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Sample records for liriomyza huidobrensis blanchard

  1. [Relationships between host preference of Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) and nutrient and chlorophyll contents in host foliage].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Ping; Pang, Bao-Ping; Meng, Rui-Xia; Wang, Juan

    2007-03-01

    The laboratory study with no free choice means showed that the host preference of Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) adult differed significantly with test plants. Phaseolus vulgaris, Chrysanthemum coronarium and Cucurbita pepo were the most preferred, while Lycopersicum esculenturn and Brassica oleracea were the least. Correlative analysis indicated that the host preference of L. huidobrensis adult had a significant positive correlation with the content of soluble sugar, but less correlation with soluble protein and chlorophyll contents in host foliage.

  2. Population dynamics and damage caused by the leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis Blanchard (Diptera: Agromyzidae), on seven potato processing varieties grown in temperate environment.

    PubMed

    López, R; Carmona, D; Vincini, A M; Monterubbianesi, G; Caldiz, D

    2010-01-01

    The leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis Blanchard is considered a key pest for potatoes in Argentina. Population dynamics and leaf damage caused by the leafminer on seven selected potato processing varieties were assessed at Balcarce during the 2002 and 2003 growing seasons. Adult population dynamic was monitored using yellow sticky traps, while leaf damage (punctures and mines) was assessed using a damage index scale from low to severe. Liriomyza huidobrensis adults were present throughout the growing season and the population increased along crop development. The same was true for all varieties regarding larval damage, being low on early crop stages and severe late in the season. Varieties were grouped in two different categories according to damage scale index. Shepody, Kennebec, Frital and Innovator showed a higher damage index when compared with Santana, Ranger Russet and Russet Burbank, which exhibited a lower damage. Moreover, it could be assumed that damage was related to the foliage greenness, with light green colored varieties (Shepody, Kennebec, Frital and Innovator) being more attractive and affected by L. huidobrensis.

  3. Molecular Survey for the Invasive Leafminer Pest Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae) in California Uncovers Only the Native Pest Liriomyza langei.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Sonja J; Lewis, Matthew L; Gaimari, Stephen D; Reitz, Stuart R

    2014-10-01

    Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) is a highly destructive invasive leafminer pest currently causing extensive damage to vegetable and horticultural crops around the world. Liriomyza langei Frick is a leafminer pest native to California that cannot currently be morphologically distinguished from L. huidobrensis. We used a DNA-barcoding approach, a published PCR-RFLP method, and a new multiplex PCR method to analyze 664 flies matching the morphological description of huidobrensis-langei. We found no evidence for the presence of L. huidobrensis in our extensive samples from California. In addition to the new molecular method, this work is important because it provides definitive data that the California "pea leafminer" is currently, and has probably always been, L. langei. These data will also be important in the event that the highly invasive L. huidobrensis ever becomes established.

  4. Molecular evidence of cryptic species within the Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Scheffer, S J

    2000-08-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among populations of the polyphagous pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), were investigated using DNA sequence data. Maximum parsimony analysis of 941 bp of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and II genes showed that L. huidobrensis contains two well-defined monophyletic groups, one composed of specimens from California and Hawaii and one composed of specimens from South and Central America together with populations that have been recently introduced into other parts of the world. The differentiation between the two clades within L. huidobrensis is equivalent to that seen between other agromyzid species, suggesting that L. huidobrensis as currently defined contains two cryptic species. This finding is consistent with field observations of differences in pest status and insecticide resistance between L. huidobrensis populations. Until additional studies are complete, no changes in L. huidobrensis taxonomy are proposed. However, researchers and quarantine officials may wish to consider the findings of the current study in designing research, pest management, and quarantine programs for L. huidobrensis.

  5. The resolution of Californian populations of Liriomyza huidobrensis and Liriomyza trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae) using PCR.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D J; Reitz, S R; Atkinson, P W; Trumble, J T

    2000-07-01

    Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) and Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) are important vegetable pests in California. Populations of each species differ in their impact in central and southern regions. This difference may be explained by geographical or host plant differences in each of the regions. We used random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reactions to assess genetic differences between two laboratory populations of each species collected from central and southern California. Individual L. trifolii from the two regions could be discriminated by the presence/absence of PCR products. No such qualitative differences were apparent in PCR products amplified from L. huidobrensis individuals, but the origins of individuals could be differentiated using a bootstrap analysis of marker frequencies. Marker primers were used to compare field and laboratory individuals. No evidence was found for the existence of further populations or of hybrid populations in central and southern California. The distribution of populations of L. huidobrensis was explained completely by geographical differences. As a consequence of the absence of leafminer infestations on the same host plant varieties in both regions, factors governing L. trifolii population distribution differences were less apparent. The presence of the same host plant varieties at both sites suggests that the two L. trifolii populations differ in host plant preference.

  6. Host plant-related parasitism and host feeding activities of Diglyphus isaea (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) on Liriomyza huidobrensis, Liriomyza sativae, and Liriomyza trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Musundire, Robert; Chabi-Olaye, Adenirin; Salifu, Daisy; Krüger, Kerstin

    2012-02-01

    Host plant species can affect the behavior and attributes of parasitoids, such as host searching, oviposition, and offspring fitness. In this study, parasitism, host feeding, and sex ratios of Diglyphus isaea (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) on Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), Liriomyza sativae Blanchard, and Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) larvae reared on Phaseolus vulgaris L., Pisum sativum L., Solanum lycopersicum L., and Vicia faba L. were determined. In no-choice tests, L. huidobrensis had the highest rate of parasitism when reared on P. vulgaris (46%), L. sativae when reared on V. faba (59%) and P. vulgaris (59%), and L. trifolii when reared on S. lycopersicum (68%). Host feeding in no-choice tests ranged between 2% and 36% and was highest on L. trifolii reared on V. faba. Results of choice tests showed a significant interaction effect for host plant and Liriomyza species on parasitism and host feeding. Within plant mixtures, L. sativae reared on P. vulgaris had the highest rate of parasitism (31%), followed by L. trifolii on S. lycopersicum (29%) and L. huidobrensis on V. faba (28%). Host feeding was highest on L. trifolii reared on S. lycopersicum (14%) and lowest on L. huidobrensis reared on P. sativum and S. lycopersicum (1%). In some instances, plant mixtures resulted in a higher proportion of females of D. isaea than single plant species. The highest proportion of females was obtained in plant mixtures on L. huidobrensis and L. trifolii on V. faba (71 and 72%, respectively). This study suggests that planting crop mixtures can potentially lead to higher proportions of females, thus improving parasitism and host feeding, depending on Liriomyza and host plant species.

  7. Molecular survey for the invasive leafminer pest Liriomyza Huidobrensis in California (Diptera: Agromyzidae) uncovers only the native pest L. langei

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liriomyza huidobrensis is a highly destructive invasive leafminer pest currently causing extensive damage to vegetable and horticultural crops around the world. Liriomyza langei is a leafminer pest native to California that cannot currently be morphologically distinguished from L. huidobrensis. This...

  8. Olfactory Response and Feeding Preference of Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae) to Potato Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Rameswor; Jung, Chuleui

    2016-10-01

    Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) is a serious invasive pest of potato in Korea. In sessile insect herbivores like leafminer flies, host plant choice is a critical decision made by adults for offspring survival, and one that is often influenced by host plant quality. In annual host plants like potato, leafminer choice is sometimes influenced by cultivar characteristics. To determine the basis of host selection, the odor and feeding preferences of adult L. huidobrensis were examined using a five-arm olfactometer offering a choice of five different potato cultivars: 'Chubeak', 'Seohong', 'Goun', 'Dejima', and 'Sumi'. Preferences of adult leafminers varied significantly among potato cultivars. Liriomyza huidobrensis showed a preference for the Goun cultivar in both olfactory and adult feeding tests. When measured 2 wk after release onto actual plants, plant damage ratings and the number of mines were consistent with the feeding preference results. Further studies should examine the influence of cultivar characteristics on larval fitness and adult longevity to develop a resistant potato cultivar through the selection behavior of leafminers.

  9. A Temperature-Dependent Phenology Model for Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sporleder, Marc; Carhuapoma, Pablo; Kroschel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) is an economically important and highly polyphagous worldwide pest. To establish a temperature-dependent phenology model, essential for understanding the development and growth of the pest population under a variety of climates and as part of a pest risk analysis, L. huidobrensis life-table data were collected under laboratory conditions at seven constant temperatures on its host faba bean (Vicia faba L.). Several nonlinear equations were fitted to each life stage to model the temperature-dependent population growth and species life history and finally compile an overall temperature-dependent pest phenology model using the Insect Life Cycle Modeling (ILCYM) software. Liriomyza huidobrensis completed development from egg to adult in all temperatures evaluated, except at 32 °C, which was lethal to pupae. Eggs did not develop at 35 °C. Mean development time of all immature stages decreased with increasing temperature. Nonlinear models predicted optimal temperature for immature survival between 20–25 °C (32–38% mortality of all immature stages). Life-table parameters simulated at constant temperatures indicated that L. huidobrensis develops within the range of 12–28 °C. Simulated life-table for predicting the population dynamics of L. huidobrensis under two contrasting environments showed that lowland temperatures at the coast of Peru (250 m.a.s.l.) presented better conditions for a potential population increase than highland (3,400 m.a.s.l.) conditions. The presented model linked with Geographic Information Systems will allow pest risk assessments in different environmental regions to support the regulation of pest movement to prevent pest entry into not-yet invaded regions as well as to implement effective management strategies. PMID:28334271

  10. Differential Effects of Pesticide Applications on Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae) and its Parasitoids on Pea in Central Kenya.

    PubMed

    Guantai, M M; Ogol, C P K O; Salifu, D; Kasina, J M; Akutse, K S; Fiaboe, K K M

    2015-04-01

    Three Liriomyza species [Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), and Liriomyza sativae Blanchard] have been reported as the most important leafminer pests in vegetable production systems in Africa. In Kenya, farmers rely on indiscriminate synthetic insecticides use. On-farm field investigations were set up at three different locations (Sagana, Kabaru, and Naromoru) in central Kenya to determine the effect of pesticide application on the abundance of leafminers and their parasitoids under three management practices, namely: farmer practice (FP), reduced pesticide use (RP), and a control with no use of pesticides (CO). In addition, laboratory experiments were designed to test the effect of commonly used pesticides in pea production systems in central Kenya--Dimethoate, Dynamec, Thunder, Cyclone, Bestox, Folicur, Milraz, and Bulldock--on L. huidobrensis and two of its parasitoids, Diglyphus isaea Walker and Phaedrotoma scabriventris Nixon. The mean numbers of leafminer flies in control treatment were higher than in RP and FP in both first and second seasons across all sites, but RP and FP did not differ significantly. Parasitoid numbers were very low and there was no much variation between treatments at each location in both first and second seasons. No significant differences were observed between the three management practices with regards to the yield measurements. In the laboratory, the estimated LD50 values for L. huidobrensis larvae were all more than two times higher than the recommended dosages, while the LD50 of adults were below the recommended dosages. The estimated LD50 values for the parasitoids were much lower than recommended dosages for all pesticides except Thunder. This study, therefore, demonstrates that the pesticides currently used do not control the Liriomyza leafminer larvae that constitute the most destructive stage of the pest, but are rather detrimental to their parasitoids. In addition, the current low level of

  11. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism method to distinguish Liriomyza huidobrensis from L. Langei (Diptera: Agromyzidae) applied to three recent leafminer invasions.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, S J; Wijesekara, A; Visser, D; Hallett, R H

    2001-10-01

    A molecular method is presented for differentiating the morphologically cryptic leafminers Liriomyza langei Frick and L. huidobrensis (Blanchard). This method requires polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a 1031-bp region of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase DNA followed by restriction fragment analysis using the restriction enzymes SpeI and EcoRV. Spel cuts the mitochondrial fragment of L. langei into two fragments, but does not cut the L. huidobrensis fragment. EcoRV cuts the L. huidobrensis fragment into two fragments, but does not cut the L. langei fragment. This PCR-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) method is faster and less costly than DNA sequencing,which is currently the only other way to differentiate these two species. We apply the method to samples from recently introduced leafminer populations in Sri Lanka, Canada, and South Africa and find that the invasive leafminer in all three locations is L. huidobrensis.

  12. The Invasive Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae): Understanding Its Pest Status and Management Globally

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Sonja J.; Visser, Diedrich; Valladares, Graciela; Soares Correa, Alberto; Shepard, B. Merle; Rauf, Aunu; Murphy, Sean T.; Mujica, Norma; MacVean, Charles; Kroschel, Jürgen; Kishinevsky, Miriam; Joshi, Ravindra C.; Johansen, Nina S.; Hallett, Rebecca H.; Civelek, Hasan S.; Chen, Bing; Metzler, Helga Blanco

    2017-01-01

    Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) is native to South America but has expanded its range and invaded many regions of the world, primarily on flowers and to a lesser extent on horticultural product shipments. As a result of initial invasion into an area, damage caused is usually significant but not necessarily sustained. Currently, it is an economic pest in selected native and invaded regions of the world. Adults cause damage by puncturing abaxial and adaxial leaf surfaces for feeding and egg laying sites. Larvae mine the leaf parenchyma tissues which can lead to leaves drying and wilting. We have recorded 365 host plant species from 49 families and more than 106 parasitoid species. In a subset of the Argentinian data, we found that parasitoid community composition attacking L. huidobrensis differs significantly in cultivated and uncultivated plants. No such effect was found at the world level, probably due to differences in collection methods in the different references. We review the existing knowledge as a means of setting the context for new and unpublished data. The main objective is to provide an update of widely dispersed and until now unpublished data, evaluate dispersion of the leafminer and management strategies in different regions of the world, and highlight the need to consider the possible effects of climate change on further regional invasions or expansions. PMID:28423426

  13. Variation in morphological characters of two invasive leafminers, Liriomyza huidobrensis and L. sativae, across a tropical elevation gradient.

    PubMed

    Tantowijoyo, Warsito; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2011-01-01

    Changes in morphological traits along elevation and latitudinal gradients in ectotherms are often interpreted in terms of the temperature-size rule, which states that the body size of organisms increases under low temperatures, and is therefore expected to increase with elevation and latitude. However other factors like host plant might contribute to spatial patterns in size as well, particularly for polyphagous insects. Here elevation patterns for trait size and shape in two leafminer species are examined, Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) and L. sativae Blanchard, along a tropical elevation gradient in Java, Indonesia. Adult leafminers were trapped from different locations in the mountainous area of Dieng in the province of Central Java. To separate environmental versus genetic effects, L. huidobrensis originating from 1378 m and 2129 m ASL were reared in the laboratory for five generations. Size variation along the elevation gradient was only found in L. huidobrensis and this followed expectations based on the temperature-size rule. There were also complex changes in wing shape along the gradient. Morphological differences were influenced by genetic and environmental effects. Findings are discussed within the context of adaptation to different elevations in the two species.

  14. Variation in Morphological Characters of Two Invasive Leafminers, Liriomyza huidobrensis and L. sativae, across a Tropical Elevation Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Tantowijoyo, Warsito; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in morphological traits along elevation and latitudinal gradients in ectotherms are often interpreted in terms of the temperature-size rule, which states that the body size of organisms increases under low temperatures, and is therefore expected to increase with elevation and latitude. However other factors like host plant might contribute to spatial patterns in size as well, particularly for polyphagous insects. Here elevation patterns for trait size and shape in two leafminer species are examined, Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) and L. sativae Blanchard, along a tropical elevation gradient in Java, Indonesia. Adult leafminers were trapped from different locations in the mountainous area of Dieng in the province of Central Java. To separate environmental versus genetic effects, L. huidobrensis originating from 1378 m and 2129 m ASL were reared in the laboratory for five generations. Size variation along the elevation gradient was only found in L. huidobrensis and this followed expectations based on the temperature-size rule. There were also complex changes in wing shape along the gradient. Morphological differences were influenced by genetic and environmental effects. Findings are discussed within the context of adaptation to different elevations in the two species. PMID:21867436

  15. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assays to distinguish Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae) from associated species on lettuce cropping systems in Italy.

    PubMed

    Masetti, Antonio; Luchetti, Andrea; Mantovani, Barbara; Burgio, Giovanni

    2006-08-01

    The pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) (Diptera: Agromyzidae), is a serious insect pest infesting open field lettuce plantings in northern Italy. In these cropping systems, it coexists with several other agromyzid species that have negligible economic importance on open field vegetables. The rapid detection of L. huidobrensis is crucial for effective management strategies, but the identification of agromyzids to species can be very difficult at adult as well at immature stages. In this study, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay is proposed to separate L. huidobrensis from Liriomyza bryoniae (Kaltenbach), Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), and Chromatomyia horticola (Goureau), which usually occur in the same lettuce plantings. An approximately 1,031-bp region of the mitochondrial genome encompassing the 3' region of cytochrome oxidase I, the whole leucine tRNA, and all of the cytochrome oxidase II was amplified by PCR and digested using the enzymes PvuII and SnaBI separately. Both endonucleases cut the amplicons of L. huidobrensis in two fragments, whereas the original band was not cleaved in the other analyzed species. The presence of Dacnusa spp. DNA does not bias the assay, because the PCR conditions and the primer set here described do not amplify any tract of this endoparasitic wasp genome.

  16. Transcriptome response analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana to leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plants have evolved a complicated resistance system and exhibit a variety of defense patterns in response to different attackers. Previous studies have shown that responses of plants to chewing insects and phloem-feeding insects are significantly different. Less is known, however, regarding molecular responses to leafminer insects. To investigate plant transcriptome response to leafminers, we selected the leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis, which has a special feeding pattern more similar to pathogen damage than that of chewing insects, as a model insect, and Arabidopsis thaliana as a response plant. Results We first investigated local and systemic responses of A. thaliana to leafminer feeding using an Affymetrix ATH1 genome array. Genes related to metabolic processes and stimulus responses were highly regulated. Most systemically-induced genes formed a subset of the local response genes. We then downloaded gene expression data from online databases and used hierarchical clustering to explore relationships among gene expression patterns in A. thaliana damaged by different attackers. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that plant response patterns are strongly coupled to damage patterns of attackers. PMID:23231622

  17. The invasive Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae): Understanding its pest status and management globally

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liriomyza huidobrensis is native to South America but has expanded its range and invaded many regions of the world, primarily on flowers and to a lesser extent on horticultural product shipments. As a result of initial invasion into an area, damage caused was usually significant but not necessarily...

  18. Cold hardiness and supercooling capacity in the pea leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Kang, Le

    2002-01-01

    Pupal SCP (supercooling point) of Liriomyza huidobrensis showed no variation with age, with an average of -20.9 degree C. Low temperature survival of different ages of pupae showed no correlation with their SCP. Nonlinear regression analysis found that the response of L. huidobrensis pupae to exposure time under different low temperature regimes above -5 degree C was best fitted by a logistic equation. Both low temperature and exposure time had significant effects on pupal mortality. Temperatures above 5 degree C do not prevent pupae from emergence. L. huidobrensis was shown to be a freeze susceptible, and at the same time, a chill tolerant insect. It can tolerate subzero temperatures by supercooling. Compared with L. sativae, another dominant leafminer in China, L. huidobrensis is more cold tolerant. Our results explain differences between the species in geographic distribution and phenology.

  19. DNA barcoding of the vegetable leafminer Liriomyza sativae Blanchard (Diptera: Agromyzidae) in Bangladesh

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA barcoding revealed the presence of the polyphagous leafminer pest Liriomyza sativae Blanchard in Bangladesh. DNA barcode sequences for mitochondrial COI were generated for Agromyzidae larvae, pupae and adults collected from field populations across Bangladesh. BLAST sequence similarity searches ...

  20. Toxicity of chemicals commonly used in Indonesian vegetable crops to Liriomyza huidobrensis populations and the Indonesian parasitoids Hemiptarsenus varicornis, Opius sp., and Gronotoma micromorpha, as well as the Australian parasitoids Hemiptarsenus varicornis and Diglyphus isaea.

    PubMed

    Prijono, Djoko; Robinson, Michelle; Rauf, Aunu; Bjorksten, Tracey; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2004-08-01

    Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) and Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) are important pests of vegetable crops in Indonesia and are likely to spread to neighboring countries. Three pesticides (dimehypo, abamectin, and cyromazine) are currently used to control these pests, but there is little information on their effectiveness against field populations and on their impact on parasitoids controlling Liriomyza species. The toxicity of these chemicals to L. huidobrensis and three common parasitoids (Hemiptarsenus varicornis Gerault, Opius sp., and Gronotoma micromorpha Perkins) was therefore evaluated in Indonesia with mortality laboratory assays. All three chemicals were effective against larvae of three populations of L. huidobrensis with different histories of chemical exposure. Dimehypo caused mortality in adult Opius sp., G. micromorpha, and H. varicornis, whereas abamectin was toxic only at concentrations substantially higher than the field rate. Cyromazine did not influence survival of the parasitoids. A commonly used fungicide, mancozeb, had no impact on parasitoid mortality. Trials were repeated with a strain of H. varicornis from Australia and a different parasitoid (Diglyphus isaea) recently found in Australia. Neither parasitoid was influenced by mancozeb or cyromazine. Abamectin applied at field rates caused some mortality among the adults of both species, but was less toxic than chlorpyrifos. Abamectin produced lower LC50s against Australian H. varicornis than against Indonesian H. varicornis. These results suggest that cyromazine can be incorporated into Liriomyza control programs in Indonesia that conserve parasitoids, whereas dimehypo and abamectin need to be used cautiously. Local Australian parasitoids should help control L. huidobrensis as long as only cyromazine and nontoxic fungicides are applied.

  1. Effects of foliar surfactants on host plant selection behavior of Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    McKee, Fraser R; Levac, Joshua; Hallett, Rebecca H

    2009-10-01

    The pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae), is a highly polyphagous insect pest of global distribution. L. huidobrensis feeds and lays its eggs on leaf tissue and reduces crop marketability because of stippling and mining damage. In field insecticide trials, it was observed that stippling was reduced on plants treated with surfactant alone. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of surfactants on host selection behaviors of female L. huidobrensis and to assess the phytotoxicity of two common surfactants to test plants. The application of the surfactant Sylgard 309 to celery (Apium graveolens) caused a significant reduction in stippling rates. The application of Agral 90 to cucumber leaves (Cucumis sativus) resulted in changes to the amount of effort invested by females in specific host plant selection behaviors, as well as causing a significant reduction in the amount of stippling damage. The recommended dose of Sylgard 309 does not induce phytotoxicity on celery over a range of age classes nor does Agral 90 cause a phytotoxic effect in 35-d-old cucumber. Thus, reductions in observed stippling and changes to host selection behaviors were caused by an antixenotic effect of the surfactant on L. huidobrensis rather than a toxic effect of the surfactant on the plant. The presence of surfactant on an otherwise acceptable host plant seems to have masked host plant cues and prevented host plant recognition. Results indicate that surfactants may be used to reduce leafminer damage to vegetable crops, potentially reducing the use of insecticides.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Liriomyza huidobrensis and comparison with L. trifolii and L. sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuaiyu; Lei, Zhongren; Wen, Jinzeng; Wang, Haihong; Li, Xue; Dong, Baoxin; Ren, Baozhen

    2014-04-01

    Liriomyza huidobrensis, L. trifolii and L. sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are serious horticultural pests. The three species are very similar and difficult to discriminate from each other. In this study, we report the mitochondrial genome of L. huidobrensis and compare with L. trifolii and L. sativae. The mitochondrial genome of L. huidobrensis is 16,239 bp long, and it contains 37 genes and one A + T-rich region as do the sequenced liriomyza species. The sequence and structure of H51-H100 region in srRNA is significantly different from that of L. trifolii and L. sativae. The greatest sequence differences among the three leafminers are located in the region including ND2, ND3, ND6, ATP6, ATP8, CYTb and A+T region, which can be considered as candidate regions for molecular identification or SNP markers.

  3. Impact of mild temperature hardening on thermotolerance, fecundity, and Hsp gene expression in Liriomyza huidobrensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Hua; Chen, Bing; Kang, Le

    2007-12-01

    The pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis, is one of the most important economic insect pests around the world. Its population fluctuates greatly with seasonal change in China, and temperature was thought to be one of the important reasons. In attempt to further explore the impact of disadvantageous temperature on L. huidobrensis, 1-day-old adults were shocked at various temperatures (10, 25, 32, and 35 degrees C, respectively) for 4h, and the effects on thermotolerance, feeding, and fecundity were studied. Meanwhile the expression of five heat shock genes (hsp90, 70, 60, 40, and 20) was examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Our results showed that both 32 and 35 degrees C hardenings remarkably increased adult heat resistance, whereas cold tolerance was not improved accordingly. No cross resistance in response to cold and heat stresses was observed. Both adult feeding and fecundity were dramatically reduced, but no effect was observed on egg hatching, larval survival, pupal eclosion, or sex ratio. The results indicate that the deleterious effect on fecundity is the result of direct cessation of oviposition during the period of stress. Simultaneously, the mRNA levels of hsp70 and hsp20 significantly increased upon thermal hardening. Taken together, our results suggest that mild heat hardening improves thermotolerance of L. huidobrensis at the cost of impairment on fecundity, and the induced expression of hsp70 and hsp20 may play an important role in balancing the functional tradeoff.

  4. Species Composition, Distribution, and Seasonal Abundance of Liriomyza Leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) Under Different Vegetable Production Systems and Agroecological Zones in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Foba, C N; Salifu, D; Lagat, Z O; Gitonga, L M; Akutse, K S; Fiaboe, K K M

    2015-04-01

    A longitudinal study to identify the species of Liriomyza leafminer, their distribution, relative abundance, and seasonal variation, including their host range, was conducted in vegetable fields at three altitudes in Kenya from November 2011 to November 2012. Three main species were identified: Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), Liriomyza sativae Blanchard, and Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), of which L. huidobrensis was the most abundant across all altitudes irrespective of the cropping season and accounting for over 90% of the total Liriomyza specimens collected. Liriomyza species were collected from all infested incubated leaves of 20 crops surveyed belonging to seven families: Fabaceae, Solanaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Malvaceae, Brassicaceae, Amaranthaceae, and Amaryllidaceae. However, more than 87.5% of the Liriomyza species were obtained from only four of these crops: Pisum sativum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., Solanum lycopersicum L., and Solanum tuberosum, thereby demonstrating that Fabaceae and Solonaceae crops are the most important hosts with regard to Liriomyza species richness and relative abundance. L. huidobrensis had the widest host range (20 crops), followed by L. sativae (18 crops) and L. trifolii (12 crops). Although L. trifolii has been considered the dominant Liriomyza leafminer in Kenya, this study suggests that this may not be the case anymore, as L. huidobrensis dominates at all altitudes.

  5. [Effect of temperature and relative-humidity on the development of Liriomyza sativae Blanchard (Diptera: Agromyzidae) in Vigna unguiculata].

    PubMed

    Lima, Tiago C Costa; Geremias, Leandro D; Parra, José R P

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to study the influence of temperature and relative-humidity (RH) on the development of Liriomyza sativae Blanchard during the egg-adult period, in cowpea, to provide essential information for future biological control projects against the pest. An inverse relation was observed between temperature increase in the range from 15 degrees Celsius to 32 degrees Celsius and development duration. Larval survival was not affected in the temperature range studied, while a high mortality of pupae was observed at 32 degrees Celsius (59.9%). RH did not affect the development time of the immature stages, although it influenced their survival. The lower developmental temperature threshold obtained for the egg-adult period was low (7.3 degrees Celsius) when compared with other species of Liriomyza, and was rather low for the larval stage (3.4 degrees Celsius). Based on the thermal requirements for L. sativae, it was possible to estimate the occurrence of 24.5 annual generations at a melon producing region in state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. For laboratory rearing aimed at biological control pest programs, the best rearing conditions are 30 degrees Celsius and 50% RH for the larval stage and 90% RH for the pupal stage.

  6. Selection for chlorpyrifos resistance in Liriomyza sativae Blanchard: Cross-resistance patterns, stability and biochemical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Askari-Saryazdi, Ghasem; Hejazi, Mir Jalil; Ferguson, J Scott; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-10-01

    The vegetable leafminer (VLM), Liriomyza sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae) is a serious pest of vegetable crops and ornamentals worldwide. In cropping systems with inappropriate management strategies, development of resistance to insecticides in leafminers is probable. Chlorpyrifos is a commonly used pesticide for controlling leafminers in Iran, but resistance to this insecticide in leafminers has not been characterized. In order to develop strategies to minimize resistance in the field and greenhouse, a laboratory selected chlorpyrifos resistant strain of L. sativae was used to characterize resistance and determine the rate of development and stability of resistance. Selecting for resistance in the laboratory after 23 generations yielded a chlorpyrifos resistant selected strain (CRSS) with a resistance ratio of 40.34, determined on the larval stage. CRSS exhibited no cross-resistance to other tested insecticides except for diazinon. Synergism and biochemical assays indicated that esterases (EST) had a key role in metabolic resistance to chlorpyrifos, but glutathione S-transferase (GST) and mixed function oxidase (MFO) were not mediators in this resistance. In CRSS acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was more active than the susceptible strain, Sharif (SH). AChE in CRSS was also less sensitive to inhibition by propoxur. The kinetics parameters (Km and Vmax) of AChE indicated that affinities and hydrolyzing efficiencies of this enzyme in CRSS were higher than SH. Susceptibility to chlorpyrifos in L. sativae was re-gained in the absence of insecticide pressure. Synergism, biochemical and cross-resistance assays revealed that overactivity of metabolic enzymes and reduction in target site sensitivity are probably joint factors in chlorpyrifos resistance. An effective insecticide resistance management program is necessary to prevent fast resistance development in crop systems.

  7. Primer design for identifying economically important Liriomyza species (Diptera: Agromyzidae) by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Masuda, Toshio; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Konishi, Kazuhiko; Tokumaru, Susumu; Ueno, Keiichiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Leafminer flies, especially, Liriomyza huidobrensis, Liriomyza sativae and Liriomyza trifolii, are quarantine species in many countries. Their morphological similarity makes identification difficult. To develop a rapid, reliable, sensitive and simple molecular identification method using multiplex PCR, we newly sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes of Liriomyza bryoniae, Liriomyza chinensis, L. huidobrensis, L. sativae, L. trifolii, Chromatomyia horticola and four parasitoid species. We aligned them with all the COI sequences of the leafminer flies found in the international DNA nucleotide sequence databases (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank). We then designed species-specific primers to allow us to differentiate between L. bryoniae, L. chinensis, L. huidobrensis, L. sativae, and L. trifolii.

  8. Repellent response of female agromyzid flies to leafminer-infested bean plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liriomyza sativae Blanchard, L. trifolii (Burgess) and L. huidobrensis (Blanchard) are three invasive leafminer species (Diptera: Agromyzidae) in China that have caused significant economic damage on vegetables and ornamental plants. In the current study, the repellent responses of female adults to ...

  9. Roles of thermal adaptation and chemical ecology in Liriomyza distribution and control.

    PubMed

    Kang, Le; Chen, Bing; Wei, Jia-Ning; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2009-01-01

    Many Liriomyza species are pests of agricultural and ornamental plants. In the past two decades, the occurrence and distribution of certain Liriomyza species have changed dramatically, leading to an extensive body of research papers. First, we review the association of thermal tolerance with population dynamics, geographic distribution, and species displacement. Differences in thermal tolerances between species result in their differential geographic locations and overwintering ranges. Displacements among Liriomyza species are associated with their temperature adaptation. We examine the chemical linkage of plants, Liriomyza, and their parasitoids. Chemical compounds from host and nonhost plants mediate the behavior of Liriomyza and their parasitoids. Liriomyza and their parasitoids use chemical cues to locate their hosts. Induced compounds can be used as attractants of parasitoids or repellents of Liriomyza. Thus, understanding the thermal tolerances and chemical ecology of Liriomyza may enable researchers to predict geographic distribution and to develop novel control strategies.

  10. Description of a nomen nudum species of Liriomyza Mik and the first record of Liriomyza blechi Spencer from Brazil (Insecta: Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Filho, Fernando Da Silva; Almeida, Flávio Roberto De Albuquerque; Esposito, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-09

    The nomen nudum Liriomyza flagellae is formerly described in this paper as Liriomyza valladaresae sp. nov., based on male and female specimens collected in the Brazilian Amazon and reared from leaves of Alternanthera tenella and Amaranthus viridis (Amaranthaceae). Information on the puparium and the biology of this new species are provided. The species Liriomyza blechi, previously recorded from the U.S.A., Guadeloupe and Dominican Republic, is newly recorded from Brazil, reared from leaves of Blechum pyramidatum (Acanthaceae) and Spigelia anthelmia (Loganiaceae).

  11. Phytosanitary irradiation of Liriomyza trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Hallman, Guy J; Guo, Kun; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2011-12-01

    Agromyzid leafminers are economic and quarantine pests of a variety of vegetables, flowers, and ornamental foliage. Methyl bromide fumigation is often used as a phytosanitary treatment when quarantined agromyzids are found in shipped commodities; alternative treatments are sought. Ionizing radiation is a viable alternative that is increasing in use worldwide. A dose of 400 Gy is accepted by USDA-APHIS for all insects (except Lepidoptera pupae and adults) on all commodities. Efforts to lower this dose and make it acceptable to other countries involve determining radiotolerance of families of major quarantine pests. Agromyzidae is one such family for which no useful information on radiotolerance exists. This research sought to determine the dose required to control a major agromyzid pest, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) and was performed on L. trifolii collected in Weslaco, TX, reared on Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Capsicum annuum L. and irradiated in the late puparial stage. The measure of efficacy was prevention of F1 mine formation. Puparia collected from Gossypium hirsutum L. and reared on P. vulgaris were more radiotolerant than those collected and reared on C. annuum. A dose of 214 Gy may prevent F1 mine formation of L. trifolii. This research used a variation of probit analysis where the direct response of the treated individual is not measured, but the response of the F1 generation is. This type of analysis is useful in phytosanitary irradiation research where the measure of efficacy often involves a response of the F1 generation.

  12. Genetic diversity and association analysis of leafminer (Liriomyza langei) resistance in spinach (Spinacia oleracea)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leafminer (Liriomyza spp.) is a major insect pest of many important agricultural crops, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Use of genetic resistance is an efficient, economic and environment-friendly method to control this pest. The objective of this research was to conduct association analysis ...

  13. Lost and found: the Plecoptera types of Blanchard and Mabille, with further contributions to the stoneflies of Chile.

    PubMed

    Murányi, Dávid; Gamboa, Maribet; Vera, Alejandro

    2016-12-01

    Types of five of the six Plecoptera species described by Émile Blanchard and the holotype of the single stonefly described by Jules François Mabille were discovered in the National Museum Prague, Czech Republic. The identity of P. myrmidon Mabille, 1891 and P. pictetii Blanchard, 1854 are confirmed as Potamoperla myrmidon and Pictetoperla gayi (Pictet, 1841), respectively. Perla virescentipennis Blanchard, 1851 is considered as Diamphipnopsis virescentipennis comb. n., with Diamphipnosis samali Illies, 1960 syn. n. as a junior subjective synonym, and Diamphipnoa chillanae nom. n. is proposed for D. virescentipennis sensu Illies 1960. Lectotypes are designated for three species: Nemoura rufescens Blanchard, 1851 is redescribed as Austronemoura rufescens (Blanchard, 1851) comb. n., with Perla infuscata Blanchard, 1851 syn. n. and Perla blanchardi Jakobson & Bianchi, 1905 syn. n. designated as junior subjective synonyms, whereas Perla stictica Blanchard, 1851 is treated as Neonemura stictica (Blanchard, 1851) comb. n., nomen dubium. Paralectotypes of these three species belong to further four taxa. Due to the missing syntypes, Perla lineatocollis Blanchard, 1851 is treated as a nomen dubium of uncertain suborder assignment. Specimens of the Blanchard collections that cannot regarded as types are enumerated belonging to six species. Recent collections of 15 species from Chile are also reported.

  14. Volatiles released from bean plants in response to agromyzid flies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia-Ning; Zhu, Junwei; Kang, Le

    2006-07-01

    Liriomyza sativae Blanchard and Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are two invasive flies in China that have caused economical damage on vegetables and ornamental plants. In this article, we report the profiles of emitted volatiles from healthy, mechanically damaged, and leafminer-damaged bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., plants. Among 25 emitted volatiles identified, (E)-2-hexen-1-al, (3E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, (syn)- and (anti)-2-methylpropanal oxime, (syn)-2-methylbutanal oxime, linalool, and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene were consistently released from damaged bean plants. Combined amounts of these nine compounds made up more than 70% of the total volatiles emitted from each treatment. No qualitative differences in volatile emission were found between bean plants damaged by the two fly species; however, amounts of several major compounds induced by L. huidobrensis damage were significantly higher than those from plants damaged by L. sativae. The mechanically damaged plants released a higher proportion of green leaf volatiles than plants in the other treatments, whereas leafminer-damaged plants produced more terpenoids and oximes. Furthermore, the volatile profiles emitted from plants, damaged by adult leafminers, by second instar larvae, and even the plants with empty mines left by leafminer larvae (the pupal stage) were significantly different. The identification of volatile oximes released from damaged plants was confirmed and is discussed in a behavioral and biological control context.

  15. Analysis of three leafminers' complete mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Du, Yuzhou; Cao, Jingman; Huang, Fangneng

    2013-10-15

    Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), and Liriomyza bryoniae (Kaltenbach), are three closely related and economically important leafminer pests in the world. This study examined the complete mitochondrial genomes of L. trifolii, L. huidobrensis and L. bryoniae, which were 16,141 bp, 16,236 bp and 16,183 bp in length, respectively. All of them displayed 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and an A+T-rich region. The genomes were highly compact with only 60-68 bp of non-coding intergenic spacer. However, considerable differences in the A+T-rich region were detected among the three species. Results of this study also showed the two ribosomal RNA genes of the three species had very limited variable sites and thus should not provide much information in the study of population genetics of these species. Data generated from three leafminers' complete mitochondrial genomes should provide valuable information in studying phylogeny of Diptera, and developing genetic markers for species identification in leafminers.

  16. Impact of insecticides on parasitoids of the leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii, in pepper in south Texas.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ricardo; Harris, Marvin; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2011-01-01

    Liriomyza leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are cosmopolitan, polyphagous pests of horticultural plants and many are resistant to insecticides. Producers in South Texas rely on insecticides as the primary management tool for leafminers, and several compounds are available. The objective of this study is to address the efficacy of these compounds for controlling Liriomyza while minimizing their effects against natural enemies. Research plots were established at Texas AgriLife research center at Weslaco, Texas in fall 2007 and spring 2008 seasons, and peppers were used as a model crop. Plots were sprayed with novaluron, abamectin, spinetoram, lambda-cyhalothrin and water as treatments according to leafminer infestation; insecticide efficacy was monitored by collecting leaves and infested foliage. Plant phenology was also monitored. Novaluron was the most effective insecticide and lambda-cyhalothrin showed resurgence in leafminer density in fall 2007 and no reduction in spring 2008. Other compounds varied in efficacy. Novaluron showed the least number of parasitoids per leafminer larva and the lowest parasitoid diversity index among treatments followed by spinetoram. Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) was the sole leafminer species on peppers, and 19 parasitoid species were found associated with this leafminer. Application of these insecticides for management of leafminers with conservation of natural enemies is discussed.

  17. Impact of Insecticides on Parasitoids of the Leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii, in Pepper in South Texas

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Ricardo; Harris, Marvin; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2011-01-01

    Liriomyza leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are cosmopolitan, polyphagous pests of horticultural plants and many are resistant to insecticides. Producers in South Texas rely on insecticides as the primary management tool for leafminers, and several compounds are available. The objective of this study is to address the efficacy of these compounds for controlling Liriomyza while minimizing their effects against natural enemies. Research plots were established at Texas AgriLife research center at Weslaco, Texas in fall 2007 and spring 2008 seasons, and peppers were used as a model crop. Plots were sprayed with novaluron, abamectin, spinetoram, lambda-cyhalothrin and water as treatments according to leafminer infestation; insecticide efficacy was monitored by collecting leaves and infested foliage. Plant phenology was also monitored. Novaluron was the most effective insecticide and lambda-cyhalothrin showed resurgence in leafminer density in fall 2007 and no reduction in spring 2008. Other compounds varied in efficacy. Novaluron showed the least number of parasitoids per leafminer larva and the lowest parasitoid diversity index among treatments followed by spinetoram. Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) was the sole leafminer species on peppers, and 19 parasitoid species were found associated with this leafminer. Application of these insecticides for management of leafminers with conservation of natural enemies is discussed. PMID:21864155

  18. Flood of June 13-15, 1981, in the Blanchard River basin, northwestern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webber, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    The flood of June 13-15, 1981, in the Blanchard River basin in northwestern Ohio caused major damage in Findlay, Ottawa, and adjacent rural areas. Approximately 25 percent of Findlay and 55 percent of Ottawa were flooded. Estimated crop damage was $12 million in Hancock Country, $7 million in Wyandot Country, and $3 million in Putnam Country. During the flood, the maximum gage height of the Blanchard River at the U.S. Geological Survey gaging station near Findlay was 17.43 feet, gage datum. This was 0.67 foot higher than the previous peak of 16.76 feet, February 11, 1959. The corresponding peak discharge, 13,000 cubic feet per second, was estimated to have a recurrence interval of 50 years. Recurrence intervals of peak flows at other locations on the Blanchard River and on tributary streams were estimated to range from 25 to more than 100 years.

  19. Raphaël Blanchard, parasitology, and the positioning of medical entomology in Paris.

    PubMed

    Osborne, M A

    2008-12-01

    The histories of medical entomology and parasitology are entwined. Raphaël Blanchard (1857-1919), Chair of Medical Natural History and Parasitology at the Faculty of Medicine in Paris, organized the teaching of medical entomology and civilian colonial medicine. He also founded and edited the journal Archives de Parasitologie and started the Institute de Médecine Coloniale where he mentored many foreign students and researchers. Additionally, Blanchard is important for his scientific internationalism and medical historical work on the cultural location of parasitology and for training the future professors of parasitology Jules Guiart, Emile Brumpt, and Charles Joyeux.

  20. Juvenile and sublethal effects of selected pesticides on the leafminer parasitoids Hemiptarsenus varicornis and Diglyphus isaea (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) from Australia.

    PubMed

    Bjorksten, Tracey A; Robinson, Michelle

    2005-12-01

    The pest leafminers Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard), and Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) have spread into South East Asia and Oceania, and they are likely to reach Australia in the near future. Two translaminar pesticides, cyromazine and abamectin, currently provide effective chemical control of these pests, but because parasitoids can play an important role in controlling and preventing leafminer outbreaks, understanding the impact of pesticides on leafminer parasitoids is vital. Here, we tested larval and pupal mortality and sublethal effects of abamectin, cyromazine, and the widely used fungicide mancozeb on two common Australian leafminer parasitoids, Hemiptarsenus varicornis (Girault) and Diglyphus isaea (Walker). Abamectin caused significant mortality to larvae and pupae of both parasitoid species but cyromazine and mancozeb did not. Progeny production and longevity of H. varicornis were not affected by adult exposure to cyromazine and mancozeb, nor did direct pupal exposure decrease number of progeny produced by either parasitoid. Mortality of H. varicornis females emerging from leaves treated with abamectin was high for up to 72 h after eclosion but those surviving beyond 72 h did not differ from control females in the number of progeny produced. Mancozeb did not influence leaf residence time or parasitism by H. varicornis females. Cyromazine and the fungicide mancozeb were concluded to be compatible with the parasitoids tested and suitable for integrated pest management of leafminers should outbreaks of pest species occur in Australia. Abamectin should be used with caution because it caused significant mortality in both parasitoids tested here.

  1. Description and biology of two new species of Neotropical Liriomyza Mik (Diptera, Agromyzidae), mining leaves of Bocconia (Papaveraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Stéphanie; Nishida, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Liriomyza mystica Boucher & Nishida, sp. n., and Liriomyza prompta Boucher & Nishida, sp. n. are described from Costa Rica. Both species were reared from leaves of Bocconia frutescens L. (Papaveraceae). The latter species was also reared from B. arborea S. Watson. Larvae of L. mystica mine primary veins of large, relatively old, mature leaves, and L. prompta mine blades of small to large, mature leaves. These represent the first record of agromyzids feeding on Bocconia. Biological information is also given and illustrated. PMID:24478590

  2. Forrester Blanchard Washington and His Advocacy for African Americans in the New Deal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Frederica H.

    2007-01-01

    Forrester Blanchard Washington (1887-1963) was an African American social work pioneer recruited to the first New Deal administration of Franklin Delano Roosevelt as director of Negro Work in the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. This role gave Washington a platform from which to object strenuously to the development of social policies that…

  3. Manifest Destiny's Child: Mary Hazelton Blanchard Wade and the Literature of American Empire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunc, Tanfer Emin

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses how, following in the footsteps of United States imperial children's writers Jacob Abbott and Edward Stratemeyer, Mary Hazelton Blanchard Wade (1860-1936), the original author of the "Our Little Cousins" series (1901-1905), contributed to the American culture of empire. Wade was one of the most prolific and popular…

  4. The Liriomyza (Diptera: Schizophora: Agromyzidae) of Canada & Alaska.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Owen

    2017-02-20

    The Liriomyza (Diptera: Agromyzidae) of Canada and Alaska is revised, with species keyed and illustrated, and new host and geographic records provided. Eighty one species are recognized, including 24 new to science: L. agrios, L. albispina, L. anatolis, L. aphila, L. apilaca, L. aquapolis, L. arenarium, L. atrassimilis, L. bicolumbis, L. charada, L. cracentis, L. elevaster, L. emaciata, L. fumeola, L. gibsoni, L. griffithsi, L. hilairensis, L. limopsis, L. mesocanadensis, L. pilicornis, L. pistilla, L. rigaudensis, L. taraxanox, L. taraxanuda, L. tryssos. Ten species known from the United States are recorded as new to Canada: L. artemisiae Spencer, L. assimilis (Malloch), L. baccharidis Spencer, L. helianthi Spencer, L. merga Lonsdale, L. minor Spencer, L. sabaziae Spencer, L. temperata Spencer, L. violivora (Spencer) and L. virgo (Zetterstedt). Palaearctic species new to North America include L. wachtli Hendel and L. flaveola (Fallén); while the latter species has been recorded in North America before, all previous records represent misidentifications. Hosts are recorded for the first time for L. balcanicoides Sehgal, L. minor Spencer, L. orilliensis Spencer and L. socialis Spencer. Galiomyza Spencer syn. nov. is included as a junior synonym of Liriomyza Mik, resulting in six new combinations.

