

  20. Baseline Computational Fluid Dynamics Methodology for Longitudinal-Mode Liquid-Propellant Rocket Combustion Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method for the analysis of longitudinal-mode liquid rocket combustion instability has been developed based on the unsteady, quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations where the combustion process source terms were introduced through the incorporation of a two-zone, linearized representation: (1) A two-parameter collapsed combustion zone at the injector face, and (2) a two-parameter distributed combustion zone based on a Lagrangian treatment of the propellant spray. The unsteady Euler equations in inhomogeneous form retain full hyperbolicity and are integrated implicitly in time using second-order, high-resolution, characteristic-based, flux-differencing spatial discretization with Roe-averaging of the Jacobian matrix. This method was initially validated against an analytical solution for nonreacting, isentropic duct acoustics with specified admittances at the inflow and outflow boundaries. For small amplitude perturbations, numerical predictions for the amplification coefficient and oscillation period were found to compare favorably with predictions from linearized small-disturbance theory as long as the grid exceeded a critical density (100 nodes/wavelength). The numerical methodology was then exercised on a generic combustor configuration using both collapsed and distributed combustion zone models with a short nozzle admittance approximation for the outflow boundary. In these cases, the response parameters were varied to determine stability limits defining resonant coupling onset.

  1. Experimental investigation of high-frequency combustion instabilities in liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richecoeur, F.; Ducruix, S.; Scouflaire, P.; Candel, S.

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency instabilities in liquid propellant rocket engines are experimentally investigated in a model scale research facility. Liquid oxygen and gaseous methane are injected in the combustion chamber at 0.9 MPa through three coaxial injectors vertically aligned. High-amplitude transverse pressure fluctuations are generated in the chamber at frequencies above 1 kHz by a rotating toothed wheel actuator which periodically blocks an auxiliary lateral nozzle. The chamber eigenmodes are identified in a first stage by examining the response of the system to a linear frequency sweep. In a second stage the chamber is excited at the frequency corresponding to the first transverse (1T) mode. The effect of the pressure mode on combustion is observed with intensified and high-speed cameras. Photo-multipliers and pressure sensors are also used to characterize the system behavior and examine phase relations between the corresponding signals. Flame structure modifications observed for specific injection conditions correspond to a strong coupling between acoustics and combustion which notably modifies the flow dynamics, augments the flame expansion rate and enhances heat transfer to the wall.

  2. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with

  3. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with

  4. Development and Hotfire Testing of Additively Manufactured Copper Combustion Chambers for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Greene, Sandy; Protz, Chris

    2017-01-01

    NASA and industry partners are working towards fabrication process development to reduce costs and schedules associated with manufacturing liquid rocket engine components with the goal of reducing overall mission costs. One such technique being evaluated is powder-bed fusion or selective laser melting (SLM), commonly referred to as additive manufacturing (AM). The NASA Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) program was designed to develop processes and material characterization for GRCop-84 (a NASA Glenn Research Center-developed copper, chrome, niobium alloy) commensurate with powder bed AM, evaluate bimetallic deposition, and complete testing of a full scale combustion chamber. As part of this development, the process has been transferred to industry partners to enable a long-term supply chain of monolithic copper combustion chambers. To advance the processes further and allow for optimization with multiple materials, NASA is also investigating the feasibility of bimetallic AM chambers. In addition to the LCUSP program, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has completed a series of development programs and hot-fire tests to demonstrate SLM GRCop-84 and other AM techniques. MSFC’s efforts include a 4,000 pounds-force thrust liquid oxygen/methane (LOX/CH4) combustion chamber. Small thrust chambers for 1,200 pounds-force LOX/hydrogen (H2) applications have also been designed and fabricated with SLM GRCop-84. Similar chambers have also completed development with an Inconel 625 jacket bonded to the GRCop-84 material, evaluating direct metal deposition (DMD) laser- and arc-based techniques. The same technologies for these lower thrust applications are being applied to 25,000-35,000 pounds-force main combustion chamber (MCC) designs. This paper describes the design, development, manufacturing and testing of these numerous combustion chambers, and the associated lessons learned throughout their design and development processes.

  5. Computational and experimental investigations of carbon-ceramic composite materials thermochemical resistance in combustion products of liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V. V.; Volkov, N. N.; Volkova, L. I.; Kondratenko, V. I.; Popov, V. A.; Tsatsuev, S. M.

    2009-09-01

    Computational and experimental investigations of thermochemical resistance of carbon-ceramic composites in the combustion products of liquid rocket engine (LRE) are presented. The tests with model extensions made of the composite material (CM) were performed. The test time was about 200 s. The maximal temperature of the material fire surface was 1600 K. Physical and numerical model of silicon carbide destruction was developed.

  6. The Effect of Rapid Liquid-Phase Reactions on Injector Design and Combustion in Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elverum, Gerard W., Jr.; Staudhammer, Peter

    1959-01-01

    Data are presented indicating the rates and magnitudes of energy released by the liquid-phase reactions of various propellant combinations. The data show that this energy release can contribute significantly to the rate of vaporization of the incoming propellants and thus aid the combustion process. Nevertheless, very low performances were obtained in rocket motors with conventional impinging-jet injectors when highly reactive systems such as N104-N2H4, were employed. A possible explanation for this low performance is that the initial reactions of such systems are so rapid that liquid-phase mixing is inhibited. Evidence for such an effect is presented in a series of color photographs of open flames using various injector elements. Based on these studies, some requirements are suggested for injector elements using highly reactive propellants. Experimental results are presented of motor tests using injector elements in which some of these requirements are met through the use of a set of concentric tubes. These tests, carried out at thrust levels of 40 to 800 lb per element, demonstrated combustion efficiencies of up to 98% based on equilibrium characteristic velocity values. Results are also presented for tests made with impinging-jet and splash-plate injectors for comparison.

  7. Development of Non-Combustible Rocket Engine by Using Explosive Boiling of Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanami, Osamu; Suzuki, Tomoya; Honda, Itsuro; Kawashima, Yousuke

    Recently, the activity of the development of a small rocket in universities has been enhancing. Focusing on safety, we have been developing a small rocket engine using two liquids (LN2 and H2O) without combustion process. In order to improve reliability and performance of this engine, we developed the engine without a valve in a LN2 passage. In this engine system, initial water temperature and GN2 pressure were changed within the ranges of 100-170°C and 1.0-2.0 MPa for reducing weight of water and getting higher performance. Thrust was increased with increasing the initial water temperature because the flow rate of H2O was decreased with increasing the water temperature. In addition, thrust was increased with decreasing the GN2 pressure under these experimental conditions. As a result, the ratio of LN2 and H2O weight could be reduced from 3:4 to 1:1. The relation between the mixing chamber pressure and an initial water temperature was very important for reducing of amount of fuel.

  8. Scaling a single element combustor to replicate combustion instability modes of a liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Brian A.

    This research evaluated a method of scaling a single element sub-scale combustor to match the combustion instability modes of a full-scale liquid rocket engine. The experiments used a shear-coaxial injector in an atmospheric chamber using gaseous oxygen and a heated gaseous methane/nitrogen fuel mixture. The flow conditions matched the full-scale equivalence ratio, propellant velocities and propellant volumetric flow rates. The first set of experiments empirically determined the effect of chamber diameter on chamber temperature. The results were used to calculate the dimensions of the sub-scaled combustion chamber that would match the transverse frequencies of the full-scale engine. The scaled chamber was used in two sets of experiments. The stationary tests placed the injector at the center of the chamber and 0.25 in. from the wall. The centered test displayed evidence of coupling between the 1L chamber mode and the injector oxygen post at 885 Hz. Injector coupling was also observed during experiments with the full-scale rocket engine. With the injector 0.25 in. from the wall, the average chamber temperature dropped about 350°C from the centered test. As a consequence, the frequencies of the transverse modes were lower than the full-scale values. No major difference was found in this research between the stable and unstable set points of the full-scale engine. A translating stage was used to evaluate where various chamber modes appear as a function of injector location. The results show that the 1L chamber mode is present at every location and transverse modes appear as the injector moves near the wall.

  9. Engine-Level Simulation of Liquid Rocket Combustion Instabilities: Transcritical Combustion Simulations in Single Injector Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    NUMBER 33SP07KR 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Conference paper for the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program 2012 Users Group Conference, New Orleans, LA, 18-22 June...unlimited 1 during the rocket flight, many validation ground tests have to be performed during the design and the production of the engine. For

  10. Lagrangian modelling of turbulent spray combustion under liquid rocket engine conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomet, Laurent; Robin, Vincent; Mura, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    In the field of liquid rocket propulsion, the use of computational design tools, such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers, may provide a great deal of help to proceed with the primary design choice. Considering the complexity of rocket engine geometries, as well as associated fluid flow conditions, the use of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) numerical simulations remains very popular. Important modelling efforts are therefore still required to provide reliable computational models able to describe the complex interaction that takes place between turbulence and chemistry in such cryogenic high-speed flows. The present manuscript reports the results of some recent investigations conducted in this field. The modelling analysis relies on a Lagrangian framework, the salient features of which consist in approximating the Lagrangian path in a reduced composition space made up of the mixture fraction variable, i.e. a conserved scalar introduced to represent the variations of composition, and a progress variable, i.e. a reactive scalar to follow the departures from chemical equilibrium. The retained methodology allows to presume the joint probability density function of the two scalar fields without invoking the assumption of statistical independence between them. Equivalence ratio fluctuations induced by the vaporization of the liquid phase are considered as additional sources terms appearing in the transport equation of the mixture fraction variance. The transport of the corresponding mean scalar dissipation rate (SDR), which is a key quantity in the corresponding closure, is also affected by the vaporization processes. The proposed model has been implemented into the U-RANS CFD code N3S_Natur, while the liquid phase is described using a Lagrangian module. The capabilities of the computation model are evaluated through a detailed comparison with the experimental databases gathered on the ONERA Mascotte test bench. The corresponding test rig consists of a

  11. Acoustic tuning of gas liquid scheme injectors for acoustic damping in a combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Chae Hoon; Park, I.-Sun; Kim, Seong-Ku; Jip Kim, Hong

    2007-07-01

    In a combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine, acoustic fine-tuning of gas-liquid scheme injectors is studied numerically for acoustic stability by adopting a linear acoustic analysis. Injector length and blockage ratio at gas inlet are adjusted for fine-tuning. First, acoustic behavior in the combustor with a single injector is investigated and acoustic-damping effect of the injector is evaluated for cold condition by the quantitative parameter of damping factor as a function of injector length. From the numerical results, it is found that the injector can play a significant role in acoustic damping when it is tuned finely. The optimum tuning-length of the injector to maximize the damping capacity corresponds to half of a full wavelength of the first longitudinal overtone mode traveling in the injector with the acoustic frequency intended for damping in the chamber. In baffled chamber, the optimum lengths of the injector are calculated as a function of baffle length for both cold and hot conditions. Next, in the combustor with numerous resonators, peculiar acoustic coupling between a combustion chamber and injectors is observed. As the injector length approaches a half-wavelength, the new injector-coupled acoustic mode shows up and thereby, the acoustic-damping effect of the tuned injectors is appreciably degraded. And, damping factor maintains a near-constant value with blockage ratio and then, decreases rapidly. Blockage ratio affects also acoustic damping and should be considered for acoustic tuning.

  12. An Investigation of High-frequency Combustion Oscillations in Liquid-propellant Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantler, Raymond L; Tischler, Adelbert O; Massa, Rudolph V

    1953-01-01

    An experimental investigation of high-frequency combustion oscillations (screaming) was conducted with a 100-pound-thrust acid-hydrocarbon rocket engine and a 500-pound-thrust oxygen-fuel rocket engine. The oscillation frequencies could be correlated as a linear function of the parameter C/L, where C is the experimentally measured characteristic velocity and L is the combustion-chamber length. The tendency of the engines to scream increased as chamber length was increased. With engine configurations that normally had a low efficiency, screaming resulted in increased performance; at the same time, a five to tenfold increase in heat-transfer rate occurred. It was possible, however, to achieve good performance without screaming.

  13. Photographic Study of Combustion in a Rocket Engine I : Variation in Combustion of Liquid Oxygen and Gasoline with Seven Methods of Propellant Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellman, Donald R; Humphrey, Jack C

    1948-01-01

    Motion pictures at camera speeds up to 3000 frames per second were taken of the combustion of liquid oxygen and gasoline in a 100-pound-thrust rocket engine. The engine consisted of thin contour and injection plates clamped between two clear plastic sheets forming a two-dimensional engine with a view of the entire combustion chamber and nozzle. A photographic investigation was made of the effect of seven methods of propellant injection on the uniformity of combustion. From the photographs, it was found that the flame front extended almost to the faces of the injectors with most of the injection methods, all the injection systems resulted in a considerable nonuniformity of combustion, and luminosity rapidly decreased in the divergent part of the nozzle. Pressure vibration records indicated combustion vibrations that approximately corresponded to the resonant frequencies of the length and the thickness of the chamber. The combustion temperature divided by the molecular weight of the combustion gases as determined from the combustion photographs was about 50 to 70 percent of the theoretical value.

  14. Turbulence in a gaseous hydrogen-liquid oxygen rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebas, J.; Tou, P.; Ohara, J.

    1975-01-01

    The intensity of turbulence and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient for a LOX-GH2 rocket combustion chamber was determined from experimental measurements of tracer gas diffusion. A combination of Taylor's turbulent diffusion theory and a numerical method for solving the conservation equations of fluid mechanics was used to calculate these quantities. Taylor's theory was extended to consider the inhomogeneity of the turbulence field in the axial direction of the combustion chamber, and an exponential function was used to represent the Lagrangian correlation coefficient. The results indicate that the value of the intensity of turbulence reaches a maximum of 14% at a location about 7" downstream from the injector. The Lagrangian correlation coefficient associated with this value is given by the above exponential expression where alpha = 10,000/sec.

  15. Development of a three-phrase combustion code for modeling liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, P. Y.; Chang, Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional/axisymmetric program for the simulation of three-phase reactive flows is presented. The three phases are: a multiple-species gaseous phase, a single-species liquid phase, and a particulate droplet phase. The liquid and gaseous phases are described with continuous Eulerian equations, while the droplets are described in a discrete Lagrangian fashion. The three phases are fully coupled together. An atomization model, a multireaction chemical kinetics model, and a subgrid scale turbulence model completes the description of a general liquid/gas bipropellant combustion process. The code development criteria and qualitative features are highlighted.

  16. Development and Hot-fire Testing of Additively Manufactured Copper Combustion Chambers for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Greene, Sandy Elam; Protz, Christopher S.; Ellis, David L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Locci, Ivan E.

    2017-01-01

    NASA and industry partners are working towards fabrication process development to reduce costs and schedules associated with manufacturing liquid rocket engine components with the goal of reducing overall mission costs. One such technique being evaluated is powder-bed fusion or selective laser melting (SLM), commonly referred to as additive manufacturing (AM). The NASA Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) program was designed to develop processes and material characterization for GRCop-84 (a NASA Glenn Research Center-developed copper, chrome, niobium alloy) commensurate with powder-bed AM, evaluate bimetallic deposition, and complete testing of a full scale combustion chamber. As part of this development, the process has been transferred to industry partners to enable a long-term supply chain of monolithic copper combustion chambers. To advance the processes further and allow for optimization with multiple materials, NASA is also investigating the feasibility of bimetallic AM chambers. In addition to the LCUSP program, NASA has completed a series of development programs and hot-fire tests to demonstrate SLM GRCop-84 and other AM techniques. NASA's efforts include a 4K lbf thrust liquid oxygen/methane (LOX/CH4) combustion chamber and subscale thrust chambers for 1.2K lbf LOX/hydrogen (H2) applications that have been designed and fabricated with SLM GRCop-84. The same technologies for these lower thrust applications are being applied to 25-35K lbf main combustion chamber (MCC) designs. This paper describes the design, development, manufacturing and testing of these numerous combustion chambers, and the associated lessons learned throughout their design and development processes.

  17. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  18. Uncertainty Quantification of Non-linear Oscillation Triggering in a Multi-injector Liquid-propellant Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Pavel; Sideris, Athanasios; Sirignano, William

    2014-11-01

    We examine the non-linear dynamics of the transverse modes of combustion-driven acoustic instability in a liquid-propellant rocket engine. Triggering can occur, whereby small perturbations from mean conditions decay, while larger disturbances grow to a limit-cycle of amplitude that may compare to the mean pressure. For a deterministic perturbation, the system is also deterministic, computed by coupled finite-volume solvers at low computational cost for a single realization. The randomness of the triggering disturbance is captured by treating the injector flow rates, local pressure disturbances, and sudden acceleration of the entire combustion chamber as random variables. The combustor chamber with its many sub-fields resulting from many injector ports may be viewed as a multi-scale complex system wherein the developing acoustic oscillation is the emergent structure. Numerical simulation of the resulting stochastic PDE system is performed using the polynomial chaos expansion method. The overall probability of unstable growth is assessed in different regions of the parameter space. We address, in particular, the seven-injector, rectangular Purdue University experimental combustion chamber. In addition to the novel geometry, new features include disturbances caused by engine acceleration and unsteady thruster nozzle flow.

  19. Theoretical, Numerical, and Experimental Investigations of the Fundamental Processes That Drive Combustion Instabilities in Liquid Rocket Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-13

    AFOSR – THEORETICAL,  NUMERICAL , AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE FUNDAMENTAL PROCESSES THAT DRIVE COMBUSTION INSTABILITIES IN LIQUID ROCKET ...access for optical  diagnostics • Injector plate may be  interchanged to allow  investigation  of the driving  by different injection  systems...Preliminary Results • The “Full scale” LRE tested to  identify its instabilities (~170 Hz) • Investigated  the acoustics of the  ACLRES rig (~250 Hz) • The

  20. High-frequency combustion instability control through acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary for liquid rocket engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennewitz, John William

    model-predicted mode stability transition was consistent with experimental observations, supporting the premise that inlet acoustic modulation is a means to control high-frequency combustion instabilities. From the modal analysis, it may be deduced that the inlet impedance provides a damping mechanism for instability suppression. Combined, this work demonstrates the strategic application of acoustic modulation within an injector as a potential method to control high-frequency combustion instabilities for liquid rocket engine applications.

  1. Combustion Dynamics in Rockets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-30

    IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side it necessary and identify, by block number) Solid propellant combustion; Aluminum...continued on the behavior of aluminum and other nonvolatile ingredients .: in the propellant combustion zone. A method for observation of particle behavior...PBAN propellant . The results showed enh~nced agglomeration, and indicate that Fe20L affects agglomeration through two competing mechanisms. rombustion

  2. High-pressure calorimeter chamber tests for liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Philip A.; Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Price, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate the rocket combustion and heat transfer characteristics of liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) mixtures at high chamber pressures. Two water-cooled calorimeter chambers of different combustion lengths were tested using 37- and 61-element oxidizer-fuel-oxidizer triplet injectors. The tests were conducted at nominal chamber pressures of 4.1, 8.3, and 13.8 MPa abs (600, 1200, and 2000 psia). Heat flux Q/A data were obtained for the entire calorimeter length for oxygen/fuel mixture ratios of 1.8 to 3.3. Test data at 4.1 MPa abs compared favorably with previous test data from another source. Using an injector with a fuel-rich outer zone reduced the throat heat flux by 47 percent with only a 4.5 percent reduction in the characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency C* sub eff. The throat heat transfer coefficient was reduced approximately 40 percent because of carbon deposits on the chamber wall.

  3. Development of a generic combustion stability code for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, J. J.; Jones, Y. T.

    1987-01-01

    The mathematical framework for a combustion stability analysis code is outlined. The goal for the code is to be general enough in problem treatment so that its validity and accuracy extend over a wide range of problem applications and that it lends the convenience for any future model improvement if necessary. An approach for modeling the combustion dynamics is devised to meet both requirements. An open-loop numerical procedure is also developed to mechanistically model various combustion processes for determining the stability parameters.

  4. Analysis of combustion instability in liquid fuel rocket motors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The development of an analytical technique used in the solution of nonlinear velocity-sensitive combustion instability problems is presented. The Galerkin method was used and proved successful. The pressure wave forms exhibit a strong second harmonic distortion and a variety of behaviors are possible depending on the nature of the combustion process and the parametric values involved. A one dimensional model provides insight into the problem by allowing a comparison of Galerkin solutions with more exact finite difference computations.

  5. Analysis of Combustion Instability in Liquid Fuel Rocket Motors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, K. W.; Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a technique to be used in the solution of nonlinear velocity-sensitive combustion instability problems is described. The orthogonal collocation method was investigated. It found that the results are heavily dependent on the location of the collocation points and characteristics of the equations, so the method was rejected as unreliabile. The Galerkin method, which has proved to be very successful in analysis of the pressure sensitive combustion instability was found to work very well. It was found that the pressure wave forms exhibit a strong second harmonic distortion and a variety of behaviors are possible depending on the nature of the combustion process and the parametric values involved. A one-dimensional model provides further insight into the problem by allowing a comparison of Galerkin solutions with more exact finite-difference computations.

  6. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  7. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  8. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  9. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Arrieta, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A document describes the low-cost manufacturing of C103 niobium alloy combustion chambers, and the use of a high-temperature, oxidation-resistant coating that is superior to the standard silicide coating. The manufacturing process involved low-temperature spray deposition of C103 on removable plastic mandrels produced by rapid prototyping. Thin, vapor-deposited platinum-indium coatings were shown to substantially improve oxidation resistance relative to the standard silicide coating. Development of different low-cost plastic thrust chamber mandrel materials and prototyping processes (selective laser sintering and stereolithography) yielded mandrels with good dimensional accuracy (within a couple of mils) for this stage of development. The feasibility of using the kinetic metallization cold-spray process for fabrication of free-standing C1O3 thrusters on removable plastic mandrels was also demonstrated. The ambient and elevated temperature mechanical properties of the material were shown to be reasonably good relative to conventionally processed C103, but the greatest potential benefit is that coldsprayed chambers require minimal post-process machining, resulting in substantially lower machining and material costs. The platinum-iridium coating was shown to provide greatly increased oxidation resistance over the silicide when evaluated through oxyacetylene torch testing to as high as 300 F (= 150 C). The iridium component minimizes reaction with the niobium alloy chamber at high temperatures, and provides the high-temperature oxidation resistance needed at the throat.

  10. Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

  11. Up the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Scale to Demonstrate a Robust, Long Life, Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber, or...Up the Downstairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Power, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Advanced vacuum plasma spray (VPS) technology, utilized to successfully apply thermal barrier coatings to space shuttle main engine turbine blades, was further refined as a functional gradient material (FGM) process for space furnace cartridge experiments at 1600 C and for robust, long life combustion chambers for liquid rocket engines. A VPS/FGM 5K (5,000 lb. thrust) thruster has undergone 220 hot firing tests, in pristine condition, showing no wear, blanching or cooling channel cracks. Most recently, this technology has been applied to a 40K thruster, with scale up planned for a 194K Ares I, J-2X engine.

  12. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-21

    technologies and advancing TRL’s • Our product is data • 100’s of sensor channels • Extreme care goes into signal conditioning and processing • Real time...and storable propellants • Liquid Oxygen (LOX) • RP-1 (Kerosene, very similar to JP-8) • Liquid Hydrogen • Liquid methane • Pressure = Performance in...demonstrator of a Kerosene-LOX, 250,000 lbf, 3000 psi oxygen -rich staged combustion engine (ORSC) • AFRL’s Test Stand 2A recently completed a two-year

  13. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  14. Combustion Processes in Hybrid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran,S.; Merkle, C. L.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in the development of hybrid rocket engines for advanced launch vehicle applications. Hybrid propulsion systems use a solid fuel such as hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) along with a gaseous/liquid oxidizer. The performance of hybrid combustors depends on the convective and radiative heat fluxes to the fuel surface, the rate of pyrolysis in the solid phase, and the turbulent combustion processes in the gaseous phases. These processes in combination specify the regression rates of the fuel surface and thereby the utilization efficiency of the fuel. In this paper, we employ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques in order to gain a quantitative understanding of the physical trends in hybrid rocket combustors. The computational modeling is tailored to ongoing experiments at Penn State that employ a two dimensional slab burner configuration. The coordinated computational/experimental effort enables model validation while providing an understanding of the experimental observations. Computations to date have included the full length geometry with and with the aft nozzle section as well as shorter length domains for extensive parametric characterization. HTPB is sed as the fuel with 1,3 butadiene being taken as the gaseous product of the pyrolysis. Pure gaseous oxygen is taken as the oxidizer. The fuel regression rate is specified using an Arrhenius rate reaction, which the fuel surface temperature is given by an energy balance involving gas-phase convection and radiation as well as thermal conduction in the solid-phase. For the gas-phase combustion, a two step global reaction is used. The standard kappa - epsilon model is used for turbulence closure. Radiation is presently treated using a simple diffusion approximation which is valid for large optical path lengths, representative of radiation from soot particles. Computational results are obtained to determine the trends in the fuel burning or

  15. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  16. Liquid fuel injection elements for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George B., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Thrust chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines include three principal components. One of these components is an injector which contains a plurality of injection elements to meter the flow of propellants at a predetermined rate, and fuel to oxidizer mixture ratio, to introduce the mixture into the combustion chamber, and to cause them to be atomized within the combustion chamber so that even combustion takes place. Evolving from these injectors are tube injectors. These tube injectors have injection elements for injecting the oxidizer into the combustion chamber. The oxidizer and fuel must be metered at predetermined rates and mixture ratios in order to mix them within the combustion chamber so that combustion takes place smoothly and completely. Hence tube injectors are subject to improvement. An injection element for a liquid propellant rocket engine of the bipropellant type is provided which includes tangential fuel metering orifices, and a plurality of oxidizer tube injection elements whose injection tubes are also provided with tangential oxidizer entry slots and internal reed valves.

  17. Liquid fuel injection elements for rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, George B., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Thrust chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines include three principal components. One of these components is an injector which contains a plurality of injection elements to meter the flow of propellants at a predetermined rate, and fuel to oxidizer mixture ratio, to introduce the mixture into the combustion chamber, and to cause them to be atomized within the combustion chamber so that even combustion takes place. Evolving from these injectors are tube injectors. These tube injectors have injection elements for injecting the oxidizer into the combustion chamber. The oxidizer and fuel must be metered at predetermined rates and mixture ratios in order to mix them within the combustion chamber so that combustion takes place smoothly and completely. Hence tube injectors are subject to improvement. An injection element for a liquid propellant rocket engine of the bipropellant type is provided herein which includes tangential fuel metering orifices, and a plurality of oxidizer tube injection elements whose injection tubes are also provided with tangential oxidizer entry slots and internal reed valves.

  18. Liquid fuel injection elements for rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, George B., Jr.

    1993-11-01

    Thrust chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines include three principal components. One of these components is an injector which contains a plurality of injection elements to meter the flow of propellants at a predetermined rate, and fuel to oxidizer mixture ratio, to introduce the mixture into the combustion chamber, and to cause them to be atomized within the combustion chamber so that even combustion takes place. Evolving from these injectors are tube injectors. These tube injectors have injection elements for injecting the oxidizer into the combustion chamber. The oxidizer and fuel must be metered at predetermined rates and mixture ratios in order to mix them within the combustion chamber so that combustion takes place smoothly and completely. Hence tube injectors are subject to improvement. An injection element for a liquid propellant rocket engine of the bipropellant type is provided which includes tangential fuel metering orifices, and a plurality of oxidizer tube injection elements whose injection tubes are also provided with tangential oxidizer entry slots and internal reed valves.

  19. Flowfield characteristics in a liquid propellant rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, S.; Moser, M. D.; Ryan, H. M.; Foust, M. J.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of LOX drop size and velocity in a uni-element liquid propellant rocket chamber are presented. The use of the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer in obtaining temporally averaged probability density functions of drop size in a harsh rocket environment has been demonstrated. Complementary measurements of drop size/velocity for simulants under cold flow conditions are also presented. The drop size/velocity measurements made for combusting and cold flow conditions are compared, and the results indicate that there are significant differences in the two flowfields.

  20. Liquid rocket combustor computer code development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, P. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Rocket Injector/Combustor Code (ARICC) that has been developed to model the complete chemical/fluid/thermal processes occurring inside rocket combustion chambers are highlighted. The code, derived from the CONCHAS-SPRAY code originally developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory incorporates powerful features such as the ability to model complex injector combustion chamber geometries, Lagrangian tracking of droplets, full chemical equilibrium and kinetic reactions for multiple species, a fractional volume of fluid (VOF) description of liquid jet injection in addition to the gaseous phase fluid dynamics, and turbulent mass, energy, and momentum transport. Atomization and droplet dynamic models from earlier generation codes are transplated into the present code. Currently, ARICC is specialized for liquid oxygen/hydrogen propellants, although other fuel/oxidizer pairs can be easily substituted.

  1. Liquid rocket performance computer model with distributed energy release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combs, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    Development of a computer program for analyzing the effects of bipropellant spray combustion processes on liquid rocket performance is described and discussed. The distributed energy release (DER) computer program was designed to become part of the JANNAF liquid rocket performance evaluation methodology and to account for performance losses associated with the propellant combustion processes, e.g., incomplete spray gasification, imperfect mixing between sprays and their reacting vapors, residual mixture ratio striations in the flow, and two-phase flow effects. The DER computer program begins by initializing the combustion field at the injection end of a conventional liquid rocket engine, based on injector and chamber design detail, and on propellant and combustion gas properties. It analyzes bipropellant combustion, proceeding stepwise down the chamber from those initial conditions through the nozzle throat.

  2. Quantifying Instability Sources in Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Cheng, Gary C.

    2000-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methodology to predict the effects of combusting flows on acoustic pressure oscillations in liquid rocket engines (LREs) is under development. 'Me intent of the investigation is to develop the causal physics of combustion driven acoustic resonances in LREs. The crux of the analysis is the accurate simulation of pressure/density/sound speed in a combustor which when used by the FDNS-RFV CFD code will produce realistic flow phenomena. An analysis of a gas generator considered for the Fastrac engine will be used as a test validation case.

  3. Computational investigation on combustion instabilities in a rocket combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing

    2016-10-01

    High frequency combustion instability is viewed as the most challenging task in the development of Liquid Rocket Engines. In this article, results of attempts to capture the self-excited high frequency combustion instability in a rocket combustor are shown. The presence of combustion instability was demonstrated using point measurements, along with Fast Fourier Transform analysis and instantaneous flowfield contours. A baseline case demonstrates a similar wall heat flux profile as the associated experimental case. The acoustic oscillation modes and corresponding frequencies predicted by current simulations are almost the same as the results obtained from classic acoustic analysis. Pressure wave moving back and forth across the combustor was also observed. Then this baseline case was compared against different fuel-oxidizer velocity ratios. It predicts a general trend: the smaller velocity ratio produces larger oscillation amplitudes than the larger one. A possible explanation for the trend was given using the computational results.

  4. Program For Analyzing Designs Of Liquid-Propellant Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klem, Mark D.; Muss, Jeff A.; Nguyen, Thong V.; Walker, Dick; Johnson, Curtis W.; Giuliani, James E.

    1995-01-01

    Rocket Combustor Interactive Design Computer Methodology (ROCCID) computer program provides standardized methodology, using state-of-art codes and procedures, for analysis of combustion performance and stability of liquid-propellant rocket engine. Provides combustion analyst with software tool to analyze existing combustor design (point-analysis option), or design high-performance, stable combustor, given set of input design requirements (point-design option). Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and VAX FORTRAN.

  5. Steady Nuclear Combustion in Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saenger, E.

    1957-01-01

    The astrophysical theory of stationary nuclear reactions in stars is applied to the conditions that would be met in the practical engineering cases that would differ from the former, particularly with respect to the much lower combustion pressures, dimensions of the reacting volume, and burnup times. This application yields maximum rates of hear production per unit volume of reacting gas occurring at about 10(exp 8) K in the cases of reactions between the hydrogen isotopes, but yields higher rates for heavier atoms. For the former, with chamber pressures of the order of 100 atmospheres, the energy production for nuclear combustion reaches values of about 10(exp 4) kilocalories per cubic meter per second, which approaches the magnitude for the familiar chemical fuels. The values are substantially lower for heavier atoms, and increase with the square of the combustion pressure. The half-life of the burnup in the fastest reactions may drop to values as low as those for chemical fuels so that, despite the high temperature, the radiated energy can remain smaller than the energy produced, particularly if an inefficiently radiating (i.e., easily completely ionized reacting material like hydrogen), is used. On the other hand, the fraction of completely ionized particles in the gases undergoing nuclear combustion must not exceed a certain upper limit because the densities (approximately 10(exp -10) grams per cubic centimeter)) lie in the range of high vacua and only for the previously mentioned fraction of nonionized particles can mean free paths be retained small enough so that the chamber diameters of several dozen meters will suffice. Under these conditions it appears that continuously maintained stable nuclear reactions at practical pressures and dimensions are fundamentally possible and their application can be visualized as energy sources for power plants and propulsion units.

  6. Advanced liquid rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    A program to substitute iridium coated rhenium for silicide coated niobium in thrust chamber fabrications is reviewed. The life limiting phenomena in each of these material systems is also reviewed. Coating cracking and spalling is not a problem with iridium-coated rhenium as in silicide-coated niobium. Use of the new material system enables an 800 K increase in thruster operating temperature from around 1700 K for niobium to 2500 K for rhenium. Specific impulse iridium-coated rhenium rockets is nominally 20 seconds higher than comparable niobium rockets in the 22 N class and nominally 10 seconds higher in the 440 N class.

  7. Computational simulation of liquid fuel rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. Brian

    1994-01-01

    A major component of any liquid propellant rocket is the propellant injection system. Issues of interest include the degree of liquid vaporization and its impact on the combustion process, the pressure and temperature fields in the combustion chamber, and the cooling of the injector face and chamber walls. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code is a primary computational tool used in the MSFC Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch. The branch has dedicated a significant amount of resources to development of this code for prediction of both liquid and solid fuel rocket performance. The FDNS code is currently being upgraded to include the capability to model liquid/gas multi-phase flows for fuel injection simulation. An important aspect of this effort is benchmarking the code capabilities to predict existing experimental injection data. The objective of this MSFC/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship term was to evaluate the capabilities of the modified FDNS code to predict flow fields with liquid injection. Comparisons were made between code predictions and existing experimental data. A significant portion of the effort included a search for appropriate validation data. Also, code simulation deficiencies were identified.

  8. Liquid rocket engine turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria for the design and development of turbines for rocket engines to meet specific performance, and installation requirements are summarized. The total design problem, and design elements are identified, and the current technology pertaining to these elements is described. Recommended practices for achieving a successful design are included.

  9. CFD Simulation of Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen; Garcia, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Detailed design issues associated with liquid rocket engine injectors and combustion chamber operation require CFD methodology which simulates highly three-dimensional, turbulent, vaporizing, and combusting flows. The primary utility of such simulations involves predicting multi-dimensional effects caused by specific injector configurations. SECA, Inc. and Engineering Sciences, Inc. have been developing appropriate computational methodology for NASA/MSFC for the past decade. CFD tools and computers have improved dramatically during this time period; however, the physical submodels used in these analyses must still remain relatively simple in order to produce useful results. Simulations of clustered coaxial and impinger injector elements for hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels, which account for real fluid properties, is the immediate goal of this research. The spray combustion codes are based on the FDNS CFD code' and are structured to represent homogeneous and heterogeneous spray combustion. The homogeneous spray model treats the flow as a continuum of multi-phase, multicomponent fluids which move without thermal or velocity lags between the phases. Two heterogeneous models were developed: (1) a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model which represents the liquid core of coaxial or impinger jets and their atomization and vaporization, and (2) a Blob model which represents the injected streams as a cloud of droplets the size of the injector orifice which subsequently exhibit particle interaction, vaporization, and combustion. All of these spray models are computationally intensive, but this is unavoidable to accurately account for the complex physics and combustion which is to be predicted, Work is currently in progress to parallelize these codes to improve their computational efficiency. These spray combustion codes were used to simulate the three test cases which are the subject of the 2nd International Workshop on-Rocket Combustion Modeling. Such test cases are considered by

  10. Photographic Investigation of Combustion in a Two-dimensional Transparent Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellman, Donald R; Humphrey, Jack C; Male, Theodore

    1953-01-01

    Motion pictures at camera speeds up to 3000 frames per second were taken of the combustion of liquid oxygen and gasoline in a 100-pound thrust rocket engine. The effect of seven methods of propellant injection on the uniformity of combustion was investigated. The flame front was generally found to extend to the injector faces and all the injection systems showed considerable nonuniformity of combustion. Pressure vibration records indicated combustion vibrations that corresponded to resonant-chamber frequencies.

  11. Advanced Booster Liquid Engine Combustion Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Kevin; Gentz, Steve; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability is a phenomenon in liquid rocket engines caused by complex coupling between the time-varying combustion processes and the fluid dynamics in the combustor. Consequences of the large pressure oscillations associated with combustion instability often cause significant hardware damage and can be catastrophic. The current combustion stability assessment tools are limited by the level of empiricism in many inputs and embedded models. This limited predictive capability creates significant uncertainty in stability assessments. This large uncertainty then increases hardware development costs due to heavy reliance on expensive and time-consuming testing.

  12. Analysis of rocket engine injection combustion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A critique is given of the JANNAF sub-critical propellant injection/combustion process analysis computer models and application of the models to correlation of well documented hot fire engine data bases. These programs are the distributed energy release (DER) model for conventional liquid propellants injectors and the coaxial injection combustion model (CICM) for gaseous annulus/liquid core coaxial injectors. The critique identifies model inconsistencies while the computer analyses provide quantitative data on predictive accuracy. The program is comprised of three tasks: (1) computer program review and operations; (2) analysis and data correlations; and (3) documentation.

  13. Injector for liquid fueled rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael David (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An injector for liquid fueled rocket engines wherein a generally flat core having a frustoconical dome attached to one side of the core to serve as a manifold for a first liquid, with the core having a generally circular configuration having an axis. The other side of the core has a plurality of concentric annular first slots and a plurality of annular concentric second slots alternating with the first slots, the second slots having a greater depth than said first slots. A bore extends through the core for inletting a second liquid into said core, the bore intersecting the second slots to feed the second liquid into the second slots. The core also has a plurality of first passageways leading from the manifold to the first annular slots for feeding the first liquid into said first slots. A faceplate brazed to said other side of the core is provided with apertures extending from the first and second slots through said face plate, these apertures being positioned to direct fuel and liquid oxygen into contact with each other in the combustion chamber. The first liquid may be liquid oxygen and the second liquid may be kerosene or liquid hydrogen.

  14. Further analytical study of hybrid rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, W. S. Y.; Chen, C. S.; Haviland, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical studies of the transient and steady-state combustion processes in a hybrid rocket system are discussed. The particular system chosen consists of a gaseous oxidizer flowing within a tube of solid fuel, resulting in a heterogeneous combustion. Finite rate chemical kinetics with appropriate reaction mechanisms were incorporated in the model. A temperature dependent Arrhenius type fuel surface regression rate equation was chosen for the current study. The governing mathematical equations employed for the reacting gas phase and for the solid phase are the general, two-dimensional, time-dependent conservation equations in a cylindrical coordinate system. Keeping the simplifying assumptions to a minimum, these basic equations were programmed for numerical computation, using two implicit finite-difference schemes, the Lax-Wendroff scheme for the gas phase, and, the Crank-Nicolson scheme for the solid phase.

