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Sample records for listeriosis complicating pregnancy

  1. Listeriosis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Listeria Infection (Listeriosis) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... is listeriosis? Listeriosis is an infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes bacteria, often called just Listeria. Listeriosis is ...

  2. Listeriosis in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Colleen; Berkowitz, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the knowledge, counseling practices, and learning needs of practitioners in British Columbia regarding risk factors for listeriosis in pregnancy. DESIGN A 1-page, mailed, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire. SETTING British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS A total of 827 practitioners (614 family physicians, 93 midwives, and 120 family practice residents) were sent the questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Awareness of listeriosis, knowledge of the risk factors for listeriosis, practices for counseling pregnant women, practitioners’ learning needs, and provider and practice characteristics. RESULTS A total of 340 practitioners (41%) completed the questionnaire. While most (88%) physicians and midwives had heard of listeriosis, few (18%) were aware that infection was more common during pregnancy. One-third (33%) of practitioners counseled pregnant women about the risk factors for listeriosis. The main reasons for not providing such counseling were lack of knowledge and the perception that listeriosis was rare and not an important concern for pregnant women. Rates of counseling were highest among midwives (84%) and lowest among physicians practising outside the Lower Mainland of British Columbia (12%). Of those practitioners providing prenatal care, 47% counseled pregnant women about the risks of unpasteurized milk and 41% counseled women about the risks of consuming soft cheese; few counseled about the risks of consuming deli meat or raw hot dogs (25%), unwashed fruit and vegetables (12%), or refrigerated smoked seafood (6%). CONCLUSION Most prenatal care providers in British Columbia are unaware of the risk factors for listeriosis or its propensity for pregnant women and do not counsel their pregnant patients about these risks. PMID:20393078

  3. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy complications Complications of pregnancy are health problems that ... pregnancy. Expand all | Collapse all Health problems before pregnancy Before pregnancy, make sure to talk to your ...

  4. Listeriosis during Pregnancy: A Public Health Concern

    PubMed Central

    Mateus, Teresa; Silva, Joana; Maia, Rui L.; Teixeira, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Listeria was first described in 1926 by Murray, Webb, and Swann, who discovered it while investigating an epidemic infection among laboratory rabbits and guinea pigs. The role of Listeria monocytogenes as a foodborne pathogen was definitively recognized during the 1980s. This recognition was the consequence of a number of epidemic human outbreaks due to the consumption of contaminated foods, in Canada, in the USA and in Europe. Listeriosis is especially severe in immunocompromised individuals such as pregnant women. The disease has a low incidence of infection, although this is undeniably increasing, with a high fatality rate amongst those infected. In pregnant women listeriosis may cause abortion, fetal death, or neonatal morbidity in the form of septicemia and meningitis. Improved education concerning the disease, its transmission, and prevention measures for immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women has been identified as a pressing need. PMID:24191199

  5. Systemic Bacillus species infection mimicking listeriosis of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Workowski, K A; Flaherty, J P

    1992-03-01

    Bacillus species are increasingly recognized as agents of infection in humans. These organisms are ubiquitous in nature and can cause clinical illness ranging from transient bacteremia to serious systemic infection. We describe a pregnant intravenous drug abuser with fever, constitutional symptoms, and premature labor. Her blood cultures yielded gram-positive bacilli, and her clinical course was consistent with systemic listeriosis of pregnancy. Pathological examination of the placenta revealed acute villitis, and Bacillus species grew from cultures of both placenta and blood. Through biochemical testing the isolate was identified as Bacillus pumilis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of premature labor induced by Bacillus species infection.

  6. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Alaska Native Activities Building Tribal MCH Epidemiologic Capacity Improving Surveillance Systems and Collecting American Indian and ... Selected Recommendations for Contraceptive Use Providing Quality Family Planning Services Training for Providers Unintended Pregnancy Women’s Reproductive ...

  7. Pregnancy Complications: Liver Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Liver disorders Liver disorders Now playing: E-mail to a friend ... have blood on them (razors, toothbrushes). Acute fatty liver of pregnancy What is acute fatty liver of ...