  5. Liriomyza Leafminer (Diptera: Agromyzidae) Parasitoid Complex in Different Agroecological Zones, Seasons, and Host Plants in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Foba, C N; Salifu, D; Lagat, Z O; Gitonga, L M; Akutse, K S; Fiaboe, K K M

    2016-04-01

    Liriomyza leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are severe pests of vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Previous studies revealed low leafminer parasitism across different agroecological zones in Kenya. The present paper reports on the composition of leafminer parasitoids at different elevations, in different seasons, and on different host crops. Surveys were conducted monthly from January to November 2012, and nine parasitoid species were recovered. Total mean parasitism in the study sites was 31.23 ± 1.03% from a total of 20 different vegetable Liriomyza-infested crops belonging to seven families. Diglyphus isaea (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), Phaedrotoma scabriventris, a newly released parasitoid, and Opius dissitus Muesebeck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were the most abundant at all elevations, accounting for 67.3, 18.6, and 9.2% of total parasitoids, respectively. Elevation, season, and host crop significantly affected the parasitoid species present and their abundance. Diglyphus isaea was more abundant at the high- and mid-elevations at all seasons compared with the low-elevation, whereas the lower-elevation favored higher abundance of P. scabriventris and O. dissitus during the long rainy season compared with the high- and mid-elevations at all seasons. Of all the host crops surveyed, parasitoids were more abundant on tomato, local kidney bean, snow pea and French bean than other crops. The total parasitism rate observed in this study suggests a considerable improvement in leafminer parasitism compared with previous surveys in Kenya. The implications of these findings for leafminer management in vegetable and ornamental production in Kenya are discussed.

  6. New sources of resistance to leafminers (Liriomyza sativae) in melon (Cucumis melo L.) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Celin, E F; Oliveira, F I C; Dias-Pini, N S; Nunes, G H S; Aragão, F A S

    2017-04-05

    Leafminers (Liriomyza sativae) are the main melon (Cucumis melo L.) pests in Northeast Brazil, which is the main region for the production and export of the fruit in Brazil. Of the integrated management strategies available, genetic resistance is the best method of preventing damage by these insects. The aim of this study was to select sources of resistance to leafminers in melon germplasm. Seven experiments were conducted in the laboratory, field, and greenhouse, with and without choice, using 52 melon accessions and 4 commercial hybrids as controls. Genetic variability among the accessions made it possible to select four new sources of resistance: 'CNPH 11-1072' and 'CNPH 11-1077', because they exhibited lower levels of infestation by the insect (antixenosis); and 'CNPH 00-915(R)' and 'BAGMEL 56(R)', because the pest larvae died soon after beginning to feed on the leaf mesophyll (antibiosis).

  7. The leafminer Liriomyza trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae) encapsulates its koinobiont parasitoid Halticoptera circulus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae): implications for biological control.

    PubMed

    Kemmochi, T; Fujimori, S; Saito, T

    2016-06-01

    The koinobiont parasitoid Halticoptera circulus (Walker) is a potential biological control agent of leafminers, but it has only rarely been collected from the invasive leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), in Japan. To understand why this is the case, parasitism and development of H. circulus in L. trifolii was compared with parasitism and development in two indigenous leafminer species, Liriomyza chinensis Kato and Chromatomyia horticola (Goureau). There was no significant difference in parasitism rates by H. circulus in the three leafminer species and the eggs and larvae successfully developed in L. chinensis and C. horticola. However, H. circulus failed to develop in L. trifolii, where developmental stages were encapsulated by host haemocytes. This parasitoid may be a good agent to control indigenous leafminers such as L. chinensis and C. horticola but is unlikely to be useful for the biological control of the invasive L. trifolii in Japan.

  8. Abamectin, pymetrozine and azadirachtin sequence as a unique solution to control the leafminer Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) infesting garden beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Saad, A S A; Massoud, M A; Abdel-Megeed, A A M; Hamid, N A; Mourad, A K K; Barakat, A S T

    2007-01-01

    Field trails were conducted to determine the performance of three different sequences as a unique solution for the control of the leaf miner Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) infesting garden beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) during the two successive seasons of 2004 and 2005. Furthermore, during the evaluation period, the side effect against the ectoparasite Diglyphus isaea (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) was put into consideration. Meanwhile, the comparative evaluation of the pesticides alone showed that abamectin and azadirachtin were highly effective against Liriomyza trifolii, while carbosulfan, pymetrozine and thiamethoxam provided to be of a moderate effect. Moreover, carbosulfan showed harmful effect to the larvae of the ectoparasite Diglyphus isaea (Walker), while abamectin and azadirachtin gave a moderate effect. Thiamethoxam and the the detergent (Masrol 410) had slight effect in this respect. The highly effective sequence among the sequences was abamectin, pymetrozine and azadirachtin, against Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), with slight harmful effect on Diglyphus isaea (Walker). However the sequence of azadirachtin, pymetrozine and abamectin had a moderate effect on Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) and exhibited a slight toxic effect on Diglyphus isaea (Walker). In contrast, the sequence of carbosulfan, thiamethoxam and pymetrozine was the least effective and represented a slight effect on Diglyphus isaea (Walker). From this study, it was concluded that abamectin, pymetrozine and azadirachtin sequence has proved to be a unique solution for the control of the leaf miner Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) infesting garden beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Egypt.

  9. Ground water in the Blanchard area, McClain County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Leon Virgil; Schoff, Stuart L.

    1948-01-01

    A letter from Lloyd L. Bowser, City Clerk, dated January 8, 1948, in behalf of the town council and Mayor Walter Casey, indicates that a serious shortage of water is faced by the town of Blanchard, McClain County, Oklahoma. The town is near the eastern boundary of Grady County, where an investigation of the ground-water resources is being made by the Oklahoma Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a State-wide investigation. Information obtained thus far may aid the town by showing where additional ground water for municipal supply may be sought.

  10. Towards environmentally and human friendly insect pest control technologies: photosensitization of leafminer flies Liriomyza bryoniae.

    PubMed

    Luksiene, Zivile; Kurilcik, Natalija; Jursenas, Saulius; Radziute, Sandra; Būda, Vincas

    2007-11-12

    Development of new, ecologically safe technologies to control insect pest populations is of great importance. Photoactive compounds usually used for photosensitization might be effective as pesticide agents, with low impact on the environment, being non-toxic and not mutagenic. Phosensitizer accumulates within the insect body and, following exposure to visible light, induces lethal photochemical reactions and death. The aim of this study is to evaluate the possible usage of several photosensitizers (acridine orange, aminolevulinic acid, hematoporphyrin dimethyl ether, methylene blue) as photopesticides to control population of polyphagous plant pest Liriomyza bryoniae (Kaltenbach, 1858) (Diptera, Agromyzidae). Fluorescence measurements of intact cooled insects indicate that insect feeding with bait containing HPde and sugar induces remarkable accumulation of this compound in the body of insect. This accumulation is strongly dependent on sex and feeding duration. The highest HPde amount in the body of insect was detected 16 h after feeding, whereas no significant photosensitizer amount was detected in the same insect following 48 h. Following irradiation with visible light results in fast death of L. bryoniae. Of importance to note that survival of insects after feeding and irradiation depends on sex: female insect died much faster than males.

  11. Genetic diversity and association analysis of leafminer (Liriomyza langei) resistance in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ainong; Mou, Beiquan

    2016-08-01

    Leafminer (Liriomyza langei) is a major insect pest of many important agricultural crops, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Use of genetic resistance is an efficient, economic, and environment-friendly method to control this pest. The objective of this research was to conduct association analysis and identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with leafminer resistance in spinach germplasm. A total of 300 USDA spinach germplasm accessions were used for the association analysis of leafminer resistance. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) was used for genotyping and 783 SNPs from GBS were used for association analysis. The leafminer resistance showed a near normal distribution with a wide range from 1.1 to 11.7 stings per square centimeter leaf area, suggesting that the leafminer resistance in spinach is a complex trait controlled by multiple genes with minor effect in this spinach panel. Association analysis indicated that five SNP markers, AYZV02040968_7171, AYZV02076752_412, AYZV02098618_4615, AYZV02147304_383, and AYZV02271373_398, were associated with the leafminer resistance with LOD 2.5 or higher. The SNP markers may be useful for breeders to select plants and lines for leafminer resistance in spinach breeding programs through marker-assisted selection.

  12. Sexual dimorphism in antennal receptors of Phyllophaga ravida Blanchard (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Melolonthidae).

    PubMed

    Romero-López, Angel; Morón, Miguel; Valdez, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The external morphology of sensilla on the antennae of males and females of Phyllophaga ravida Blanchard is described using scanning electron microscopy. Sexual dimorphism in body and antennal dimensions and in antennal receptor types was found. The female's body is slightly larger than the male's, although male antennal lamellae are longer than in females. Sixteen types of sensilla were identified on the proximal and distal surfaces of lamellae from both sexes, most of them in males: three types of placodea sensilla, four types of auricilica sensilla, five types of basiconica sensilla, and four types of coeloconica sensilla. Also, two types of mechanoreceptor sensilla were present on the lamellae periphery. Furthermore, males had larger placodea, auricilica and some types of basiconica sensilla.

  13. Water quality study of the Riley Creek (Blanchard River, Ottawa, Ohio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiese, C. E.; Berry, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Riley Creek in northwest central Ohio is one of the most heavily impacted tributaries in the Blanchard River watershed. Anthropogenic inputs of phosphorus and nitrogen from agriculture have led to heavy eutrophication over the past decades. Because the Blanchard River is part of the Lake Erie basin, controls on phosphorus and nitrogen, among other inputs, are critical for restoration of ecosystem health in Lake Erie. A previous study in the Riley Creek watershed has shown high historical loadings of both nitrogen and phosphorus. Additionally, bacterial impairment has been noted in the watershed, from both municipal sources and failing septic tanks. This study is the most recent data detailing water quality parameters both chemical and microbiological in Riley Creek. This is also the first data set in Riley Creek examining the spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM). From May to August, 2012, dissolved oxygen concentrations at six sites in the watershed declined from a maximum of 13.2 mg/L (154% O2 saturation) to 1.1 mg/L (12.9%). Median dissolved oxygen during the same period was 5.96 mg/L. Water pH was relatively steady, ranging from 8.6 to 7.9, with values generally declining with time. All six sites were found to have nitrate concentrations above the enforcement target (1 mg/L NO3--N) at various times, with four out of 73 samples falling below this value. Dissolved reactive phosphorus was generally low, with concentrations ranging from 0.074 mg P/L to below detection limits (<0.005 mg P/L). Dissolved organic matter concentrations (measured as mg C/L, potassium hydrogen phthalate equivalent) ranged from 24.1 to 3.5 mg C/L (mean = 9.8 ± 3.8 mg C/L), with no apparent temporal trends. Spectral slope ratios, a proxy for molecular mass, were relatively constant at 0.9 ± 0.2, with only intermittent excursions. No correlation to either flow or time was observed. Tests for fecal coliform bacteria were almost universally positive at all sites, with 10

  14. Development of a Flood-Warning System and Flood-Inundation Mapping for the Blanchard River in Findlay, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2009-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps of the Blanchard River in Findlay, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Findlay, Ohio. The maps, which correspond to water levels at the USGS streamgage at Findlay (04189000), were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning system that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. The USGS reestablished one streamgage and added another on the Blanchard River upstream of Findlay. Additionally, the USGS established one streamgage each on Eagle and Lye Creeks, tributaries to the Blanchard River. The stream-gage sites were equipped with rain gages and multiple forms of telemetry. Data from these gages can be used by emergency management personnel to determine a course of action when flooding is imminent. Flood profiles computed by means of a step-backwater model were prepared and calibrated to a recent flood with a return period exceeding 100 years. The hydraulic model was then used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for 11 flood stages with corresponding streamflows ranging from approximately 2 to 100 years in recurrence interval. The simulated flood profiles were used in combination with digital elevation data to delineate the flood-inundation areas. Maps of Findlay showing flood-inundation areas overlain on digital orthophotographs are presented for the selected floods.

  15. Phylogenetic Relationships within Phyllophaga Harris (sensu lato) (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae, Melolonthinae) with Emphasis on Listrochelus Blanchard.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Gasperín, S L; Morón Rios, M A

    2017-02-07

    As partial results of a long-term project for the revision of the supraspecific classification of the American Melolonthini, using phylogenetic methods, interesting information on the relationships between the subgeneric groups of Phyllophaga Harris proposed by Saylor were obtained. The genus Listrochelus was described by Blanchard in 1851. However, in 1940, Saylor reduced it as a subgenus of Phyllophaga. The objective of the present study is to confirm the monophyly of Listrochelus by means of a phylogenetic analysis. A total of 132 species were analyzed; 31 species of them belong to Listrochelus, 76 are from other groups of Phyllophaga, and 25 species are from the outgroup. A morphological matrix with 281 characters was codified. A traditional search with 1000 iterations was performed in TNT. Branch support was investigated using the bootstrap method. Parsimony analysis resulted in ten equally parsimonious trees. The topology obtained in the strict consensus tree shows that the limits of Listrochelus are very clear (bootstrap 99%), supported by five synapomorphies and a combination of eight character states that are not exclusive to the group. Based on the hypothesis obtained, the restitution of the genus Listrochelus is proposed.

  16. Acute toxicity of Headline® fungicide to Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi).

    PubMed

    Cusaac, J Patrick W; Morrison, Shane A; Belden, Jason B; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T

    2016-04-01

    Previous laboratory studies have suggested that pyraclostrobin-containing fungicide formulations are toxic to amphibians at environmentally relevant concentrations. However, it is unknown if all pyraclostrobin formulations have similar toxicity and if toxicity occurs in different amphibian species. We investigated the acute toxicity of two formulations, Headline(®) fungicide and Headline AMP(®) fungicide, to Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) based on a direct overspray scenario. In addition, we examined body residues of fungicide active ingredients in A. blanchardi following direct exposure to Headline AMP fungicide. Headline fungicide and Headline AMP fungicide had similar toxicity to A. blanchardi with calculated median lethal doses of 2.1 and 1.7 µg pyraclostrobin/cm(2), respectively, which are similar to the suggested maximum label rate in North American corn (2.2 and 1.52 µg pyraclostrobin/cm(2), respectively). Tissue concentrations of pyraclostrobin were lower than predicted based on full uptake of a direct dose, and did not drop during the first 24 h after exposure. Headline fungicides at corn application rates are acutely toxic to cricket frogs, but acute toxicity in the field will depend on worst-case exposure.

  17. Application of molecular techniques to distinguish Liriomyza trifolii from L. sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae) on tomato cultivation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kazuki; Tagami, Yohsuke; Ohtaishi, Makoto; Iwvasaki, Akeo

    2004-06-01

    A molecular method is applied for differentiating the morphologically related leafminers Liriomyza trifolli and L. sativae on tomato cultivation. The method requires multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a region of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase DNA using multiprimer sets. The method divides the mitochondrial fragment of L. trifolli into two fragments and L. sativae into three fragments. It is faster, less costly, and easier than random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, PCR-restriction fragment-length polymorphism, and DNA sequencing and more sensitive than the enzyme electrophoresis method, which are other ways to differentiate these two species. We applied the method to samples from populations of another place, sex, and stage and obtained the same results.

  18. Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 February 2013-31 March 2013.

    PubMed

    Arias, M C; Atteke, Christiane; Augusto, S C; Bailey, J; Bazaga, Pilar; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Benoit, Laure; Blatrix, Rumsaïs; Born, Céline; Brito, R M; Chen, Hai-kui; Covarrubias, Sara; de Vega, Clara; Djiéto-Lordon, Champlain; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Francisco, F O; García, Cristina; Gonçalves, P H P; González, Clementina; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Carla; Hammer, Michael P; Herrera, Carlos M; Itoh, H; Kamimura, S; Karaoglu, H; Kojima, S; Li, Shou-Li; Ling, Hannah J; Matos-Maraví, Pável F; McKey, Doyle; Mezui-M'Eko, Judicaël; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Park, R F; Pozo, María I; Ramula, Satu; Rigueiro, Cristina; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; Santiago, L R; Seino, Miyuki M; Song, Chang-Bing; Takeshima, H; Vasemägi, Anti; Wellings, C R; Yan, Ji; Yu-Zhou, Du; Zhang, Chang-Rong; Zhang, Tian-Yun

    2013-07-01

    This article documents the addition of 142 microsatellite marker loci to the Molecular Ecology Resources database. Loci were developed for the following species: Agriophyllum squarrosum, Amazilia cyanocephala, Batillaria attramentaria, Fungal strain CTeY1 (Ascomycota), Gadopsis marmoratus, Juniperus phoenicea subsp. turbinata, Liriomyza sativae, Lupinus polyphyllus, Metschnikowia reukaufii, Puccinia striiformis and Xylocopa grisescens. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Amazilia beryllina, Amazilia candida, Amazilia rutila, Amazilia tzacatl, Amazilia violiceps, Amazilia yucatanensis, Campylopterus curvipennis, Cynanthus sordidus, Hylocharis leucotis, Juniperus brevifolia, Juniperus cedrus, Juniperus osteosperma, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus thurifera, Liriomyza bryoniae, Liriomyza chinensis, Liriomyza huidobrensis and Liriomyza trifolii. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. DNA-based identifications reveal multiple introductions of the vegetable leafminer Liriomyza sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae) into the Torres Strait Islands and Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Blacket, M J; Rice, A D; Semeraro, L; Malipatil, M B

    2015-10-01

    Leafmining flies (Diptera: Agromyzidae) can be serious economic pests of horticultural crops. Some genera such as Liriomyza are particularly problematic with numerous species, some of which are highly polyphagous (wide host range), which can only be confidently identified morphologically from adult males. In our study, DNA barcoding was employed to establish new locality records of the vegetable leafminer fly, Liriomyza sativae, from the islands of Torres Strait (Queensland, Australia) and the central highlands of Papua New Guinea (PNG). These records represent significant range extensions of this highly invasive plant pest. Specimens of immature leafminers (from leaf mines) were collected over a 5-year period during routine plant health surveys in ethanol or on FTA® filter paper cards, both methods proved effective at preserving and transporting insect DNA under tropical conditions, with FTA cards possessing some additional logistical benefits. Specimens were identified through sequencing two sections of the cytochrome oxidase I gene and the utility of each was assessed for the identification of species and intra-specific genetic lineages. Our study indicates that multiple haplotypes of L. sativae occur in PNG, while a different haplotype is present in the Torres Strait, with genetic regionalization between these areas apart from a single possible instance - one haplotype 'S.7' appears to be common between these two regions - interestingly this has also been the most common haplotype detected in previous studies of invasive L. sativae populations. The DNA barcoding methods employed here not only identified multiple introductions of L. sativae, but also appear generally applicable to the identification of other agromyzid leafminers (Phytomyzinae and Agromyzinae) and should decrease the likelihood of potentially co-amplifying internal hymenopteran parasitoids. Currently, L. sativae is still not recorded from the Australian mainland; however, further sampling of

  20. Eufriesea violacea (Blanchard) (Hymenoptera: Apidae): an orchid bee apparently sensitive to size reduction in forest patches.

    PubMed

    Giangarelli, Douglas C; Freiria, Gabriele A; Colatreli, Olavo P; Suzuki, Karen M; Sofia, Silvia H

    2009-01-01

    Eufriesea violacea (Blanchard) is a very seasonal euglossine species, more frequently found in the southern and southeastern regions of Brazil. A number of studies have revealed large variations in the abundance of males of this species present in Atlantic Forest remnants throughout both regions. In this paper, we report variations in the abundance of E. violacea males sampled in several forest patches of different sizes (ranging from 10 to 580 ha), and we propose that this species is possibly sensitive to the reduction in size of forest remnants. Surveys were carried out in nine forest remnants of Atlantic rainforest located in northern Paraná State, southern Brazil. Male euglossine bees were collected with an entomological net when visiting scent-baits, between 10:00 am and 1:00 pm, from October to December of 2001 and 2006. A total of 360 E. violacea males were captured in the nine forest fragments studied. The number of bees attracted to scent baits in each forest patch varied from zero to 261. A very high association (r = 0.993) was detected between the forest patch size and the visitation rate of E. violacea males at different sites, with the highest mean number of males visiting baits/sampling (43.5) being observed for bees from the largest forest remnant. Although alternative hypothesis should not be discharged for the decline in the abundance or absence of E. violacea in small forest patches, our results indicate that populations of this euglossine species need larger forest areas for existing.

  1. Development of a flood-warning network and flood-inundation mapping for the Blanchard River in Ottawa, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitehead, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps of the Blanchard River in Ottawa, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Village of Ottawa, Ohio. The maps, which correspond to water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Ottawa (USGS streamgage site number 04189260), were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning Network that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. Flood profiles were computed by means of a step-backwater model calibrated to recent field measurements of streamflow. The step-backwater model was then used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for 12 flood stages with corresponding streamflows ranging from less than the 2-year and up to nearly the 500-year recurrence-interval flood. The computed flood profiles were used in combination with digital elevation data to delineate flood-inundation areas. Maps of the Village of Ottawa showing flood-inundation areas overlain on digital orthophotographs are presented for the selected floods. As part of this flood-warning network, the USGS upgraded one streamgage and added two new streamgages, one on the Blanchard River and one on Riley Creek, which is tributary to the Blanchard River. The streamgage sites were equipped with both satellite and telephone telemetry. The telephone telemetry provides dual functionality, allowing village officials and the public to monitor current stage conditions and enabling the streamgage to call village officials with automated warnings regarding flood stage and/or predetermined rates of stage increase. Data from the streamgages serve as a flood warning that emergency management personnel can use in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps by to determine a course of action when flooding is imminent.

  2. Pathogenicity of entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) isolates to the adult pea leafminer (Diptera: Agromyzidae) and prospects of an autoinoculation device for infection in the field.

    PubMed

    Migiro, L N; Maniania, N K; Chabi-Olaye, A; Vandenberg, J

    2010-04-01

    Seventeen isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin and three isolates of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) were evaluated for their pathogenicity to the adult pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) (Diptera: Agromyzidae), in the laboratory. Flies were contaminated with dry conidia through a velvet material wrapped around the inner side of a cylindrical plastic tube. All the isolates were pathogenic to the pea leafminer, causing mortality between 40 and 100% at 5 d after exposure. The lethal time for 50% mortality (LT(50)) ranged from 2.6 to 5.4 d, whereas the LT(90) values varied between 3.2 and 9.1 d depending on the isolate. An autoinoculation device was evaluated in cage field experiments using only one of the virulent isolates, M. anisopliae ICIPE 20. The device was loaded with 2-3 g of dry conidia. Mortality of up to 100% was observed in flies captured from fungus-treated cages held under laboratory conditions. The average number of spores picked up by a single fly visiting the device increased with days after inoculation. One day after the inoculation, adults picked up an average of 4.1 +/- 0.7 x 10(5) conidia and 39.6 +/- 4.0 x 10(5) conidia 5 d after inoculation. Depending on the sampling date, the LT(50) varied between 1.8 and 3.4 d. Results indicate that some isolates of B. bassiana and M. anisopliae are highly pathogenic to L. huidobrensis, suggesting a potential for their use in the control of this pest. They also suggest the possibility of L. huidobrensis suppression with fungi using an autoinoculation device.

  3. Natural efficiency of parasitism by Billaea rhynchophorae (Blanchard) (Diptera: Tachinidae) for the control of Rhynchophorus palmarum (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Moura, José Inacio L; Toma, Ronaldo; Sgrillo, Ricardo B; Delabie, Jacques H C

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of the tachinid parasitoid Billaea rhynchophorae (Blanchard) on larvae of the palm weevil Rhynchophorus palmarum (L.) was evaluated in plantations of piassava palm (Attalea funifera Mart.) and African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacquin), in southeastern Bahia, Brazil. The monthly percentages of parasitism were evaluated during 13 months, from November 2000 to November 2001, based on the comparison between the number of parasitized and non-parasitized cocoons of R. palmarum. Mean parasitism was 40% and ranged from 50% in November 2000 to 18% in July 2001. While there is no method of mass reproduction of the parasitoid, a simple management practice is recommended, in order to preserve its beneficial effects in palm plantations.

  4. No man is an island. A personal tribute to Bob Blanchard and ethoexperimental approaches to the study of behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Robert John

    2015-07-01

    I first met Bob Blanchard at an international conference in Paris some 40 years ago. We collaborated intensively during the late 1980s/early 1990s on the ethopharmacology of antipredator defence in wild and laboratory rats, and remained good friends until his untimely passing in November 2013. Bob will undoubtedly be remembered as one of the most influential behavioural neuroscientists of the 20th century and, with Caroline, the most eloquent advocate of ethoexperimental approaches to the study of behaviour. In this brief trip down memory lane, I describe when and where Bob and I first met and how, over a lengthy period, he directly and indirectly helped shape my own research career. His profound influence in this regard is illustrated by reference to not only our collaborative research on antipredator behaviour but also my other work on the ethopharmacology of agonistic behaviour, social conflict analgesia, anxiety, and appetite. The element common to all of this work has been ethoexperimental analysis and, for teaching me the true value of this approach, I shall always remain indebted to the big man. Literally and figuratively, Bob was most certainly larger than life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Species displacements are common to two invasive species of leafminer fly in China, Japan and the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Under field conditions, species displacements have occurred in different directions between the same invasive species of leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) was displaced by L. trifolii (Burgess) in the western USA, with evidence suggesting that lower insecticide suscept...

  6. Prey species preference of the predator Serangium parcesetosum sicard (Col., Coccinellidae) and its interaction with another natural enemy.

    PubMed

    Al-Zyoud, Firas Ahmad

    2007-07-01

    This study aimed to determine Serangium parcesetosum preference for different prey species and parasitized Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) (Hom., Aleyrodidae) by the parasitoid, Eretmocerus mundus Mercet (Hym., Aphelinidae). The results on S. parcesetosum preference by feeding on different prey species offered separately and together indicated that the predatory larvae and adults preferred significantly the cotton whitefly, B. tabaci and the castor bean whitefly, Trialeurodes ricini (Misra) (Hom., Aleyrodidae) rather than the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari, Tetranychidae); melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hom., Aphididae) and pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) (Dip., Agromyzidae). The results on S. parcesetosum preference for the whitefly species, B. tabaci and T. ricini demonstrated that there were no significant differences in the preference of both predatory larvae and adults for any whitefly species. Moreover, S. parcesetosum larvae and adults were significantly tended to avoid parasitized puparia of B. tabaci by E. mundus and fed instead on unparasitized ones. Thus, there is a feasible potential for integration the predator and the parasitoid into a biological control program to suppress B. tabaci.

  7. Emamectin, a novel insecticide for controlling field crop pests.

    PubMed

    Ishaaya, Isaac; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Horowitz, A Rami

    2002-11-01

    Emamectin is a macrocyclic lactone insecticide with low toxicity to non-target organisms and the environment, and is considered an important component in pest-management programmes for controlling field crop pests. It is a powerful compound for controlling the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner). A spray concentration of 25 mg AI litre-1 in a cotton field resulted in over 90% suppression of H armigera larvae up to day 28 after treatment, while similar mortality of the Egyptian cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis Boisduval, under the same conditions, was maintained for 3 days only. Emamectin is a potent compound for controlling the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) under both laboratory and field conditions and its activity on adults was over 10-fold greater than that of abamectin. Spray concentrations of 10 and 50 mg AI litre-1 in Ageratum houstonianum Mill flowers resulted in total suppression of adults up to day 11 and of larvae up to day 20 after treatment. Under standard laboratory conditions, emamectin exhibits a considerable activity on the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) and the leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard). Further studies are required to evaluate its potential activity on the latter pests under field conditions.

  8. Variation in malathion sensitivity among populations of Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and implications for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Tyler D; Boone, Michelle D

    2016-12-16

    Intraspecific variability in contaminant sensitivity could undermine risk assessments for nontarget organisms such as amphibians. To test how amphibian populations vary in tolerance to anticipated lethal and sublethal exposures to a pesticide, we exposed Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) from 3 populations across a broad portion of their range to the insecticide malathion. Exposure in mesocosms to a nominal concentration of 1 mg/L (measured concentrations at 1 h and 24 h postaddition of 0.160 mg/L and 0.062 mg/L, respectively), a realistic direct-overspray scenario, reduced survival to metamorphosis by 43% relative to controls and revealed variation in tolerance among populations. Survival ranged from 74% for the most tolerant population to 18% for the least tolerant population, a 4.1-fold difference. Mass at metamorphosis and time to metamorphosis were unaffected. Although malathion reduced zooplankton abundance, it did not alter food resources (periphyton or phytoplankton relative abundance), or a suite of water-quality variables (pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen). A 96-h time-to-death assay designed to isolate direct, lethal effects also revealed variation in tolerance among populations. Time to death (mean ± standard error) ranged from 2.4 ± 0.18 h for the least tolerant population to 17.8 ± 4.72 h for the most tolerant population, a 7.4-fold difference. However, relative sensitivities of populations differed in the mesocosm and laboratory studies, which differed in exposure concentrations, suggesting that populations tolerant of high concentrations can be more sensitive to lower concentrations. We suggest that direct overspray could reduce larval survival in the field for this species. Studies assessing the role of contaminants in declines or extrapolating to untested populations, especially across large geographical regions, should quantify the range of intraspecific variation. Risk assessors could address

  9. Selection and validation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR analysis under different experimental conditions in the leafminer Liriomyza trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Chen, Jing-Yun; Lu, Ming-Xing; Gao, Yuan; Tian, Zi-Hua; Gong, Wei-Rong; Zhu, Wei; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Liriomyza trifolii is a highly-invasive leafmining insect that causes significant damage to vegetables and horticultural crops worldwide. Relatively few studies have quantified gene expression in L. trifolii using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), which is a reliable and sensitive technique for measuring gene expression. RT-qPCR requires the selection of reference genes to normalize gene expression data and control for internal differences between samples. In this study, nine housekeeping genes from L. trifolii were selected for their suitability in normalizing gene expression using geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, the ΔCt method and RefFinder. HSP21.7, which encodes heat shock protein 21.7, was used as a target gene to validate the expression of candidate reference genes. Results indicated that ACTIN and 18S were optimal for developmental stage and low temperature, TUB and 18S showed the most stable expression for sex, and GAPDH and ACTIN were the best reference genes for monitoring gene expression at high temperature. Selection and validation of appropriate reference genes are critical steps in normalizing gene expression levels, which improve the accuracy and quality of expression data. Results of this study provide vital information on reference genes and is valuable in developing a standardized RT-qPCR protocol for functional genomics research in L. trifolii.

  10. New data on Pleistocene and Holocene herpetofauna of Marie Galante (Blanchard Cave, Guadeloupe Islands, French West Indies): Insular faunal turnover and human impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailon, S.; Bochaton, C.; Lenoble, A.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents the herpetofaunal remains collected from Blanchard Cave (Marie-Galante, Guadeloupe Archipelago). This site has yielded the oldest stratigraphic layers (around 40,000 BP) of the island, along with data concerning the herpetofaunal biodiversity of the island from the Late Pleistocene to pre-Columbian and modern times. The study of these fossil remains reveals the presence of at least 11 amphibian and squamata taxa (Eleutherodactylus cf. martinicensis, Iguana sp., Anolis ferreus, Leiocephalus cf. cuneus, Thecadactylus cf. rapicauda, cf. Capitellum mariagalantae, Ameiva sp., cf. Antillotyphlops, Boa sp., Alsophis sp. and Colubridae sp. 2) during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene on Marie-Galante Island and provides new evidence concerning extinction times and the introduced or native status of taxa. This study also reveals that this bone assemblage is the result of diverse accumulation processes and provides new morphological data on the past herpetofauna of Marie-Galante.

  11. Phytosanitary irradiation of Liriomyza trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agromyzid leafminers are economic and quarantine pests of a variety of vegetables, flowers and ornamental foliage. Methyl bromide fumigation is often used as a phytosanitary treatment when quarantined agromyzids are found in shipped commodities; alternative treatments are sought. Ionizing radiation...

  12. Effects of endophyte colonization of Vicia faba (Fabaceae) plants on the life-history of leafminer parasitoids Phaedrotoma scabriventris (hymenoptera: braconidae) and Diglyphus isaea (hymenoptera: eulophidae).

    PubMed

    Akutse, Komivi S; Fiaboe, Komi K M; Van den Berg, Johnnie; Ekesi, Sunday; Maniania, Nguya K

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the fungal endophytes Beauveria bassiana (isolates ICIPE 279, G1LU3, S4SU1) and Hypocrea lixii (isolate F3ST1) on the life-history of Phaedrotoma scabriventris and Diglyphus isaea, parasitoids of the pea leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis, were studied in the laboratory. Parasitoids were allowed to parasitize 2(nd) and 3(rd) instar L. huidobrensis larvae reared on endophytically-inoculated faba bean, Vicia faba. In the control, parasitoids were reared on non-inoculated host plants. Parasitism, pupation, adult emergence and survival were recorded. No significant difference was observed between the control and the endophyte-inoculated plants in terms of parasitism rates of P. scabriventris (p = 0.68) and D. isaea (p = 0.45) and adult' survival times (p = 0.06). The survival period of the F1 progeny of P. scabriventris was reduced (p<0.0001) in B. bassiana S4SU1 to 28 days as compared to more than 40 days for B. bassiana G1LU3, ICIPE 279 and H. lixii F3ST1. However, no significant difference (p = 0.54) was observed in the survival times of the F1 progeny of D. isaea. This study has demonstrated that together, endophytes and parasitoids have beneficial effects in L. huidobrensis population suppression.

  13. Cloning and interspecific altered expression of heat shock protein genes in two leafminer species in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Hua; Kang, Le

    2007-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated differences in temperature tolerance between two Liriomyza species, L. huidobrensis and L. sativae. To investigate whether the heat shock proteins (Hsps) in the two species have different expression profiles during temperature stress, we cloned hsp90, 70, 60, 40 and 20, and analysed their expression profiles across temperature gradients by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. The results revealed that the number of TATA-box-like elements and A/T-rich insertion/deletions within the 5' UTRs of the hsps are different in the two species. The temperatures for onset (T(on)) or maximal (T(max)) induction of hsp expression in L. huidobrensis were generally 2.5-10 degrees C lower than those in L. sativae, and the T(on) were highly consistent with the temperature limits of the northern boundary of the range of these two leafminer species. These studies confirmed, in terms of gene expression levels, that L. huidobrensis is more cold tolerant than L. sativae, which is more heat tolerant, and suggest that the T(on) (or T(max)) of hsps can represent the differences in temperature tolerance of these two leafminer species, and may be used to determine their natural geographical distribution limits.

  14. Effects of Endophyte Colonization of Vicia faba (Fabaceae) Plants on the Life–History of Leafminer Parasitoids Phaedrotoma scabriventris (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and Diglyphus isaea (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    PubMed Central

    Akutse, Komivi S.; Fiaboe, Komi K. M.; Van den Berg, Johnnie; Ekesi, Sunday; Maniania, Nguya K.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the fungal endophytes Beauveria bassiana (isolates ICIPE 279, G1LU3, S4SU1) and Hypocrea lixii (isolate F3ST1) on the life-history of Phaedrotoma scabriventris and Diglyphus isaea, parasitoids of the pea leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis, were studied in the laboratory. Parasitoids were allowed to parasitize 2nd and 3rd instar L. huidobrensis larvae reared on endophytically-inoculated faba bean, Vicia faba. In the control, parasitoids were reared on non-inoculated host plants. Parasitism, pupation, adult emergence and survival were recorded. No significant difference was observed between the control and the endophyte-inoculated plants in terms of parasitism rates of P. scabriventris (p = 0.68) and D. isaea (p = 0.45) and adult' survival times (p = 0.06). The survival period of the F1 progeny of P. scabriventris was reduced (p<0.0001) in B. bassiana S4SU1 to 28 days as compared to more than 40 days for B. bassiana G1LU3, ICIPE 279 and H. lixii F3ST1. However, no significant difference (p = 0.54) was observed in the survival times of the F1 progeny of D. isaea. This study has demonstrated that together, endophytes and parasitoids have beneficial effects in L. huidobrensis population suppression. PMID:25338084

  15. Plants Attract Parasitic Wasps to Defend Themselves against Insect Pests by Releasing Hexenol

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jianing; Wang, Lizhong; Zhu, Junwei; Zhang, Sufang; Nandi, Owi I.; Kang, Le

    2007-01-01

    Background Plant volatiles play an important role in defending plants against insect attacks by attracting their natural enemies. For example, green leaf volatiles (GLVs) and terpenoids emitted from herbivore-damaged plants were found to be important in the host location of parasitic wasps. However, evidence of the functional roles and mechanisms of these semio-chemicals from a system of multiple plants in prey location by the parasitoid is limited. Little is known about the potential evolutionary trends between herbivore-induced host plant volatiles and the host location of their parasitoids. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study includes hierarchical cluster analyses of plant volatile profiles from seven families of host and non-host plants of pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis, and behavioral responses of a naive parasitic wasp, Opius dissitus, to some principal volatile compounds. Here we show that plants can effectively pull wasps, O. dissitus, towards them by releasing a universally induced compound, (Z)-3-hexenol, and potentially keep these plants safe from parasitic assaults by leafminer pests, L. huidobrensis. Specifically, we found that volatile profiles from healthy plants revealed a partly phylogenetic signal, while the inducible compounds of the infested-plants did not result from the fact that the induced plant volatiles dominate most of the volatile blends of the host and non-host plants of the leafminer pests. We further show that the parasitoids are capable of distinguishing the damaged host plant from the non-host plant of the leafminers. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that, as the most passive scenario of plant involvement, leafminers and mechanical damages evoke similar semio-chemicals. Using ubiquitous compounds, such as hexenol, for host location by general parasitoids could be an adaptation of the most conservative evolution of tritrophic interaction. Although for this, other compounds may be used to improve the

  16. Choosing between good and better: optimal oviposition drives host plant selection when parents and offspring agree on best resources.

    PubMed

    Videla, Martín; Valladares, Graciela R; Salvo, Adriana

    2012-07-01

    Insect preferences for particular plant species might be subjected to trade-offs among several selective forces. Here, we evaluated, through laboratory and field experiments, the feeding and ovipositing preferences of the polyphagous leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae) in relation to adult and offspring performance and enemy-free space. Female leafminers preferred laying their eggs on Vicia faba (Fabaceae) over Beta vulgaris var. cicla (Chenopodiaceae), in both laboratory and field choice experiments, although no oviposition preference was observed in no-choice tests. Females fed more often on B. v. var. cicla (no-choice test) or showed no feeding preference (choice test), even when their realized fecundity was remarkably higher on V. faba. Offspring developed faster, tended to survive better, and attained bigger adult size on the preferred host plant. Also, a field experiment showed higher overall parasitism rates for leafminers developing on B. v. var. cicla, with a nonsignificant similar tendency in field surveys. According to these results, host plant selection by L. huidobrensis appears to be driven mainly by variation in host quality. Moreover, the consistent oviposition choices for the best host and the labile feeding preferences observed here, suggest that host plant selection might be driven by maximization of offspring fitness even without a conflict of interest between parents and offspring. Overall, these results highlight the complexity of decisions performed by phytophagous insects regarding their host plants, and the importance of simultaneous evaluation of the various driving forces involved, in order to unravel the adaptive significance of female choices.

  17. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of a parasitic wasp to plant volatiles induced by two leaf miner species.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia-Ning; Kang, Le

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, Y-tube olfactometric assays demonstrated that headspace volatile extracts collected from leaf miner-damaged, or artificially damaged, bean plants were more attractive to naive females of the parasitoid insect Opius dissitus than those collected from healthy plants. Headspace extracts from both Liriomyza huidobrensis and Liriomyza sativae second-instar larvae-damaged beans were analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD). Of nine EAD-active volatiles identified, (3E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, (3Z)-hexenyl acetate, (syn)-2-methylpropanal oxime, and (syn)-2-methylbutanal oxime were the most abundant compounds that evoked significant electroantennogram (EAG) responses. Compounds (3Z)-hexen-1-ol, (anti)-2-methylbutanal oxime, linalool, beta-caryophyllene, and (3E,7E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene also elicited clear EAG responses but were present in smaller amounts. Choice experiments in a Y-tube olfactometer indicated that synthetic versions of (3Z)-hexen-1-ol, 2-methylpropanal oxime, 2-methylbutanal oxime, 3-methylbutanal oxime, linalool, (E,E)-alpha-farnesene, and (3E,7E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene were attractive individually, while (3Z)-hexenyl acetate and (3E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene were unattractive at concentrations similar to those obtained from the headspace collection. Moreover, a blend of nine EAD-active volatiles was significantly more attractive relative to hexane (solvent). A mixture of oximes, tereponids, and green leaf volatiles may facilitate host location by female O. dissitus.

  18. Can greenhouses eliminate the development of cold resistance of the leafminers?

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Kang, Le

    2005-06-01

    Latitudinal patterns for quantitative traits in insect are commonly used to investigate climatic adaptation. We compare the cold resistance of the leafminer (Liriomyza sativae) pupa among populations distributed from tropical to temperate regions, incorporating the thermal overwintering limit of the insect's range. The patterns of cold resistance for northern and southern populations differ. The southern populations significantly increased their cold resistance with latitude, showing a latitudinal pattern independent of seasons, acclimation regimes, and assay methods. In contrast, the northern populations showed no stable patterns; they were always intermediate in cold hardiness between the low-latitude and high-latitude populations within the overwintering limit. Integration of these data with those of the biologically similar congeneric leafminer, L. huidobrensis, suggests that a pattern shift in stress tolerance associated with the overwintering range limit is probably a general adaptive strategy adopted by freeze-intolerant species that have a high-latitude boundary of distribution, but can only overwinter and develop in protected greenhouses in harsh seasons. Considering the widespread availability of greenhouses for overwintering insects in northern China, we speculated that the large-scale existence of thermally-buffered microhabitats in greenhouses might eliminate the development of cold resistance of the leafminer populations. However, results suggest a strong selection for increased cold resistance for natural populations of Liriomyza species at higher latitudes that can overwinter in the field, but not for populations at latitudes above the thermal limit. Thus, habitat modification associated with greenhouses can limit gene flow and reduce cold tolerances even at latitudes above where the leafminers can overwinter in the field.

  19. General Reevaluation Report and Environmental Impact Statement for the Blanchard River, Ottawa, Ohio Flood Protection Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    nettle Velvet leaf Poison ivy Solomon’s seal Green-headed coneflower Jimson weed A more complete survey of the area by the Fish and Wildlife service...disturbed by plowing. Surface vegetation at the time of the survey included soybeans, alfalfa, and short, mixed grasses and weeds . Areas immediately... weeds (Figure 7B). Surface visibility ranged from moderate to excellent. Except for the portion on the south side of the river, immediately adjacent to

  20. Debbie Blanchard Access to Health Care for Individuals With Disabilities Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Dodd, Christopher J. [D-CT

    2010-09-29

    Senate - 09/29/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. FIRST CASE OF HUMAN INFECTION BY Bertiella studeri (Blanchard, 1891) Stunkard,1940 (Cestoda; Anoplocephalidae) IN BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Valeriana Valadares; dos Santos, Hudson Andrade; Silva, Amália Verônica Mendes da; Fontes, Gilberto; Vieira, Gabriela Lisboa; Ferreira, Arilton Carlos; da Silva, Eduardo Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Cestodes of the Bertiella genus are parasites of non-human primates found in Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas. Species Bertiella studeri and Bertiella mucronata could, accidentally, infect human beings. The infection occurs from ingestion of mites from the Oribatida order containing cysticercoid larvae of the parasite. The objective of this report is to register the first case of human infection by Bertiella studeri in Brazil. Proglottids of the parasite, found in the stool sample of a two-and-a-half-year-old child, were fixed, stained and microscopically observed to evaluate its morphological characteristics. Eggs obtained from the proglottids were also studied. The gravid proglottids examined matched the description of the genus Bertiella. The eggs presented a round shape, with the average diameter of 43.7 µm, clearly showing the typical pyriform apparatus of B. studeri. The authors concluded that the child was infected with Bertiella studeri,based on Stunkard's (1940) description of the species. This is the fifth case of human Bertiellosis described in Brazil through morphometric analysis of the parasite, the third in Minas Gerais State and the first diagnosed case of Bertiella studeri in Brazil.

  2. FIRST CASE OF HUMAN INFECTION BY Bertiella studeri (Blanchard, 1891) Stunkard,1940 (Cestoda; Anoplocephalidae) IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, Valeriana Valadares; dos SANTOS, Hudson Andrade; da SILVA, Amália Verônica Mendes; FONTES, Gilberto; VIEIRA, Gabriela Lisboa; FERREIRA, Arilton Carlos; da SILVA, Eduardo Sergio

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cestodes of the Bertiella genus are parasites of non-human primates found in Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas. Species Bertiella studeri and Bertiella mucronata could, accidentally, infect human beings. The infection occurs from ingestion of mites from the Oribatida order containing cysticercoid larvae of the parasite. The objective of this report is to register the first case of human infection by Bertiella studeri in Brazil. Proglottids of the parasite, found in the stool sample of a two-and-a-half-year-old child, were fixed, stained and microscopically observed to evaluate its morphological characteristics. Eggs obtained from the proglottids were also studied. The gravid proglottids examined matched the description of the genus Bertiella. The eggs presented a round shape, with the average diameter of 43.7 µm, clearly showing the typical pyriform apparatus of B. studeri. The authors concluded that the child was infected with Bertiella studeri, based on Stunkard's (1940) description of the species. This is the fifth case of human Bertiellosis described in Brazil through morphometric analysis of the parasite, the third in Minas Gerais State and the first diagnosed case of Bertiella studeri in Brazil. PMID:26603236

  3. Ecological trade-offs between jasmonic acid-dependent direct and indirect plant defences in tritrophic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jianing; Wang, Lizhong; Zhao, Jiuhai; Li, Chuanyou; Ge, Feng; Kang, Le

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies on plants genetically modified in jasmonic acid (JA) signalling support the hypothesis that the jasmonate family of oxylipins plays an important role in mediating direct and indirect plant defences. However, the interaction of two modes of defence in tritrophic systems is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the preference and performance of a herbivorous leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis) and its parasitic wasp (Opius dissitus) on three tomato genotypes: a wild-type (WT) plant, a JA biosynthesis (spr2) mutant, and a JA-overexpression 35S::prosys plant. Their proteinase inhibitor production and volatile emission were used as direct and indirect defence factors to evaluate the responses of leafminers and parasitoids. Here, we show that although spr2 mutant plants are compromised in direct defence against the larval leafminers and in attracting parasitoids, they are less attractive to adult flies compared with WT plants. Moreover, in comparison to other genotypes, the 35S::prosys plant displays greater direct and constitutive indirect defences, but reduced success of parasitism by parasitoids. Taken together, these results suggest that there are distinguished ecological trade-offs between JA-dependent direct and indirect defences in genetically modified plants whose fitness should be assessed in tritrophic systems and under natural conditions. PMID:21039561

  4. Novaluron (Rimon), a novel IGR--mechanism, selectivity and importance in IPM programs.

    PubMed

    Ishaaya, Isaac; Horowitz, A Rami; Tirry, Luc; Barazani, Avner

    2002-01-01

    Novaluron (Rimon), a new IGR, acts by both ingestion and contact. It is a powerful toxicant for controlling lepidopteran larvae resulting in LC-90 values of 0.42 and 0.30 mg a.i./liter for Spodoptera littoralis and S. exigua, respectively. Its residual activity under field conditions ranges between 10 and 30 days depending on environmental conditions. The compound is a powerful toxicant against developing stages of whiteflies, resulting in LC-90 values of 0.68 and 8.56 mg a.i./liter for Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum, respectively. It has translaminar activity, enabling the control of the leaf miner Liriomyza huidobrensis at concentrations ranging between 5 and 45 mg a.i./liter. Novaluron has no cross-resistance with other leading compounds for controlling whiteflies such as buprofezin and pyriproxyfen. It is a rain fast compound suitable in the tropics and in rainy seasons. It has no appreciable effect on parasitoids and phytoseiids and a mild effect on other natural enemies and may be considered a potential component in IPM programs. The compound is in the process of commercialization worldwide by Makhteshim Chemical Works for controlling agricultural pests.