  15. Liquid rocket engine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The nozzle is a major component of a rocket engine, having a significant influence on the overall engine performance and representing a large fraction of the engine structure. The design of the nozzle consists of solving simultaneously two different problems: the definition of the shape of the wall that forms the expansion surface, and the delineation of the nozzle structure and hydraulic system. This monography addresses both of these problems. The shape of the wall is considered from immediately upstream of the throat to the nozzle exit for both bell and annular (or plug) nozzles. Important aspects of the methods used to generate nozzle wall shapes are covered for maximum-performance shapes and for nozzle contours based on criteria other than performance. The discussion of structure and hydraulics covers problem areas of regeneratively cooled tube-wall nozzles and extensions; it treats also nozzle extensions cooled by turbine exhaust gas, ablation-cooled extensions, and radiation-cooled extensions. The techniques that best enable the designer to develop the nozzle structure with as little difficulty as possible and at the lowest cost consistent with minimum weight and specified performance are described.

  16. Plasma Igniter for Reliable Ignition of Combustion in Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam; Eskridge, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A plasma igniter has been developed for initiating combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. The device propels a hot, dense plasma jet, consisting of elemental fluorine and fluorine compounds, into the combustion chamber to ignite the cold propellant mixture. The igniter consists of two coaxial, cylindrical electrodes with a cylindrical bar of solid Teflon plastic in the region between them. The outer electrode is a metal (stainless steel) tube; the inner electrode is a metal pin (mild steel, stainless steel, tungsten, or thoriated-tungsten). The Teflon bar fits snugly between the two electrodes and provides electrical insulation between them. The Teflon bar may have either a flat surface, or a concave, conical surface at the open, down-stream end of the igniter (the igniter face). The igniter would be mounted on the combustion chamber of the rocket engine, either on the injector-plate at the upstream side of the engine, or on the sidewalls of the chamber. It also might sit behind a valve that would be opened just prior to ignition, and closed just after, in order to prevent the Teflon from melting due to heating from the combustion chamber.

  17. Analysis of rocket engine injection combustion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, J. W.; Saltzman, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Mixing methodology improvement for the JANNAF DER and CICM injection/combustion analysis computer programs was accomplished. ZOM plane prediction model development was improved for installation into the new standardized DER computer program. An intra-element mixing model developing approach was recommended for gas/liquid coaxial injection elements for possible future incorporation into the CICM computer program.

  18. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 2: a Study of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in Rocket Engine Preburners Using a Heterogeneous Stirred Tank Reactor Model. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartrand, Timothy A.

    1988-01-01

    During the shutdown of the space shuttle main engine, oxygen flow is shut off from the fuel preburner and helium is used to push the residual oxygen into the combustion chamber. During this process a low frequency combustion instability, or chug, occurs. This chug has resulted in damage to the engine's augmented spark igniter due to backflow of the contents of the preburner combustion chamber into the oxidizer feed system. To determine possible causes and fixes for the chug, the fuel preburner was modeled as a heterogeneous stirred tank combustion chamber, a variable mass flow rate oxidizer feed system, a constant mass flow rate fuel feed system and an exit turbine. Within the combustion chamber gases were assumed perfectly mixed. To account for liquid in the combustion chamber, a uniform droplet distribution was assumed to exist in the chamber, with mean droplet diameter determined from an empirical relation. A computer program was written to integrate the resulting differential equations. Because chamber contents were assumed perfectly mixed, the fuel preburner model erroneously predicted that combustion would not take place during shutdown. The combustion rate model was modified to assume that all liquid oxygen that vaporized instantaneously combusted with fuel. Using this combustion model, the effect of engine parameters on chamber pressure oscillations during the SSME shutdown was calculated.

  19. The Assessment of Liquid Propellant Injectors. Part 1. Atomisation: Its Measurements and Influence on Combustion Efficiency of Rocket Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-04-01

    liquids; a review. Secton II. The weasurei.ient of’ spray dro-olet size; a revicw. Summary Bibliography Appendix A. The Use of’ the Rosin Rammler ...by some types of atomiscrs c7n be represented by the Rosin - Rammler expression: This equation defines the ’size constpnt’, do, and the dis- tribution...J.P. "Fucl oil atomisation". E[.I.T Thesis, 1943. 7. Rosin P.& Rammler E. "Law governing fineness of powdered coal". J. Inst. Fuel 7, 29. 1933. 8

  20. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  1. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  2. Liquid rocket propellant feedline dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holster, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study of liquid rocket propellant feedline dynamics has been performed. The analytical model, which includes the effects of turbulent flow, distributed and local compliances, bellows, side branches, and structural mounting stiffness, was verified by an experimental program. Water was used as the internal fluid and the dynamic perturbations in pressure and flow were created by a piston pulser. Measurements were made to determine the pressure perturbation amplitude and phase at the line terminal due to a sinusoidal pulser excitation. The frequency response of the various line configurations tested were compared with the computed theoretical results.

  3. Scaling of Performance in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses scaling of combustion and combustion performance in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. In development of new combustors, comparisons are often made between predicted performance in a new combustor and measured performance in another combustor with different geometric and thermodynamic characteristics. Without careful interpretation of some key features, the comparison can be misinterpreted and erroneous information used in the design of the new device. This paper provides a review of this performance comparison, including a brief review of the initial liquid rocket scaling research conducted during the 1950s and 1960s, a review of the typical performance losses encountered and how they scale, a description of the typical scaling procedures used in development programs today, and finally a review of several historical development programs to see what insight they can bring to the questions at hand.

  4. Simulation of a GOX-kerosene subscale rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglauer, Christoph; Kniesner, Björn; Knab, Oliver; Kirchberger, Christoph; Schlieben, Gregor; Kau, Hans-Peter

    2011-12-01

    In view of future film cooling tests at the Institute for Flight Propulsion (LFA) at Technische Universität München, the Astrium in-house spray combustion CFD tool Rocflam-II was validated against first test data gained from this rocket test bench without film cooling. The subscale rocket combustion chamber uses GOX and kerosene as propellants which are injected through a single double swirl element. Especially the modeling of the double swirl element and the measured wall roughness were adapted on the LFA hardware. Additionally, new liquid kerosene fluid properties were implemented and verified in Rocflam-II. Also the influences of soot deposition and hot gas radiation on the wall heat flux were analytically and numerically estimated. In context of reviewing the implemented evaporation model in Rocflam-II, the binary diffusion coefficient and its pressure dependency were analyzed. Finally simulations have been performed for different load points with Rocflam-II showing a good agreement compared to test data.

  5. Heat transfer in rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P.; Cheng, G.; Farmer, R.

    1993-01-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis was used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and film coolant flows. These components were analyzed, and the analyses verified when appropriate test data were available. The component analyses are being synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. A Navier-Stokes flow solver, the FDNS code, was used to make the analyses. Particular attention was given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and are being used to describe the flame structure near the injector faceplate.

  6. Pressurization systems for liquid rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Guidelines for the successful design of pressurization systems for main propulsion, auxiliary propulsion, and attitude control systems for boosters, upper stages, and spacecraft were presented, drawing on the wealth of design experience that has accumulated in the development of pressurization systems for liquid rockets operational in the last 15 years. The design begins with a preliminary phase in which the system requirements are received and evaluated. Next comes a detail-design and integration phase in which the controls and the hardware components that make up the system are determined. The final phase, design evaluation, provides analysis of problems that may arise at any point in the design when components are combined and considered for operation as a system. Throughout the monograph, the design tasks are considered in the order and manner in which the designer must handle them.

  7. Hydrodynamics of shear coaxial liquid rocket injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsohas, John

    Hydrodynamic instabilities within injector passages can couple to chamber acoustic modes and lead to unacceptable levels of combustion instabilities inside liquid rocket engines. The instability of vena-contracta regions and mixing between fuel and oxidizer can serve as a fundamental source of unsteadiness produced by the injector, even in the absence of upstream or downstream pressure perturbations. This natural or "unforced" response can provide valuable information regarding frequencies where the element could conceivably couple to chamber modes. In particular, during throttled conditions the changes in the injector response may lead to an alignment of the injector and chamber modes. For these reasons, the basic unforced response of the injector element is of particular interest when developing a new engine. The Loci/Chem code was used to perform single-element, 2-D unsteady CFD computations on the Hydrogen/Oxygen Multi-Element Experiment (HOMEE) injector which was hot-fire tested at Purdue University. The Loci/Chem code was used to evaluate the effects of O/F ratio, LOX post thickness, recess length and LOX tube length on the hydrodynamics of shear co-axial rocket injectors.

  8. Investigations of Rocket Engine Combustion Emissions During ACCENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M. N.; Friedl, R. R.

    2001-12-01

    The composition of rocket combustion emissions and the atmospheric processes that determine their stratospheric impacts are poorly understood. While present day rocket emissions do not significantly affect stratospheric chemistry, the potential for vigorous growth of the space transportation industry in coming decades suggests that rocket emissions and their stratospheric impacts should be better understood. A variety of in-situ measurements and modeling results were obtained during the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) effort that will be used to evaluate the role of rocket exhaust in perturbing ozone chemistry in plume wakes and in the global stratosphere. We present a review of the ACCENT rocket emissions science objectives, summarize data obtained during the WB-57F plume wake sorties, and briefly discuss how the data will help resolve several outstanding questions regarding the impact of rocket emissions on the stratosphere. These include measurement of the emission indices for several important rocket engine combustion products and validation of plume wake chemistry models.

  9. ROCKETS OR JATO JET ASSISTED TAKE OFF UNITS AT THE HIGH PRESSURE COMBUSTION FACILITY - STATIC FIRING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1946-01-01

    ROCKETS OR JATO JET ASSISTED TAKE OFF UNITS AT THE HIGH PRESSURE COMBUSTION FACILITY - STATIC FIRING OF NITRIC ACID ANILINE ROCKET - PERMANGANATE PER OXIDE ROCKET SETUP INCLUDING TWO VIEWS THROUGH CONTROL ROOM SAFETY WINDOW

  10. Computational analysis of liquid hypergolic propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, K. W.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion process in liquid rocket engines depends on a number of complex phenomena such as atomization, vaporization, spray dynamics, mixing, and reaction mechanisms. A computational tool to study their mutual interactions is developed to help analyze these processes with a view of improving existing designs and optimizing future designs of the thrust chamber. The focus of the article is on the analysis of the Variable Thrust Engine for the Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle. This engine uses a hypergolic liquid bipropellant combination of monomethyl hydrazine as fuel and nitrogen tetroxide as oxidizer.

  11. Computing Instability In Combustion Of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code developed for use in design analyses of flow instabilities associated with combustion of sprayed liquid propellants in rocket engines. Code also contributes to design of improved commercial sprayed-fuel combustors in furnaces and jet engines. Proves robust, user-friendly software tool with comprehensive analysis capability. Enables characterization of stability or instability of engine in terms of such physically meaningful parameters as initial conditions of spray, spatial distribution of ratio between concentrations of fuel and oxidizer at injector faces, geometry of combustor, and configurations of baffles.

  12. Computing Instability In Combustion Of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code developed for use in design analyses of flow instabilities associated with combustion of sprayed liquid propellants in rocket engines. Code also contributes to design of improved commercial sprayed-fuel combustors in furnaces and jet engines. Proves robust, user-friendly software tool with comprehensive analysis capability. Enables characterization of stability or instability of engine in terms of such physically meaningful parameters as initial conditions of spray, spatial distribution of ratio between concentrations of fuel and oxidizer at injector faces, geometry of combustor, and configurations of baffles.

  13. Multivariable optimization of liquid rocket engines using particle swarm algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel Ray

    Liquid rocket engines are highly reliable, controllable, and efficient compared to other conventional forms of rocket propulsion. As such, they have seen wide use in the space industry and have become the standard propulsion system for launch vehicles, orbit insertion, and orbital maneuvering. Though these systems are well understood, historical optimization techniques are often inadequate due to the highly non-linear nature of the engine performance problem. In this thesis, a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) variant was applied to maximize the specific impulse of a finite-area combustion chamber (FAC) equilibrium flow rocket performance model by controlling the engine's oxidizer-to-fuel ratio and de Laval nozzle expansion and contraction ratios. In addition to the PSO-controlled parameters, engine performance was calculated based on propellant chemistry, combustion chamber pressure, and ambient pressure, which are provided as inputs to the program. The performance code was validated by comparison with NASA's Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) and the commercially available Rocket Propulsion Analysis (RPA) tool. Similarly, the PSO algorithm was validated by comparison with brute-force optimization, which calculates all possible solutions and subsequently determines which is the optimum. Particle Swarm Optimization was shown to be an effective optimizer capable of quick and reliable convergence for complex functions of multiple non-linear variables.

  14. Fuel Chemistry And Combustion Distribution Effects On Rocket Engine Combustion Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-19

    experiments of Crowe et al. [50] are performed with PBAN- based polymer type solid propellants containing 16% aluminum particles. Crowe et al.’s nozzle...controlled by the combustion process at the propellant surface. As described above, the mass flow ratio and momentum ratio are calculated based on the...model rocket combustor, and associated modeling of particles in combustion chamber gas flows. 15. SUBJECT TERMS energetic propellants , combustion

  15. Scaling of Performance in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James

    2008-01-01

    The objectives are: a) Re-introduce to you the concept of scaling; b) Describe the scaling research conducted in the 1950s and early 1960s, and present some of their conclusions; c) Narrow the focus to scaling for performance of combustion devices for liquid propellant rocket engines; and d) Present some results of subscale to full-scale performance from historical programs. Scaling is "The ability to develop new combustion devices with predictable performance on the basis of test experience with old devices." Scaling can be used to develop combustion devices of any thrust size from any thrust size. Scaling is applied mostly to increase thrust. Objective is to use scaling as a development tool. - Move injector design from an "art" to a "science"

  16. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, G. C.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analyses verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analyses will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Since test data from the NLS development program are not available, new validation heat transfer data have been sought. Suitable data were obtained from a Rocketdyne test program on a model hydrocarbon/oxygen engine. Simulations of these test data will be presented. Recent interest in the hybrid motor have established the need for analyses of ablating solid fuels in the combustion chamber. Analysis of a simplified hybrid motor will also be presented.

  17. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, G. C.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-07-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analyses verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analyses will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Since test data from the NLS development program are not available, new validation heat transfer data have been sought. Suitable data were obtained from a Rocketdyne test program on a model hydrocarbon/oxygen engine. Simulations of these test data will be presented. Recent interest in the hybrid motor have established the need for analyses of ablating solid fuels in the combustion chamber. Analysis of a simplified hybrid motor will also be presented.

  18. Combustion-wave ignition for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Larry C.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion wave ignition concept was experimentally studied in order to verify its suitability for application in baffled sections of a large booster engine combustion chamber. Gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane (GOX/GH4) and gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GOX/GH2) propellant combinations were evaluated in a subscale combustion wave ignition system. The system included four element tubes capable of carrying ignition energy simultaneously to four locations, simulating four baffled sections. Also, direct ignition of a simulated Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) was performed. Tests were conducted over a range of mixture ratios and tube geometries. Ignition was consistently attained over a wide range of mixture ratios. And at every ignition, the flame propagated through all four element tubes. For GOX/GH4, the ignition system ignited the MCC flow at mixture ratios from 2 to 10 and for GOX/GH2 the ratios is from 2 to 13. The ignition timing was found to be rapid and uniform. The total ignition delay when using the MCC was under 11 ms, with the tube-to-tube, as well as the run-to-run, variation under 1 ms. Tube geometries were found to have negligible effect on the ignition outcome and timing.

  19. Liquid rocket engine turbopump gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Design and fabrication of gear drives for rocket engine turbopumps are described in the sequence encountered during the design process as follows: (1) selection of overall arrangement; (2) selection of gear type; (3) preliminary sizing; (4) lubrication system design; (5) detail tooth design; (6) selection of gear materials; and (7) gear fabrication and testing as it affects the design. The description is oriented towards the use of involute spur gears, although reference material for helical gears is also cited.

  20. Effects of high combustion chamber pressure on rocket noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The acoustical environment for a high combustion chamber pressure engine was examined in detail, using both conventional and advanced theoretical analysis. The influence of elevated chamber pressure on the rocket noise environment was established, based on increase in exit velocity and flame temperature, and changes in basic engine dimensions. Compared to large rocket engines, the overall sound power level is found to be 1.5 dB higher, if the thrust is the same. The peak Strouhal number shifted about one octave lower to a value near 0.01. Data on apparent sound source location and directivity patterns are also presented.

  1. Heat exchanger. [rocket combustion chambers and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, D. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger, as exemplified by a rocket combustion chamber, is constructed by stacking thin metal rings having microsized openings therein at selective locations to form cooling passages defined by an inner wall, an outer wall and fins. Suitable manifolds are provided at each end of the rocket chamber. In addition to the cooling channel openings, coolant feed openings may be formed in each of rings. The coolant feed openings may be nested or positioned within generally U-shaped cooling channel openings. Compression on the stacked rings may be maintained by welds or the like or by bolts extending through the stacked rings.

  2. Large Liquid Rocket Testing: Strategies and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim A.; Hebert, Bartt J.

    2005-01-01

    Rocket propulsion development is enabled by rigorous ground testing in order to mitigate the propulsion systems risks that are inherent in space flight. This is true for virtually all propulsive devices of a space vehicle including liquid and solid rocket propulsion, chemical and non-chemical propulsion, boost stage and in-space propulsion and so forth. In particular, large liquid rocket propulsion development and testing over the past five decades of human and robotic space flight has involved a combination of component-level testing and engine-level testing to first demonstrate that the propulsion devices were designed to meet the specified requirements for the Earth to Orbit launchers that they powered. This was followed by a vigorous test campaign to demonstrate the designed propulsion articles over the required operational envelope, and over robust margins, such that a sufficiently reliable propulsion system is delivered prior to first flight. It is possible that hundreds of tests, and on the order of a hundred thousand test seconds, are needed to achieve a high-reliability, flight-ready, liquid rocket engine system. This paper overviews aspects of earlier and recent experience of liquid rocket propulsion testing at NASA Stennis Space Center, where full scale flight engines and flight stages, as well as a significant amount of development testing has taken place in the past decade. The liquid rocket testing experience discussed includes testing of engine components (gas generators, preburners, thrust chambers, pumps, powerheads), as well as engine systems and complete stages. The number of tests, accumulated test seconds, and years of test stand occupancy needed to meet varying test objectives, will be selectively discussed and compared for the wide variety of ground test work that has been conducted at Stennis for subscale and full scale liquid rocket devices. Since rocket propulsion is a crucial long-lead element of any space system acquisition or

  3. Preburner of Staged Combustion Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    A regeneratively cooled LOX/hydrogen staged combustion assembly system with a 400:1 expansion area ratio nozzle utilizing an 89,000 Newton (20,000 pound) thrust regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and 175:1 tubular nozzle was analyzed, assembled, and tested. The components for this assembly include two spark/torch oxygen-hydrogen igniters, two servo-controlled LOX valves, a preburner injector, a preburner combustor, a main propellant injector, a regeneratively cooled combustion chamber, a regeneratively cooled tubular nozzle with an expansion area ratio of 175:1, an uncooled heavy-wall steel nozzle with an expansion area ratio of 400:1, and interconnecting ducting. The analytical effort was performed to optimize the thermal and structural characteristics of each of the new components and the ducting, and to reverify the capabilities of the previously fabricated components. The testing effort provided a demonstration of the preburner/combustor chamber operation, chamber combustion efficiency and stability, and chamber and nozzle heat transfer.

  4. Turbulent Mixing and Combustion of Multi-Phase Reacting Flows in Ramjet and Ducted Rocket Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    both the fuel characteristics (gaseous fuels, boron-laden gaseous fuels, liquid fuels, and slurry fuels) and the flow field (axisymmetric-coaxial...D-A133 802 TURBULENT M IXING AND COMBUSTION OF MULTI-PHASE REACTING i/1 FLOWS I N RAMJET*RA U) NAVAL WEAPONS CENTER CHINA LAKE CA M J LEE ET AL. OCT...AFOSR MIPR 82-00010 .w~ TURBULENT MIXING AND COMBUSTION OF MULTI-PHASE REACTING FLOWS IN RAMJET AND DUCTED ROCKET ENVIRONMENT M. J. Lee K.C. Schadow

  5. Radiative heat transfer analysis in modern rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Florian; Kniesner, Björn; Frey, Manuel; Knab, Oliver; Mundt, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Radiative heat transfer is analyzed for subscale and fullscale rocket combustion chambers for H2/O2 and CH4/O2 combustion using the P1 radiation transport model in combination with various Weighted Sum of Gray Gases Models (WSGGMs). The influence of different wall emissivities, as well as the results using different WSGGMs, the size of the combustion chamber and the coupling of radiation and fluid dynamics, is investigated. Using rather simple WSGGMs for homogeneous systems yields similar results as using sophisticated models. With models for nonhomogeneous systems the radiative wall heat flux (RWHF) decreases by 25-30 % for H2/O2 combustion and by almost 50 % for CH4/O2 combustion. Enlarging the volume of the combustion chamber increases the RWHF. The influence of radiation on the flow field is found to be negligible. The local ratio of RWHF to total wall heat flux shows a maximum of 9-10 % for H2/O2 and 8 % for CH4/O2 combustion. The integrated heat load ratio is around 3 % for H2/O2 and 2.5 % for CH4/O2 combustion. With WSGGMs for nonhomogeneous systems, the local ratio decreases to 5 % (H2/O2) and 3 % (CH4/O2) while the integrated ratio is only 2 % (H2/O2) and 1.3 % (CH4/O2).

  6. Diagram of Liquid Rocket Systems General Arrangement

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-05-21

    S64-05966 (1964) --- Diagram shows the general arrangement of the liquid rocket systems on the Gemini spacecraft are shown. The locations of the 25-pound, 85-pound and 100-pound thrusters of the orbital attitude and maneuver system and the 25-pound thrusters of the re-entry control system are shown.

  7. Reusable cryogenic liquid rocket propellant tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, William T.; MacConochie, Ian O.; Breiner, Charles A.; Bryan, Charles F., Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A reusable liquid rocket propellant tank is provided. The tank consists of a composite outer shell, a foam-filled honeycomb sandwich insulation layer bonded to the inner surface of the composite shell and a collapsible inner lining which may be removed from the outer shell for inspection and replacement.

  8. Modeling and simulation of a GOX/kerosene subscale rocket combustion chamber with film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglauer, C.; Kniesner, B.; Knab, O.; Schlieben, G.; Kirchberger, C.; Silvestri, S.; Haidn, O. J.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed knowledge on the heat transfer mechanisms is crucial for the design of reliable and efficient rocket engines. Due to the high heat loads of the combustion chamber walls and the corrosive hot gases, film cooling is often applied supplementary or even as a primary cooling technique. Nevertheless, the dominating processes determining the film effectiveness under the conditions representative for rocket combustors are still not fully understood. In context of the national research program Transregio SFB/TRR-40, TEKAN and TARES, the Institute for Flight Propulsion (LFA) of the Technische Universität München (TUM) and Airbus Defence and Space carry out experimental and numerical investigations on heat transfer and film cooling techniques at application-relevant combustion pressures and temperatures. In this paper, results from film cooling experiments and numerical simulations with liquid and transcritical kerosene films in a water-cooled GOX/kerosene rocket combustion chamber are presented. The tests have been performed at two different combustion chamber pressures and with two different throat diameters to study the influence of Reynolds and Mach number. In the numerical investigations, a major issue has been the modeling of kerosene films in sub- and transcritical state. For the modeling Airbus Defence and Space's in-house tool, Rocflam-II has been applied. The main goal of Rocflam-II is to provide a tool package for the simulation of a wide range of rocket combustion devices, validated against experimental data. This includes the modeling of propellant injection, atomization, mixing, combustion, wall heat transfer, film modeling as well as the conjugate heat transfer into the chamber wall and the cooling channels.

  9. Designing Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors for Performance, Stability, and Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; West, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, Brian R.; Tucker, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to lower the cost and increase the performance and stability of fuel injector designs for next-generation liquid rocket engines (LREs). The Loci-STREAM CFD code is used to simulate the complex combustion processes inside the LRE. These analyses enable efficient evaluation of the performance and stability characteristics of injector design concepts, while decreasing reliance on the costly test-fail-fix cycle of traditional design approaches. These injector simulations were recently employed as a key part of the design process for an Advanced Booster concept for NASA's heavy-lift Space Launch System (SLS).

  10. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

    1991-12-09

    The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

  11. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  12. Method of fabricating a rocket engine combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Mckechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Power, Christopher A. (Inventor); Daniel, Ronald L., Jr. (Inventor); Saxelby, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for making a combustion chamber for a rocket engine wherein a copper alloy in particle form is injected into a stream of heated carrier gas in plasma form which is then projected onto the inner surface of a hollow metal jacket having the configuration of a rocket engine combustion chamber is described. The particles are in the plasma stream for a sufficient length of time to heat the particles to a temperature such that the particles will flatten and adhere to previously deposited particles but will not spatter or vaporize. After a layer is formed, cooling channels are cut in the layer, then the channels are filled with a temporary filler and another layer of particles is deposited.

  13. Composite Material Application to Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The substitution of reinforced plastic composite (RPC) materials for metal was studied. The major objectives were to: (1) determine the extent to which composite materials can be beneficially used in liquid rocket engines; (2) identify additional technology requirements; and (3) determine those areas which have the greatest potential for return. Weight savings, fabrication costs, performance, life, and maintainability factors were considered. Two baseline designs, representative of Earth to orbit and orbit to orbit engine systems, were selected. Weight savings are found to be possible for selected components with the substitution of materials for metal. Various technology needs are identified before RPC material can be used in rocket engine applications.

  14. Liquid Oxygen Cooling of Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1989-01-01

    Rocket engines using liquid oxygen (LOX) and hydrocarbon fuel as the propellants are being given serious consideration for future launch vehicle propulsion. Normally, the fuel is used to regeneratively cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability. Another possibility for the coolant is the liquid oxygen. Combustion chambers previously tested with LOX and RP-1 as propellants and LOX as the collant demonstrated the feasibility of using liquid oxygen as a coolant up to a chamber pressure of 13.8 MPa (2000 psia). However, there was concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot gas side wall. In order to study this effect, chambers were fabricated with slots machined upstream of the throat between the cooling passage wall and the hot gas side wall to simulate cracks. The chambers were tested at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa (1247 psia) over a range of mixture ratios from 1.9 to 3.1 using liquid oxygen as the coolant. The results of the testing showed that the leaking LOX did not have a deleterious effect on the chambers in the region of the slots. However, there was unexplained melting in the throat region of both chambers, but not in line with the slots.

  15. First Flight of a Liquid Propellant Rocket

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and a liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology. He is considered one of the fathers of rocketry along with Konstantin Tsiolovsky (1857-1935) and Hermann Oberth (1894-1989). NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  16. Combustion Model of Supersonic Rocket Exhausts in an Entrained Flow Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Oliveira, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate the supersonic rocket exhaust in an entrained flow cylinder. The model can be used to study the plume-induced environment due to static firing test of the Taurus II launch vehicle. The finite rate chemistry is used to model the combustion process involving rocket propellant (RP 1) and liquid oxidizer (LOX). A similar chemical reacting model is also used to simulate the mixing of rocket plume and ambient air. The model provides detailed information on the gas concentration and other flow parameters within the enclosed region thus allowing different operating scenarios to be examined in an efficient manner. It is shown that the real gas influence is significant and yields better agreement with the theory.

  17. Combustion Model of Supersonic Rocket Exhausts in an Entrained Flow Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Oliveira, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate the supersonic rocket exhaust in an entrained flow cylinder. The model can be used to study the plume-induced environment due to static firing tests of the Taurus-II launch vehicle. The finite-rate chemistry is used to model the combustion process involving rocket propellant (RP-1) and liquid oxidizer (LOX). A similar chemical reacting model is also used to simulate the mixing of rocket plume and ambient air. The model provides detailed information on the gas concentration and other flow parameters within the enclosed region, thus allowing different operating scenarios to be examined in an efficient manner. It is shown that the real gas influence is significant and yields better agreement with the theory.

  18. Practical uses of liquid methane in rocket engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Todd; Judd, Donald; Veith, Eric; Rousar, Donald

    2009-09-01

    Liquid methane has been considered an attractive rocket propellant for several decades. However, most rocket engine development efforts in the last 30 years have focused on using more traditional fuels such as hydrogen, kerosene, and earth storables, without any serious development or application of methane to propulsion systems. This paper presents a summary of recent 870 lbf thrust LOX/LCH4 (liquid oxygen/liquid methane) engine test results and recent LOX/LCH4 torch igniter testing. Multiple test series were conducted using both radiation cooled and ablative chamber hardware. This engine testing yielded measured minimum C* efficiencies of 97% using non-optimized engine hardware, with expectations that better than 99% efficiency can readily be achieved with minor hardware optimization. The combustion process was shown to be stable in all tests and the operating transition from poor quality methane (two-phase fluid) at startup to liquid-liquid, sub-cooled, steady state operation was demonstrated. Engine test results showed chamber wall compatibility with high propellant mixture ratios and excellent boundary layer performance of methane as a chamber film coolant. The Aerojet work on methane propulsion and energy applications is also briefly summarized.

  19. A Historical Systems Study of Liquid Rocket Engine Throttling Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Erin M.; Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive systems study to examine and evaluate throttling capabilities of liquid rocket engines. The focus of this study is on engine components, and how the interactions of these components are considered for throttling applications. First, an assessment of space mission requirements is performed to determine what applications require engine throttling. A background on liquid rocket engine throttling is provided, along with the basic equations that are used to predict performance. Three engines are discussed that have successfully demonstrated throttling. Next, the engine system is broken down into components to discuss special considerations that need to be made for engine throttling. This study focuses on liquid rocket engines that have demonstrated operational capability on American space launch vehicles, starting with the Apollo vehicle engines and ending with current technology demonstrations. Both deep throttling and shallow throttling engines are discussed. Boost and sustainer engines have demonstrated throttling from 17% to 100% thrust, while upper stage and lunar lander engines have demonstrated throttling in excess of 10% to 100% thrust. The key difficulty in throttling liquid rocket engines is maintaining an adequate pressure drop across the injector, which is necessary to provide propellant atomization and mixing. For the combustion chamber, cooling can be an issue at low thrust levels. For turbomachinery, the primary considerations are to avoid cavitation, stall, surge, and to consider bearing leakage flows, rotordynamics, and structural dynamics. For valves, it is necessary to design valves and actuators that can achieve accurate flow control at all thrust levels. It is also important to assess the amount of nozzle flow separation that can be tolerated at low thrust levels for ground testing.

  20. Rocket combustion chamber life-enhancing design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA continues to pursue technologies which can lead to an increase in life and reduce the costs of fabrication of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The joint NASA/Air Force Advanced Launch System Program has set its prime objectives to be high reliability and low cost for their new advanced booster engine. In order to meet these objectives, NASA will utilize the results of several ongoing programs to provide the required technologies. An overview is presented of those programs which address life enhancing design concepts for the combustion chamber. Seven different design concepts, which reduce the thermal strain and/or increase the material strength of the combustion chamber liner wall are discussed. Subscale rocket test results are presented, where available, for life enhancing design concepts. Two techniques for reducing chamber fabrication costs are discussed, as well as issues relating to hydrocarbon fuels/combustion chamber liner materials compatibility.

  1. Parametric Trends in the Combustion Stability Characteristics of a Single-Element Gas-Gas Rocket Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    High Performance Computing Modernization Program. References 1Oefelein, J . and Yang, V., “Comprehensive Review of Liquid-Propellant Combustion...of Combustion Instability in Motors: Case Studies,” 37th AIAA/ASME/ SAE /ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit , Salt Lake City, Utah, July 2001...gas coaxial rocket injector,” 49th AIAA/ASME/ SAE /ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit , AIAA, San Jose, CA, July 2013. 4Garby, R., Selle, L

  2. Size Distribution and Velocity of Ethanol Drops in a Rocket Combustor Burning Ethanol and Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1961-01-01

    Single jets of ethanol were studied photomicrographically inside a rocket chamber as they broke up into sprays of drops which underwent simultaneous acceleration and vaporization with chemical reaction occurring in the surrounding combustion gas stream. In each rocket test-firing, liquid oxygen was used as the oxidant. Both drop velocity and drop size distribution data were obtained from photomicrographs of the ethanol drops taken with an ultra-high speed tracking camera developed at NASA, Lewis Research Center.

  3. Liquid atomization by coaxial rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, S. V.; Brena De La Rosa, A.; Isakovic, A.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    The atomization characteristics of a scaled-down version of a coaxial rocket injector was investigated using a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The injector was operated in the conventional mode with liquid being injected through its inner orifice and gas being injected through its outer annulus. The shearing action occurring at the liquid-gas interface causes the liquid jet to atomize. In this study, two different liquid-air systems, namely a water-air system and a liquid nitrogen-gaseous nitrogen system, were chosen for detailed investigation. This paper discusses the performance characteristics of the coaxial injector under different flow and geometric conditions. Specifically, the effects of injection gas pressure and the injector cavity size on variables such as the mean particle diameter, Sauter mean diameter, number density, volume flux, and velocity have been presented.

  4. Liquid atomization by coaxial rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, S. V.; Brena De La Rosa, A.; Isakovic, A.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    The atomization characteristics of a scaled-down version of a coaxial rocket injector was investigated using a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The injector was operated in the conventional mode with liquid being injected through its inner orifice and gas being injected through its outer annulus. The shearing action occurring at the liquid-gas interface causes the liquid jet to atomize. In this study, two different liquid-air systems, namely a water-air system and a liquid nitrogen-gaseous nitrogen system, were chosen for detailed investigation. This paper discusses the performance characteristics of the coaxial injector under different flow and geometric conditions. Specifically, the effects of injection gas pressure and the injector cavity size on variables such as the mean particle diameter, Sauter mean diameter, number density, volume flux, and velocity have been presented.

  5. Numerical Modelling of Staged Combustion Aft-Injected Hybrid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijsse, Jeff

    The staged combustion aft-injected hybrid (SCAIH) rocket motor is a promising design for the future of hybrid rocket propulsion. Advances in computational fluid dynamics and scientific computing have made computational modelling an effective tool in hybrid rocket motor design and development. The focus of this thesis is the numerical modelling of the SCAIH rocket motor in a turbulent combustion, high-speed, reactive flow framework accounting for solid soot transport and radiative heat transfer. The SCAIH motor is modelled with a shear coaxial injector with liquid oxygen injected in the center at sub-critical conditions: 150 K and 150 m/s (Mach ≈ 0.9), and a gas-generator gas-solid mixture of one-third carbon soot by mass injected in the annual opening at 1175 K and 460 m/s (Mach ≈ 0.6). Flow conditions in the near injector region and the flame anchoring mechanism are of particular interest. Overall, the flow is shown to exhibit instabilities and the flame is shown to anchor directly on the injector faceplate with temperatures in excess of 2700 K.

  6. Oxide Protective Coats for Ir/Re Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, Arthur; Tuffias, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    An improved material system has been developed for rocket engine combustion chambers for burning oxygen/ hydrogen mixtures or novel monopropellants, which are highly oxidizing at operating temperatures. The baseline for developing the improved material system is a prior iridium/rhenium system for chambers burning nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine mixtures, which are less oxidizing. The baseline combustion chamber comprises an outer layer of rhenium that provides structural support, plus an inner layer of iridium that acts as a barrier to oxidation of the rhenium. In the improved material system, the layer of iridium is thin and is coated with a thermal fatigue-resistant refractory oxide (specifically, hafnium oxide) that serves partly as a thermal barrier to decrease the temperature and thus the rate of oxidation of the rhenium. The oxide layer also acts as a barrier against the transport of oxidizing species to the surface of the iridium. Tests in which various oxygen/hydrogen mixtures were burned in iridium/rhenium combustion chambers lined with hafnium oxide showed that the operational lifetimes of combustion chambers of the improved material system are an order of magnitude greater than those of the baseline combustion chambers.

  7. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  8. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  9. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  10. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  11. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  12. Polymer degradation rate control of hybrid rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickler, D. B.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1970-01-01

    Polymer degradation to small fragments is treated as a rate controlling step in hybrid rocket combustion. Both numerical and approximate analytical solutions of the complete energy and polymer chain bond conservation equations for the condensed phase are obtained. Comparison with inert atmosphere data is very good. It is found that the intersect of curves of pyrolysis rate versus interface temperature for hybrid combustors, with the thermal degradation theory, falls at a pyrolysis rate very close to that for which a pressure dependence begins to be observable. Since simple thermal degradation cannot give sufficient depolymerization at higher pyrolysis rates, it is suggested that oxidative catalysis of the process occurs at the surface, giving a first order dependence on reactive species concentration at the wall. Estimates of the ratio of this activation energy and interface temperature are in agreement with best fit procedures for hybrid combustion data. Requisite active species concentrations and flux are shown to be compatible with turbulent transport. Pressure dependence of hybrid rocket fuel regression rate is thus shown to be describable in a consistent manner in terms of reactive species catalysis of polymer degradation.

  13. Powdered aluminum and oxygen rocket propellants: Subscale combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Mike L.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum combined with oxygen has been proposed as a potential lunar in situ propellant for ascent/descent and return missions for future lunar exploration. Engine concepts proposed to use this propellant have not previously been demonstrated, and the impact on performance from combustion and two-phase flow losses could only be estimated. Therefore, combustion tests were performed for aluminum and aluminum/magnesium alloy powders with oxygen in subscale heat-sink rocket engine hardware. The metal powder was pneumatically injected, with a small amount of nitrogen, through the center orifice of a single element O-F-O triplet injector. Gaseous oxygen impinged on the fuel stream. Hot-fire tests of aluminum/oxygen were performed over a mixture ratio range of 0.5 to 3.0, and at a chamber pressure of approximately 480 kPa (70 psia). The theoretical performance of the propellants was analyzed over a mixture ratio range of 0.5 to 5.0. In the theoretical predictions the ideal one-dimensional equilibrium rocket performance was reduced by loss mechanisms including finite rate kinetics, two-dimensional divergence losses, and boundary layer losses. Lower than predicted characteristic velocity and specific impulse performance efficiencies were achieved in the hot-fire tests, and this was attributed to poor mixing of the propellants and two-phase flow effects. Several tests with aluminum/9.8 percent magnesium alloy powder did not indicate any advantage over the pure aluminum fuel.

  14. Launch site integration of Liquid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Leland P.; Dickinson, William J.

    1989-01-01

    The impacts of introducing Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRB) into the STS/KSC launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Pre-launch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated.

  15. Cavitation behavior of liquid rocket pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.

    1994-12-31

    Liquid rocket pumps were released and tested for obtaining the cavitation and non-cavitation performance. Two pumps, one each for fuel and oxidizer were tested for obtaining the critical Net Positive Suction Head for ensuring the cavitation free operation of these pumps in flight. The experimentally obtained values of NPSH have been compared with the theoretical values obtained using the model developed by Stripling (1962). Based on this comparison it is possible to predict the propellant tank pressure in advance with some confidence. The final value of tank pressure can be revised later when more comprehensive experimental values are available.

  16. Coated oxidizers for combustion stability in solid-propellant rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmy, A. M.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in a laboratory-scale (6.25-cm diameter) end-burning rocket motor with state-of-the-art, ammonium perchlorate hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), nonmetallized propellants. The concept of tailoring the stability characteristics with a small amount (less than 1 percent by weight) of COATING on the oxidizer is explored. The thermal degradation characteristics of the coat chemical are deduced through theoretical arguments on thermal diffusivity of the composite material (propellant). Several candidate coats are selected and propellants are cast. These propellants (with coated oxidizers) are fired in a laboratory-scale end-burning rocket motor, and real-time pressure histories are recorded. The control propellant (with no coating) is also tested for comparison. The uniformity of the coating, confirmed by SEM pictures and BET adsorption measurements, is thought to be an advance in technology. The frequency of bulk mode instability (BMI), the pressure fluctuation amplitudes, and stability boundaries are correlated with parameters related to the characteristic length (L-asterisk) of the rocket motor. The coated oxidizer propellants, in general, display greater combustion stability than the control (state-of-the-art). The correlations of the various parameters are thought to be new to a field filled with much uncertainty.