  8. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  9. Pregnancy-related listeriosis in France, 1984 to 2011, with a focus on 606 cases from 1999 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Girard, D; Leclercq, A; Laurent, E; Lecuit, M; de Valk, H; Goulet, V

    2014-09-25

    This study describes trends in the incidence of pregnancy-related listeriosis in France between 1984 and 2011, and presents the major characteristics of 606 cases reported between 1999 and 2011 to the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance through the mandatory notification system. The incidence of pregnancy-related listeriosis decreased by a factor of 12 from 1984 to 2011. This reduction was a result of progressive implementation of specific Listeria monocytogenes control measures in food production. A lower incidence of pregnancy-related listeriosis was observed in regions with a lower prevalence of toxoplasmosis. Given that dietary recommendations in pregnancy target both toxoplasmosis and listeriosis prevention, we suppose that recommendations may have been delivered and followed more frequently in these regions. Cases reported between 1999 and 2011 (n=606) were classified as maternal infections with ongoing pregnancy (n=89, 15%), fetal loss (n=166, 27%), or live-born neonatal listeriosis (n=351, 58%). The majority of live-born neonatal listeriosis cases (n=216, 64%) were preterm births (22–36 weeks of gestation), of whom 14% (n=30) were extremely preterm births (22–27 weeks of gestation). Eighty per cent of mothers reported having eaten high risk food during pregnancy. A better awareness of dietary recommendations in pregnant women is therefore necessary.

  10. Pregnancy complicated with agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Sun, Jiang-Li; Zhang, Zheng-Liang; Pei, Hong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pregnancy is a complicated physiological process. Physiological leukocytosis often takes place and it is primarily related to the increased circulation of neutrophils, especially during the last trimester of pregnancy. Noncongenital agranulocytosis during pregnancy is rare and reported only occasionally, while in most of the cases, the agranulocytosis has already occurred prior to pregnancy or induced by identified factors such as antibiotics, antithyroid agents, or cytotoxic agents. Gestation-induced agranulocytosis has not been reported, so we present a case of gestation-induced agranulocytosis in this article. Patients concern: In this case, we present a Chinese woman (aged 25) in her 38th week of the first gestation who had the complication of agranulocytosis. No abnormality was detected in regular examinations before pregnancy and in the first trimester. Since the last trimester of pregnancy, the patient began to suffer from agranulocytosis and intermittent fever, the maximum being temperature 38.8°C. At admission, the neutrophil granulocytes were 0.17 × 109 L−1 and the bone marrow biopsy showed that agranulocytosis was detected, but the levels of red blood cell and megalokaryocyte were normal. In addition, antinuclear antibodies were detected at a dilution of 1:40, but anti-dsDNA, antiphospholipid antibody, and neutrophil granulocyte antibody were negative. Diagnoses: The patient was empirically treated as having pneumonia. Interventions: We tried to use granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, γ-globulin, glucocorticoids, antibiotics, and antifungi agents to treat the patient, but her symptoms were not alleviated until the patient had a cesarean section. Outcomes: After 24 hours of cesarean section, the temperature and neutrophil granulocyte returned to normal. After a year of follow-up, we found that the patient and the baby were healthy. Lessons: Agranulocytosis during pregnancy seems to be associated with immunosuppression

  11. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-11-30

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  12. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  13. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K

    2015-10-09

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman's physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up.

  14. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  15. Epidemiology and Molecular Typing of Pregnancy-Associated Listeriosis Cases in Lombardy, Italy, over a 10-Year Period (2005–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Filipello, Virginia; Amato, Ettore; Gori, Maria; Huedo, Pol; Ciceri, Giulia; Lomonaco, Sara

    2017-01-01

    In developed countries, pregnancy-related listeriosis accounts for 20–43% of total invasive listeriosis. This work describes the first pregnancy-related listeriosis survey in Italy based on two data sources, that is, mandatory notification system and regional laboratory-based network. Out of 610 listeriosis cases reported over a 10-year period, 40 were pregnancy-related (6.6%). Among these, 29 pregnancy-related isolates were available and have been analysed with serotyping, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, and Multi-Virulence-Locus Sequence Typing. No maternal fatality was recorded, but 11 (29.7%) pregnancies resulted in a foetal death, a miscarriage, or a birth of a foetus dying immediately after birth. The average incidence of pregnancy-related listeriosis was 4.3 cases per 100000 births, and the proportion of pregnancy-associated listeriosis among ethnic minorities was significantly higher compared to the general population (30.0% versus 3.5%, P < 0.01). L. monocytogenes isolates belonged to serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b, with the latter significantly more prevalent among pregnancy-related isolates. Twenty different pulsotypes were distinguished and 16 out of the 29 isolates were classified into seven clusters. A total of 16 virulence types (VTs) were identified. Five VTs accounted for 45% of the total cases and coincided with those of previously described Epidemic Clones (ECs) of L. monocytogenes.