  5. Rhythms of volatiles release from healthy and insect-damaged Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Sufang, Zhang; Jianing, Wei; Zhen, Zhang; Le, Kang

    2013-10-01

    The release rhythm of volatiles is an important physiological characteristic of plants, because the timing of release can affect the function of each particular volatile compound. However, most studies on volatiles release rhythms have been conducted using model plants, rather than crop plants. Here, we analyzed the variations in volatile compounds released from healthy and leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis)-infested kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), an important legume crop plant, over a 24 h period. The constituents of the volatiles mixture released from plants were analyzed every 3 h starting from 08:00. The collected volatiles were identified and quantified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Undamaged kidney bean plants released trace amounts of volatiles, with no obvious release rhythms. However, leafminer-damaged plants released large amounts of volatiles, in two main peaks. The main peak of emission was from 17:00 to 20:00, while the secondary peak was in the early morning. The terpene volatiles and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate showed similar rhythms as that of total volatiles. However, the green leaf volatile (Z)-3-hexen-ol was emitted during the night with peak emission in the early morning. These results give us a clear picture of the volatiles release rhythms of kidney bean plants damaged by leafminer.

  6. Rhythms of volatiles release from healthy and insect-damaged Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Sufang, Zhang; Jianing, Wei; Zhen, Zhang; Le, Kang

    2013-01-01

    The release rhythm of volatiles is an important physiological characteristic of plants, because the timing of release can affect the function of each particular volatile compound. However, most studies on volatiles release rhythms have been conducted using model plants, rather than crop plants. Here, we analyzed the variations in volatile compounds released from healthy and leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis)-infested kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), an important legume crop plant, over a 24 h period. The constituents of the volatiles mixture released from plants were analyzed every 3 h starting from 08:00. The collected volatiles were identified and quantified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Undamaged kidney bean plants released trace amounts of volatiles, with no obvious release rhythms. However, leafminer-damaged plants released large amounts of volatiles, in two main peaks. The main peak of emission was from 17:00 to 20:00, while the secondary peak was in the early morning. The terpene volatiles and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate showed similar rhythms as that of total volatiles. However, the green leaf volatile (Z)-3-hexen-ol was emitted during the night with peak emission in the early morning. These results give us a clear picture of the volatiles release rhythms of kidney bean plants damaged by leafminer. PMID:23887493

  7. Ecological trade-offs between jasmonic acid-dependent direct and indirect plant defences in tritrophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianing; Wang, Lizhong; Zhao, Jiuhai; Li, Chuanyou; Ge, Feng; Kang, Le

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies on plants genetically modified in jasmonic acid (JA) signalling support the hypothesis that the jasmonate family of oxylipins plays an important role in mediating direct and indirect plant defences. However, the interaction of two modes of defence in tritrophic systems is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the preference and performance of a herbivorous leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis) and its parasitic wasp (Opius dissitus) on three tomato genotypes: a wild-type (WT) plant, a JA biosynthesis (spr2) mutant, and a JA-overexpression 35S::prosys plant. Their proteinase inhibitor production and volatile emission were used as direct and indirect defence factors to evaluate the responses of leafminers and parasitoids. Here, we show that although spr2 mutant plants are compromised in direct defence against the larval leafminers and in attracting parasitoids, they are less attractive to adult flies compared with WT plants. Moreover, in comparison to other genotypes, the 35S::prosys plant displays greater direct and constitutive indirect defences, but reduced success of parasitism by parasitoids. Taken together, these results suggest that there are distinguished ecological trade-offs between JA-dependent direct and indirect defences in genetically modified plants whose fitness should be assessed in tritrophic systems and under natural conditions.

  8. Evolution of Hsp70 Gene Expression: A Role for Changes in AT-Richness within Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ronghui; Zhang, Bo; Kang, Le

    2011-01-01

    In disparate organisms adaptation to thermal stress has been linked to changes in the expression of genes encoding heat-shock proteins (Hsp). The underlying genetics, however, remain elusive. We show here that two AT-rich sequence elements in the promoter region of the hsp70 gene of the fly Liriomyza sativae that are absent in the congeneric species, Liriomyza huidobrensis, have marked cis-regulatory consequences. We studied the cis-regulatory consequences of these elements (called ATRS1 and ATRS2) by measuring the constitutive and heat-shock-induced luciferase luminescence that they drive in cells transfected with constructs carrying them modified, deleted, or intact, in the hsp70 promoter fused to the luciferase gene. The elements affected expression level markedly and in different ways: Deleting ATRS1 augmented both the constitutive and the heat-shock-induced luminescence, suggesting that this element represses transcription. Interestingly, replacing the element with random sequences of the same length and A+T content delivered the wild-type luminescence pattern, proving that the element's high A+T content is crucial for its effects. Deleting ATRS2 decreased luminescence dramatically and almost abolished heat-shock inducibility and so did replacing the element with random sequences matching the element's length and A+T content, suggesting that ATRS2's effects on transcription and heat-shock inducibility involve a common mechanism requiring at least in part the element's specific primary structure. Finally, constitutive and heat-shock luminescence were reduced strongly when two putative binding sites for the Zeste transcription factor identified within ATRS2 were altered through site-directed mutagenesis, and the heat-shock-induced luminescence increased when Zeste was over-expressed, indicating that Zeste participates in the effects mapped to ATRS2 at least in part. AT-rich sequences are common in promoters and our results suggest that they should play important

  9. Evolution of hsp70 gene expression: a role for changes in AT-richness within promoters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Jia, Tieliu; Ma, Ronghui; Zhang, Bo; Kang, Le

    2011-01-01

    In disparate organisms adaptation to thermal stress has been linked to changes in the expression of genes encoding heat-shock proteins (Hsp). The underlying genetics, however, remain elusive. We show here that two AT-rich sequence elements in the promoter region of the hsp70 gene of the fly Liriomyza sativae that are absent in the congeneric species, Liriomyza huidobrensis, have marked cis-regulatory consequences. We studied the cis-regulatory consequences of these elements (called ATRS1 and ATRS2) by measuring the constitutive and heat-shock-induced luciferase luminescence that they drive in cells transfected with constructs carrying them modified, deleted, or intact, in the hsp70 promoter fused to the luciferase gene. The elements affected expression level markedly and in different ways: Deleting ATRS1 augmented both the constitutive and the heat-shock-induced luminescence, suggesting that this element represses transcription. Interestingly, replacing the element with random sequences of the same length and A+T content delivered the wild-type luminescence pattern, proving that the element's high A+T content is crucial for its effects. Deleting ATRS2 decreased luminescence dramatically and almost abolished heat-shock inducibility and so did replacing the element with random sequences matching the element's length and A+T content, suggesting that ATRS2's effects on transcription and heat-shock inducibility involve a common mechanism requiring at least in part the element's specific primary structure. Finally, constitutive and heat-shock luminescence were reduced strongly when two putative binding sites for the Zeste transcription factor identified within ATRS2 were altered through site-directed mutagenesis, and the heat-shock-induced luminescence increased when Zeste was over-expressed, indicating that Zeste participates in the effects mapped to ATRS2 at least in part. AT-rich sequences are common in promoters and our results suggest that they should play important

  10. Differential jumping performance in newly metamorphosed Blanchard's cricket frogs, Acris blanchardi (Anura: Hylidae), from fish- and invertebrate-dominated ponds

    Treesearch

    Taylor L. Hall; Daniel Saenz; Matthew A. Kwiatkowski

    2013-01-01

    Organisms that adopt phenotypically plastic anti-predator strategies during larval stages may incur fitness costs later in development. These costs are typically difficult to define in many species. The difficulty identifying ecological trade-offs may result from experimental comparisons that do not adequately mirror naturally occurring predator-prey relationships. To...

  11. [Feeding pattern of Triatoma rubrovaria (Blanchard, 1843) (Hemiptera, Triatominae) in peridomiciliary habitats, of a rural area of Uruguay].

    PubMed

    Salvatella, R; Calegari, L; Puime, A; Basmadjian, Y; Rosa, R; Guerrero, J; Martinez, M; Mendaro, G; Briano, D; Montero, C

    1994-01-01

    It has been studied the feeding patterns of Triatoma rubrovaria (wild triatominae bug, and intradomiciliary secondary vector of T. cruzi) in a rural area of "La Bolsa" (Department of Artigas). Agar double diffusion test were used for analyze the blood meal, from 120 insects, which were confronted to 13 antisera. It has 251 identify blood meals, and the most frequently was mammalian host (73%), but it has a variable source of feeding (mammals, birds, reptiles and cockroach), including humans rate 8% of the total. The identify of haemolimphe as feed, place this triatominae bug as an intermediary vector between predator and haematophagous. The most usual mammals are dasypodides and bovines. The frequence of human blood meal near the dwellings, shows its potentiality as vectors. Therefore, the peridomicile is an area of interaction between, domestic, wild and sinantropic host. The trypanosomic infection's rate at peridomiciles was lesser those at wild areas.

  12. Species displacements are common to two invasive species of leafminer fly in China, Japan, and the United States.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yulin; Lei, Zhongren; Abe, Yoshihisa; Reitz, Stuart R

    2011-12-01

    Under field conditions, species displacements have occurred in different directions between the same invasive species of leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) was displaced by L. trifolii (Burgess) in the western United States, with evidence suggesting that lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii is a factor. However, in Japan, the opposite has occurred, as L. trifolii was recently displaced by L. sativae. This displacement is probably because of the higher fecundity of L. sativae and differential effects of parasitoids on the two leafminer species. Here, we carried out long-term surveys of these same two invasive leafminer species during January through March in 1999, 2007, and 2011, as well as June through July in 2011, in eight locations (Sanya, Dongfang, Haikou, Leidong, Lingshui, Wuzhisan, Qionghai, and Danzhou) across Hainan Island of southern China. Our results indicate that, between 2007 and 2011, L. trifolii rapidly replaced L. sativae as the predominant leafminer of vegetables on Hainan Island, similar to the situation in the western United States. Further surveys of growers revealed that avermectins and cyromazine are the two most frequently used insecticides against leafminers on Hainan Island. Dose-mortality tests showed that L. trifolii populations from Hainan Island are less susceptible to avermectins and cyromazine compared with L. sativae populations. This lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii may be associated with the displacement of L. sativae by L. trifolii, although additional ecological or environmental factors cannot be ruled out.

  13. Life cycle and reproductive patterns of Triatoma rubrovaria (Blanchard, 1843) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) under constant and fluctuating conditions of temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Damborsky, Miryam P; Bar, María E; Gorla, David

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the temperature and relative humidity influence in the life cycle, mortality and fecundity patterns of Triatoma rubrovaria. Four cohorts with 60 recently laid eggs each were conformed. The cohorts were divided into two groups. In the controlled conditions group insects were maintained in a dark climatic chamber under constant temperature and humidity, whereas triatomines of the ambiental temperature group were maintained at room temperature. Average incubation time was 15.6 days in the controlled conditions group and 19.1 days in the ambiental temperature. In group controlled conditions the time from egg to adult development lasted 10 months while group ambiental temperature took four months longer. Egg eclosion rate was 99.1% and 98.3% in controlled conditions and ambiental temperature, respectively. Total nymphal mortality in controlled conditions was 52.6% whereas in ambiental temperature was 51.8%. Mean number of eggs/female was 817.6 controlled conditions and 837.1 ambiental temperature. Fluctuating temperature and humidity promoted changes in the life cycle duration and in the reproductive performance of this species, although not in the species mortality.

  14. Insecticide-mediated apparent displacement between two invasive species of Leafminer fly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Closely related invasive species may often displace one another, but it is often difficult to determine mechanisms because of the historical nature of these events. The leafmining flies Liriomyza sativae and Liriomyza trifolii have become serious invasive agricultural pests throughout the world. W...

  15. Analysis of Management Behavior Assessments and Affect on Productivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-10

    Theories of Motivation, the Ohio State and University of Michigan Leadership Studies, Blanchard’s Leadership Model , and Anderson’s Behavioral Model ...productivity. Leadership as a dimension of management behavior, is addressed by Blanchard’s Leadership Model (Hershey & Blanchard, 1974) as consisting...productivity. Furthermore, Anderson’s Behavioral Model (Anderson, 1968) postulates that the organizational environment is comprised of predisposing

  16. Host Plant Resistance and Insect Pest Management in Chickpea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nearly 60 insect species feed on chickpea worldwide, of which cutworms (black cutworm - Agrotis ipsilon and turnip moth - Agrotis segetum), leaf feeding caterpillars (leaf caterpillar - Spodoptera exigua and hairy caterpillar - Spilarctia oblique), leaf miners (Liriomyza cicerina), aphids (Aphis cr...

  17. Research Potential of a Heart Rate Variability Diagnostic System for the Study of Stress and Health Risk in Peacekeeping Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    physiological reactivity [ Blanchard & Buckley, 1999; Buckley & Kaloupek, 2001; Cohen et al, 1997; Liberzon et al, 1999; McFall et al, 1990]. Results of...sympathetic activity [ Blanchard et al, 1991; Bremner et al, 1999; Keane et al, 1985; Kolb, 1987; Kolb, 1984]; and increased sympathetic activity and...in increased heart rate, blood pressure, and increased low frequency component of heart rate variability [ Blanchard , 1990; Buckley & Kaloupek, 2001

  18. Building and Understanding Trust Relationships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-17

    interdependence. To meet these challenges, senior military leaders must understand and build internal and external trust. The Ken Blanchard Company, one...Military Review: The Profession of Arms, September 30, 2011, 16. 2 The Ken Blanchard Company, “Building Trust,” 2010,pdf, http...www.kenblanchard.com/img/pub/ Blanchard -Building-Trust.pdf (accessed November 27, 2011). 3 Richard H. Kohn, “The Early Retirement of Gen. Ronald Fogleman, Chief of

  19. 77 FR 67020 - Performance Review Board Appointments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ..., Michael Black, Michael Black, Steven Blanchard, Mary Josie Bolton, Hannibal Burden, John Burzyk, Carla..., David Velasco, Janine Ward, Joseph Weber, Wendi Welch, Ruth Wells, Sandra Wenk, Daniel Wessels,...

  20. 76 FR 68500 - Performance Review Board Appointments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Bathrick, Mark Bayani, Theresa Bean, Michael Berrigan, Michael Black, Michael Black, Steven Blanchard, Mary... Velasco, Janine Ward, Joseph Washburn, Julia Wells, Sandra Wenk, Daniel Whitesell, Stephen Woody,...

  1. Rethinking Command & Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-20

    Science Conference. Orlando, FL: 29 November – 2 December, 2004. [Blanchard, 1996] Blanchard, Ken, John P. Carlos and Alan Randolph. The 3 Keys...2002. [ Prieto -Diaz, 2002] Prieto -Diaz, Ruben. “A Faceted Approach to Building Ontologies.” Unpublished paper from the Commonwealth Information

  2. MU06-857, a Green Leaf Lettuce Breeding Line with Resistance to Leafminer and Lettuce Mosaic Virus.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture announces the release of a breeding line of green leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) with resistance to leafminers (Liriomyza langei Frick) and lettuce mosaic. The line MU06-857 is similar to cultivar ‘Lolla Rossa’ (‘Lollo Ros...

  3. New, More Authentic Model for AIDS Will Accelerate Studies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer Researchers are working to develop a more authentic animal model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS that is expected to speed up studies of experimental treatments and vaccines.

  4. New, More Authentic Model for AIDS Will Accelerate Studies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer Researchers are working to develop a more authentic animal model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS that is expected to speed up studies of experimental treatments and vaccines.

  5. Description of the immature stages of four species of Macrodactylini (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Melolonthinae).

    PubMed

    Neita-Moreno, J C; Morón, M A; Zuluaga-Correa, C A

    2012-04-01

    The third instar of the genera Ceraspis, Clavipalpus, Isonychus and Manopus (Melolonthidae: Melolonthinae: Macrodactylini) are described for the first time. Descriptions are based on the larvae of Ceraspis innotata (Blanchard), Clavipalpus ursinus Blanchard, Isonychus maculatus Waterhouse and Manopus biguttatus Laporte. The pupae of C. ursinus, I. maculatus and M. biguttatus are also described. A key to the larvae of nine genera of Macrodactylini and a list of the species with immature descriptions are provided.

  6. First Record of the Scarab Beetle, Phyllophaga lissopyge from South America, with Descriptions of Adult Seasonal Activity and Male Response to Sex Attractants

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Rodriguez, Anuar; Peck, Daniel C.; Robbins, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Phyllophaga lissopyge (Bates) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) is reported for the first time from South America. Male sex pheromone response is described for P. lissopyge and two other co-occurring Phyllophaga species. Adults of P. lissopyge and P. menetriesi (Blanchard) flew to traps baited with methyl 2-(methylthio) benzoate whereas adults of P. obsoleta (Blanchard) flew irregularly to four different pheromone compounds. Adult seasonal activity is described from males captures in Rionegro, Antioquia, Colombia. PMID:21529153

  7. Behind the Scenes, Animal Caretakers and Technical Staff Contribute to High-Quality Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer; photos by Frank Blanchard and Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer Each day at 6 a.m. the lights pop on inside 18 buildings on the NCI at Frederick campus, illuminating the residential quarters for thousands of research mice. For the mice, it’s the end of their nocturnal day.  For their caretakers, however, the day has just begun.

  8. Behind the Scenes, Animal Caretakers and Technical Staff Contribute to High-Quality Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer; photos by Frank Blanchard and Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer Each day at 6 a.m. the lights pop on inside 18 buildings on the NCI at Frederick campus, illuminating the residential quarters for thousands of research mice. For the mice, it’s the end of their nocturnal day.  For their caretakers, however, the day has just begun.

  9. New species of Anisophya Karabag from Chile (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phanopterinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many of the most primitive Neotropical bush katydids (Phaneropterinae) — including species of Cosmophyllum Blanchard, Stenophylla Brunner von Wattenwyl, Marenestha Brunner von Wattenwyl, Anisophya Karabag, Coryphoda Brunner von Wattenwyl, and Burgilis Stål — are endemic in Chile. The Chilean species...

  10. Faculty Development Using the Situational Leadership Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaner, Michael C.

    1995-01-01

    The situational leadership model developed by Hersey and Blanchard is described, and the task-specific model is then applied to the four primary tasks of college faculty--teaching, research, community service, and institutional service. The model combines directive and supportive behavior as they are reflected in four distinctive leadership…

  11. Correction to Cantor et al. (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, James M.; Blanchard, Ray; Robichaud, Lori K.; Christensen, Bruce K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports an error in the original article by James M. Cantor, Ray Blanchard, Lori K. Robichaud, and Bruce K. Christensen ("Psychological Bulletin," 2005, Vol. 131, No. 4, pp. 555-568). As a result of an editorial error the article listed the link to online supplemental data incorrectly. The correct URL is provided here. (The following…

  12. Yellowstone grizzly bear investigations: Annual report of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, Charles C.; Haroldson, Mark A.; West, Karrie K.

    2007-01-01

    The annual reports of the IGBST summarize annual data collection. Because additional information can be obtained after publication, data summaries are subject to change. For that reason, data analyses and summaries presented in this report supersede all previously published data. The study area and sampling techniques are reported by Blanchard (1985), Mattson et al. (1991 a), and Haroldson et al. (1998).

  13. Novel Vaccine Approach Achieves “Functional Cure” of AIDS Virus in Monkeys | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer Scientists at the Oregon Health & Science University and the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research have used a novel vaccine approach to achieve a “functional cure” and apparent eradication of infection with a monkey version of the AIDS virus.

  14. 78 FR 42776 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ..., Texas 75202-2733. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Philip Dellinger, Chief Ground Water/ UIC Section... Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; Blanchard Refining Company LLC Galveston Bay Refinery, Texas City, Texas (Formerly BP Products North America Inc.--Texas City Business Unit) AGENCY:...

  15. Proposed Train and Equip Authorities for Syria: In Brief

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-16

    Proposed Train and Equip Authorities for Syria : In Brief Christopher M. Blanchard Specialist in Middle Eastern Affairs Amy Belasco...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Proposed Train and Equip Authorities for Syria : In Brief 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Authorities for Syria : In Brief Congressional Research Service Contents Introduction

  16. Sexuality of male-to-female transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Veale, Jaimie F; Clarke, Dave E; Lomax, Terri C

    2008-08-01

    Blanchard's (J Nerv Ment Dis 177:616-623, 1989) theory of autogynephilia suggests that male-to-female transsexuals can be categorized into different types based on their sexuality. Little previous research has compared the sexuality of male-to-female transsexuals to biological females. The present study examined 15 aspects of sexuality among a non-clinical sample of 234 transsexuals and 127 biological females, using either an online or a paper questionnaire. The results showed that, overall, transsexuals tended to place more importance on partner's physical attractiveness and reported higher scores on Blanchard's Core Autogynephilia Scale than biological females. In addition, transsexuals classified as autogynephilic scored significantly higher on Attraction to Feminine Males, Core Autogynephilia, Autogynephilic Interpersonal Fantasy, Fetishism, Preference for Younger Partners, Interest in Uncommitted Sex, Importance of Partner Physical Attractiveness, and Attraction to Transgender Fiction than other transsexuals and biological females. In accordance with Blanchard's theory, autogynephilia measures were positively correlated to Sexual Attraction to Females among transsexuals. In contrast to Blanchard's theory, however, those transsexuals classified as autogynephilic scored higher on average on Sexual Attraction to Males than those classified as non-autogynephilic, and no transsexuals classified as autogynephilic reported asexuality.

  17. Armed Conflict in Syria: Overview and U.S. Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-14

    Armed Conflict in Syria: Overview and U.S. Response Christopher M. Blanchard, Coordinator Specialist in Middle Eastern Affairs Carla E. Humud...Syria: Overview and U.S. Response 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...

  18. Situational Leadership and Innovation in the EFL Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osburne, Andrea G.

    A case-study approach is presented to demonstrate how to use situational leadership (a management theory model developed by Hersey and Blanchard) to make students in teacher education programs more receptive to educational innovation in second language learning. Situational leadership theory defines a leader as anyone trying to influence another…

  19. ATRF Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony Coincides with Chamber of Commerce Centennial Gala | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, NCI Deputy Director for Management John Czajkowski, and SAIC Corporate Chief Executive Officer (CEO) John Jumper were joined by representatives of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce in cutting the ribbon for the National Cancer Institute’s Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  20. Affirming Commonalities--Curriculum Directions To Support the Study of All Contexts of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Jeffrey M.

    A number of reasons could no doubt be found for why the study of communication has been so fragmented over the years. R. Blanchard and W. Christ have indicated that when mass communication courses were first developed, those courses were generally located in departments "offering vocationally based instruction." Speech communication and…

  1. Blueprints: Framework for the Future. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Association of College Unions-International (65th, San Diego, California, March 24-27, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Nancy T., Ed.; Hahn, Laurel Markey, Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1985 conference of College Unions-International cover college union staff development, better management, and student development. Paper titles and authors are as follows: "Leadership and the One-Minute Manager" (Kenneth Blanchard); "Current Legal Issues in Personnel" (Donna Colianni); "Congruence…

  2. 75 FR 65453 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Blanchard. Catch Share Program Report. Second ACL Amendment--Other Species. PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD (5 MINUTES... Members and Staff. Public Comment Period (5-Minutes Presentations). Other Business. Next Council Meeting.... However, simultaneous translation (English/Spanish) will be provided. Fishers and other interested persons...

  3. 77 FR 71404 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Flood Risk Management Study...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... ten years. The Blanchard River has reached or exceeded major flood stage 23 times since 1913. Nine of... conducting a second round of scoping, and four public scoping meetings in December, 2012, which include: (1) 6:30 p.m. on December 10, 2012 at the Ottawa-Glandorf High School Auditorium, 630 Glendale Ave...

  4. Comments on the failure of intensive self-regulatory treatment with chronic daily headache.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, N M

    2001-12-01

    Non-pharmacological therapy of primary headache conditions including chronic daily headache (CDH) is not well-studied. Barton and Blanchard report on their experience with intensive self-regulatory treatment in a cohort of patients with CDH. This negative trial provides preliminary observations that need further investigations in controlled, adequately powered clinical study.

  5. Passive 19.3 GHz Radiometer and Aerosol Data from the North Sea during MARSEN I, September-October 1979.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-13

    MODIFIED CONTINENTAL 3.0- [ 0.17 2! y > 0.06, CONTINENTAL, POLLUTED CONTINENTAL 3. ro 2.0- 1.0 20 30 40 SO 60 70 so 90 100 R. H. (% Fig. 15 - Plot...Chemistry of Sea/Air Particulate Exchange Processes; Summary and Recommendations, Journal de Recherches Atmospheriques , 8, pp 509-513. (3) Blanchard

  6. Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John; McCaw, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships (SIMOR) integrates two models addressed in the leadership literature and then highlights the importance of relationships. The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships combines the modified Hersey and Blanchard model of situational leadership, the…

  7. Situational Leadership: Conscious Criteria Applied in Educational Leaders' Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Alan R.; Bentley, Ernest L., Jr.

    To test a situational leadership model, this study sought to determine (1) whether, among a population of educational administrators in East Tennessee, individuals possessing high flexibility/high effectiveness leadership characteristics can be identified and (2) whether those leaders consciously apply Hersey and Blanchard's concept of maturity…

  8. Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education. Proceedings of the Annual Conference (9th, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, June 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Barbara Stolze, Ed.

    Among 17 French and 63 English papers are the following: "Case Study of the Convergence Model in Program Evaluation" (Alexander); "Nowlen's Approach to Continuing Professional Education" (Blanchard); "Challenge for Indigenous Approaches to Adult Education (AE) and Development" (Bonson); "Cultural and Social…

  9. Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John; McCaw, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships (SIMOR) integrates two models addressed in the leadership literature and then highlights the importance of relationships. The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships combines the modified Hersey and Blanchard model of situational leadership, the…

  10. Manufacturing Technology for Shipbuilding (National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. Overview and Background, O.H. Gatlin Introduction, E.E. Blanchard, Jr. Production Engineering, R. Oehmichen Moldloft, B... Oehmichen 43. Production Planning and Control, D. Bergeron 44. Zone Outfitting Concepts, G. Grimsley 45. Moldloft, B. Pourciau 46. Accuracy Control

  11. Complex Envelope Properties, Interpretation, Filtering, and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    University Documents Library 1 Canberra College of Advanced Education P. Morgan 1 Concordia University, Quebec Prof. J. Krolik 1 Dalhousie University Dr...Systems, Inc. J. P. Costas 1 Diagnostic/Retrieval Systems, Inc. J. Williams 1 EDO Corporation M. Blanchard 1 EG&G D. Frohman 1 General Electric Company

  12. Exact Detection Performance of Normalizer With Multiple-Pulse Frequency- Shift-Keyed Signals in a Partially-Correlated Fading Medium With Generalized Noncentral Chi-Squared Statistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-21

    Canberra College of Advanced Education P. Morgan 1 Concordia University, Quebec Prof. J. Krolik 1 Dalhousie University Dr. B. Ruddick 1 Drexel...Research Associates Steven W. McDonald 1 Cogent Systems, Inc. J. P. Costas 1 EDO Corporation M. Blanchard 1 EG&G D. Frohman 1 General Electric Company

  13. Advanced Technology for Portable Personal Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    SIGGRAPH. $ Conclusion 161 Fucks . Henry. Jack Goldfeather. Jeff P HultquiSL Susan Spach. John D. Austin. Frederick P. Brooks. Jr.. John 3dm draws...Coestaints. Proceedings of the Workshop on Interactive 3D Graphics. October 1986. Sponsore4 by ACM 121 Blanchard. Chuck. Scot Burgess, Young Harv, Jeron

  14. ATRF Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony Coincides with Chamber of Commerce Centennial Gala | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, NCI Deputy Director for Management John Czajkowski, and SAIC Corporate Chief Executive Officer (CEO) John Jumper were joined by representatives of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce in cutting the ribbon for the National Cancer Institute’s Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  15. Taxonomy of Hylotribus Jekel (Coleoptera: Anthribidae, Anthribinae): new synonymies, combinations and type designations.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Fernando Ávila; Elgueta, Mario; Mermudes, José Ricardo M

    2017-02-02

    The type material of six species of Anthribidae from Chile and one from Peru, originally described as Stenocerus Schoenherr and Stenorrhynchus Philippi & Philippi and later transferred to Hylotribus Jekel, was reexamined. These species are Stenocerus asperatus Blanchard, 1851, Stenocerus aspis Erichson, 1847, Stenocerus posticalis Philippi & Philippi, 1864, Stenocerus quadratipennis Germain, 1854, Stenorrhynchus quadrinotatus Philippi & Philippi, 1864, and Stenocerus tuberculosus Blanchard, 1851. Lectotype designations were made for Hylotribus asperatus, Hylotribus quadratipennis, and Hylotribus tuberculosus. New synonyms were established as follows: Hylotribus signatipes (Blanchard, 1851) = H. quadratipennis (Germain, 1854) syn. n., = H. quadrinotatus (Philippi & Philippi, 1864) syn. n., Hylotribus asperatus (Blanchard, 1851) = H. posticalis (Philippi & Philippi, 1864) syn. n.. While, Hylotribus aspis (Erichson, 1847) from Peru was transferred to Piesocorynus Dejean, 1834 and a new combination and synonymy proposed, Piesocorynus aspis (Erichson, 1847) n. comb. = Piesocorynus gracilicornis (Jekel, 1855) syn. n. The genus Hylotribus is defined with five species from Chile and six from Brazil, and the Chilean species are redescribed with illustrations. A new key to all species is included.

  16. Correction to Cantor et al. (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, James M.; Blanchard, Ray; Robichaud, Lori K.; Christensen, Bruce K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports an error in the original article by James M. Cantor, Ray Blanchard, Lori K. Robichaud, and Bruce K. Christensen ("Psychological Bulletin," 2005, Vol. 131, No. 4, pp. 555-568). As a result of an editorial error the article listed the link to online supplemental data incorrectly. The correct URL is provided here. (The following…

  17. An Evaluation of a Human Development Laboratory. A Study of the Outcome and Process of a Laboratory Learning Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    limits intimacy, produces fear of honest self-disclosure, lacks commitment and leads to loneliness and alienation. Finally it has been suggested that...Words: The story of sensitivity training and the encounter movement. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1972. Blanchard, W. E. Ecstasy without agony is

  18. Partnership to Explore New Drug Combination for Pancreatic Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer Scientists at NCI and Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) are partnering with the Lustgarten Foundation to test whether a vitamin D derivative will make a difference when combined with a conventional anticancer drug in treating tumors of the pancreas.

  19. Novel Vaccine Approach Achieves “Functional Cure” of AIDS Virus in Monkeys | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer Scientists at the Oregon Health & Science University and the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research have used a novel vaccine approach to achieve a “functional cure” and apparent eradication of infection with a monkey version of the AIDS virus.

  20. Leadership Training: Putting the One Minute Manager to Work in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Richard L.

    The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education selected material produced by Ken Blanchard, co-author of "The One Minute Manager," as the basis for a series of 4-day workshops on situational leadership for school personnel. Among the concepts brought to bear in situational leadership training are that (1) concern for…

  1. Analysis of the Hessian for Inverse Scattering Problems. Part 3. Inverse Medium Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves in Three Dimensions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    mathematics. [3] Philippe Blanchard and Erwin Brüning, Mathematical Methods in Physics, Birhäuser Ver- lag, 2003. [4] Tan Bui-Thanh, Carsten Burstedde, Omar...Order, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, second (Classics in Mathematics) ed., 2001. [16] Ken Kreutz-Delgado, The complex gradient operator and the CR-calculus

  2. Environmental Biology: A Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Jim

    1984-01-01

    Recounts experiences of an environmental biology class, highlighting the eight-day field trip that is the culmination of the course. Describes activities during the bus trip, a two-day canoe trip, and field work at the Ozark Underground Laboratory and Blanchard Springs Caverns. Also discusses the field journal and final examination. (JM)

  3. New Mouse Model May Aid in Developing Effective Therapies for Ovarian Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A new genetically engineered mouse model appears promising as an effective tool for preclinical testing of novel therapies for ovarian cancer, which tends to be diagnosed in late stage. There are few effective treatments for the disease.

  4. Faculty Development Using the Situational Leadership Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaner, Michael C.

    1995-01-01

    The situational leadership model developed by Hersey and Blanchard is described, and the task-specific model is then applied to the four primary tasks of college faculty--teaching, research, community service, and institutional service. The model combines directive and supportive behavior as they are reflected in four distinctive leadership…

  5. Your Leadership Style: A Management Development Module for Educational Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rima

    Management processes of planning, organizing, directing, and motivating are vital to schools and industries alike. Accordingly, this module, the first in a series of two, has been developed as a training guide using the Hersey-Blanchard approach to leadership styles. It can help build principal-faculty relationships, superintendent-governing board…

  6. Preceptor Leadership Style and the Nursing Practicum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood-Rayermann, Suzy

    2003-01-01

    Preceptors' leadership characteristics influence nursing students' clinical experience. Preceptors' leadership styles can be assessed with the Myers Briggs Type Indicator or Hersey and Blanchard's Leader Behavior Analysis II instrument, which identifies four styles based on situational leadership. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  7. The Gap between Research and Practice Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korthagen, Fred A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, teachers--but also parents and politicians--voice dissatisfaction with the divide they experience between research and practice and the resulting minimal impact of teacher education (Ashton, 1996; Barone, Berliner, Blanchard, Casanova, & McGowan, 1996). The problem seems to be perennial. More than a century ago, John Dewey pointed…

  8. Educational Computing in the Schools: Technology, Communication, and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Jay, Ed.

    This book is a collection of articles that examine critical issues of technology, teaching, and learning in three areas: access, communication, and literacy. Following an Introduction by Jay Blanchard, articles are presented in three sections: Access and Opportunity; Online Communication; and Literacy. The articles include: "An Exploration of…

  9. Securing Afghanistan’s Future Against Opium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    International Studies, 2007), 51. 38 Blanchard, Afghanistan: Narcotics and U.S. Policy, 35. 39 Geoffrey Hayes and Mark Sedra , Afghanistan Transition Under...Geoffrey and Mark Sedra . Afghanistan: Transition Under Threat. Waterloo, Ontario: Centre for International Governance Innovation and Wilfrid Laurier

  10. Species of tribe Mansoniini (Diptera: Culicidae: Culicinae) with published illustrations and/or descriptions of female genitalia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Examples are provided for species of the mosquito tribe Mansoniini with published illustrations and/or descriptions of the female genitalia and include corresponding literature citations. Most species of Mansonia Blanchard have only the tergum VIII illustrated and/or described for the female genital...

  11. A synonymic revision of the Prunus-infesting aphid genus Hyalopterus Koch 1854 (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The three species of Hyalopterus Koch cause economic damage to various stone fruit trees of the genus Prunus L., H. pruni (Geoffroy), H. amygdali (Blanchard), and H. persikonus Miller et al. Although the third species was established recently, it has been suggested that one of the twelve older synon...

  12. Educational Computing in the Schools: Technology, Communication, and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Jay, Ed.

    This book is a collection of articles that examine critical issues of technology, teaching, and learning in three areas: access, communication, and literacy. Following an Introduction by Jay Blanchard, articles are presented in three sections: Access and Opportunity; Online Communication; and Literacy. The articles include: "An Exploration of…

  13. Response to Elwood, M. et al., Comment on: Maternal Exposure to Domestic Hair Cosmetics and Occupational Endocrine Disruptors Is Associated with a Higher Risk of Hypospadias in the Offspring. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 27.

    PubMed

    Haraux, Elodie; Braun, Karine; Buisson, Philippe; Stéphan-Blanchard, Erwan; Devauchelle, Camille; Ricard, Jannick; Boudailliez, Bernard; Tourneux, Pierre; Gouron, Richard; Chardon, Karen

    2017-09-15

    Dear Editor, Thank you for inviting us to reply to a "Comment" paper to our published paper "Maternal Exposure to Domestic Hair Cosmetics and Occupational Endocrine Disruptors Is Associated with a Higher Risk of Hypospadias in the Offspring" (Authors: Elodie Haraux, Karine Braun, Philippe Buisson, Erwan Stéphan-Blanchard, Jannick Ricard, Camille Devauchelle, Bernard Boudailliez, Pierre Tourneux, Richard Gouron, Karen Chardon).[...].

  14. US Options in Syria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    response to a chemical 10 Christopher Harmer , Required Sorties and Weapons to Degrade Syrian Air Force Excluding Integrated Air Defense System...Westport, CT: Praeger, 2009), Chapter 6. 19 Jeremy M. Sharp and Christopher M. Blanchard, “Armed Conflict in Syria: Background and U.S. Response

  15. Life Cycle Leadership Theory vs. Theory on the Phases of Small Group Discussion: Comparisons, Contrasts, and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Charles Thomas, Jr.

    The work of Paul Hersey and Kenneth Blanchard on life-cycle leadership was compared and contrasted to three studies on group phase theories. The studies on group phases were conducted by Robert Bales and Fred Strodtbeck in 1951, Thomas Scheidel and Laura Crowell in 1964, and B. Aubrey Fisher in 1970. The two theoretical approaches were found to…

  16. Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance of a 10-Item Decisional Balance Scale: Longitudinal and Subgroup Examination within an Adult Diabetic Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Michael A.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the longitudinal and subgroup measurement properties of a 10-item, physical activity decisional balance scale, previously published by Plotnikoff, Blanchard, Hotz, and Rhodes (2001), within a diabetic sample of Canadian adults. Results indicated that a three-factor measurement model consistently improved model fit compared to…

  17. Management Theory Meets Student Development Theory: Implications for Student Affairs Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, Henry F.; Reister, Barry W.

    One goal of student affairs programming is the promotion of character development. Based on the assumption that empathy training will have a significant impact on character development, a study was designed which incorporated the listening skills (empathy) training of the Sierra Project (Whitely, 1982) with the Hersey/Blanchard model for…

  18. New Mouse Model May Aid in Developing Effective Therapies for Ovarian Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A new genetically engineered mouse model appears promising as an effective tool for preclinical testing of novel therapies for ovarian cancer, which tends to be diagnosed in late stage. There are few effective treatments for the disease.

  19. Preceptor Leadership Style and the Nursing Practicum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood-Rayermann, Suzy

    2003-01-01

    Preceptors' leadership characteristics influence nursing students' clinical experience. Preceptors' leadership styles can be assessed with the Myers Briggs Type Indicator or Hersey and Blanchard's Leader Behavior Analysis II instrument, which identifies four styles based on situational leadership. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  20. A Non-Profit University and a For-Profit Consulting Company Partner to a Offer a New Master's Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Gary; Dalton, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    The University of San Diego, School of Business Administration (non-profit university) and the Ken Blanchard Companies (for profit management consulting company) teamed to create the Master of Science in Executive Leadership at USD. Fusing a traditional non-profit university faculty and staff with a for-profit consulting company created a plethora…

  1. Brachymeria koehleri (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) as a Hyperparasitoid of Lespesia melloi (Diptera: Tachinidae) Pupae in Thagona tibialis (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) Caterpillars in Brazil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hyperparasitoids use the offspring of other parasitoids for their development, which can reduce the efficiency of biological control. The aim of this study was to present the first report of hyperparasitoidism by Brachymeria koehleri Blanchard, 1935 (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) in pupae of Lespesia s...

  2. Partnership to Explore New Drug Combination for Pancreatic Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer Scientists at NCI and Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) are partnering with the Lustgarten Foundation to test whether a vitamin D derivative will make a difference when combined with a conventional anticancer drug in treating tumors of the pancreas.

  3. Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance of a 10-Item Decisional Balance Scale: Longitudinal and Subgroup Examination within an Adult Diabetic Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Michael A.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the longitudinal and subgroup measurement properties of a 10-item, physical activity decisional balance scale, previously published by Plotnikoff, Blanchard, Hotz, and Rhodes (2001), within a diabetic sample of Canadian adults. Results indicated that a three-factor measurement model consistently improved model fit compared to…

  4. The Sea Breeze Convergence Zone and Its Relationship to Fair Weather Electricity in East Central Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    and Rodebust 1948; Gentry and Moore 1954; Estoque 1962; Frank et al. 1967; Neumann 1971; Pielke 1974; Blanchard and Lopez 1985; Waston et al. 1987...convection and boundary layer interactions. J. Appl. Meteor., 21, 953-977. Estoque , M.A., 1962: The sea breeze as a function of the prevailing synoptic

  5. Local crop planting systems enhance insecticide-mediated displacement of two invasive leafminer fly.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yulin; Reitz, Stuart R; Wei, Qingbo; Yu, Wenyan; Zhang, Zhi; Lei, Zhongren

    2014-01-01

    Liriomyza sativae and L. trifolii are highly invasive leafminer pests of vegetable crops that have invaded southern China in recent years. Liriomyza sativae was the first of these species to invade China, but it is now being displaced by L. trifolii. The rate and extent of this displacement vary across southern China. In Hainan, monocultures of highly valuable cowpea are planted and treated extensively with insecticides in attempts to control leafminer damage. In Guangdong, cowpea fields are interspersed with other less valuable crops, such as towel gourd (Luffa cylindrica), which receive significantly fewer insecticide applications than cowpea. To determine how differences in cropping systems influence the Liriomyza species composition, we conducted field trials in 2011 and 2012 in Guangdong where both species were present. We replicated conditions in Hainan by planting cowpea monocultures that were isolated from other agricultural fields, and we replicated conditions in Guangdong by planting cowpea in a mixed crop environment with towel gourd planted in neighboring plots. We then compared leafminer populations in cowpea treated with the insecticide avermectin and untreated cowpea. We also monitored leafminer populations in the untreated towel gourd. Untreated cowpea and towel gourd had comparatively low proportions of L. trifolii, which remained relatively stable over the course of each season. Avermectin applications led to increases in the proportions of L. trifolii, and after three weekly applications populations were >95% L. trifolii in both crop systems. However, the rate of change and persistence of L. trifolii in the mixed crop system were less than in the monocrop. These results indicate that L. trifolii is much less susceptible to avermectin than is L. sativae. Further, L. sativae was able to persist in the untreated towel gourd, which probably enabled it to recolonize treated cowpea.

  6. Local Crop Planting Systems Enhance Insecticide-Mediated Displacement of Two Invasive Leafminer Fly

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yulin; Reitz, Stuart R.; Wei, Qingbo; Yu, Wenyan; Zhang, Zhi; Lei, Zhongren

    2014-01-01

    Liriomyza sativae and L. trifolii are highly invasive leafminer pests of vegetable crops that have invaded southern China in recent years. Liriomyza sativae was the first of these species to invade China, but it is now being displaced by L. trifolii. The rate and extent of this displacement vary across southern China. In Hainan, monocultures of highly valuable cowpea are planted and treated extensively with insecticides in attempts to control leafminer damage. In Guangdong, cowpea fields are interspersed with other less valuable crops, such as towel gourd (Luffa cylindrica), which receive significantly fewer insecticide applications than cowpea. To determine how differences in cropping systems influence the Liriomyza species composition, we conducted field trials in 2011 and 2012 in Guangdong where both species were present. We replicated conditions in Hainan by planting cowpea monocultures that were isolated from other agricultural fields, and we replicated conditions in Guangdong by planting cowpea in a mixed crop environment with towel gourd planted in neighboring plots. We then compared leafminer populations in cowpea treated with the insecticide avermectin and untreated cowpea. We also monitored leafminer populations in the untreated towel gourd. Untreated cowpea and towel gourd had comparatively low proportions of L. trifolii, which remained relatively stable over the course of each season. Avermectin applications led to increases in the proportions of L. trifolii, and after three weekly applications populations were >95% L. trifolii in both crop systems. However, the rate of change and persistence of L. trifolii in the mixed crop system were less than in the monocrop. These results indicate that L. trifolii is much less susceptible to avermectin than is L. sativae. Further, L. sativae was able to persist in the untreated towel gourd, which probably enabled it to recolonize treated cowpea. PMID:24651465

  7. Personality and defensive reactions: fear, trait anxiety, and threat magnification.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Adam M; Cooper, Andrew; Abdelall, Maura; Smillie, Luke D; Corr, Philip J

    2010-06-01

    The revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (rRST) of personality (Gray & McNaughton, 2000) maintains that trait individual differences in the operation of defensive systems relate to facets of human personality, most notably anxiety and fear. We investigated this theory in 2 separate studies (total N=270) using a threat scenario research strategy (Blanchard, Hynd, Minke, Minemoto, & Blanchard, 2001). Consistent with rRST, results showed that individuals with high fear questionnaire scores tended to select defensive responses entailing orientation away from threat (e.g., run away) and that fear-prone individuals also tended to perceive threats as magnified. The extent of this threat magnification mediated the positive association observed between fear and orientation away from threat. Overall, results suggest that interindividual variance in defensive reactions is associated with a variety of existing personality constructs but that further research is required to determine the precise relationship between personality and defensive reactions.