  17. Liquid-propellant droplet vaporization and combustion in high pressure environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor

    1991-01-01

    In order to correct the deficiencies of existing models for high-pressure droplet vaporization and combustion, a fundamental investigation into this matter is essential. The objective of this research are: (1) to acquire basic understanding of physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the vaporization and combustion of isolated liquid-propellant droplets in both stagnant and forced-convective environments; (2) to establish droplet vaporization and combustion correlations for the study of liquid-propellant spray combustion and two-phase flowfields in rocket motors; and (3) to investigate the dynamic responses of multicomponent droplet vaporization and combustion to ambient flow oscillations.

  18. Liquid rocket engine test facility engineering challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Hartwig; Ziegenhagen, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Liquid rocket engines for launch vehicles and space crafts as well as their subsystems need to be verified and qualified during hot-runs. A high test cadence combined with a flexible test team helps to reduce the cost for test verification during development/qualification as well as during acceptance testing for production. Test facility intelligence allows to test subsystems in the same manner as during complete engine system tests and will therefore reduce development time and cost. This paper gives an overview of the maturing of test engineering know how for rocket engine test stands as well as high altitude test stands for small propulsion thrusters at EADS-ST in Ottobrunn and Lampoldshausen and is split into two parts: Part 1 gives a historical overview of the EADS-ST test stands at Ottobrunn and Lampoldshausen since the beginning of Rocket propulsion activities in the 1960s. Part 2 gives an overview of the actual test capabilities and the test engineering know-how for test stand construction/adaptation and their use during running programs. Examples of actual realised facility concepts are given to demonstrate cost saving potential for test programs in both cases for development/qualification issues as well as for production purposes.

  19. Progress in Fabrication of Rocket Combustion Chambers by VPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; McKechnie, Timothy N.

    2004-01-01

    Several documents in a collection describe aspects of the development of advanced materials and fabrication processes intended to enable the manufacture of advanced rocket combustion chambers and nozzles at relatively low cost. One concept discussed in most of the documents is the fabrication of combustion-chamber liners by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) of an alloy of 88Cu/8Cr/4Nb (numbers indicate atomic percentages) -- a concept that was reported in "Improved Alloy for Fabrication of Combustion Chambers by VPS" (MFS-26546). Another concept is the deposition of graded-composition wall and liner structures by VPS in order to make liners integral parts of wall structures and to make oxidation- and thermal-protection layers integral parts of liners: The VPS process is started at 100 percent of a first alloy, then the proportion of a second alloy is increased gradually from zero as deposition continues, ending at 100 percent of the second alloy. Yet another concept discussed in one of the documents is the VPS of oxidation-protection coats in the forms of nickel-and-chromium-containing refractory alloys on VPS-deposited 88Cu/8Cr/4Nb liners.

  20. Integrated Design Methodology for Highly Reliable Liquid Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuratani, Naoshi; Aoki, Hiroshi; Yasui, Masaaki; Kure, Hirotaka; Masuya, Goro

    The Integrated Design Methodology is strongly required at the conceptual design phase to achieve the highly reliable space transportation systems, especially the propulsion systems, not only in Japan but also all over the world in these days. Because in the past some catastrophic failures caused some losses of mission and vehicle (LOM/LOV) at the operational phase, moreover did affect severely the schedule delays and cost overrun at the later development phase. Design methodology for highly reliable liquid rocket engine is being preliminarily established and investigated in this study. The sensitivity analysis is systematically performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology, and to clarify and especially to focus on the correlation between the combustion chamber, turbopump and main valve as main components. This study describes the essential issues to understand the stated correlations, the need to apply this methodology to the remaining critical failure modes in the whole engine system, and the perspective on the engine development in the future.

  1. Solid rocket combustion simulator technology using the hybrid rocket for simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1994-01-01

    The hybrid rocket is reexamined in light of several important unanswered questions regarding its performance. The well-known heat transfer limited burning rate equation is quoted, and its limitations are pointed out. Several inconsistencies in the burning rate determination through fuel depolymerization are explicitly discussed. The resolution appears to be through the postulate of (surface) oxidative degradation of the fuel. Experiments are initiated to study the fuel degradation in mixtures of nitrogen/oxygen in the 99.9 percent/0.1 percent to 98 percent/2 percent range. The overall hybrid combustion behavior is studied in a 2 in-diameter rocket motor, where a PMMA tube is used as the fuel. The results include detailed, real-time infrared video images of the combustion zone. Space- and time-averaged images give a broad indication of the temperature reached in the gases. A brief outline is shown of future work, which will specifically concentrate on the exploration of the role of the oxidizer transport to the fuel surface, and the role of the unburned fuel that is reported to escape below the classical time-averaged boundary layer flame.

  2. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Lord Kahil

    A number of promising alternative rocket propulsion concepts have been developed over the past two decades that take advantage of unsteady combustion waves in order to produce thrust. These concepts include the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE), in which repetitive ignition, propagation, and reflection of detonations and shocks can create a high pressure chamber from which gases may be exhausted in a controlled manner. The Pulse Detonation Rocket Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector (PDRIME) is a modification of the basic PDRE concept, developed by Cambier (1998), which has the potential for performance improvements based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation. The PDRIME has the advantage of both low combustion chamber seeding pressure, per the PDRE concept, and efficient energy distribution in the system, per the rocket-induced MHD ejector (RIME) concept of Cole, et al. (1995). In the initial part of this thesis, we explore flow and performance characteristics of different configurations of the PDRIME, assuming quasi-one-dimensional transient flow and global representations of the effects of MHD phenomena on the gas dynamics. By utilizing high-order accurate solvers, we thus are able to investigate the fundamental physical processes associated with the PDRIME and PDRE concepts and identify potentially promising operating regimes. In the second part of this investigation, the detailed coupling of detonations and electric and magnetic fields are explored. First, a one-dimensional spark-ignited detonation with complex reaction kinetics is fully evaluated and the mechanisms for the different instabilities are analyzed. It is found that complex kinetics in addition to sufficient spatial resolution are required to be able to quantify high frequency as well as low frequency detonation instability modes. Armed with this quantitative understanding, we then examine the interaction of a propagating detonation and the applied MHD, both in one-dimensional and two

  3. Lagrangian modeling of turbulent spray combustion: application to rocket engines cryogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izard, J.-F.; Mura, A.

    2011-10-01

    The present work is concerned with the application of a turbulent two-phase flow combustion model to a spray flame of Liquid Oxygen (LOx) and Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2). The proposed strategy relies on a joint Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. The Probability Density Function (PDF) that characterizes the liquid phase is evaluated by simulating the Williams spray equation [1] thanks to the semifluid approach introduced in [2]. The Lagrangian approach provides the classical exchange terms with the gaseous phase and, especially, several vaporization source terms. They are required to describe turbulent combustion but difficult to evaluate from the Eulerian point of view. The turbulent combustion model retained here relies on the consideration of the mixture fraction to evaluate the local fuel-to-oxidizer ratio, and the oxygen mass fraction to follow the deviations from chemical equilibrium. The difficulty associated with the estimation of a joint scalar PDF is circumvented by invoking the sudden chemistry hypothesis [3]. In this manner, the problem reduces to the estimation of the mixture fraction PDF, but with the influence of the terms related to vaporization that are the source of additional fluctuations of composition. Following the early proposal of [4], these terms are easily obtained from the Lagrangian framework adopted to describe the two-phase flows. The resulting computational model is applied to the numerical simulation of LOx-GH2 spray flames. The test case (Mascotte) is representative of combustion in rocket engine conditions. The results of numerical simulations display a satisfactory agreement with available experimental data.

  4. A Design Tool for Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R.; Cheng, G.; Trinh, H.; Tucker, K.

    2000-01-01

    A practical design tool which emphasizes the analysis of flowfields near the injector face of liquid rocket engines has been developed and used to simulate preliminary configurations of NASA's Fastrac and vortex engines. This computational design tool is sufficiently detailed to predict the interactive effects of injector element impingement angles and points and the momenta of the individual orifice flows and the combusting flow which results. In order to simulate a significant number of individual orifices, a homogeneous computational fluid dynamics model was developed. To describe sub- and supercritical liquid and vapor flows, the model utilized thermal and caloric equations of state which were valid over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The model was constructed such that the local quality of the flow was determined directly. Since both the Fastrac and vortex engines utilize RP-1/LOX propellants, a simplified hydrocarbon combustion model was devised in order to accomplish three-dimensional, multiphase flow simulations. Such a model does not identify drops or their distribution, but it does allow the recirculating flow along the injector face and into the acoustic cavity and the film coolant flow to be accurately predicted.

  5. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  6. Combustion and Performance Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Jones, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper summarizes the analyses of combustion and performance as a follow-up to a paper published in the 2008 JANNAF/LPS meeting. Combustion stability analyses are presented in a separate paper. The current paper includes test and analysis results of coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane or gaseous methane propellants. Several thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element swirl coax element injectors tested at the NASA MSFC, and a uni-element chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods

  7. Combustion and Performance Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Jones, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper summarizes the analyses of combustion and performance as a follow-up to a paper published in the 2008 JANNAF/LPS meeting. Combustion stability analyses are presented in a separate paper. The current paper includes test and analysis results of coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane or gaseous methane propellants. Several thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element swirl coax element injectors tested at the NASA MSFC, and a uni-element chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods

  8. Triggering of longitudinal combustion instabilities in solid rocket motors: Nonlinear combustion response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicker, J. M.; Greene, W. D.; Kim, S. I.; Yang, V.

    1995-01-01

    Pulsed oscillations in solid rocket motors are investigated with emphasis on nonlinear combustion response. The study employs a wave equation governing the unsteady motions in a two-phase flow, and a solution technique based on spatial- and time-averaging. A wide class of combustion response functions is studied to second-order in fluctuation amplitude to determine if, when, and how triggered instabilities arise. Conditions for triggering are derived from analysis of limit cycles, and regions of triggering are found in parametric space. Based on the behavior of model dynamical systems, introduction of linear cross-coupling and quadratic self-coupling among the acoustic modes appears to be the manner in which the nonlinear combustion response produces triggering to a stable limit cycle. Regions of initial conditions corresponding to stable pulses were found, suggesting that stability depends on initial phase angle and harmonic content, as well as the composite amplitude, of the pulse.

  9. Triggering of longitudinal combustion instabilities in solid rocket motors: Nonlinear combustion response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicker, J. M.; Greene, W. D.; Kim, S. I.; Yang, V.

    1995-01-01

    Pulsed oscillations in solid rocket motors are investigated with emphasis on nonlinear combustion response. The study employs a wave equation governing the unsteady motions in a two-phase flow, and a solution technique based on spatial- and time-averaging. A wide class of combustion response functions is studied to second-order in fluctuation amplitude to determine if, when, and how triggered instabilities arise. Conditions for triggering are derived from analysis of limit cycles, and regions of triggering are found in parametric space. Based on the behavior of model dynamical systems, introduction of linear cross-coupling and quadratic self-coupling among the acoustic modes appears to be the manner in which the nonlinear combustion response produces triggering to a stable limit cycle. Regions of initial conditions corresponding to stable pulses were found, suggesting that stability depends on initial phase angle and harmonic content, as well as the composite amplitude, of the pulse.

  10. Combustion Stability Assessments of the Black Brant Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Black Brant variation of the Standard Brant developed in the 1960's has been a workhorse motor of the NASA Sounding Rocket Project Office (SRPO) since the 1970's. In March 2012, the Black Brant Mk1 used on mission 36.277 experienced combustion instability during a flight at White Sands Missile Range, the third event in the last four years, the first occurring in November, 2009, the second in April 2010. After the 2010 event the program has been increasing the motor's throat diameter post-delivery with the goal of lowering the chamber pressure and increasing the margin against combustion instability. During the most recent combustion instability event, the vibrations exceeded the qualification levels for the Flight Termination System. The present study utilizes data generated from T-burner testing of multiple Black Brant propellants at the Naval Air Warfare Center at China Lake, to improve the combustion stability predictions for the Black Brant Mk1 and to generate new predictions for the Mk2. Three unique one dimensional (1-D) stability models were generated, representing distinct Black Brant flights, two of which experienced instabilities. The individual models allowed for comparison of stability characteristics between various nozzle configurations. A long standing "rule of thumb" states that increased stability margin is gained by increasing the throat diameter. In contradiction to this experience based rule, the analysis shows that little or no margin is gained from a larger throat diameter. The present analysis demonstrates competing effects resulting from an increased throat diameter accompanying a large response function. As is expected, more acoustic energy was expelled through the nozzle, but conversely more acoustic energy was generated due to larger gas velocities near the propellant surfaces.

  11. Cooled Ceramic Composite Panel Tested Successfully in Rocket Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2003-01-01

    Regeneratively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) structures are being considered for use along the walls of the hot-flow paths of rocket-based or turbine-based combined-cycle propulsion systems. They offer the combined benefits of substantial weight savings, higher operating temperatures, and reduced coolant requirements in comparison to components designed with traditional metals. These cooled structures, which use the fuel as the coolant, require materials that can survive aggressive thermal, mechanical, acoustic, and aerodynamic loads while acting as heat exchangers, which can improve the efficiency of the engine. A team effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and various industrial partners has led to the design, development, and fabrication of several types of regeneratively cooled panels. The concepts for these panels range from ultra-lightweight designs that rely only on CMC tubes for coolant containment to more maintainable designs that incorporate metal coolant containment tubes to allow for the rapid assembly or disassembly of the heat exchanger. One of the cooled panels based on an all-CMC design was successfully tested in the rocket combustion facility at Glenn. Testing of the remaining four panels is underway.

  12. Combustion Stability Innovations for Liquid Rocket

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-31

    unsteady reacting flows al high pressures. Intake manifolds, injector design and placement, addition of baffles and acoustic cavities add to the...model recommendations: for transonic flows the Rt model or the cubic k-e closure should be used. For hypersonic flows the Rt model should be invoked

  13. Additive Manufacturing a Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Carl P.; Robertson, Elizabeth H.; Koelbl, Mary Beth; Singer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Space Propulsion is a 5 day event being held from 2nd May to the 6th May 2016 at the Rome Marriott Park Hotel in Rome, Italy. This event showcases products like Propulsion sub-systems and components, Production and manufacturing issues, Liquid, Solid, Hybrid and Air-breathing Propulsion Systems for Launcher and Upper Stages, Overview of current programmes, AIV issues and tools, Flight testing and experience, Technology building blocks for Future Space Transportation Propulsion Systems : Launchers, Exploration platforms & Space Tourism, Green Propulsion for Space Transportation, New propellants, Rocket propulsion & global environment, Cost related aspects of Space Transportation propulsion, Modelling, Pressure-Thrust oscillations issues, Impact of new requirements and regulations on design etc. in the Automotive, Manufacturing, Fabrication, Repair & Maintenance industries.

  14. Nonlinear Longitudinal Mode Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Preburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    Nonlinear pressure oscillations have been observed in liquid propellant rocket instability preburner devices. Unlike the familiar transverse mode instabilities that characterize primary combustion chambers, these oscillations appear as longitudinal gas motions with frequencies that are typical of the chamber axial acoustic modes. In several respects, the phenomenon is similar to longitudinal mode combustion instability appearing in low-smoke solid propellant motors. An important feature is evidence of steep-fronted wave motions with very high amplitude. Clearly, gas motions of this type threaten the mechanical integrity of associated engine components and create unacceptably high vibration levels. This paper focuses on development of the analytical tools needed to predict, diagnose, and correct instabilities of this type. For this purpose, mechanisms that lead to steep-fronted, high-amplitude pressure waves are described in detail. It is shown that such gas motions are the outcome of the natural steepening process in which initially low amplitude standing acoustic waves grow into shock-like disturbances. The energy source that promotes this behavior is a combination of unsteady combustion energy release and interactions with the quasi-steady mean chamber flow. Since shock waves characterize the gas motions, detonation-like mechanisms may well control the unsteady combustion processes. When the energy gains exceed the losses (represented mainly by nozzle and viscous damping), the waves can rapidly grow to a finite amplitude limit cycle. Analytical tools are described that allow the prediction of the limit cycle amplitude and show the dependence of this wave amplitude on the system geometry and other design parameters. This information can be used to guide corrective procedures that mitigate or eliminate the oscillations.

  15. Study of basic physical processes in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chen, C. P.

    1992-09-01

    Inconsistencies between analytical results and measurements for liquid rocket thrust chamber performance, which escape suitable explanations, have motivated the examination of the basic phys ical modeling formulations as to their unlimited application. The publication of Prof. D. Straub's book, 'Thermofluid-dynamics of Optimized Rocket Propulsions,' further stimulated the interest of understanding the gas dynamic relationships in chemically reacting mixtures. A review of other concepts proposed by Falk-Ruppel (Gibbsian Thermodynamics), Straub (Alternative Theory, AT), Prigogine (Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics), Boltzmann (Kinetic Theory), and Truesdell (Rational Mechanism) has been made to obtain a better understanding of the Navier-Stokes equation, which is now used extensively for chemically reacting flow treatment in combustion chambers. In addition to the study of the different concepts, two workshops were conducted to clarify some of the issues. The first workshop centered on Falk-Ruppel's new 'dynamics' concept, while the second one concentrated on Straub's AT. In this report brief summaries of the reviewed philosophies are presented and compared with the classical Navier-Stokes formulation in a tabular arrangement. Also the highlights of both workshops are addressed.

  16. Study of basic physical processes in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chen, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    Inconsistencies between analytical results and measurements for liquid rocket thrust chamber performance, which escape suitable explanations, have motivated the examination of the basic phys ical modeling formulations as to their unlimited application. The publication of Prof. D. Straub's book, 'Thermofluid-dynamics of Optimized Rocket Propulsions,' further stimulated the interest of understanding the gas dynamic relationships in chemically reacting mixtures. A review of other concepts proposed by Falk-Ruppel (Gibbsian Thermodynamics), Straub (Alternative Theory, AT), Prigogine (Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics), Boltzmann (Kinetic Theory), and Truesdell (Rational Mechanism) has been made to obtain a better understanding of the Navier-Stokes equation, which is now used extensively for chemically reacting flow treatment in combustion chambers. In addition to the study of the different concepts, two workshops were conducted to clarify some of the issues. The first workshop centered on Falk-Ruppel's new 'dynamics' concept, while the second one concentrated on Straub's AT. In this report brief summaries of the reviewed philosophies are presented and compared with the classical Navier-Stokes formulation in a tabular arrangement. Also the highlights of both workshops are addressed.

  17. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework [1, 2, 3]. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick [4, 5]. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF) and mathematics module. The HMNF module evaluates the gas flow inside of a SRM using St. Robert's law to model the solid propellant burn rate, no slip boundary conditions, and the hybrid outflow condition. Results from the HMNF model are verified by comparing the pertinent ballistics parameters with the industry standard code outputs (i.e. pressure drop, thrust, ect.). These results are then used by the coefficient form of the mathematics module to determine the complex eigenvalues of the

  18. Cooling of rocket thrust chambers with liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Schlumberger, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Rocket engines using high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP-1) as the propellants have been considered for future launch vehicle propulsion. Generally, in regeneratively cooled engines, the fuel is used to cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability at high temperatures and pressures. Therefore, LOX is being considered as an alternative coolant. However, there has been concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot-gas side wall. To address this concern, an investigation was previously conducted with simulated fatigue cracks upstream of the thrust chamber throat. When these chambers were tested, an unexpected melting in the throat region developed which was not in line with the simulated fatigue cracks. The current experimental program was conducted in order to determine the cause for the failure in the earlier thrust chambers and to further investigate the effects of cracks in the thrust chamber liner upstream of the throat. The thrust chambers were tested at oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratios from 1.5 to 2.86 at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa. As a result of the test series, the reason for the failure occurring in the earlier work was determined to be injector anomalies. The LOX leaking through the simulated fatigue cracks did not affect the integrity of the chambers.

  19. Liquid Rocket Propulsion Technology: An evaluation of NASA's program. [for space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The liquid rocket propulsion technology needs to support anticipated future space vehicles were examined including any special action needs to be taken to assure that an industrial base in substained. Propulsion system requirements of Earth-to-orbit vehicles, orbital transfer vehicles, and planetary missions were evaluated. Areas of the fundamental technology program undertaking these needs discussed include: pumps and pump drives; combustion heat transfer; nozzle aerodynamics; low gravity cryogenic fluid management; and component and system life reliability, and maintenance. The primary conclusion is that continued development of the shuttle main engine system to achieve design performance and life should be the highest priority in the rocket engine program.

  20. Numerical analysis of combustion characteristics of hybrid rocket motor with multi-section swirl injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengen; Cai, Guobiao; Tian, Hui

    2016-06-01

    This paper is aimed to analyse the combustion characteristics of hybrid rocket motor with multi-section swirl injection by simulating the combustion flow field. Numerical combustion flow field and combustion performance parameters are obtained through three-dimensional numerical simulations based on a steady numerical model proposed in this paper. The hybrid rocket motor adopts 98% hydrogen peroxide and polyethylene as the propellants. Multiple injection sections are set along the axis of the solid fuel grain, and the oxidizer enters the combustion chamber by means of tangential injection via the injector ports in the injection sections. Simulation results indicate that the combustion flow field structure of the hybrid rocket motor could be improved by multi-section swirl injection method. The transformation of the combustion flow field can greatly increase the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency. The average fuel regression rate of the motor with multi-section swirl injection is improved by 8.37 times compared with that of the motor with conventional head-end irrotational injection. The combustion efficiency is increased to 95.73%. Besides, the simulation results also indicate that (1) the additional injection sections can increase the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency; (2) the upstream offset of the injection sections reduces the combustion efficiency; and (3) the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency decrease with the reduction of the number of injector ports in each injection section.

  1. The washout of combustion-generated hydrogen chloride. [rocket exhaust raindrop scavenging quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.; Hrdina, D.; Knutson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The coefficient for the washout from a rocket exhaust cloud of HCl generated by the combustion of an ammonium perchlorate-based solid rocket propellant such as that to be used for the Space Shuttle Booster is determined. A mathematical model of HCl scavenging by rain is developed taking into account rain droplet size, fall velocity and concentration under various rain conditions, partitioning of exhaust HCl between liquid and gaseous phases, the tendency of HCl to promote water vapor condensation and the concentration and size of droplets within the exhaust cloud. The washout coefficient is calculated as a function of total cloud water content, total HCl content at 100% relative humidity, condensation nuclei concentration and rain intensity. The model predictions are compared with experimental results obtained in scavenging tests with solid rocket exhaust and raindrops of different sizes, and the large reduction in washout coefficient at high relative humidities predicted by the model is not observed. A washout coefficient equal to 0.0000512 times the -0.176 power of the mass concentration of HCl times the 0.773 power of the rainfall intensity is obtained from the experimental data.

  2. Fuel Chemistry and Combustion Distribution Effects on Rocket Engine Combustion Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-25

    H2O2 into hot oxygen and steam, an oxidizer injector mounted on a shaft that can translate during the course of the test, a co-axial fuel injector...have higher rates of reaction. It is known that hydrogen , with a very high rate of reaction, tends to be a stable rocket fuel . This study seeks to... hydrogen , JP-8 & ethanol), and liquid fuels containing energetic additives (eg hydrides and aluminum) have been studied. The modeling is being used to

  3. Reduced Basis and Stochastic Modeling of Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine as a Complex System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-02

    injection of bi- propellants which is able to predict based on injector configuration, mixture ratio, mean chamber pressure, and mean flow Mach number...13. Current Research Activity: A current thermomechanics- based study is motivated by the liquid propellant rocket engine (LPRE) instability studies... propellants . ARS J., 31, 112. Godsave, G.A.E. 1953. Studies of the combustion of drops in a fuel spray: The burning of single drops of fuel. Symp. (Int

  4. A review of liquid rocket propulsion programs in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment of Japan's current capabilities in the areas of space and transatmospheric propulsion is presented. The primary focus is upon Japan's programs in liquid rocket propulsion and in space plane and related transatmospheric areas. Brief reference is also made to their solid rocket programs, as well as to their supersonic air breathing propulsion efforts that are just getting underway.

  5. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRBs) replacing Solid Rocket Boosters on the Space Shuttle program. The major findings are given. The most significant conclusion is that LRBs offer significantly safety and performance advantages over the SRBs currently used by the STS without major impact to the ongoing program.

  6. Spark Ignition of Combustible Vapor in a Plastic Bottle as a Demonstration of Rocket Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    I report an innovation that provides a compelling demonstration of rocket propulsion, appropriate for students of physics and other physical sciences. An electrical spark is initiated from a distance to cause the deflagration of a combustible vapor mixed with air in a lightweight plastic bottle that is consequently propelled as a rocket by the…

  7. Spark Ignition of Combustible Vapor in a Plastic Bottle as a Demonstration of Rocket Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    I report an innovation that provides a compelling demonstration of rocket propulsion, appropriate for students of physics and other physical sciences. An electrical spark is initiated from a distance to cause the deflagration of a combustible vapor mixed with air in a lightweight plastic bottle that is consequently propelled as a rocket by the…

  8. Theoretical Performance of Liquid Hydrogen with Liquid Oxygen as a Rocket Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    1959-01-01

    Theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen composition during expansion was calculated for the propellant combination liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen at four chamber pressures (60, 150, 300, and 600 lb/sq in. abs) and a wide range of pressure ratios (1 to 4000) and oxidant-fuel ratios (1.190 to 39.683). Data are given to estimate performance parameters at chamber pressures other than those for which data are tabulated. The parameters included are specific impulse, specific impulse in vacuum, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, molecular weight, molecular-weight derivatives, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, thermal conductivity, Mach number, and equilibrium gas compositions.

  9. Theoretical performance of liquid ammonia and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Huff, Vearl N

    1953-01-01

    Theoretical values of performance parameters for liquid ammonia and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant were calculated on the assumption of equilibrium composition during the expansion process for a wide range of fuel-oxidant and expansion ratios. The parameters included were specific impulse, combustion chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, equilibrium composition, mean molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, coefficient of viscosity, and coefficient of thermal conductivity. The maximum value of specific impulse was 311.5 pound-seconds per pound for a chamber pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute (20.41 atm) and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  10. Theoretical performance of liquid hydrogen and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Huff, Vearl N

    1953-01-01

    Theoretical values of performance parameters for liquid hydrogen and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant were calculated on the assumption of equilibrium composition during the expansion process for a wide range of fuel-oxidant and expansion ratios. The parameters included were specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, equilibrium composition, mean molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ration of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, coefficient of viscosity, and coefficient of thermal conductivity. The maximum value of specific impulse was 364.6 pound-seconds per pound for a chamber pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute (20.41 atm) and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  11. A numerical model for atomization-spray coupling in liquid rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, Anantha; Lee, J. J.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, K.

    1992-01-01

    The physical process of atomization is an important consideration in the stable operation of liquid rocket engines. Many spray combustion computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes do not include an atomization sub-model but assume arbitrary drop size distributions, drop initial locations, and velocities. A method of coupling an atomization model with the spray model in a REFLEQS CFD code is presented. This method is based on a jet-embedding technique in which the equations governing the liquid jet core are solved separately using the surrounding gas phase conditions. The droplet initial conditions are calculated using a stability analysis appropriate for the atomization regime of liquid jet break-up.

  12. Robert H. Goddard and His Liquid-Gasoline Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Goddard's 1926 rocket configuration. Dr. Goddard's liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  13. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials § 176.340 Combustible liquids in portable tanks. Combustible liquids, having a flash point of 38 °C (100 °F) or...

  14. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials § 176.340 Combustible liquids in portable tanks. Combustible liquids, having a flash point of 38 °C (100 °F) or...

  15. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials § 176.340 Combustible liquids in portable tanks. Combustible liquids, having a flash point of 38 °C (100 °F) or...

  16. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials § 176.340 Combustible liquids in portable tanks. Combustible liquids, having a flash point of 38 °C (100 °F) or...

  17. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials § 176.340 Combustible liquids in portable tanks. Combustible liquids, having a flash point of 38 °C (100 °F) or...

  18. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. This work builds upon previous efforts to verify the use of the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) laid out by Campos. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, del squared psi - (lambda/c) squared psi - M x [M x del((del)(psi))] - 2((lambda)(M)/c + M x del(M) x (del)(psi) - 2(lambda)(psi)[M x del(1/c)] = 0. with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and ? as the complex eigenvalue. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF

  19. Fiber optics in liquid propellant rocket engine environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcher, R.; Dinnsen, D.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber optics have recently been seen to offer several major benefits in liquid-fuel rocket engine applications. Fiber-optic sensors can provide measurements that cannot be made with conventional techniques. Fiber optics also can reduce harness weight, provide lightning immunity, and increase frequency response. This paper discusses the results of feasibility testing optical fibers in simulated liquid-fuel rocket engine environments. The environments included cryogenic and high temperatures, and high vibration levels.

  20. Comparison of High Aspect Ratio Cooling Channel Designs for a Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical investigation on the effect of high aspect ratio (height/width) cooling channels, considering different coolant channel designs, on hot-gas-side wall temperature and coolant pressure drop for a liquid hydrogen cooled rocket combustion chamber, was performed. Coolant channel design elements considered were: length of combustion chamber in which high aspect ratio cooling was applied, number of coolant channels, and coolant channel shape. Seven coolant channel designs were investigated using a coupling of the Rocket Thermal Evaluation code and the Two-Dimensional Kinetics code. Initially, each coolant channel design was developed, without consideration for fabrication, to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature from a given conventional cooling channel baseline. These designs produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions up to 22 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 7.5 percent from the baseline. Fabrication constraints for milled channels were applied to the seven designs. These produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions of up to 20 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 2 percent. Using high aspect ratio cooling channels for the entire length of the combustion chamber had no additional benefit on hot-gas-side wall temperature over using high aspect ratio cooling channels only in the throat region, but increased coolant pressure drop 33 percent. Independent of coolant channel shape, high aspect ratio cooling was able to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature by at least 8 percent, with as low as a 2 percent increase in coolant pressure drop. The design with the highest overall benefit to hot-gas-side wall temperature and minimal coolant pressure drop cooling can now be done in relatively short periods of time with multiple iterations.

  1. Spark Ignition of Combustible Vapor in a Plastic Bottle as a Demonstration of Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    I report an innovation that provides a compelling demonstration of rocket propulsion, appropriate for students of physics and other physical sciences. An electrical spark is initiated from a distance to cause the deflagration of a combustible vapor mixed with air in a lightweight plastic bottle that is consequently propelled as a rocket by the release of combustion products, i.e., a "whoosh rocket." My recommendation is that the standard fuel for pedagogical whoosh demonstrations be isopropanol, and the recommended vessel is the 3.8-L high-density polyethylene (HDPE) bottle.

  2. Liquid-hydrogen rocket engine development at Aerojet, 1944 - 1950

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, G. H.; Gordon, R.; Coplen, H. L.; James, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    This program demonstrated the feasibility of virtually all the components in present-day, high-energy, liquid-rocket engines. Transpiration and film-cooled thrust chambers were successfully operated. The first liquid-hydrogen tests of the coaxial injector was conducted and the first pump to successfully produce high pressures in pumping liquid hydrogen was tested. A 1,000-lb-thrust gaseous propellant and a 3,000-lb-thrust liquid-propellant thrust chamber were operated satisfactorily. Also, the first tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of jet overexpansion and separation on performance of rocket thrust chambers with hydrogen-oxygen propellants.

  3. Combustion oscillation study in a kerosene fueled rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Wei; He, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Fei; Xue, Rui; Wei, Xiang-Geng; Shi, Lei

    2016-12-01

    This study reports the combustion oscillation features in a three-dimensional (3D) rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engine combustor under flight Mach number (Mflight) 3.0 conditions both experimentally and numerically. Experiment is performed on a direct-connect ground test facility, which measures the wall pressure along the flow-path. High-speed imaging of the flame luminosity and schlieren is carried out at exit of the primary rocket. Compressible reactive large eddy simulation (LES) with reduced chemical kinetics of a surrogate model for kerosene is performed to further understand the combustion oscillation mechanisms in the combustor. LES results are validated with experimental data by the time-averaged and root mean square (RMS) pressure values, and show acceptable agreement. Effects of the primary rocket jet on pressure oscillation in the combustor are analyzed. Relation of the high speed rocket jet oscillation, which is thought to among the most probable sources of combustion oscillation, with the RBCC combustor is recognized. Results reveal that the unsteady over-expanded rocket jet has significant impacts on the combustion oscillation feature of the RBCC combustor, which is different from a thermo-acoustics type oscillation. The rocket jet/air inflow physical interactions under different rocket jet expansion degrees are experimentally studied.

  4. Extinction of solid rocket motor by liquid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jinqi; Li, Baoxiun; Wang, Kexiu; Wu, Xinping; Zhang, Baoqing; Su, Guangshou

    1992-10-01

    An empirical data-based theoretical model is presented for liquid quenching of a solid rocket motor, taking into account the details of internal-ballistics coupling effects, solid propellant transient burning, liquid drop evaporation, and heat transfer via liquid-jet boiling. The exceeding of a critical injection pressure drop value is found to be required for effective quenching; as the injection pressure drop increases, the volume of the liquid required for reliable extinction decreases. Good agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  5. Snecma Liquid Rocket Engine Concepts for Future ELV and RLV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Excoffon, Tony; de Spiegeleer, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Snecma is the prime contractor for the development of the storable and cryogenic liquid rocket engines of the Ariane launcher, including the Viking storable engine, HM7 cryogenic engine, Vulcain and Vulcain 2 cryogenic engines. The new cryogenic engine Vinci is under development and qualification is planned by 2006. This paper presents the results of a study which has been performed over the last 2 years to define the most suitable engines for the future versions of expendable launchers as well as future reusable vehicles. A family of new engines is introduced including LOX/LH2 engines and LOX/CH4 engines. Particularly, a cryogenic staged combustion fuel-rich engine has been designed and optimized in two versions. The first one is dedicated to an expendable launcher and could be developed first. It offers high performance and reliability at the minimum cost. The second version is a derivative which offers reusability and increased performance for future RLV application. The development and production of the expandable version will allow to achieve and demonstrate high reliability and to better evaluate the potential for reusability through the development test campaigns which usually requires as many as 20 tests with the same engines. Only some critical components would be changed to achieve reusability. This approach allows to minimize the development cost and to keep the production cost low for both versions by using a learning curve over a large number of engines.

  6. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analysis verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analysis will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Film cooling simulations of film coolant flows typical of the subscale Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) being experimentally studied by Pratt and Whitney have been made, and these results will be presented. Other film coolant experiments have also been simulated to verify the CFD heat transfer model being developed. The status of the study and its relevance as a new design tool are covered. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  7. Numerical and experimental study of liquid breakup process in solid rocket motor nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Yi-Hsin

    Rocket propulsion is an important travel method for space exploration and national defense, rockets needs to be able to withstand wide range of operation environment and also stable and precise enough to carry sophisticated payload into orbit, those engineering requirement makes rocket becomes one of the state of the art industry. The rocket family have been classified into two major group of liquid and solid rocket based on the fuel phase of liquid or solid state. The solid rocket has the advantages of simple working mechanism, less maintenance and preparing procedure and higher storage safety, those characters of solid rocket make it becomes popular in aerospace industry. Aluminum based propellant is widely used in solid rocket motor (SRM) industry due to its avalibility, combusion performance and economical fuel option, however after aluminum react with oxidant of amonimum perchrate (AP), it will generate liquid phase alumina (Al2O3) as product in high temperature (2,700˜3,000 K) combustion chamber enviornment. The liquid phase alumina particles aggromorate inside combustion chamber into larger particle which becomes major erosion calprit on inner nozzle wall while alumina aggromorates impinge on the nozzle wall surface. The erosion mechanism result nozzle throat material removal, increase the performance optimized throat diameter and reduce nozzle exit to throat area ratio which leads to the reduction of exhaust gas velocity, Mach number and lower the propulsion thrust force. The approach to avoid particle erosion phenomenon taking place in SRM's nozzle is to reduce the alumina particle size inside combustion chamber which could be done by further breakup of the alumina droplet size in SRM's combustion chamber. The study of liquid breakup mechanism is an important means to smaller combustion chamber alumina droplet size and mitigate the erosion tack place on rocket nozzle region. In this study, a straight two phase air-water flow channel experiment is set up

  8. Hybrid rockets - Combining the best of liquids and solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry R.; Goldberg, Ben E.; Estey, Paul N.; Wiley, Dan R.

    1992-01-01

    Hybrid rockets employing liquid oxidizer and solid fuel grain answers to cost, safety, reliability, and environmental impact concerns that have become as prominent as performance in recent years. The oxidizer-free grain has limited sensitivity to grain anomalies, such as bond-line separations, which can cause catastrophic failures in solid rocket motors. An account is presently given of the development effort associated with the AMROC commercial hybrid booster and component testing efforts at NASA-Marshall. These hybrid rockets can be fired, terminated, inspected, evaluated, and restarted for additional testing.

  9. Liquid Rocket Lines, Bellows, Flexible Hoses, and Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Fluid-flow components in a liquid propellant rocket engine and the rocket vehicle which it propels are interconnected by lines, bellows, and flexible hoses. Elements involved in the successful design of these components are identified and current technologies pertaining to these elements are reviewed, assessed, and summarized to provide a technology base for a checklist of rules to be followed by project managers in guiding a design or assessing its adequacy. Recommended procedures for satisfying each of the design criteria are included.

  10. Technique for the optimization of the powerhead configuration and performance of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Germain, Brad David

    The development and optimization of liquid rocket engines is an integral part of space vehicle design, since most Earth-to-orbit launch vehicles to date have used liquid rockets as their main propulsion system. Rocket engine design tools range in fidelity from very simple conceptual level tools to full computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The level of fidelity of interest in this research is a design tool that determines engine thrust and specific impulse as well as models the powerhead of the engine. This is the highest level of fidelity applicable to a conceptual level design environment where faster running analyses are desired. The optimization of liquid rocket engines using a powerhead analysis tool is a difficult problem, because it involves both continuous and discrete inputs as well as a nonlinear design space. Example continuous inputs are the main combustion chamber pressure, nozzle area ratio, engine mixture ratio, and desired thrust. Example discrete variable inputs are the engine cycle (staged-combustion, gas generator, etc.), fuel/oxidizer combination, and engine material choices. Nonlinear optimization problems involving both continuous and discrete inputs are referred to as Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programming (MINLP) problems. Many methods exist in literature for solving MINLP problems; however none are applicable for this research. All of the existing MINLP methods require the relaxation of the discrete variables as part of their analysis procedure. This means that the discrete choices must be evaluated at non-discrete values. This is not possible with an engine powerhead design code. Therefore, a new optimization method was developed that uses modified response surface equations to provide lower bounds of the continuous design space for each unique discrete variable combination. These lower bounds are then used to efficiently solve the optimization problem. The new optimization procedure was used to find optimal rocket engine designs

  11. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Rocket Heat Transfer and Combustion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of rocket engine heat transfer experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants was conducted. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-lb/f thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-percentage by weight loadings of aluminum particles. Gaseous oxygen was used as the oxidizer. Three different injectors were used during the testing: one for the baseline O(2)/RP-1 tests and two for the gelled and metallized gelled fuel firings. Heat transfer measurements were made with a rocket engine calorimeter chamber and nozzle with a total of 31 cooling channels. Each chamber used a water flow to carry heat away from the chamber and the attached thermocouples and flow meters allowed heat flux estimates at each of the 31 stations. The rocket engine Cstar efficiency for the RP-1 fuel was in the 65-69 percent range, while the gelled 0 percent by weight RP-1 and the 5-percent by weight RP-1 exhibited a Cstar efficiency range of 60 to 62% and 65 to 67%, respectively. The 55-percent by weight RP-1 fuel delivered a 42-47% Cstar efficiency. Comparisons of the heat flux and temperature profiles of the RP-1 and the metallized gelled RP-1/A1 fuels show that the peak nozzle heat fluxes with the metallized gelled O2/RP-1/A1 propellants are substantially higher than the baseline O2/RP-1: up to double the flux for the 55 percent by weight RP-1/A1 over the RP-1 fuel. Analyses showed that the heat transfer to the wall was significantly different for the RP-1/A1 at 55-percent by weight versus the RP-1 fuel. Also, a gellant and an aluminum combustion delay was inferred in the 0 percent and 5-percent by weight RP-1/A1 cases from the decrease in heat flux in the first part of the chamber. A large decrease in heat flux in the last half of the chamber was caused by fuel deposition in the chamber and nozzle. The engine combustion occurred well downstream of the injector face

  12. Turbopump systems for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The turbopump system, from preliminary design through rocket engine testing is examined. Selection of proper system type for each application and integration of the components into a working system are dealt with. Details are also given on the design of various components including inducers, pumps, turbines, gears, and bearings.