  16. Infections complicating pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reilly, K; Clemenson, N

    1993-09-01

    Common infectious disease problems that occur in pregnancy are outlined, including implications for pregnancy, appropriate diagnostic techniques, treatments, and methods for prevention of disease in mother and infant. Also included is general information about the use of immunizations and antibiotics in pregnancy.

  17. Pregnancy Complications: Preeclampsia

    MedlinePlus

    ... youth volunteer leader Partner Spotlight Become a partner World Prematurity Day What's happening in your area Find ... serious health problem for pregnant women around the world. It affects 2 to 8 percent of pregnancies ...

  18. Pregnancy Complications: HELLP Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and those who urgently need you. GO Stay up-to-date! Get our emails about zika and all other pregnancy concerns. News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our ...

  19. Pregnancy Complications: Chlamydia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and those who urgently need you. GO Stay up-to-date! Get our emails about zika and all other pregnancy concerns. News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our ...

  20. Pregnancy Complications: Gonorrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... and those who urgently need you. GO Stay up-to-date! Get our emails about zika and all other pregnancy concerns. News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our ...

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and those who urgently need you. GO Stay up-to-date! Get our emails about zika and all other pregnancy concerns. News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our ...

  2. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe cases, which are rare, this can cause brain damage and even death. Complications for the mother include: Heavy bleeding after ... severe cases, which are rare, this can cause brain damage and even death. Complications for the mother include: Heavy bleeding after ...

  3. Epidemiology of human listeriosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schuchat, A; Swaminathan, B; Broome, C V

    1991-01-01

    During the 1980s, investigation of several large epidemics of listeriosis confirmed that transmission of L. monocytogenes in food causes human disease. Progress in laboratory detection and subtyping of the organism has enhanced our ability to compare human and environmental isolates of L. monocytogenes. Transmission by foodborne organisms is now recognized as causing both epidemic and sporadic listeriosis. Continued study of dietary risk factors associated with listeriosis is needed in order to develop dietary recommendations for the expanding population at increased risk of disease. Current research application of new molecular methods to the study of L. monocytogenes may improve the ability to diagnose pregnancy-associated disease and permit the rapid detection and control of L. monocytogenes in the food supply. PMID:1906370

  4. Listeria (Listeriosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Learn how CDC’s Listeria Whole Genome Sequencing Project is improving food safety Listeriosis is a ... Prevention People at Risk Outbreaks Surveillance Whole Genome Sequencing Publications Pregnant Women and Listeria Pregnant women are ...

  5. Two Episodes of Listeriosis in Pregnancy and Newborns: Investigation, Problems and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Marozzi, Selene; Tolli, Rita; Bilei, Stefano; Ricci, Daniela; Rossi, Claudia; Bossù, Teresa

    2015-05-28

    In January 2013, 3 strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from one mother and her newborn and a second infant arrived at the Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Latium and Tuscany. At the same time the Local Health Unit Rome B sampled at retail a smoked salmon that was suspected to be involved in the transmission of the disease. The sample was tested for the presence of L. monocytogenes (UNI EN ISO 11290: 2005 part 1 and 2). Laboratory investigations have shown that all 3 strains isolated from patients belonged to serotype 4b of two different clusters (cluster B for the isolates from mother and child and cluster A to that obtained from another baby), so no epidemiological link was demonstrated in the human cases. The tests conducted on smoked salmon have shown the presence of L. monocytogenes serotype 1/2a. Therefore, no correlation has been demonstrated between the reported cases of listeriosis and the food analyzed.