  8. The Evolution of Al Qaeda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    www.carleton.ca/cciss/res_docs/itac/gendron_e.pdf; Internet. 26Muhammad Abd al-salam Faraj, Al-Farīdah al-Ghā’ibah, trans. Johannes J.G. Jansen and... Theo Van Gogh.91 Hoffman also supports the idea proposed by other experts like Benjamin Orbach and Keith Blanchard of the Congressional Research...religious intolerance over cartoons in Danish newspapers, the assassination of Theo Van Goeh, and increasing discontent among disassociated Muslim

  9. Wave-current interactions in megatidal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennis, A. C.; Pascal, B. D. B.; Feddy, A.; Garnier, V.; Accenti, M.; Dumas, F.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-12-01

    The strongest tidal current in western Europe (up to 12 knots) occurs in Raz Blanchard (Normandy, France). High winds occur over six months which generate energetic wave conditions with breaking waves, hence the name of `Blanchard'. However, few studies have been conducted on the wave effects on the tidal current at this location because of the lack of measurements. Studies are now required to aid the creation of tidal farms. For this purpose, the 3D fully-coupled model MARS-WW3 is used with three nested ranks which are forced at boundaries by wave spectra from HOMERE database (Boudière et al., 2013) and by sea level from the French Navy (SHOM). The model is tested against ADCP data of IRSN at three locations near Raz Blanchard. Time series of current velocity and of mean sea level are consistent with ADCP data. A rephasing by waves of the tidal current is observed in comparison with simulations without waves, which fits the ADCP data. A strong dependence of the tidal current on bottom roughness is shown as well as the necessity to take into account its spatial heterogeneity. The simulated mean sea level is close to the measured one while it was underestimated for high tide in simulations without wave effects. The vertical shape of the tidal current is especially modified near the surface by waves as expected. Depending on the tidal cycle and wave direction, acceleration or deceleration of the surface current due to waves is observed. Lastly, several hydrodynamical scenarios for Raz Blanchard are carried out for different tidal and wave conditions pending the HYD2M'17 data (ADCP, ADV, drifting wave buoys, HF and VHF and X-Band radars). First results show the impacts of refractive, shoaling and blocking effects on the flood and ebb currents.

  10. Birth order among homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Blanchard, Ray; Siegelman, Marvin

    2003-02-01

    Nicolosi and Byrd in 2002 summarized empirical research on birth order and sexual orientation in men, which research has documented that homosexual men have a later birth order than heterosexual men. They did not, however, note a more refined analysis of an earlier null finding by Siegelman. This 1998 reanalysis by Blanchard, Zucker, Siegelman, Dickey, and Klassen also confirmed the later birth order of homosexual men.

  11. Cordylobia anthropophaga (Diptera: Calliphoridae) outside Africa: a case of furuncular myiasis in a child returning from Congo.

    PubMed

    Dehecq, Eric; Nzungu, Placide Nyombe; Cailliez, Jean-Charles; Guevart, Edouart; Delhaes, Laurence; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Bourel, Benoit

    2005-03-01

    International travel to tropical countries accounts for an increasing incidence of imported diseases. An unusual case of furuncular myiasis due to Cordylobia anthropophaga (Blanchard) is reported in northern France in a 9-mo-old infant, after a 4-mo stay in Congo. A review has been made of the major cases of imported furuncular myiasis due to Cordylobia, as well as identification of second larval instars and management of the myiasis.

  12. Proposed Train and Equip Authorities for Syria: In Brief

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-03

    Proposed Train and Equip Authorities for Syria : In Brief Christopher M. Blanchard Specialist in Middle Eastern Affairs Amy Belasco...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Proposed Train and Equip Authorities for Syria : In Brief 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Authorities for Syria : In Brief Congressional Research Service Summary The FY2015 continuing appropriations resolution (H.J.Res. 124, P.L. 113-164

  13. Sea Salt Aerosol, Atmospheric Radon and Meteorological Observations in the Western South Atlantic Ocean (February 1981).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-28

    surface is currently of special interest as a generator of bubbles which later burst, producing both jet and film droplets. This mechanism is thought by...Blanchard (1963) has demonstrated that the ejection height of jet drops increases with temperature for most of the bubbles in the natural spectrum...produced at sea, but temperature effects on the size of film drops are largely unknown. However, we do not believe the temperature effect on bubble

  14. Water-Cooled Data Center Packs More Power Per Rack | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard and Ken Michaels, Staff Writers Behind each tall, black computer rack in the data center at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) is something both strangely familiar and oddly out of place: It looks like a radiator. The back door of each cabinet is gridded with the coils of the Liebert cooling system, which circulates chilled water to remove heat generated by the high-speed, high-capacity, fault-tolerant equipment.

  15. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  16. Disease-Bearing Mosquitoes of North and Central America, the West Indies, and the Philippine Islands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1913-11-01

    malarial parasite. There should be more extended study of these species and their relation to malaria. Genus , MYZOMYIA Blanchard. (Grassia Theob...Stegomyiafasciatn Fabr. ( pupa ). Bulletin 4, War. PLATE XXVI. After Howard. Culex territans Walk. ( pupa ). Disease-Bearing Mosq_uitoes-Ludlow. 81 make a general...laboratories, the reports of the Boards for the Study of Tropical Diseases, and other work of n1edical officers which is of too special or technical

  17. New Animal Model Could Boost Research on AIDS Drugs and Vaccines | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer In a research milestone reported in the June 20 issue of the journal Science, scientists have developed a minimally modified version of HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS in infected humans, that is capable of causing progressive infection and AIDS in monkeys. The advance should help create more authentic animal models of the disease and provide a potentially invaluable approach for faster and better preclinical evaluation of new drugs and vaccines.

  18. General Procedure for Protective Cooling and Equipment Evaluations Relative to Heat and Cold Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Catherine O’Brien Bruce S. Cadarette Thomas L. Endrusick Laurie A. Blanchard Xiaoxiang Xu Larry G. Berglund Michael N. Sawka Reed W. Hoyt...International Organization for Standardization, ISO 11092:1993, 1993. 22. Kenefick, R. W., N. V. Mahood, M. P. Hazzard, T. J. Quinn , and J. W...1998. 31. O’Brien, C., A. J. Young, and M. N. Sawka. Hypohydration and thermoregulation in cold air. J Appl Physiol 84: 185-189, 1998. 32. Patton

  19. Scrutinizing and Assessing the Performance of the German and U.S.-Led Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Alliance; the Rome group, composed of the family and supporters of the former King Zahir Shah; the Peshawar group, Pashtun mujahedin, tribal and religious...Afghanistan Jane’s Sentinel Security Assessment,[ 2007]) (accessed April 26, 2007). 28 Christopher M . Blanchard, Afghanistan: Narcotics and U.S. Policy...activities, primarily conducted by the Taliban, beginning in mid- 2006. Thomas H. Johnson and M . Chris Mason discuss in their article, “Understanding the

  20. Geophysicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Of the 440 people elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 15 are AGU members. They are Leo R. Beard, Duncan Blanchard, Jack E. Cermak, Leverett Davis, Jr., James E. Faller, John C. Gille, William W. Hambleton, Bruce B. Hanshaw, Peter V. Hobbs, Thomas Johnson Joiner, Donald H. Kupfer, James Pollack, Eric C. Silverberg, Arthur A. Socolow, and Kendall L. Svendsen.

  1. An Innovative Network to Improve Sea Ice Prediction in a Changing Arctic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Kumar, 2013: Seasonal prediction of Arctic sea ice extent from a coupled dynamical forecast system. Mon. Weather Rev., 141, 1375–1394. PUBLICATIONS...Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E., R.I. Cullather, W. Wang, J. Zhang, and C.M. Bitz: Model forecast skill and sensitivity to initial conditions in the seasonal ...modelers in SIPN is exploring the limits of Arctic sea ice predictability over seasonal -to-interannual time scales. We lead the design of SIO and

  2. An Assessment of the Meteorological Conditions Leading to the NOAA WP-3D Engine Compressor Stalls of February 9, 2007, Due to Sea Salt Aerosol Particle Fouling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-25

    brief rain shower . After reaching a minimum altitude of 275 m the engine was restarted and N42RF began a slow climb. Eventually engines #3 and #4...much engine efficiency was regained by the brief flight period in the rain shower while the engines were being restarted. Engineers further cautioned...Transfer Experiment, Bull. Amer. Meteor . Soc. 88, 357-374. Blanchard, D. C., A. H. Woodcock, and R. J. Cipriano (1984), The vertical distribution of

  3. Creating Common Space in Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief: Best Practices for the Operational Commander to Ensure Unity of Effort between Military and Non-Military Organizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-04

    and Rawle O. King, Piracy off the Horn of Africa (Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, 28 September 2009), 20-21, and NATO Shipping...Special report. Miami, FL: John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, 2010. http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/rwb.nsf/db900SID/VVOS- 8CZN2L?OpenDocument&RSS20...United States Institute of Peace Press, 2007. Ploch, Lauren, Christopher M. Blanchard, Ronald O’Rourke, R. Chuck Mason, and Rawle O. King. Piracy

  4. Systems Engineering: From Dream to Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Frankenstein a good systems engineer? Page 158 Created: 120211/v0.2 SSTC2011_Presentation_TEMPLATE Systems Engineering: From Dream to Reality SSTC 2011...ConstraintsSystems Engineering: From Dream to Reality Epilogue (2) Stating the Problem: Frankenstein was depressed when his mother dies. So he wanted to...Inc., 2009, Hoboken, New Jersey • Shelly,Mary, Frankenstein , Barnes & Noble Inc, 2003, New York • Blanchard, Benjamin S., System Engineering

  5. Numbers, Types and Compositions of an Unbiased Collection of Cosmic Spherules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    flux has been calculated. Another rich source for micrometeorites is Antarctic surface sediment (AS) (Hagen, 1988; Koeberl and Hagen, 1989; Harvey...noted (Blanchard et al., 1980; Koeberl and Hagen, 1989; Schramm et a/., 1989; Brownlee et al., 1997), there is a correlation between Al and Ca in...169 glass spherules and 195 stony (all types) spherules. Micrographs and analyses presented by Koeberl &d Hagen (1989) show that their Antarctic

  6. Chemical Routes to Ceramics with Tunable Properties and Structures: Chemical Routes to Nano and Micro-Structured Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-20

    2-dimensional nanoporous ceramic arrays, (5) the demonstration (in collaboration with Ken Sandhage at Georgia Tech) that diatom-templating methods...uniform silica beads. This need stimulated our interest in finding ways of achieving nanoporous ceramics more efficiently on much larger scales. Ken ...sectional view of the sample FIB milled in perpendicularly to the (111) plane and sample tilt at 52°. 14 Personnel Supported Larry G. Sneddon Blanchard

  7. The Nabidae (Insecta, Hemiptera, Heteroptera) of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marcela; Coscarón, María C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In Argentina, five genera and 14 species are recorded in the subfamilies Prostemmatinae and Nabinae: Hoplistoscelis sordidus Reuter, Lasiomerus constrictus Champion, Metatropiphorus alvarengai Reuter, Nabis argentinus Meyer-Dür, Nabis (Tropiconabis) capsiformis Germar, Nabis faminei Stål, Nabis paranensis Harris, Nabis punctipennis Blanchard, Nabis roripes Stål, Nabis setricus Harris, Nabis tandilensis Berg, Pagasa (Pagasa) costalis Reuter, Pagasa (Lampropagasa) fuscipennis Reuter and Pagasa (Pagasa) signatipennis Reuter. PMID:24146557

  8. UAVs and Patient Movement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    determining factor and is often the deciding element between life and death. An examination of the evolution of patient movement to make the case...AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY UAVs and PATIENT MOVEMENT by Brian R Blanchard, Major, USAF Doctor...depth look at the evolution of patient movement and the utilization of advanced technologies from to ultimately decrease the time to care. Future

  9. It’s Eff, En, Ell | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ken Michaels, Staff Writer The other day, in a discussion about implementing new branding standards for the name change to Frederick National Laboratory, Frank Blanchard, our public affairs director, related to me that he had recently been asked, “So how exactly do I pronounce FNL?” His answer was, “Eff, en, ell.” Why? Because FNL is not an acronym.

  10. Design of a Highly Linear Closed-Loop FMCW Sweep Generator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-08

    0 < t < T (18) Vr K T ’ " - " V Such a command would ideally generate a VCO output angular frequency of ,+(27rBIT)t. O<t<T where w, is the initial...Avr0t’ l’mea (nd iht’Itronic .% Si%’sici.. Volume AFlS-9. Number 5, September. 1973. pp. 670-678. 3. A. Blanchard. Pl/ase-l.ocked l.oop. Aplication to

  11. Dynamics of the Open Closed Field Line Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanswick, E.; Roy, E.; Nishimura, T.; Unick, C.; Jackel, B. J.; Donovan, E.

    2015-12-01

    In most cases, large-scale features of the auroral distribution are the projection, along magnetic field lines, of corresponding magnetospheric features. The poleward boundary of the oval is a key example of such a feature. At almost all local times, this is most often interpreted as the ionospheric marker of the latitudinal transition between open lobe and closed central plasma sheet field lines. Earlier work by Blanchard et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 1995 & 1997] used ground-based photometric observations of 630 nm "redline" aurora and in situ particle observations from simultaneous DMSP overflights to demonstrate that the poleward boundary of the redline aurora is a particularly robust signature of the poleward boundary of the plasma sheet. Owing to the orbits of the DMSP spacecraft and the relative newness of the photometer program (CANOPUS) that provided the optical observations, the Blanchard results represent a limited sampling of magnetic local time and a limited number of events. In this paper we revisit the Blanchard et al study, using particle data from the NASA FAST satellite and the DMSP program, together with redline observations obtained by ground-based All-Sky Imagers. Our results indicate that the Blanchard technique for identifying the polar cap boundary holds true for essentially all magnetic local times on the night side, but that the picture is more nuanced than previously appreciated. Here we present these results, and discuss specific examples where the technique does not work (and explore why). Furthermore, this work is motivated by a new extensive network of highly sensitive redline imagers that has been deployed across northern and central Canada which provides high time resolution large-scale snapshots of the instantaneous polar cap boundary. This in turn enables us to explore magnetospheric dynamics at the interface between the lobe and central plasma sheet in fundamentally new and exciting ways.

  12. Models of Weather Environments Adverse to Electro-Optical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    think that Army users could be satisfied witlt only macro- scale data. In turn, the macro- physicist feels threatened when told only extensive...16, (1973). Blanchard, D.C., and Spencer, A.T., " Experiments on the Generation of Raindrop-Size Distributions by Drop Breakup," J. Atmos. Sci., 27...R.G., "Rainfall Attenuation of Centimeter Waves: Comparison of Thoery and Measurement," Tefe Transactions on antennas and Propagation, ed. Falcone, pp

  13. It’s Eff, En, Ell | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ken Michaels, Staff Writer The other day, in a discussion about implementing new branding standards for the name change to Frederick National Laboratory, Frank Blanchard, our public affairs director, related to me that he had recently been asked, “So how exactly do I pronounce FNL?” His answer was, “Eff, en, ell.” Why? Because FNL is not an acronym.

  14. Use of Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) to Complement the Management by Objectives (MBO) and Fitness Report Components of the Marine Corps Performance Evaluation System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-06

    several years ago and obviously on another topic, the ?ranch philosopher, Jean Paul Sartre , described to stark perfaction the situation of the recruiting...ed in this appendix were extracted from a study conducted by Walter C. Borman and Paul D. Johnson of Personnel Deci- sions Research, Inc...4th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin,�. Hersey, Paul , and Kenneth H. Blanchard, els. Manaement of Organizational Behavior: Utilizing Human Resources

  15. Water-Cooled Data Center Packs More Power Per Rack | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard and Ken Michaels, Staff Writers Behind each tall, black computer rack in the data center at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) is something both strangely familiar and oddly out of place: It looks like a radiator. The back door of each cabinet is gridded with the coils of the Liebert cooling system, which circulates chilled water to remove heat generated by the high-speed, high-capacity, fault-tolerant equipment.

  16. Deadline Tightness and Performance in Operational and Logistics Contexts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT DEADLINE TIGHTNESS AND PERFORMANCE IN OPERATIONAL AND...blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED MBA professional report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DEADLINE TIGHTNESS AND PERFORMANCE IN...OPERATIONAL AND LOGISTICS CONTEXTS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jason E. Blanchard, Paul J. Kloepping, and Derek E. Vogt 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  17. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  18. User-Centered Design Driven Development of a Virtual Reality Therapy Application for Iraq War Combat-Related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Paper presented at the 10th Annual Cybertherapy Conference, Basel Switzerland , June 13-17, 2005. K Glantz, A A Rizzo & K Graap (2003), Virtual...Paper presented at the 10th Annual Cybertherapy Conference, Basel , Switzerland , June 13-17, 2005. T M Keane, D G Kaloupek, E B Blanchard, F Y Hsieh...scenario in which the patient is positioned in an urban cafe across the street from the site where a civilian bus may explode. The system controls allow

  19. Execution Of Systems Integration Principles During Systems Engineering Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Very Idea Some Thoughts about Why They Work When they Work.” Science of Computer Programming, 42.1: 11–27. Blanchard, Benjamin S., and Wolter J...degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL September 2016 Approved by...acceptable period of time.” References Brooks, Frederick P. 2010. The Design of the Design, Essays from a Computer Scientist. Boston, MA: Pearson

  20. The Impact of Synoptic-Scale Flow on Sea Breeze Front Propagation and Intensity at Eglin Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Blanchard and Lopez 1985). Numerical ( Estoque 1962; Bechtold et al. 1991; Arritt 1993) and observational (Kingsmill 1995; Atkins and Wakimoto 1997...observation and numerical research suggest that the sea breeze evolves differently under the influence of a prevailing background synoptic flow ( Estoque 1962...penetration of the sea breeze are strongly modulated by the presence of a background flow. a. Model Studies Estoque (1962) was one of the first

  1. Index to FAA Office of Aerospace Medicine Reports: 1961 Through 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    training. ADA024704/9GI 76-3 Tobias JV: Massed versus distributed practice in learned improvement of speech intelligibility. ADA024705/GGI 76-4 Constant GN...survival analysis for a cohort of retired airline pilots. ADA292060 95-6 Williams KW, Blanchard RE: Qualification guidelines for personal computer - based ...effective thoracic mass. ADA306061 96-8 Williams KW: Qualification guidelines for personal computer - based aviation training devices: Instrument rating

  2. Index to FAA Office of Aerospace Medicine Reports: 1961 through 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    ADA292060 27 Part I: Chronological Index 95-6 Wllams KW, Blanchard RE: Qualficaton gudelnes for personal computer - based avaton tranng devces...ADA306061 96-8 Wllams KW: Qualficaton gudelnes for personal computer - based avaton tranng devces: Instrument ratng. ADA306206 96-9 Stern JA...Young WC, Broach D, Farmer WL: The effects of vdeo game experence on computer - based Ar Traffic Control Specal- st, ar traffic scenaro test

  3. A Further Assessment of Blanchard’s Typology of Homosexual Versus Non-Homosexual or Autogynephilic Gender Dysphoria

    PubMed Central

    Bockting, Walter; Mason, Mona; Hwahng, Sel; Rosenblum, Andrew; Macri, Monica; Becker, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In a series of important but now highly controversial articles, Blanchard examined associations of sexual orientation and transvestic fetishism among male-to-female (MTF) transgender persons in Toronto, Canada. Transvestic fetishism was rare among the homosexuals but prevalent among the non-homosexuals. Subtypes of non-homosexual MTFs (heterosexual, bisexual, and asexual) were consistently high with regard to transvestic fetishism. Non-linear associations of a continuous measurement of sexual attraction to women (gynephilia) and transvestic fetishism were interpreted in terms of an etiological hypothesis in which transvestic fetishism interferes with the early development of heterosexuality. Blanchard concluded that homosexual versus non-homosexual sexual orientation is a dominant and etiologically significant axis for evaluating and understanding this population. We further assessed these findings among 571 MTFs from the New York City metropolitan area. Using the Life Chart Interview, multiple measurements of transvestic fetishism were obtained and classified as lifetime, lifecourse persistent, adolescent limited, and adult onset. Large (but not deterministic) differences in lifetime, lifecourse persistent, and adolescent limited transvestic fetishism were found between the homosexuals and non-homosexuals. Contrary to Blanchard, differences in transvestic fetishism were observed across subtypes of the non-homosexuals, and linear (not curvilinear) associations were found along a continuous measurement of gynephilia and transvestic fetishism. Age and ethnicity, in addition to sexual orientation, were found to be statistically significant predictors of transvestic fetishism. The clinical, etiological, and sociopolitical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:20039113

  4. Pesticide compatibility with natural enemies for pest management in greenhouse gerbera daisies.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Cheri M; Braman, S K; Oetting, R D; Hinkle, N C

    2013-08-01

    Pesticides commonly used in commercial greenhouse management were evaluated for compatibility with two biological control agents: a leafminer parasitoid (Diglyphus isaea [Walker]), and a predatory mite (Neoseiulus californicus [McGregor]). These natural enemies were exposed to miticides, fungicides, and insecticides targeting leafminers, thrips, and whiteflies, according to label directions in laboratory vial assays, after which mortality at 12, 24, and 48 h was recorded. Greater mortality of predatory mites than leafminer parasitoids was observed overall, illustrating that fewer pesticides were compatible with predatory mites compared with the parasitoid. However, some commonly used pesticides were found to cause high mortality to both the leafminer parasitoid and predatory mites. Twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch) infestations often disrupt leafminer (Liriomyza trifolii [Burgess]) biocontrol programs. Therefore, potentially compatible miticides (bifenazate, hexythiazox, spiromesifen, acequinocyl, etoxazole, and clofentezine) identified in laboratory trials were also evaluated in a greenhouse study and found to be compatible with leafminer biocontrol.

  5. Insecticide-Mediated Apparent Displacement between Two Invasive Species of Leafminer Fly

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yulin; Reitz, Stuart R.; Wei, Qingbo; Yu, Wenyan; Lei, Zhongren

    2012-01-01

    Background Closely related invasive species may often displace one another, but it is often difficult to determine mechanisms because of the historical nature of these events. The leafmining flies Liriomyza sativae and Liriomyza trifolii have become serious invasive agricultural pests throughout the world. Where both species have invaded the same region, one predominates over the other. Although L. sativae invaded Hainan Island of China first, it recently has been displaced by the newly invasive L. trifolii. We hypothesized that differential susceptibilities to insecticides could be causing this demographic shift. Methodology/Principal Findings Avermectin and cyromazine are the most commonly used insecticides to manage leafminers, with laboratory bioassays demonstrating that L. trifolii is significantly less susceptible to these key insecticides than is L. sativae. In trials where similar numbers of larvae of both species infested plants, which subsequently were treated with the insecticides, the eclosing adults were predominately L. trifolii, yet similar numbers of adults of both species eclosed from control plants. The species composition was then surveyed in two regions where L. trifolii has just begun to invade and both species are still common. In field trials, both species occurred in similar proportions before insecticide treatments began. Following applications of avermectin and cyromazine, almost all eclosing adults were L. trifolii in those treatment plots. In control plots, similar numbers of adults of the two species eclosed, lending further credence to the hypothesis that differential insecticide susceptibilities could be driving the ongoing displacement of L. sativae by L. trifolii. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that differential insecticide susceptibility can lead to rapid shifts in the demographics of pest complexes. Thus, successful pest management requires the identification of pest species to understand the outcome of insecticide

  6. Hebephilia as mental disorder? A historical, cross-cultural, sociological, cross-species, non-clinical empirical, and evolutionary review.

    PubMed

    Rind, Bruce; Yuill, Richard

    2012-08-01

    Blanchard et al. (2009) demonstrated that hebephilia is a genuine sexual preference, but then proposed, without argument or evidence, that it should be designated as a mental disorder in the DSM-5. A series of Letters-to-the-Editor criticized this proposal as a non sequitur. Blanchard (2009), in rebuttal, reaffirmed his position, but without adequately addressing some central criticisms. In this article, we examine hebephilia-as-disorder in full detail. Unlike Blanchard et al., we discuss definitions of mental disorder, examine extensive evidence from a broad range of sources, and consider alternative (i.e., non-pathological) explanations for hebephilia. We employed Wakefield's (1992b) harmful dysfunction approach to disorder, which holds that a condition only counts as a disorder when it is a failure of a naturally selected mechanism to function as designed, which is harmful to the individual in the current environment. We also considered a harmful-for-others approach to disorder (Brülde, 2007). Examination of historical, cross-cultural, sociological, cross-species, non-clinical empirical, and evolutionary evidence and perspectives indicated that hebephilic interest is an evolved capacity and hebephilic preference an expectable distributional variant, both of which were adaptively neutral or functional, not dysfunctional, in earlier human environments. Hebephilia's conflict with modern society makes it an evolutionary mismatch, not a genuine disorder. Though it should not be classified as a disorder, it could be entered in the DSM's V-code [corrected] section, used for non-disordered conditions that create significant problems in present-day society.

  7. The leader as a retention specialist.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, K

    2000-08-01

    Retention problems will plague us for the near future. Blanchard and Waghorn (1997) believe that everyone wants to be magnificent, and not just ordinary. Unfortunately, often we expect only the ordinary and not the magnificient. People respond to our expectations. We can help staff to achieve magnificence by providing unconditional love and remembering that people are magnificent. Sometimes their behavior is a problem and certain things block the expression of their greatness, but all people are magnificent. If we create "sanctuaries of caring" where nurses and others are given the opportunity to achieve their innate nobility and magnificence, people will flock to participate in the noble and magnificent experience of patient care.

  8. The leader as a retention specialist.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, K

    2000-01-01

    Retention problems will plague us for the near future. Blanchard and Waghorn (1997) believe that everyone wants to be magnificent, and not just ordinary. Unfortunately, often we expect only the ordinary and not the magnificent. People respond to our expectations. We can help staff to achieve magnificence by providing unconditional love and remembering that people are magnificent. Sometimes their behavior is a problem and certain things block the expression of their greatness, but all people are magnificent. If we create "sanctuaries of caring" where nurses and others are given the opportunity to achieve their innate nobility and magnificence, people will flock to participate in the noble and magnificent experience of patient care.

  9. Larval and pupal descriptions of Anomalini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae) species from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Valentina; Onore, Giovanni; Guidolin, Laura

    2017-02-02

    The third instars are described and illustrated for five Anomalini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae) species from Ecuador: Anomala balzapambae Ohaus, 1897, A. popayana Ohaus, 1897, A. valida Burmeister, 1844, Callistethus buchwaldianus (Ohaus, 1908), and C. levii (Blanchard, 1851). The pupae of three Ecuadorian species are also described and illustrated: A. discoidalis Bates, 1888, A. popayana, and C. levii. Diagnostic characters of the species are provided. A key to the known larvae of Anomalini from the New World is provided, which now includes five genera and 31 species.

  10. The type specimens of Tachinidae (Diptera) housed in the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Mulieri, Pablo Ricardo; Patitucci, Luciano Damián; Bachmann, Axel Oscar; O'Hara, James E

    2013-01-01

    The type material of species of Tachinidae (Diptera) housed in the collection of the Entomology Division of the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" were examined and are herein documented. The collection contains 202 type specimens consisting of 54 species described by E.E. Blanchard and 12 described by J. Brèthes. Comparison of their original descriptions with the label information reveals the existence of 24 holotypes, 1 lectotype, 141 syntypes and 36 paratypes. Complete information is given for each type, including reference to the original description, label data, and preservation condition.

  11. Synopsis of the genus Pharaonus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae), with descriptions of new taxa.

    PubMed

    Keith, Denis; Sabatinelli, Guido; Uliana, Marco

    2015-09-02

    An overview of the genus Pharaonus Blanchard, 1851 is presented. Pharaonus farsensis new species and P. adelphus new species are described from Iran, P. lederi turcmenius Ohaus, 1941 is recognized as new synonym of P. lederi (Reitter, 1888), and the subgenus Tamerlanius new subgenus is proposed for the two central-Asian species. New distribution records and systematic notes are presented: P. caucasicus (Reitter, 1888) is removed from the fauna of Iran and P. varicoloreus (Burmeister, 1844) from that of Israel; P. fasciculatus (Burmeister, 1844) is reported for the first time from Israel, P. semenowi (Reitter, 1888) from Tajikistan. All known species are illustrated and a key to species is presented.

  12. [The leadership style exercised by nurses in surgical wards focuses on situational leadership].

    PubMed

    Galvão, C M; Trevizan, M A; Sawada, N O; Fávero, N

    1997-04-01

    The present study was oriented to the leadership theme focussing nurses inside surgical ward unities. As a theoretical reference, the authors used the Situational Leadership Model proposed by Hersey and Blanchard. This study aimed at analysing the correspondence between the opinions of nurses and auxiliary personnel about the leadership style exerted by nurses in the surgical ward unit regarding the six categories of the assistance activity that were studied. Authors noticed that nurses, from the two studied hospitals, adopted the directive leadership styles (E2/selling or E1/telling) with the auxiliary personnel.

  13. Community transformation through culturally competent nursing leadership: application of theory of culture care diversity and universality and tri-dimensional leader effectiveness model.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Mina L; Miller, June; White, Kathleen

    2006-04-01

    Transcultural knowledge and competency have become a critical need for nurses to accommodate the global trends in cultural diversity and health care disparities. Today, nurses are increasingly taking on leadership roles in community settings. This article addresses the application of Leininger's culture care theory with the sunrise model and Hersey and Blanchard's tri-dimensional leader effectiveness model as potential collaborating theories for capacity building and community transformation from a global, transcultural nursing perspective. The two theories, used in collaboration, view the provision of competent leadership as the delivery of effective, culturally congruent nursing care in promoting health and health equity at the community level.

  14. 10-Methyldodecanal, a Novel Attractant Pheromone Produced by Males of the South American Cerambycid Beetle Eburodacrys vittata.

    PubMed

    Silva, Weliton D; Millar, Jocelyn G; Hanks, Lawrence M; Bento, José Maurício S

    2016-01-01

    We report the identification, synthesis, and field bioassay of a novel attractant pheromone produced by males of Eburodacrys vittata (Blanchard), a South American cerambycid beetle in the subfamily Cerambycinae. Headspace volatiles from males contained a sex-specific compound, identified as 10-methyldodecanal. In a field bioassay conducted in Brazil, significant numbers of males and females were caught in traps baited with synthesized racemic 10-methyldodecanal, consistent with the aggregation-sex pheromones produced by males of many cerambycine species. This compound represents a new structural class of cerambycid pheromones, and it is the first pheromone identified for a species in the tribe Eburiini.

  15. 10-Methyldodecanal, a Novel Attractant Pheromone Produced by Males of the South American Cerambycid Beetle Eburodacrys vittata

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Jocelyn G.; Hanks, Lawrence M.; Bento, José Maurício S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the identification, synthesis, and field bioassay of a novel attractant pheromone produced by males of Eburodacrys vittata (Blanchard), a South American cerambycid beetle in the subfamily Cerambycinae. Headspace volatiles from males contained a sex-specific compound, identified as 10-methyldodecanal. In a field bioassay conducted in Brazil, significant numbers of males and females were caught in traps baited with synthesized racemic 10-methyldodecanal, consistent with the aggregation-sex pheromones produced by males of many cerambycine species. This compound represents a new structural class of cerambycid pheromones, and it is the first pheromone identified for a species in the tribe Eburiini. PMID:27512985

  16. FDA Approves Immunotherapy for a Cancer that Affects Infants and Children | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved dinutuximab (ch14.18) as an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that offers poor prognosis for about half of the children who are affected. The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Biopharmaceutical Development Program (BDP) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research produced ch14.18 for the NCI-sponsored clinical trials that proved the drug’s effectiveness against the disease.

  17. Tree planters' notes, Volume 44, Number 2, Spring 1993. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Mangold, R.; Nisley, R.; Karrfalt, R.; Landis, T.; Lantz, C.

    1993-01-01

    Contents: our new editorial policy is working; calculating filled and empty cells based on number of seeds sown per cell: a microcomputer application; effect of root form on 10-year survival and growth of planted douglas-fir trees; presowing treatments affect shortleaf pine seed germination and seedling development; taylorilygus pallidulus (blanchard): a potential pest of pine seedlings; fertilization affects growth and incidence of grey mold on container-grown giant sequoia; top pruning improves field performance of blue oak seedlings; and hackberry seed sources for planting in the southern great plains.

  18. FDA Approves Immunotherapy for a Cancer that Affects Infants and Children | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved dinutuximab (ch14.18) as an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that offers poor prognosis for about half of the children who are affected. The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Biopharmaceutical Development Program (BDP) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research produced ch14.18 for the NCI-sponsored clinical trials that proved the drug’s effectiveness against the disease.

  19. Development of an Interactive Control Engineering Computer Analysis Package (ICECAP) for Discrete and Continuous Systems. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    and Full-State Feedback Controller Design via Pole-Placement Methods (3) 2.3.1.26 Z-Domain Stability Analysis (2) 2.3.1.26.1 Jury- Blanchard Test (2...0 0 C) tn EM- ’-I- raz E rzru I-iIV 0 4.1 0 02 Uz0 󈧭 $0 4 94a 00 E-4’ U 0LIII-4 C,0 M STRUCTURE CHARTS 0 H I 044 z 0 E-40 :0. 1.4 A-14 STRUCTURE...featuring AC analysis, transient analysis, DC, noise, sensitivity, driving point impedance, Fourier, temperature , distortion, transfer characteristics

  20. An Evaluation of River Restoration Techniques in Northwestern Ohio.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    34. FOREWORD During the 1970’s, George Palmiter, a railroad switchman interested in _ canoeing, began to devise ways to unclog and restore stretches of...channel is used to protect " rod - in banks and/or to divert flow to./.,ard a bar that is restricting flow. The remi:ainder of the material is allcy.,ed...Johnny darter* Logperch darter* Central redfin sculpin* (Northern mottled sculpin) N. E. sand shiner* Hog sucker * Blanchard, Tiffin’ Bean Creek’ Creek

  1. Situational Leadership in Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidsson, Marcus; Johansson, Curt R.; Ek, Asa; Akselsson, Roland

    2007-01-01

    In high-risk environments such as air traffic control, leadership on different levels plays a certain role in establishing, promoting, and maintaining a good safety culture. The current study aimed to investigate how leadership styles, leadership style adaptability, and over and under task leadership behavior differed across situations, operative conditions, leadership structures, and working tasks in an air traffic control setting. Study locations were two air traffic control centers in Sweden with different operational conditions and leadership structures, and an administrative air traffic management unit. Leadership was measured with a questionnaire based on Leader Effectiveness and Adaptability Description (LEAD; Blanchard, Zigarmi & Zigarmi, 2003; Hersey & Blanchard, 1988). The results showed that the situation had strong impact on the leadership in which the leadership behavior was more relationship oriented in Success and Group situations than in Hardship and Individual situations. The leadership adaptability was further superior in Success and Individual situations compared with Hardship and Group situations. Operational conditions, leadership structures and working tasks were, on the other hand, not associated with leadership behavior.

  2. A taxonomic revision of Neoserica (sensu lato): the species groups N. lubrica, N. obscura, and N. silvestris (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Sericini)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wan-Gang; Fabrizi, Silvia; Bai, Ming; Ahrens, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The species of the Neoserica lubrica Brenske, 1898, Neoserica obscura (Blanchard, 1850) and Neoserica silvestris Brenske, 1902 species groups are revised. The study resulted in the following new synonymies and combinations: Neoserica obscura (Blanchard, 1850) = Microserica roeri Frey, 1972, syn. n., = Maladera chinensis (Arrow, 1946), syn. n.; Neoserica hainana (Brenske, 1898), comb. n., and Neoserica minor (Arrow, 1946), comb. n. The known species are redescribed. The following nine new species are described from China: Neoserica allobscura Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n., Neoserica dongjiafenensis Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n., Neoserica fugongensis Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n., Neoserica mantillerii Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n., Neoserica menglunensis Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n., Neoserica pseudosilvestris Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n., Neoserica sakoliana Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n., Neoserica shuyongi Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n., and Neoserica tahianensis Ahrens, Fabrizi & Liu, sp. n. A key to the Sericini genera with multilamellate antenna, species groups of Neoserica of mainland Asia, and species of the species groups examined here are provided. Maps of the species distribution are provided, habitus and male genitalia are illustrated. PMID:27917061

  3. The Prevalence of Only-Child Status Among Children and Adolescents Referred to a Gender Identity Service Versus a Clinical Comparison Group.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S Kathleen; VanderLaan, Doug P; Blanchard, Ray; Wood, Hayley; Wasserman, Lori; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2016-07-11

    Several studies indicate that homosexual males have a high proportion of older brothers compared to heterosexual males. Natal males with gender dysphoria who are likely to be homosexual also display this sibship pattern. Until recently, there was little evidence linking homosexuality and/or gender dysphoria in females to unique sibship characteristics. Two studies have indicated that natal female youth clinically referred for gender dysphoria are more likely to be only children (Schagen, Delemarre-van de Waal, Blanchard, & Cohen-Kettenis, 2012; VanderLaan, Blanchard, Wood, & Zucker, 2014). However, these studies did not include control groups of youth clinically referred for other reasons. Thus, it is unclear whether the increased likelihood of only-child status is specific to gender-referred natal females. This study compared only-child status among youth referred to a mental health service for gender dysphoria (778 males, 245 females) versus other reasons (783 males, 281 females). Prehomosexual gender-referred males were less likely to be only children than clinical controls. Contrary to previous findings, gender-referred females were not more likely to be only children, indicating that increased likelihood of only-child status is not specific to gender-referred females, but is characteristic of clinic-referred females more generally.

  4. Late Quaternary changes in bat palaeobiodiversity and palaeobiogeography under climatic and anthropogenic pressure: new insights from Marie-Galante, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoetzel, Emmanuelle; Royer, Aurélien; Cochard, David; Lenoble, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    Data on Lesser Antillean Late Quaternary fossil bat assemblages remains limited, leading to their general exclusion from studies focusing on Caribbean bat palaeobiodiversity and palaeobiogeography. Additionally, the role of climatic versus human pressure driving changes in faunal communities remains poorly understood. Here we describe a fossil bat assemblage from Blanchard Cave on Marie-Galante in the Lesser Antilles, which produced numerous bat remains from a well-dated, stratified context. Our study reveals the occurrence of at least 12 bat species during the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene on Marie-Galante, whereas only eight species are currently known on the island. Among these 12 species, six are extirpated and one is extinct. Faunal changes within the Blanchard sequence indicate variations in Pleistocene bat species representation in the Lesser Antilles to have been influenced by climatic conditions, with "northern species" (Greater Antilles) favored during glacial conditions and "southern species" (southern Lesser Antilles) during interglacial events. However, few species disappeared at the end of the Late Pleistocene, with most of the extinction/extirpation events occurring during the Holocene. This pattern suggests human activities in the Lesser Antilles to have played a major role in bat turnover during the late Holocene.

  5. A high-resolution temporal record of environmental changes in the Eastern Caribbean (Guadeloupe) from 40 to 10 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Aurélien; Malaizé, Bruno; Lécuyer, Christophe; Queffelec, Alain; Charlier, Karine; Caley, Thibaut; Lenoble, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    In neotropical regions, fossil bat guano accumulated over time as laminated layers in caves, hence providing a high-resolution temporal record of terrestrial environmental changes. Additionally, cave settings have the property to preserve such organic sediments from processes triggered by winds (deflation, abrasion and sandblasting) and intense rainfall (leaching away). This study reports both stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of frugivorous bat guano deposited in a well-preserved stratigraphic succession of Blanchard Cave on Marie-Galante, Guadeloupe. These isotopic data are discussed with regard to climate changes and its specific impact on Eastern Caribbean vegetation during the Late Pleistocene from 40 to 10 ka cal. BP. Guano δ13C values are higher than modern ones, suggesting noticeable vegetation changes. This provides also evidence for overall drier environmental conditions during the Pleistocene compared to today. Meanwhile, within this generally drier climate, shifts between wetter and drier conditions can be observed. Large temporal amplitudes in both δ13C and δ15N variations reaching up to 5.9‰ and 16.8‰, respectively, also indicate these oceanic tropical environments have been highly sensitive to regional or global climatic forcing. Stable isotope compositions of bat guano deposited from 40 to 35 ka BP, the Last Glacial Maximum and the Younger-Dryas reveal relatively wet environmental conditions whereas, at least from the end of the Heinrich event 1 and the Bølling period the region experienced drier environmental conditions. Nevertheless, when considering uncertainties in the model age, the isotopic record of Blanchard Cave show relatively similar variations with known proxy records from the northern South America and Central America, suggesting thus that the Blanchard Cave record is a robust proxy of past ITCZ migration. Teleconnections through global atmospheric pattern suggest that islands of the eastern Caribbean Basin could

  6. Use of pine nuts by grizzly and black bears in the Yellowstone area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, Katherine C.

    1983-01-01

    The large seeds (pine nuts) of whitebark pine are commonly eaten in the spring (March-May) and fall (September-November) by grizzly and black bears in Yellowstone National Park and adjacent areas (Craighead and Craighead 1972, Blanchard 1978, Mealey 1980) and western Montana (Tisch 1961; J. Sumner and J. J. Craighead, unpubl. rep., Montant Coop. Wildl. Res. Unit, Univ. Montana, Missoula, 1973). Similar nuts from limber pine are eaten by grizzly bears on the east Rocky Mountain Front of northwestern Montana (Schallenberger and Jonkel, annual rep., Border Grizzly Project, Univ. Montana, Missoula, 1980). The nuts of the European stone pine (P. cembra) are an important food for brown bears (U. arctos) throughout the taiga zone in the Soviet Union (Pavlov and Zhdanov 1972, Ustinov 1972, Yazan 1972). Both the production of whitebark pine cones (Forcella 1977, Blanchard 1978, Mealey 1980) and the quantity of nuts consumed by bears vary annually (Mealey 1975, Blancard 1978). Pine nuts are also an important food for red squirrels in whitebark forests. In fall, squirrels remove cones from trees and cache them in middens. Bears as well as other mammalian and avian seed predators compete with squirrels for whitebark nuts (Forcella 1977, Tomback 1977). Confusion about the ripening process of whitebark pine cones has resulted in errors in the literature on the availability of pine nuts as a bear food. Whitebark cones are indehiscent and do not disintegrate (Tomback 1981). Vertebrate foraging probably leaves few, if any, seed-bearing cones on trees by late fall; the cones remaining abscise sometime thereafter (Tomback 1981). Because cones do not abscise or release their seed in fall, bears may obtain pine nuts in 2 ways. Black bears may climb whitebark pine trees and break off cone-bearing brnahces to feed on cones (Tisch 1961, Mealey 1975, Forcella 1977); or both black bears and grizzly bears may raid squirrel caches to feed on pine nuts (Tisch 1961, Craighead and Craighead 1972

  7. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  8. Wing-kinematics measurement and aerodynamics in a small insect in hovering flight

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xin; Sun, Mao

    2016-01-01

    Wing-motion of hovering small fly Liriomyza sativae was measured using high-speed video and flows of the wings calculated numerically. The fly used high wingbeat frequency (≈265 Hz) and large stroke amplitude (≈182°); therefore, even if its wing-length (R) was small (R ≈ 1.4 mm), the mean velocity of wing reached ≈1.5 m/s, the same as that of an average-size insect (R ≈ 3 mm). But the Reynolds number (Re) of wing was still low (≈40), owing to the small wing-size. In increasing the stroke amplitude, the outer parts of the wings had a “clap and fling” motion. The mean-lift coefficient was high, ≈1.85, several times larger than that of a cruising airplane. The partial “clap and fling” motion increased the lift by ≈7%, compared with the case of no aerodynamic interaction between the wings. The fly mainly used the delayed stall mechanism to generate the high-lift. The lift-to-drag ratio is only 0.7 (for larger insects, Re being about 100 or higher, the ratio is 1–1.2); that is, although the small fly can produce enough lift to support its weight, it needs to overcome a larger drag to do so. PMID:27168523

  9. Wing-kinematics measurement and aerodynamics in a small insect in hovering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xin; Sun, Mao

    2016-05-01

    Wing-motion of hovering small fly Liriomyza sativae was measured using high-speed video and flows of the wings calculated numerically. The fly used high wingbeat frequency (≈265 Hz) and large stroke amplitude (≈182°) therefore, even if its wing-length (R) was small (R ≈ 1.4 mm), the mean velocity of wing reached ≈1.5 m/s, the same as that of an average-size insect (R ≈ 3 mm). But the Reynolds number (Re) of wing was still low (≈40), owing to the small wing-size. In increasing the stroke amplitude, the outer parts of the wings had a “clap and fling” motion. The mean-lift coefficient was high, ≈1.85, several times larger than that of a cruising airplane. The partial “clap and fling” motion increased the lift by ≈7%, compared with the case of no aerodynamic interaction between the wings. The fly mainly used the delayed stall mechanism to generate the high-lift. The lift-to-drag ratio is only 0.7 (for larger insects, Re being about 100 or higher, the ratio is 1–1.2) that is, although the small fly can produce enough lift to support its weight, it needs to overcome a larger drag to do so.

  10. Wing-kinematics measurement and aerodynamics in a small insect in hovering flight.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Sun, Mao

    2016-05-11

    Wing-motion of hovering small fly Liriomyza sativae was measured using high-speed video and flows of the wings calculated numerically. The fly used high wingbeat frequency (≈265 Hz) and large stroke amplitude (≈182°); therefore, even if its wing-length (R) was small (R ≈ 1.4 mm), the mean velocity of wing reached ≈1.5 m/s, the same as that of an average-size insect (R ≈ 3 mm). But the Reynolds number (Re) of wing was still low (≈40), owing to the small wing-size. In increasing the stroke amplitude, the outer parts of the wings had a "clap and fling" motion. The mean-lift coefficient was high, ≈1.85, several times larger than that of a cruising airplane. The partial "clap and fling" motion increased the lift by ≈7%, compared with the case of no aerodynamic interaction between the wings. The fly mainly used the delayed stall mechanism to generate the high-lift. The lift-to-drag ratio is only 0.7 (for larger insects, Re being about 100 or higher, the ratio is 1-1.2); that is, although the small fly can produce enough lift to support its weight, it needs to overcome a larger drag to do so.

  11. New Acotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) from the east coast of the North Atlantic Ocean with special mention of the Iberian littoral.

    PubMed

    Noreña, Carolina; Rodríguez, Jorge; Pérez, Jacinto; Almon, Bruno

    2015-11-03

    Polyclad species diversity, although generally well known for European North Atlantic waters, is nearly unknown for the Iberian Peninsula. The "Ría de Arousa", located on the Atlantic coast of Galicia (Spain), is a place where many positive biological factors for species biodiversity converge. Therefore, it is an ideal location to study polyclad diversity. This research, which describes new records and new species, contributes to the knowledge of the distribution of Polycladida (Platyhelminthes), particularly of the suborder Acotylea, in the Atlantic waters of the Iberian Peninsula. The new records include the re-descriptions of Cryptocelis compacta Lang, 1884, Stylochus neapolitanus (Delle Chiaje, 1841-1844) and Discocelis tigrina (Blanchard, 1847), while the two newly described species are Hoploplana elisabelloi n. sp. and Armatoplana celta n. sp.