  13. A Preliminary Study of End-Burning Hybrid Rocket: Part 2 Combustion Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Nozomu; Kato, Takahiro; Nagata, Harunori; Kudo, Isao

    To overcome defects of conventional hybrid rockets such as the loss of specific impulse, which is caused by the O/F shift during the combustion, and the low combustion efficiency, the authors have proposed a new idea of design. The point of this idea, named “End-Burning Hybrid Rocket, ” is that oxidizer gas flows in the gap space of a porous solid fuel bed. Diffusion flame is formed at the end of the solid fuel bed. Experimental studies were made to clarify the basic combustion characteristics of the propellant. Results show that pressure exponent of the burning rate with the same equivalence ratio is approximately 0.85 and virtually independent with the equivalence ratio. Using this result, a designing method of End-Burning Hybrid Rocket Motor is shown. Finally, thrust and specific impulse is estimated as functions of oxidizer gas flow rates to investigate the throttling characteristics of the motor.

  14. The 2003 Goddard Rocket Replica Project: A Reconstruction of the World's First Functional Liquid Rocket System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, R. A.; Elam, S. K.; Hicks, G. D.; Sanders, T. M.; London, J. R.; Mayne, A. W.; Christensen, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of NASA s 2003 Centennial of Flight celebration, engineers and technicians at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, in cooperation with the Alabama-Mississippi AIAA Section, have reconstructed historically accurate, functional replicas of Dr. Robert H. Goddard s 1926 first liquid- fuel rocket. The purposes of this project were to clearly understand, recreate, and document the mechanisms and workings of the 1926 rocket for exhibit and educational use, creating a vital resource for researchers studying the evolution of liquid rocketry for years to come. The MSFC team s reverse engineering activity has created detailed engineering-quality drawings and specifications describing the original rocket and how it was built, tested, and operated. Static hot-fire tests, as well as flight demonstrations, have further defined and quantified the actual performance and engineering actual performance and engineering challenges of this major segment in early aerospace history.

  15. The 2003 Goddard Rocket Replica Project: A Reconstruction of the World's First Functional Liquid Rocket System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, R. A.; Elam, S. K.; Hicks, G. D.; Sanders, T. M.; London, J. R.; Mayne, A. W.; Christensen, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of NASA s 2003 Centennial of Flight celebration, engineers and technicians at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, in cooperation with the Alabama-Mississippi AIAA Section, have reconstructed historically accurate, functional replicas of Dr. Robert H. Goddard s 1926 first liquid- fuel rocket. The purposes of this project were to clearly understand, recreate, and document the mechanisms and workings of the 1926 rocket for exhibit and educational use, creating a vital resource for researchers studying the evolution of liquid rocketry for years to come. The MSFC team s reverse engineering activity has created detailed engineering-quality drawings and specifications describing the original rocket and how it was built, tested, and operated. Static hot-fire tests, as well as flight demonstrations, have further defined and quantified the actual performance and engineering actual performance and engineering challenges of this major segment in early aerospace history.

  16. A numerical model for coupling between atomization and spray dynamics in liquid rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, Klaus

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method of coupling the atomization and spray combustion processes encountered in coaxial injection elements of liquid rocket engine thrust chambers. This method is based on the Jet-Embedding technique in which the liquid jet core equations and the gas phase equations are solved separately. The liquid and gas phase solutions, however, are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface between the phases. The computational grid for the gas phase calculations are adapted to the shape of the liquid jet core. The axial variation of droplet sizes are calculated using a stability analysis appropriate for the atomization regime of liquid jet breakup. The predictions of this method have been validated with experimental data on low speed water jets. Using this method, calculations are performed for the SSME fuel preburner single injector flow field. The results obtained are in good agreement with the predictions of the volume-of-fluid method.

  17. Combustion Instability Mechanisms in a Pressure-coupled Gas-gas Coaxial Rocket Injector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Coaxial Rocket Injector 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Harvazinski, M. , Huang, C...Combustion Instability Mechanisms in a Pressure-coupled Gas-gas Coaxial Rocket Injector Matthew E. Harvazinski∗, Air Force Research Laboratory...downstream and the vortex partially decayed before impingement, the timing of this event was not well correlated with the acoustic mode.11 For the third

  18. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 1: A One-Dimensional Analysis of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fuel Preburner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kair Chuan

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency combustion instability, known as chugging, is consistently experienced during shutdown in the fuel and oxidizer preburners of the Space Shuttle Main Engines. Such problems always occur during the helium purge of the residual oxidizer from the preburner manifolds during the shutdown sequence. Possible causes and triggering mechanisms are analyzed and details in modeling the fuel preburner chug are presented. A linearized chugging model, based on the foundation of previous models, capable of predicting the chug occurrence is discussed and the predicted results are presented and compared to experimental work performed by NASA. Sensitivity parameters such as chamber pressure, fuel and oxidizer temperatures, and the effective bulk modulus of the liquid oxidizer are considered in analyzing the fuel preburner chug. The computer program CHUGTEST is utilized to generate the stability boundary for each sensitivity study and the region for stable operation is identified.

  19. Yuzhnoye's new liquid rocket engines as enablers for space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Kushnaryov, Alexander; Shulga, Vladimir; Ventskovsky, Oleg

    2016-10-01

    Advanced liquid rocket engines (LREs) are being created by Yuzhnoye Design Office of Ukraine based on the fifty-year experience of rocket engines' and propulsion systems' development. These LREs use both hypergolic (NTO+UDMH) and cryogenic (liquid oxygen+kerosene) propellants. First stage engines have a range of thrust from 40 to 250 t, while the upper stage (used in space) engines - from several kilograms to 50 t and a re-ignition feature. The engines are intended for both Ukraine;s independent access to space and international market.

  20. Fluid thrust control system. [for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. L.; Jansen, H. B.; Lehmann, E. N. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A pure fluid thrust control system is described for a pump-fed, regeneratively cooled liquid propellant rocket engine. A proportional fluid amplifier and a bistable fluid amplifier control overshoot in the starting of the engine and take it to a predetermined thrust. An ejector type pump is provided in the line between the liquid hydrogen rocket nozzle heat exchanger and the turbine driving the fuel pump to aid in bringing the fluid at this point back into the regular system when it is not bypassed. The thrust control system is intended to function in environments too severe for mechanical controls.

  1. Laser Schlieren and ultraviolet diagnostics of rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    A low pressure oxygen/hydrogen turbine drive combustor hot-fire test series was conducted on the Turbine Drive Combustor Technology Program. The first objective was to gather data on an axisymmetric combustion system to support anchoring of a new combustion/fluid dynamics computer code under development on the same contract. The second objective was to gain insight into low mixture ratio combustion characteristics of coaxial injector elements.

  2. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/aluminum Rocket Combustion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

    1995-01-01

    A series of combustion experiments were conducted to measure the specific impulse, Cstar-, and specific-impulse efficiencies of a rocket engine using metallized gelled liquid propellants. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-1bf (89- to 178-N) thrust, modular engine consisting of an injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-wt% loadings of aluminum and gaseous oxygen was the oxidizer. Ten different injectors were used during the testing: 6 for the baseline 02/RP-1 tests and 4 for the gelled fuel tests which covered a wide range of mixture ratios. At the peak of the Isp versus oxidizer-to-fuel ratio (O/F) data, a range of 93 to 99% Cstar efficiency was reached with ungelled 02/RP-1. A Cstar efficiency range of 75 to 99% was obtained with gelled RP-l (0-wt% RP-1/Al) while the metallized 5-wt% RP-1/Al delivered a Cstar efficiency of 94 to 99% at the peak Isp in the O/F range tested. An 88 to 99% Cstar efficiency was obtained at the peak Isp of the gelled RP1/Al with 55-wt% Al. Specific impulse efficiencies for the 55-wt% RP-1/Al of 67%-83% were obtained at a 2.4:1 expansion ratio. Injector erosion was evident with the 55-wt% testing, while there was little or no erosion seen with the gelled RP-1 with 0- and 5-wt% Al. A protective layer of gelled fuel formed in the firings that minimized the damage to the rocket injector face. This effect may provide a useful technique for engine cooling. These experiments represent a first step in characterizing the performance of and operational issues with gelled RP-1 fuels.

  3. Development of a liquid oxygen facility for rocket engine injector performance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkey, Henry W.

    This study demonstrated the successful operation of a new liquid oxygen-gaseous methane rocket engine test facility to characterize the performance of a swirl coaxial injector. In support of safe system functional development, an oxygen compatibility and hazards assessment was completed to identify and minimize operational risks. Facility changes were implemented to create a more fault tolerant system. Major upgrades included initiatives to manage the oxygen risk and mitigate specific oxygen ignition mechanisms. Oxygen compatible materials and facility configuration changes were instituted to achieve safer experimentation. The demonstration testing of the cryogenic propellant system employed the swirl coaxial injector element in an ongoing program to study liquid oxygen-methane injectors. The injector performance was evaluated by experimental determination of combustion efficiency. The combustion efficiency determined for the injector arrangement during the single operational test was 80% with a 95% confidence systematic standard uncertainty estimate of 4%. Random uncertainty estimation must await repeated tests.

  4. Combustion Instability in an Acid-Heptane Rocket with a Pressurized-Gas Propellant Pumping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Adelbert O.; Bellman, Donald R.

    1951-01-01

    Results of experimental measurements of low-frequency combustion instability of a 300-pound thrust acid-heptane rocket engine were compared to the trends predicted by an analysis of combustion instability in a rocket engine with a pressurized-gas propellant pumping system. The simplified analysis, which assumes a monopropellant model, was based on the concept of a combustion the delay occurring from the moment of propellant injection to the moment of propellant combustion. This combustion time delay was experimentally measured; the experimental values were of approximately half the magnitude predicted by the analysis. The pressure-fluctuation frequency for a rocket engine with a characteristic length of 100 inches and operated at a combustion-chamber pressure of 280 pounds per square inch absolute was 38 cycles per second; the analysis indicated. a frequency of 37 cycles per second. Increasing combustion-chamber characteristic length decreased the pressure-fluctuation frequency, in conformity to the analysis. Increasing the chamber operating pressure or increasing the injector pressure drop increased the frequency. These latter two effects are contrary to the analysis; the discrepancies are attributed to the conflict between the assumptions made to simplify the analysis and the experimental conditions. Oxidant-fuel ratio had no apparent effect on the experimentally measured pressure-fluctuation frequency for acid-heptane ratios from 3.0 to 7.0. The frequencies decreased with increased amplitude of the combustion-chamber pressure variations. The analysis indicated that if the combustion time delay were sufficiently short, low-frequency combustion instability would be eliminated.

  5. Low loss injector for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A low pressure loss injector element is disclosed for the main combustion chamber of a rocket engine which includes a lox post terminating in a cylindrical barrel. Received within the barrel is a lox plug which is threaded in the lox post and includes an interchangeable lox metering sieve which meters the lox into an annular lox passage. A second annular gas passage is coaxial with the annular lox passage. A cylindrical sleeve surrounds the annular gas passage and includes an interchangeable gas metering seive having metering orifices through which a hot gas passes into the annular passage. The jets which emerge from the annular lox passage and annular gas passage intersect in a recessed area away from the combustion area. Thus, mixing and combustion stability are enhanced.

  6. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  7. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

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  8. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  9. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  10. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  11. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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  12. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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  13. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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  14. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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  15. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

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  16. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

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  17. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

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  18. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

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  19. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  20. 46 CFR 109.557 - Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. 109.557... DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.557 Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. The master or person in charge shall ensure that— (a) Flammable and combustible liquids in bulk are not carried...

  1. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids. 147.45 Section 147.45... Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.45 Flammable and combustible liquids. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transfer of flammable and combustible liquids (including...

  2. 46 CFR 109.557 - Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. 109.557... DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.557 Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. The master or person in charge shall ensure that— (a) Flammable and combustible liquids in bulk are not carried...

  3. 46 CFR 109.557 - Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. 109.557... DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.557 Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. The master or person in charge shall ensure that— (a) Flammable and combustible liquids in bulk are not carried...

  4. 46 CFR 109.557 - Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. 109.557... DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.557 Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. The master or person in charge shall ensure that— (a) Flammable and combustible liquids in bulk are not carried...

  5. Primary atomization study of a swirl coaxial liquid propellant rocket injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Shamim Aejaz

    The present work addresses swirl-induced injection and atomization phenomena for rocket combustion applications. An experimental approach is taken which focuses on the fluid mechanics of the injection process for non- combusting water sprays and then applies the knowledge to measure and describe liquid oxygen spray atomization in a research rocket chamber. Following industry practice, two swirl coaxial injectors are designed and fabricated for research; the smaller unit is representative of an upper stage propulsion engine injector, and a larger unit of identical design but twice the size is representative of a booster propulsion engine injector. Despite the difference in scale, visualizations comparing the sprays produced by the two injectors reveal a remarkably similar pattern of spray breakup and ligament and drop formation when the injection Weber number is maintained. Atomization flowfield similitude is thus alluded in imaging studies, and is further explored in spatially-resolved drop measurement experiments. Guided by dimensional analysis, experimental conditions are chosen such that all non-dimensional spray parameters are maintained in comparing the sprays formed from the two injectors. It is found that a matching of injection Weber number, and liquid-to-gas momentum ratio, results in identical drop flowfields from the two injectors in terms of the normalized measurements of drop size and velocity. Experiments for liquid only flow and liquid/gas flows are consistent in demonstrating this basis for similitude. A combusting spray of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen (adiabatic flame temperature of 2450 K, and chamber pressure of 2.1 MPa) is then compared with its non- combusting counterpart at equivalent Weber number and momentum ratio. While the non-burning and burning drop flowfields are qualitatively similar, the burning oxygen drops are found to be significantly smaller, probably due to drop evaporation effects in the elevated temperature environment of

  6. Numerical analysis of bipropellant combustion in liquid thrust chambers by an Eulerian-Eulerian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dang, A. L.; Navaz, H. K.; Rangel, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid thrust chambers performance (LTCP) code is used for parametric studies of flow and combustion in liquid rocket engines. Multiphase flow equations are solved in an Eulerian-Eulerian framework, and multistep finite rate chemistry is incorporated. The discretization scheme is fully implicit and is based on the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme, which is accurate, robust, very efficient and capable of handling steep gradients and stiff chemistry. Effects of injection velocity and chamber size have been considered, and the effect of group combustion on the evaporation rate has been studied for a dense spray.

  7. Theoretical Rocket Performance of Liquid Methane with Several Fluorine-Oxygen Mixtures Assuming Frozen Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Kastner, Michael E

    1958-01-01

    Theoretical rocket performance for frozen composition during expansion was calculated for liquid methane with several fluorine-oxygen mixtures for a range of pressure ratios and oxidant-fuel ratios. The parameters included are specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The maximum calculated value of specific impulse for a chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute (40.827atm) and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere is 315.3 for 79.67 percent fluorine in the oxidant.

  8. Mixing characteristics of injector elements in liquid rocket engines - A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, Jonathan C.; Trinh, Huu P.

    1992-07-01

    A computational study has been performed to better understand the mixing characteristics of liquid rocket injector elements. Variations in injector geometry as well as differences in injector element inlet flow conditions are among the areas examined in the study. Most results involve the nonreactive mixing of gaseous fuel with gaseous oxidizer but preliminary results are included that involve the spray combustion of oxidizer droplets. The purpose of the study is to numerically predict flowfield behavior in individual injector elements to a high degree of accuracy and in doing so to determine how various injector element properties affect the flow.

  9. Fast Ignition and Sustained Combustion of Ionic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B. (Inventor); Piper, Lawrence G. (Inventor); Oakes, David B. (Inventor); Sabourin, Justin L. (Inventor); Hicks, Adam J. (Inventor); Green, B. David (Inventor); Tsinberg, Anait (Inventor); Dokhan, Allan (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A catalyst free method of igniting an ionic liquid is provided. The method can include mixing a liquid hypergol with a HAN (Hydroxylammonium nitrate)-based ionic liquid to ignite the HAN-based ionic liquid in the absence of a catalyst. The HAN-based ionic liquid and the liquid hypergol can be injected into a combustion chamber. The HAN-based ionic liquid and the liquid hypergol can impinge upon a stagnation plate positioned at top portion of the combustion chamber.

  10. Combustion engine for solid and liquid fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pabst, W.

    1986-01-01

    A combustion engine having no piston, a single cylinder, and a dual-action, that is applicable for solid and liquid fuels and propellants, and that functions according to the principle of annealing point ignition is presented. The invention uses environmentally benign amounts of fuel and propellants to produce gas and steam pressure, and to use a simple assembly with the lowest possible consumption and constant readiness for mixing and burning. The advantage over conventional combustion engines lies in lower consumption of high quality igniting fluid in the most cost effective manner.

  11. Designing Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors for Performance, Stability, and Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing the Space Launch System (SLS) for crewed exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is designing rocket engines for the SLS Advanced Booster (AB) concepts being developed to replace the Shuttle-derived solid rocket boosters. One AB concept uses large, Rocket-Propellant (RP)-fueled engines that pose significant design challenges. The injectors for these engines require high performance and stable operation while still meeting aggressive cost reduction goals for access to space. Historically, combustion stability problems have been a critical issue for such injector designs. Traditional, empirical injector design tools and methodologies, however, lack the ability to reliably predict complex injector dynamics that often lead to combustion stability. Reliance on these tools alone would likely result in an unaffordable test-fail-fix cycle for injector development. Recently at MSFC, a massively parallel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program was successfully applied in the SLS AB injector design process. High-fidelity reacting flow simulations were conducted for both single-element and seven-element representations of the full-scale injector. Data from the CFD simulations was then used to significantly augment and improve the empirical design tools, resulting in a high-performance, stable injector design.

  12. Advancing the State-of-the-Practice for Liquid Rocket Engine Injector Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Kenny, R. J.; Richardson, B. R.; Anderso, W. E.; Austin, B. J.; Schumaker, S. A.; Muss, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Current shortcomings in both the overall injector design process and its underlying combustion stability assessment methodology are rooted in the use of empirically based or low fidelity representations of complex physical phenomena and geometry details that have first order effects on performance, thermal environments and combustion stability. The result is a design and analysis capability that is often inadequate to reliably arrive at a suitable injector design in an efficient manner. Specifically, combustion instability has been particularly difficult to predict and mitigate. Large hydrocarbon-fueled booster engines have been especially problematic in this regard. Where combustion instability has been a problem, costly and time-consuming redesign efforts have often been an unfortunate consequence. This paper presents an overview of a recently completed effort at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to advance the state-of-the-practice for liquid rocket engine injector design. Multiple perturbations of a gas-centered swirl coaxial (GCSC) element that burned gaseous oxygen and RP-1 were designed, assessed for combustion stability, and tested. Three designs, one stable, one marginally unstable and one unstable, were used to demonstrate both an enhanced overall injector design process and an improved combustion stability assessment process. High-fidelity results from state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics CFD simulations were used to substantially augment and improve the injector design methodology. The CFD results were used to inform and guide the overall injector design process. They were also used to upgrade selected empirical or low-dimensional quantities in the ROCket Combustor Interactive Design (ROCCID) stability assessment tool. Hot fire single element injector testing was used to verify both the overall injector designs and the stability assessments. Testing was conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory and at Purdue University. Companion papers

  13. Liquid Metal Fuel Combustion Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Mechanics. No such analysis seem to have been done todate . The other way is to calculate the fluid Finally the location of the liquid particles within the...3601, July about 10 axial locations before peaking up . At about y=25, the 1987. 5 3. L.P.Cook and E.R.Plante: Survey of alternate Stored Chemical

  14. Fuel/oxidizer-rich high-pressure preburners. [staged-combustion rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1981-01-01

    The analyses, designs, fabrication, and cold-flow acceptance testing of LOX/RP-1 preburner components required for a high-pressure staged-combustion rocket engine are discussed. Separate designs of injectors, combustion chambers, turbine simulators, and hot-gas mixing devices are provided for fuel-rich and oxidizer-rich operation. The fuel-rich design addresses the problem of non-equilibrium LOX/RP-1 combustion. The development and use of a pseudo-kinetic combustion model for predicting operating efficiency, physical properties of the combustion products, and the potential for generating solid carbon is presented. The oxygen-rich design addresses the design criteria for the prevention of metal ignition. This is accomplished by the selection of materials and the generation of well-mixed gases. The combining of unique propellant injector element designs with secondary mixing devices is predicted to be the best approach.

  15. Some unusual oscillating bearing applications in liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engines have some unique applications for highly loaded oscillating-motion bearings operating at cryogenic temperatures and vacuum environment conditions. Among these are (1) thrust attitude control gimbal bearings that permit pivoting of the entire rocket engine and (2) bearings in the linkages of ducting bellows joints that articulate when the engine gimbals. The main rocket engines for first, second, and third stages of the Saturn vehicle have thrust vector control gimbals which use PTFE liner bearing materials and ducting linkage bearings using solid film dry lubricants, both to reduce friction and provide required wear life. Data on the frictional and wear characteristics of these materials, while operating under varying temperature and atmospheric pressure conditions, are presented. A discussion of the bearing designs for flexible bellows joint linkages is also presented.

  16. Fuel decomposition and boundary-layer combustion processes of hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene) fuel cross-linked with diisocyanate was burned with GOX under various operating conditions. Large-amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed-line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from +/-20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of +/-1.5% Embedded fine-wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading-edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations are thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real-time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thickness burned and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented.

  17. Oscillatory combustion of liquid monopropellant droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanin, S. P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on the open-loop combustion response of monopropellant droplets and sprays to imposed pressure oscillations. The theoretical model was solved as a perturbation analysis through first order, yielding linear response results. Unsteady gas phase effects were considered in some cases, but the bulk of the calculations assumed a quasi-steady gas phase. Calculations were conducted using properties corresponding to hydrazine decomposition. Zero-order results agreed with earlier measurements of hydrazine droplet burning in combustion gases. The droplet response was greatest (exceeding unity in some cases) for large droplets with liquid phase temperature gradients; at frequencies near the characteristic frequency of the liquid phase thermal wave. The response of a spray is less than that of its largest droplet, however, a relatively small percentage of large droplets provides a substantial response (exceeding unity in some cases).

  18. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  19. A Design Tool for Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Cheng, Gary; Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Tucker, P. Kevin; Hutt, John

    1999-01-01

    A practical design tool for the analysis of flowfields near the injector face has been developed and used to analyze the Fastrac engine. The objective was to produce a computational design tool which was detailed enough to predict the interactive effects of injector element impingement angles and points and the momenta of the individual orifice flows. To obtain a model which could be used to simulate a significant number of individual orifices, a homogeneous computational fluid dynamics model was developed. To describe liquid and vapor sub- and super-critical flows, the model included thermal and caloric equations of state which were valid over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. A homogeneous model was constructed such that the local state of the flow was determined directly, i.e. the quality of the flow was calculated. Such a model does not identify drops or their distribution, but it does allow the flow along the injector face and into the acoustic cavity to be predicted. It also allows the film coolant flow to be accurately described. The initial evaluation of the injector code was made by simulating cold flow from an unlike injector element and from a like-on-like overlapping fan (LOL) injector element. The predicted mass flux distributions of these injector elements compared well to cold flow test results. These are the same cold flow tests which serve as the data base for the JANNAF performance prediction codes. The flux distributions 1 inch downstream of the injector face are very similar; the differences were somewhat larger at further distances from the faceplate. Since the cold flow testing did not achieve good mass balances when integrations across the entire fan were made, the CFD simulation appears to be reasonable alternative to future cold flow testing. To simulate the Fastrac, an RP-1/LOX combustion model must be chosen. This submodel must be relatively simple to accomplish three-dimensional, multiphase flow simulations. Single RP-1

  20. A Design Tool for Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Cheng, Gary; Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Tucker, P. Kevin; Hutt, John

    1999-01-01

    A practical design tool for the analysis of flowfields near the injector face has been developed and used to analyze the Fastrac engine. The objective was to produce a computational design tool which was detailed enough to predict the interactive effects of injector element impingement angles and points and the momenta of the individual orifice flows. To obtain a model which could be used to simulate a significant number of individual orifices, a homogeneous computational fluid dynamics model was developed. To describe liquid and vapor sub- and super-critical flows, the model included thermal and caloric equations of state which were valid over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. A homogeneous model was constructed such that the local state of the flow was determined directly, i.e. the quality of the flow was calculated. Such a model does not identify drops or their distribution, but it does allow the flow along the injector face and into the acoustic cavity to be predicted. It also allows the film coolant flow to be accurately described. The initial evaluation of the injector code was made by simulating cold flow from an unlike injector element and from a like-on-like overlapping fan (LOL) injector element. The predicted mass flux distributions of these injector elements compared well to cold flow test results. These are the same cold flow tests which serve as the data base for the JANNAF performance prediction codes. The flux distributions 1 inch downstream of the injector face are very similar; the differences were somewhat larger at further distances from the faceplate. Since the cold flow testing did not achieve good mass balances when integrations across the entire fan were made, the CFD simulation appears to be reasonable alternative to future cold flow testing. To simulate the Fastrac, an RP-1/LOX combustion model must be chosen. This submodel must be relatively simple to accomplish three-dimensional, multiphase flow simulations. Single RP-1

  1. Test of a CMC liquid propulsion rocket engine turbine stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berque, J.; Georges, J. M.

    The succesful testing of two Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) stators in conditions fully representative of a cryogenic rocket engine turbine is reported. Both stators possessed the same overall geometry as the actual metallic component used in the turbine second stage of the HM7 engine. They sustained several mid duration tests devoted to combustion parameter tuning and composite material behavior control, before long duration runs, representative of the engine duty cycle. The main objectives were to increase the gas temperature above 1600 K, and to simulate the thermal shock that occurs during the chilldown at the end of the combustion phase, in order to provide a good insight of the benefits in terms of performance, mass, durability and reliability associated with CMC application to a large set of aerospace engine turbines.

  2. Test of a CMC liquid propulsion rocket engine turbine stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berque, J.; Georges, J. M.

    1992-07-01

    During the first semester of 1991, SEP successfully tested two Ceramic Matrix Composite stators in conditions fully representative of a cryogenic rocket engine turbine. Both stators possessed the same overall geometry as the actual metallic component used in the turbine second stage of the HM7 engine. They sustained several mid-duration tests devoted to combustion parameter tuning and composite material behavior control, before long duration runs, representative of the engine duty cycle. The main objectives were to increase the gas temperature above 1600 K, and to simulate the thermal shock that occurs during the chilldown at the end of the combustion phase, in order to provide a good insight of the benefits in terms of performance, mass, durability and reliability associated with CMC application to a large set of aerospace engine turbines.

  3. 75 FR 17111 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Combustible Liquids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... to harmonize the domestic regulations applicable to the transportation of combustible liquids with... burdens on shippers and carriers while facilitating movement of these materials in domestic and... defining flammable liquids and retained a domestic exception for flammable liquids reclassed as...

  4. Combustion Tests of Rocket Motor Washout Material: Focus on Air toxics Formation Potential and Asbestos Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    G. C. Sclippa; L. L. Baxter; S. G. Buckley

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the suitability of cofiring as a recycle / reuse option to landfill disposal for solid rocket motor washout residue. Solid rocket motor washout residue (roughly 55% aluminum powder, 40% polybutadiene rubber binder, 5% residual ammonium perchlorate, and 0.2-1% asbestos) has been fired in Sandia's MultiFuel Combustor (MFC). The MFC is a down-fired combustor with electrically heated walls, capable of simulating a wide range of fuel residence times and stoichiometries. This study reports on the fate of AP-based chlorine and asbestos from the residue following combustion.

  5. Reusable, flyback liquid rocket booster for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, Mark G.

    1989-08-01

    This paper outlines a preliminary design for an unmanned, reusable, flyback liquid rocket booster (LRB) as an evolutionary follow-on to the Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB). Previous Shuttle liquid-propellant booster concepts are reviewed in order to gain insight into these designs. The operating costs, environmental impacts, and abort options of the SRB are discussed. The LRB flight profile and advantages of LRB use are discussed. The preliminary design for the LRB is outlined in detail using calculations and drawings. This design maximizes the use of existing hardware and proven technology to minimize cost and development time. The LRB design is presented as a more capable, more environmentally acceptable, and safer Shuttle booster.

  6. 77 FR 31815 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Combustible Liquids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    .../delay of international shipments in the port area); Increased burden on domestic industry (elimination of domestic combustible liquid exceptions); and Driver Eligibility (exception from placarding which... 5 ANPRM; two suggesting that domestic requirements for the transportation of combustible...

  7. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  8. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  9. Rocket engine coaxial injector liquid/gas interface flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Wolfgang; Kruelle, Gerd

    1992-07-01

    Coaxial injectors are used for injecting and mixing propellants in cryogenic rocket engines. Theoretical and experimental studies are reported which show the significance for atomization and mixing of the physical processes involved in the coaxial injector flow. The impact of internal fluid jet motions on surface irritation is demonstrated. A model is presented which calculates droplet atomization quantities such as frequency, droplet diameter, and liquid core shape.

  10. Data Mining for ISHM of Liquid Rocket Propulsion Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Ashok; Schwabacher, Mark; Oza, Nijunj; Martin, Rodney; Watson, Richard; Matthews, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides that review the current status of data mining to support the work with the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) for the systems associated with Liquid Rocket Propulsion. The aim of this project is to have test stand data from Rocketdyne to design algorithms that will aid in the early detection of impending failures during operation. These methods will be extended and improved for future platforms (i.e., CEV/CLV).

  11. Analytical concepts for health management systems of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Richard; Tulpule, Sharayu; Hawman, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Substantial improvement in health management systems performance can be realized by implementing advanced analytical methods of processing existing liquid rocket engine sensor data. In this paper, such techniques ranging from time series analysis to multisensor pattern recognition to expert systems to fault isolation models are examined and contrasted. The performance of several of these methods is evaluated using data from test firings of the Space Shuttle main engines.

  12. Temperature measurement. [liquid monopropellant rocket engine performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, installation, checkout, calibration, and operation of a temperature measuring system to be used during tests of a liquid monopropellant rocket engine are discussed. Appendixes include: (1) temperature measurement system elemental uncertainties, and (2) tables and equations for use with thermocouples and resistance thermometers. Design guidelines are given for the critical components of each portion of the system to provide an optimum temperature measurement system which meets the performance criteria specified.

  13. Liquid rocket engine centrifugal flow turbopumps. [design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Design criteria and recommended practices are discussed for the following configurations selected from the design sequence of a liquid rocket engine centrifugal flow turbopump: (1) pump performance including speed, efficiency, and flow range; (2) impeller; (3) housing; and (4) thrust balance system. Hydrodynamic, structural, and mechanical problems are addressed for the achievement of required pump performance within the constraints imposed by the engine/turbopump system. Materials and fabrication specifications are also discussed.

  14. Primary atomization of liquid jets issuing from rocket engine coaxial injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Roger D.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their optical opacity. This work focuses on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial type rocket engine injectors. Real-time x-ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, has been used to make the measurements. Nitrogen and helium were employed as the fuel simulants while an x-ray absorbing potassium iodide aqueous solution was used as the liquid oxygen (LOX) simulant. The intact-liquid-core length data have been obtained and interpreted to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure (gas density), injected-gas and liquid velocities, and cavitation. The results clearly show that the effect of cavitation must be considered at low chamber pressures since it can be the dominant breakup mechanism. A correlation of intact core length in terms of gas-to-liquid density ratio, liquid jet Reynolds number, and Weber number is suggested. The gas-to-liquid density ratio appears to be the key parameter for aerodynamic shear breakup in this study. A small number of hot-fire, LOX/hydrogen tests were also conducted to attempt intact-LOX-core measurements under realistic conditions in a single-coaxial-element rocket engine. The tests were not successful in terms of measuring the intact core, but instantaneous imaging of LOX jets suggests that LOX jet breakup is qualitatively similar to that of cold-flow, propellant-simulant jets. The liquid oxygen jets survived in the hot-fire environment much longer than expected, and LOX was even visualized exiting the chamber nozzle

  15. Combustion Stability Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper presents test data and analyses of combustion stability from the recent PCAD-funded test programs at the NASA MSFC. These test programs used swirl coaxial element injectors with liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants. Oxygen was injected conventionally in the center of the coaxial element, and swirl was provided by tangential entry slots. Injectors with 28-element and 40-element patterns were tested with several configurations of combustion chambers, including ablative and calorimeter spool sections, and several configurations of fuel injection design. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred with both injectors, and high-frequency combustion instability occurred at the first tangential (1T) transverse mode with the 40-element injector. In most tests, a transition between high-amplitude chug with gaseous methane flow and low-amplitude chug with liquid methane flow was readily observed. Chug analyses of both conditions were conducted using techniques from Wenzel and Szuch and from the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code. The 1T mode instability occurred in several tests and was apparent by high-frequency pressure measurements as well as dramatic increases in calorimeter-measured heat flux

  16. Combustion Stability Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper presents test data and analyses of combustion stability from the recent PCAD-funded test programs at the NASA MSFC. These test programs used swirl coaxial element injectors with liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants. Oxygen was injected conventionally in the center of the coaxial element, and swirl was provided by tangential entry slots. Injectors with 28-element and 40-element patterns were tested with several configurations of combustion chambers, including ablative and calorimeter spool sections, and several configurations of fuel injection design. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred with both injectors, and high-frequency combustion instability occurred at the first tangential (1T) transverse mode with the 40-element injector. In most tests, a transition between high-amplitude chug with gaseous methane flow and low-amplitude chug with liquid methane flow was readily observed. Chug analyses of both conditions were conducted using techniques from Wenzel and Szuch and from the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code. The 1T mode instability occurred in several tests and was apparent by high-frequency pressure measurements as well as dramatic increases in calorimeter-measured heat flux

  17. Development of Efficient Real-Fluid Model in Simulating Liquid Rocket Injector Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Farmer, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of propellant mixing near the injector have a profound effect on the liquid rocket engine performance. However, the flow features near the injector of liquid rocket engines are extremely complicated, for example supercritical-pressure spray, turbulent mixing, and chemical reactions are present. Previously, a homogeneous spray approach with a real-fluid property model was developed to account for the compressibility and evaporation effects such that thermodynamics properties of a mixture at a wide range of pressures and temperatures can be properly calculated, including liquid-phase, gas- phase, two-phase, and dense fluid regions. The developed homogeneous spray model demonstrated a good success in simulating uni- element shear coaxial injector spray combustion flows. However, the real-fluid model suffered a computational deficiency when applied to a pressure-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The deficiency is caused by the pressure and enthalpy being the independent variables in the solution procedure of a pressure-based code, whereas the real-fluid model utilizes density and temperature as independent variables. The objective of the present research work is to improve the computational efficiency of the real-fluid property model in computing thermal properties. The proposed approach is called an efficient real-fluid model, and the improvement of computational efficiency is achieved by using a combination of a liquid species and a gaseous species to represent a real-fluid species.

  18. Worldwide Space Launch Vehicles and Their Mainstage Liquid Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim A.

    2010-01-01

    Space launch vehicle begins with a basic propulsion stage, and serves as a missile or small launch vehicle; many are traceable to the 1945 German A-4. Increasing stage size, and increasingly energetic propulsion allows for heavier payloads and greater. Earth to Orbit lift capability. Liquid rocket propulsion began with use of storable (UDMH/N2O4) and evolved to high performing cryogenics (LOX/RP, and LOX/LH). Growth versions of SLV's rely on strap-on propulsive stages of either solid propellants or liquid propellants.

  19. Effect of grain port length-diameter ratio on combustion performance in hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guobiao; Zhang, Yuanjun; Tian, Hui; Wang, Pengfei; Yu, Nanjia

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop a more accurate regression rate considering the oxidizer mass flow and the fuel grain geometry configuration with numerical and experimental investigations in polyethylene (PE)/90% hydrogen peroxide (HP) hybrid rocket. Firstly, a 2-D axisymmetric CFD model with turbulence, chemistry reaction, solid-gas coupling is built to investigate the combustion chamber internal flow structure. Then a more accurate regression formula is proposed and the combustion efficiency changing with the length-diameter ratio is studied. A series experiments are conducted in various oxidizer mass flow to analyze combustion performance including the regression rate and combustion efficiency. The regression rates are measured by the fuel mass reducing and diameter changing. A new regression rate formula considering the fuel grain configuration is proposed in this paper. The combustion efficiency increases with the length-diameter ratio changing. To improve the performance of a hybrid rocket motor, the port length-diameter ratio is suggested 10-12 in the paper.

  20. Thermal radiation of heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. A.; Maratkanova, E. I.; Zagray, I. A.; Rukavishnikova, R. V.

    2015-05-01

    The work presents a method of complex investigation of thermal radiation emitted by heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume. Realization of the method has allowed us to obtain full information on the results in all stages of calculations. Dependence of the optical properties (complex refractive index), the radiation characteristics (coefficients and cross sections) and emission characteristics (flux densities, emissivity factors) of the main determining factors and parameters was analyzed. It was found by the method of computational experiment that the presence of the gaseous phase in the combustion products causes a strongly marked selectivity of emission, due to which the use of gray approximation in the calculation of thermal radiation is unnecessary. The influence of the optical properties, mass fraction, the function of particle size distribution, and the temperature of combustion products on thermal radiation in the model rocket engine plume was investigated. The role of "spotlight" effect-increasing the amount of energy of emission exhaust combustion products due to scattering by condensate particles radiation from the combustion chamber-was established quantitatively.

  1. Research on combustion instability and application to solid propellant rocket motors. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of analyses of combustion instability in solid-propellant rocket motors, citing appropriate measurements and observations. The work discussed has become increasingly important, both for the interpretation of laboratory data and for predicting the transient behavior of disturbances in full-scale motors. Two central questions are considered - namely, linear stability and nonlinear behavior. Several classes of problems are discussed as special cases of a general approach to the analysis of combustion instability. Application to motors, and particularly the limitations presently understood, are stressed.

  2. NASA Engineers Test Combustion Chamber to Advance 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Design

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-08

    A series of test firings like this one in late August brought a group of engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, a big step closer to their goal of a 100-percent 3-D printed rocket engine, said Andrew Hanks, test lead for the additively manufactured demonstration engine project. The main combustion chamber, fuel turbopump, fuel injector, valves and other components used in the tests were of the team's new design, and all major engine components except the main combustion chamber were 3-D printed. (NASA/MSFC)

  3. Research on combustion instability and application to solid propellant rocket motors. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of analyses of combustion instability in solid-propellant rocket motors, citing appropriate measurements and observations. The work discussed has become increasingly important, both for the interpretation of laboratory data and for predicting the transient behavior of disturbances in full-scale motors. Two central questions are considered - namely, linear stability and nonlinear behavior. Several classes of problems are discussed as special cases of a general approach to the analysis of combustion instability. Application to motors, and particularly the limitations presently understood, are stressed.

  4. Catalytic combustion of coal-derived liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested with three grades of SRC 2 coal derived liquids, naphtha, middle distillate, and a blend of three parts middle distillate to one part heavy distillate. A petroleum derived number 2 diesel fuel was also tested to provide a direct comparison. The catalytic reactor was tested at inlet temperatures from 600 to 800 K, reference velocities from 10 to 20 m/s, lean fuel air ratios, and a pressure of 3 x 10 to the 5th power Pa. Compared to the diesel, the naphtha gave slightly better combustion efficiency, the middle distillate was almost identical, and the middle heavy blend was slightly poorer. The coal derived liquid fuels contained from 0.58 to 0.95 percent nitrogen by weight. Conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx was approximately 75 percent for all three grades of the coal derived liquids.

  5. Catalytic combustion of coal-derived liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested with three grades of SRC 2 coal derived liquids, naphtha, middle distillate, and a blend of three parts middle distillate to one part heavy distillate. A petroleum derived number 2 diesel fuel was also tested to provide a direct comparison. The catalytic reactor was tested at inlet temperatures from 600 to 800 K, reference velocities from 10 to 20 m/s, lean fuel air ratios, and a pressure of 3 x 10 to the 5th power Pa. Compared to the diesel, the naphtha gave slightly better combustion efficiency, the middle distillate was almost identical, and the middle heavy blend was slightly poorer. The coal derived liquid fuels contained from 0.58 to 0.95 percent nitrogen by weight. Conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx was approximately 75 percent for all three grades of the coal derived liquids.

  6. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportion System (STS) systems study. Appendix D: Trade study summary for the liquid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Trade studies plans for a number of elements in the Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) component of the Space Transportation System (STS) are given in viewgraph form. Some of the elements covered include: avionics/flight control; avionics architecture; thrust vector control studies; engine control electronics; liquid rocket propellants; propellant pressurization systems; recoverable spacecraft; cryogenic tanks; and spacecraft construction materials.

  7. Enhancement of hybrid rocket combustion performance using nano-sized energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risha, Grant Alexander

    Until now, the regression rate of classical hybrid rocket engines have typically been an order of magnitude lower than solid propellant motors; thus, hybrids require a relatively large fuel surface area for a given thrust level. In addition to low linear regression rates, relatively low combustion efficiency (87 to 92%), low mass burning rates, varying oxidizer-to-fuel ratio during operation, and lack of scaling laws have been reported. These disadvantages can be ameliorated by introducing nano-sized energetic powder additives into the solid fuel. The addition of nano-sized energetic particles into the solid fuel enhances performance as measured by parameters such as: density specific impulse, mass and linear burning rates, and thrust. Thermophysical properties of the solid fuel such as density, heat of combustion, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are also enhanced. The types of nano-sized energetic particles used in this study include aluminum, boron, boron carbide, and some Viton-A coated particles. Since the combustion process of solid fuels in a hybrid rocket engine is governed by the mass flux of the oxidizer entering the combustion chamber, the rate-limiting process is the mixing and reacting of the pyrolysis products of the fuel grain with the incoming oxidizer. The overall goal of this research was to determine the relative propulsive and combustion behavior for a family of newly-developed HTPB-based solid-fuel formulations containing various nano-sized energetic particles. Seventeen formulations contained 13% additive by weight, one formulation (SF4) contained 6.5% additive by weight, and one formulation (SF19) contained 5.65% boron by weight. The two hybrid rocket engines which were used in this investigation were the Long Grain Center-Perforated (LGCP) rocket engine and the X-Ray Transparent Casing (XTC) rocket engine. The smaller scale LGCP rocket engine was used to evaluate all of the formulations because conducting experiments using the

  8. 46 CFR 188.10-17 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 188.10-17 Section 188.10-17 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-17 Combustible liquid. This term includes any liquid whose flashpoint, as determined by an open cup tester, is above 80 °F....

  9. 46 CFR 188.10-17 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 188.10-17 Section 188.10-17 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-17 Combustible liquid. This term includes any liquid whose flashpoint, as determined by an open cup tester, is above 80 °F....

  10. 46 CFR 188.10-17 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 188.10-17 Section 188.10-17 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-17 Combustible liquid. This term includes any liquid whose flashpoint, as determined by an open cup tester, is above 80 °F....

  11. 46 CFR 188.10-17 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 188.10-17 Section 188.10-17 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-17 Combustible liquid. This term includes any liquid whose flashpoint, as determined by an open cup tester, is above 80 °F....

  12. 46 CFR 188.10-17 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 188.10-17 Section 188.10-17 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-17 Combustible liquid. This term includes any liquid whose flashpoint, as determined by an open cup tester, is above 80 °F....

  13. Hybrid rocket fuel combustion and regression rate study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Ray, R. L.; Anderson, F. A.; Cohen, N. S.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop hybrid fuels (1) with higher regression rates and reduced dependence on fuel grain geometry and (2) that maximize potential specific impulse using low-cost materials. A hybrid slab window motor system was developed to screen candidate fuels - their combustion behavior and regression rate. Combustion behavior diagnostics consisted of video and high speed motion pictures coverage. The mean fuel regression rates were determined by before and after measurements of the fuel slabs. The fuel for this initial investigation consisted of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene binder with coal and aluminum fillers. At low oxidizer flux levels (and corresponding fuel regression rates) the filled-binder fuels burn in a layered fashion, forming an aluminum containing binder/coal surface melt that, in turn, forms into filigrees or flakes that are stripped off by the crossflow. This melt process appears to diminish with increasing oxidizer flux level. Heat transfer by radiation is a significant contributor, producing the desired increase in magnitude and reduction in flow dependency (power law exponent) of the fuel regression rate.

  14. Hybrid rocket fuel combustion and regression rate study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Ray, R. L.; Anderson, F. A.; Cohen, N. S.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop hybrid fuels (1) with higher regression rates and reduced dependence on fuel grain geometry and (2) that maximize potential specific impulse using low-cost materials. A hybrid slab window motor system was developed to screen candidate fuels - their combustion behavior and regression rate. Combustion behavior diagnostics consisted of video and high speed motion pictures coverage. The mean fuel regression rates were determined by before and after measurements of the fuel slabs. The fuel for this initial investigation consisted of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene binder with coal and aluminum fillers. At low oxidizer flux levels (and corresponding fuel regression rates) the filled-binder fuels burn in a layered fashion, forming an aluminum containing binder/coal surface melt that, in turn, forms into filigrees or flakes that are stripped off by the crossflow. This melt process appears to diminish with increasing oxidizer flux level. Heat transfer by radiation is a significant contributor, producing the desired increase in magnitude and reduction in flow dependency (power law exponent) of the fuel regression rate.

  15. Development of a combustor analytical design methodology for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieper, Jerry L.; Muss, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    The development of a user friendly computerized methodology for the design and analysis of liquid propellant rocket engine combustion chambers is described. An overview of the methodology, consisting of a computer program containing an appropriate modular assembly of existing industry wide performance and combustion stability models, is presented. These models are linked with an interactive front end processor enabling the user to define the performance and stability traits of an existing design (point analysis) or to create the essential design features of a combustor to meet specific performance goals and combustion stability (point design). Plans for demonstration and verification of this methodology are also presented. These plans include the creation of combustor designs using the methodology, together with predictions of the performance and combustion stability for each design. A verification test program of 26 hot fire tests with up to four designs created using this methodology is described. This testing is planned using LOX/RP-1 propellants with a thrust level of approx. 220,000 N (50,000 lbf).

  16. Problems of providing completeness of the methane-containing block-jet combustion in a rocket-ramjet engine's combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, Valeriy I.; Belotserkovets, Igor S.; Gusinin, Vjacheslav P.

    2009-11-01

    Some problems of methane-containing hydrocarbon fuel combustion are discussed. It seems that reduction of methane burnout zone length is one from main problems of designing new type engine. It is very important at the creation of combustion chambers of a rocket-ramjet engine for prospective space shuttle launch vehicles.

  17. Liquid Rocket Booster Study. Volume 2, Book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The recommended Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) concept is shown which uses a common main engine with the Advanced Launch System (ALS) which burns LO2 and LH2. The central rationale is based on the belief that the U.S. can only afford one big new rocket engine development in the 1990's. A LO2/LH2 engine in the half million pound thrust class could satisfy STS LRB, ALS, and Shuttle C (instead of SSMEs). Development costs and higher production rates can be shared by NASA and USAF. If the ALS program does not occur, the LO2/RP-1 propellants would produce slight lower costs for and STS LRB. When the planned Booster Engine portion of the Civil Space Transportation Initiatives has provided data on large pressure fed LO2/RP-1 engines, then the choice should be reevaluated.

  18. Large eddy simulation of combustion characteristics in a kerosene fueled rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-wei; He, Guo-qiang; Qin, Fei; Cao, Dong-gang; Wei, Xiang-geng; Shi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This study reports combustion characteristics of a rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor operating at ramjet mode numerically. Compressible large eddy simulation with liquid kerosene sprayed and vaporized is used to study the intrinsic unsteadiness of combustion in such a propulsion system. Results for the pressure oscillation amplitude and frequency in the combustor as well as the wall pressure distribution along the flow-path, are validated using experimental data, and they show acceptable agreement. Coupled with reduced chemical kinetics of kerosene, results are compared with the simultaneously obtained Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes results, and show significant differences. A flow field analysis is also carried out for further study of the turbulent flame structures. Mixture fraction is used to determine the most probable flame location in the combustor at stoichiometric condition. Spatial distributions of the Takeno flame index, scalar dissipation rate, and heat release rate reveal that different combustion modes, such as premixed and non-premixed modes, coexisted at different sections of the combustor. The RBCC combustor is divided into different regions characterized by their non-uniform features. Flame stabilization mechanism, i.e., flame propagation or fuel auto-ignition, and their relative importance, is also determined at different regions in the combustor.

  19. Characteristics of Vaporizing Cryogenic Sprays for Rocket Combustion Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the volume-median drop diameter, Dv.5e, of vaporizing cryogenic sprays were obtained with a drop size measuring instrument developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. To demonstrate the effect of atomizing-gas properties on characteristic drop size, a two-fluid fuel nozzle was used to break up liquid-nitrogen, LN2, jets in high-velocity gasflows of helium argon and gaseous nitrogen, GN2. Also, in order to determine the effect of atomizing-gas temperature on specific surface-areas of LN2 sprays, drop size measurements were made at gas temperatures of 111 and 293 K.

  20. Hazards Induced by Breach of Liquid Rocket Fuel Tanks: Conditions and Risks of Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixture Explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osipov, Viatcheslav; Muratov, Cyrill; Hafiychuk, Halyna; Ponizovskya-Devine, Ekaterina; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Mathias, Donovan; Lawrence, Scott; Werkheiser, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the data of purposeful rupture experiments with LOx and LH2 tanks, the Hydrogen-Oxygen Vertical Impact (HOVI) tests that were performed to clarify the ignition mechanisms, the explosive power of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures under different conditions, and to elucidate the puzzling source of the initial formation of flames near the intertank section during the Challenger disaster. We carry out a physics-based analysis of general explosions scenarios for cryogenic gaseous H2/Ox mixtures and determine their realizability conditions, using the well-established simplified models from the detonation and deflagration theory. We study the features of aerosol H2/Ox mixture combustion and show, in particular, that aerosols intensify the deflagration flames and can induce detonation for any ignition mechanism. We propose a cavitation-induced mechanism of self-ignition of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures that may be realized when gaseous H2 and Ox flows are mixed with a liquid Ox turbulent stream, as occurred in all HOVI tests. We present an overview of the HOVI tests to make conclusion on the risk of strong explosions in possible liquid rocket incidents and provide a semi-quantitative interpretation of the HOVI data based on aerosol combustion. We uncover the most dangerous situations and discuss the foreseeable risks which can arise in space missions and lead to tragic outcomes. Our analysis relates to only unconfined mixtures that are likely to arise as a result of liquid propellant space vehicle incidents.

  1. Liquid rocket disconnects, couplings, fittings, fixed joints, and seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    State of the art and design criteria for components used in liquid propellant rocket propulsion systems to contain and control the flow of fluids involved are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the design of components used in the engine systems of boosters and upper stages, and in spacecraft propulsion systems because of the high pressure and high vibration levels to which these components are exposed. A table for conversion of U.S. customary units to SI units is included with a glossary, and a list of NASA space vehicle design criteria monographs issued to September 1976.

  2. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 5, part 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the appendices of the five volume series.

  3. Fabrication of liquid-rocket thrust chambers by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Electroforming has proven to be an excellent fabrication method for building liquid rocket regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. NASA sponsored technology programs have investigated both common and advanced methods. Using common procedures, several cooled spool pieces and thrust chambers have been made and successfully tested. The designs were made possible through the versatility of the electroforming procedure, which is not limited to simple geometric shapes. An advanced method of electroforming was used to produce a wire-wrapped, composite, pressure-loaded electroformed structure, which greatly increased the strength of the structure while still retaining the advantages of electroforming.

  4. Liquid Rocket Booster Integration Study. Volume 2: Study synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the study summary of the five volume series.

  5. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the executive summary of the five volume series.

  6. Gas velocity and temperature near a liquid rocket injector face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boylan, D. M.; Ohara, J.

    1973-01-01

    The gas flow near the injector of a liquid propellant rocket was investigated by rapidly inserting butt-welded platinum-platinum rhodium thermocouples through the injector into the chamber. The transient responses of the thermocouples were analyzed to determine average gas temperatures and velocities. A method of fitting exponential curves to repeated measurements of the transient temperature at several positions near the injector face produced consistent results. Preliminary tests yielded gas flow directions and gas compositions at the injector face. Average gas temperatures were found to be between 3100 (1700) and 3500 F (1950 C) and the average gas velocities between 550 (170) and 840 feet/second (260 m/sec).

  7. Evaluation of Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Knuth, Williams; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rocket-based combined-cycle engines (RBBC) being considered at NASA for future generation launch vehicles feature clusters of small rocket thrusters as part of the engine components. Depending on specific RBBC concepts, these thrusters may be operated at various operating conditions including power level and/or propellant mixture ratio variations. To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for the subject cycle engine application. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to- diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  8. Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engine Throttling: A Comprehensive Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew; Hulka, James; Yang, Virog

    2009-01-01

    Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engines (LREs) are capable of on-command variable thrust or thrust modulation, an operability advantage that has been studied intermittently since the late 1930s. Throttleable LREs can be used for planetary entry and descent, space rendezvous, orbital maneuvering including orientation and stabilization in space, and hovering and hazard avoidance during planetary landing. Other applications have included control of aircraft rocket engines, limiting of vehicle acceleration or velocity using retrograde rockets, and ballistic missile defense trajectory control. Throttleable LREs can also continuously follow the most economical thrust curve in a given situation, compared to discrete throttling changes over a few select operating points. The effects of variable thrust on the mechanics and dynamics of an LRE as well as difficulties and issues surrounding the throttling process are important aspects of throttling behavior. This review provides a detailed survey of LRE throttling centered around engines from the United States. Several LRE throttling methods are discussed, including high-pressure-drop systems, dual-injector manifolds, gas injection, multiple chambers, pulse modulation, throat throttling, movable injector components, and hydrodynamically dissipative injectors. Concerns and issues surrounding each method are examined, and the advantages and shortcomings compared.

  9. 46 CFR 109.557 - Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. 109.557 Section 109.557 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.557 Flammable and combustible liquids: Carriage. The master...

  10. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-06-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  11. Effect of Nozzle Nonlinearities upon Nonlinear Stability of Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmanabhan, M. S.; Powell, E. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    A three dimensional, nonlinear nozzle admittance relation is developed by solving the wave equation describing finite amplitude oscillatory flow inside the subsonic portion of a choked, slowly convergent axisymmetric nozzle. This nonlinear nozzle admittance relation is then used as a boundary condition in the analysis of nonlinear combustion instability in a cylindrical liquid rocket combustor. In both nozzle and chamber analyses solutions are obtained using the Galerkin method with a series expansion consisting of the first tangential, second tangential, and first radial modes. Using Crocco's time lag model to describe the distributed unsteady combustion process, combustion instability calculations are presented for different values of the following parameters: (1) time lag, (2) interaction index, (3) steady-state Mach number at the nozzle entrance, and (4) chamber length-to-diameter ratio. In each case, limit cycle pressure amplitudes and waveforms are shown for both linear and nonlinear nozzle admittance conditions. These results show that when the amplitudes of the second tangential and first radial modes are considerably smaller than the amplitude of the first tangential mode the inclusion of nozzle nonlinearities has no significant effect on the limiting amplitude and pressure waveforms.

  12. Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. F.; Figueroa, F.; Politopoulos, T.; Oonk, S.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to correctly detect and identify any possible failure in the systems, subsystems, or sensors within a reusable liquid rocket engine is a major goal at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). A health management (HM) system is required to provide an on-ground operation crew with an integrated awareness of the condition of every element of interest by determining anomalies, examining their causes, and making predictive statements. However, the complexity associated with relevant systems, and the large amount of data typically necessary for proper interpretation and analysis, presents difficulties in implementing complete failure detection, identification, and prognostics (FDI&P). As such, this paper presents a Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines as a solution to these problems through the use of highly intelligent algorithms for real-time FDI&P, and efficient and embedded processing at multiple levels. The end result is the ability to successfully incorporate a comprehensive HM platform despite the complexity of the systems under consideration.

  13. Determination of Combustion Product Radicals in a Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Lester A.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Junell, Justin C.

    2007-01-01

    The identification of metallic effluent materials in a rocket engine exhaust plume indicates the health of the engine. Since 1989, emission spectroscopy of the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been used for ground testing at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC). This technique allows the identification and quantification of alloys from the metallic elements observed in the plume. With the prospect of hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines, such as Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) or methane (CH4) fueled engines being considered for use in future space flight systems, the contributions of intermediate or final combustion products resulting from the hydrocarbon fuels are of great interest. The effect of several diatomic molecular radicals, such as Carbon Dioxide , Carbon Monoxide, Molecular Carbon, Methylene Radical, Cyanide or Cyano Radical, and Nitric Oxide, needs to be identified and the effects of their band systems on the spectral region from 300 nm to 850 nm determined. Hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines will play a prominent role in future space exploration programs. Although hydrogen fuel provides for higher engine performance, hydrocarbon fuels are denser, safer to handle, and less costly. For hydrocarbon-fueled engines using RP-1 or CH4 , the plume is different from a hydrogen fueled engine due to the presence of several other species, such as CO2, C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO, in the exhaust plume, in addition to the standard H2O and OH. These species occur as intermediate or final combustion products or as a result of mixing of the hot plume with the atmosphere. Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy has emerged as a comprehensive non-intrusive sensing technology which can be applied to a wide variety of engine performance conditions with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Stennis Space Center researchers have been in the forefront of advancing experimental techniques and developing theoretical approaches in order to bring this technology to a more

  14. Amplification of Reynolds number dependent processes by wave distortion. [acoustic instability of liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventrice, M. B.; Fang, J. C.; Purdy, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    A system using a hot-wire transducer as an analog of a liquid droplet of propellant was employed to investigate the ingredients of the acoustic instability of liquid-propellant rocket engines. It was assumed that the combustion process was vaporization-limited and that the combustion chamber was acoustically similar to a closed-closed right-circular cylinder. Before studying the hot-wire closed-loop system (the analog system), a microphone closed-loop system, which used the response of a microphone as the source of a linear feedback exciting signal, was investigated to establish the characteristics of self-sustenance of acoustic fields. Self-sustained acoustic fields were found to occur only at resonant frequencies of the chamber. In the hot-wire closed-loop system, the response of hot-wire anemometer was used as the source of the feedback exciting signal. The self-sustained acoustic fields which developed in the system were always found to be harmonically distorted and to have as their fundamental frquency a resonant frequency for which there also existed a second resonant frequency which was approximately twice the fundamental frequency.

  15. Experimental performance of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at high combustion chamber pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the thrust coefficient of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at combustion chamber pressures of 12.4 to 16.5 MPa (1800 to 2400 psia). A nozzle with a modified Rao contour and an expansion area ratio of 1025:1 was tested with hydrogen and oxygen at altitude conditions. The same nozzle, truncated to an area ratio of 440:1, was also tested. Values of thrust coefficient are presented along with characteristic exhaust velocity efficiencies, nozzle wall temperatures, and overall thruster specific impulse.

  16. Analytical flow/thermal modeling of combustion gas flows in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor test joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, G. H.; Knox, E. C.; Pond, J. E.; Bacchus, D. L.; Hengel, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical tool, TOPAZ (Transient One-dimensional Pipe flow AnalyZer), was used to model the flow characteristics of hot combustion gases through Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints and to compute the resultant material surface temperatures and o-ring seal erosion of the joints. The capabilities of the analytical tool were validated with test data during the Seventy Pound Charge (SPC) motor test program. The predicted RSRM joint thermal response to ignition transients was compared with test data for full-scale motor tests. The one-dimensional analyzer is found to be an effective tool for simulating combustion gas flows in RSRM joints and for predicting flow and thermal properties.

  17. Experimental determination of turbulence in a GH2-GOX rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, P.; Russell, R.; Ohara, J.

    1974-01-01

    The intensity of turbulence and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient for a gaseous rocket combustion chamber have been determined from the experimental measurements of the tracer gas diffusion. A combination of Taylor's turbulent diffusion theory and Spalding's numerical method for solving the conservation equations of fluid mechanics was used to calculate these quantities. Taylor's theory was extended to consider the inhomogeneity of the turbulence field in the axial direction of the combustion chamber. An exponential function was used to represent the Lagrangian correlation coefficient. The results indicate that the maximum value of the intensity of turbulence is about 15% and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient drops to about 0.12 in one inch of the chamber length.

  18. Measurement of regression rate in hybrid rocket using combustion chamber pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Ramakrishna, P. A.

    2014-10-01

    An attempt was made in this paper to determine the regression rate of a hybrid fuel by using combustion chamber pressure. In this method, the choked flow condition at the nozzle throat of the hybrid rocket was used to obtain the mass of fuel burnt and in turn the regression rate. The algorithm used here is better than those reported in the literature as the results obtained were compared with the results obtained using the weight loss method and was demonstrated to be in good agreement with the results obtained using the weight loss method using the same motor and the same fuel and oxidizer combination. In addition, the O/F ratio obtained was in good agreement with those obtained using the weight loss method. The combustion efficiencies obtained were in good agreement with the average values.

  19. Combustion-Characteristic-Based Active Thrust Modulation of a Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masafumi; Gaspard, Guillaume; Urakawa, Katsuya

    A new concept of thrust modulation of solid propellant rocket motor is proposed. Some propellants cannot burn at intermediate pressure, while they can burn at lower and higher pressures. When one applies such a propellant to a motor, two combustion modes or two thrust levels are attainable without any change of the nozzle configuration. In the experiments different ignition conditions brought independent two combustion modes (low mode and high mode) in the same motor geometry. Some motors showed a natural transition from low mode to high mode. As an example, the alternative thrust levels were 50 N and 180 N. The natural transition was restricted with use of the partitioned grain. An active transition method was explored by exerting pressure perturbation through a vent hole with a ball valve. The valve system worked for the transition from high mode to low mode, but the reverse transition was not achieved well.

  20. Analytical flow/thermal modeling of combustion gas flows in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor test joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, G. H.; Knox, E. C.; Pond, J. E.; Bacchus, D. L.; Hengel, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical tool, TOPAZ (Transient One-dimensional Pipe flow AnalyZer), was used to model the flow characteristics of hot combustion gases through Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints and to compute the resultant material surface temperatures and o-ring seal erosion of the joints. The capabilities of the analytical tool were validated with test data during the Seventy Pound Charge (SPC) motor test program. The predicted RSRM joint thermal response to ignition transients was compared with test data for full-scale motor tests. The one-dimensional analyzer is found to be an effective tool for simulating combustion gas flows in RSRM joints and for predicting flow and thermal properties.

  1. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  2. Powdered Magnesium-Carbon Dioxide Rocket Combustion Technology for In Situ Mars Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, J. P.; Litchford, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Powdered magnesium (Mg) carbon dioxide (CO2) combustion is examined as a potential in situ propellant combination for Mars propulsion. Although this particular combination has relatively low performance in comparison to traditional bipropellants, it remains attractive as a potential basis for future martian mobility systems, since it could be partially or wholly manufactured from indigenous planetary resources. As a means of achieving high mobility during long-duration Mars exploration missions, the poorer performing in situ combination can, in fact, become a superior alternative to conventional storable propellants, which would need to be entirely transported from Earth. Thus, the engineering aspects of powdered metal combustion devices are discussed including transport/injection of compacted powder, ignition, combustion efficiency, combustion stability, dilution effects, lean burn limits, and slag formation issues. It is suggested that these technological issues could be effectively addressed through a multiphase research and development effort beginning with basic feasibility tests using an existing dump configured atmospheric pressure burner. Follow-on phases would involve the development and testing of a pressurized research combustor and technology demonstration tests of a prototypical rocket configuration.

  3. Large liquid rocket engine transient performance simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Southwick, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    A simulation system, ROCETS, was designed and developed to allow cost-effective computer predictions of liquid rocket engine transient performance. The system allows a user to generate a simulation of any rocket engine configuration using component modules stored in a library through high-level input commands. The system library currently contains 24 component modules, 57 sub-modules and maps, and 33 system routines and utilities. FORTRAN models from other sources can be operated in the system upon inclusion of interface information on comment cards. Operation of the simulation is simplified for the user by run, execution, and output processors. The simulation system makes available steady-state trim balance, transient operation, and linear partial generation. The system utilizes a modern equation solver for efficient operation of the simulations. Transient integration methods include integral and differential forms for the trapezoidal, first order Gear, and second order Gear corrector equations. A detailed technology test bed engine (TTBE) model was generated to be used as the acceptance test of the simulation system. The general level of model detail was that reflected in the Space Shuttle Main Engine DTM. The model successfully obtained steady-state balance in main stage operation and simulated throttle transients, including engine starts and shutdown. A NASA FORTRAN control model was obtained, ROCETS interface installed in comment cards, and operated with the TTBE model in closed-loop transient mode.

  4. Overview of initial research into the effects of strong vortex flow on hybrid rocket combustion and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloyer, P.; Knuth, William H.; Goodman, J.

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the effect of vortex flow on hybrid rocket combustion and performance is underway. Emphasis is on response of the fuel regression rate when subjected to vortex flow. Initial results show that there is a definite effect of the vortex on fuel regression rate. Future work will focus on quantitatively measuring this regression rate. This work is part of an overall program to develop an ultra low cost fuel system for hybrid rocket engines.

  5. A methodology to study the possible occurrence of chugging in liquid rocket engines during transient start-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Marco; Nasuti, Francesco; Di Matteo, Francesco; Steelant, Johan

    2017-10-01

    An investigation on the low frequency combustion instabilities due to the interaction of combustion chamber and feed line dynamics in a liquid rocket engine is carried out implementing a specific module in the system analysis software EcosimPro. The properties of the selected double time lag model are identified according to the two classical assumptions of constant and variable time lag. Module capabilities are evaluated on a literature experimental set up consisting of a combustion chamber decoupled from the upstream feed lines. The computed stability map results to be in good agreement with both experimental data and analytical models. Moreover, the first characteristic frequency of the engine is correctly predicted, giving confidence on the use of the module for the analysis of chugging instabilities. As an example of application, a study is carried out on the influence of the feed lines on the system stability, correctly capturing that the lines extend the stable regime of the combustion chamber and that the propellant domes play a key role in coupling the dynamics of combustion chamber and feed lines. A further example is presented to discuss on the role of pressure growth rate and of the combustion chamber properties on the possible occurrence of chug instability during engine start-up and on the conditions that lead to its damping or growth.

  6. Fundamental phenomena on fuel decomposition and boundary layer combustion processes with applications to hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Kenneth K.; Lu, Y. C.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study on the fundamental processes involved in fuel decomposition and boundary layer combustion in hybrid rocket motors is being conducted at the High Pressure Combustion Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. This research should provide a useful engineering technology base in the development of hybrid rocket motors as well as a fundamental understanding of the complex processes involved in hybrid propulsion. A high pressure slab motor has been designed and manufactured for conducting experimental investigations. Oxidizer (LOX or GOX) supply and control systems have been designed and partly constructed for the head-end injection into the test chamber. Experiments using HTPB fuel, as well as fuels supplied by NASA designated industrial companies will be conducted. Design and construction of fuel casting molds and sample holders have been completed. The portion of these items for industrial company fuel casting will be sent to the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Corporation in the near future. The study focuses on the following areas: observation of solid fuel burning processes with LOX or GOX, measurement and correlation of solid fuel regression rate with operating conditions, measurement of flame temperature and radical species concentrations, determination of the solid fuel subsurface temperature profile, and utilization of experimental data for validation of a companion theoretical study (Part 2) also being conducted at PSU.

  7. Fundamental phenomena on fuel decomposition and boundary layer combustion processes with applications to hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Kenneth K.; Lu, Y. C.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study on the fundamental processes involved in fuel decomposition and boundary layer combustion in hybrid rocket motors is being conducted at the High Pressure Combustion Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. This research should provide an engineering technology base for development of large scale hybrid rocket motors as well as a fundamental understanding of the complex processes involved in hybrid propulsion. A high pressure slab motor has been designed for conducting experimental investigations. Oxidizer (LOX or GOX) is injected through the head-end over a solid fuel (HTPB) surface. Experiments using fuels supplied by NASA designated industrial companies will also be conducted. The study focuses on the following areas: measurement and observation of solid fuel burning with LOX or GOX, correlation of solid fuel regression rate with operating conditions, measurement of flame temperature and radical species concentrations, determination of the solid fuel subsurface temperature profile, and utilization of experimental data for validation of a companion theoretical study also being conducted at PSU.

  8. Fundamental phenomena on fuel decomposition and boundary layer combustion processes with applications to hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Kenneth K.; Lu, Y. C.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.

    1994-11-01

    An experimental study on the fundamental processes involved in fuel decomposition and boundary layer combustion in hybrid rocket motors is being conducted at the High Pressure Combustion Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. This research should provide a useful engineering technology base in the development of hybrid rocket motors as well as a fundamental understanding of the complex processes involved in hybrid propulsion. A high pressure slab motor has been designed and manufactured for conducting experimental investigations. Oxidizer (LOX or GOX) supply and control systems have been designed and partly constructed for the head-end injection into the test chamber. Experiments using HTPB fuel, as well as fuels supplied by NASA designated industrial companies will be conducted. Design and construction of fuel casting molds and sample holders have been completed. The portion of these items for industrial company fuel casting will be sent to the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Corporation in the near future. The study focuses on the following areas: observation of solid fuel burning processes with LOX or GOX, measurement and correlation of solid fuel regression rate with operating conditions, measurement of flame temperature and radical species concentrations, determination of the solid fuel subsurface temperature profile, and utilization of experimental data for validation of a companion theoretical study (Part 2) also being conducted at PSU.

  9. Parallel Unsteady Turbopump Simulations for Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan; Chan, William

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports the progress being made towards complete turbo-pump simulation capability for liquid rocket engines. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbo-pump impeller is used as a test case for the performance evaluation of the MPI and hybrid MPI/Open-MP versions of the INS3D code. Then, a computational model of a turbo-pump has been developed for the shuttle upgrade program. Relative motion of the grid system for rotor-stator interaction was obtained by employing overset grid techniques. Time-accuracy of the scheme has been evaluated by using simple test cases. Unsteady computations for SSME turbo-pump, which contains 136 zones with 35 Million grid points, are currently underway on Origin 2000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. Results from time-accurate simulations with moving boundary capability, and the performance of the parallel versions of the code will be presented in the final paper.

  10. Materials Problems in Chemical Liquid-Propellant Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. L.

    1959-01-01

    With the advent of the space age, new adjustments in technical thinking and engineering experience are necessary. There is an increasing and extensive interest in the utilization of materials for components to be used at temperatures ranging from -423 to over 3500 deg F. This paper presents a description of the materials problems associated with the various components of chemical liquid rocket systems. These components include cooled and uncooled thrust chambers, injectors, turbine drive systems, propellant tanks, and cryogenic propellant containers. In addition to materials limitations associated with these components, suggested research approaches for improving materials properties are made. Materials such as high-temperature alloys, cermets, carbides, nonferrous alloys, plastics, refractory metals, and porous materials are considered.

  11. Large liquid rocket engine transient performance simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Southwick, R. D.

    1989-01-01

    Phase 1 of the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) program consists of seven technical tasks: architecture; system requirements; component and submodel requirements; submodel implementation; component implementation; submodel testing and verification; and subsystem testing and verification. These tasks were completed. Phase 2 of ROCETS consists of two technical tasks: Technology Test Bed Engine (TTBE) model data generation; and system testing verification. During this period specific coding of the system processors was begun and the engineering representations of Phase 1 were expanded to produce a simple model of the TTBE. As the code was completed, some minor modifications to the system architecture centering on the global variable common, GLOBVAR, were necessary to increase processor efficiency. The engineering modules completed during Phase 2 are listed: INJTOO - main injector; MCHBOO - main chamber; NOZLOO - nozzle thrust calculations; PBRNOO - preburner; PIPE02 - compressible flow without inertia; PUMPOO - polytropic pump; ROTROO - rotor torque balance/speed derivative; and TURBOO - turbine. Detailed documentation of these modules is in the Appendix. In addition to the engineering modules, several submodules were also completed. These submodules include combustion properties, component performance characteristics (maps), and specific utilities. Specific coding was begun on the system configuration processor. All functions necessary for multiple module operation were completed but the SOLVER implementation is still under development. This system, the Verification Checkout Facility (VCF) allows interactive comparison of module results to store data as well as provides an intermediate checkout of the processor code. After validation using the VCF, the engineering modules and submodules were used to build a simple TTBE.

  12. Comparison of a Structured-LES and an Unstructured-DES Code for Predicting Combustion Instabilities in a Longitudinal Mode Rocket

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Structured-LES and an Unstructured-DES Code for Predicting Combustion Instabilities in a Longitudinal Mode Rocket 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Predicting Combustion Instabilities in a Longitudinal Mode Rocket Matt Harvazinski, Doug Tally, & Venke Sankaran Air Force Research Laboratory Edwards

  13. Space shuttle with common fuel tank for liquid rocket booster and main engines (supertanker space shuttle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    An operation and schedule enhancement is shown that replaces the four-body cluster (Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO), external tank, and two solid rocket boosters) with a simpler two-body cluster (SSO and liquid rocket booster/external tank). At staging velocity, the booster unit (liquid-fueled booster engines and vehicle support structure) is jettisoned while the remaining SSO and supertank continues on to orbit. The simpler two-bodied cluster reduces the processing and stack time until SSO mate from 57 days (for the solid rocket booster) to 20 days (for the liquid rocket booster). The areas in which liquid booster systems are superior to solid rocket boosters are discussed. Alternative and future generation vehicles are reviewed to reveal greater performance and operations enhancements with more modifications to the current methods of propulsion design philosophy, e.g., combined cycle engines, and concentric propellant tanks.

  14. 46 CFR 30.10-15 - Combustible liquid-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible liquid-TB/ALL. 30.10-15 Section 30.10-15...-15 Combustible liquid—TB/ALL. The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above... of this subchapter, combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (a) Grade D....

  15. 46 CFR 30.10-15 - Combustible liquid-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible liquid-TB/ALL. 30.10-15 Section 30.10-15...-15 Combustible liquid—TB/ALL. The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above... of this subchapter, combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (a) Grade D....

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-15 - Combustible liquid-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible liquid-TB/ALL. 30.10-15 Section 30.10-15...-15 Combustible liquid—TB/ALL. The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above... of this subchapter, combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (a) Grade D....

  17. 46 CFR 30.10-15 - Combustible liquid-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible liquid-TB/ALL. 30.10-15 Section 30.10-15...-15 Combustible liquid—TB/ALL. The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above... of this subchapter, combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (a) Grade D....

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-15 - Combustible liquid-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible liquid-TB/ALL. 30.10-15 Section 30.10-15...-15 Combustible liquid—TB/ALL. The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above... of this subchapter, combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (a) Grade D....

  19. Testing of a Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Reaction Control Thruster in a New Altitude Rocket Engine Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Marshall, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A relocated rocket engine test facility, the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), was activated in 2009 at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility has the capability to test with a variety of propellants and up to a thrust level of 2000 lbf (8.9 kN) with precise measurement of propellant conditions, propellant flow rates, thrust and altitude conditions. These measurements enable accurate determination of a thruster and/or nozzle s altitude performance for both technology development and flight qualification purposes. In addition the facility was designed to enable efficient test operations to control costs for technology and advanced development projects. A liquid oxygen-liquid methane technology development test program was conducted in the ACS from the fall of 2009 to the fall of 2010. Three test phases were conducted investigating different operational modes and in addition, the project required the complexity of controlling propellant inlet temperatures over an extremely wide range. Despite the challenges of a unique propellant (liquid methane) and wide operating conditions, the facility performed well and delivered up to 24 hot fire tests in a single test day. The resulting data validated the feasibility of utilizing this propellant combination for future deep space applications.

  20. Design of a 500 lbf liquid oxygen and liquid methane rocket engine for suborbital flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trillo, Jesus Eduardo

    Liquid methane (LCH4)is the most promising rocket fuel for our journey to Mars and other space entities. Compared to liquid hydrogen, the most common cryogenic fuel used today, methane is denser and can be stored at a more manageable temperature; leading to more affordable tanks and a lighter system. The most important advantage is it can be produced from local sources using in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology. This will allow the production of the fuel needed to come back to earth on the surface of Mars, or the space entity being explored, making the overall mission more cost effective by enabling larger usable mass. The major disadvantage methane has over hydrogen is it provides a lower specific impulse, or lower rocket performance. The UTEP Center for Space Exploration and Technology Research (cSETR) in partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been the leading research center for the advancement of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Liquid Methane (LCH4) propulsion technologies. Through this partnership, the CROME engine, a throattable 500 lbf LOX/LCH4 rocket engine, was designed and developed. The engine will serve as the main propulsion system for Daedalus, a suborbital demonstration vehicle being developed by the cSETR. The purpose of Daedalus mission and the engine is to fire in space under microgravity conditions to demonstrate its restartability. This thesis details the design process, decisions, and characteristics of the engine to serve as a complete design guide.

  1. Experimental Performance of Area Ratio 200, 25 and 8 Nozzles on JP-4 Fuel and Liquid Oxygen Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, J. Calvin; Samanich, Nick E.; Barnett, Donald O.

    1960-01-01

    The performance of an area ratio 200 bell-shaped nozzle, an area ratio 25 bell-shaped nozzle, and an area ratio 8 conic nozzle on a JP-4 fuel and liquid-oxygen rocket engine has been determined. Tests were conducted using a nominal 4000-pound-thrust rocket in the Lewis 10- by 10-foot supersonic tunnel, which provided the altitude environment needed for fully expanded nozzle flow. The area ratio 200 nozzle had a vacuum thrust coefficient of 1.96, compared with 1.82 and 1.70 for the area ratio 25 and 8 nozzles, respectively. These values are approximately equal to those for theoretical frozen expansion. The measured value of vacuum specific impulse for the area ratio 200 nozzle was 317 seconds for a combustion-chamber characteristic velocity of 5200 feet per second. The vacuum-specific-impulse increase for the area-ratio increase from 8 to 200 was 46 seconds.

  2. Changes in combustion behavior of liquid fuels due to the addition of small amounts of ammonia borane or nano aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeil, Mark A.