  12. Scanning Electron Microscopy Investigations of Third-Instar Larva of Cordylobia rodhaini (Diptera: Calliphoridae), an Agent of Furuncular Myiasis.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, M; Cultrera, R; Chicca, M; Leis, M

    2015-05-01

    A scanning electron microscopy study of the third larval instar of Cordylobia rodhaini Gedoelst (Diptera: Calliphoridae), causing obligatory furuncular myiasis, is presented here for the first time. The larvae were collected from a patient exposed to them in the tropical rainforest of Kibale National Park (Uganda). Distinctive features are described in sequence from the anterior region to the posterior region, highlighting the morphological features of antennae, maxillary palps, structures related to mouth opening, sensory structures, thoracic and abdominal spines, and anterior and posterior spiracles. The results are compared with those of other Calyptrata flies, mainly from the family Calliphoridae and, when possible, with Cordylobia anthropophaga Blanchard (Diptera: Calliphoridae), the only other species of genus Cordylobia investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. [Detection of triatomines (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in domiciliary and extra-domiciliary ecotopes. Corrientes, Argentina. ].

    PubMed

    Damborsky, M P; Bar, M E; Oscherov, E B

    2001-01-01

    In order to identify intra- and extra-domiciliary triatomines, a study in different counties of Corrientes Province, Argentina, was conducted from 1985 to 1995. Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834), Triatoma sordida (Stål, 1859), Panstrongylus geniculatus (Latreille, 1811), and Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister, 1835) were detected in domestic ecotopes. T. infestans and T. sordida were also found in the peridomicile. Triatoma platensis (Neiva, 1913), Psammolestes coreodes (Bergroth, 1911), T. sordida, and Triatoma rubrovaria (Blanchard, 1843) were collected in sylvatic biotopes. T. infestans was confirmed as the predominant species in the domestic environment and was the only species infected with Trypanosoma cruzi-like parasites. T. sordida was most frequent in extra-domiciliary ecotopes, but could be considered capable of colonizing human dwellings.

  14. The genus Anisoscelis Latreille (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae: Coreinae: Anisoscelini): new species, taxonomical arrangements, distributional records and key.

    PubMed

    Brailovsky, Harry

    2016-07-27

    Anisoscelis currently comprises nine species and has been recorded from Texas (here recorded for the first time) on the south of the United States of North America across Mexico, Central and South America, but absent in Chile and the Great and Lesser Antilles; Anisoscelis (Bitta) flavolineatus Blanchard, 1849 is placed in synonym under Anisoscelis (Bitta) alipes Guérin-Méneville, 1831, and Anisoscelis (Bitta) flavolineatus osunai Brailovsky and Mayorga, 1995 is placed in synonymy under Anisoscelis (Bitta) hymenipherus Westwood, 1840; Anisoscelis (Anisoscelis) marginellus (Dallas) previously considered a subspecies under Anisoscelis (Anisoscelis) foliaceus (Fabricius) is removed to specific rank; a new species A. (Bitta) luridus from México is described. Photographs of dorsal habitus and parameres and key to the known species are included. New distributional records for most of the species are given; food plants records are included with an apparent trophic preferences for member of the genus Passiflora. A complete checklist, with subgeneric position of each species is given.

  15. Conditional Akaike information under generalized linear and proportional hazards mixed models

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, M. C.; Overholser, R.; Xu, R.; Vaida, F.

    2011-01-01

    We study model selection for clustered data, when the focus is on cluster specific inference. Such data are often modelled using random effects, and conditional Akaike information was proposed in Vaida & Blanchard (2005) and used to derive an information criterion under linear mixed models. Here we extend the approach to generalized linear and proportional hazards mixed models. Outside the normal linear mixed models, exact calculations are not available and we resort to asymptotic approximations. In the presence of nuisance parameters, a profile conditional Akaike information is proposed. Bootstrap methods are considered for their potential advantage in finite samples. Simulations show that the performance of the bootstrap and the analytic criteria are comparable, with bootstrap demonstrating some advantages for larger cluster sizes. The proposed criteria are applied to two cancer datasets to select models when the cluster-specific inference is of interest. PMID:22822261

  16. Preliminary map showing limonitic areas in the Silver City 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Arizona and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, Gary L.

    1984-01-01

    This map is a part of a folio of maps of the Silver City 1o x 2o quadrangle, Arizona and New Mexico, prepared under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program. As a part of this study Landstat images were used to map the anomalous areas of limonitic materials as a guide to hydrothermal alteration which, in turn, acts as a guide to mineralized systems. The term limonite, defined by Blanchard (1968) as a general term for undifferentiated ferric oxide percipitates, is here modified to include any mineral with the typical spectral reflectance properties of the ferric oxide minerals such as hematite and goethite, as defined by Hunt (1980). The nap shows anomalous areas of limonitic miaterials that might be associated with mineralization. 

  17. Characterizing Fatigue: The Effects of Ethnicity and Acculturation

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Elizabeth D.; Loredo, Jose S.; Murray, Kate E.; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    It is unknown if fatigue measures like the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form (MFSI-SF; Stein, Jacobsen, Blanchard, & Thors, 2004) appropriately describe fatigue in Hispanics or if acculturation plays a role in fatigue. This study compared fatigue in community samples of Hispanics and Anglos. The MFSI-SF and pertinent questionnaires were administered to adults in San Diego County via telephone survey. Some differences in fatigue were observed in initial comparisons between Hispanics and Anglos, including when acculturation was considered. When age and education were controlled, Hispanics reported less general fatigue than Anglos, regardless of acculturation status, p = < .01. Exploratory factor analyses indicate that the MFSI-SF general-fatigue subscale was problematic for Hispanics. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed. PMID:22773899

  18. A review of the genus Paramoniezia Maplestone et Southwell, 1923 (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae), with a new genus, Phascolocestus, from wombats (Marsupialia) and redescriptions of Moniezia mettami Baylis, 1934 and Moniezia phacochoeri (Baylis, 1927) comb. n. from African warthogs (Artiodactyla).

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Paramoniezia suis Maplestone et Southwell, 1923 is redescribed from the type and only specimen, and is considered to be a genus inquirendum and species inquirenda, possibly based on a host misidentification. Paramoniezia phacochoeri Baylis, 1927 is redescribed from new material from Phacochoerus africanus (Gmelin) from South Africa and is transferred to Moniezia Blanchard. 1891 as M. phacochoeri (Baylis, 1927) comb. n. A redescription of M. mettami Baylis, 1934, also from Ph. africanus, establishes the independence of the two congeneric species parasitizing warthogs. A new genus, Phascolocestus, is erected for Paramoniezia johnstoni Beveridge, 1976 from vombatid marsupials as Phascolocestus johnstoni (Beveridge, 1976) comb. n., and additional host and distributional data are provided for this species.

  19. Defining paraphilia in DSM-5: do not disregard grammar.

    PubMed

    Hinderliter, Andrew C

    2011-01-01

    Blanchard (2009a, 2009b, 2009c) proposed a definition of paraphilia for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-5, delimiting a range of so-called normative sexuality and defining paraphilia as any intense and persistent sexual interest other than that. The author examines the wording and intended meaning of this definition, and he argues that there are many problems with it that "correct" interpretation requires ignoring what it says. Because of these problems and the possibility of civil commitment under sexually violent predator/person laws on the basis of a diagnosis of paraphilia NOS, caution and careful consideration of grammar and wording is urged in drafting a definition for paraphilia for DSM-5.

  20. Overcoming the four toughest management challenges. Increase your effectiveness by using situational leadership.

    PubMed

    Ketchum, S M

    1991-01-01

    The high-pressure work environment of the clinical laboratory presents significant challenges for managers. Often thrust into supervisory roles without formal management training, laboratory managers must find ways to delegate tasks, mediate conflict, minimize office politics, and build effective teams out of employees who may be quite diverse in their experience levels, motivation levels, and cultural backgrounds. This article explores the concept of situational leadership, which was developed by Ken Blanchard and Paul Hersey, and its applicability within the clinical laboratory. This practical paradigm involves matching one of four distinct management styles to the four development levels of employees. Each leadership style is explained, along with guidelines for giving performance feedback to employees, so that managers can evaluate their own supervisory styles. Finally, step-by-step recommendations for coping with the four management roles of delegator, referee, influencer, and team builder are presented.

  1. Can we (control) Engineer the degree learning process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. S.; Censlive, M.; Neilsen, D.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates how control theory could be applied to learning processes in engineering education. The initial point for the analysis is White's Double Loop learning model of human automation control modified for the education process where a set of governing principals is chosen, probably by the course designer. After initial training the student decides unknowingly on a mental map or model. After observing how the real world is behaving, a strategy to achieve the governing variables is chosen and a set of actions chosen. This may not be a conscious operation, it maybe completely instinctive. These actions will cause some consequences but not until a certain time delay. The current model is compared with the work of Hollenbeck on goal setting, Nelson's model of self-regulation and that of Abdulwahed, Nagy and Blanchard at Loughborough who investigated control methods applied to the learning process.

  2. Changes in the sexual orientation of six heterosexual male-to-female transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Daskalos, C T

    1998-12-01

    Researchers traditionally have assumed that sex reassignment procedures do not change sexual orientation. Of 20 transsexuals of various types that were interviewed, 6 heterosexual male-to-female transsexual respondents reported that their sexual orientation had changed since transitioning from male to female. These respondents stated that before transitioning they had been sexually orientated towards females. After transitioning, these same respondents reported that they were sexually orientated towards males. Five of the six respondents reported having various sexual encounters with males since transitioning. The respondents explained the changes in their sexual orientation as part of their emerging female gender identities. Three of the respondents claimed that the use of female hormones played a role in changing their sexual orientation. It did not appear that the respondents' post-transitional sexual attractions towards males were similar to autogynephilic images and fantasies described by Blanchard (1991).

  3. Ecology of Triatoma rubrovaria (Hemiptera, Triatominae) in wild and peridomestic environments of Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Salvatella, R; Rosa, R; Basmadjian, Y; Puime, A; Calegari, L; Guerrero, J; Martinez, M; Mendaro, G; Briano, D; Montero, C

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes population structure, spatial distribution and habitat selection of wild and peridomestic populations of Triatoma rubrovaria (Blanchard, 1843). Field studies were carried out at Las Piedras and La Bolsa in the Northern Department of Artigas, Uruguay. A semicircular sampling area, divided in seven or eight triangular sectors was sequentially examined from October 1990 to November 1991. At Las Piedras (typical wild habitat) 1063 T. rubrovaria bugs were collected from 84% of the rocky outcroops ("pedregales"). Abundance varied by season peaking in October-November (spring). Throughout the year, most of the population was made up of third, fourth and fifth instar nymphs; adults were found from October to March. In the peridomestic environment of La Bolsa, however T. rubrovaria was less common and showed a more irregular instar distribution. Colonized ecotopes, were those close to houses. In both sites T. rubrovaria was mainly associated with the geckonid Homonota uruguayensis and the cockroach Blaptica dubia.

  4. Morphological characterisation of Andrya Railliet, 1893, Neandrya n. g. and Paranoplocephala Lühe, 1910 (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) in rodents and lagomorphs.

    PubMed

    Haukisalmi, V; Wickström, L M

    2005-11-01

    The taxonomic significance of the main morphological features of the 25 species allocated to Andrya Railliet, 1893 and Paranoplocephala Lühe, 1910 is re-evaluated in the light of the recent molecular phylogenetic hypotheses for anoplocephaline cestodes. The present analysis and the existing phylogenetic data suggest that the structure and complexity of the early uterus are not, as previously assumed, the main phylogenetic or systematic determinants for anoplocephaline cestodes. Instead, the position of the early uterus with respect to other organs, combined with the morphology of the female genitalia, appear to allow a fairly straightforward discrimination of the three genera recognised here, without contradicting current phylogenetic hypotheses. A new genus, Neandrya n. g., is proposed for N. cuniculi (Blanchard, 1891) n. comb. (previously in Andrya), amended diagnoses are provided for Andrya and Paranoplocephala and a diagnostic key to these three genera is presented.

  5. Impact of Na ordering on the electronic properties of the Co planes in NaxCoO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloul, Henri

    2010-03-01

    lattice of Co sites^(6). Further efforts to determine the actual arrangement of the non magnetic cobalt sites for different Na concentrations is presently undertaken and should give hints to link the ground state properties with the Co charge arrangements. [4pt] [1] H. Alloul, I. Mukhamedshin, G. Collin , N. Blanchard, Europhysics Lett. 82, 17002 (2008).[0pt] [2] S. P. Bayrakci S. P. et al., Phys. Rev. B, 69 (R) 100410 (2004).[0pt] [3] G. Lang, J. Bobroff, H. Alloul, G. Collin, N. Blanchard, Phys. Rev. B 78, 155116 (2008).[0pt] [4] J. Bobroff, G. Lang, H. Alloul, N. Blanchard, G. Collin, Phys. Rev. Letters 96, 107201 (2006).[0pt] [5] I.R. Mukhamedshin, H.Alloul, N. Blanchard, G. Collin, Phys. Rev. Letters 94, 247602 (2005).[0pt] [6] H.Alloul, I.R. Mukhamedshin, T. A. Platova, A.V. Dooglav, Europhysics Lett. 85, 47006 (2009)

  6. Sibling sex ratio of boys with gender identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Zucker, K J; Green, R; Coates, S; Zuger, B; Cohen-Kettenis, P T; Zecca, G M; Lertora, V; Money, J; Hahn-Burke, S; Bradley, S J; Blanchard, R

    1997-07-01

    Sibling sex ratio (the ratio of brothers to sisters) was calculated for 444 boys with gender identity disorder (or with behaviors consistent with this diagnosis). The probands were ascertained from several researchers with expertise with this disorder and from the English language case report literature between 1938 and 1995. Among the probands with at least one sibling (N = 333), the results showed that boys with gender identity disorder had a significant excess of brothers to sisters, 131.1:100, when compared with the expected secondary sex ratio of 106:100. The excess of brothers replicated a previous study by Blanchard, Zucker, Bradley, and Hume (1995), in which the sibling sex ratio was 140.6:100. Further analyses showed that the probands were born later relative to their brothers than they were relative to their sisters. These findings are amenable to several psychosocial and biological explanations, which require further investigation.

  7. A Revolutionary War: Korea and the Transformation of the Postwar World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Boston 0 K Hal1, 1970-72 (Z 3001 C07) Blanchard, Carroll Henry K.pon NfX_ liogr L py I..M Korea Albany Korean Conflint Research Found , 1904 (7 3319...Soon Kim. ’ Korea and the Korean War.’ S.ovietorig EOLI l ai4fl "I1 WorldA QvmivJa: & Se.letedi Annotatd ibl.oEfraIhy f2 ,O =Books La ;I 0DlAyAA.L Comp...Edgar Korea 12M9-1i2 Hamden Archon, 199 IDS 918 012) v’Chaudhnessy. John F ,JPIDA 211n.B IBLILLUIn.9 IA ArcIA &fL hnal~8,9 2. Warning Th9eis, Defense

  8. Exploring the bacterial microbiota associated with native South American species of Aphis (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Arneodo, J D; Ortego, J

    2014-06-01

    Aphids harbor a variety of bacterial endosymbionts, including the obligate symbiont Buchnera aphidicola and diverse facultative symbionts. The former supplies its host with essential amino acids. The latter are not indispensable for insect survival, but often improve their host's fitness. To date, the study of such associations was restricted to aphids of Holarctic origin. The bacterial microbiota of seven Aphis species from Argentina was investigated. The presence of B. aphidicola was assessed by specific PCR. Additional symbionts were identified through PCR with eubacterial universal primers, cloning, and sequencing of nearly complete 16S rRNA gene, intergenic spacer region, and partial 23S rRNA gene and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Infection with B. aphidicola was confirmed in every species analyzed. The facultative symbiont Serratia symbiotica was detected in Aphis malalhuina Mier Durante, Nieto Nafría & Ortego, 2003, Aphis senecionicoides Blanchard, 1944, and Aphis schinifoliae Blanchard, 1939, while Hamiltonella defensa was identified in Aphis mendocina Mier Durante, Ortego & Nieto Nafría, 2006. Arsenophonus sp. was found infecting Aphis melosae Mier Durante & Ortego, 1999, and a new, undescribed Aphis sp. In Aphis danielae Remaudière, 1994, no facultative symbionts could be recorded. When analyzing the highly conserved 16S rRNA gene, the phylogenetic tree grouped the S. symbiotica, H. defensa, and Arsenophonus isolates into three well-defined clusters showing little variability among clones corresponding to the same aphid host species. This article reports for the first time the endosymbionts associated with aphids native to South America. Despite their geographic origin, the qualitative composition of their microbiota revealed no evident differences from that described for aphids in the Northern Hemisphere.

  9. Effects of urbanisation on the parasitoid community of a leafminer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenoglio, María S.; Salvo, Adriana; Estallo, Elizabet L.

    2009-03-01

    Urbanisation may have detrimental effects on communities of parasitoids, affecting their species richness, abundance, and species dominance. Here we investigated the influence of the degree of urbanisation on parasitoid communities of Liriomyza commelinae (Frost) (Diptera: Agromyzidae), a leafminer of Commelina erecta L. (Commelinaceae), in the city of Córdoba, Argentina. To study changes in species richness, the specific composition of parasitic complexes and their degree of impact on the leafminer, 18 sampling sites from the centre to the outskirts of the city were selected and different variables indicative of urbanisation were quantified in each site. During January and February of 2005 and 2006, all mined leaves found in each plant patch were collected and the following variables were estimated: proportion of mined patches, abundance of the leafminer, total parasitoid species richness, total parasitism rates and parasitism due to the most abundant parasitoid species. The percentage of mined patches and leafminer abundance increased with urbanisation degree. Estimates of parasitoid species richness were not influenced by urbanisation degree but increased with species richness of mined plants. Changes in the specific composition of species along the urbanisation gradient were observed. Although parasitism by one of the species studied was higher in more urbanised sites of the city, the total parasitism rate of L. commelinae was not affected by urbanisation degree, species richness of mined plants or leafminer abundance. It appears that urbanisation benefits the herbivore species here studied but not through altering parasitoid activity. Changes in parasitoid community composition reflex dissimilar tolerance to environmental conditions displayed by different parasitoid species.

  10. Does Temperature-Mediated Reproductive Success Drive the Direction of Species Displacement in Two Invasive Species of Leafminer Fly?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haihong; Reitz, Stuart R.; Xiang, Juncheng; Smagghe, Guy; Lei, Zhongren

    2014-01-01

    Liriomyza sativae and L. trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are two highly invasive species of leafmining flies, which have become established as pests of horticultural crops throughout the world. In certain regions where both species have been introduced, L. sativae has displaced L. trifolii, whereas the opposite has occurred in other regions. These opposing outcomes suggest that neither species is an inherently superior competitor. The regions where these displacements have been observed (southern China, Japan and western USA) are climatically different. We determined whether temperature differentially affects the reproductive success of these species and therefore if climatic differences could affect the outcome of interspecific interactions where these species are sympatric. The results of life table parameters indicate that both species can develop successfully at all tested temperatures (20, 25, 31, 33°C). L. sativae had consistently higher fecundities at all temperatures, but L. trifolii developed to reproductive age faster. Age-stage specific survival rates were higher for L. sativae at low temperatures, but these were higher for L. trifolii at higher temperatures. We then compared the net reproductive rates (R0) for both species in pure and mixed cultures maintained at the same four constant temperatures. Both species had significantly lower net reproductive rates in mixed species cultures compared with their respective pure species cultures, indicating that both species are subject to intense interspecific competition. Net reproductive rates were significantly greater for L. sativae than for L. trifolii in mixed species groups at the lower temperatures, whereas the opposite occurred at the higher temperature. Therefore, interactions between the species are temperature dependent and small differences could shift the competitive balance between the species. These temperature mediated effects may contribute to the current ongoing displacement of L. sativae by

  11. Does temperature-mediated reproductive success drive the direction of species displacement in two invasive species of leafminer fly?

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihong; Reitz, Stuart R; Xiang, Juncheng; Smagghe, Guy; Lei, Zhongren

    2014-01-01

    Liriomyza sativae and L. trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are two highly invasive species of leafmining flies, which have become established as pests of horticultural crops throughout the world. In certain regions where both species have been introduced, L. sativae has displaced L. trifolii, whereas the opposite has occurred in other regions. These opposing outcomes suggest that neither species is an inherently superior competitor. The regions where these displacements have been observed (southern China, Japan and western USA) are climatically different. We determined whether temperature differentially affects the reproductive success of these species and therefore if climatic differences could affect the outcome of interspecific interactions where these species are sympatric. The results of life table parameters indicate that both species can develop successfully at all tested temperatures (20, 25, 31, 33°C). L. sativae had consistently higher fecundities at all temperatures, but L. trifolii developed to reproductive age faster. Age-stage specific survival rates were higher for L. sativae at low temperatures, but these were higher for L. trifolii at higher temperatures. We then compared the net reproductive rates (R0) for both species in pure and mixed cultures maintained at the same four constant temperatures. Both species had significantly lower net reproductive rates in mixed species cultures compared with their respective pure species cultures, indicating that both species are subject to intense interspecific competition. Net reproductive rates were significantly greater for L. sativae than for L. trifolii in mixed species groups at the lower temperatures, whereas the opposite occurred at the higher temperature. Therefore, interactions between the species are temperature dependent and small differences could shift the competitive balance between the species. These temperature mediated effects may contribute to the current ongoing displacement of L. sativae by

  12. Community-wide convergent evolution in insect adaptation to toxic cardenolides by substitutions in the Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Dobler, Susanne; Dalla, Safaa; Wagschal, Vera; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2012-01-01

    The extent of convergent molecular evolution is largely unknown, yet is critical to understanding the genetics of adaptation. Target site insensitivity to cardenolides is a prime candidate for studying molecular convergence because herbivores in six orders of insects have specialized on these plant poisons, which gain their toxicity by blocking an essential transmembrane carrier, the sodium pump (Na,K-ATPase). We investigated gene sequences of the Na,K-ATPase α-subunit in 18 insects feeding on cardenolide-containing plants (spanning 15 genera and four orders) to screen for amino acid substitutions that might lower sensitivity to cardenolides. The replacement N122H that was previously shown to confer resistance in the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and Chrysochus leaf beetles was found in four additional species, Oncopeltus fasciatus and Lygaeus kalmii (Heteroptera, Lygaeidae), Labidomera clivicollis (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae), and Liriomyza asclepiadis (Diptera, Agromyzidae). Thus, across 300 Myr of insect divergence, specialization on cardenolide-containing plants resulted in molecular convergence for an adaptation likely involved in coevolution. Our screen revealed a number of other substitutions connected to cardenolide binding in mammals. We confirmed that some of the particular substitutions provide resistance to cardenolides by introducing five distinct constructs of the Drosophila melanogaster gene into susceptible eucaryotic cells under an ouabain selection regime. These functional assays demonstrate that combined substitutions of Q111 and N122 are synergistic, with greater than twofold higher resistance than either substitution alone and >12-fold resistance over the wild type. Thus, even across deep phylogenetic branches, evolutionary degrees of freedom seem to be limited by physiological constraints, such that the same molecular substitutions confer adaptation. PMID:22826239

  13. Disarming the jasmonate-dependent plant defense makes nonhost Arabidopsis plants accessible to the American serpentine leafminer.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroshi; Tateishi, Ken; Seo, Shigemi; Kugimiya, Soichi; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Sawada, Yuji; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Yara, Kaori; Shimoda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Masatomo

    2013-11-01

    Here, we analyzed the interaction between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the American serpentine leafminer (Liriomyza trifolii), an important and intractable herbivore of many cultivated plants. We examined the role of the immunity-related plant hormone jasmonate (JA) in the plant response and resistance to leafminer feeding to determine whether JA affects host suitability for leafminers. The expression of marker genes for the JA-dependent plant defense was induced by leafminer feeding on Arabidopsis wild-type plants. Analyses of JA-insensitive coi1-1 mutants suggested the importance of JA in the plant response to leafminer feeding. The JA content of wild-type plants significantly increased after leafminer feeding. Moreover, coi1-1 mutants showed lower feeding resistance against leafminer attack than did wild-type plants. The number of feeding scars caused by inoculated adult leafminers in JA-insensitive coi1-1 mutants was higher than that in wild-type plants. In addition, adults of the following generation appeared only from coi1-1 mutants and not from wild-type plants, suggesting that the loss of the JA-dependent plant defense converted nonhost plants to accessible host plants. Interestingly, the glucosinolate-myrosinase defense system may play at most a minor role in this conversion, indicating that this major antiherbivore defense of Brassica species plants probably does not have a major function in plant resistance to leafminer. Application of JA to wild-type plants before leafminer feeding enhanced feeding resistance in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and garland chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum coronarium). Our results indicate that JA plays an important role in the plant response and resistance to leafminers and, in so doing, affects host plant suitability for leafminers.

  14. Disarming the Jasmonate-Dependent Plant Defense Makes Nonhost Arabidopsis Plants Accessible to the American Serpentine Leafminer1

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Hiroshi; Tateishi, Ken; Seo, Shigemi; Kugimiya, Soichi; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Sawada, Yuji; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Yara, Kaori; Shimoda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Masatomo

    2013-01-01

    Here, we analyzed the interaction between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the American serpentine leafminer (Liriomyza trifolii), an important and intractable herbivore of many cultivated plants. We examined the role of the immunity-related plant hormone jasmonate (JA) in the plant response and resistance to leafminer feeding to determine whether JA affects host suitability for leafminers. The expression of marker genes for the JA-dependent plant defense was induced by leafminer feeding on Arabidopsis wild-type plants. Analyses of JA-insensitive coi1-1 mutants suggested the importance of JA in the plant response to leafminer feeding. The JA content of wild-type plants significantly increased after leafminer feeding. Moreover, coi1-1 mutants showed lower feeding resistance against leafminer attack than did wild-type plants. The number of feeding scars caused by inoculated adult leafminers in JA-insensitive coi1-1 mutants was higher than that in wild-type plants. In addition, adults of the following generation appeared only from coi1-1 mutants and not from wild-type plants, suggesting that the loss of the JA-dependent plant defense converted nonhost plants to accessible host plants. Interestingly, the glucosinolate-myrosinase defense system may play at most a minor role in this conversion, indicating that this major antiherbivore defense of Brassica species plants probably does not have a major function in plant resistance to leafminer. Application of JA to wild-type plants before leafminer feeding enhanced feeding resistance in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and garland chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum coronarium). Our results indicate that JA plays an important role in the plant response and resistance to leafminers and, in so doing, affects host plant suitability for leafminers. PMID:24022267

  15. Effects of Host Sex, Plant Species, and Putative Host Species on the Prevalence of Wolbachia in Natural Populations of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae): A Modified Nested PCR Study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Han-Le; Qi, Lan-Da; Hong, Xiao-Yue; Xie, Hong-Fang; Li, Yuan-Xi

    2015-02-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a globally distributed pest. One of the key endosymbionts in B. tabaci is Wolbachia, an α-proteobacterium implicated in many important biological processes. Previous studies indicated that the infection frequency of Wolbachia in Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED) varied greatly among populations in different areas. However, little is known about the factors that influence the prevalence of Wolbachia in B. tabaci. In this paper, 25 field populations were collected from different locations in China, and 1,161 individuals were screened for the presence of Wolbachia using a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method, which targets the wsp gene, to confirm Wolbachia infection status. The prevalence of Wolbachia ranged from 1.54 to 66.67% within the 25 field populations, and the infection frequency of Wolbachia was affected significantly by the putative species of B. tabaci. The infection frequency (51.55%) of Wolbachia was significantly greater in native species than in the MED (25.65%) and MEAM1 (14.37%). With the exception of host plant, all factors, including putative species, geographic location, and the sex of the host, affected the Wolbachia infection frequency in whiteflies. Six Wolbachia strains were found and clustered into four distinct clades upon phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore, Wolbachia in B. tabaci have close relationships with those from other host species, including Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), Sogatella furcifera (Horvath), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), and Culex pipiens L. The results demonstrated the variation and diversity of Wolbachia in B. tabaci field populations, and that the application of nested PCR extended our knowledge of Wolbachia infection in B. tabaci, especially in invasive whiteflies. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Nuance and behavioral cogency: How the Visible Burrow System inspired the Stress-Alternatives Model and conceptualization of the continuum of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, James M.; Prince, Melissa A.; Achua, Justin K.; Carpenter, Russ E.; Arendt, David H.; Smith, Justin P.; Summers, Torrie L.; Summers, Tangi R.; Summers, Cliff H.

    2015-01-01

    By creating the Visible Burrow System (VBS) Bob Blanchard found a way to study the interaction of genetics, physiology, environment, and adaptive significance in a model with broad validity. The VBS changed the way we think about anxiety and affective disorders by allowing the mechanisms which control them to be observed in a dynamic setting. Critically, Blanchard used the VBS and other models to show how behavioral systems like defense are dependent upon context and behavioral elements unique to the individual. Inspired by the VBS, we developed a Stress Alternatives Model (SAM) to further explore the multifaceted dynamics of the stress response with a dichotomous choice condition. Like the VBS, the SAM is a naturalistic model built upon risk-assessment and defensive behavior, but with a choice of response: escape or submission to a large conspecific aggressor. The anxiety of novelty during the first escape must be weighed against fear of the aggressor, and a decision must be made. Both outcomes are adaptively significant, evidenced by a 50/50 split in outcome across several study systems. By manipulating the variables of the SAM, we show that a gradient of anxiety exists that spans the contextual settings of escaping an open field, escaping from aggression, and submitting to aggression. These findings correspond with increasing levels of corticosterone and increasing levels of NPS and BDNF in the central amygdala as the context changes. Whereas some anxiolytics were able to reduce the latency to escape for some animals, only with the potent anxiolytic drug antalarmin (CRF1R-blocker) and the anxiogenic drug yohimbine (α2 antagonist) were we able to reverse the outcome for a substantial proportion of individuals. Our findings promote a novel method for modeling anxiety, offering a distinction between low-and-high levels, and accounting for individual variability. The translational value of the VBS is immeasurable, and it guided us and many other researchers to seek

  17. Generic classification of the Archiborborinae (Diptera: Sphaeroceridae), with a revision of Antrops Enderlein, Coloantrops gen. nov., Maculantrops gen. nov., Photoantrops gen. nov., and Poecilantrops gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Kits, Joel H; Marshall, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    The Archiborborinae comprise a diverse clade of flies in the family Sphaeroceridae. We here revise the generic classification, redefining the genus Antrops Enderlein and naming 5 new genera: Boreantrops gen. nov., Coloantrops gen. nov., Maculantrops gen. nov., Photoantrops gen. nov., and Poecilantrops gen. nov. The genus Archiborborus, until recently a paraphyletic assemblage including most of the described species in the subfamily, is treated as a junior synonym of Antrops (syn. nov.) We revise the genera Antrops (53 species, including 40 sp. nov.: Antrops anovariegatus, Antrops aurantifemur, Antrops baeza, Antrops bellavista, Antrops biflavus, Antrops bucki, Antrops carpishensis, Antrops cochabamba, Antrops cochinoca, Antrops coniobaptos, Antrops coroico, Antrops cotopaxi, Antrops didactylos, Antrops diversipennis, Antrops eurus, Antrops fulgiceps, Antrops fuliginosus, Antrops guandera, Antrops guaramacalensis, Antrops inca, Antrops juninensis, Antrops mucarensis, Antrops niger, Antrops papallacta, Antrops pecki, Antrops podocarpus, Antrops quadrilobus, Antrops siberia, Antrops sierrazulensis, Antrops tachira, Antrops tequendama, Antrops tetrastichus, Antrops tumbrensis, Antrops unduavi, Antrops variegatus, Antrops versabilis, Antrops vittatus, Antrops yungas, and Antrops zongo and the following comb. nov.: Antrops annulatus (Richards), Antrops chaetosus (Richards), Antrops femoralis (Blanchard), Antrops hirtus (Bigot), Antrops maculipennis (Duda), Antrops maximus (Richards), Antrops microphthalmus (Richards), Antrops quadrinotus (Bigot), Antrops setosus (Duda), Antrops simplicimanus (Richards), Antrops nitidicollis (Becker), and Antrops orbitalis (Duda)), Coloantrops (1 species: Coloantrops daedalus, sp. nov.), Maculantrops (2 species, Maculantrops hirtipes (Macquart) comb. nov. and Maculantrops altiplanus, sp. nov.), Photoantrops (1 species: Pho-toantrops echinus sp. nov.), and Poecilantrops (10 species: Poecilantrops baorucensis, Poecilantrops boraceiensis

  18. Nuance and behavioral cogency: How the Visible Burrow System inspired the Stress-Alternatives Model and conceptualization of the continuum of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James M; Prince, Melissa A; Achua, Justin K; Carpenter, Russ E; Arendt, David H; Smith, Justin P; Summers, Torrie L; Summers, Tangi R; Summers, Cliff H

    2015-07-01

    By creating the Visible Burrow System (VBS) Bob Blanchard found a way to study the interaction of genetics, physiology, environment, and adaptive significance in a model with broad validity. The VBS changed the way we think about anxiety and affective disorders by allowing the mechanisms which control them to be observed in a dynamic setting. Critically, Blanchard used the VBS and other models to show how behavioral systems like defense are dependent upon context and behavioral elements unique to the individual. Inspired by the VBS, we developed a Stress Alternatives Model (SAM) to further explore the multifaceted dynamics of the stress response with a dichotomous choice condition. Like the VBS, the SAM is a naturalistic model built upon risk assessment and defensive behavior, but with a choice of response: escape or submission to a large conspecific aggressor. The anxiety of novelty during the first escape must be weighed against fear of the aggressor, and a decision must be made. Both outcomes are adaptively significant, evidenced by a 50/50 split in outcome across several study systems. By manipulating the variables of the SAM, we show that a gradient of anxiety exists that spans the contextual settings of escaping an open field, escaping from aggression, and submitting to aggression. These findings correspond with increasing levels of corticosterone and increasing levels of NPS and BDNF in the central amygdala as the context changes.Whereas some anxiolytics were able to reduce the latency to escape for some animals, only with the potent anxiolytic drug antalarmin (CRF1R-blocker) and the anxiogenic drug yohimbine (α2 antagonist) were we able to reverse the outcome for a substantial proportion of individuals. Our findings promote a novel method for modeling anxiety, offering a distinction between low-and-high levels, and accounting for individual variability. The translational value of the VBS is immeasurable, and it guided us and many other researchers to seek

  19. The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina and adjacent countries.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Osvaldo Di; Turienzo, Paola

    2016-03-14

    The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina is represented by three species of the genus Taphropiestes Reitter, 1875: T. fusca Reitter, 1875 [Chubut], T. magna Ślipiński & Tomaszewska, 2010 [Río Negro; Chubut], and T. plaumanni Ślipiński & Tomaszewska 2010 [Buenos Aires]. A total of 2565 larvae (multiple instars), 83 pupae, 2028 live adults, and 16 dead adults of T. plaumanni were found in Argentina between 2005 and 2013 in the nests of birds representing the families Columbidae, Emberizidae, Falconidae, Furnariidae, Hirundinidae, Mimidae, Passeridae, Psittacidae, Troglodytidae and Tyrannidae. The adults were most abundant in closed mud nests of Furnarius rufus (Gmelin, 1788) [Furnariidae] and its inquiline birds, but the larvae were most abundant in wood nest boxes. When T. plaumanni was scarcely represented in bird nests from some localities, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1797), an exotic darkling beetle [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Tenebrioninae], and one native species, Phobelius crenatus Blanchard, 1842 [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Lagriinae], were most abundant in stick nests of Furnariidae. In contrast, when A. diaperinus and P. crenatus were absent in one locality from the province of Buenos Aires, T. plaumanni was the most abundant beetle. A complete account of data is provided for these collections of T. plaumanni in Argentina. Known distributional data for all Argentinian species of Taphropiestes are plotted on maps with biogeographical provinces indicated.

  20. Geographical tourism research and education at the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism in Poland (1936-1939)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackowski, Antoni; Sołjan, Izabela; Bilska-Wodecka, Elżbieta; Liro, Justyna

    2016-11-01

    The beginning of the twentieth century was a time of intensive development of geographical research on tourism, as well as the establishment of tourism research centers in many European countries. The Jagiellonian University School of Tourism played an important role in the development of tourism geography and education, spatial and regional planning, and personnel training for tourism developing in the 1930s in Poland. Tourism education in the school was characterized by a modern curriculum and forms of teaching, including fieldwork, focusing on developing practical skills, and linking research topics with the teaching process. The school conducted extensive research, publishing and documentary activities. The achievements of the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism helped raise awareness in society of the importance of tourism in the socio-economic development of regions and cities. This article presents the history of the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism and highlights its role in the development of tourism research and education in Europe. The school is mentioned among the pioneering centers of tourism, i.e., Robert Glucksmann's Tourism Research Institute at the Berlin School of Commerce, Walter Hunziker's and Kurt Krapf's tourism seminar in St. Gallen, and Raoul Blanchard's Institute of Alpine Geography in Grenoble.

  1. Effects of Terrestrial Buffer Zones on Amphibians on Golf Courses

    PubMed Central

    Puglis, Holly J.; Boone, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians. PMID:22761833

  2. Diablotin Pterodroma hasitata: a biography of the endangered Black-capped Petrel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Theodore R.; Lee, David S.; Haney, J. Chris

    2013-01-01

    Our findings are in accord with the recent decision by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to evaluate the need for additional protection of the species and the primary foraging habitat off the southeastern United States under the Endangered Species Act (USFWS 2012). Additional conservation measures and research strategies that warrant further consideration include (1) protection, monitoring, and management of known breeding populations and nesting habitat in the Dominican Republic and Haiti through controlling predators, installing artificial nest burrows in appropriate sites and hiring local wardens at breeding sites during the nesting season; (2) local and regional training, education and public awareness (e.g. Blanchard & Nettleship 1992); (3) restoration of the original common name Diablotin to common usage to promote the historical and cultural importance of this species; (4) studies to determine the distribution and genetic variability in the remaining populations; and (5) studies of satellite-tagged birds to assess their seasonal and geographic use of pelagic habitats.

  3. Ozone process insights from field experiments - Part III: extent of reaction and ozone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Charles L.

    The analysis of ambient data offers a means of developing a qualitative understanding of the sensitivity of ozone formation at specific times and places to changes in VOC and NO x concentrations. The Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) model (Johnson, 1984, Proceedings of the Eighth International Clean Air Conference, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 715-731) and two revisions known as the Smog Production (SP) algorithm (Blanchard et al., 1999, Atmospheric Environment 33, 369-381; Chang et al., 1997, Atmospheric Environment 31, 2787-2794) are reviewed. Applied to ambient data, the algorithm requires measurements of ozone, NO, and either NO x or NO y and computes a quantity known as the extent of reaction. The extent of reaction is shown to be related to photochemical age and serves as an indicator of the sensitivity of instantaneous ozone production to changes in VOC or NO x concentrations. Extent of reaction alone is insufficient as an indicator of the sensitivity of ozone concentration to a complex upwind history of emission changes. Consideration of daily, hourly, and spatial patterns of extent of reaction is needed to interpret applications of the SP algorithm.

  4. Redescription of Spirura guianensis (Nematoda: Spiruridae) from a rare South American Gracile Opossum.

    PubMed

    Torres, E J Lopes; Maldonado, A; Anjos, D H da Silva; de Souza, W; Miranda, K

    2015-10-01

    Spirura genus Blanchard, 1849 comprise of nematode parasites that infect primate and marsupial species. Although several taxonomical studies have shown that the infection by this species occurs primarily in the esophagus of primates, evidence for the occurrence of these parasites in other hosts (marsupials, rodents and bats) has become the subject of investigation by several groups. In this work, we describe the presence of Spirura guianensis Ortlepp, 1924 in the marsupial Gracilinanus agilis (Marsupialia: Didelphidae) found in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso do Sul state of Brazil. Structural characteristics of this nematode were identified using light microscopy (bright field and fluorescence stereomicroscopy) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) approaches. Details of the surface topography such as cephalic projections, ventral boss, details of the caudal papillae and cuticular ornamentations were shown, providing taxonomic characteristics that may help in the establishment of diagnostic protocols. In addition, the presence of this species in a new host and new geographical area of Brazil provide grounds for a revision on the distribution of S. guianensis in South America.

  5. The dog mite, Demodex canis: prevalence, fungal co-infection, reactions to light, and hair follicle apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Jen; Chung, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Lian-Chen; Ju, Yu-Ten; Hong, Chin-Lin; Tsai, Yu-Yang; Li, Yi-Hung; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Infection rate, reaction to light, and hair follicle apoptosis are examined in the dogmite, Demodex canis Leydig (Prostigmata: Demodicidae), in dogs from the northern area of Taiwan. An analysis of relevant samples revealed 7.2% (73/1013) prevalence of D. canis infection. Infection during the investigation peaked each winter, with an average prevalence of 12.5% (32/255). The infection rates significantly varied in accordance with month, sex, age, and breed (p < 0.05). Most of the lesions were discovered on the backs of the infected animals, where the infection rate was 52.1% (38/73) (P < 0.05). The epidemiologic analysis of infection based on landscape area factor, found that employing a map-overlapping method showed a higher infection rate in the eastern distribution of Taiwan's northern area than other areas. Isolation tests for Microsporum canis Bodin (Onygenales: Arthrodermataceae) and Trichophyton mentagrophyte Robin (Blanchard) on the D. canis infected dogs revealed prevalence rates of 4.4% (2/45) and 2.2% (1/45), respectively. Observations demonstrated that D. canis slowly moved from a light area to a dark area. Skin samples were examined for cellular apoptosis by activated caspase3 immunohistochemical staining. Cells that surrounded the infected hair follicles were activated caspase3-positive, revealing cell apoptosis in infected follicles via the activation of caspase3.

  6. A Review of the Status of Brain Structure Research in Transsexualism.

    PubMed

    Guillamon, Antonio; Junque, Carme; Gómez-Gil, Esther

    2016-10-01

    The present review focuses on the brain structure of male-to-female (MtF) and female-to-male (FtM) homosexual transsexuals before and after cross-sex hormone treatment as shown by in vivo neuroimaging techniques. Cortical thickness and diffusion tensor imaging studies suggest that the brain of MtFs presents complex mixtures of masculine, feminine, and demasculinized regions, while FtMs show feminine, masculine, and defeminized regions. Consequently, the specific brain phenotypes proposed for MtFs and FtMs differ from those of both heterosexual males and females. These phenotypes have theoretical implications for brain intersexuality, asymmetry, and body perception in transsexuals as well as for Blanchard's hypothesis on sexual orientation in homosexual MtFs. Falling within the aegis of the neurohormonal theory of sex differences, we hypothesize that cortical differences between homosexual MtFs and FtMs and male and female controls are due to differently timed cortical thinning in different regions for each group. Cross-sex hormone studies have reported marked effects of the treatment on MtF and FtM brains. Their results are used to discuss the early postmortem histological studies of the MtF brain.

  7. The Sarcophaginae (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) of Southern South America. I. The species of Microcerella Macquart from the Patagonian Region.

    PubMed

    Mulieri, Pablo Ricardo; Mariluis, Juan Carlos; Patitucci, Luciano Damián; Olea, María Sofía

    2015-03-17

    A revision is given of the species placed in the genus Microcerella Macquart, known from the southern extreme of South America, the so-called Patagonian Region. A new diagnosis of the genus is given on the basis of the revision of a large number of Neotropical species. A total of 25 valid species are recognized in the region. Most of these (21 species) are divided into four species-groups on the basis of general groundplan of genitalia and external characters. Four new species are described, M. deliae sp. nov., M. holmbergi sp. nov., M. nataliae sp. nov. and M. paetoi sp. nov. One new synonymy is established: Austrohartigia shannoni Lopes as a new junior synonym of Microcerella spinosa (Hall), syn. nov. A lectotype is designated for Doringia subandina Blanchard [a junior synonym of Microcerella spinigena (Rondani)]. Two species are recorded from Argentina for the first time: M. chicoensis (Lopes) and M. engeli (Hall). Three nominal species were not examined and are treated as nomina dubia within Microcerella: M. apicalis (Townsend), M. rufomaculata Macquart and M. sarcophagina Thomson. An illustrated key is provided to the males of Patagonian species of Microcerella allowing for separation of 25 species. Additionally, a series of images of male genitalia based on color photography and illustrations is provided to aid in the identification of these species of Microcerella. Biological information is given for the species, where known.

  8. Two new species of Temnocephala (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalida) from the South American snake-necked turtle Hydromedusa tectifera (Testudines, Chelidae).

    PubMed

    Volonterio, Odile

    2010-12-01

    Temnocephala brevicornis Monticelli, 1889 is the only species of the genus Temnocephala Blanchard, 1849 reported from chelonians to date. During a survey of the species of Temnocephala extant in southern Uruguay, two new species were found on the chelonian Hydromedusa tectifera Cope, 1869. They are described here as Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. and Temnocephala cuocoloi n. sp. Both resemble T. brevicornis, but differ in the morphometry of the penial stylet, and in qualitative details of the reproductive complex. Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. differs from T. brevicornis by having a massive, cylindrical sphincter in the distal portion of the vagina, and a seminal vesicle that opens into the subpolar to equatorial portion of the contractile vesicle. In addition, the penial stylet in Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. is large in relation to body size, straight and more slender, having the distal portion of its shaft slightly sinuous, and a smaller introvert equipped with about 16 distal crowns of smaller spines. Temnocephala cuocoloi n. sp. is most similar to T. brevicornis, but differs by having a smaller, curved penial stylet that has a smaller introvert in relation to stylet size, with about 10 distal crowns of smaller spines. A key to the species of the Temnocephala from chelonians is provided. This study supports the validity of the following characters previously proposed for the taxonomy of the genus Temnocephala: the shape of the sphincters in the female reproductive system, the shape of the penial stylet, and the number, size, and position of spines in the introvert.

  9. Erotic target location errors: an underappreciated paraphilic dimension.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Anne A

    2009-01-01

    Based on studies of heterosexual male fetishists, transvestites, and transsexuals, Blanchard (1991) proposed the existence of a hitherto unrecognized paraphilic dimension, erotic target location errors (ETLEs), involving the erroneous location of erotic targets in the environment. ETLEs can involve preferential attention to a peripheral or inessential part of an erotic target, manifesting as fetishism, or mislocation of an erotic target in one's own body, manifesting as the desire to impersonate or become a facsimile of the erotic target (e.g., transvestism or transsexualism). Despite its potential clinical and heuristic value, the concept that ETLEs define a paraphilic dimension is underappreciated. This review summarizes the studies leading to the concept of ETLEs and describes how ETLEs are believed to manifest in men whose preferred erotic targets are women, children, men, amputees, plush animals, and real animals. This review also describes ETLEs in women; discusses possible etiologies of ETLEs; considers the implications of the ETLE concept for psychoanalytic theories of transvestism and male-to-female transsexualism, as well as for the forthcoming revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition; suggests reasons why the concept of ETLEs has been underappreciated; and describes what might result if the concept were more widely appreciated.

  10. Effects of terrestrial buffer zones on amphibians on golf courses.

    PubMed

    Puglis, Holly J; Boone, Michelle D

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians.