    Both ammonia borane and nano aluminum as additives to liquid fuels are investigated. Both fundamental droplet combustion experiments and experiments using an unstable liquid rocket combustor are used to study the effects these additives on the combustion behavior. The liquid fuels consist of ethanol and JP-8. The droplet experiments consist of both visual and OH high speed planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements. Simple combustion models are incorporated as well to provide further understanding. It is found that ammonia borane increases the regression rate of a single ethanol droplet. Evidence indicates that hydrogen gas is released throughout the combustion process of the droplet and influences the combustion behavior notably. Laser diagnostics indicate that changes in flame structure occur. The other components of ammonia borane affect the combustion behavior of the droplet, especially near the end of the droplet lifetime, causing the droplet to shatter. Nano aluminum has very little impact on the combustion behavior of single fuel droplets of JP-8 and ethanol. Nano aluminum is observed to combust only when a surfactant, Neodol, is present which produces gas generation and bubble formation within the droplet. Combustor experiments show similar trends as the droplet combustion experiments. Ammonia borane has a notable impact on the combustion stability of the system allowing it to be unstable for more combustor geometries. It is shown that ammonia borane addition produces a bimodal unsteady energy release within the combustor while the neat fuel does not. This combustion behavior allows for the increased amount of unstable combustor geometries. Nano aluminum has a small impact on the combustion stability of the system causing pressure oscillations to increase.

  3. Comparison of High Aspect Ratio Cooling Channel Designs for a Rocket Combustion Chamber with Development of an Optimized Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical investigation on the effect of high aspect ratio (height/width) cooling channels, considering different coolant channel designs, on hot-gas-side wall temperature and coolant pressure drop for a liquid hydrogen cooled rocket combustion chamber, was performed. Coolant channel design elements considered were: length of combustion chamber in which high aspect ratio cooling was applied, number of coolant channels, and coolant channel shape. Seven coolant channel designs were investigated using a coupling of the Rocket Thermal Evaluation code and the Two-Dimensional Kinetics code. Initially, each coolant channel design was developed, without consideration for fabrication, to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature from a given conventional cooling channel baseline. These designs produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions up to 22 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 7.5 percent from the baseline. Fabrication constraints for milled channels were applied to the seven designs. These produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions of up to 20 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 2 percent. Using high aspect ratio cooling channels for the entire length of the combustion chamber had no additional benefit on hot-gas-side wall temperature over using high aspect ratio cooling channels only in the throat region, but increased coolant pressure drop 33 percent. Independent of coolant channel shape, high aspect ratio cooling was able to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature by at least 8 percent, with as low as a 2 percent increase in coolant pressure drop. ne design with the highest overall benefit to hot-gas-side wall temperature and minimal coolant pressure drop increase was the design which used bifurcated cooling channels and high aspect ratio cooling in the throat region. An optimized bifurcated high aspect ratio cooling channel design was developed which reduced the hot-gas-side wall temperature by 18 percent and

  4. Rocket engine coaxial injector liquid/gas interface flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Wolfgang; Kruelle, Gerd

    1995-05-01

    Coaxial injectors are used for the injection and mixing of propellants H2/O2 in cryogenic rocket engines. The aim of the theoretical and experimental investigations presented here is to elucidate some of the physical processes in coaxial injector flow with respect to their significance for atomization and mixing. Experiments with the simulation fluids H2O and air were performed under ambient conditions and at elevated counter pressures up to 20 bar. This article reports on phenomenological studies of spray generation under a broad variation of parameters using nanolight photography and high-speed cinematography (up to 3 x 10(exp 4) frames/s). Detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the surface evolution of turbulent jets were performed. Proof was obtained of the impact of internal fluid jet motions on surface deformation. The m = 1 nonaxisymmetric instability of the liquid jet seems to be superimposed onto the small-scale atomization process. A model is presented that calculates droplet atomization quantities as frequency, droplet diameter, and liquid core shape. The overall procedure for implementing this model as a global spray model is also described and an example calculation is presented.

  5. Rocket engine coaxial injector liquid/gas interface flow phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, W.; Kruelle, G.

    1995-05-01

    Coaxial injectors are used for the injection and mixing of propellants H2/O2 in cryogenic rocket engines. The aim of the theoretical and experimental investigations presented here is to elucidate some of the physical processes in coaxial injector flow with respect to their significance for atomization and mixing. Experiments with the simulation fluids H2O and air were performed under ambient conditions and at elevated counter pressures up to 20 bar. This article reports on phenomenological studies of spray generation under a broad variation of parameters using nanolight photography and high-speed cinematography (up to 3 x 10(exp 4) frames/s). Detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the surface evolution of turbulent jets were performed. Proof was obtained of the impact of internal fluid jet motions on surface deformation. The m = 1 nonaxisymmetric instability of the liquid jet seems to be superimposed onto the small-scale atomization process. A model is presented that calculates droplet atomization quantities as frequency, droplet diameter, and liquid core shape. The overall procedure for implementing this model as a global spray model is also described and an example calculation is presented. 15 refs.

  6. Cooling of High Pressure Rocket Thrust Chambers with Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental program using hydrogen and oxygen as the propellants and supercritical liquid oxygen (LOX) as the coolant was conducted at 4.14 and 8.274 MN/square meters (600 and 1200 psia) chamber pressure. Data on the following are presented: the effect of LOX leaking into the combustion region through small cracks in the chamber wall; and verification of the supercritical oxygen heat transfer correlation developed from heated tube experiments; A total of four thrust chambers with throat diameters of 0.066 m were tested. Of these, three were cyclically tested to 4.14 MN/square meters (600 psia) chamber pressure until a crack developed. One had 23 additional hot cycles accumulated with no apparent metal burning or distress. The fourth chamber was operated at 8.274 MN/square meters (1200 psia) pressure to obtain steady state heat transfer data. Wall temperature measurements confirmed the heat transfer correlation.

  7. High-pressure liquid-monopropellant strand combustion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of the influence of dissolved gases on the state of the liquid surface during high-pressure liquid-monopropellant combustion through the use of a strand burning experiment. Liquid surface temperatures were measured, using fine-wire thermocouples, during the strand combustion of ethyl nitrate, normal propyl nitrate, and propylene glycol dinitrate at pressures up to 81 atm. These measurements were compared with the predictions of a variable-property gas-phase analysis assuming an infinite activation energy for the decomposition reaction. The state of the liquid surface was estimated using a conventional low-pressure phase equilibrium model, as well as a high-pressure version that considered the presence of dissolved combustion-product gases in the liquid phase. The high-pressure model was found to give a superior prediction of measured liquid surface temperatures. Computed total pressures required for the surface to reach its critical mixing point during strand combustion were found to be in the range from 2.15 to 4.62 times the critical pressure of the pure propellant. Computed dissolved gas concentrations at the liquid surface were in the range from 35 to 50% near the critical combustion condition.

  8. Characterization of Rocket Propellant Combustion Products. Chemical Characterization and Computer Modeling of the Exhaust Products from Four Propellant Formulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-31

    Fractions as a Function of Exit/Throat Area Ratios Com position Q ............................................... 43 20 Effect of ± 5% Shift in Heat of...Constituents in ASCF Chamber .................................. 49 23 Effect of Choice Gaseous Equation of State on Computed Mole Fractions for Composition...health hazards from weapons combustion products, to include rockets and missiles, became evident, Research to elucidate significant health effects of

  9. Cold Flow Testing for Liquid Propellant Rocket Injector Scaling and Throttling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Jeremy R.; Moser, Marlow D.; Hulka, James; Jones, Gregg

    2006-01-01

    Scaling and throttling of combustion devices are important capabilities to demonstrate in development of liquid rocket engines for NASA's Space Exploration Mission. Scaling provides the ability to design new injectors and injection elements with predictable performance on the basis of test experience with existing injectors and elements, and could be a key aspect of future development programs. Throttling is the reduction of thrust with fixed designs and is a critical requirement in lunar and other planetary landing missions. A task in the Constellation University Institutes Program (CUIP) has been designed to evaluate spray characteristics when liquid propellant rocket engine injectors are scaled and throttled. The specific objectives of the present study are to characterize injection and primary atomization using cold flow simulations of the reacting sprays. These simulations can provide relevant information because the injection and primary atomization are believed to be the spray processes least affected by the propellant reaction. Cold flow studies also provide acceptable test conditions for a university environment. Three geometric scales - 1/4- scale, 1/2-scale, and full-scale - of two different injector element types - swirl coaxial and shear coaxial - will be designed, fabricated, and tested. A literature review is currently being conducted to revisit and compile the previous scaling documentation. Because it is simple to perform, throttling will also be examined in the present work by measuring primary atomization characteristics as the mass flow rate and pressure drop of the six injector element concepts are reduced, with corresponding changes in chamber backpressure. Simulants will include water and gaseous nitrogen, and an optically accessible chamber will be used for visual and laser-based diagnostics. The chamber will include curtain flow capability to repress recirculation, and additional gas injection to provide independent control of the

  10. Design of Cooling Channels of Preburners for Small Liquid Rocket Engines with Computational Flow and Heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, In-Sang; Lee, Seon-Mi; Moon, Il-Yoon; Yoo, Jae-Han; Lee, Soo-Yong

    2011-09-01

    A series of computational analyses was performed to predict the cooling process by the cooling channel of preburners used for kerosene-liquid oxygen staged combustion cycle rocket engines. As an oxygen-rich combustion occurs in the kerosene fueled preburner, it is of great importance to control the wall temperature so that it does not exceed the critical temperature. However, since the heat transfer is proportional to the speed of fluid running inside the channel, the high heat transfer leads to a trade-off of pressure loss. For this reason, it is necessary to establish a certain criteria between the pressure loss and the heat transfer or the wall surface temperature. The design factors of the cooling channel were determined by the computational research, and a test model was manufactured. The test model was used for the hot fire tests to prove the function of the cooling mechanism, among other purposes.

  11. Pressure oscillations and instability of working processes in the combustion chambers of solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, V. N.; Teterina, I. V.; Volkov, K. N.; Garkushev, A. U.

    2017-06-01

    Metal particles are widely used in space engineering to increase specific impulse and to supress acoustic instability of intra-champber processes. A numerical analysis of the internal injection-driven turbulent gas-particle flows is performed to improve the current understanding and modeling capabilities of the complex flow characteristics in the combustion chambers of solid rocket motors (SRMs) in presence of forced pressure oscillations. The two-phase flow is simulated with a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and transport equations of k - ε model are solved numerically for the gas. The particulate phase is simulated through a Lagrangian deterministic and stochastic tracking models to provide particle trajectories and particle concentration. The results obtained highlight the crucial significance of the particle dispersion in turbulent flowfield and high potential of statistical methods. Strong coupling between acoustic oscillations, vortical motion, turbulent fluctuations and particle dynamics is observed.

  12. Progress and Challenges in Liquid Rocket Combustion Stability Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-04

    propulsion activities at AFRL. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF... ht er a nd /o r m or e ca pa bl e s/ c Tr an si tio n? In -H ou se : • Te st fa ci lit ie s • 8 va cu um ch am be rs • Th ru st er d es ig...ag e fly in g rig ht n ow • D ev el op ed p ro pu ls io n m od ul e fo r F al co nS at -5 te ch d em o, in cl ud in g sp

  13. Design and Testing of a Liquid Nitrous Oxide and Ethanol Fueled Rocket Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Stewart

    2015-08-01

    A small-scale, bi-propellant, liquid fueled rocket engine and supporting test infrastructure were designed and constructed at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC). This facility was used to evaluate liquid nitrous oxide and ethanol as potential rocket propellants. Thrust and pressure measurements along with high-speed digital imaging of the rocket exhaust plume were made. This experimental data was used for validation of a computational model developed of the rocket engine tested. The developed computational model was utilized to analyze rocket engine performance across a range of operating pressures, fuel-oxidizer mixture ratios, and outlet nozzle configurations. A comparative study of the modeling of a liquid rocket engine was performed using NASA CEA and Cantera, an opensource equilibrium code capable of being interfaced with MATLAB. One goal of this modeling was to demonstrate the ability of Cantera to accurately model the basic chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, and transport properties for varied fuel and oxidizer operating conditions. Once validated for basic equilibrium, an expanded MATLAB code, referencing Cantera, was advanced beyond CEAs capabilities to predict rocket engine performance as a function of supplied propellant flow rate and rocket engine nozzle dimensions. Cantera was found to comparable favorably to CEA for making equilibrium calculations, supporting its use as an alternative to CEA. The developed rocket engine performs as predicted, demonstrating the developedMATLAB rocket engine model was successful in predicting real world rocket engine performance. Finally, nitrous oxide and ethanol were shown to perform well as rocket propellants, with specific impulses experimentally recorded in the range of 250 to 260 seconds.

  14. A computer model for liquid jet atomization in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H. Q.; Ibrahim, E.; Chuech, S.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1991-12-01

    The process of atomization has been used as an efficient means of burning liquid fuels in rocket engines, gas turbine engines, internal combustion engines, and industrial furnaces. Despite its widespread application, this complex hydrodynamic phenomenon has not been well understood, and predictive models for this process are still in their infancy. The difficulty in simulating the atomization process arises from the relatively large number of parameters that influence it, including the details of the injector geometry, liquid and gas turbulence, and the operating conditions. In this study, numerical models are developed from first principles, to quantify factors influencing atomization. For example, the surface wave dynamics theory is used for modeling the primary atomization and the droplet energy conservation principle is applied for modeling the secondary atomization. The use of empirical correlations has been minimized by shifting the analyses to fundamental levels. During applications of these models, parametric studies are performed to understand and correlate the influence of relevant parameters on the atomization process. The predictions of these models are compared with existing experimental data. The main tasks of this study were the following: development of a primary atomization model; development of a secondary atomization model; development of a model for impinging jets; development of a model for swirling jets; and coupling of the primary atomization model with a CFD code.

  15. Thrust stand for low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qin; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Min; Jia, Zhen-yuan; Sun, Bao-yuan

    2010-09-01

    A thrust stand is developed for measuring the pulsed thrust generated by low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines. It mainly consists of a thrust dynamometer, a base frame, a connecting frame, and a data acquisition and processing system. The thrust dynamometer assembled with shear mode piezoelectric quartz sensors is developed as the core component of the thrust stand. It adopts integral shell structure. The sensors are inserted into unique double-elastic-half-ring grooves with an interference fit. The thrust is transferred to the sensors by means of static friction forces of fitting surfaces. The sensors could produce an amount of charges which are proportional to the thrust to be measured. The thrust stand is calibrated both statically and dynamically. The in situ static calibration is performed using a standard force sensor. The dynamic calibration is carried out using pendulum-typed steel ball impact technique. Typical thrust pulse is simulated by a trapezoidal impulse force. The results show that the thrust stand has a sensitivity of 25.832 mV/N, a linearity error of 0.24% FSO, and a repeatability error of 0.23% FSO. The first natural frequency of the thrust stand is 1245 Hz. The thrust stand can accurately measure thrust waveform of each firing, which is used for fine control of on-orbit vehicles in the thrust range of 5-20 N with pulse frequency of 50 Hz.

  16. Consideration of real gas effects and condensation in a spray-combustion rocket-thrust-chamber design tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M.; Kniesner, B.; Knab, O.

    2011-10-01

    For the prediction of hot gas side heat transfer in rocket thrust chambers, Astrium Space Transportation (ST) uses the second generation multiphase Navier-Stokes solver Rocflam-II. To account for real-gas and condensation effects, pressure-dependent and even multiphase fluid data are included in the chemistry tables used by the code. Thus, the changing fluid properties near the two-phase region as well as transformation from gaseous to liquid and even solid state are reflected properly. Heat flux measurements for a dedicated subscale test campaign with strongly cooled walls show a clearly increasing heat load as soon as the combustion gases condense at the wall, due to the released latent heat of condensation. Corresponding coupled Rocflam-II/CFX simulations show a good quantitative agreement in heat flux for load cases with and without condensation, showing the ability of the code to correctly simulate flows in the real-gas and even inside the two-phase region.

  17. Triggered instabilities in rocket motors and active combustion control for an incinerator afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicker, Josef M.

    1999-11-01

    Two branches of research are conducted in this thesis. The first deals with nonlinear combustion response as a mechanism for triggering combustion instabilities in solid rocket motors. A nonlinear wave equation is developed to study a wide class of combustion response functions to second-order in fluctuation amplitude. Conditions for triggering are derived from analysis of limit cycles, and regions of triggering are found in parametric space. Introduction of linear cross-coupling and quadratic self-coupling among the acoustic modes appears to be how the nonlinear combustion response produces triggering to a stable limit cycle. Regions of initial conditions corresponding to stable pulses were found, suggesting that stability depends on initial phase angle and harmonic content, as well as the composite amplitude, of the pulse. Also, dependence of nonlinear stability upon system parameters is considered. The second part of this thesis presents research for a controller to improve the emissions of an incinerator afterburner. The developed controller was experimentally tested at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), on a 50kW-scale model of an afterburner for Naval shipboard incinerator applications. Acoustic forcing of the combustor's reacting shear layer is used to control the formation of coherent vortical structures, within which favorable fuel-air mixing and efficient combustion can occur. Laser-based measurements of CO emissions are used as the performance indicator for the combustor. The controller algorithm is based on the downhill simplex method and adjusts the shear layer forcing parameters in order to minimize the CO emissions. The downhill simplex method was analyzed with respect to its behavior in the face of time-variation of the plant and noise in the sensor signal, and was modified to account for these difficulties. The control system has experimentally demonstrated the ability (1) to find optimal control action for single- and multi-variable control, (2

  18. Combustion process for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials from liquid hydrocarbon

    DOEpatents

    Diener, Michael D.; Alford, J. Michael; Nabity, James; Hitch, Bradley D.

    2007-01-02

    The present invention provides a combustion apparatus for the production of carbon nanomaterials including fullerenes and fullerenic soot. Most generally the combustion apparatus comprises one or more inlets for introducing an oxygen-containing gas and a hydrocarbon fuel gas in the combustion system such that a flame can be established from the mixed gases, a droplet delivery apparatus for introducing droplets of a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock into the flame, and a collector apparatus for collecting condensable products containing carbon nanomaterials that are generated in the combustion system. The combustion system optionally has a reaction zone downstream of the flame. If this reaction zone is present the hydrocarbon feedstock can be introduced into the flame, the reaction zone or both.

  19. Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries

    DOEpatents

    Robben, Franklin A.

    1985-01-01

    A method and device for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal.

  20. Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries

    DOEpatents

    Robben, F.A.

    1984-10-19

    A method and device are claimed for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Combustion Instability Analysis and the Effects of Drop Size on Acoustic Driving Rocket Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Ellison, L. Renea; Moser, Marlow D.

    2004-01-01

    High frequency combustion instability, the most destructive kind, is generally solved on a per engine basis. The instability often is the result of compounding acoustic oscillations, usually from the propellant combustion itself. To counteract the instability the chamber geometry can be changed and/or the method of propellant injection can be altered. This experiment will alter the chamber dimensions slightly; using a cylindrical shape of constant diameter and the length will be varied from six to twelve inches in three-inch increments. The main flowfield will be the products of a high OF hydrogen/oxygen flow. The liquid fuel will be injected into this flowfield using a modulated injector. It will allow for varied droplet size, feed rate, spray pattern, and location for the mixture within the chamber. The response will be deduced from the chamber pressure oscillations.

  2. Wick-Type Liquid-Metal Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    Properties of Li2 S .......................................................... 4 2.2 Flow Analysis... light Cp specific heat D binary diffusion coefficient E energy f dimensionless stream function, Eq. 12 F Boltzmann fraction g acceleration of gravity gi...the gas phase. To model the wick combustion of Li and SF 6 , thermochemical properties of reactants and products were identified and the transport

  3. Turbine Burners: Turbulent Combustion of Liquid Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    nozzle guide vane geometries can be quite complex, the experiments will concentrate initially on an auxiliary combustion chamber and its interaction...pressure measurements along the curved duct walls and pitot pressure surveys. To these measurements we will add particle image velocimetry (PIV) of the flow

  4. Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Centaur is one of the most powerful rockets in the world. As an upper-stage rocket for the Atlas and Titan boosters it has been a reliable workhorse for NASA for over forty years and has played an essential role in many of NASA's adventures into space. In this CD-ROM you will be able to explore the Centaur's history in various rooms to this virtual museum. Visit the "Movie Theater" to enjoy several video documentaries on the Centaur. Enter the "Interview Booth" to hear and read interviews with scientists and engineers closely responsible for building and operating the rocket. Go to the "Photo Gallery" to look at numerous photos of the rocket throughout its history. Wander into the "Centaur Library" to read various primary documents of the Centaur program. Finally, stop by the "Observation Deck" to watch a virtual Centaur in flight.

  5. Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Centaur is one of the most powerful rockets in the world. As an upper-stage rocket for the Atlas and Titan boosters it has been a reliable workhorse for NASA for over forty years and has played an essential role in many of NASA's adventures into space. In this CD-ROM you will be able to explore the Centaur's history in various rooms to this virtual museum. Visit the "Movie Theater" to enjoy several video documentaries on the Centaur. Enter the "Interview Booth" to hear and read interviews with scientists and engineers closely responsible for building and operating the rocket. Go to the "Photo Gallery" to look at numerous photos of the rocket throughout its history. Wander into the "Centaur Library" to read various primary documents of the Centaur program. Finally, stop by the "Observation Deck" to watch a virtual Centaur in flight.

  6. Technology developments for thrust chambers of future launch vehicle liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immich, H.; Alting, J.; Kretschmer, J.; Preclik, D.

    2003-08-01

    In this paper an overview of recent technology developments for thrust chambers of future launch vehicle liquid rocket engines at Astrium, Space Infrastructure Division (SI), is shown. The main technology. developments shown in this paper are: Technologies Technologies for enhanced heat transfer to the coolant for expander cycle engines Advanced injector head technologies Advanced combustion chamber manufacturing technologies. The main technologies for enhanced heat transfer investigated by subscale chamber hot-firing tests are: Increase of chamber length Hot gas side ribs in the chamber Artificially increased surface roughness. The developments for advanced injector head technologies were focused on the design of a new modular subscale chamber injector head. This injector head allows for an easy exchange of different injection elements: By this, cost effective hot-fire tests with different injection element concepts can be performed. The developments for advanced combustion chamber manufacturing technologies are based on subscale chamber tests with a new design of the Astrium subscale chamber. The subscale chamber has been modified by introduction of a segmented cooled cylindrical section which gives the possibility to test different manufacturing concepts for cooled chamber technologies by exchanging the individual segments. The main technology efforts versus advanced manufacturing technologies shown in this paper are: Soldering techniques Thermal barrier coatings for increased chamber life. A new technology effort is dedicated especially to LOX/Hydrocarbon propellant combinations. Recent hot fire tests on the subscale chamber with Kerosene and Methane as fuel have already been performed. A comprehensive engine system trade-off between the both propellant combinations (Kerosene vs. Methane) is presently under preparation.

  7. Development of a model for baffle energy dissipation in liquid fueled rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathan A.

    In this thesis the energy dissipation from a combined hub and blade baffle structure in a combustion chamber of a liquid-fueled rocket engine is modeled and computed. An analytical model of the flow stabilization due to the effect of combined radial and hub blades was developed. The rate of energy dissipation of the baffle blades was computed using a corner-flow model that included unsteady flow separation and turbulence effects. For the inviscid portion of the flow field, a solution methodology was formulated using an eigenfunction expansion and a velocity potential matching technique. Parameters such as local velocity, elemental path length, effective viscosity, and local energy dissipation rate were computed as a function of the local angle alpha for a representative baffle blade, and compared to results predicted by the Baer-Mitchell blade dissipation model. The sensitivity of the model to the overall engine acoustic oscillation mode, blade length, and thickness was also computed and compared to previous results. Additional studies were performed to determine the sensitivity to input parameters such as the dimensionless turbulence coefficient, the location of the potential difference in the generation of the dividing streamline, the number of baffle blades and the size of the central hub. Stability computations of a test engine indicated that when the baffle length is increased, the baffles provide increased stabilization effects. The model predicts greatest dissipation for radial modes with a hub radius at approximately half the chamber's radius.

  8. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This photograph is of the engine for the Redstone rocket. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and the production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of its versatility, the Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile.

  9. PC programs for the prediction of the linear stability behavior of liquid propellant propulsion systems and application to current MSFC rocket engine test programs, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III; Armstrong, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on propulsion stability (chugging and acoustic modes), and propellant valve control was investigated. As part of the activation of the new liquid propulsion test facilities, it is necessary to analyze total propulsion system stability. To accomplish this, several codes were built to run on desktop 386 machines. These codes enable one to analyze the stability question associated with the propellant feed systems. In addition, further work was adapted to this computing environment and furnished along with other codes. This latter inclusion furnishes those interested in high frequency oscillatory combustion behavior (that does not couple to the feed system) a set of codes for study of proposed liquid rocket engines.

  10. The Effect of Resistance on Rocket Injector Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability, where unsteady heat release couples with acoustic modes, has long been an area of concern in liquid rocket engines. Accurate modeling of the acoustic normal modes of the combustion chamber is important to understanding and preventing combustion instability. The injector resistance can have a significant influence on the chamber normal mode shape, and hence on the system stability.

  11. [Integral evaluation of immune homeostasis in rockets liquidators and role of this evaluation for prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    Long-standing clinical and immunologic monitoring and integral evaluation of immune homeostasis (through generalized parameter) in personnel of Center for liquid-fuel rockets liquidation demonstrated diagnostically reliable immunity parameters that enable to forecast changes in the workers' health state. The authors defined boundary values of the generalized parameter to form risk groups for specific entities formation.

  12. Exploiting hydrophobic borohydride-rich ionic liquids as faster-igniting rocket fuels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianlin; Qi, Xiujuan; Huang, Shi; Jiang, Linhai; Li, Jianling; Tang, Chenglong; Zhang, Qinghua

    2016-02-04

    A family of hydrophobic borohydride-rich ionic liquids was developed, which exhibited the shortest ignition delay times of 1.7 milliseconds and the lowest viscosity (10 mPa s) of hypergolic ionic fluids, demonstrating their great potential as faster-igniting rocket fuels to replace toxic hydrazine derivatives in liquid bipropellant formulations.

  13. Highly resolved numerical simulation of combustion downstream of a rocket engine igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttay, R.; Gomet, L.; Lehnasch, G.; Mura, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study ignition processes in the turbulent reactive flow established downstream of highly under-expanded coflowing jets. The corresponding configuration is typical of a rocket engine igniter, and to the best knowledge of the authors, this study is the first that documents highly resolved numerical simulations of such a reactive flowfield. Considering the discharge of axisymmetric coaxial under-expanded jets, various morphologies are expected, depending on the value of the nozzle pressure ratio, a key parameter used to classify them. The present computations are conducted with a value of this ratio set to fifteen. The simulations are performed with the massively parallel CREAMS solver on a grid featuring approximately 440,000,000 computational nodes. In the main zone of interest, the level of spatial resolution is D/74, with D the central inlet stream diameter. The computational results reveal the complex topology of the compressible flowfield. The obtained results also bring new and useful insights into the development of ignition processes. In particular, ignition is found to take place rather far downstream of the shock barrel, a conclusion that contrasts with early computational studies conducted within the unsteady RANS computational framework. Consideration of detailed chemistry confirms the essential role of hydroperoxyl radicals, while the analysis of the Takeno index reveals the predominance of a non-premixed combustion mode.

  14. Highly resolved numerical simulation of combustion downstream of a rocket engine igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttay, R.; Gomet, L.; Lehnasch, G.; Mura, A.

    2017-02-01

    We study ignition processes in the turbulent reactive flow established downstream of highly under-expanded coflowing jets. The corresponding configuration is typical of a rocket engine igniter, and to the best knowledge of the authors, this study is the first that documents highly resolved numerical simulations of such a reactive flowfield. Considering the discharge of axisymmetric coaxial under-expanded jets, various morphologies are expected, depending on the value of the nozzle pressure ratio, a key parameter used to classify them. The present computations are conducted with a value of this ratio set to fifteen. The simulations are performed with the massively parallel CREAMS solver on a grid featuring approximately 440,000,000 computational nodes. In the main zone of interest, the level of spatial resolution is D/74, with D the central inlet stream diameter. The computational results reveal the complex topology of the compressible flowfield. The obtained results also bring new and useful insights into the development of ignition processes. In particular, ignition is found to take place rather far downstream of the shock barrel, a conclusion that contrasts with early computational studies conducted within the unsteady RANS computational framework. Consideration of detailed chemistry confirms the essential role of hydroperoxyl radicals, while the analysis of the Takeno index reveals the predominance of a non-premixed combustion mode.

  15. 46 CFR 70.05-30 - Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. 70.05-30... GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-30 Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided the...

  16. 46 CFR 194.05-19 - Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-19 Combustible liquids as chemical stores—Detail requirements. (a) Combustible liquid chemical stores and reagents shall be governed by subparts 194.15 and 194.20. (b)...

  17. 46 CFR 70.05-30 - Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. 70.05-30... GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-30 Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided the...

  18. 46 CFR 70.05-30 - Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. 70.05-30... GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-30 Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided the...

  19. 46 CFR 70.05-30 - Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. 70.05-30... GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-30 Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided the...

  20. 46 CFR 194.05-19 - Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-19 Combustible liquids as chemical stores—Detail requirements. (a) Combustible liquid chemical stores and reagents shall be governed by subparts 194.15 and 194.20. (b)...

  1. 46 CFR 194.05-19 - Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-19 Combustible liquids as chemical stores—Detail requirements. (a) Combustible liquid chemical stores and reagents shall be governed by subparts 194.15 and 194.20. (b)...

  2. 46 CFR 90.05-35 - Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. 90.05-35... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-35 Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided...

  3. 46 CFR 194.05-19 - Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-19 Combustible liquids as chemical stores—Detail requirements. (a) Combustible liquid chemical stores and reagents shall be governed by subparts 194.15 and 194.20. (b)...

  4. 46 CFR 90.05-35 - Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. 90.05-35... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-35 Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided...

  5. 46 CFR 90.05-35 - Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. 90.05-35... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-35 Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided...

  6. 46 CFR 90.05-35 - Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. 90.05-35... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-35 Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided...

  7. 46 CFR 70.05-30 - Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. 70.05-30... GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-30 Combustible and flammable liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided the...

  8. 46 CFR 90.05-35 - Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. 90.05-35... VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 90.05-35 Flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk. Note... limited quantities of flammable and combustible liquid cargo in bulk in the grades indicated, provided...

  9. 46 CFR 194.05-19 - Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible liquids as chemical stores-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-19 Combustible liquids as chemical stores—Detail requirements. (a) Combustible liquid chemical stores and reagents shall be governed by subparts 194.15 and 194.20. (b)...

  10. Predicting performance of axial pump inducer of LOX booster turbo-pump of staged combustion cycle based rocket engine using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Arpit; Ghosh, Parthasarathi

    2015-12-01

    For low cost, high thrust, space missions with high specific impulse and high reliability, inert weight needs to be minimized and thereby increasing the delivered payload. Turbopump feed system for a liquid propellant rocket engine (LPRE) has the highest power to weight ratio. Turbopumps are primarily equipped with an axial flow inducer to achieve the high angular velocity and low suction pressure in combination with increased system reliability. Performance of the turbopump strongly depends on the performance of the inducer. Thus, for designing a LPRE turbopump, demands optimization of the inducer geometry based on the performance of different off-design operating regimes. In this paper, steady-state CFD analysis of the inducer of a liquid oxygen (LOX) axial pump used as a booster pump for an oxygen rich staged combustion cycle rocket engine has been presented using ANSYS® CFX. Attempts have been made to obtain the performance characteristic curves for the LOX pump inducer. The formalism has been used to predict the performance of the inducer for the throttling range varying from 80% to 113% of nominal thrust and for the different rotational velocities from 4500 to 7500 rpm. The results have been analysed to determine the region of cavitation inception for different inlet pressure.

  11. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity, but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer and one fuel orifices) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme as Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 92%, can be obtained. MSFC and the U.S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of

  12. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity, but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer and one fuel orifices) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme as Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 92%, can be obtained. MSFC and the U.S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of

  13. An experimental investigation of liquid methane convection and boiling in rocket engine cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Abraham Gerardo

    In the past decades, interest in developing hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines for deep spaceflight missions has continued to grow. In particular, liquid methane (LCH4) has been of interest due to the weight efficiency, storage, and handling advantages it offers over several currently used propellants. Deep space exploration requires reusable, long life rocket engines. Due to the high temperatures reached during combustion, the life of an engine is significantly impacted by the cooling system's efficiency. Regenerative (regen) cooling is presented as a viable alternative to common cooling methods such as film and dump cooling since it provides improved engine efficiency. Due to limited availability of experimental sub-critical liquid methane cooling data for regen engine design, there has been an interest in studying the heat transfer characteristics of the propellant. For this reason, recent experimental studies at the Center for Space Exploration Technology Research (cSETR) at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) have focused on investigating the heat transfer characteristics of sub-critical CH4 flowing through sub-scale cooling channels. To conduct the experiments, the csETR developed a High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) where all the channels are heated using a conduction-based thermal concentrator. In this study, two smooth channels with cross sectional geometries of 1.8 mm x 4.1 mm and 3.2 mm x 3.2 mm were tested. In addition, three roughened channels all with a 3.2 mm x 3.2 mm square cross section were also tested. For the rectangular smooth channel, Reynolds numbers ranged between 68,000 and 131,000, while the Nusselt numbers were between 40 and 325. For the rough channels, Reynolds numbers ranged from 82,000 to 131,000, and Nusselt numbers were between 65 and 810. Sub-cooled film-boiling phenomena were confirmed for all the channels presented in this work. Film-boiling onset at Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was correlated to a Boiling Number (Bo) of

  14. Theoretical performance of liquid ammonia, hydrazine and mixture of liquid ammonia and hydrazine as fuels with liquid oxygen biflouride as oxidant for rocket engines : I-mixture of liquid ammonia and hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Vearl N; Gordon, Sanford

    1952-01-01

    Theoretical performance for mixture of 36.3 percent liquid ammonia and 63.7 percent hydrazine with liquid oxygen bifluoride as rocket propellant was calculated on assumption of equilibrium composition during expansion for a wide range of fuel-oxidant and expansios ratios. Parameters included were specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle exit temperature, composition mean molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust and ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area. For chamber pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute and expansion to 1 atmosphere, maximum specific impulse was 295.8 pound-seconds per pound. Five percent by weight of water in the hydrazine lowered specific impulse from about one to three units over a wide range of weight-percent fuel.

  15. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    NARloy-Z alloy (Cu-3 percent, Ag-0.5 percent, Zr) is a state of the art alloy currently used for fabricating rocket engine combustion chamber liners. Research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State – Applied Research Laboratory has shown that thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z can be increased significantly by adding diamonds to form a composite (NARloy-Z-D). NARloy-Z-D is also lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes make this advanced composite material an ideal candidate for fabricating combustion chamber liner for an advanced rocket engine. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. This paper describes the process development for fabricating a subscale high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D combustion chamber liner using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). The FAST process uses a mixture of NARloy-Z and diamond powders which is sintered under pressure at elevated temperatures. Several challenges were encountered, i.e., segregation of diamonds, machining the super hard NARloy-Z-D composite, net shape fabrication and nondestructive examination. The paper describes how these challenges were addressed. Diamonds coated with copper (CuD) appear to give the best results. A near net shape subscale combustion chamber liner is being fabricated by diffusion bonding cylindrical rings of NARloy-Z-CuD using the FAST process.

  16. Integrated model development for liquid fueled rocket propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. Michael

    1993-01-01

    As detailed in the original statement of work, the objective of phase two of this research effort was to develop a general framework for rocket engine performance prediction that integrates physical principles, a rigorous mathematical formalism, component level test data, system level test data, and theory-observation reconciliation. Specific phase two development tasks are defined.

  17. Combustion of liquid sprays at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The combustion of pressure atomized fuel sprays in high pressure stagnant air was studied. Measurements were made of flame and spray boundaries at pressures in the range 0.1-9 MPa for methanol and n-pentane. At the higher test pressure levels, critical phenomena are important. The experiments are compared with theoretical predictions based on a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model. The theory correctly predicted the trends of the data, but underestimates flame and spray boundaries by 30-50 percent, indicating that slip is still important for the present experiments (Sauter mean diameters of 30 microns at atmospheric pressure under cold flow conditions). Since the sprays are shorter at high pressures, slip effects are still important even though the density ratio of the phases approach one another as the droplets heat up. The model indicates the presence of a region where condensed water is present within the spray and provides a convenient means of treating supercritical phenomena.

  18. Combustion of liquid fuels in diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alt, Otto

    1924-01-01

    Hitherto, definite specifications have always been made for fuel oils and they have been classified as more or less good or non-utilizable. The present aim, however, is to build Diesel engines capable of using even the poorest liquid fuels and especially the waste products of the oil industry, without special chemical or physical preparation.

  19. Development of carbon-carbon nozzle extension for liquid fuel rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovsky, M. I.; Petukhov, S. N.; Semyonov, Yu. P.; Sokolov, B. A.

    2008-12-01

    Successful experience of RSC “Energy” and SPA “Iskra” in the development of carbon-carbon extension for oxygen-kerosene liquid fuel rocket motor has been summarized. Methodological approach that served to completion of carbon-carbon extension development in full and at comparatively small expenses has been described. Results of practical application of carbon-carbon extension for liquid fuel rocket motor 11D58M have been presented within the framework of International Space Program “Sea Launch”.

  20. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines is a complication that continues to plague designers and engineers. Many rocket systems experience violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. During sever cases of combustion instability fluctuation amplitudes can reach values equal to or greater than the average chamber pressure. Large amplitude oscillations lead to damaged injectors, loss of rocket performance, damaged payloads, and in some cases breach of case/loss of mission. Historic difficulties in modeling and predicting combustion instability has reduced most rocket systems experiencing instability into a costly fix through testing paradigm or to scrap the system entirely.

  1. Combustion of liquid-fuel droplets in supercritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Yang, Vigor; Hsaio, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of liquid-fuel droplet combustion in both subcritical and supercritical environments has been conducted. The formulation is based on the complete conservation equations for both gas and liquid phases, and accommodates variable thermophysical properties, finite-rate chemical kinetics, and a full treatment of liquid-vapor phase equilibrium at the drop surface. The governing equations and associated interfacial boundary conditions are solved numerically using a fully coupled, implicit scheme with the dual time-stepping integration technique. The model is capable of treating the entire droplet history, including the transition from the subcritical to supercritical state. As a specific example, the combustion of n-pentane fuel droplets in air is studied for pressures in the range of 5-140 atm. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the critical pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure.

  2. Combustion of liquid-fuel droplets in supercritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Yang, Vigor; Hsaio, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of liquid-fuel droplet combustion in both subcritical and supercritical environments has been conducted. The formulation is based on the complete conservation equations for both gas and liquid phases, and accommodates variable thermophysical properties, finite-rate chemical kinetics, and a full treatment of liquid-vapor phase equilibrium at the drop surface. The governing equations and associated interfacial boundary conditions are solved numerically using a fully coupled, implicit scheme with the dual time-stepping integration technique. The model is capable of treating the entire droplet history, including the transition from the subcritical to supercritical state. As a specific example, the combustion of n-pentane fuel droplets in air is studied for pressures in the range of 5-140 atm. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the critical pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure.

  3. Status of flow separation prediction in liquid propellant rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmucker, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Flow separation which plays an important role in the design of a rocket engine nozzle is discussed. For a given ambient pressure, the condition of no flow separation limits the area ratio and, therefore, the vacuum performance. Avoidance of performance loss due to area ratio limitation requires a correct prediction of the flow separation conditions. To provide a better understanding of the flow separation process, the principal behavior of flow separation in a supersonic overexpanded rocket nozzle is described. The hot firing separation tests from various sources are summarized, and the applicability and accuracy of the measurements are described. A comparison of the different data points allows an evaluation of the parameters that affect flow separation. The pertinent flow separation predicting methods, which are divided into theoretical and empirical correlations, are summarized and the numerical results are compared with the experimental points.

  4. The Evaluation of High Temperature Adhesive Bonding Processes for Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Daniel; Smith, Jeffrey; Rice, Brian; Blohowiak, Kay; Anderson, Robert; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda; Sutter, James

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is currently evaluating the possibility of using high- temperature polymer matrix composites to reinforce the combustion chamber of a rocket engine. One potential design utilizes a honeycomb structure composed of a PMR-II- 50/M40J 4HS composite facesheet and titanium honeycomb core to reinforce a stainless steel shell. In order to properly fabricate this structure, adhesive bond PMR-II-50 composite. Proper prebond surface preparation is critical in order to obtain an acceptable adhesive bond. Improperly treated surfaces will exhibit decreased bond strength and durability, especially in metallic bonds where interface are susceptible to degradation due to heat and moisture. Most treatments for titanium and stainless steel alloys require the use of strong chemicals to etch and clean the surface. This processes are difficult to perform due to limited processing facilities as well as safety and environmental risks and they do not consistently yield optimum bond durability. Boeing Phantom Works previously developed sol-gel surface preparations for titanium alloys using a PETI-5 based polyimide adhesive. In support of part of NASA Glenn Research Center, UDRI and Boeing Phantom Works evaluated variations of this high temperature sol-gel surface preparation, primer type, and primer cure conditions on the adhesion performance of titanium and stainless steel using Cytec FM 680-1 polyimide adhesive. It was also found that a modified cure cycle of the FM 680-1 adhesive, i.e., 4 hrs at 370 F in vacuum + post cure, significantly increased the adhesion strength compared to the manufacturer's suggested cure cycle. In addition, the surface preparation of the PMR-II-50 composite was evaluated in terms of surface cleanness and roughness. This presentation will discuss the results of strength and durability testing conducted on titanium, stainless steel, and PMR-II-50 composite adherends to evaluate possible bonding processes.

  5. Combustion of liquid fuels in a flowing combustion gas environment at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canada, G. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    The combustion of fuel droplets in gases which simulate combustion chamber conditions was considered both experimentally and theoretically. The fuel droplets were simulated by porous spheres and allowed to gasify in combustion gases produced by a burner. Tests were conducted for pressures of 1-40 atm, temperatures of 600-1500 K, oxygen concentrations of 0-13% (molar) and approach Reynolds numbers of 40-680. The fuels considered in the tests included methanol, ethanol, propanol-1, n-pentane, n-heptane and n-decane. Measurements were made of both the rate of gasification of the droplet and the liquid surface temperature. Measurements were compared with theory, involving various models of gas phase transport properties with a multiplicative correction for the effect of forced convection.

  6. A ballistic compressor-based experiment for the visualization of liquid propellant jet combustion above 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, A.; Kooker, D. E.

    This paper describes the components and operation of an experimental setup for the visualization of liquid propellant (LP) jet combustion at pressures above 100 MPa. The apparatus consists of an in-line ballistic compressor and LP injector. The ballistic compressor, based on a modified 76 mm gun, provides high-pressure (ca. 55 MPa) clear hot gas for the jet ignition. A piston (projectile) is fired toward a test chamber beyond the barrel's end, and its rebound is arrested in a transition section that seals the test chamber to the barrel. The LP jet is injected once the piston is restrained, and combustion of the jet further elevates the pressure. At a preset pressure, a disc in the piston ruptures and the combustion gas vents sonically into the barrel. If a monopropellant is used, the jet injection-combustion process then resembles liquid rocket combustion but at very high pressures (ca. 140 MPa). This paper discusses the ballistics of the compression and compares experimental results to those predicted by a numerical model of the apparatus. Experimentally, a pressure of 70 MPa was achieved upon a 12.5 volumetric compression factor by firing a 10 kg piston into 1.04 MPa argon using a charge of 75 g of small-grain M1 propellant.

  7. 49 CFR 173.150 - Exceptions for Class 3 (flammable and combustible liquids).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... liquids). 173.150 Section 173.150 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Class 3 (flammable and combustible liquids). (a) General. Exceptions for hazardous materials shipments... flammable liquids (Class 3) and combustible liquids are excepted from labeling requirements, unless...

  8. Atmospheric Dispersion of Hypergolic Liquid Rocket Fuels. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    3) 2. Excess Oxidant Reactions ..... .............. .. 37 C. Calctilation of Fireball Size and Quantification of Heat Flux...this hypergolic fuel-oxidizer combustion have been reported in the literature. While the identification and quantification of all such chemical...due to thermal or toxicity considerations. Dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA), for example, is an expected and confirmed product from the nitrogen tetroxide

  9. JANNAF "Test and Evaluation Guidelines for Liquid Rocket Engines": Status and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Douglas; VanLerberghe, Wayne M.; Rahman, Shamim A.

    2017-01-01

    For many decades, the U.S. rocket propulsion industrial base has performed remarkably in developing complex liquid rocket engines that can propel critical payloads into service for the nation, as well as transport people and hardware for missions that open the frontiers of space exploration for humanity. This has been possible only at considerable expense given the lack of detailed guidance that captures the essence of successful practices and knowledge accumulated over five decades of liquid rocket engine development. In an effort to provide benchmarks and guidance for the next generation of rocket engineers, the Joint Army Navy NASA Air Force (JANNAF) Interagency Propulsion Committee published a liquid rocket engine (LRE) test and evaluation (T&E) guideline document in 2012 focusing on the development challenges and test verification considerations for liquid rocket engine systems. This document has been well received and applied by many current LRE developers as a benchmark and guidance tool, both for government-driven applications as well as for fully commercial ventures. The USAF Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) has taken an additional near-term step and is directing activity to adapt and augment the content from the JANNAF LRE T&E guideline into a standard for potential application to future USAF requests for proposals for LRE development initiatives and launch vehicles for national security missions. A draft of this standard was already sent out for review and comment, and is intended to be formally approved and released towards the end of 2017. The acceptance and use of the LRE T&E guideline is possible through broad government and industry participation in the JANNAF liquid propulsion committee and associated panels. The sponsoring JANNAF community is expanding upon this initial baseline version and delving into further critical development aspects of liquid rocket propulsion testing at the integrated stage level as well as engine component level, in

  10. Determination of Local Experimental Heat-Transfer Coefficients on Combustion Side of an Ammonia-Oxygen Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Ehlers, Robert C.

    1961-01-01

    Local experimental heat-transfer coefficients were measured in the chamber and throat of a 2400-pound-thrust ammonia-oxygen rocket engine with a nominal chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute. Three injector configurations were used. The rocket engine was run over a range of oxidant-fuel ratio and chamber pressure. The injector that achieved the best performance also produced the highest rates of heat flux at design conditions. The heat-transfer data from the best-performing injector agreed well with the simplified equation developed by Bartz at the throat region. A large spread of data was observed for the chamber. This spread was attributed generally to the variations of combustion processes. The spread was least evident, however, with the best-performing injector.

  11. Combustor design and analysis using the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design (ROCCID) methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klem, Mark D.; Pieper, Jerry L.; Walker, Richard E.

    1990-01-01

    The ROCket Combustor Interactive Design (ROCCID) Methodology is a newly developed, interactive computer code for the design and analysis of a liquid propellant rocket combustion chamber. The application of ROCCID to design a liquid rocket combustion chamber is illustrated. Designs for a 50,000 lbf thrust and 1250 psi chamber pressure combustor using liquid oxygen (LOX)RP-1 propellants are developed and evaluated. Tradeoffs between key design parameters affecting combustor performance and stability are examined. Predicted performance and combustion stability margin for these designs are provided as a function of the combustor operating mixture ratio and chamber pressure.

  12. Combustor design and analysis using the ROCket Combustor Interactive Design (ROCCID) Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klem, Mark D.; Pieper, Jerry L.; Walker, Richard E.

    1990-01-01

    The ROCket Combustor Interactive Design (ROCCID) Methodology is a newly developed, interactive computer code for the design and analysis of a liquid propellant rocket combustion chamber. The application of ROCCID to design a liquid rocket combustion chamber is illustrated. Designs for a 50,000 lbf thrust and 1250 psi chamber pressure combustor using liquid oxygen (LOX)RP-1 propellants are developed and evaluated. Tradeoffs between key design parameters affecting combustor performance and stability are examined. Predicted performance and combustion stability margin for these designs are provided as a function of the combustor operating mixture ratio and chamber pressure.

  13. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix C: Battery report for the liquid rocket booster TVC actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The actuators for control of engine valves and gimbals for a booster require 165 kW or more peak power at 270 volts direct current (VDC) during the 2 or 3 minutes of first stage ascent; other booster devices require much less power at 28 VDC. It is desired that a booster supply its own electrical power and satisfy redundancy requirements of the Solid Rocket Booster Shuttle, when applicable. The power of a Liquid Rocket Booster is therefore provided by two subsystems: Actuator Battery Power (270 VDC) Subsystem for the engine actuators, and Electrical Power and Distribution (28 VDC) Subsystem, to power everything else. Boosters will receive no electrical power from Orbiter, only commands and data, according to current plans. It was concluded that nine 30 volt silver-zinc batteries-in-series be used to provide the 270 volt, 37 kW average (165 kW peak).

  14. Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The Project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane rocket engines demonstrated acousticcoupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC). High-amplitude, 1T, 1R, 1T1R (and higher order) modes appear to be triggered by injector conditions. The instability occurred during the Morpheus-specific engine ignition/start sequence, and did demonstrate the capability to propagate into mainstage. However, the instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. The Morpheus main engine is a JSC-designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. Two different engine designs, named HD4 and HD5, and two different builds of the HD4 engine all demonstrated similar instability characteristics. Through the analysis of more than 200 hot fire tests on the Morpheus vehicle and SSC test stand, a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure was developed. The instability has the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop (dP) at low chamber pressure (Pc); i.e., instabilities initiated at high dP/Pc at low Pc during the start sequence. The high dP/Pc during start results during the injector /chamber chill-in, and is enhanced by hydraulic flip in the injector orifice elements. Because of the fixed mixture ratio of the existing engine design (the main valves share a common actuator), it is not currently possible to determine if LOX or methane injector dP/Pc were individual contributors (i.e., LOX and methane dP/Pc typically trend in the same direction within a given test). The instability demonstrated initiation characteristic of starting at or shortly after methane injector chillin. Colder methane (e.g., sub-cooled) at the injector inlet prior to engine start was much more likely to result in an instability. A secondary effect of LOX

  15. Combustion of liquid fuel droplets in supercritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Yang, Vigor

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of liquid-fuel droplet combustion in both sub- and super-critical environments has been conducted. The formulation is based on the complete conservation equations for both gas and liquid phases, and accommodates finite-rate chemical kinetics and a full treatment of liquid-vapor phase equilibrium at the droplet surface. The governing equations and the associated interface boundary conditions are solved numerically using a fully coupled, implicit scheme with the dual time-stepping integration technique. The model is capable of treating the entire droplet history, including the transition from the subcritical to the supercritical state. As a specific example, the combustion of n-pentane fuel droplets in air is studied for pressures of 5-140 atm. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influences on the fluid transport, gas/liquid interface thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibits a significant variation near the critical burning pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass-diffusion rate and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  16. Combustion of liquid fuel droplets in supercritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Yang, Vigor

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of liquid-fuel droplet combustion in both sub- and super-critical environments has been conducted. The formulation is based on the complete conservation equations for both gas and liquid phases, and accommodates finite-rate chemical kinetics and a full treatment of liquid-vapor phase equilibrium at the droplet surface. The governing equations and the associated interface boundary conditions are solved numerically using a fully coupled, implicit scheme with the dual time-stepping integration technique. The model is capable of treating the entire droplet history, including the transition from the subcritical to the supercritical state. As a specific example, the combustion of n-pentane fuel droplets in air is studied for pressures of 5-140 atm. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influences on the fluid transport, gas/liquid interface thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibits a significant variation near the critical burning pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass-diffusion rate and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  17. Simulations of Transient Phenomena in Liquid Rocket Feed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, V.; Hosangadi, A.; Cavallo, P. A.; Daines, R.

    2006-01-01

    Valve systems in rocket propulsion systems and testing facilities are constantly subject to dynamic events resulting from the timing of valve motion leading to unsteady fluctuations in pressure and mass flow. Such events can also be accompanied by cavitation, resonance, system vibration leading to catastrophic failure. High-fidelity dynamic computational simulations of valve operation can yield important information of valve response to varying flow conditions. Prediction of transient behavior related to valve motion can serve as guidelines for valve scheduling, which is of crucial importance in engine operation and testing. Feed components operating in cryogenic regimes can also experience cavitation based instabilities leading to large scale shedding of vapor clouds and pressure oscillations. In this paper, we present simulations of the diverse unsteady phenomena related to valve and feed systems that include valve stall, valve timing studies as well as two different forms of cavitation instabilities in components utilized in the test loop.

  18. Transferring jet engine diagnostic and control technology to liquid propellant rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, J.F.; Hagar, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for developing a diagnostic and control system for a current, operational jet engine. A description is given of each development stage, the system components and the technologies which could be transferred to liquid propellant rocket engines. Finally, the operational impact is described in terms of cost and maintenance based on actual jet engine experience. Efforts are continuing to develop new diagnostic techniques under IR D for application on the advanced technical fighter. Already improved techniques and application methods are becoming available. This technology is being evaluated and may also be transferred to rocket engine diagnostic and control system development.

  19. Bonded and Sealed External Insulations for Liquid-Hydrogen-Fueled Rocket Tanks During Atmospheric Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Gelder, T. F.; Cochran, R. P.; Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1960-01-01

    Several currently available nonmetallic insulation materials that may be bonded onto liquid-hydrogen tanks and sealed against air penetration into the insulation have been investigated for application to rockets and spacecraft. Experimental data were obtained on the thermal conductivities of various materials in the cryogenic temperature range, as well as on the structural integrity and ablation characteristics of these materials at high temperatures occasioned by aerodynamic heating during atmospheric escape. Of the materials tested, commercial corkboard has the best overall properties for the specific requirements imposed during atmospheric flight of a high-acceleration rocket vehicle.

  20. Study of Liquid Breakup Process in Solid Rocket Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Averaged Navier-Stokes code ( URANS ) to investigate the interaction of the liquid film flow with the gas flow, and analyzed the breakup process for...unsteady-flow Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes code ( URANS ) to investigate the interaction of the liquid film flow with the gas flow, and analyzed the...predict the flows by solving the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes ( URANS ) equations16. The system of equations was solved in an Eulerian multi

  1. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products: Description of sampling and analysis methods for rocket exhaust characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.

    1990-06-07

    A systematic approach has been developed and experimentally validated for the sampling and chemical characterization of the rocket motor exhaust generated from the firing of scaled down test motors at the US Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The overall strategy was to sample and analyze major exhaust constituents in near real time, while performing off-site analyses of samples collected for the determination of trace constituents of the particulate and vapor phases. Initial interference studies were performed using atmospheric pressure burns of 1 g quantities of propellants in small chambers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were determined using non-dispersive infrared instrumentation. Hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen chloride, and ammonia determinations were made using ion selective electrode technology. Oxides of nitrogen were determined using chemiluminescence instrumentation. Airborne particulate mass concentration was determined using infrared forward scattering measurements and a tapered element oscillating microbalance, as well as conventional gravimetry. Particulate phase metals were determined by collection on Teflon membrane filters, followed by inductively coupled plasma and atomic absorption analysis. Particulate phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-PAH were collected using high volume sampling on a two stage filter. Target species were extracted, and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Vapor phase species were collected on multi-sorbent resin traps, and subjected to thermal desorption GC/MS for analysis. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Combustion of single and agglomerated aluminum particles in solid rocket motor flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, John Charles, IV

    2001-07-01

    Single and agglomerated aluminum droplets were studied in a solid rocket motor (SRM) test chamber with optical access to the internal flow at 6--22 atm and 2300 K. The chamber was pressurized by burning a main grain AP/HTPB propellant, and the burning aluminum droplets were generated by a smaller aluminized solid propellant sample, center-mounted in the flow. A 35 mm camera was used with a chopper wheel to give droplet flame diameter vs. time measurements of the burning droplets in flight, from which bum-rate laws were developed. A high-speed video CCD was used with high-magnification optics in order to image the flame/smoke cloud surrounding the burning liquid droplets. The intensity profiles of the droplet images were de-convoluted using an Abel inversion to give true intensity profiles. Both single and agglomerated droplets were studied, where agglomerates are comprised of hundreds of parent particles or more. The Abel inversion results show that the relative smoke cloud size is not constant with diameter, but instead grows as the droplet shrinks, by ˜D -0.5, for both the single and agglomerated droplets. Measured diameter trajectories show that for single droplets, the diameter law is D 0.75 = DO0.75 = 8·t [mu m, msec], and for agglomerated droplets, D 1.0 = Do1.0 - 20·t, such that the single droplets burn faster than the agglomerates. For both single and agglomerated droplets, the burning rate slope k did not change significantly over the chamber pressure studied. Lastly, a model was developed to describe the oxide cap accumulation on the droplet surface from the oxide smoke cloud surrounding the droplet. Results suggest that less oxide accumulates in high-pressure SRMs when considering mass burning rates for different relative cap sizes. The thermophoretic force, which can control oxide transport only over the cap, decreases with pressure.

  3. Investigation of Critical Burning of Fuel Droplets. [of liquid rocket propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanin, S. P.; Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    An earlier analysis for the combustion response of a liquid monopropellant strand (hydrazine) was extended to consider individual droplets and sprays. While small drops gave low or negative response, large droplets provided response near unity at low frequencies, with the response declining at frequencies greater than the characteristic liquid phase frequency. Temperature gradients in the liquid phase resulted in response peaks greater than unity. A second response peak was found for large drops which corresponded to gas phase transient effects. Spray response was generally reduced from the response of the largest injected droplet, however, even a small percentage of large droplets can yield appreciable response. An apparatus was designed and fabricated to allow observation of bipropellant fuel spray combustion at elevated pressures. A locally homogeneous model was developed to describe this combustion process which allows for high pressure phenomena associated with the thermodynamic critical point.

  4. Liquid oxygen/hydrogen testing of a single swirl coaxial injector element in a windowed combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulka, J.; Makel, D.

    1993-06-01

    A modular, high pressure, liquid rocket single element combustion chamber was developed at Aerojet for use with nonintrusive combustion diagnostics. The hardware is able to accommodate full-size injection elements and includes a recessed annular injector around the single element to provide a source for hot gas background flow, which reduces recirculation in the chamber and provides additional injection mass to elevate chamber pressure. Experiments are being conducted to develop the diagnostics required to characterize a single-element combustion spray field for combustion modeling, benchmark data for CFD model validation, and development of the transfer functions between single element cold flow and multielement hot fire. The latter task is being pursued using an injector element identical to elements that had been previously cold-flow tested in single element tests to ambient backpressure and hot fire tested in a multielement injector. Preliminary tests conducted to date without hydrogen flowing through the annular coaxial orifice of the single element show the general flow characteristics of a reacting, unconfined, liquid oxygen hollow cone swirl spray.

  5. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  6. Fundamental phenomena on fuel decomposition and boundary-layer combustion processes with applications to hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Kenneth K.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Johnson, David K.; Serin, Nadir

    1995-01-01

    The experimental study on the fundamental processes involved in fuel decomposition and boundary-layer combustion in hybrid rocket motors is continuously being conducted at the High Pressure Combustion Laboratory of The Pennsylvania State University. This research will provide a useful engineering technology base in the development of hybrid rocket motors as well as a fundamental understanding of the complex processes involved in hybrid propulsion. A high-pressure, 2-D slab motor has been designed, manufactured, and utilized for conducting seven test firings using HTPB fuel processed at PSU. A total of 20 fuel slabs have been received from the Mcdonnell Douglas Aerospace Corporation. Ten of these fuel slabs contain an array of fine-wire thermocouples for measuring solid fuel surface and subsurface temperatures. Diagnostic instrumentation used in the test include high-frequency pressure transducers for measuring static and dynamic motor pressures and fine-wire thermocouples for measuring solid fuel surface and subsurface temperatures. The ultrasonic pulse-echo technique as well as a real-time x-ray radiography system have been used to obtain independent measurements of instantaneous solid fuel regression rates.

  7. Analysis of Flow-System Starting Dynamics of Turbopump-Fed Liquid-Propellant Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Richard P.; Hart, Clint E.

    1959-01-01

    Two rocket configurations with turbopump drive were investigated analytically. In one configuration the inlet pressure to the turbine was fixed at the design value. The second configuration employed a "bootstrap" technique for supplying energy to the turbine. An injector was the chief resistance between the pump and the rocket combustion chamber. From the analysis two parameters were developed from which the speed response time of the turbopump, the flow response time, and the maximum dynamic line loss could be evaluated. These parameters were functions of turbopump moment of inertia, design performance of the turbine, and flow-system geometry. The moment of inertia of the turbopump and the ratio of turbine torque at zero speed to design torque had the most influence on the starting dynamics of the flow system. These parameters were also applicable to the bootstrap configuration as long as the inlet pressure to the turbine exceeded half the design value.

  8. Nonlinear longitudinal oscillations of fuel in rockets feed lines with gas-liquid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramov, K. V.; Filipkovsky, S.; Tonkonogenko, A. M.; Klimenko, D. V.

    2016-03-01

    The mathematical model of the fuel oscillations in the rockets feed lines with gas-liquid dampers is derived. The nonlinear model of the gas-liquid damper is suggested. The vibrations of fuel in the feed lines with the gas-liquid dampers are considered nonlinear. The weighted residual method is applied to obtain the finite degrees of freedom nonlinear model of the fuel oscillations. Shaw-Pierre nonlinear normal modes are applied to analyze free vibrations. The forced oscillations of the fuel at the principle resonances are analyzed. The stability of the forced oscillations is investigated. The results of the forced vibrations analysis are shown on the frequency responses.

  9. Measurements for liquid rocket engine performance code verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Palko, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of the rocket engine performance code verification tests is to obtain the I sub sp with an accuracy of 0.25% or less. This needs to be done during the sequence of four related tests (two reactive and two hot gas simulation) to best utilize the loss separation technique recommended in this study. In addition to I sub sp, the measurements of the input and output parameters for the codes are needed. This study has shown two things in regard to obtaining the I sub sp uncertainty within the 0.25% target. First, this target is generally not being realized at the present time, and second, the instrumentation and testing technology does exist to obtain this 0.25% uncertainty goal. However, to achieve this goal will require carefully planned, designed, and conducted testing. In addition, the test-stand (or system) dynamics must be evaluated in the pre-test and post-test phases of the design of the experiment and data analysis, respectively always keeping in mind that a .25% overall uncertainty in I sub sp is targeted. A table gives the maximum allowable uncertainty required for obtaining I sub sp with 0.25% uncertainty, the currently-quoted instrument specification, and present test uncertainty for the parameters. In general, it appears that measurement of the mass flow parameter within the required uncertainty may be the most difficult.

  10. Subscale Carbon-Carbon Nozzle Extension Development and Hot Fire Testing in Support of Upper Stage Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul; Valentine, Peter; Crisanti, Matthew; Greene, Sandy Elam

    2016-01-01

    Upper stage and in-space liquid rocket engines are optimized for performance through the use of high area ratio nozzles to fully expand combustion gases to low exit pressures increasing exhaust velocities. Due to the large size of such nozzles and the related engine performance requirements, carbon-carbon (C/C) composite nozzle extensions are being considered for use in order to reduce weight impacts. NASA and industry partner Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies (C-CAT) are working towards advancing the technology readiness level of large-scale, domestically-fabricated, C/C nozzle extensions. These C/C extensions have the ability to reduce the overall costs of extensions relative to heritage metallic and composite extensions and to decrease weight by 50%. Material process and coating developments have advanced over the last several years, but hot fire testing to fully evaluate C/C nozzle extensions in relevant environments has been very limited. NASA and C-CAT have designed, fabricated and hot fire tested multiple subscale nozzle extension test articles of various C/C material systems, with the goal of assessing and advancing the manufacturability of these domestically producible materials as well as characterizing their performance when subjected to the typical environments found in a variety of liquid rocket and scramjet engines. Testing at the MSFC Test Stand 115 evaluated heritage and state-of-the-art C/C materials and coatings, demonstrating the capabilities of the high temperature materials and their fabrication methods. This paper discusses the design and fabrication of the 1.2k-lbf sized carbon-carbon nozzle extensions, provides an overview of the test campaign, presents results of the hot fire testing, and discusses potential follow-on development work.

  11. Carbon-Carbon Nozzle Extension Development in Support of In-Space and Upper-Stage Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Valentine, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    Upper stage and in-space liquid rocket engines are optimized for performance through the use of high area ratio nozzles to fully expand combustion gases to low exit pressures, increasing exhaust velocities. Due to the large size of such nozzles, and the related engine performance requirements, carbon-carbon (C-C) composite nozzle extensions are being considered to reduce weight impacts. Currently, the state-of-the-art is represented by the metallic and foreign composite nozzle extensions limited to approximately 2000 degrees F. used on the Atlas V, Delta IV, Falcon 9, and Ariane 5 launch vehicles. NASA and industry partners are working towards advancing the domestic supply chain for C-C composite nozzle extensions. These development efforts are primarily being conducted through the NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in addition to other low level internal research efforts. This has allowed for the initial material development and characterization, subscale hardware fabrication, and completion of hot-fire testing in relevant environments. NASA and industry partners have designed, fabricated and hot-fire tested several subscale domestically produced C-C extensions to advance the material and coatings fabrication technology for use with a variety of liquid rocket and scramjet engines. Testing at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) evaluated heritage and state-of-the-art C-C materials and coatings, demonstrating the initial capabilities of the high temperature materials and their fabrication methods. This paper discusses the initial material development, design and fabrication of the subscale carbon-carbon nozzle extensions, provides an overview of the test campaign, presents results of the hot fire testing, and discusses potential follow-on development work. The follow on work includes the fabrication of ultra-high temperature materials, larger C-C nozzle extensions, material characterization, sub-element testing and hot-fire testing at

  12. Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket, 1958-2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Virginia P.; Bowles, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    During its maiden voyage in May 1962, a Centaur upper stage rocket, mated to an Atlas booster, exploded 54 seconds after launch, engulfing the rocket in a huge fireball. Investigation revealed that Centaur's light, stainless-steel tank had split open, spilling its liquid-hydrogen fuel down its sides, where the flame of the rocket exhaust immediately ignited it. Coming less than a year after President Kennedy had made landing human beings on the Moon a national priority, the loss of Centaur was regarded as a serious setback for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). During the failure investigation, Homer Newell, Director of Space Sciences, ruefully declared: "Taming liquid hydrogen to the point where expensive operational space missions can be committed to it has turned out to be more difficult than anyone supposed at the outset." After this failure, Centaur critics, led by Wernher von Braun, mounted a campaign to cancel the program. In addition to the unknowns associated with liquid hydrogen, he objected to the unusual design of Centaur. Like the Atlas rocket, Centaur depended on pressure to keep its paper-thin, stainless-steel shell from collapsing. It was literally inflated with its propellants like a football or balloon and needed no internal structure to give it added strength and stability. The so-called "pressure-stabilized structure" of Centaur, coupled with the light weight of its high- energy cryogenic propellants, made Centaur lighter and more powerful than upper stages that used conventional fuel. But, the critics argued, it would never become the reliable rocket that the United States needed.

  13. Plume spectrometry for liquid rocket engine health monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, William T.; Sherrell, F. G.; Bridges, J. H., III; Bratcher, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) testing failures identified optical events which appeared to be precursors of those failures. A program was therefore undertaken to detect plume trace phenomena characteristic of the engine and to design a monitoring system, responsive to excessive activity in the plume, capable of delivering a warning of an anomalous condition. By sensing the amount of extraneous material entrained in the plume and considering engine history, it may be possible to identify wearing of failing components in time for a safe shutdown and thus prevent a catastrophic event. To investigate the possibilities of safe shutdown and thus prevent a monitor to initiate the shutdown procedure, a large amount of plume data were taken from SSME firings using laboratory instrumentation. Those data were used to design a more specialized instrument dedicated to rocket plume diagnostics. The spectral wavelength range of the baseline data was about 220 nanometers (nm) to 15 micrometer with special attention given to visible and near UV. The data indicates that a satisfactory design will include a polychromator covering the range of 250 nM to 1000 nM, along with a continuous coverage spectrometer, each having a resolution of at least 5A degrees. The concurrent requirements for high resolution and broad coverage are normally at odds with one another in commercial instruments, therefore necessitating the development of special instrumentation. The design of a polychromator is reviewed herein, with a detailed discussion of the continuous coverage spectrometer delayed to a later forum. The program also requires the development of applications software providing detection, variable background discrimination, noise reduction, filtering, and decision making based on varying historical data.

  14. CFD-based surrogate modeling of liquid rocket engine components via design space refinement and sensitivity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Yolanda

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to improve the design and optimization of rocket engine components that traditionally rely on empirical calculations and limited experimentation. CFD based-design optimization can be made computationally affordable through the use of surrogate modeling which can then facilitate additional parameter sensitivity assessments. The present study investigates surrogate-based adaptive design space refinement (DSR) using estimates of surrogate uncertainty to probe the CFD analyses and to perform sensitivity assessments for complex fluid physics associated with liquid rocket engine components. Three studies were conducted. First, a surrogate-based preliminary design optimization was conducted to improve the efficiency of a compact radial turbine for an expander cycle rocket engine while maintaining low weight. Design space refinement was used to identify function constraints and to obtain a high accuracy surrogate model in the region of interest. A merit function formulation for multi-objective design point selection reduced the number of design points by an order of magnitude while maintaining good surrogate accuracy among the best trade-off points. Second, bluff body-induced flow was investigated to identify the physics and surrogate modeling issues related to the flow's mixing dynamics. Multiple surrogates and DSR were instrumental in identifying designs for which the CFD model was deficient and to help to pinpoint the nature of the deficiency. Next, a three-dimensional computational model was developed to explore the wall heat transfer of a GO2/GH2 shear coaxial single element injector. The interactions between turbulent recirculating flow structures, chemical kinetics, and heat transfer are highlighted. Finally, a simplified computational model of multi-element injector flows was constructed to explore the sensitivity of wall heating and improve combustion efficiency to injector element spacing. Design space refinement

  15. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott

    2002-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer system simplicity, but also enhance the combustion performance. Test results have shown that chamber performance is markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (LD). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer orifices and one fuel orifice) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme an Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 9295, can be obtained. MSFC and the U. S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of this concept

  16. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott

    2002-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer system simplicity, but also enhance the combustion performance. Test results have shown that chamber performance is markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (LD). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer orifices and one fuel orifice) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme an Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 9295, can be obtained. MSFC and the U. S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of this concept

  17. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1958-05-15

    Redstone missile No. 1002 on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on May 16, 1958. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of the versatility, Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile

  18. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The image depicts Redstone missile being erected. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and the production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of the versatility, Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile

  19. Rapid Fabrication Techniques for Liquid Rocket Channel Wall Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The functions of a regeneratively-cooled nozzle are to (1) expand combustion gases to increase exhaust gas velocity while, (2) maintaining adequate wall temperatures to prevent structural failure, and (3) transfer heat from the hot gases to the coolant fluid to promote injector performance and stability. Regeneratively-cooled nozzles are grouped into two categories: tube-wall nozzles and channel wall nozzles. A channel wall nozzle is designed with an internal liner containing a series of integral coolant channels that are closed out with an external jacket. Manifolds are attached at each end of the nozzle to distribute coolant to and away from the channels. A variety of manufacturing techniques have been explored for channel wall nozzles, including state of the art laser-welded closeouts and pressure-assisted braze closeouts. This paper discusses techniques that NASA MSFC is evaluating for rapid fabrication of channel wall nozzles that address liner fabrication, slotting techniques and liner closeout techniques. Techniques being evaluated for liner fabrication include large-scale additive manufacturing of freeform-deposition structures to create the liner blanks. Abrasive water jet milling is being evaluated for cutting the complex coolant channel geometries. Techniques being considered for rapid closeout of the slotted liners include freeform deposition, explosive bonding and Cold Spray. Each of these techniques, development work and results are discussed in further detail in this paper.

  20. Combustion characteristics in the transition region of liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cernansky, N. P.; Namer, I.; Tidona, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    A number of important effects have been observed in the droplet size transition region in spray combustion systems. In this region, where the mechanism of flame propagation is transformed from diffusive to premixed dominated combustion, the following effects have been observed: (1) maxima in burning velocity; (2) extension of flammability limits; (3) minima in ignition energy; and (4) minima in NOx formation. A monodisperse aerosol generator has been used to form and deliver a well controlled liquid fuel spray to the combustion test section where measurements of ignition energy have been made. The ignition studies were performed on monodisperse n-heptane sprays at atmospheric pressure over a range of equivalence ratios and droplet diameters. A capacitive discharge spark ignition system was used as the ignition source, providing independent control of spark energy and duration. Preliminary measurements were made to optimize spark duration and spark gap, optimum conditions being those at which the maximum frequency or probability of ignition was observed. Using the optimum electrode spacing and spark duration, the frequency of ignition was determined as a function of spark energy for three overall equivalence ratios (0.6, 0.8, and 1.0) and for initial droplet diameters of 25, 40, 50, 60, and 70 micro m.

  1. Analysis of the laser ignition of methane/oxygen mixtures in a sub-scale rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlhüter, Michael; Zhukov, Victor P.; Sender, Joachim; Schlechtriem, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The laser ignition of methane/oxygen mixtures in a sub-scale rocket combustion chamber has been investigated numerically and experimentally. The ignition test case used in the present paper was generated during the In-Space Propulsion project (ISP-1), a project focused on the operation of propulsion systems in space, the handling of long idle periods between operations, and multiple reignitions under space conditions. Regarding the definition of the numerical simulation and the suitable domain for the current model, 2D and 3D simulations have been performed. Analysis shows that the usage of a 2D geometry is not suitable for this type of simulation, as the reduction of the geometry to a 2D domain significantly changes the conditions at the time of ignition and subsequently the flame development. The comparison of the numerical and experimental results shows a strong discrepancy in the pressure evolution and the combustion chamber pressure peak following the laser spark. The detailed analysis of the optical Schlieren and OH data leads to the conclusion that the pressure measurement system was not able to capture the strong pressure increase and the peak value in the combustion chamber during ignition. Although the timing in flame development following the laser spark is not captured appropriately, the 3D simulations reproduce the general ignition phenomena observed in the optical measurement systems, such as pressure evolution and injector flow characteristics.

  2. Analysis of the laser ignition of methane/oxygen mixtures in a sub-scale rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlhüter, Michael; Zhukov, Victor P.; Sender, Joachim; Schlechtriem, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    The laser ignition of methane/oxygen mixtures in a sub-scale rocket combustion chamber has been investigated numerically and experimentally. The ignition test case used in the present paper was generated during the In-Space Propulsion project (ISP-1), a project focused on the operation of propulsion systems in space, the handling of long idle periods between operations, and multiple reignitions under space conditions. Regarding the definition of the numerical simulation and the suitable domain for the current model, 2D and 3D simulations have been performed. Analysis shows that the usage of a 2D geometry is not suitable for this type of simulation, as the reduction of the geometry to a 2D domain significantly changes the conditions at the time of ignition and subsequently the flame development. The comparison of the numerical and experimental results shows a strong discrepancy in the pressure evolution and the combustion chamber pressure peak following the laser spark. The detailed analysis of the optical Schlieren and OH data leads to the conclusion that the pressure measurement system was not able to capture the strong pressure increase and the peak value in the combustion chamber during ignition. Although the timing in flame development following the laser spark is not captured appropriately, the 3D simulations reproduce the general ignition phenomena observed in the optical measurement systems, such as pressure evolution and injector flow characteristics.

  3. Prediction of explosive yield and other characteristics of liquid rocket propellant explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, E. A.; Smith, J. H.; Watts, E. H.

    1973-01-01

    Work which has been done at the University of Florida in arriving at credible explosive yield values for liquid rocket propellants is presented. The results are based upon logical methods which have been well worked out theoretically and verified through experimental procedures. Three independent methods to predict explosive yield values for liquid rocket propellants are described. All three give the same end result even though they utilize different parameters and procedures. They are: (1) mathematical model; (2) seven chart approach; and (3) critical mass method. A brief description of the methods, how they were derived, how they were applied, and the results which they produced are given. The experimental work used to support and verify the above methods both in the laboratory and in the field with actually explosive mixtures are presented. The methods developed are used and their value demonstrated in analyzing real problems, among them the destruct system of the Saturn 5, and the early configurations of the space shuttle.

  4. Examination of the liver in personnel working with liquid rocket propellant

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Palle; Bredahl, Erik; Lauritsen, Ove; Laursen, Thomas

    1970-01-01

    Petersen, P., Bredahl, E., Lauritsen, O., and Laursen, T. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 141-146. Examination of the liver in personnel working with liquid rocket propellants. Personnel working with liquid rocket propellants were subjected to routine health examinations, including liver function tests, as the propellant, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) is potentially toxic to the liver. In 46 persons the concentrations of serum alanine aminotransferase (SGPT) were raised. Liver biopsy was performed in 26 of these men; 6 specimens were pathological (fatty degeneration), 5 were uncertain, and 15 were normal. All 6 pathological biopsies were from patients with a raised SGPT at the time of biopsy. Of the 15 persons with a normal liver biopsy, 14 had a normal SGPT, while one (who was an alcoholic) had a raised SGPT. The connection between SGPT and histology of the liver, as well as the possible causal relation between the pathological findings and exposure to UDMH, is discussed. Images PMID:5428632

  5. Transient Mathematical Modeling for Liquid Rocket Engine Systems: Methods, Capabilities, and Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Michael A.; Nguyen, Huy H.; Greene, William D.; Seymout, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The subject of mathematical modeling of the transient operation of liquid rocket engines is presented in overview form from the perspective of engineers working at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The necessity of creating and utilizing accurate mathematical models as part of liquid rocket engine development process has become well established and is likely to increase in importance in the future. The issues of design considerations for transient operation, development testing, and failure scenario simulation are discussed. An overview of the derivation of the basic governing equations is presented along with a discussion of computational and numerical issues associated with the implementation of these equations in computer codes. Also, work in the field of generating usable fluid property tables is presented along with an overview of efforts to be undertaken in the future to improve the tools use for the mathematical modeling process.

  6. Transient Mathematical Modeling for Liquid Rocket Engine Systems: Methods, Capabilities, and Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seymour, David C.; Martin, Michael A.; Nguyen, Huy H.; Greene, William D.

    2005-01-01

    The subject of mathematical modeling of the transient operation of liquid rocket engines is presented in overview form from the perspective of engineers working at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The necessity of creating and utilizing accurate mathematical models as part of liquid rocket engine development process has become well established and is likely to increase in importance in the future. The issues of design considerations for transient operation, development testing, and failure scenario simulation are discussed. An overview of the derivation of the basic governing equations is presented along with a discussion of computational and numerical issues associated with the implementation of these equations in computer codes. Also, work in the field of generating usable fluid property tables is presented along with an overview of efforts to be undertaken in the future to improve the tools use for the mathematical modeling process.

  7. State-space analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Lin

    This paper states the application of state-space method to the analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engine and presents a set of state equations for describing the dynamic process of the engine. An efficient numerical method for solving these system equations is developed. The theoretical solutions agree well with the experimental data. The analysis leads to the following conclusion: the set coefficient of the pulse width, the working frequency of the solenoid valves and the deviation of the critical working points of these valves are important parameters for determining the dynamic response time and the control precision of this engine. The methods developed in this paper may be used effectively in the analysis of dynamic characteristics of variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engines.

  8. Rocket engine heat transfer and material technology for commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltabiddle, J.; Campbell, J.