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase is essential for viability, and a single Leu-to-Pro mutation in a conserved sequence leads to thermosensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Bergès, T; Guyonnet, D; Karst, F

    1997-01-01

    The mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase is an enzyme which converts mevalonate diphosphate to isopentenyl diphosphate, the building block of isoprenoids. We used the Saccharomyces cerevisiae temperature-sensitive mutant defective for mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase previously described (C. Chambon, V. Ladeveve, M. Servouse, L. Blanchard, C. Javelot, B. Vladescu, and F. Karst, Lipids 26:633-636, 1991) to characterize the mutated allele. We showed that a single change in a conserved amino acid accounts for the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the mutant. Complementation experiments were done both in the erg19-mutated background and in a strain in which the ERG19 gene, which was shown to be an essential gene for yeast, was disrupted. Epitope tagging of the wild-type mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase allowed us to isolate the enzyme in an active form by a versatile one-step immunoprecipitation procedure. Furthermore, during the course of this study, we observed that a high level of expression of the wild-type ERG19 gene led to a lower sterol steady-state accumulation compared to that of a wild-type strain, suggesting that this enzyme may be a key enzyme in mevalonate pathway regulation. PMID:9244250

  12. A two-dimensional numerical investigation of the interaction between sea breezes and deep convection over the Florida peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Melville E.; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System is used to investigate the interaction between sea breezes and deep convection over the Florida peninsula, and it is shown that this model can simulate the broad features of the three characteristic types of convection systems classified by Blanchard and Lopez (1985). In sensitivity tests performed for a variety of wind and thermodynamic profiles and for different soil-moisture contents, it was found that increases in the low-level temperature and in moisture content speeded up the development of convection. It was found that the dry-soil simulation produced rapidly developing sea breezes that moved inland quickly, while the moist soil case produced a much more slowly developing sea breeze. The total rainfall over the peninsula for the dry-soil case was greater than for the moist soil; it is suggested that the enhanced surface heat fluxes for the dry soil case create stronger low-level convergence over the peninsula (than in the moist-soil case) to force the convection.

  13. A karyotype comparison between two species of bordered plant bugs (Hemiptera, Heteroptera, Largidae) by conventional chromosome staining, C-banding and rDNA-FISH

    PubMed Central

    Salanitro, Lucila Belén; Massaccesi, Anabella Cecilia; Urbisaglia, Santiago; Bressa, María José; Chirino, Mónica Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A cytogenetic characterization, including heterochromatin content, and the analysis of the location of rDNA genes, was performed in Largus fasciatus Blanchard, 1843 and L. rufipennis Laporte, 1832. Mitotic and meiotic analyses revealed the same diploid chromosome number 2n = 12 + X0/XX (male/female). Heterochromatin content, very scarce in both species, revealed C-blocks at both ends of autosomes and X chromosome. The most remarkable cytological feature observed between both species was the different chromosome position of the NORs. This analysis allowed us to use the NORs as a cytological marker because two clusters of rDNA genes are located at one end of one pair of autosomes in L. fasciatus, whereas a single rDNA cluster is located at one terminal region of the X chromosome in L. rufipennis. Taking into account our results and previous data obtained in other heteropteran species, the conventional staining, chromosome bandings, and rDNA-FISH provide important chromosome markers for cytotaxonomy, karyotype evolution, and chromosome structure and organization studies. PMID:28919962

  14. A karyotype comparison between two species of bordered plant bugs (Hemiptera, Heteroptera, Largidae) by conventional chromosome staining, C-banding and rDNA-FISH.

    PubMed

    Salanitro, Lucila Belén; Massaccesi, Anabella Cecilia; Urbisaglia, Santiago; Bressa, María José; Chirino, Mónica Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    A cytogenetic characterization, including heterochromatin content, and the analysis of the location of rDNA genes, was performed in Largus fasciatus Blanchard, 1843 and L. rufipennis Laporte, 1832. Mitotic and meiotic analyses revealed the same diploid chromosome number 2n = 12 + X0/XX (male/female). Heterochromatin content, very scarce in both species, revealed C-blocks at both ends of autosomes and X chromosome. The most remarkable cytological feature observed between both species was the different chromosome position of the NORs. This analysis allowed us to use the NORs as a cytological marker because two clusters of rDNA genes are located at one end of one pair of autosomes in L. fasciatus, whereas a single rDNA cluster is located at one terminal region of the X chromosome in L. rufipennis. Taking into account our results and previous data obtained in other heteropteran species, the conventional staining, chromosome bandings, and rDNA-FISH provide important chromosome markers for cytotaxonomy, karyotype evolution, and chromosome structure and organization studies.

  15. The Nuclear Thomas-Fermi Model

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Myers, W. D.; Swiatecki, W. J.

    1994-08-01

    The statistical Thomas-Fermi model is applied to a comprehensive survey of macroscopic nuclear properties. The model uses a Seyler-Blanchard effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, generalized by the addition of one momentum-dependent and one density-dependent term. The adjustable parameters of the interaction were fitted to shell-corrected masses of 1654 nuclei, to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface and to the measured depths of the optical model potential. With these parameters nuclear sizes are well reproduced, and only relatively minor deviations between measured and calculated fission barriers of 36 nuclei are found. The model determines the principal bulk and surface properties of nuclear matter and provides estimates for the more subtle, Droplet Model, properties. The predicted energy vs density relation for neutron matter is in striking correspondence with the 1981 theoretical estimate of Friedman and Pandharipande. Other extreme situations to which the model is applied are a study of Sn isotopes from {sup 82}Sn to {sup 170}Sn, and the rupture into a bubble configuration of a nucleus (constrained to spherical symmetry) which takes place when Z{sup 2}/A exceeds about 100.

  16. Measuring the leadership styles and scholarly productivity of nursing department chairpersons.

    PubMed

    Womack, R B

    1996-01-01

    Self-perceived leadership styles of nursing department chairpersons were correlated with their scholarly productivity. The sample consisted of the 106 nursing department chairpersons from National League for Nursing (NLN)-accredited baccalaureate and higher-degree programs in 10 midwestern states. Hersey and Blanchard's Situational Leadership Model was used as the conceptual framework. Their LEAD-Self instrument was used to measure leadership styles, range, and adaptability. In addition, the Scholarly Productivity Index (SPI) was used to measure the nursing chairpersons' involvement in prepublication and research, publication, editorial, and other scholarly activities. College size and status (public or private) were among the variables examined to assess a relationship or group differences. A majority of nursing department chairpersons viewed themselves as having a "participating" leadership style. Most of the remaining chairpersons viewed themselves as having a "selling" leadership style. Study participants viewed their backup leadership styles to be in a reverse order from their primary leadership styles with the "selling" leadership style the most frequently used backup style and "participating" the second most frequently used style. Chairpersons from public nursing schools reported significantly greater numbers of scholarly activities than did chairpersons from private nursing schools. Chairpersons who had held their positions for less than 5 years tended to have a "participating" leadership style. A majority of nursing department chairpersons in the study reported that they felt institutional pressure to engage in scholarly activities.

  17. Differences in coprophilous beetle communities structure in Sierra de Minas (Uruguay): a mosaic landscape.

    PubMed

    González-Vainer, Patricia; Morelli, E; Defeo, O

    2012-10-01

    Coprophilous beetles represent an abundant and rich group with critical importance in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Most coprophagous beetles have a stenotopic distribution in relation to vegetation types. Because of this, they are usually very sensitive to environmental changes and are considered well suited as bioindicator organisms. The aim of this study was to analyze variations in coprophilous beetle assemblages in natural and anthropogenic habitats. Coprophilous beetle communities were sampled monthly for 1 year using pitfall traps baited with cow dung, in native xeric upland forests, 15-years-old plantations of Pinus elliottii and pastures in Sierra de Minas, Lavalleja, Uruguay. A total of 7,436 beetles were caught and identified to species or morphospecies level. The most abundant families were Aphodiidae, Scarabaeidae, and Staphylinidae. Differences in species richness, abundance, Shannon index, evenness, and dominance were detected between habitats. Abundances of most frequent families were significantly higher in both kinds of forests. Species richness and diversity of Aphodiidae and Staphylinidae were higher in forests, while Scarabaeidae showed the highest richness and diversity in pine plantations. Species composition significantly differed between habitats. Uroxys terminalis Waterhouse and Ataenius perforatus Harold typified the assemblages in native forests and pine plantations and also discriminated both communities because of their differential pattern of abundance between habitats. Typifying species in pastures were Onthophagus hirculus, Ateuchus robustus (Harold), and Ataenius platensis Blanchard. Habitat type had a strong effect on the coprophilous beetle community structure and composition.

  18. Effects of curricular activity on students' situational motivation and physical activity levels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C; Newton, Maria; Huang, Chaoqun

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) the effects of three curricular activities on students'situational motivation (intrinsic motivation [IM], identified regulation [IR], external regulation, and amotivation [AM]) and physical activity (PA) levels, and (b) the predictive strength of situational motivation to PA levels. Four hundred twelve students in grades 7-9 participated in three activities (cardiovascular fitness, ultimate football, and Dance Dance Revolution [DDR]) in physical education. ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers were used to measure students' PA levels for three classes for each activity. Students also completed a Situational Motivation Scale (Guay, Vallerand, & Blanchard, 2000) at the end of each class. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that students spent significantly higher percentages of time in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) in fitness and football classes than they did in DDR class. Students reported higher lM and IR toward fitness than DDR They also scored higher in IR toward fitness than football. In contrast, students displayed significantly lower AM toward fitness than football and DDR Hierarchical Linear Modeling revealed that IM was the only positive predictor for time in MVPA (p = .02), whereas AM was the negative predictor (p < .01). The findings are discussed in regard to the implications for educational practice.

  19. Lytopylus Förster (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Agathidinae) species from Costa Rica, with an emphasis on specimens reared from caterpillars in Area de Conservación Guanacaste

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Michael J.; Clutts, Stephanie; Tucker, Erika M.; Janzen, Daniel; Hallwachs, Winnie; Dapkey, Tanya; Smith, M. Alex

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Twelve species of Costa Rican Lytopylus are treated; these include all species reared from Lepidoptera caterpillars in Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, over 32 years of caterpillar inventory, as well as two species recorded in the literature as occurring in Costa Rica. Ten new species are described, i.e., Lytopylus bradzlotnicki, Lytopylus colleenhitchcockae, Lytopylus gregburtoni, Lytopylus jessicadimauroae, Lytopylus jessiehillae, Lytopylus mingfangi, Lytopylus rebeccashapleyae, Lytopylus robpringlei, Lytopylus sandraberriosae, Lytopylus vaughntani. The following species are transferred to Lytopylus: Metriosoma flavicalcar Enderlein 1920 to Lytopylus flavicalcar comb. n.; Bassus macadamiae Briceño and Sharkey 2000 to Lytopylus macadamiae comb. n.; Metriosoma bicarinatum Enderlein 1920 to Lytopylus bicarinatum comb. n.; Metriosoma brasiliense Enderlein 1920 to Lytopylus brasiliense comb. n.; Bassus tayrona Campos 2007 to Lytopylus tayrona comb. n.; Microdus femoratus Cameron 1887 to Lytopylus femoratus comb. n.; Microdus melanocephalus Cameron 1887 to Lytopylus melanocephalus comb. n.; Bassus pastranai Blanchard 1952 to Lytopylus pastranai comb. n.; Agathis nigrobalteata Cameron 1911 to Lytopylus nigrobalteatus comb. n. Two keys to species of Lytopylus are presented, one interactive and the other static. PMID:22259290

  20. [Situational leadership in nursing in a health institution in Bucaramanga, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Torres-Contreras, Claudia Consuelo

    2013-01-01

    In nursing, it is crucial to know the leadership style required in each situation to act as a leader. The clinical nurse must have an effective leadership style that suits the situations presented during the performance of their functions, in order to achieve the objectives in the care of the patient and family. To describe the situational leadership styles present in nurses in hospital departments, including intensive care, according to the theory of Hersey and Blanchard and to determine the relationship between leadership styles and occupational variables. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on a sample population of 107nurses working in clinical areas of hospital and intensive care in two health institutions. The Dr. Herman Bachenheimer situational leadership tool was applied to nursing staff. The nurses at the hospital area (61) and intensive care (46) have mainly a guide-leadership style (35.4%), followed by a participative style (33.9%) and manager-style (27.9%). Delegation leadership style (2.8%) was not present in clinical nurses. There is no significant relationship between leadership styles and the time working in the institution. A statistically significant relationship was found between leadership styles and length of management experience in the clinical area (P=.011). The predominant leadership style of hospital nurses is to guide, and for intensive care nurses it is participatory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Two new species of Anagyrus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) from Argentina, parasitoids of Hypogeococcus spp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), with taxonomic notes on some congeneric taxa.

    PubMed

    Triapitsyn, Serguei V; Logarzo, Guillermo A; Aguirre, María B; Aquino, Daniel A

    2014-09-15

    Two new species of Anagyrus Howard (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) are described from Argentina, A. cachamai Triapitsyn, Logarzo & Aguirre sp. n. (Catamarca, Córdoba, Salta and Tucumán Provinces) and A. quilmes Triapitsyn, Logarzo & Aguirre sp. n. (Catamarca, Salta and Tucumán). Both new species are parasitoids of Hypogeococcus spp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). Anagyrus cachamai is a parasitoid of H. pungens Granara de Willink on Alternanthera paronychioides, A. pungens and Gomphrena sp. (Amaranthaceae), and also of a Hypogeococcus sp. on Cleistocactus baumannii and Hypogeococcus sp. on C. smaragdiflorus (Cactaceae). Anagyrus quilmes is a parasitoid of H. pungens on A. paronychioides, A. pungens and Gomphrena sp. Other biological traits of the new species are also reported. These parasitoids may be of importance as potential candidate biological control agents against a Hypogeococcus sp., commonly called the Harrisia cactus mealybug and identified as H. pungens, but possibly not belonging to that species. This mealybug threatens the native cacti in some Caribbean islands and Florida, USA, and is devastating the native columnar cacti in Puerto Rico. Illustrations and taxonomic notes on the type specimens of some other, little known described species of Anagyrus from Argentina and Chile are provided, and a key to females of the 14 species of Anagyrus known from Argentina is given. Anagyrus nigriceps (De Santis) syn. n. is synonymized under A. bellator (De Santis). Lectotypes are designated for Paranusia bifasciata Brèthes, Philoponectroma pectinatum Brèthes, and Protanagyrus aciculatus Blanchard

  2. William Stewart Halsted: letters to a young female admirer.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J L; Gordon, T A; Kehoe, M W; McCall, N

    2001-11-01

    To present the first new information in the past 25 years concerning the life of Dr. William Stewart Halsted. This paper reports on recently discovered personal correspondence of Dr. Halsted, beginning at age 66, to a young lady, Elizabeth Blanchard Randall, 40 years his junior. Dr. William Stewart Halsted is generally considered the most important and influential surgeon that this country has produced. During his Hopkins days in Baltimore (1886-1922) he was rather reclusive, and little is known of his personal life. He was married but had no children. Several biographies written by Halsted's contemporaries constitute the bulk of what is known about Halsted's personal life. All extant letters from Dr. Halsted to Miss Randall were reviewed. Archival materials were consulted to understand the context for this friendship. The correspondence between Halsted and Randall took place during a 3-year period, although their acquaintance was probably long-standing. The letters reveal Dr. Halsted and Miss Randall's great and warm affection for each other, despite their 40-year age difference. The letters have a playful nature absent in Halsted's other correspondence. This relationship has not been previously noted. Late in Halsted's life, he developed a warm and affectionate relationship with a young lady 40 years his junior, as revealed in Halsted's correspondence. Halsted's warm, personal, and playful letters are in stark contrast to his biographers' portrayals of him as a more serious and reclusive person.

  3. The orchid-bee faunas (Hymenoptera: Apidae) of 'Parque Nacional do Monte Pascoal', 'Parque Nacional do Descobrimento' and three other Atlantic Forest remnants in southern Bahia, eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nemésio, A

    2013-05-01

    The orchid-bee faunas of 'Parque Nacional do Monte Pascoal', 'Parque Nacional do Descobrimento' and three other Atlantic Forest remnants ranging from 1 to 300 ha in southern Bahia, eastern Brazil, were surveyed. Baits with seventeen different scents were used to attract orchid-bee males. Four thousand seven hundred and sixty-four males belonging to 36 species were actively collected with insect nets during 300 hours from November, 2008 to November, 2009. Richness and diversity of orchid bees found in this study are the highest ever recorded in the Atlantic Forest domain. Eufriesea dentilabris (Mocsáry, 1897) and Eufriesea violacea (Blanchard, 1840) were collected at the 'Parque Nacional do Monte Pascoal', the first record of these species for the state of Bahia and the northernmost record for both species. Females Exaerete dentata (Linnaeus, 1758) were also collected at 'Parque Nacional do Monte Pascoal' and old records of Eufriesea aeneiventris (Mocsáry, 1896) in this area makes this site the richest and most diverse concerning its orchid-bee fauna in the entire Atlantic Forest and similar to areas in the Amazon Basin.

  4. Lytopylus Förster (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Agathidinae) species from Costa Rica, with an emphasis on specimens reared from caterpillars in Area de Conservación Guanacaste.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael J; Clutts, Stephanie; Tucker, Erika M; Janzen, Daniel; Hallwachs, Winnie; Dapkey, Tanya; Smith, M Alex

    2011-01-01

    Twelve species of Costa Rican Lytopylus are treated; these include all species reared from Lepidoptera caterpillars in Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, over 32 years of caterpillar inventory, as well as two species recorded in the literature as occurring in Costa Rica. Ten new species are described, i.e., Lytopylus bradzlotnicki, Lytopylus colleenhitchcockae, Lytopylus gregburtoni, Lytopylus jessicadimauroae, Lytopylus jessiehillae, Lytopylus mingfangi, Lytopylus rebeccashapleyae, Lytopylus robpringlei, Lytopylus sandraberriosae, Lytopylus vaughntani. The following species are transferred to Lytopylus: Metriosoma flavicalcar Enderlein 1920 to Lytopylus flavicalcarcomb. n.; Bassus macadamiae Briceño and Sharkey 2000 to Lytopylus macadamiaecomb. n.; Metriosoma bicarinatum Enderlein 1920 to Lytopylus bicarinatumcomb. n.; Metriosoma brasiliense Enderlein 1920 to Lytopylus brasiliensecomb. n.; Bassus tayrona Campos 2007 to Lytopylus tayronacomb. n.; Microdus femoratus Cameron 1887 to Lytopylus femoratuscomb. n.; Microdus melanocephalus Cameron 1887 to Lytopylus melanocephaluscomb. n.; Bassus pastranai Blanchard 1952 to Lytopylus pastranaicomb. n.; Agathis nigrobalteata Cameron 1911 to Lytopylus nigrobalteatuscomb. n. Two keys to species of Lytopylus are presented, one interactive and the other static.

  5. Restraint stress and social defeat: What they have in common.

    PubMed

    Motta, Simone Cristina; Canteras, Newton Sabino

    2015-07-01

    Bob Blanchard was a great inspiration for our studies on the neural basis of social defense. In the present study, we compared the hypothalamic pattern of activation between social defeat and restraint stress. As important stress situations, both defeated and immobilized animals displayed a substantial increase in Fos in the parvicellular part of the paraventricular nucleus,mostly in the region that contains the CRH neurons. In addition, socially defeated animals, but not restrained animals, recruited elements of the medial hypothalamic conspecific-responsive circuit, a region also engaged in other forms of social behavior. Of particular interest, both defeated and immobilized animals presented a robust increase in Fos expression in specific regions of the lateral hypothalamic area (i.e., juxtaparaventricular and juxtadorsomedial regions) likely to convey septo-hippocampal information encoding the environmental boundary restriction observed in both forms of stress, and in the dorsomedial part of the dorsal premammillary nucleus which seems to work as a key player for the expression of, at least, part of the behavioral responses during both restraint and social defeat. These results indicate interesting commonalities between social defeat and restraint stress, suggesting, for the first time, a septo-hippocampal–hypothalamic path likely to respond to the environmental boundary restriction that may act as common stressor component for both types of stress. Moreover, the comparison of the neural circuits mediating physical restraint and social defense revealed a possible path for encoding the entrapment component during social confrontation.

  6. It Takes More Than a Cow Bell to Lead a Team

    SciTech Connect

    Sickles, L.D.

    1999-01-20

    Leading an audit team goes beyond performance of the duties outlined in any requirement or training course. Anyone can memorize the steps to begin and to complete an audit, but it takes leadership to capitalize on the strengths of each team member and to interact with the auditee. Leadership has been written about and studied for many years. Principles and ideas developed by Covey, Senge, Peters, Blanchard, Hersey, Drucker, Yuki and many, many more but they all come down to some basic issues. There is no magic formula. There are theories and models that when applied work in one situation. Some theories and methodologies work better than others depending on the situation. The presentation today looks at leadership from the perspective of the lead auditor, as he/she has to guide the audit process and deal with many personalities from the audit team to the people being interviewed, Each situation is different, each audit team is different, each audit is unique. The basic principles are applied but it takes understanding leadership to have a successful audit. Applying the Situational Leadership model will enable you to be a good and effective leader and capitalize on the strengths of each team member. It is an invaluable asset to add to your communication toolbox. So let's put our bells on the shelf and put on our learning caps.

  7. The nuclear Thomas-Fermi model

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1994-08-01

    The statistical Thomas-Fermi model is applied to a comprehensive survey of macroscopic nuclear properties. The model uses a Seyler-Blanchard effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, generalized by the addition of one momentum-dependent and one density-dependent term. The adjustable parameters of the interaction were fitted to shell-corrected masses of 1654 nuclei, to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface and to the measured depths of the optical model potential. With these parameters nuclear sizes are well reproduced, and only relatively minor deviations between measured and calculated fission barriers of 36 nuclei are found. The model determines the principal bulk and surface properties of nuclear matter and provides estimates for the more subtle, Droplet Model, properties. The predicted energy vs density relation for neutron matter is in striking correspondence with the 1981 theoretical estimate of Friedman and Pandharipande. Other extreme situations to which the model is applied are a study of Sn isotopes from {sup 82}Sn to {sup 170}Sn, and the rupture into a bubble configuration of a nucleus (constrained to spherical symmetry) which takes place when Z{sup 2}/A exceeds about 100.

  8. Time management and leadership styles: an empirical study of long-term health care administrators.

    PubMed

    Hartley, H J; Kramer, J A

    1991-01-01

    Is there a relationship between the type of leadership style employed by long-term health care administrators and the effective use and management of time? This paper describes a 1989 study of 188 administrators of skilled nursing facilities and intermediate care facilities in Connecticut. Two self-rating instruments were employed: the Executive Time Management Inventory (Hartley, Kramer, et al.) and the LEAD-Self instrument (Hersey and Blanchard). Four hypotheses were tested at the .05 level of significance to examine relationships among time management, leadership style, size of facility, administrator experience, and cost factors. Statistical procedures included Pearson Product-Moment correlations, analysis of variance, t-tests, and partial correlations. Results of the study included (1) time management effectiveness increased as administrators gained more experience; (2) no significant relationship existed between type of leadership style and time management effectiveness; (3) women administrators perceived themselves as significantly more effective time managers than men did; (4) most health care administrators employed the same primary leadership style: "selling," which is defined as high relationship/high task; and (5) institutional size was not related to the time management effectiveness of the administrator. The findings have implications for pre-service and in-service training and for future studies in health administration education.

  9. Upper and lower critical decay exponents of Ising ferromagnets with long-range interaction.

    PubMed

    Horita, Toshiki; Suwa, Hidemaro; Todo, Synge

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the universality class of the finite-temperature phase transition of the two-dimensional Ising model with the algebraically decaying ferromagnetic long-range interaction, J_{ij}=|r[over ⃗]_{i}-r[over ⃗]_{j}|^{-(d+σ)}, where d (=2) is the dimension of the system and σ is the decay exponent, by means of the order-N cluster-algorithm Monte Carlo method. In particular, we focus on the upper and lower critical decay exponents, the boundaries between the mean-field-universality, intermediate, and short-range-universality regimes. At the critical decay exponents, it is found that the standard Binder ratio of magnetization at the critical temperature exhibits extremely slow convergence as a function of the system size. We propose more effective physical quantities, namely the combined Binder ratio and the self-combined Binder ratio, both of which cancel the leading finite-size corrections of the conventional Binder ratio. Utilizing these techniques, we clearly demonstrate that in two dimensions, the lower and upper critical decay exponents are σ=1 and 7/4, respectively, contrary to the recent Monte Carlo and renormalization-group studies [M. Picco, arXiv:1207.1018; T. Blanchard et al., Europhys. Lett. 101, 56003 (2013)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/101/56003].

  10. Upper and lower critical decay exponents of Ising ferromagnets with long-range interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horita, Toshiki; Suwa, Hidemaro; Todo, Synge

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the universality class of the finite-temperature phase transition of the two-dimensional Ising model with the algebraically decaying ferromagnetic long-range interaction, Ji j=|r⃗i-r⃗j| -(d +σ ) , where d (=2) is the dimension of the system and σ is the decay exponent, by means of the order-N cluster-algorithm Monte Carlo method. In particular, we focus on the upper and lower critical decay exponents, the boundaries between the mean-field-universality, intermediate, and short-range-universality regimes. At the critical decay exponents, it is found that the standard Binder ratio of magnetization at the critical temperature exhibits extremely slow convergence as a function of the system size. We propose more effective physical quantities, namely the combined Binder ratio and the self-combined Binder ratio, both of which cancel the leading finite-size corrections of the conventional Binder ratio. Utilizing these techniques, we clearly demonstrate that in two dimensions, the lower and upper critical decay exponents are σ =1 and 7/4, respectively, contrary to the recent Monte Carlo and renormalization-group studies [M. Picco, arXiv:1207.1018; T. Blanchard et al., Europhys. Lett. 101, 56003 (2013) 10.1209/0295-5075/101/56003].

  11. Redescription and resurrection of Bertiella satyri (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae) parasitizing the orangutan (Pongo abelii) in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Foitová, Ivona; Mašová, Sárka; Tenora, František; Koubková, Božena; Hodová, Iveta; Vyskočilová, Martina; Baruš, Vlastimil; Nurcahyo, Wisnu

    2011-09-01

    The tapeworm species Bertiella satyri from a semi-wild Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii: Ponginae) is redescribed and the sequence of its 18S rDNA is presented. The tapeworms parasitizing the genera Pan, Pongo, Homo and Hylobates from Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris and from Muséum d´Histoire Naturelle, Genève are also presented. The validity of B. satyri is confirmed. B. satyri (BSA) differs from the most similar species Bertiella studeri (BSTU) in the following characteristics: (1) testes number, BSTU 300-400; BSA 116-124, (2) genital opening, BSTU regularly alternate; BSA irregularly alternate, (3) Cirrus-sac, BSTU short, 0.250-0.320, does not reach excretory ducts; BSA long, 0.630 × 0.495, reaches excretory ducts, (4) egg size, BSTU 0.053-0.060; BSA 0.030-0.051, (5) host BSTU Pan troglodytes, Africa; BSA Pongo pygmaeus, P. abelii, Indonesia (Borneo, Sumatra). Both species differ according to our material and the name B. satyri (Blanchard, 1891) is resurrected.

  12. Description of Hymenolepis microstoma (Nottingham strain): a classical tapeworm model for research in the genomic era

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hymenolepis microstoma (Dujardin, 1845) Blanchard, 1891, the mouse bile duct tapeworm, is a rodent/beetle-hosted laboratory model that has been used in research and teaching since its domestication in the 1950s. Recent characterization of its genome has prompted us to describe the specific strain that underpins these data, anchoring its identity and bringing the 150+ year-old original description up-to-date. Results Morphometric and ultrastructural analyses were carried out on laboratory-reared specimens of the 'Nottingham' strain of Hymenolepis microstoma used for genome characterization. A contemporary description of the species is provided including detailed illustration of adult anatomy and elucidation of its taxonomy and the history of the specific laboratory isolate. Conclusions Our work acts to anchor the specific strain from which the H. microstoma genome has been characterized and provides an anatomical reference for researchers needing to employ a model tapeworm system that enables easy access to all stages of the life cycle. We review its classification, life history and development, and briefly discuss the genome and other model systems being employed at the beginning of a genomic era in cestodology. PMID:21194465

  13. Situational leadership applied to the dissertation process.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, James W

    2008-01-01

    For more than 40 years, concern has been expressed over the attrition rate of students in Ph.D. programs in American universities. Although there are a number of significant factors at work, attrition of doctoral students in sciences such as anatomy may lead to a dearth of trained teaching anatomists as well as research scientists in the anatomical sciences. Failure to complete the Ph.D. process including the dissertation carries a high cost, not only to the students who fail to complete their programs, but also to society at large due to the expenditure of scarce education resources. A variety of factors have been examined in the various studies, but two stands out of major interest for this article: student personality factors such as perseverance and the level of faculty mentoring/support to the students during the graduate education process. A new approach to providing faculty support based on the needs of the individual student is presented in this article. Situational Leadership(R) has been developed over the past 40 years by Paul Hersey and Kenneth Blanchard and their associates. This leadership model is unique in that when it is applied to the dissertation process, it requires the faculty member to determine the readiness level of the graduate student. Because each student is a unique individual, the faculty mentor assesses each student based on the specific task at hand in order to provide the appropriate style of mentorship each student requires.

  14. [Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae) of the northwestern slope of the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Neis J; García, Héctor; Pulido, Luz A; Ospino, Deibi; Harváez, Juan C

    2009-01-01

    The community structure of dung beetles in the middle and lower river basin of the Gaira river, Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia, is described. Four sites were selected along an altitudinal gradient of 50-940 m for sampling from June to October, 2004. Dung beetles were captured using modified pitfall traps and manual recollections. We captured 7,872 individuals belonging to 29 species, distributed in 15 genera and five tribes of Scarabaeinae. Canthon and Onthophagus were the most diverse genera, each represented by six species. The sampled sites shared the following species: Onthophagus acuminatus Harold, O. clypeatus Blanchard, O. marginicollis Harold. Bocatoma was the most diverse site with 23 species; whereas Port Mosquito presented the highest abundance, with 3,262 individuals. Seven species represented 89% of all captures: Canthidium sp., Dichotomius sp., Uroxys sp. 1, Uroxys sp. 2, O. marginicollis, O. clypeatus and O. acuminatus. Of the 29 captured species, 17 belonged to the functional group of diggers and 10 were ball-rollers. We did not observe significant among-site differences in community structure. Abiotic factors such as altitude, temperature and humidity cannot explain observed variation in community structure across sites, indicating other variables such as vegetation cover, density of the vegetation and soil type may play a role in the community structure of these insects.

  15. PIMMS (Pragmatic Insertional Mutation Mapping System) Laboratory Methodology a Readily Accessible Tool for Identification of Essential Genes in Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Adam M.; Egan, Sharon A.; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Leigh, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The Pragmatic Insertional Mutation Mapping (PIMMS) laboratory protocol was developed alongside various bioinformatics packages (Blanchard et al., 2015) to enable detection of essential and conditionally essential genes in Streptococcus and related bacteria. This extended the methodology commonly used to locate insertional mutations in individual mutants to the analysis of mutations in populations of bacteria. In Streptococcus uberis, a pyogenic Streptococcus associated with intramammary infection and mastitis in ruminants, the mutagen pGhost9:ISS1 was shown to integrate across the entire genome. Analysis of >80,000 mutations revealed 196 coding sequences, which were not be mutated and a further 67 where mutation only occurred beyond the 90th percentile of the coding sequence. These sequences showed good concordance with sequences within the database of essential genes and typically matched sequences known to be associated with basic cellular functions. Due to the broad utility of this mutagen and the simplicity of the methodology it is anticipated that PIMMS will be of value to a wide range of laboratories in functional genomic analysis of a wide range of Gram positive bacteria (Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus) of medical, veterinary, and industrial significance. PMID:27826289

  16. Molecular phylogeny of anoplocephalid tapeworms (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) infecting humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Doležalová, Jana; Vallo, Peter; Petrželková, Klára J; Foitová, Ivona; Nurcahyo, Wisnu; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Hashimoto, Chie; Jirků, Milan; Lukeš, Julius; Scholz, Tomáš; Modrý, David

    2015-09-01

    Anoplocephalid tapeworms of the genus Bertiella Stiles and Hassall, 1902 and Anoplocephala Blanchard, 1848, found in the Asian, African and American non-human primates are presumed to sporadic ape-to-man transmissions. Variable nuclear (5.8S-ITS2; 28S rRNA) and mitochondrial genes (cox1; nad1) of isolates of anoplocephalids originating from different primates (Callicebus oenanthe, Gorilla beringei, Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes and Pongo abelii) and humans from various regions (South America, Africa, South-East Asia) were sequenced. In most analyses, Bertiella formed a monophyletic group within the subfamily Anoplocephalinae, however, the 28S rRNA sequence-based analysis indicated paraphyletic relationship between Bertiella from primates and Australian marsupials and rodents, which should thus be regarded as different taxa. Moreover, isolate determined as Anoplocephala cf. gorillae from mountain gorilla clustered within the Bertiella clade from primates. This either indicates that A. gorillae deserves to be included into the genus Bertiella, or, that an unknown Bertiella species infects also mountain gorillas. The analyses allowed the genetic differentiation of the isolates, albeit with no obvious geographical or host-related patterns. The unexpected genetic diversity of the isolates studied suggests the existence of several Bertiella species in primates and human and calls for revision of the whole group, based both on molecular and morphological data.

  17. Sexual dimorphism and mating behavior in Anomala testaceipennis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sérgio Roberto; Gomes, Elias Soares; Bento, José Maurício Simões

    2014-01-01

    The beetle, Anomala testaceipennis Blanchard (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), occurs in central-western Brazil where larvae feed on the roots of plants causing damage. This research aimed to study sexual dimorphism and mating behavior of A. testaceipennis. Adults of A. testaceipennis were collected with light traps in the experimental area of the State University of Mato Grosso do Sul, in Aquidauana. Laboratory experiments were performed to describe copulation behavior and adult morphology of males and females. In males the last abdominal segment has a pronounced constriction, which is absent in females, and the male's last segment of the first pair of legs has a ventral projection, which is poorly developed in females. The mating activities of adults begin soon after sunset, when adults leave the soil and fly. When the male encounters a female, he touches her with antennae and tarsi. If accepted, the male climbs on the female and remains on her back, and soon after the copulation begins. When the female does not accept the male for mating, she moves rapidly and can roll on the ground, and by so removing the male. In the field, adults feed and mate on bloomed trees of Oiti, Licania tomentosa Benth (Malpighiales: Chrysobalanaceae) and Louro, Cordia glabrata Martius (Boraginaceae). In trees without inflorescences no adults of this species were found.

  18. Taxonomic review of the genus Hypomicrogaster Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae), with descriptions of 40 new species.

    PubMed

    Valerio, A A; Whitfield, J B

    2015-06-25

    A taxonomic review of the genus Hypomicrogaster Ashmead is presented with the redescription and redelimitation of the already named species Hypomicrogaster ecus Nixon, H. imitator (Ashmead), H. tydeus Nixon and H. zonaria (Say). The review also implies eleven new synonymies, and a new combination for the species H. areolaris (Blanchard). Also, the present revision identified 40 new Hypomicrogaster species: Hypomicrogaster aodous n. sp., H. aplebis n. sp., H. cernus n. sp., H. crocinus n. sp., H. daktulios n. sp., H. deltis n. sp., H. duo n. sp., H. epipagis n. sp., H. espera n. sp., H. evrys n. sp., H. guille n. sp., H. hektos n. sp., H. hupsos n. sp., H. ingensis n. sp., H. insolitus n. sp., H. inversalis n. sp., H. koinos n. sp., H. largus n. sp., H. laxus n. sp., H. linearis n. sp., H. lineatus n. sp., H. luisi n. sp., H. masoni n. sp., H. mesos n. sp., H. mikrosus n. sp., H. multus n. sp., H. pectinatus n. sp., H. plagios n. sp., H. pollex n. sp., H. rugosus n. sp., H. scindus n. sp., H. sicingens n. sp., H. sicpollex n. sp., H. sicscindus n. sp., H. siderion n. sp., H. spatulae n. sp., H. specialis n. sp., H. tantillus n. sp., H. tetra n. sp., H. zan n. sp. The Hypomicrogaster species are using as hosts 11 families of Lepidoptera, and 52 confirmed lepidopteran species feeding on 34 families of plants. Additionally, a fully illustrated key to all known described species of Hypomicrogaster is presented.

  19. The carboxy-terminal fragment of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A induces Alzheimer disease pathology and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochuan; Blanchard, Julie; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Clement, Nathalie; Linden, R. Michael; Radu, Aurelian; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Development of rational therapeutic treatments of Alzheimer disease (AD) requires the elucidation of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of neurofibrillary degeneration and β-amyloidosis, the two hallmarks of this disease. Here we show, employing an adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1)-induced expression of the C-terminal fragment (I2CTF) of I2PP2A, also called SET, in rat brain, decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, and neurodegeneration; littermates treated identically but with vector only, i.e., AAV1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), served as a control. Furthermore, there was an increase in the level of activated glycogen synthase kinase-3β and enhanced expression of intraneuronal Aβ in AAV1-I2CTF animals. Morris water maze behavioral test revealed that infection with AAV1-I2CTF induced spatial reference memory and memory consolidation deficits and a decrease in the brain level of pSer133-CREB. These findings suggest a novel etiopathogenic mechanism of AD, which is initiated by the cleavage of I2PP2A, producing I2CTF, and describe a novel disease-relevant nontransgenic animal model of AD.—Wang, X., Blanchard, J., Kohlbrenner, E., Clement, N., Linden, R. M., Radu, A., Grundke-Iqbal, I., Iqbal, K. The carboxy-terminal fragment of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A induces Alzheimer disease pathology and cognitive impairment. PMID:20651003

  20. Testing a Longitudinal Integrated Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination Theory Model for Physical Activity Post-Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Shane N.; Fortier, Michelle S.; Strachan, Shaelyn M.; Blanchard, Chris M.; Boulay, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012) have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.’s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109) answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, P<0.001). The overall model retained good fit indices. In conclusion, results diverged from theoretical predictions of physical activity, but self-determination and self-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible. PMID:26973926

  1. Direct evidence of an elongation factor-Tu/Ts·GTP·Aminoacyl-tRNA quaternary complex.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Benjamin J; Altman, Roger B; Ferguson, Angelica; Wasserman, Michael R; Zhou, Zhou; Blanchard, Scott C

    2014-08-22

    During protein synthesis, elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu) bound to GTP chaperones the entry of aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) into actively translating ribosomes. In so doing, EF-Tu increases the rate and fidelity of the translation mechanism. Recent evidence suggests that EF-Ts, the guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for EF-Tu, directly accelerates both the formation and dissociation of the EF-Tu-GTP-Phe-tRNA(Phe) ternary complex (Burnett, B. J., Altman, R. B., Ferrao, R., Alejo, J. L., Kaur, N., Kanji, J., and Blanchard, S. C. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 13917-13928). A central feature of this model is the existence of a quaternary complex of EF-Tu/Ts·GTP·aa-tRNA(aa). Here, through comparative investigations of phenylalanyl, methionyl, and arginyl ternary complexes, and the development of a strategy to monitor their formation and decay using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we reveal the generality of this newly described EF-Ts function and the first direct evidence of the transient quaternary complex species. These findings suggest that EF-Ts may regulate ternary complex abundance in the cell through mechanisms that are distinct from its guanosine nucleotide exchange factor functions.

  2. Which Fungus Originally was Trichophyton mentagrophytes? Historical Review and Illustration by a Clinical Case.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Annemay; Cattin, Vincent; Fratti, Marina; Mignon, Bernard; Monod, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Several dermatophytes producing numerous pyriform or round microconidia were called Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Among these dermatophytes are the teleomorph species Arthroderma benhamiae, Arthroderma vanbreuseghemii and Arthroderma simii, and other species such as Trichophyton interdigitale, Trichophyton erinacei and Trichophyton quinckeanum for which only the anamorph is known. Confusion exists about which fungus should be really called T. mentagrophytes and about the rational use of this name in practice. We report a case of beard ringworm (tinea barbae) with A. vanbreuseghemii. According to both clinical signs and the type of hair parasitism, this case was exactly compatible to the first description of a non-favic dermatophytosis by Gruby under the name of "mentagrophyte" from which was derived the dermatophyte epithet mentagrophytes. In addition, the phenotypic characters of the isolated fungus in cultures perfectly matched with those of the first description of a dermatophyte under T. mentagrophytes by Blanchard (Parasites animaux et parasites végétaux à l'exclusion des Bactéries, Masson, Paris, 1896). In conclusion, T. mentagrophytes corresponds to the fungus later named A. vanbreuseghemii. However, because the neotype of T. mentagrophytes was not adequately designated in regard to the ancient literature, we would privilege the use of A. vanbreuseghemii and abandon the name of T. mentagrophytes.

  3. Future fisheries yield in shelf waters: a model study into effects of a warmer and more acidic marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, S. M.; le Quesne, W.; Parker, R. E.

    2015-07-01

    We applied a coupled, marine water column model to three sites in the North Sea. The three sites represent different hydrodynamic regimes and are thus representative of a wider area. The model consists of a hydro-biogeochemical model (GOTM-ERSEM-BFM) coupled one way upwards to a size-structured model representing pelagic predators and detritivores (Blanchard et al., 2009). Thus, bottom-up pressures like changing abiotic environment (climate change, chemical cycling) impact on fish biomass across the size spectrum. Here, we studied three different impacts of future conditions on fish yield: climatic impacts (medium emission scenario), abiotic ocean acidification impacts (reduced pelagic nitrification) and biotic ocean acidification impacts (reduced detritivore growth rate). The three impacts were studied separately and combined, and showed that sites within different hydrodynamic regimes responded very differently. The seasonally stratified site showed an increase in fish yields (occuring in winter and spring), with acidification effects of the same order of magnitude as climatic effects. The permanently mixed site also showed an increase in fish yield (increase in summer, decrease in winter), due to climatic effects moderated by acidification impacts. The third site, which is characterised by large interannual variability in thermal stratification duration, showed a decline in fish yields (occuring in winter) due to decline of the benthic system which forms an important carbon pathway at this site. All sites displayed a shift towards a more pelagic oriented system.

  4. Potential future fisheries yields in shelf waters: a model study of the effects of climate change and ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, S. M.; Le Quesne, W. F.; Parker, E. R.

    2016-01-01

    We applied a coupled marine water column model to three sites in the North Sea. The three sites represent different hydrodynamic regimes and are thus representative of a wider area. The model consists of a hydro-biogeochemical model (GOTM-ERSEM-BFM) coupled one way upwards to a size-structured model representing pelagic predators and detritivores (Blanchard et al., 2009). Thus, bottom-up pressures like changing abiotic environment (climate change, chemical cycling) will have an impact on fish biomass across the size spectrum. Here, we studied three different impacts of future conditions on fish yield: climatic impacts (medium emission scenario), abiotic ocean acidification impacts (reduced pelagic nitrification), and biotic ocean acidification impacts (reduced detritivore growth rate). The three impacts were studied separately and combined, and results showed that sites within different hydrodynamic regimes can respond very differently. The seasonally stratified site showed an increase in fish yields (occurring in winter and spring), with acidification effects of the same order of magnitude as climatic effects. The permanently mixed site also showed an increase in fish yield (increase in summer, decrease in winter), due to climatic effects moderated by acidification impacts. The third site, which is characterised by large inter-annual variability in thermal stratification duration, showed a decline in fish yields (occurring in winter) due to decline in the benthic system which forms an important carbon pathway at this site. All sites displayed a shift towards a more pelagic-oriented system.

  5. Three new genera of Neotropical Mimallonidae (Lepidoptera, Mimallonoidea, Mimallonidae) with descriptions of three new species

    PubMed Central

    St. Laurent, Ryan A.; Mielke, Carlos G. C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three new genera of Mimallonidae are described. The monotypic genus Tostallo gen. n. is erected to contain “Perophora” albescens Jones, 1912, which was previously placed in the preoccupied genus Perophora Harris, 1841 and was never formally moved to a valid genus. Perophora is a junior homonym of Cicinnus Blanchard, 1852, but the name albescens is not appropriately placed in Cicinnus due to external and genitalia characteristics entirely unique to the species albescens. The female of Tostallo albescens comb. n. is described and both sexes are figured for the first time. Auroriana gen. n. is erected to contain Auroriana florianensis (Herbin, 2012), comb. n. previously described as Cicinnus florianensis, and two new species: Auroriana colombiana sp. n. from Colombia and Auroriana gemma sp. n. from southeastern and southern Brazil. The female of Auroriana florianensis is described and figured for the first time. Finally, the monotypic genus Micrallo gen. n. is erected to include a new species, Micrallo minutus sp. n. described from northeastern Brazil. PMID:27047246

  6. A two-dimensional numerical investigation of the interaction between sea breezes and deep convection over the Florida peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Melville E.; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System is used to investigate the interaction between sea breezes and deep convection over the Florida peninsula, and it is shown that this model can simulate the broad features of the three characteristic types of convection systems classified by Blanchard and Lopez (1985). In sensitivity tests performed for a variety of wind and thermodynamic profiles and for different soil-moisture contents, it was found that increases in the low-level temperature and in moisture content speeded up the development of convection. It was found that the dry-soil simulation produced rapidly developing sea breezes that moved inland quickly, while the moist soil case produced a much more slowly developing sea breeze. The total rainfall over the peninsula for the dry-soil case was greater than for the moist soil; it is suggested that the enhanced surface heat fluxes for the dry soil case create stronger low-level convergence over the peninsula (than in the moist-soil case) to force the convection.

  7. Fabrication of an optical component

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Michael A.; Aikens, David M.; Camp, David W.; Thomas, Ian M.; Kiikka, Craig; Sheehan, Lynn M.; Kozlowski, Mark R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming optical parts used in laser optical systems such as high energy lasers, high average power lasers, semiconductor capital equipment and medical devices. The optical parts will not damage during the operation of high power lasers in the ultra-violet light range. A blank is first ground using a fixed abrasive grinding method to remove the subsurface damage formed during the fabrication of the blank. The next step grinds and polishes the edges and forms bevels to reduce the amount of fused-glass contaminants in the subsequent steps. A loose abrasive grind removes the subsurface damage formed during the fixed abrasive or "blanchard" removal process. After repolishing the bevels and performing an optional fluoride etch, the surface of the blank is polished using a zirconia slurry. Any subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind will be removed during this zirconia polish. A post polish etch may be performed to remove any redeposited contaminants. Another method uses a ceria polishing step to remove the subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind. However, any residual ceria may interfere with the optical properties of the finished part. Therefore, the ceria and other contaminants are removed by performing either a zirconia polish after the ceria polish or a post ceria polish etch.

  8. Building a sense of virtual community: the role of the features of social networking sites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Wen; Lin, Chiun-Sin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, social networking sites have received increased attention because of the potential of this medium to transform business by building virtual communities. However, theoretical and empirical studies investigating how specific features of social networking sites contribute to building a sense of virtual community (SOVC)-an important dimension of a successful virtual community-are rare. Furthermore, SOVC scales have been developed, and research on this issue has been called for, but few studies have heeded this call. On the basis of prior literature, this study proposes that perceptions of the three most salient features of social networking sites-system quality (SQ), information quality (IQ), and social information exchange (SIE)-play a key role in fostering SOVC. In particular, SQ is proposed to increase IQ and SIE, and SIE is proposed to enhance IQ, both of which thereafter build SOVC. The research model was examined in the context of Facebook, one of the most popular social networking sites in the world. We adopted Blanchard's scales to measure SOVC. Data gathered using a Web-based questionnaire, and analyzed with partial least squares, were utilized to test the model. The results demonstrate that SIE, SQ, and IQ are the factors that form SOVC. The findings also suggest that SQ plays a fundamental role in supporting SIE and IQ in social networking sites. Implications for theory, practice, and future research directions are discussed.

  9. Tectonic creep in the Hayward fault zone, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, Dorothy H.; Bonilla, M.G.

    1966-01-01

    Tectonic creep is slight apparently continuous movement along a fault. Evidence of creep has been noted at several places within the Hayward fault zone--a zone trending northwestward near the western front of the hills bordering the east side of San Francisco Bay. D. H. Radbruch of the Geological Survey and B. J. Lennert, consulting engineer, confirmed a reported cracking of a culvert under the University of California stadium. F. B. Blanchard and C. L. Laverty of the East Bay Municipal Utility District of Oakland studied cracks in the Claremont water tunnel in Berkeley. M. G. Bonilla of the Geological Survey noted deformation of railroad tracks in the Niles district of Fremont. Six sets of tracks have been bent and shifted. L. S. Cluff of Woodward-Clyde-Sherard and Associates and K. V. Steinbrugge of the Pacific Fire Rating Bureau noted that the concrete walls of a warehouse in the Irvington district of Fremont have been bent and broken, and the columns forced out of line. All the deformations noted have been right lateral and range from about 2 inches in the Claremont tunnel to about 8 inches on the railroad tracks. Tectonic creep almost certainly will continue to damage buildings, tunnels, and other structures that cross the narrow bands of active movement within the Hayward fault zone.

  10. Scientific Programme Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Scientific Programme Committee A. Blondel, University of Geneva A. Cervera, IFIC M. Dracos, IN2P3 I. Efhymiopoulos, CERN J. Ellis, CERN S. Geer, FNAL R. Garoby, CERN M. Goodman, ANL D. Harris, FNAL T. Hasegawa, KEK P. Huber, Virginia Tech. D. Kaplan, IIT Y.D. Kim, Sejong University H. Kirk, BNL Y. Kuno, Osaka University K. Long, Imperial College N.K. Mondal, TIFR J. Morfin, FNAL Y. Mori, Kyoto University K. Nishikawa, KEK V. Palladino, University of Napoli C. Prior, RAL F.J.P. Soler, University of Glasgow J. Strait, FNAL R. Svoboda, University of California Davis F. Terranova, LN Frascati M. Zisman, LBNL Local Organizing Committee E. Benedetto, CERN/NTUA C. Blanchard, University of Geneva A. Blondel, University of Geneva (co-chair) I. Efthymiopoulos, CERN (co-chair) F. Dufour, University of Geneva F. Girard-Madoux, CERN E. Gschwendtner, CERN A. Korzenev, University of Geneva M. Morer-Olafsen, CERN S. Murphy, University of Geneva G. Prior, CERN G. Wikström, University of Geneva E. Wildner, CERN Sponsors EuCARD European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) Swiss Institute for Particle Physics (CHIPP) University of Geneva

  11. Situational leadership style as a predictor of success and productivity among Taiwanese business organizations.

    PubMed

    Silverthorne, C; Wang, T H

    2001-07-01

    The present study was an evaluation of the impact of Taiwanese leadership styles on the productivity of Taiwanese business organizations. Specifically, it looked at the impact that both adaptive and nonadaptive leaders have on 6 measures of productivity: absenteeism, turnover rate, quality of work, reject rates, profitability, and units produced. The results indicated that the greater the level of adaptability, the more productive the organization is likely to be. Although not all of the computed correlations were statistically significant, they were all in the predicted directions. In particular, the findings for units produced and reject rates were consistently statistically significant. The study was also an examination of the usefulness of the Leadership Effectiveness and Adaptability Description (LEAD) questionnaire (P. Hersey & K. Blanchard, 1988), which appeared to be an accurate predictor of adaptability and valid for use in Taiwan. The final part of this study was an investigation of whether successful companies were more likely to have a greater percentage of adaptive leaders than unsuccessful companies. The data supported this expectation, although it is suggested that caution be used in the interpretation of this particular finding because it could have several different explanations. Overall, the evidence supported the value of adaptive leadership styles in high-technology industries in Taiwan.

  12. Oxygen enhances phosphine toxicity for postharvest pest control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Biao

    2011-10-01

    Phosphine fumigations under superatmospheric oxygen levels (oxygenated phosphine fumigations) were significantly more effective than the fumigations under the normal 20.9% atmospheric oxygen level against western flower thrips [Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande)] adults and larvae, leafminer Liriomyza langei Frick pupae, grape mealybug [Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn)] eggs, and Indianmeal moth [Plodia interpunctella (Hübner)] eggs and pupae. In 5-h fumigations with 1,000 ppm phosphine at 5 degrees C, mortalities of western flower thrips increased significantly from 79.5 to 97.7% when oxygen was increased from 20.9 to 40% and reached 99.3% under 80% O2. Survivorships of leafminer pupae decreased significantly from 71.2% under 20.9% O2 to 16.2% under 40% O2 and reached 1.1% under 80% O2 in 24-h fumigations with 500 ppm phosphine at 5 degrees C. Complete control of leafminer pupae was achieved in 24-h fumigations with 1,000 ppm phosphine at 5 degrees C under 60% O2 or higher. Survivorships of grape mealybug eggs also decreased significantly in 48-h fumigations with 1,000 ppm phosphine at 2 degrees C under 60% O2 compared with the fumigations under 20.9% O2. Indian meal moth egg survivorships decreased significantly from 17.4 to 0.5% in responses to an oxygen level increase from 20.9 to 40% in 48-h fumigations with 1,000 ppm phosphine at 10 degrees C and reached 0.2% in fumigations under 80% O2. When the oxygen level was reduced from 20.9 to 15 and 10% in fumigations, survivorships of Indianmeal moth eggs increased significantly from 17.4 to 32.9 and 39.9%, respectively. Increased O2 levels also resulted in significantly lower survival rates of Indianmeal moth pupae in response to 24-h fumigations with 500 and 1,000 ppm phosphine at 10 degrees C and a complete control was achieved in the 1,000 ppm phosphine fumigations under 60% O2. Oxygenated phosphine fumigations have marked potential to improve insecticidal efficacy. Advantages and limitations of oxygenated

  13. A review of the Cetoniinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina and adjacent countries: systematics and geographic distributions.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    A total of 30 species of Gymnetini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) are known from Argentina: Allorhina corni-frons (Gory & Percheron, 1833); Blaesia atra Burmeister, 1842; Blaesia subrugosa Moser, 1905; Desicasta purpurascens Schoch, 1898, dubious record; Gymnetis bajula (Olivier, 1789); Gymnetis bonplandi Schaum, 1844, new country record; Gymnetis bouvieri Bourgoin, 1912; Gymnetis bruchi Moser, 1910, new status (= Aemilius wagneri Le Moult, 1939, new synonymy); Gymnetis carbo (Schürhoff, 1937); Gymnetis chalcipes Gory & Percheron, 1833; Gymnetis cordobana (Schürhoff, 1937), new status; Gymnetis flavomarginata Blanchard, 1847; Gymnetis goryi Janson, 1877, new status; Gym-netis hebraica (Drapiez, 1820), new country record; Gymnetis hepatica Di Iorio, new species; Gymnetis litigiosa Gory & Percheron, 1833, new status; Gymnetis pantherina Blanchard, 1842 (= Gymnetis meleagris Burmeister, 1842, = Paragym-netis rubrocincta Schürhoff, 1937, new synonymy), new country record; Gymnetis pudibunda Burmeister, 1866; Gymne-tis schistacea Burmeister, 1847, new status; Gymnetis undata (Olivier, 1789); Heterocotinis semiopaca (Moser, 1907); Hologymnetis sp. (= Gymnetis rubida, not Gory & Percheron, 1833); Hoplopyga albiventris (Gory & Percheron, 1833); Hoplopyga brasiliensis (Gory & Percheron, 1833); Hoplopyga liturata (Olivier, 1789); Hoplopygothrix atropurpurea (Schaum, 1841), new country record; Marmarina insculpta (Kirby, 1819), new status, new country record; Marmarina tigrina (Gory & Percheron, 1833), (= Maculinetis litorea Schürhoff, 1937, new synonymy); Neocorvicoana reticulata (Kirby, 1819); Neocorvicoana tricolor (Schürhoff, 1933). Marmarina argentina Moser, 1917 is considered a nomen du-bium until a redescription and illustration of the type specimen facilitates the proper identification of this species. The fol-lowing type specimens were examined: Blaesia atra Burmeister, 1842 (holotype); Gymnetis alauda Burmeister, 1842 (holotype, = G. pantherina); G

  14. Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer, west-central Florida, May 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.; Blanchard, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    show the approximate annual low and high water-level conditions, respectively. Most of the water-level data for this map were collected by the USGS during May 23-27, 2005. Supplemental water-level data were collected by other agencies and companies. A corresponding potentiometric-surface map was prepared for areas east and north of the SWFWMD boundary by the USGS office in Altamonte Springs, Florida (Kinnaman, 2006). Most water-level measurements were made during a 5-day period; therefore, measurements do not represent a 'snapshot' of conditions at a specific time, nor do they necessarily coincide with the seasonal low water-level condition. Water levels in about 19 percent of the wells measured in May 2005 were lower than the May 2004 water levels (Blanchard and others, 2004). Data from 409 wells indicate that the May 2005 water levels ranged from about 5 feet below to about 18 feet above the May 2004 water levels (fig. 1). The largest water-level declines occurred in southwestern Hernando County, northeastern Hillsborough County, and parts of Hillsborough, Sumter, and Sarasota Counties. The largest water-level rises occurred in southeastern Hillsborough County, eastern Manatee County, and western Hardee County (fig. 1). Water levels in about 95 percent of the wells measured in May 2005 were lower than the September 2004 water levels (Blanchard and Seidenfeld, 2005). Data from 405 wells indicate that the May 2005 water levels ranged from about 22 feet below to 14 feet above the September 2004 water levels. The largest water-level decline was in east-central Manatee County and the largest water-level rise was in central Sarasota County.

  15. Influence of Weather Variables and Plant Communities on Grasshopper Density in the Southern Pampas, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    de Wysiecki, María Laura; Arturi, Marcelo; Torrusio, Sandra; Cigliano, María Marta

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the influence of weather (precipitation and temperature) and plant communities on grasshopper density over a 14-year period (1996–2009) in Benito Juárez County, Southern Pampas, Argentina. Total density strongly varied among plant communities. Highest values were registered in 2001 and 2003 in highly disturbed pastures and in 2002 and 2009 in halophilous grasslands. Native grasslands had the lowest density values. Seasonal precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on total grasshopper density. Dichroplus elongatus (Giglio-Tos) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea), Covasacris pallidinota (Bruner), Dichroplus pratensis Bruner, Scotussa lemniscata Stål, Borellia bruneri (Rehn) and Dichroplus maculipennis (Blanchard) comprised, on average, 64% of the grasshopper assemblages during low density years and 79% during high density years. Dichroplus elongatus, S. lemniscata and C. pallidinota were the most abundant species in 2001, 2002 and 2003, while D. elongatus, B. brunneri and C. pallidinota in 2009. Dichroplus elongatus and D. pratensis, mixed feeders species, were positively affected by summer rainfall. This suggests that the increase in summer precipitation had a positive effect on the quantity and quality forage production, affecting these grasshopper populations. Scotussa lemniscata and C. pallidinota were negatively affected by winter and fall temperature, possibly affecting the embryonic development before diapause and hatching. Dichroplus elongatus and D. pratensis were associated with highly disturbed pastures, S. lemniscata with pastures and B. bruneri and D. maculipennis with halophilous grasslands. Covasacris pallidinota was closely associated with halophilous grasslands and moderately disturbed pastures. Weather conditions changed over the years, with 2001, 2002 and 2003 having excessive rainfall while 2008 and 2009 were the driest years since the study started. We suggest that although seasonal precipitation and

  16. Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) in three landscapes in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M M; Uchôa, M A; Ide, S

    2013-02-01

    Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) in three landscapes in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Dung Beetles are important for biological control of intestinal worms and dipterans of economic importance to cattle, because they feed and breed in dung, killing parasites inside it. They are also very useful as bioindicators of species diversity in agricultural or natural environments. The aims of this paper were to study the species richness, and abundance of dung beetles, helping to answer the question: are there differences in the patterns of dung beetle diversity in three environments (pasture, agriculture and forest) in the municipality of Dourados, in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. A total of 105 samplings were carried out weekly, from November 2005 to November 2007, using three pitfall traps in each environment. The traps were baited with fresh bovine dung, and 44,355 adult dung beetles from 54 species were captured: two from Hyborosidae and 52 from Scarabaeidae. Five species were constant, very abundant and dominant on the pasture, two in the agricultural environment, and two in the environment of Semideciduous forest. Most of the species were characterised as accessories, common and not-dominant. The species with higher abundance was Ataenius platensis Blanchard, 1844. The indexes of Shannon-Wiener diversity were: 2.90 in the pasture, 2.84 in the agricultural environment and 2.66 in the area of native forest. The medium positive presence of dung beetles in the traps in each environment were: 36.88, 42.73 and 20.18 individuals per trap, in the pasture, agricultural environment and in the native forest, respectively. The pasture environment presented a higher diversity index. The species diversity of dung beetles was superior where there was higher abundance and regularity of resource (bovine dung).

  17. Using Scientific Argumentation in a Science Methods Course to Improve Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. L.; Bleicher, R. E.; Soden, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Given that K-12 students have numerous alternative conceptions, it is critical that teachers have an understanding of the fundamental science underlying climate change (Feldman et al., 2010). Many teachers, however, do not demonstrate adequate understanding of these concepts (Daskolia et al., 2006). Argumentation has been identified as a mechanism for conceptual change (Mercer et al., 2004). Even with several educational initiatives promoting and supporting the use of argumentation as an instructional practice, teachers often struggle to implement argumentation in the classroom (Sampson & Blanchard, 2012). To remedy both issues above, we have designed an innovative methods course to provide background in climate change knowledge and argumentation instruction. In our methods course, we utilize Climate Science Investigations (CSI), an online, interactive series of modules and teaching resources funded by a NASA grant to support teachers learning about the basic science concepts underlying climate change. A key assignment is to develop and present an evidence-based scientific argument. The teachers were assigned a typical question and claim of climate skeptics and asked to conduct research on the scientific findings to prepare a counter-argument (rebuttal). This study examined changes in 60 preservice teachers' knowledge and perceptions about climate change after participation in the course. The teachers' understanding of fundamental concepts increased significantly. Their perceptions about climate change became more aligned to those of climate scientists. Findings suggest that scientific argumentation can play an effective role in the preparation of science educators. In addition to reporting findings in more detail, methods course activities, particularly in argumentation, will be shared in our presentation.

  18. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  19. William Stewart Halsted: Letters to a Young Female Admirer

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, John L.; Gordon, Toby A.; Kehoe, Marjorie Winslow; McCall, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    Objective To present the first new information in the past 25 years concerning the life of Dr. William Stewart Halsted. This paper reports on recently discovered personal correspondence of Dr. Halsted, beginning at age 66, to a young lady, Elizabeth Blanchard Randall, 40 years his junior. Summary Background Data Dr. William Stewart Halsted is generally considered the most important and influential surgeon that this country has produced. During his Hopkins days in Baltimore (1886–1922) he was rather reclusive, and little is known of his personal life. He was married but had no children. Several biographies written by Halsted’s contemporaries constitute the bulk of what is known about Halsted’s personal life. Methods All extant letters from Dr. Halsted to Miss Randall were reviewed. Archival materials were consulted to understand the context for this friendship. The correspondence between Halsted and Randall took place during a 3-year period, although their acquaintance was probably long-standing. Results The letters reveal Dr. Halsted and Miss Randall’s great and warm affection for each other, despite their 40-year age difference. The letters have a playful nature absent in Halsted’s other correspondence. This relationship has not been previously noted. Conclusions Late in Halsted’s life, he developed a warm and affectionate relationship with a young lady 40 years his junior, as revealed in Halsted’s correspondence. Halsted’s warm, personal, and playful letters are in stark contrast to his biographers’ portrayals of him as a more serious and reclusive person. PMID:11685036

  20. Swiss AlpArray: deployment of the Swiss AlpArray temporary broad-band stations and their noise characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Irene; Kissling, Edi; Clinton, John; Hetényi, György; Šipka, Vesna; Stipćević, Josip; Dasović, Iva; Solarino, Stefano; Wéber, Zoltán; Gráczer, Zoltán; Electronics Lab, SED

    2016-04-01

    One of the main actions of the AlpArray European initiative is the deployment of a dense seismic broad-band network, that complements the existing permanent stations. This will ensure a spatially homogeneous seismic coverage of the greater Alpine area for at least two years, allowing a great number of innovative scientific works to be carried out. Our contribution to the AlpArray Seismic Network consists in the deployment of 24 temporary broad-band stations: three in Switzerland, twelve in Italy, three in Croatia, three in Bosnia and Herzegovina and three in Hungary. This deployment is lead by ETH Zurich and founded by the Swiss-AlpArray Sinergia programme by SNSF, and is the result of a fruitful collaboration between five research institutes. Stations were installed between Autumn and Winter 2015. Our installations are both free field and in-house and consist of 21 STS-2 and 3 Trillium Compact sensors equipped with Taurus digitizers and 3G telemetry sending data in real time to the ETH EIDA node. In this work, we present sites and stations setting and we discuss in details the characteristics in terms of site effects and noise level of each station. In particular we analyse the power spectral density estimates investigating the major source of noise and the background noise related to seasons, time of the day, human activities and type of installation. In addition we will show examples of data usage - i.e. earthquake locations, noise cross correlations, measures of surface wave dispersion curves. We thanks the Swiss AlpArray Field Team: Blanchard A., Erlanger E. D., Jarić D., Herak D., M. Herak, Hermann M., Koelemeijer P. J., Markušić S., Obermann A., Sager K., Šikman S., Singer J., Winterberg S. SED Electronic Lab: Barman S., Graf P., Hansemann R., Haslinger F., Hiemer S., Racine R., Tanner R., Weber F.

  1. Terrestrial exposure and effects of Headline AMP(®) Fungicide on amphibians.

    PubMed

    Cusaac, J Patrick W; Mimbs, William H; Belden, Jason B; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that a pyraclostrobin-containing fungicide (Headline(®) Fungicide--Headline(®) Fungicide and Headline AMP(®) Fungicide are registered trademarks of BASF) is toxic to amphibians at environmentally relevant concentrations. However, these studies were performed in a laboratory setting of a worst-case direct exposure in clean media. Interception of spray by the crop canopy and ground cover used by animals for security cover will influence exposure. Thus, risk to amphibians is unclear in an environmentally realistic field environment. We tested exposure and toxicity of Headline AMP(®) Fungicide to amphibians in multiple agricultural habitat scenarios (e.g., within treated crop vs. grassy areas adjacent to crop) and at two rates during routine aerial application. Specifically, we placed Woodhouse's toads (Bufo woodhousii) and Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) in enclosures located within treated and untreated corn (VT stage, approximate height = 3 m), and in the potential drift area (adjacent to treated corn) during aerial application of Headline AMP Fungicide at either 731 or 1052 ml/ha (70 and 100 % the maximum application rate in corn, respectively). Mean concentrations of pyraclostrobin measured at ground level were ≤19 % of nominal application rate in all areas. Overall, mean mortality of recovered individuals of both species was ≤15 %, and mortality within Headline AMP Fungicide-treated corn (where risk was anticipated to be highest) was <10 %. It is important to understand that application timing, interception by the crop canopy (which varies both within and between crop systems), and timing of amphibian presence in the crop field influences risk of exposure and effects; however, our results demonstrate that amphibians inhabiting VT stage corn during routine aerial application of Headline AMP Fungicide are at low risk for acute mortality, matching existing laboratory results from acute toxicity studies of

  2. Epioptics-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cricenti, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    Preface -- Ab-initio theories for the calculation of excited states properties / O. Pulci ... [et al.] -- Theory of surface second harmonic generation / W. Luis Mochán, Jesś A. Maytorena -- Exitation of multiple plasmon in optical second-harmonic generation / K. Pedersen, T. G. Pedersen, P. Morgen -- Non-linear optical probes of biological surfaces / Mischa Bonn, Volker Knecht, Michiel Müller -- Ab initio study of the Ge(111): Sn surface / Paola Gori, Olivia Pulci, Antonio Cricenti -- Lifetime of excited states / B. Hellsing -- Soliton dynamics in non-commensurate surface structure / Alexander S. Kovalev, Igor V. Gerasimchuk -- Raman scattering as an epioptic probe for low dimensional structures / E. Speiser, K. Fleischer, W. Richter -- Calculation of reflectance anisotropy for semiconductor surface exploration / W. G. Schmidt -- Molecular assembly at metal surfaces studied by reflection anisotropy spectroscopy / David S. Martin -- Study of solid/liquid interfaces by optical techniques / Y. Borensztein -- Surface preparation of Cu(110) for ambient environments / G. E. Isted, N. P. Blanchard, D. S. Martin -- Micro-radiographs stored in lithium fluoride films show strong optical contrast with no topographical contribution / A. Ustione ... [et al.] -- Metal nanofilms studied with infrared spectroscopy / Gerhard Fahsold, Andreas Priebe, Annemarie Pucci -- An AFM investigation of oligonucleotides anchored on an unoxidized crystalline silicon surface / G. Longo ... [et al.] -- A new approach to characterize polymeric nanofilters contamination using scanning near-field optical microscopy / C. Oliva ... [et al.] -- Magnetization reversal processes in Fe/NiO/Fe(001) trilayers studied by means of magneto-optical Kerr effect / P. Biagioni -- Laser-induced band bending variation for ZnTe (110)1x1 surface / S. D. Thorpe ... [et al.] -- Optical properties of materials in an undergraduate physics curriculum / Julio R. Blanco.

  3. Spatial and temporal variation of dung beetle assemblages in a fragmented landscape at eastern humid Chaco.

    PubMed

    Damborsky, M P; Alvarez Bohle, M C; Ibarra Polesel, M G; Porcel, E A; Fontana, J L

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the fauna of dung beetles and analyze their spatial and temporal diversity in a cattle ranch in the province of Chaco. Seven surveys were conducted in three environmental units: a forest fragment, a cattle pasture, and an open grassland. The efficiency of the sampling was assessed with non-parametric richness estimators, and attributes of the assemblage were evaluated. The species composition and the abundance distribution in each of the environmental units studied were compared using rank-abundance curves. The indicator value of each species was measured with the IndVal method. The relationship between richness, abundance, and environmental variables (temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity) was calculated by multivariate multiple regression analysis. A total of 3,356 adult individuals belonging to 29 species of the subfamily Scarabaeinae and to five species of Aphodiinae were captured. Dichotomius nisus (Olivier), Trichillum externepunctatum (Preudhomme), Canthon podagricus (Harold), Onthophagus hirculus (Mannerheim), Pseudocanthon aff. perplexus, Ontherus sulcator (Fabricius), and Ataenius platensis (Blanchard) were the most abundant. Diversity, species richness, and abundance were highest in the forest fragment and in spring and summer captures. Between 94% and 97% of the species present in the entire landscape were recorded. According to the analysis of similarity, the composition of the assemblage was different among habitats. Eurysternus caribaeus (Herbst), Eurysternus aeneus (Génier), and O. sulcator were indicators of the forest. In the three units, the coprophagous species represented more than 60% of the total species number. The rainfall regime, the temperature, and the heterogeneous use of the environmental units influenced the structure of dung beetle assemblages.

  4. Modelling of the impact of biofouling on hydrodynamics downstream of a tidal turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennis, A. C.; Rivier, A.; Dauvin, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Biological organisms, like barnacles, mussels or bryozoans, colonize rapidly an immersed surface and could form a thickness until several centimeters on it. This biofouling could modify hydrodynamics around tidal turbine by increasing drag and hence resistance and could be detrimental to the performance of turbine (e.g. Orme et al., 2001; Khor and Xiao, 2011). Our work focuses on modifications of vortices downstream of a tidal turbine due to biofouling using CFD. Fixed biological organisms are solved explicitly by the model and are considered by modifying the blade profile. Firstly an airfoil colonized by barnacles is modelled for various fouling height and spacing and results are compared to experimental and simulated data (Orme et al., 2001; Khor and Xiao, 2011) in order to assess the capacity of the model to reproduce the flow around a blade with biofouling. Then a Darrieus vertical axis tidal turbine is modelled using a dynamic mesh. Configuration with smooth clean blades is assessed by comparison with experiments and simulations made by Roa (2011) and Bossard (2012). Biological organisms with various heights, spacing and shapes are fixed on blades and wakes downstream of clean and colonized tidal turbine are compared. Vorticity fields around the tidal turbine are clearly modified when blades are colonized. Samples will be taken from location where farms are planned to be built (Alderney Race/Raz Blanchard) to characterize more precisely the characteristics of species which are liable to fix on tidal turbine.Reference:Bossard (2012). Doctoral dissertation, Université de Grenoble.Khor & Xiao. (2011). Ocean Eng, 38(10), 1065-1079. Orme et al. (2001). Marine Renewable Energy Conference, Newcastle.Roa (2011).Doctoral dissertation, Université de Grenoble.

  5. Analysis of ground-water flow along a regional flow path of the Midwestern Basins and Arches aquifer system in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanover, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of ground-water flow in central-western and northwestern Ohio was done as part of the Midwestern Basins and Arches Regional Aquifer-System Analysis project. The Midwestern Basins and Arches aquifer system is composed of carbonate bedrock of Silurian and Devonian age and overlying glacial flow analysis of the Scioto and Blanchard rivers in the study area were used to describe patrems of ground-water flow, to evaluate stream-aquifer interaction, and to quantify recharge and discharge within the ground-water-flow system along a regional ground-water-flow path. The selected regional flow path begins at a regional topographic high in Logan County, Ohio, and ends in Sandusky Bay (Lake Erie), a regional topographic low. Recharge to the ground-water system along the selected regional flow path was estimated from hydrograph separation of streamflow and averaged 3.24 inches per year. Computer model simulations indicate that 84 percent of the water entering the ground-water system flows less than 5 miles from point of recharge to point of discharge and no deeper than the upper surficial aquifers. The distance and depth that ground water travels and traveltime from point of recharge to point of discharge is controlled largely by where ground water enters the flow system. Ground water entering the flow system in the vicinity of major surface- water divides generally travels further, deeper, and longer than ground water entering the flow system elsewhere along the regional flow path. Particle tracking simulations substantiate the concept that the 80-mile-long regional flow path is within a continuous ground-water basin. Estimated traveltimes for ground-water from the regional high to Sandusky Bay range from 22,000 to 40,700 years, given a range of porosities from 8 to 22 percent for the carbonate-rock aquifer.

  6. INTENSITY DISCRIMINATION IN THE HUMAN EYE

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Selig; Peskin, James C.; Patt, Marjorie

    1938-01-01

    1. A new apparatus is described for measuring visual intensity discrimination over a large range of intensities, with white light and with selected portions of the spectrum. With it measurements were made of the intensity ΔI which is just perceptible when it is added for a short time to a portion of a field of intensity I to which the eye has been adapted. 2. For white and for all colors the fraction ΔI/I decreases as I increases and reaches an asymptotic minimum value at high values of I. In addition, with white light the relation between ΔI/I and I shows two sections, one at low intensities and the other at high intensities, the two being separated by an abrupt transition. These findings are contrary to the generally accepted measurements of Koenig and Brodhun; however, they confirm the recent work of Steinhardt, as well as the older work of Blanchard and of Aubert. The abrupt transition is in keeping with the Duplicity theory which attributes the two sections to the functions of the rods and cones respectively. 3. Measurements with five parts of the spectrum amplify these relationships in terms of the different spectral sensibilities of the rods and cones. With extreme red light the relation of ΔI/I to I shows only a high intensity section corresponding to cone function, while with other colors the low intensity rod section appears and increases in extent as the light used moves toward the violet end of the spectrum. 4. Like most of the previously published data from various sources, the present numerical data are all described with precision by the theory which supposes that intensity discrimination is determined by the initial photochemical and chemical events in the rods and cones. PMID:19873093

  7. INTENSITY DISCRIMINATION IN THE HUMAN EYE : II. THE RELATION BETWEENDeltaI/IAND INTENSITY FOR DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE SPECTRUM.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S; Peskin, J C; Patt, M

    1938-09-20

    1. A new apparatus is described for measuring visual intensity discrimination over a large range of intensities, with white light and with selected portions of the spectrum. With it measurements were made of the intensity DeltaI which is just perceptible when it is added for a short time to a portion of a field of intensity I to which the eye has been adapted. 2. For white and for all colors the fraction DeltaI/I decreases as I increases and reaches an asymptotic minimum value at high values of I. In addition, with white light the relation between DeltaI/I and I shows two sections, one at low intensities and the other at high intensities, the two being separated by an abrupt transition. These findings are contrary to the generally accepted measurements of Koenig and Brodhun; however, they confirm the recent work of Steinhardt, as well as the older work of Blanchard and of Aubert. The abrupt transition is in keeping with the Duplicity theory which attributes the two sections to the functions of the rods and cones respectively. 3. Measurements with five parts of the spectrum amplify these relationships in terms of the different spectral sensibilities of the rods and cones. With extreme red light the relation of DeltaI/I to I shows only a high intensity section corresponding to cone function, while with other colors the low intensity rod section appears and increases in extent as the light used moves toward the violet end of the spectrum. 4. Like most of the previously published data from various sources, the present numerical data are all described with precision by the theory which supposes that intensity discrimination is determined by the initial photochemical and chemical events in the rods and cones.

  8. From rational bubbles to crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent μ<1. We then outline the main results of Malevergne and Sornette, who extend the RE bubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent μ<1 for all assets. The distribution of price differences and of returns is dominated by the same power-law over an extended range of large returns. Although power-law tails are a pervasive feature of empirical data, the numerical value μ<1 is in disagreement with the usual empirical estimates μ≈3. We then discuss two extensions (the crash hazard rate model and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  9. Track Analysis of the North, Central, and South American Species of the Epicauta maculata Group (Coleoptera: Meloidae).

    PubMed

    Campos-Soldini, M P; García, M S; Safenraiter, M E

    2015-08-01

    We undertook a panbiogeographic analysis of 23 species of the Epicauta maculata group of America-Epicauta abeona Pinto, Epicauta adspersa (Klug), Epicauta andersoni Werner, Epicauta atomaria (Germar), Epicauta apache Pinto, Epicauta cavernosa (Courbon), Epicauta dilatipennis Pic, Epicauta fulvicornis (Burmeister), Epicauta horni Champion, Epicauta jeffersi Pinto, Epicauta koheleri Denier, Epicauta lizeri Denier, E. maculata (Say), Epicauta magnomaculata Martin, Epicauta minutepunctata Borchmann, Epicauta nigropunctata (Blanchard), Epicauta normalis Werner, Epicauta ocellata (Dugès), Epicauta pardalis LeConte, picauta phoenix Werner, Epicauta pluvialis Borchmann, Epicauta proscripta Werner, Epicauta rubella Denier, and Epicauta ventralis Werner-with the purpose of analyzing the distributional data for taxa, to establish patterns of distribution of an ancestral biota and areas where these groups have interacted. Based on the overlap of 20 individual tracks, four generalized tracks constituted by different numbers of species were identified; two of them are located in the Nearctic region and the Mexican transition zone (tracks "A" and "B"), and the other two are distributed in the Neotropical region and the South America transition zone ("C", "D"). Six nodes were recognized: Two of them are included in the Nearctic Region, node 'I' located in northern USA and node 'II' located in southwestern USA, both at the intersection of the tracks "A" and "B". The other four are included in the Neotropical Region at the intersection of the tracks "C" and "D": Node 'III' is located in Chaco province; node 'IV' is located in Parana Forest province; node 'V' is located in the northwest of Argentina in Puna province, and node 'VI' is located in Monte province.

  10. [Characteristics of the leadership of health center coordinators in the autonomous community of Murcia].

    PubMed

    Menárguez Puche, J F; Saturno Hernández, P J

    1998-12-01

    To describe the style and effectiveness (adaptability) of the leadership of coordinators of an autonomous community according to the model of leadership on the ground, analysing its relationship with the work environment. Observational crossover study. All the functioning teams in this community. Medical and nursing coordinators. Hersey and Blanchard's questionnaire on leadership on the ground was employed. This identifies 1) the predominant style (scoring for style 0-12). On the approach of the coordinator to personal relationships and/or task development, it identifies 4 points: direction, persuasion, participation, delegation. 2) Adaptability of the manager (ranging from +24 to -24), based on that the best choice between different options depends on the maturity of the group. To contrast work environment and leadership, a validated questionnaire, adapted to our milieu, was used. Overall reply rate (51 coordinators) was 89.4%. Analysis of styles was: persuasive 5.05 points (SD = 1.25), participatory 4.74 (SD 1.76), directive 1.2 (SD 1.11) and delegating 0.34 (SD 0.68). Adaptability scored 8.38 points (SD = 4.67), and was greater for the nursing coordinators (p < 0.002) without differences for type, place or teaching qualifications. The work environment, both overall and by dimensions, correlated with adaptability, although no relationship was found with leaders' styles. Leadership adaptability was quite high and greater in nursing. The most prevalent styles were the persuasive and the participatory, more efficacious in teams of average maturity. Theoretical effectiveness was positively related to a better work environment.

  11. Human polymorphisms in nicotinic receptors: a functional analysis in iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Deflorio, Cristina; Blanchard, Stéphane; Carisì, Maria Carla; Bohl, Delphine; Maskos, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is a public health problem, with ∼5 million deaths per year, representing a heavy burden for many countries. No effective therapeutic strategies are currently available for nicotine addiction, and it is therefore crucial to understand the etiological and pathophysiological factors contributing to this addiction. The neuronal α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit is critically involved in nicotine dependence. In particular, the human polymorphism α5D398N corresponds to the strongest correlation with nicotine dependence risk found to date in occidental populations, according to meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies. To understand the specific contribution of this subunit in the context of nicotine addiction, an efficient screening system for native human nAChRs is needed. We have differentiated human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons and obtained a comprehensive characterization of these neurons by quantitative RT-PCR. The functional properties of nAChRs expressed in these human DA neurons, with or without the polymorphism in the α5 subunit, were studied with the patch-clamp electrophysiological technique. Our results in human DA neurons carrying the polymorphism in the α5 subunit showed an increase in EC50, indicating that, in the presence of the polymorphism, more nicotine or acetylcholine chloride is necessary to obtain the same effect. This human cell culturing system can now be used in drug discovery approaches to screen for compounds that interact specifically with human native and polymorphic nAChRs.-Deflorio, C., Blanchard, S., Carisì, M. C., Bohl, D., Maskos, U. Human polymorphisms in nicotinic receptors: a functional analysis in iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons.

  12. Influence of weather variables and plant communities on grasshopper density in the Southern Pampas, Argentina.

    PubMed

    de Wysiecki, María Laura; Arturi, Marcelo; Torrusio, Sandra; Cigliano, María Marta

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the influence of weather (precipitation and temperature) and plant communities on grasshopper density over a 14-year period (1996-2009) in Benito Juárez County, Southern Pampas, Argentina. Total density strongly varied among plant communities. Highest values were registered in 2001 and 2003 in highly disturbed pastures and in 2002 and 2009 in halophilous grasslands. Native grasslands had the lowest density values. Seasonal precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on total grasshopper density. Dichroplus elongatus (Giglio-Tos) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea), Covasacris pallidinota (Bruner), Dichroplus pratensis Bruner, Scotussa lemniscata Stål, Borellia bruneri (Rehn) and Dichroplus maculipennis (Blanchard) comprised, on average, 64% of the grasshopper assemblages during low density years and 79% during high density years. Dichroplus elongatus, S. lemniscata and C. pallidinota were the most abundant species in 2001, 2002 and 2003, while D. elongatus, B. brunneri and C. pallidinota in 2009. Dichroplus elongatus and D. pratensis, mixed feeders species, were positively affected by summer rainfall. This suggests that the increase in summer precipitation had a positive effect on the quantity and quality forage production, affecting these grasshopper populations. Scotussa lemniscata and C. pallidinota were negatively affected by winter and fall temperature, possibly affecting the embryonic development before diapause and hatching. Dichroplus elongatus and D. pratensis were associated with highly disturbed pastures, S. lemniscata with pastures and B. bruneri and D. maculipennis with halophilous grasslands. Covasacris pallidinota was closely associated with halophilous grasslands and moderately disturbed pastures. Weather conditions changed over the years, with 2001, 2002 and 2003 having excessive rainfall while 2008 and 2009 were the driest years since the study started. We suggest that although seasonal precipitation and

  13. Has ESA's XMM-Newton cast doubt over dark energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    -Newton Omega Project present results showing that clusters of galaxies in the distant Universe are not like those of today. They seem to give out more X-rays than today. So clearly, clusters of galaxies have changed their appearance with time. In an accompanying paper, Alain Blanchard of the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées and his team use the results to calculate how the abundance of galaxy clusters changes with time. Blanchard says, "There were fewer galaxy clusters in the past." Such a result indicates that the Universe must be a high-density environment, in clear contradiction to the 'concordance model,' which postulates a Universe with up to 70% dark energy and a very low density of matter. Blanchard knows that this conclusion will be highly controversial, saying, "To account for these results you have to have a lot of matter in the Universe and that leaves little room for dark energy." To reconcile the new XMM-Newton observations with the concordance models, astronomers would have to admit a fundamental gap in their knowledge about the behaviour of the clusters and, possibly, of the galaxies within them. For instance, galaxies in the faraway clusters would have to be injecting more energy into their surrounding gas than is currently understood. That process should then gradually taper off as the cluster and the galaxies within it grow older. No matter which way the results are interpreted, XMM-Newton has given astronomers a new insight into the Universe and a new mystery to puzzle over. As for the possibility that the XMM-Newton results are simply wrong, they are in the process of being confirmed by other X-ray observations. Should these return the same answer, we might have to rethink our understanding of the Universe. Notes for editors The two papers, The XMM-Newton Omega Project: I. The X-ray Luminosity-Temperature Relationship at z>0.4 by D.H. Lumb et al. and The XMM-Newton Omega Project: II. Cosmological implications from the high

  14. The controversy surrounding "The man who would be queen": a case history of the politics of science, identity, and sex in the Internet age.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Alice D

    2008-06-01

    In 2003, psychology professor and sex researcher J. Michael Bailey published a book entitled The Man Who Would Be Queen: The Science of Gender-Bending and Transsexualism. The book's portrayal of male-to-female (MTF) transsexualism, based on a theory developed by sexologist Ray Blanchard, outraged some transgender activists. They believed the book to be typical of much of the biomedical literature on transsexuality-oppressive in both tone and claims, insulting to their senses of self, and damaging to their public identities. Some saw the book as especially dangerous because it claimed to be based on rigorous science, was published by an imprint of the National Academy of Sciences, and argued that MTF sex changes are motivated primarily by erotic interests and not by the problem of having the gender identity common to one sex in the body of the other. Dissatisfied with the option of merely criticizing the book, a small number of transwomen (particularly Lynn Conway, Andrea James, and Deirdre McCloskey) worked to try to ruin Bailey. Using published and unpublished sources as well as original interviews, this essay traces the history of the backlash against Bailey and his book. It also provides a thorough exegesis of the book's treatment of transsexuality and includes a comprehensive investigation of the merit of the charges made against Bailey that he had behaved unethically, immorally, and illegally in the production of his book. The essay closes with an epilogue that explores what has happened since 2003 to the central ideas and major players in the controversy.

  15. Very long-period GPS waveforms. What can GPS bring to Earth seismic velocity models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelevitz, K.; Houlie, N.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Boschi, L.; Giardini, D.; Rothacher, M.

    2014-12-01

    It is now admitted that high rate GPS observations can provide reliable surface displacement waveforms. For long-period (T > 5s) transients, it was shown that GPS and seismometer (STS-1) displacements are in agreement at least for vertical component [Houlié et al., 2011]. We propose here to supplement existing long-period seismic networks with high rate (>= 1Hz) GPS data in order to improve the resolution of global seismic velocity models. We aim at extending the use of GPS measurements beyond the range of STS-1 in the low frequency end (T>1000s). We present the results of the processing of 1Hz GPS records of the Hokkaido, Sumatra and Tohoku earthquakes (25th of September, 2003, Mw = 8.3; 26th of December, 2004, Mw = 8.9; 11th of March, 2011, Mw = 9.1, respectively). 3D waveforms phase time-series have been used to recover the ground motion histories at the GPS sites. Through the better resolution of inversion of the GPS phase observations, we determine displacement waveforms of periods ranging from 30 seconds to 1300 seconds for a selection of sites. We compare inverted GPS waveforms with STS-1 waveforms, superconducting gravity waveforms and synthetic waveforms computed using 3D global wave propagation with SPECFEM. We find that the GPS waveforms are in agreement with the SPECFEM synthetic data and are able to fill the period-gap between the broadband seismometer STS-1 data and the normal mode period range detected by the superconducting gravimeters. References: Houlié, N., G. Occhipinti, T. Blanchard, N. Shapiro, P. Lognonne, and M. Murakami (2011), New approach to detect seismic surface waves in 1Hz-sampled GPS time series, Scientific reports, 1, 44.

  16. Excitation of seismic waves by a tornado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovcin, A.; Tanimoto, T.; Twardzik, C.

    2016-12-01

    Tornadoes are among the most common natural disasters to occur in the United States. Various methods are currently used in tornado forecasting, including surface weather stations, weather balloons and satellite and Doppler radar. These methods work for detecting possible locations of tornadoes and funnel clouds, but knowing when a tornado has touched down still strongly relies on reports from spotters. Studying tornadoes seismically offers an opportunity to know when a tornado has touched down without requiring an eyewitness report. With the installation of Earthscope's Transportable Array (TA), there have been an increased number of tornadoes that have come within close range of seismometers. We have identified seismic signals corresponding to three tornadoes that occurred in 2011 in the central US. These signals were recorded by the TA station closest to each of the tornado tracks. For each tornado, the amplitudes of the seismic signals increase when the storm is in contact with the ground, and continue until the tornado lifts off some time later. This occurs at both high and low frequencies. In this study we will model the seismic signal generated by a tornado at low frequencies (below 0.1 Hz). We will begin by modeling the signal from the Joplin tornado, an EF5 rated tornado which occurred in Missouri on May 22, 2011. By approximating the tornado as a vertical force, we model the generated signal as the tornado moves along its track and changes in strength. By modeling the seismic waveform generated by a tornado, we can better understand the seismic-excitation process. It could also provide a way to quantitatively compare tornadoes. Additional tornadoes to model include the Calumet-El Reno-Piedmont-Guthrie (CEPG) and Chickasa-Blanchard-Newcastle (CBN) tornadoes, both of which occurred on May 24, 2011 in Oklahoma.