    1974-01-01

    Liquid fueled rocket engine combustion, heat transfer, and material technology have been utilized in the design and development of compact combustion and heat exchange equipment intended for application in the commercial field. An initial application of the concepts to the design of a compact steam generator to be utilized by electrical utilities for the production of peaking power is described.

  9. Rocket engine heat transfer and material technology for commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltabiddle, J.; Campbell, J.

    1974-01-01

    Liquid fueled rocket engine combustion, heat transfer, and material technology have been utilized in the design and development of compact combustion and heat exchange equipment intended for application in the commercial field. An initial application of the concepts to the design of a compact steam generator to be utilized by electrical utilities for the production of peaking power is described.

  10. Mixing Nozzles for Liquid-Fuel Rocket Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-08-01

    Introduct ion 3 2 Performance of a simple swirl nozzle used as an emulsifier 3 2.1 Apparatus 3 2.2 Experimental results 4 2.3 Characteristics of the emulsion...only one liquid passes through the nozzle , 2. 2 Purformance of a simple swirl no:,zle used an an emulsifier 2.1 ,pparatus A noszle Tro , i h rirogun...B respectivel- thfraono the avrera,e percentage of waterfor each series of VA . , thc . urc in llcolui,n s or 6 for onenozzle are C.parated by a tli

  11. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse, and propellant density specific impulse.

  12. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse and propellant density specific impulse.

  13. Modeling Liquid Rocket Engine Atomization and Swirl/Coaxial Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-27

    21. Giffen, E., and Muraszew, A., "Atomization of Liquid Fuels", Chapman and Hall London,1953 22. Lefebvre , A. H., "Atomization and Spray...L.S.Blackford, J. Choi, A. Geary, E. D’Azevedo, J. Demmel, I.Dhillon, J. Dongarra, S.Hammarling, G. Henry , A. Petitet, K. Stanley, D. Walker, and R. C. Whaley...34ScaLAPACK Users’ Guide". Society for Industrial and Applied Mathmatics, 1997. 43. N. K. Rizk and A. H. Lefebvre , "Internal Flow Characteristics of

  14. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse and propellant density specific impulse.

  15. The dynamic model of failures in a liquid propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisnyakov, V. F.; Pron', L. V.; Serebryanskij, V. N.

    1993-10-01

    A mathematical model of failures in a liquid propellant rocket engine is developed which includes dynamic equations for every component of the powerplant. These equations describe the operation of a given component in the transient mode and allow the simulation of different types of failures, such as leaks and obstructions in hydraulic and gas mains, breakdowns of impellers and bearings, cavitation in pumps, spring failure, and turbine shroud burnout. Model predictions are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 4: Reviews and presentation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Liquid rocket booster integration study is presented. Volume 4 contains materials presented at the MSFC/JSC/KSC Integrated Reviews and Working Group Sessions, and the Progress Reviews presented to the KSC Study Manager. The following subject areas are covered: initial impact assessment; conflicts with the on-going STS mission; access to the LRB at the PAD; the activation schedule; transition requirements; cost methodology; cost modelling approach; and initial life cycle cost.

  17. AFOSR/ONR Contractors Meeting - Combustion, Rocket Propulsion, Diagnostics of Reacting Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    43 RF Wave Propagation in the Plasma of a Tandem Mirror Rocket,5 R. F. Chang- Diaz and T. F. Yang...Flames R K Chang, M B Long, and R Kuc, Yale University 10:30 - 11:00 BREAK 11:00 - 12:00 Upcoming Space Shuttle Mission Report Franklin Chang- Diaz , Lyndon...in the Plasma of a Tandem Mirror Rocket Grant No. AFOSR-90-NA-001 Principal Investigators: F. R. Chang- Diaz *, T. F. Yang 3 MIT Plasma Fusion Center

  18. Combustion diagnosis for analysis of solid propellant rocket abort hazards: Role of spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, W.; Cruz-Cabrera, A. A.; Donaldson, A. B.; Lim, J.; Sivathanu, Y.; Bystrom, E.; Haug, A.; Sharp, L.; Surmick, D. M.

    2014-11-01

    Solid rocket propellant plume temperatures have been measured using spectroscopic methods as part of an ongoing effort to specify the thermal-chemical-physical environment in and around a burning fragment of an exploded solid rocket at atmospheric pressures. Such specification is needed for launch safety studies where hazardous payloads become involved with large fragments of burning propellant. The propellant burns in an off-design condition producing a hot gas flame loaded with burning metal droplets. Each component of the flame (soot, droplets and gas) has a characteristic temperature, and it is only through the use of spectroscopy that their temperature can be independently identified.

  19. Spray combustion stability project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes research activity on the Spray Combustion Stability Project, characterizes accomplishments and current status, and discusses projected future work. The purpose is to provide a concise conceptual overview of the research effort to date so the reader can quickly assimilate the gist of the research results and place them within the context of their potential impact on liquid rocket engine design technology.

  20. Liquid fuel vaporizer and combustion chamber having an adjustable thermal conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Michael R; Whyatt, Greg A; Howe, Daniel T; Fountain, Matthew S

    2014-03-04

    The efficiency and effectiveness of apparatuses for vaporizing and combusting liquid fuel can be improved using thermal conductors. For example, an apparatus having a liquid fuel vaporizer and a combustion chamber can be characterized by a thermal conductor that conducts heat from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The thermal conductor can be a movable member positioned at an insertion depth within the combustion chamber that corresponds to a rate of heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The rate of heat conduction can, therefore, be adjusted by positioning the movable member at a different insertion depth.

  1. A fast sampling device for the mass spectrometric analysis of liquid rocket engine exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryason, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    The design of a device to obtain compositional data on rocket exhaust by direct sampling of reactive flow exhausts into a mass spectrometer is presented. Sampling at three stages differing in pressure and orifice angle and diameter is possible. Results of calibration with pure gases and gas mixtures are erratic and of unknown accuracy for H2, limiting the usefulness of the apparatus for determining oxidizer/fuel ratios from combustion product analysis. Deposition effects are discussed, and data obtained from rocket exhaust spectra are analyzed to give O/F ratios and mixture ratio distribution. The O/F ratio determined spectrometrically is insufficiently accurate for quantitative comparison with cold flow data. However, a criterion for operating conditions with improved mixing of fuel and oxidizer which is consistent with cold flow results may be obtained by inspection of contour plots. A chemical inefficiency in the combustion process when oxidizer is in excess is observed from reactive flow measurements. Present results were obtained with N2O4/N2H4 propellants.

  2. An Approach of Preventing Combustion Vibrations of Rocket Engine with Lateral Baffle,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-25

    qualitative analysis . The approach is novel. It can be used as a reference.. ) I. Introduction As the development work proceeded, when the variable...active. It is our analysis that the pressure oscillation in the combustion chamber is an inevitable phenomenon. This is determined by the structure of...definitely affects its operation. We can conclude from the above analysis that it is inevitable for the combustion-chamber pressure of the engine to

  3. Hydrodynamic Stability of Liquid-Propellant Combustion: Landau's Problem Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S. B.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrodynamic, or Landau, instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. As its name suggests, it stems from hydrodynamic effects connected with thermal expansion across the reaction region. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, the classical models that originally predicted this phenomenon have been extended to include the important effects that arise from a dynamic dependence of the burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. Thus, the onset of Landau instability has now been shown to occur for sufficiently small negative values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. It has also been shown that the onset of instability occurs for decreasing values of the disturbance wave number as the gravitational-acceleration parameter decreases. Consequently, in an appropriate weak-gravity limit, Landau instability becomes a long-wave phenomena associated with the formation of large cells on the liquid-propellant surface. Additionally, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. This instability occurs for sufficiently large negative values of the pressure sensitivity, and is enhanced by increasing values of the burning-rate temperature sensitivity. It is further shown that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating

  4. High-Area-Ratio Rocket Nozzle at High Combustion Chamber Pressure: Experimental and Analytical Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smith, Timothy D.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained on an optimally contoured nozzle with an area ratio of 1025:1 and on a truncated version of this nozzle with an area ratio of 440:1. The nozzles were tested with gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at combustion chamber pressures of 1800 to 2400 psia and mixture ratios of 3.89 to 6.15. This report compares the experimental performance, heat transfer, and boundary layer total pressure measurements with theoretical predictions of the current Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) developed methodology. This methodology makes use of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle performance code. Comparisons of the TDK-predicted performance to experimentally attained thrust performance indicated that both the vacuum thrust coefficient and the vacuum specific impulse values were approximately 2.0-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 1025:1 configurations, and approximately 0.25-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 440:1 configuration. Nozzle wall temperatures were measured on the outside of a thin-walled heat sink nozzle during the test fittings. Nozzle heat fluxes were calculated front the time histories of these temperatures and compared with predictions made with the TDK code. The heat flux values were overpredicted for all cases. The results range from nearly 100 percent at an area ratio of 50 to only approximately 3 percent at an area ratio of 975. Values of the integral of the heat flux as a function of nozzle surface area were also calculated. Comparisons of the experiment with analyses of the heat flux and the heat rate per axial length also show that the experimental values were lower than the predicted value. Three boundary layer rakes mounted on the nozzle exit were used for boundary layer measurements. This arrangement allowed total pressure measurements to be obtained at 14 different distances from the nozzle wall. A comparison of boundary layer total pressure profiles and analytical

  5. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  6. Nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves in combustion chambers. I, II. [stability in solid propellant rocket engine and T burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1976-01-01

    The general problem of the nonlinear growth and limiting amplitude of acoustic waves in a combustion chamber is treated in three parts: (1) the general conservation equations are expanded in two small parameters, and then combined to yield a nonlinear inhomogeneous wave equation, (2) the unsteady pressure and velocity fields are expressed as a synthesis of the normal modes of the chamber, but with unknown time-varying amplitudes, and (3) the system of nonlinear equations is treated by the method of averaging to produce a set of coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the amplitudes and phases of the modes. This approximate analysis is applied to the investigation of the unstable motions in a solid propellant rocket engine and in a T burner.

  7. Nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves in combustion chambers. I, II. [stability in solid propellant rocket engine and T burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1976-01-01

    The general problem of the nonlinear growth and limiting amplitude of acoustic waves in a combustion chamber is treated in three parts: (1) the general conservation equations are expanded in two small parameters, and then combined to yield a nonlinear inhomogeneous wave equation, (2) the unsteady pressure and velocity fields are expressed as a synthesis of the normal modes of the chamber, but with unknown time-varying amplitudes, and (3) the system of nonlinear equations is treated by the method of averaging to produce a set of coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the amplitudes and phases of the modes. This approximate analysis is applied to the investigation of the unstable motions in a solid propellant rocket engine and in a T burner.

  8. An Integrated Ignition and Combustion System for Liquid Propellant Micro Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-26

    STATEMENT Unlimited Distribution 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Liquid monopropellant microthrusters utilizing electrolytic ignition were...order to evaluate the applicability of the technology to high temperature combustion systems. Microscale diffusion flames were stabilized in the burners...nitrate based liquid monopropellants by electrolytic decomposition. The volume of the thruster combustion chamber was 0.82 mm3. The microthruster was

  9. Development of a CuNiCrAl Bond Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings in Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Torben; Rösler, Joachim; Bäker, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The lifetime of rocket combustion chambers can be increased by applying thermal barrier coatings. The standard coating systems usually used in gas turbines or aero engines will fail at the bond coat/substrate interface due to the chemical difference as well as the different thermal expansion between the copper liner and the applied NiCrAlY bond coat. A new bond coat alloy for rocket engine applications was designed previously with a chemical composition and coefficient of thermal expansion more similar to the copper substrate. Since a comparable material has not been applied by thermal spraying before, coating tests have to be carried out. In this work, the new Ni-30%Cu-6%Al-5%Cr bond coat alloy is applied via high velocity oxygen fuel spraying. In a first step, the influence of different coating parameters on, e.g., porosity, amount of unmolten particles, and coating roughness is investigated and a suitable parameter set for further studies is chosen. In a second step, copper substrates are coated with the chosen parameters to test the feasibility of the process. The high-temperature behavior and adhesion is tested with laser cycling experiments. The new coatings showed good adhesion even at temperatures beyond the maximum test temperatures of the NiCrAlY bond coat in previous studies.

  10. A method of determining combustion gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bon Tempi, P. J.

    1968-01-01

    Zirconium oxide coating enables the determination of hot gas flow patterns on liquid rocket injector face and baffle surfaces to indicate modifications that will increase performance and improve combustion stability. The coating withstands combustion temperatures and due to the coarse surface and coloring of the coating, shows the hot gas patterns.

  11. High-Energy Propellant Rocket Firing at the Rocket Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1955-01-21

    A rocket using high-energy propellant is fired from the Rocket Laboratory at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. The Rocket Lab was a collection of ten one-story cinderblock test cells located behind earthen barriers at the western edge of the campus. The rocket engines tested there were comparatively small, but the Lewis researchers were able to study different configurations, combustion performance, and injectors and nozzle design. The rockets were generally mounted horizontally and fired, as seen in this photograph of Test Cell No. 22. A group of fuels researchers at Lewis refocused their efforts after World War II in order to explore high energy propellants, combustion, and cooling. Research in these three areas began in 1945 and continued through the 1960s. The group of rocket researches was not elevated to a division branch until 1952. The early NACA Lewis work led to the development of liquid hydrogen as a viable propellant in the late 1950s. Following the 1949 reorganization of the research divisions, the rocket group began working with high-energy propellants such as diborane, pentaborane, and hydrogen. The lightweight fuels offered high levels of energy but were difficult to handle and required large tanks. In late 1954, Lewis researchers studied the combustion characteristics of gaseous hydrogen in a turbojet combustor. Despite poor mixing of the fuel and air, it was found that the hydrogen yielded more than a 90-percent efficiency. Liquid hydrogen became the focus of Lewis researchers for the next 15 years.

  12. Enhanced simulation software for rocket turbopump, turbulent, annular liquid seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padavala, Satya; Palazzolo, Alan

    1994-01-01

    One of the main objectives of this work is to develop a new dynamic analysis for liquid annular seals with arbitrary profile and to analyze a general distorted interstage seal of the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump (SSME-ATD-HPOTP). The dynamic analysis developed is based on a method originally proposed by Nelson and Nguyen. A simpler scheme based on cubic splines is found to be computationally more efficient and has better convergence properties at higher eccentricities. The first order solution of the original analysis is modified by including a more exact solution that takes into account the variation of perturbed variables along the circumference. A new set of equations for dynamic analysis are derived based on this more general model. A unified solution procedure that is valid for both Moody's and Hirs' friction models is presented. Dynamic analysis is developed for three different models: constant properties, variable properties, and thermal effects with variable properties. Arbitrarily varying seal profiles in both axial and circumferential directions are considered. An example case of an elliptical seal with varying degrees of axial curvature is analyzed in detail. A case study based on predicted clearances of an interstage seal of the SSME-ATD-HPOTP is presented. Dynamic coefficients based on external specified load are introduced to analyze seals that support a preload. The other objective of this work is to study the effect of large rotor displacements of SSME-ATD-HPOTP on the dynamics of the annular seal and the resulting transient motion. One task is to identify the magnitude of motion of the rotor about the centered position and establish limits of effectiveness of using current linear models. This task is accomplished by solving the bulk flow model seal governing equations directly for transient seal forces for any given type of motion, including motion with large eccentricities. Based on the above study, an equivalence is

  13. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of Ignition, Combustion and Expansion Processes of Hypergolic Liquid Fuel Combinations at Gas Temperatures up to 3000 K. Thesis - Rhein-Westfalia Technical Coll., 1967

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Harry

    1987-01-01

    The ignition, combustion, and expansion characteristics of hypergolic liquid propellant mixtures in small rocket engines are studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown by using the Bray approximation procedure that the reaction H + OH + M = H2O + M (where M is the molecular mass of the gas mixture) has a strong effect on the combustion efficiency. Increases in recombination energies ranging from 30 to 65% were obtained when the rate of this reaction was increased by a factor of 10 in gas mixtures containing 90% oxygen. The effect of aluminum additions and various injection techniques on the combustion process is investigated.

  14. Multi-Dimensional Combustion Instability Analysis of Solid Propellant Rocket Motors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    that vortex shedding may lead to an instability in solid propellant rocket motors. It is quite possible that high speed mean flows also affect the...significant [7-13]. Although it can be ar- gued that the hydrodynamic instability may not occur in high Reynolds numbers, the turbulent shear layer...can be significant [7-13]. Although it -(U + ] u 0 (2) can be argued that the hydrodynamic instability may Re i,jj 3 jji not occur in high Reynolds

  15. Combustible ionic liquids by design: is laboratory safety another ionic liquid myth?

    PubMed

    Smiglak, Marcin; Reichert, W Mathew; Holbrey, John D; Wilkes, John S; Sun, Luyi; Thrasher, Joseph S; Kirichenko, Kostyantyn; Singh, Shailendra; Katritzky, Alan R; Rogers, Robin D

    2006-06-28

    The non-flammability of ionic liquids (ILs) is often highlighted as a safety advantage of ILs over volatile organic compounds (VOCs), but the fact that many ILs are not flammable themselves does not mean that they are safe to use near fire and/or heat sources; a large group of ILs (including commercially available ILs) are combustible due to the nature of their positive heats of formation, oxygen content, and decomposition products.

  16. Combustion Characteristics of Liquid Normal Alkane Fuels in a Model Combustor of Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    今村, 宰; 石川, 雄太; 鈴木, 俊介; 福本, 皓士郎; 西田, 俊介; 氏家, 康成; 津江, 光洋

    Effect of kinds of one-component n-alkane liquid fuels on combustion characteristics was investigated experimentally using a model combustor of scramjet engine. The inlet condition of a model combustor is 2.0 of Mach number, up to 2400K of total temperature, and 0.38MPa of total pressure. Five kinds of n-alkane are tested, of which carbon numbers are 7, 8, 10, 13, and 16. They are more chemically active and less volatile with an increase of alkane carbon number. Fuels are injected to the combustor in the upstream of cavity with barbotage nitrogen gas and self-ignition performance was investigated. The result shows that self-ignition occurs with less equivalence ratio when alkane carbon number is smaller. This indicates that physical characteristic of fuel, namely volatile of fuel, is dominant for self-ignition behavior. Effect on flame-holding performance is also examined with adding pilot hydrogen and combustion is kept after cutting off pilot hydrogen with the least equivalence ratio where alkane carbon number is from 8 to 10. These points are discussed qualitatively from the conflict effect of chemical and physical properties on alkane carbon number.

  17. Spray and Combustion of Gelled Hypergolic Propellants for Future Rocket and Missile Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    transition state (VRC-TST) theory ............................201 3.4. Rice –Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus (RRKM) theory...258 Figure 29. PDF of child droplet diameter for Weber numbers of 365, 537, 636, 742, 858 and 981...and nitramine gun propellants”, Proc. Combust. Inst., 1996, 26, 1997-2006. [17]. G. P. Smith, D. M. Golden , M. Frenklach, N. W. Moriarty, B

  18. High Frequency Combustion Instability Studies of LOX/Methane Fueled Rocket Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-25

    drops, secondary atomization of drops, drop heating and vaporization , mixing processes involving the drops and gases, mixture ratio distribution in space... hydrazine family of fuels. Engines using LOX/H2 propellants have experienced considerably less incidences of combustion instability, but are not totally...fuel tanks and its low vaporization temperature limiting its storability. Recently, renewed interest in lower operational costs, higher propellant

  19. Small rocket research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven; Biaglow, James

    1993-01-01

    Small chemical rockets are used on nearly all space missions. The small rocket program provides propulsion technology for civil and government space systems. Small rocket concepts are developed for systems which encompass reaction control for launch and orbit transfer systems, as well as on-board propulsion for large space systems and earth orbit and planetary spacecraft. Major roles for on-board propulsion include apogee kick, delta-V, de-orbit, drag makeup, final insertions, north-south stationkeeping, orbit change/trim, perigee kick, and reboost. The program encompasses efforts on earth-storable, space storable, and cryogenic propellants. The earth-storable propellants include nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) as an oxidizer with monomethylhydrazine (MMH) or anhydrous hydrazine (AH) as fuels. The space storable propellants include liquid oxygen (LOX) as an oxidizer with hydrazine or hydrocarbons such as liquid methane, ethane, and ethanol as fuels. Cryogenic propellants are LOX or gaseous oxygen (GOX) as oxidizers and liquid or gaseous hydrogen as fuels. Improved performance and lifetime for small chemical rockets are sought through the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, the introduction of high temperature materials to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency, and improved component designs to optimize performance. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Results indicate that modeling of the injector and combustion process in small rockets needs improvement. High temperature materials require the development of fabrication processes, a durability data base in both laboratory and rocket environments, and basic engineering property data such as strength, creep, fatigue, and work hardening properties at both room and elevated temperature. Promising materials under development include iridium-coated rhenium and a

  20. Small rocket research and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Steven; Biaglow, James

    1993-11-01

    Small chemical rockets are used on nearly all space missions. The small rocket program provides propulsion technology for civil and government space systems. Small rocket concepts are developed for systems which encompass reaction control for launch and orbit transfer systems, as well as on-board propulsion for large space systems and earth orbit and planetary spacecraft. Major roles for on-board propulsion include apogee kick, delta-V, de-orbit, drag makeup, final insertions, north-south stationkeeping, orbit change/trim, perigee kick, and reboost. The program encompasses efforts on earth-storable, space storable, and cryogenic propellants. The earth-storable propellants include nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) as an oxidizer with monomethylhydrazine (MMH) or anhydrous hydrazine (AH) as fuels. The space storable propellants include liquid oxygen (LOX) as an oxidizer with hydrazine or hydrocarbons such as liquid methane, ethane, and ethanol as fuels. Cryogenic propellants are LOX or gaseous oxygen (GOX) as oxidizers and liquid or gaseous hydrogen as fuels. Improved performance and lifetime for small chemical rockets are sought through the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, the introduction of high temperature materials to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency, and improved component designs to optimize performance. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Results indicate that modeling of the injector and combustion process in small rockets needs improvement. High temperature materials require the development of fabrication processes, a durability data base in both laboratory and rocket environments, and basic engineering property data such as strength, creep, fatigue, and work hardening properties at both room and elevated temperature. Promising materials under development include iridium-coated rhenium and a

  1. Noncircular Orifice Holes and Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Liquid Rocket Injectors (Phases 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchale, R. M.; Nurick, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive summary of the results of a cold-flow and hot-fire experimental study of the mixing and atomization characteristics of injector elements incorporating noncircular orifices is presented. Both liquid/liquid and gas/liquid element types are discussed. Unlike doublet and triplet elements (circular orifices only) were investigated for the liquid/liquid case while concentric tube elements were investigated for the gas/liquid case. It is concluded that noncircular shape can be employed to significant advantage in injector design for liquid rocket engines.

  2. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Volume 2: Addendum 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The potential of a common Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) design was evaluated for use with both the Space Transportation System (STS) and the Advanced Launch System (ALS). A goal is to have a common Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen (LO2/LH2) engine developed for both the ALS booster and the core stage. The LO2/LH2 option for the STS was evaluated to identify potential LRB program cost reductions. The objective was to identify the structural impacts to the external tank (ET), and to determine if any significant ET re-development costs are required as a result of the larger LO2/LH2 LRB. The potential ET impacts evaluated are presented.

  3. Stability analysis of a liquid fuel annular combustion chamber. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of combustion instability in an annular combustion chamber are investigated. A modified Galerkin method was used to produce a set of modal amplitude equations from the general nonlinear partial differential acoustic wave equation. From these modal amplitude equations, the two variable perturbation method was used to develop a set of approximate equations of a given order of magnitude. These equations were modeled to show the effects of velocity sensitive combustion instabilities by evaluating the effects of certain parameters in the given set of equations. By evaluating these effects, parameters which cause instabilities to occur in the combustion chamber can be ascertained. It is assumed that in the annular combustion chamber, the liquid propellants are injected uniformly across the injector face, the combustion processes are distributed throughout the combustion chamber, and that no time delay occurs in the combustion processes.

  4. Studies of the Ignition and Combustion of Boron Particles for Air - Augmented Rocket Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    flat-flame burner ha"e been compared with experimental results -- agreement is good for dry gan cases, but poor when the gas stream includes water...OF CONDENSED-PRASE EXHAUST ..... 17 V. COMEUSTION OF CONDENSED PHASE EXHAUST MATERIAL .. ... 21 A. The Gas Burner ...by a single-particle technique: ut-i••izing a gas burner ,- which was previously developed and exten- sively used at At-antic Research for combustion

  5. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) Systems Definition Handbook presents the analyses and design data developed during the study. The Systems Definition Handbook (SDH) contains three major parts: the LRB vehicles definition; the Pressure-Fed Booster Test Bed (PFBTB) study results; and the ALS/LRB study results. Included in this volume are the results of all trade studies; final configurations with supporting rationale and analyses; technology assessments; long lead requirements for facilities, materials, components, and subsystems; operational requirements and scenarios; and safety, reliability, and environmental analyses.

  6. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1986-01-01

    In previous tests of liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastropic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed here.

  7. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1986-01-01

    In previous tests of liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastropic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed here.

  8. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 2, book 5, appendix 9: LRB alternate applications and evolutionary growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The analyses performed in assessing the merit of the Liquid Rocket Booster concept for use in alternate applications such as for Shuttle C, for Standalone Expendable Launch Vehicles, and possibly for use with the Air Force's Advanced Launch System are presented. A comparison is also presented of the three LRB candidate designs, namely: (1) the LO2/LH2 pump fed, (2) the LO2/RP-1 pump fed, and (3) the LO2/RP-1 pressure fed propellant systems in terms of evolution along with design and cost factors, and other qualitative considerations. A further description is also presented of the recommended LRB standalone, core-to-orbit launch vehicle concept.

  9. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 2, book 6, appendix 10: Vehicle systems effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Three tasks were undertaken by Eagle Engineering as a part of the Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) study. Task 1 required Eagle to supply current data relative to the Space Shuttle vehicle and systems affected by an LRB substitution. Tables listing data provided are presented. Task 2 was to evaluate and compare shuttle impacts of candidate LRB configuration in concert with overall trades of analysis activity. Three selected configurations with emphasis on flight loads, separation dynamics, and cost comparison are presented. Task 3 required the development of design guidelines and requirements to minimize impacts to the Space Shuttle system from all LRB substitution. Results are presented for progress to date.

  10. Daniel Sokolowski in the Rocket Operations Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-21

    Dan Sokolowski worked as an engineering coop student at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center from 1962 to 1966 while earning his Mechanical Engineering degree from Purdue. At the time of this photograph Sokolowski had just been hired as a permanent NASA employee in the Chemical Rocket Evaluation Branch of the Chemical Rocket Division. He had also just won a regional American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics competition for his paper on high and low-frequency combustion instability. The resolution of the low-frequency combustion instability, or chugging, in liquid hydrogen rocket systems was one of Lewis’ more significant feats of the early 1960s. In most rocket engine combustion chambers, the pressure, temperature, and flows are in constant flux. The engine is considered to be operating normally if the fluctuations remain random and within certain limits. Lewis researchers used high-speed photography to study and define Pratt and Whitney’s RL-10’s combustion instability by throttling the engine under the simulated flight conditions. They found that the injection of a small stream of helium gas into the liquid-oxygen tank immediately stabilized the system. Sokolowski’s later work focused on combustion in airbreathing engines. In 1983 was named Manager of a multidisciplinary program aimed at improving durability of combustor and turbine components. After 39 years Sokolowski retired from NASA in September 2002.

  11. Combustion characteristics of nanoaluminum, liquid water, and hydrogen peroxide mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sabourin, J.L.; Yetter, R.A.; Risha, G.A.; Son, S.F.; Tappan, B.C.

    2008-08-15

    An experimental investigation of the combustion characteristics of nanoaluminum (nAl), liquid water (H{sub 2}O{sub (l)}), and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) mixtures has been conducted. Linear and mass-burning rates as functions of pressure, equivalence ratio ({phi}), and concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in H{sub 2}O{sub (l)} oxidizing solution are reported. Steady-state burning rates were obtained at room temperature using a windowed pressure vessel over an initial pressure range of 0.24 to 12.4 MPa in argon, using average nAl particle diameters of 38 nm, {phi} from 0.5 to 1.3, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations between 0 and 32% by mass. At a nominal pressure of 3.65 MPa, under stoichiometric conditions, mass-burning rates per unit area ranged between 6.93 g/cm{sup 2} s (0% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and 37.04 g/cm{sup 2} s (32% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), which corresponded to linear burning rates of 9.58 and 58.2 cm/s, respectively. Burning rate pressure exponents of 0.44 and 0.38 were found for stoichiometric mixtures at room temperature containing 10 and 25% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, respectively, up to 5 MPa. Burning rates are reduced above {proportional_to}5 MPa due to the pressurization of interstitial spaces of the packed reactant mixture with argon gas, diluting the fuel and oxidizer mixture. Mass burning rates were not measured above {proportional_to}32% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} due to an anomalous burning phenomena, which caused overpressurization within the quartz sample holder, leading to tube rupture. High-speed imaging displayed fingering or jetting ahead of the normal flame front. Localized pressure measurements were taken along the sample length, determining that the combustion process proceeded as a normal deflagration prior to tube rupture, without significant pressure buildup within the tube. In addition to burning rates, chemical efficiencies of the combustion reaction were determined to be within approximately 10% of the theoretical maximum under all conditions

  12. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 3: Sample case. [propellant combustion simulation/internal ballistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-11) is used to predict internal ballistics in a sample motor. This motor contains a five segmented grain. The first segment has a 14 pointed star configuration with a web which wraps partially around the forward dome. The other segments are circular in cross-section and are tapered along the interior burning surface. Two of the segments are inhibited on the forward face. The nozzle is not assumed to be submerged. The performance prediction is broken into two simulation parts: the delivered end item specific impulse and the propellant properties which are required as inputs for the internal ballistics module are determined; and the internal ballistics for the entire burn duration of the motor are simulated.

  13. Combustion anomalies in stop-restart firing of hybrid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saraniero, M. A.; Caveny, L. H.; Summerfield, M.

    1970-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the restart process of an oxygen-Plexiglas hybrid rocket demonstrated that preheating the fuel (as a consequence of a previous ignition and a temporary extinguishment) significantly increases the rate of chamber pressurization and produces regression rate overshoots during reignition. Higher rates of chamber pressurization measured during the restart transient imply faster instantaneous regression rates of the fuel during restart. Transient periods following the initial ignition and the restart after a two-second shutdown were observed for four experimental tests. Thermocouples were embedded in the fuel to record subsurface temperature histories. A mathematical model of the thermal processes in the fuel and the events that occur during an experimental firing was developed to calculate the regression rate transients. Quantitative agreement with experimental results was obtained by making nominal corrections to the calculated convective and radiative heating rates.

  14. Theoretical and experimental analysis of liquid layer instability in hybrid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobald, Mario; Verri, Isabella; Schlechtriem, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The combustion behavior of different hybrid rocket fuels has been analyzed in the frame of this research. Tests have been performed in a 2D slab burner configuration with windows on two sides. Four different liquefying paraffin-based fuels, hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) have been tested in combination with gaseous oxygen (GOX). Experimental high-speed video data have been analyzed manually and with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) technique. Application of POD enables the recognition of the main structures of the flow field and the combustion flame appearing in the video data. These results include spatial and temporal analysis of the structures. For liquefying fuels these spatial values relate to the wavelengths associated to the Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI). A theoretical long-wave solution of the KHI problem shows good agreement with the experimental results. Distinct frequencies found in the POD analysis can be related to the precombustion chamber configuration which can lead to vortex shedding phenomena.

  15. The technique for Simulation of Transient Combustion Processes in the Rocket Engine Operating with Gaseous Fuel “Hydrogen and Oxygen”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubanov, V. M.; Stepanov, D. V.; Shabliy, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the method for simulation of transient combustion processes in the rocket engine. The engine operates on gaseous propellant: oxygen and hydrogen. Combustion simulation was performed using the ANSYS CFX software. Three reaction mechanisms for the stationary mode were considered and described in detail. Reactions mechanisms have been taken from several sources and verified. The method for converting ozone properties from the Shomate equation to the NASA-polynomial format was described in detail. The way for obtaining quick CFD-results with intermediate combustion components using an EDM model was found. Modeling difficulties with combustion model Finite Rate Chemistry, associated with a large scatter of reference data were identified and described. The way to generate the Flamelet library with CFX-RIF is described. Formulated adequate reaction mechanisms verified at a steady state have also been tested for transient simulation. The Flamelet combustion model was recognized as adequate for the transient mode. Integral parameters variation relates to the values obtained during stationary simulation. A cyclic irregularity of the temperature field, caused by precession of the vortex core, was detected in the chamber with the proposed simulation technique. Investigations of unsteady processes of rocket engines including the processes of ignition were proposed as the area for application of the described simulation technique.

  16. Combustion Chamber Fluid Dynamics and Hypergolic Gel Propellant Chemistry Simulations for Selectable Thrust Rocket Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    analysis indicates that there are represent finite-rate (nonequilibrium) chemical kinetics, 14 major products of combustion: 02, N 2 , C0 2 , CO, H2, multi...smaller than that for Engine No. 1. ( UDMH ) by NO2. These reactions hypothesized to be Figures 6 and 7 show contours of OH mass fraction rate limiting...phase reaction of UDMH and NO2 indicate that the first Table 1. Condensed-phase property and Isp estimates step is the abstraction of an H atom from a

  17. Focused RBCC Experiments: Two-Rocket Configuration Experiments and Hydrocarbon/Oxygen Rocket Ejector Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2003-01-01

    This addendum report documents the results of two additional efforts for the Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) rocket-ejector mode research work carried out at the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center in support of NASA s technology development efforts for enabling 3 d generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The tasks reported here build on an earlier NASA MSFC funded research program on rocket ejector investigations. The first task investigated the improvements of a gaseous hydrogen/oxygen twin thruster RBCC rocket ejector system over a single rocket system. The second task investigated the performance of a hydrocarbon (liquid JP-7)/gaseous oxygen single thruster rocket-ejector system. To gain a systematic understanding of the rocket-ejector s internal fluid mechanic/combustion phenomena, experiments were conducted with both direct-connect and sea-level static diffusion and afterburning (DAB) configurations for a range of rocket operating conditions. For all experimental conditions, overall system performance was obtained through global measurements of wall static pressure profiles, heat flux profiles and engine thrust. Detailed mixing and combustion information was obtained through Raman spectroscopy measurements of major species (gaseous oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen and water vapor) for the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen rocket ejector experiments.

  18. Test results from a simple, low-cost, pressure-fed liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen rocket combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, G. A.; Stoddard, F. J.; Gavitt, K. R.; Klem, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A simple, low-cost rocket engine was designed, fabricated, and successfully hot fire tested over a wide range of interface conditions and operating parameters. The engine used low enthalpy hydrogen (45 to 70 R, 200 to 390 psia) and oxygen (139 to 163 R, 210 to 480 psia) propellants pressure-fed directly from facility cryogenic tanks. The engine demonstrated excellent performance, with 97% average combustion efficiency, and absence of combustion instabilities. Engine design chamber pressure was 300 psia, yielding about 16,500 pounds thrust at sea level with a 3:1 expansion ration test nozzle. The engine used a fixed-element injector based on TRW's unique coaxial pintle design, but was operated at 60%, 80%, and 100% thrust levels by throttling facility propellant valves. The engine was tested at propellant mixture ratios (O/F) from 5.8 to 8.4; design O/F was 6.6. To document combustion stability, in five tests RDX explosive pulse guns were detonated in radial and tangential directions across the combustion chamber during steady-state operation. The largest disturbance consisted of simultaneous detonation of a 20-grain radial gun and a 40-grain tangential gun. In no case was an instability, either feed system mode or chamber acoustic mode, excited. High-frequency piezoelectric pressure transducers documented stable recovery from disturbance overpressures within 40 milliseconds of peak pressure. A total of 67 firing tests, accumulating 149 seconds of firing time above 10% P(sub c), were performed. Since parametric testing required run durations of only 2 to 3 seconds, a heat sink combustion chamber was employed for most runs. To evaluate the feasibility of a low-cost ablative system for a flight engine design, one 20-second continuous firing was conducted with a silicone rubber chamber/throat/nozzle liner cast in one piece directly into the engine. The ablative engine operated at the equivalent of 309 seconds sea level specific impulse, when adjusted to a 98% efficient

  19. Test results from a simple, low-cost, pressure-fed liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen rocket combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, G. A.; Stoddard, F. J.; Gavitt, K. R.; Klem, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A simple, low-cost rocket engine was designed, fabricated, and successfully hot fire tested over a wide range of interface conditions and operating parameters. The engine used low enthalpy hydrogen (45 to 70 R, 200 to 390 psia) and oxygen (139 to 163 R, 210 to 480 psia) propellants pressure-fed directly from facility cryogenic tanks. The engine demonstrated excellent performance, with 97% average combustion efficiency, and absence of combustion instabilities. Engine design chamber pressure was 300 psia, yielding about 16,500 pounds thrust at sea level with a 3:1 expansion ration test nozzle. The engine used a fixed-element injector based on TRW's unique coaxial pintle design, but was operated at 60%, 80%, and 100% thrust levels by throttling facility propellant valves. The engine was tested at propellant mixture ratios (O/F) from 5.8 to 8.4; design O/F was 6.6. To document combustion stability, in five tests RDX explosive pulse guns were detonated in radial and tangential directions across the combustion chamber during steady-state operation. The largest disturbance consisted of simultaneous detonation of a 20-grain radial gun and a 40-grain tangential gun. In no case was an instability, either feed system mode or chamber acoustic mode, excited. High-frequency piezoelectric pressure transducers documented stable recovery from disturbance overpressures within 40 milliseconds of peak pressure. A total of 67 firing tests, accumulating 149 seconds of firing time above 10% P(sub c), were performed. Since parametric testing required run durations of only 2 to 3 seconds, a heat sink combustion chamber was employed for most runs. To evaluate the feasibility of a low-cost ablative system for a flight engine design, one 20-second continuous firing was conducted with a silicone rubber chamber/throat/nozzle liner cast in one piece directly into the engine. The ablative engine operated at the equivalent of 309 seconds sea level specific impulse, when adjusted to a 98% efficient

  20. Radiative and combustion properties of nanoparticle-laden liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Himanshu

    Key processes in energy conversion systems are radiative transport and combustion. The general objective of this dissertation is to improve energy conversion efficiency by a fundamental investigation of how nanoparticle-laden liquid suspensions, generally termed nanofluids, can be used to either enhance radiative absorption in solar thermal energy systems, or to improve the combustion properties of liquid fuels. The present study theoretically investigates the feasibility of using a non-concentrating direct absorption solar collector (DAC) and compares its performance with that of a typical flat-plate collector. Here a nanofluid - a mixture of water and aluminum nanoparticles - is used as the absorbing medium. It was observed that the presence of nanoparticles increases the absorption of incident radiation by more than 9 times over that of pure water. Under similar operating conditions, the efficiency of a DAC using nanofluid as the working fluid is found to be up to 10 percent higher (on an absolute basis) than that of a flat-plate collector. This study also attempts to improve the ignition properties of diesel fuel by investigating the influence of adding aluminum and aluminum-oxide nanoparticles to diesel. As part of this study, droplet ignition experiments were carried out atop a heated hot plate over the range of 688 to 768 degrees centigrade. Different types of fuel mixtures were used; both particle size (15 nm and 50 nm) as well as the volume fraction (0, 0.1 and 0.5 percent) of nanoparticles added to diesel were varied. It was observed that the ignition probability for the fuel mixtures which contained nanoparticles was significantly higher than that of pure diesel. Finally, the concept of using solar energy for converting biomass into useful product-gases was explored. A molten salt mixture (containing nanoparticles) was used to absorb and transfer solar energy to the biomass. Under the highest amount of solar radiation (60 times the normal solar radiation