  17. Acoustic identification and measurement of activity patterns of white grubs in soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minling; Crocker, Robert L; Mankin, Richard W; Flanders, Kathy L; Brandhorst-Hubbard, Jamee L

    2003-12-01

    Activity patterns of Phyllophaga crinita (Burmeister), Phyllophaga congrua (LeConte), Phyllophaga crassissima (Blanchard), and Cyclocephala lurida (Bland) grubs were monitored with acoustic sensors in small pots of bluegrass, Poa arachnifera Torr, at varying and constant temperatures over multiple-day periods. Experienced listeners readily distinguished three types of sound with distinct differences in frequency and temporal patterns, intensities, and durations. Of approximately 3,000 sounds detected from P. crinita larvae, 7% were identifiable as snaps, with large amplitudes and short durations typically associated with root breakage or clipping activity. Approximately 60% were identifiable as rustles, suggestive of surfaces sliding or rubbing past each other during general movement activity. Another 2% of sounds contained patterns of repeated pulses suggestive of surfaces scraping across a pointed ridge. The remaining 31% had spectral or temporal patterns that fell outside the ranges of easily recognizable sound types. Because the behavioral significance of the different sound types has not yet been fully established, the classified and unclassified sounds were pooled together in analyses of the effects of species, temperature, weight, and time of day. Grubs of all four species produced detectable sounds at rates that increased with temperature [0.45 sounds/((min)(degrees C))] and larval weight [6.3 sounds/((min)(g))]. Mean sound rates were independent of species and time of day. At temperatures <9 degrees C, mean sound rates fell below the typical levels of background noise observed under field conditions. This reduced activity at low temperatures is likely to reduce the effectiveness of acoustic monitoring in the field in cold weather. The consistency of results obtained in these tests over multiple-day periods suggests that acoustic systems have potential as tools for nondestructive monitoring of the efficacy of insect management treatments as well as for

  18. Natural distribution of parasitoids of larvae of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gabriela Murúa, M; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Fidalgo, Patricio

    2009-01-01

    To develop a better understanding of the natural distribution of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and to update the knowledge of the incidence of its complex of parasitoids. S. frugiperda, samplings in whorl-stage corn were carried out in provinces of Argentina from 1999 to 2003. S. frugiperda larvae were collected from corn in localities of the provinces of Tucumán, Salta, Jujuy, Santiago del Estero, La Rioja, Córdoba, San Luis, Chaco and Misiones. In each locality 30 corn plants were sampled and only larvae located in those plants were collected. The parasitoids that emerged from S. frugiperda larvae were identified and counted. The abundance of the parasitoids and the parasitism rate were estimated. The S. frugiperda parasitoids collected were Campoletis grioti (Blanchard) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Chelonus insularis (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Archytas marmoratus (Townsend) (Diptera Tachinidae) and/or A. incertus (Macquart), Ophion sp. (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Euplectrus platyhypenae Howard (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), and Incamyia chilensis (Aldrich) (Diptera Tachinidae). C. grioti was the most abundant and frequent during the five-year survey. Similar diversity of parasitoids was obtained in all the provinces, with the exception of I. chilensis and E. platyhypenae that were recovered only in the province of Salta. In the Northwestern region, in Tucumán, C. grioti and species of Archytas were the most abundant and frequent parasitoids. On the contrary, in Salta and Jujuy Ch. insularis was the parasitoid most abundant and frequently recovered. The parasitism rate obtained in Tucumán, Salta and Jujuy provinces were 21.96%, 17.87% and 6.63% respectively with an average of 18.93%. These results demonstrate that hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids of S. frugiperda occurred differentially throughout the Argentinian provinces and played an important role on the natural control of the S. frugiperda larval

  19. Natural Distribution of Parasitoids of Larvae of the Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gabriela Murúa, M.; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Fidalgo, Patricio

    2009-01-01

    To develop a better understanding of the natural distribution of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and to update the knowledge of the incidence of its complex of parasitoids. S. frugiperda, samplings in whorl-stage corn were carried out in provinces of Argentina from 1999 to 2003. S. frugiperda larvae were collected from corn in localities of the provinces of Tucumán, Salta, Jujuy, Santiago del Estero, La Rioja, Córdoba, San Luis, Chaco and Misiones. In each locality 30 corn plants were sampled and only larvae located in those plants were collected. The parasitoids that emerged from S. frugiperda larvae were identified and counted. The abundance of the parasitoids and the parasitism rate were estimated. The S. frugiperda parasitoids collected were Campoletis grioti (Blanchard) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Chelonus insularis (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Archytas marmoratus (Townsend) (Diptera Tachinidae) and/or A. incertus (Macquart), Ophion sp. (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Euplectrus platyhypenae Howard (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), and Incamyia chilensis (Aldrich) (Diptera Tachinidae). C. grioti was the most abundant and frequent during the five-year survey. Similar diversity of parasitoids was obtained in all the provinces, with the exception of I. chilensis and E. platyhypenae that were recovered only in the province of Salta. In the Northwestern region, in Tucumán, C. grioti and species of Archytas were the most abundant and frequent parasitoids. On the contrary, in Salta and Jujuy Ch. insularis was the parasitoid most abundant and frequently recovered. The parasitism rate obtained in Tucumán, Salta and Jujuy provinces were 21.96%, 17.87% and 6.63% respectively with an average of 18.93%. These results demonstrate that hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids of S. frugiperda occurred differentially throughout the Argentinian provinces and played an important role on the natural control of the S. frugiperda larval

  20. Leadership Development for Program Directors

    PubMed Central

    Bing-You, Robert; Wiltshire, Whitney; Skolfield, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Background Residency program directors have increasingly challenging roles, but they may not be receiving adequate leadership development. Objective To assess and facilitate program directors' leadership self-awareness and development at a workshop retreat. Methods At our annual program director retreat, program directors and associate program directors from a variety of specialties completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which evaluates an individual's behavior in conflict situations, and the Hersey-Blanchard Situational Leadership (HBSL) model, which measures individuals' preferred leadership style in working with followers. Participants received their results during the retreat and discussed their leadership style results in the context of conflict situations experienced in the past. An online survey was distributed 3 weeks after the retreat to assess participant satisfaction and to determine whether participants would make changes to their leadership styles. Results Seventeen program directors attended the retreat and completed the tools. On the TKI, 47% preferred the Compromising mode for handling conflict, while 18% preferred either the Avoiding or Accommodating modes. On the HBSL, 71% of program directors preferred a Coaching leadership style. Ninety-one percent of postretreat-survey respondents found the leadership tools helpful and also thought they had a better awareness of their conflict mode and leadership style preferences. Eighty-two percent committed to a change in their leadership behaviors in the 6 months following the retreat. Conclusions Leadership tools may be beneficial for promoting the professional development of program directors. The TKI and HBSL can be used within a local retreat or workshop as we describe to facilitate positive leadership-behavior changes. PMID:22132267

  1. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, J. B.

    2007-02-01

    cosmology. The doubters' case is threadbare at best, as Alain Blanchard put it rather more politely in his panel contribution. The Burbidges and Halton Arp reiterate the difficulties that these eminent scientists have long had in reconciling certain observations with the standard model. Most workers in the field are aware of their views and find they lack substance, especially Arp's worries about some close coincidences between the observed positions of low-redshift galaxies and high-redshift quasars. Virtually everyone believes that they have no statistical significance. Arp's belief that some quasars have non-cosmological redshifts and are being spewed out of nearby exploding galactic centres raises eyebrows. For me the most worthwhile of the 'rebel' papers is Narlikar's. Its first half is a thought-provoking survey of the many modifications through which the big-bang model has passed. He calls them additions of epicycles and in some cases I think he has a point. But his rival theory seems very far fetched and makes my point about Hamlet's ghost. The steady-state theory just will not die: in 1994, Hoyle, G. Burbidge, and Narlikar published the quasi-steady-state theory (The Astrophysical Journal 410 437) in which the universe expands, not perfectly steadily but 'in mini-creation events at regular intervals and in response the universe oscillates on a short-term period of about 50 Gyr while it also has a steady (exponential) long-term expansion at a characteristic time scale of about 1000 Gyr.' I won't go into details, but this looks like a whopping epicycle on the steady-state model! Wickramasinghe's paper is on iron whiskers, which have now taken over from standard dust as the agents that must transform starlight into the microwave background. In my view the two best papers in the volume are those of the panellists Alain Blanchard (in favour of the standard model though he has difficulties with X-ray clusters) and the observer Michael Disney, who expresses radical doubts

  2. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  3. Evolution and Growth Competition of Salt Fingers in Saline Lake with Slight Wind Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ray-Yeng; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Shugan, Igor

    2010-05-01

    Since the discover of double-diffusive convection by Stommel, Arons & Blanchard (1956), 'evidence has accumulated for the widespread presence of double-diffusion throughout the ocean' and for its 'significant effects on global water-mass structure and the thermohaline convection' (Schmitt, 1998). The salt-fingering form of double-diffusion has particularly attracted interest because of salt-finger convection being now widely recognized as an important mechanism for mixing heat and salt both vertically and laterally in the ocean and saline lake. In oceanographic situations or saline lake where salt fingers may be an important mechanism for the transport of heat and salt in the vertical, velocity shears may also be present. Salt finger convection is analogous to Bénard convection in that the kinetic energy of the motions is obtained from the potential energy stored in the unstable distribution of a stratifying component. On the basis of the thermal analogy it is of interest to discover whether salt fingers are converted into two-dimensional sheets by the wind shear, and how the vertical fluxes of heat and salt are changed by the wind shear. Salt finger convection under the effect of steady wind shear is theoretically examined in this paper. The evolution of developing in the presence of a vertical density gradient disturbance and the horizontal Couette flow is considered near the onset of salt fingers in the saline lake under a moderate rate of wind shear. We use velocity as the basic variable and solve the pressure Poisson equation in terms of the associated Green function. Growth competition between the longitudinal rolls (LR) and the transverse rolls (TR), whose axes are respectively in the direction parallel to and perpendicular to the Couette flow, is investigated by the weakly nonlinear analysis of coupled-mode equations. The results show that the TR mode is characterized in some range of the effective Rayleigh number, and that the stability is dominated by

  4. Hydrogen-extraction experiments on grossular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurka, A.; Blanchard, M.; Ingrin, J.

    2003-04-01

    Grossular generally contains the highest amount of hydrogen within the garnet-group and is a minor component in many pyrope-rich mantle garnets, despite some mantle garnets are known showing significant grossular-component. Gemmy, orange-brown colored, grossular-samples from Madagascar of composition Gr 83.2 Py 2.2 An 14.3 were used to study the hydrogen-extraction behaviour. Five doubly polished, single crystal-slices with a thickness ranging from about 350 to 500 microns were cut. The slices were heated in air at temperatures of 800^o, 900^o, 950^o, 1000^o and 1050^o C for 2 hours up to 900 hours. The hydrogen content was determined using FTIR-spectroscopy. Our material shows a spectra characteristic for grossular with about 12 absorption-bands in the OH-region. The initial OH content was determined as 0.022 wt% H_2O. The diffusion coefficients calculated using the equation proposed by Hercule &Ingrin (1999) range from 7 10-15 to 2 10-12 (m2/s) leading to an activation energy for H-extraction in grossular at about 260 kJ/mol, which is similar to that of pyrope from Dora Maira (personal communication M. Blanchard) but slightly higher than pyrope investigated by Wang et al. (1996). It should be further noticed that the extraction rate of some bands at lower energies shows slightly different behaviour than that of other bands. This may affect the model of H-incorporation in grossular, that is usually described by the classic hydrogen-incorporation via O_4H_4 - SiO_4, and may support more sophisticated models of OH-substitution in garnet as proposed recently by Andrut et al. (2002). This study was financially supported by the EU through the Human Potential Program HPRN-CT-2000-0056. References: [1] Wang, L., Zhang, Y., Essene, E. (1996) Diffusion of the hydrous component in pyrope. Am. Mineral., 81, 701-718. [2] Hercule, S. and Ingrin, J. (1999) Hydrogen in diopside: Diffusion, kinetics of extraction-incorporation, and solubility. Am. Mineral., 84, 1577-1587. [3

  5. Comparison of Neurofeedback and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Efficacy on Treatment of Primary Headaches: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moshkani Farahani, Davood; Tavallaie, Seyed Abbas; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Fathi Ashtiani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Headache is one of the most prevalent investigated complaints in the neurology clinics and is the most common pain-related complaint worldwide. Stress is a significant factor that causes and triggers headaches. Since healthcare practitioners experience a lot of stress in their careers, they are more prone to headaches. Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate and compares the efficacy of neurofeedback behavioural therapy (NFB) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the treatment of primary headaches in healthcare providers. Patients and Methods: The current study was a clinical trial, performed in Teheran, IR Iran, with two experimental groups and a control group. Convenient sampling method was used to recruit patients. Independent variables were NFB and TENS and dependent variables were frequency, severity, and duration of headache. Blanchard headache diary was used for assessment. Hence, 45 healthcare providers with primary headache were selected and randomly allocated to one of the NFB, TENS, and control groups by block random assignment method. All three groups completed the headache diary during one week before and after the treatment period as pretest and posttests, respectively. The NFB group was treated in the period between pretest and posttest with fifteen 30-minute treatment sessions three times a week and the TENS group was treated with fifteen 20-minute daily sessions. The control group received none of these treatments. Results: The results from the analysis of covariance showed that treatment with NFB and TENS had caused significant decrease in the frequency, severity, and duration of headache in experimental groups. The results of the LSD post-hoc test indicated that there were significant differences in the frequency, severity, and duration of pain among experimental groups and the control group. Moreover, there were significant differences between pain frequencies in experimental groups. Conclusions: According

  6. Vanadium Dioxide: a reconfigurable disordered metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, Federico

    2014-03-01

    . Sharma, R. Blanchard, P. Genevet, J. Lin, S. Zhang, C. Ko, Z. Yang, M. M. Qazilbash, D. N. Basov are gratefully acknowledged. Support from AFOSR (Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0289) is acknowledged.

  7. Visual performance of subjects wearing presbyopic contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Aruna S; Bennett, Edward S; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the visual performance of subjects wearing gas-permeable (GP) multifocal contact lenses, soft bifocal contact lenses, GP monovision lenses and spectacles. The study included 32 subjects between the ages of 42 and 65 years wearing GP monovision, the Acuvue Bifocal (Vistakon), the Essentials GP Multifocal (Blanchard), and progressive addition lenses (PAL; spectacles group). There were eight subjects in each of these groups who were already wearing these modalities. Binocular low (18%) and high (95%) contrast acuities were recorded using the Bailey-Lovie chart; binocular contrast sensitivity from 1.5 to 18 cycles per degree (cpd) measured with the Vistech VCTS 6500 system, and monocular glare sensitivity at three luminance settings (400, 100, and 12 foot lamberts) was measured using the brightness acuity tester (BAT). Binocular near visual task performance (a modified version of letter counting method used in previous presbyopic studies) was also assessed. For the contact lens-wearing groups, subjects wearing GP multifocals provided the best binocular high and low contrast acuity followed by soft bifocal wearers. There was relative parity between the binocular high and low contrast acuity with PAL and GP multifocal wearers. Monovision acuity, measured binocularly, was determined to be lower than the other three groups with this difference being most significant with high contrast acuity. Among contact lens-wearing groups, it was observed that GP multifocal lens wearers experienced the lowest amount of monocular disability glare followed by soft bifocal wearers and monovision wearers. Subjects wearing soft bifocal lenses and monovision demonstrated slightly reduced binocular contrast sensitivity at all spatial frequencies. In the contact lens groups, GP multifocal lens wearers had the highest binocular contrast sensitivity at all spatial frequencies, on parity with PAL wearers, except at the highest spatial frequency (18 cpd) at

  8. Modulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide by global electric circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.

    2003-04-01

    In this report I propose a model connecting changes in ionosphere potential to the removal rate of carbon from ocean surface, which in turn, affects the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide. The basic argument is that variations in the mean magnetic field of the heliosphere lead to the modulation of galactic cosmic radiation, which affects the ionosphere potential and conductivity of the atmosphere. These parameters exert a direct control on the electrophoretic velocity of the organic colloids present close to the ocean surface affecting their removal rate through coagulation. The ionosphere is maintained at a potential of ˜ +250 kV by thunderstorms which drive up current through the conducting atmosphere. The global electric circuit is completed mainly by currents of ˜2 pA/m2 flowing through fair weather atmosphere, remote from thunderstorms. The electric conductivity over the ocean surface is similar to that over ground (= 0.02 x pmho/m). Blanchard [1966; 1985] found that positively charged drops from bubbles bursting at the surface of the sea (whitecaps) produce a flow of positive current from the world ocean to the atmosphere of about 40 pA/m2. The ocean whitecaps could then be considered as electrophoretic cells subjected to a fair-weather electric field of the order of 2000 V/m. In an electrophoretic cell, suspended particles carrying surface charge migrate at a velocity proportional to their surface charge and applied field strength (Smoluchowski equation) and collide with each other and form larger particles. A large inventory of organic carbon in the world oceans is in the form of nm size colloids and somewhat larger transparent exopolymer particles and other aggregates that are collectively called dissolved organic matter (DOM). The DOM coagulates to transform into larger particulate organic matter (POM), which is subsequently removed from the ocean surface. As colloidal particles often bear a surface charge, or zeta potential, it is likely that

  9. Nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconducting nanowires and nanostructures have been a focus of much research in the past decade. Most often the aim is to understand how their properties can lead to novel device applications predicated on their smaller volumes and therefore potentially interesting quantum size effects. If the crystal structure and composition is under control, correlations with electronic transport, optoelectronic emission, and other properties rely on the formation of well-understood electrical contacts. While much is known about planar contacts to semiconductor thin films and quantum wells, the reduction in volume and increase in surface area of nanowires has led to many fascinating questions and discoveries. This special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology brings together a collection of work in this field. Each paper provides another example of how nanoscale geometries are influencing reaction kinetics and interfacial transport mechanisms. Orrù et al describe experimental results for alloyed NiGeAu contacts to GaAs nanowires where an axial Schottky barrier is formed instead of the expected ohmic contacts familiar for planar geometries. The formation of transparent indium tin oxide ohmic contacts to GaAs nanowires—important to nanowire optoelectronic devices—is described in a paper by Zhang et al . Simulations of the significant nanoscale effects on transport in Mo contacts to GaAs is the subject of a paper by Aldegunde et al . Tang et al review the case of Ni reactions for contacts to III-V, Si and Ge nanowires developing an understanding of the general effects of nanoscale geometries on reaction kinetics and contact properties. Blanchard et al focus on ohmic contacts to GaN nanowires establishing an upper limit on contact resistivity with direct 4-point probe measurements. A comparison of the ohmic properties of metal contacts to carbon nanotubes as a function of geometry, sidewall versus end, is the focus of a paper by Wilhite et al . Conclusions are reached

  10. Dimensionality of posttraumatic stress symptoms: a confirmatory factor analysis of DSM-IV symptom clusters and other symptom models.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, G J; Frombach, I; McQuaid, J; Pedrelli, P; Lenox, R; Stein, M B

    2000-02-01

    Recent exploratory [Taylor, S., Kuch, K., Koch, W. J., Crockett, D. J., & Passey, G. (1998). The structure of posttraumatic stress symptoms. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 107, 154-160.] and confirmatory [Buckley, T. C., Blanchard, E. B., & Hickling, E. J. (1998). A confirmatory factor analysis of posttraumatic stress symptoms. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 36, 1091-1099; King, D. W., Leskin, G. A., King, L. A., & Weathers, F. W. (1998). Confirmatory factor analysis of the clinician-administered PTSD scale: evidence for the dimensionality of posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychological Assessment, 10, 90-96.] factor analytic investigations suggest that the three symptom clusters of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual [4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.] may not provide the best conceptualization of symptom dimensionality. However, the alternative models have not been in agreement, nor have they been compared against each other or models based on the DSM-IV. The purpose of the present investigation was to test a series of dimensional models suggested by these recent factor analytic investigations and the DSM-IV. Using data collected with the PTSD Checklist--Civilian Version [Weathers, F. W., Litz, B. T., Huska, J. A., & Keane, T. M. (1994). PCL-C for DSM-IV. Boston: National Center for PTSD--Behavioral Science Division.] from 349 referrals to a primary care medical clinic, we used confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate a: (1) hierarchical four-factor model, (2) four-factor intercorrelated model, (3) hierarchical three-factor model, (4) three-factor intercorrelated model, and (5) hierarchical two-factor model. The hierarchical four-factor model (comprising four first-order factors corresponding to reexperiencing, avoidance, numbing, and hyperarousal all subsumed by a higher-order general factor

  11. Geology and mining industry of the Tintic district, Utah: Section in Nineteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey to the Secretary of the Interior 1897 - 1898: Part III - Economic Geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tower, George Warren; Smith, George Otis

    1899-01-01

    The field work upon which this report is based was begun in July, 1897, and continued without interruption until December of the same year. The area studied is approximately 15 miles square and contains 234 square miles. The topographic maps, which are two in number, were prepared under the direction of Mr. R. U. Goode, Mr. S. S. Gannett doing the triangulation and Messrs. Marshall and Griswold the topography in the fall of 1896 and summer of 1897. The mapping is done on two scales; the larger area, approximately 15 miles square, is mapped on a scale of 1: 62,500. This map is designed to form a part of the Geologic Atlas of the United States. The other map represents the portion of the larger area in which the majority of the mines are located. It is on a scale of 1: 9,600, and covers an area of 12 square miles. The work has been greatly facilitated through the assistance rendered by the mining men of the district, among whom special thanks are due to Messrs. G. H. Robinson, W. J. Craig, W. M. Nesbit, and C. H. Blanchard. The chemical work on the ores and country rocks from the district has been done in the laboratory of the Survey by Messrs. H. N. Stokes and George Steiger, and the determination of the fossils collected is to be credited to Mr. G. H. Girty, also of the Geological Survey. In the field work the authors have cooperated constantly on every phase of the varied problems. The same is true for the office work, except that the stratigraphic and economic problems have been the especial studies of Mr. Tower, while the petrologic and remaining problems have been the special studies of Mr. Smith. In pursuance of this system of work the introduction has been written conjointly, Chapter II of Part I and all of Part II have been written by Mr. Tower, and Chapters I and III to VII of Part I by Mr. Smith.

  12. Investigating inquiry beliefs and nature of science (NOS) conceptions of science teachers as revealed through online learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atar, Hakan Yavuz

    Creating a scientifically literate society appears to be the major goal of recent science education reform efforts (Abd-El-Khalick, Boujaoude, Dushl, Lederman, Hofstein, Niaz, Tregust, & Tuan, 2004). Recent national reports in the U.S, such as Shaping the Future, New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (NSF,1996), Inquiry in Science and In Classroom, Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 2001), Pursuing excellence: Comparison of international eight-grade mathematics and science achievement from a U.S. perspective (NCES, 2001), and Standards for Science Teacher Preparation (NSTA 2003) appear to agree on one thing: the vision of creating a scientifically literate society. It appears from science education literature that the two important components of being a scientifically literate individual are developing an understanding of nature of science and ability to conduct scientific inquiries. Unfortunately, even though teaching science through inquiry has been recommended in national reports since the 1950's, it has yet to find its way into many science classrooms (Blanchard, 2006; Yerrick, 2000). Science education literature identfies several factors for this including: (1) lack of content knowledge (Anderson, 2002; Lee, Hart Cuevas, & Enders, 2004; Loucks-Horsely, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1998; Moscovici, 1999; Smith & Naele, 1989; Smith, 1989); (2) high stake tests (Aydeniz, 2006); (3) teachers' conflicting beliefs with inquiry-based science education reform (Blanchard, 2006; Wallace & Kang, 2004); and, (4) lack of collaboration and forums for communication (Anderson, 2002; Davis, 2003; Loucks-Horsely, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1998; Wallace & Kang, 2004). In addition to the factors stated above this study suggest that some of the issues and problems that have impeded inquiry instruction to become the primary approach to teaching science in many science classrooms might be related to

  13. Effects of climate change adaptation scenarios on perceived spatio-temporal characteristics of drought events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, J.-P.; Martin, E.; Kitova, N.; Najac, J.; Soubeyroux, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    " adaptation) or over a 30-year period centred around the date considered ("prospective" adaptation). These adaptation scenarios are translated into local-scale transient drought thresholds, as opposed to a non-adaptation scenario where the drought threshold remains constant. The perceived spatio-temporal characteristics derived from the theoretical adaptation scenarios show much reduced changes, but they call for more realistic scenarios at both the catchment and national scale in order to accurately assess the combined effect of local-scale adaptation and global-scale mitigation. This study thus proposes a proof of concept for using standardized drought indices for (1) assessing projections of spatio-temporal drought characteristics and (2) building theoretical adaptation scenarios and associated perceived changes in hydrological impact studies (Vidal et al., submitted). Vidal J.-P., Martin E., Franchistéguy L., Habets F., Soubeyroux J.-M., Blanchard M. & Baillon M. (2010) Multilevel and multiscale drought reanalysis over France with the Safran-Isba-Modcou hydrometeorological suite. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 14, 459-478.doi: 10.5194/hess-14-459-2010 Vidal J.-P., Martin E., Kitova N., Najac J. & Soubeyroux, J. M. (submitted) Evolution of spatio-temporal drought characteristics: validation, projections and effect of adaptation scenarios. Submitted to Hydrology and earth System Sciences

  14. Investigation and classification of spume droplets production mechanisms at hurricane winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil; Zilitinkevich, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    : The work was supported by RFBR (Project No. 16-05-00839, 15-35-20953, 14-05-91767), Yu. Troitskaya, D. Sergeev, A. Kandaurov were partially supported by FP7 collaborative project No. 612610, experimental studies of spray generation mechanisms were supported by Russian Science Foundation (Grant No. 15-17-20009), post-processing was supported by Russian Science Foundation (Grant No. 14-17-00667). References: 1. Koga M. Direct production of droplets from breaking wind-waves - its observation by a multi-colored overlapping exposure photographing technique // Tellus. 1981. V.33. Issue 6. P. 552-563 2. Blanchard, D.C., The electrification of the atmosphere by particles from bubbles in the sea, Progr. Oceanogr., 1963. V. 1. P. 71-202. 3. Spiel D.E. On the birth of jet drops from bubbles bursting on water surfaces // J. Geophys. Res. 1995. V.100. P. 4995-5006 4. Villermaux, E. Fragmentation // Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., 2007. V.39. P.419-446

  15. The genera in the second catalogue (1833–1836) of Dejean’s Coleoptera collection

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Yves; Bouchard, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    (Cerambyx abbreviatus Fabricius, 1801) [Cerambycidae], Psalicerus Dejean, 1833 (Lucanus femoratus Fabricius, 1775) [Lucanidae], and Pygolampis Dejean, 1833 (Lampyris glauca Olivier, 1790) [Lampyridae]. A new name, Neoeutrapela Bousquet and Bouchard [Tenebrionidae], is proposed for Eutrapela Dejean, 1834 (junior homonym of Eutrapela Hübner, 1809). The following generic names, made available in Dejean’s catalogue, were found to be older than currently accepted valid names: Catoxantha Dejean, 1833 over Catoxantha Solier, 1833 [Buprestidae], Pristiptera Dejean, 1833 over Pelecopselaphus Solier, 1833 [Buprestidae], Charactus Dejean, 1833 over Calopteron Laporte, 1836 [Lycidae], Cyclonotum Dejean, 1833 over Dactylosternum Wollaston, 1854 [Hydrophilidae], Ancylonycha Dejean, 1833 over Holotrichia Hope, 1837 [Scarabaeidae], Aulacium Dejean, 1833 over Mentophilus Laporte, 1840 [Scarabaeidae], Sciuropus Dejean, 1833 over Ancistrosoma Curtis, 1835 [Scarabaeidae], Sphaeromorphus Dejean, 1833 over Ceratocanthus White, 1842 [Scarabaeidae], Psalicerus Dejean, 1833 over Leptinopterus Hope, 1838 [Lucanidae], Adelphus Dejean, 1834 over Praeugena Laporte, 1840 [Tenebrionidae], Amatodes Dejean, 1834 over Oncosoma Westwood, 1843 [Tenebrionidae], Cyrtoderes Dejean, 1834 over Phligra Laporte, 1840 [Tenebrionidae], Euphron Dejean, 1834 over Derosphaerus Thomson, 1858 [Tenebrionidae], Pezodontus Dejean, 1834 over Odontopezus Alluaud, 1889 [Tenebrionidae], Anoplosthaeta Dejean, 1835 over Prosopocera Blanchard, 1845 [Cerambycidae], Closteromerus Dejean, 1835 over Hylomela Gahan, 1904 [Cerambycidae], Hebecerus Dejean, 1835 over Ancita Thomson, 1864 [Cerambycidae], Mastigocera Dejean, 1835over Mallonia Thomson, 1857 [Cerambycidae], Zygocera Dejean, 1835 over Disternopsis Breuning, 1939 [Cerambycidae], Australica Chevrolat, 1836 over Calomela Hope, 1840 [Chrysomelidae], Edusa Chevrolat, 1836 over Edusella Chapuis, 1874 [Chrysomelidae], Litosonycha Chevrolat, 1836 over Asphaera Duponchel and Chevrolat

  16. Solar Games at Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Cerro Paranal, home of ESO's Very Large Telescope, is certainly one of the best astronomical sites on the planet. Stunning images, obtained by ESO staff at Paranal, of the green and blue flashes, as well as of the so-called 'Gegenschein', are real cases in point. Green Flash at Paranal ESO PR Photo 12a/08 Green Flash at Paranal The Earth's atmosphere is a gigantic prism that disperses sunlight. In the most ideal atmospheric conditions, such as those found regularly above Cerro Paranal, this will lead to the appearance of so-called green and blue flashes at sunset. The phenomenon is so popular on the site that it is now the tradition for the Paranal staff to gather daily on the telescope platform to observe the sunset and its possible green flash before starting their long night of observations. The green and blue flashes are fleeting events that require an unobstructed view of the setting Sun, and a very stable atmosphere. These conditions are very often met at Paranal, a 2635m high mountain in the Chilean Atacama Desert, where the sky is cloudless more than 300 days a year. Paranal is home of ESO's Very Large Telescope, an ensemble of four 8.2-m telescopes and four 1.8-m Auxiliary Telescopes that together form the world's most advanced optical telescope. Blue Flash at Paranal ESO PR Photo 12b/08 Blue Flash at Paranal ESO staff Stéphane Guisard has been chasing green flashes for many years and has been able to capture them on many occasions. The picture shown above is one of many examples from his collection. "The most challenging is to capture the green flash while still seeing the rest of the Sun with all its colours," says Guisard. His colleague Guillaume Blanchard was even luckier. On Christmas Eve, as he was one of the few to follow the tradition of looking at the sunset, he had the chance to immortalise a blue flash using his hobby telescope. ESO astronomer Yuri Beletsky also likes to take photographs from Paranal, but he prefers the night views. This allows

  17. Agrotis Ochsenheimer (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae): a systematic analysis of South American species.

    PubMed

    San Blas, Germán

    2014-03-03

    . comb.; Scotia picata Köhler, n. comb.; Agrotis rondanelli León, n. comb.; Euxoa senta Draudt, n. comb.; and Agrotis submontana Köhler, n. comb. New Feltia tent. synonymies include: Agrotis daguerrei Köhler, Porosagrotis atricentrica Hampson, and Agrotis llanoi Köhler = F. brachystria; Lycophotia baeckstroemi Aurivillius = F. deprivata (Walker); Agrotis raveni Köhler = F. fasicola; Agrotis gentilii Köhler = F. forasmicans; Scotia nyei Köhler, Euxoa australis Köhler, and Scotia liniclinans Köhler = F. hispidula; Euxoa bosqui Köhler and Euxoa griseosparsa Köhler = F. lutescens (Blanchard); Euxoa praeocupata Köhler, Agrotis andinicola Köhler, and Scotia songoensis Köhler = F. subandina (Köhler); Agrotis maldonadoi Köhler = F. submontana. New combinations of Agrotis species: Anicla albiorbis (Dyar), n. comb.; Noctubourgognea chimaera (Köhler), n. comb.; Noctubourgognea dissociata (Staudinger), n. comb.; Pseudoleucania nigrocollaris (Köhler), n. comb.; and P. wittmeri (Köhler), n. comb. One lectotype and one paralectotype are designated for A. edmondsi Butler. The 20 species of South American Agrotis are redescribed using characters of color pattern, external morphology of head and thorax, and internal morphology of male (including vesica) and female genitalia. This is the first time complete eversions and description of male genitalia (aedeagus and vesica) and female genitalia are done for almost all the South American species. Images of all described characters and dichotomous keys to identify South American species of Agrotis are included. 

  18. Fatty Acids as Surfactants on Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Niemi, J.

    2003-12-01

    Fatty acids (n-alcanoic acids) are common compounds in numerous anthropogenic and natural emissions. According to Rogge et al. (1993), catalyst-equipped automobiles emitted more than 600 μg km-1 of fatty acids which was over 50% of all identified organics in fine aerosol emissions. Coal burning produces fatty acids ranging from about 1700 mg kg-1 for bituminous coal to over 10000 mg kg-1 for lignite (Oros and Simoneit, 2000). Similarly, biomass burning is an important source for aerosol fatty acids. They are the major identified compound group in deciduous tree smoke, their total emission factor being measured as 1589 mg kg-1 which was 56% of all identified organic compounds (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a). Large amounts of fatty acid are also emitted from burning of conifer trees and grass (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a; Simoneit, 2002). Fatty acids have been reported to be major constituents of marine aerosols in many investigations (Barger and Garrett, 1976; Gagosian et. al, 1981; Sicre et al., 1990; Stephanou, 1992). It has been suggested that as the marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants (Blanchard, 1964; Gill et al., 1983; Middlebrook et al., 1998; Ellison et al., 1999). Amphiphilic molecules, including lipids, can be assembled as monomolecular layers at air/water interfaces as well as transported to a solid support. Recently, we could show by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the sea-salt aerosol particles (Tervahattu et al., 2002). In their TOF-SIMS studies on the surface composition of atmospheric aerosols, Peterson and Tyler (2002) found fatty acids on the surface of Montana forest fire particles. In this work we have studied by TOF-SIMS the surface chemical composition of aerosol particles emitted from field fires in the Baltic and other East European countries and transported to Finland as well as aerosol particles transported from

  19. Baseline climatology of extremely high vertical wind shears' values over Europe based on ERA-Interim reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palarz, Angelika; Celiński-Mysław, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The dominant role in the development of deep convection is played by kinematic and thermodynamic conditions, as well as atmospheric circulation, land cover and local relief. Severe thunderstorms are considerably more likely to form in environments with large values of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and significant magnitude of vertical wind shears (VWSs). According to the most recent research, the tropospheric wind shears have an important influence on intensity, longevity and organisation of the primary convective systems - bow echoes, squall lines and supercell thunderstorms. This study, in turn, examines the role of wind structure in controlling the spatial and temporal variability of VWSs over Europe. Considering the importance of the kinematic conditions for the convective systems formation, research is limited exclusively to 0-1 km, 0-3 km and 0-6 km wind shears. In order to compute the VWS' values, the data derived from ERA-Interim reanalysis for the period 1981-2015 was applied. It consisted of U and V wind components with 12-hourly sampling and horizontal resolution of 0.75×0.75°. The VWS' values were calculated as wind difference between two levels - this entails that the hodograph's shape was not considered (e.g. Clark 2013, Pucik et. al 2015). We have analysed both VWS' mean values (MN) and frequency of VWSs exceeding assumed thresholds (FQ). Taking into account previous studies (e.g. Rasmussen & Blanchard 1998, Schneider et al. 2006, Schaumann & Przybylinski 2012), the thresholds for extremely high values of vertical wind shears were set at 10 m/s for 0-1 km shear, 15 m/s for 0-3 km shear and 18 m/s for 0-6 km shear. Both MN and FQ values were characterised by strong temporal variability, as well as significant spatial differentiation over the research area. A clear diurnal cycle was identified in the case of 0-1 km shear, while seasonal variability was typical for 0-3 km and 0-6 km shears. Regardless of the season, 0-1 km shear reached

  20. The amino acid and hydrocarbon contents of the Paris meteorite, the most primitive CM chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita; Modica, Paola; Zanda, Brigitte; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis

    2015-04-01

    or contribution from interstellar precursors. In summary, the soluble organic content of the primitive CM chondrite Paris possibly relates to late phases of condensed phase chemistry in molecular clouds. References: [1] Blanchard et al. (2011) Abstract #5322. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 46:A21. [2] Caillet Komorowski et al. (2011) Abstract #5289. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 46:A35. [3] Kimura et al. (2011) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 46:431-442. [4] Bourot-Denise et al. (2010) Abstract #1533. 41st LPSC. CD-ROM. [5] Merouane et al. (2011) Proceedings, EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting, pp.902. [6] Merouane et al. (2012) The Astrophysical Journal 756:154-160. [7] Remusat et al. (2010) The Astrophysical Journal 713:1048-1058. [8] Remusat et al. (2011) Abstract #5327. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 46:A197. [9] Martins et al. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, under review. [10] Glavin et al. (2006) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 41:889-902. [11] Glavin et al. (2010) Abstract #5131. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 45:A64. [12] Pizzarello et al. (2003) GCA 67:1589-1595. [13] Glavin and Dworkin (2009) PNAS 106:5487-5492. [14] Elsila et al. (2005) GCA 69:1349-1357.

  1. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, May 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    -level data are collected in May and September each year to show the approximate annual low and high water-level conditions, respectively. Most of the water-level data for this map were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during the period May 15-19, 2006. Supplemental water-level data were collected by other agencies and companies. A corresponding potentiometric-surface map was prepared for areas east and north of the Southwest Florida Water Management District boundary by the U.S. Geological Survey office in Altamonte Springs, Florida (Kinnaman, 2006). Most water-level measurements were made during a 5-day period; therefore, measurements do not represent a 'snapshot' of conditions at a specific time, nor do they necessarily coincide with the seasonal low water-level condition. Water-Level Changes Water levels in about 95 percent of the wells measured in May 2006 were lower than the May 2005 water levels (Ortiz and Blanchard, 2006). May 2006 water levels in 403 wells ranged from about 26 feet below to about 6 feet above May 2005 water levels (fig. 1). Significant water level declines occurred in eastern Manatee County, southwestern Polk County, southeastern Hillsborough County, and in all of Hardee County. The largest water level declines occurred in southwestern Hardee County. The largest water level rises occurred in south-central Pasco County, northeastern Levy County, northwestern Marion County, and along the gulf coast from Pasco County to Citrus County (fig. 1). Water levels in about 96 percent of the wells measured in May 2006 were lower than the September 2005 water levels (Ortiz, 2006). May 2006 water levels in 397 wells ranged from about 31 feet below to 3 feet above the September 2005 water levels. The largest water level decline was in west-central Hardee County and the largest rise in water levels was in south-central Pasco County.

  2. FY07 LDRD Final Report A Fracture Mechanics and Tribology Approach to Understanding Subsurface Damage on Fused Silica during Grinding and Polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Menapace, J A; Wong, L L; Steele, R A; Feit, M D; Davis, P J; Walmer, C D

    2008-02-05

    The objective of this work is to develop a solid scientific understanding of the creation and characteristics of surface fractures formed during the grinding and polishing of brittle materials, specifically glass. In this study, we have experimentally characterized the morphology, number density, and depth distribution of various surface cracks as a function of various grinding and polishing processes (blanchard, fixed abrasive grinding, loose abrasive, pitch polishing and pad polishing). Also, the effects of load, abrasive particle (size, distribution, foreign particles, geometry, velocity), and lap material (pitch, pad) were examined. The resulting data were evaluated in terms of indentation fracture mechanics and tribological interactions (science of interacting surfaces) leading to several models to explain crack distribution behavior of ground surfaces and to explain the characteristics of scratches formed during polishing. This project has greatly advanced the scientific knowledge of microscopic mechanical damage occurring during grinding and polishing and has been of general interest. This knowledge-base has also enabled the design and optimization of surface finishing processes to create optical surfaces with far superior laser damage resistance. There are five major areas of scientific progress as a result of this LDRD. They are listed in Figure 1 and described briefly in this summary below. The details of this work are summarized through a number of published manuscripts which are included this LDRD Final Report. In the first area of grinding, we developed a technique to quantitatively and statistically measure the depth distribution of surface fractures (i.e., subsurface damage) in fused silica as function of various grinding processes using mixtures of various abrasive particles size distributions. The observed crack distributions were explained using a model that extended known, single brittle indentation models to an ensemble of loaded, sliding

  3. Chromium, Nickel, and Iron in Deep-Sea Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Brownlee, D. E.; Xue, S.; Hall, G. S.; Herzog, G. F.

    1995-09-01

    from the vapor pressures of the metals. The Ni available from KK1-10 was insufficient for isotopic analysis, but Fe was unfractionated (Fig. 1). Phi(Cr) = 0.27+/-0.21%/AMU, implying a modest Cr loss of ~30%. A terrestrial origin for KK1-10, suggested by low Ni/Fe <10^-3, is counter to mass fractionation of Cr and the presence of cosmogenic 53Mn in similar spherules [10]. The possibility of an extra-terrestrial source with low Ni/Fe merits further investigation. The Fe isotopic abundances in KK1-10 were within error limits of the terrestrial composition when normalized to 54Fe/56Fe = 0.062669 [11], but the data for KK1-9 hint at an 57Fe deficit of -2+/-1 epsilon-units, similar to values reported for non-FUN inclusions of Allende [11]. References:[ 1] Blanchard M. B. et al. (1980) EPSL, 46, 178-190. [2] Davis A. M. and Brownlee D. E. (1993) LPS XXIV, 373-374. [3] Davis A. M. et al. (1991) LPS XXII, 281-282. [4] Clayton R. N. et al. (1986) EPSL, 79, 235-240. [5] Herzog et al. (1994) GCA, 58, 5319-5323. [6] Xue et al. (1995) LPS XXVI, 1527-1528. [7] Shih C.-Y. et al. (1995) LPS XXVI, 1289-1290. [8] Nyquist L. E. et al. (1994) Meteoritics, 29, 872-885. [9] Czajkowski J. (1987) Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of California, San Diego. [10] Nishiizumi K. (1983) EPSL, 63, 223-228. [11] Volkening J. and Papanastassiou D. A., Astrophys. J., 347, L43-L46. Figure 1 showing the Fe-isotopic fractionation in two Type I spheres appears here in the hard copy.

  4. Systematics and phylogenetics of Indo-Pacific Luciolinae fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) and the description of new genera.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Lesly A; Lambkin, Christine L

    2013-01-01

    . similispupillae sp. nov. have two pairs of wide bursa plates. The second genus including species in which the males have deflexed elytral apices is Trisinuata gen. nov., where all males have light organ in ventrite 7 bipartite and posterolateral projections expanded; it is proposed for eight New Guinean species: T. microthorax (Olivier), T. minor (Ballantyne), T. papuae (McDermott) and T. similispapuae(Ballantyne) are transferred from Pteroptyx Olivier, T. papuana (Olivier) previously known only from a female, has males associated and is transferred from Luciola, and T. caudabifurca sp. nov., T. dimidiata sp. nov. and T. apicula sp. nov. are described. Females of T. similispapuae (Ballantyne) have two pairs of wide bursa plates. Luciola s. str. is defined by scoring the type species L. italica (L), Bourgeoisia Olivier and Lampyroidea (based on its type species syriaca Costa) both of which are submerged into Luciola; Luciola s. str is addressed here from four Pacific Island species: L. hypocrita Olivier, L. antipodum Bourgeois both transferred from Bourgeoisia; L. aquilaclarasp. nov. and L. oculofissa sp. nov. are described. L. oculofissa sp. nov. is the only Luciolinae male known to lack light organs. Females of L. italica and L. hypocrita lack bursa plates.Pacifica gen. nov. is proposed for five species from the Solomon Islands transferred from Pygatyphella(Ballantyne), and which the phylogenetic analysis shows to be distinctive viz. P. limbatifusca (Ballantyne), P. limbatipennis (Pic), P. plagiata (Blanchard), P. russellia (Ballantyne), and P. salomonis (Olivier). A monotypic genus Poluninius gen. nov. is proposed for Pol. selangoriensis sp. nov. from Selangor, Malaysia. The genera Colophotia, Pteroptyx, Pyrophanes, and Pygoluciola are treated in an abbreviated fashion with generic diagnoses, lists of, and keys to, species. Pteroptyx bearni Olivier and P. tener Olivier are characterised from type specimens and female bursae and P. similis Ballantyne is synonymised with P

  5. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    . Furthermore, we measured TC ^13C/12C isotopic ratio on each cascade. This ratio contributed to identifying sources of carbonaceous species. References Garbaras, A., Andriejauskiene, J., Bariseviciute, R., Remeikis, V., 2008. Tracing of atmospheric aerosol sources using stable carbon isotopes. Lithuanian J. Phys. 48, 259-264. Jaenicke, R., 1998. Atmospheric aerosol size distribution. In: Harrison, R.M., van Grieken, R.E. (Eds.), Atmospheric Particles. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, pp. 1-28. Middlebrook, A.M., Murphy, D.M., Thomson, D.S., 1998. Observations of organic material in individual marine particles at Cape Grim during the first aerosol characterization experiment (ACE 1). Journal of Geophysical Research 103, 16475-16483. Norman, A.L., Hopper, J.F., Blanchard, P., Ernst, D., Brice, K., Alexandrou, N., Klouda, G., 1999. The stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric PAHs. Atmospheric Environment 33 (17), 2807-2814. Samara, C., Voutsa, D., 2005. Size distribution of airborne particulate matter and associated heavy metals in the roadside environment. Chemosphere 59, 1197-1206.

  6. Synopsis of the pelidnotine scarabs (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae, Rutelini) and annotated catalog of the species and subspecies.

    PubMed

    Moore, Matthew R; Jameson, Mary L; Garner, Beulah H; Audibert, Cédric; Smith, Andrew B T; Seidel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The pelidnotine scarabs (Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae: Rutelini) are a speciose, paraphyletic assemblage of beetles that includes spectacular metallic species ("jewel scarabs") as well as species that are ecologically important as herbivores, pollinators, and bioindicators. These beetles suffer from a complicated nomenclatural history, due primarily to 20(th) century taxonomic and nomenclatural errors. We review the taxonomic history of the pelidnotine scarabs, present a provisional key to genera with overviews of all genera, and synthesize a catalog of all taxa with synonyms, distributional data, type specimen information, and 107 images of exemplar species. As a result of our research, the pelidnotine leaf chafers (a paraphyletic group) include 27 (26 extant and 1 extinct) genera and 420 valid species and subspecies (419 extant and 1 extinct). Our research makes biodiversity research on this group tractable and accessible, thus setting the stage for future studies that address evolutionary and ecological trends. Based on our research, 1 new species is described, 1 new generic synonym and 12 new species synonyms are proposed, 11 new lectotypes and 1 new neotype are designated, many new or revised nomenclatural combinations, and many unavailable names are presented. The following taxonomic changes are made: New generic synonym: The genus Heteropelidnota Ohaus, 1912 is a new junior synonym of Pelidnota MacLeay, 1819. New species synonyms: Plusiotis adelaida pavonacea Casey, 1915 is a syn. n. of Chrysina adelaida (Hope, 1841); Odontognathus gounellei Ohaus, 1908 is a revised synonym of Pelidnota ebenina (Blanchard, 1842); Pelidnota francoisgenieri Moore & Jameson, 2013 is a syn. n. of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota genieri Soula, 2009 is a syn. n. of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota lutea (Olivier, 1758) is a revised synonym of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota (Pelidnota) texensis Casey, 1915 is a revised synonym of Pelidnota

  7. Synopsis of the pelidnotine scarabs (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae, Rutelini) and annotated catalog of the species and subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Matthew R.; Jameson, Mary L.; Garner, Beulah H.; Audibert, Cédric; Smith, Andrew B. T.; Seidel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The pelidnotine scarabs (Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae: Rutelini) are a speciose, paraphyletic assemblage of beetles that includes spectacular metallic species (“jewel scarabs”) as well as species that are ecologically important as herbivores, pollinators, and bioindicators. These beetles suffer from a complicated nomenclatural history, due primarily to 20th century taxonomic and nomenclatural errors. We review the taxonomic history of the pelidnotine scarabs, present a provisional key to genera with overviews of all genera, and synthesize a catalog of all taxa with synonyms, distributional data, type specimen information, and 107 images of exemplar species. As a result of our research, the pelidnotine leaf chafers (a paraphyletic group) include 27 (26 extant and 1 extinct) genera and 420 valid species and subspecies (419 extant and 1 extinct). Our research makes biodiversity research on this group tractable and accessible, thus setting the stage for future studies that address evolutionary and ecological trends. Based on our research, 1 new species is described, 1 new generic synonym and 12 new species synonyms are proposed, 11 new lectotypes and 1 new neotype are designated, many new or revised nomenclatural combinations, and many unavailable names are presented. The following taxonomic changes are made: New generic synonym: The genus Heteropelidnota Ohaus, 1912 is a new junior synonym of Pelidnota MacLeay, 1819. New species synonyms: Plusiotis adelaida pavonacea Casey, 1915 is a syn. n. of Chrysina adelaida (Hope, 1841); Odontognathus gounellei Ohaus, 1908 is a revised synonym of Pelidnota ebenina (Blanchard, 1842); Pelidnota francoisgenieri Moore & Jameson, 2013 is a syn. n. of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota genieri Soula, 2009 is a syn. n. of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota lutea (Olivier, 1758) is a revised synonym of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota (Pelidnota) texensis Casey, 1915 is a revised synonym of