  6. Two Episodes of Listeriosis in Pregnancy and Newborns: Investigation, Problems and Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Tolli, Rita; Bilei, Stefano; Ricci, Daniela; Rossi, Claudia; Bossù, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In January 2013, 3 strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from one mother and her newborn and a second infant arrived at the Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Latium and Tuscany. At the same time the Local Health Unit Rome B sampled at retail a smoked salmon that was suspected to be involved in the transmission of the disease. The sample was tested for the presence of L. monocytogenes (UNI EN ISO 11290: 2005 part 1 and 2). Laboratory investigations have shown that all 3 strains isolated from patients belonged to serotype 4b of two different clusters (cluster B for the isolates from mother and child and cluster A to that obtained from another baby), so no epidemiological link was demonstrated in the human cases. The tests conducted on smoked salmon have shown the presence of L. monocytogenes serotype 1/2a. Therefore, no correlation has been demonstrated between the reported cases of listeriosis and the food analyzed. PMID:27800391

  7. Maternal physiology and complications of multiple pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, Errol R; Edusa, Valentine; Park, Joong Shin

    2005-10-01

    Approximately 1% to 3% of all pregnancies in the United States are multiple gestations. The vast majority (97-98%) are twin pregnancies. Multiple pregnancies constitute significant risk to both mother and fetuses. Antepartum complications-including preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of the membranes, intrauterine growth restriction, intrauterine fetal demise, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia-develop in over 80% of multiple pregnancies as compared with approximately 25% of singleton gestations. This article reviews in detail the maternal physiologic adaptations required to support a multiple pregnancy and the maternal complications that develop when these systems fail or are overwhelmed.

  8. Sigmoid volvulus complicating pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk; Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Ozogul, Bunyami; Kantarci, Mecit; Disci, Esra; Bulut, O Hakan; Aksungur, Nurhak; Atamanalp, Refik Selim

    2015-02-01

    Sigmoid volvulus during pregnancy is a rare complication, and as of 2012, fewer than 100 cases had been reported. In this report, we present a 30 year-old pregnant woman with sigmoid volvulus, and we discuss this rare entity.

  9. Anticoagulant prophylaxis for placenta mediated pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Marc A

    2011-02-01

    Thrombophilias are not yet established as a cause of the placenta-mediated pregnancy complications (pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, small for gestational age and placental abruption). A thrombophilia may be only one of many factors that lead to development of these complications. Our recent large systematic review of prospective cohort studies highlight that the association between thrombophilia and placenta mediated pregnancy complications is far from proven. The small step of previously describing an association in case control studies has led a large number of clinicians and opinion leaders to take the large leap of accepting this relationship as being causal and potentially treatable with anticoagulant interventions. Furthermore, while data in women with prior severe pre-eclpamsia, abruption and small for gestational age births without thrombophilia suggests some promise for anticoagulant prophylaxis to prevent complications in subsequent pregnancies in these women, in the absence of large well done and generalisable "no intervention" controlled studies adopting anticoagulant prophylaxis to prevent these complications is premature. The absence of strong evidence, coupled with the small potential for harm from anticoagulant prophylaxis suggests that these drugs should be considered experimental in thrombophilic and non-thrombophilic women with prior placenta mediated pregnancy complications.

  10. Risk Factors for Sporadic Non-Pregnancy Associated Listeriosis in Germany—Immunocompromised Patients and Frequently Consumed Ready-To-Eat Products

    PubMed Central

    Preußel, Karina; Milde-Busch, Astrid; Schmich, Patrick; Wetzstein, Matthias; Stark, Klaus; Werber, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Non-pregnancy associated (N-PA) listeriosis, caused by Listeria monocytogenes, is a rare but severe disease, and is predominantly food-borne. Most cases appear sporadic and their infection vehicle remains unknown. Incidence has increased since 2008 in Germany. We aimed to identify underlying conditions and foods associated with sporadic N-PA listeriosis in Germany. We performed a nationwide case-control study from March 2012-December 2013. Cases were sporadic N-PA listeriosis patients notified to public health. Control subjects were age (40–65 years, 66–75 years, ≥76 years) frequency-matched persons from a nationwide random telephone sample. A structured questionnaire collected information on underlying diseases, therapies and >60 food items. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analysis, adjusting for host factors identified by causal diagram theory, and calculated population attributable fractions. We enrolled 109 cases and 1982 controls. Cases’ median age was 69 years, 55% were male, 44% received immunosuppressive therapy within 3 months prior to illness onset; a further 28% had at least one immunocompromising disease. In multivariable analysis, immunosuppressive therapy (OR 8.8, 95%CI 4.9–15.6), immunocompromising disease (OR 2.7; 95%CI 1.4–5.2), gastric acid suppression (OR 3.0; 95%CI 1.4–6.3), the consumption of cold cooked sausages (OR 2.6; 95%CI 1.6–4.4), the preferred consumption of packaged cheese (OR 2.1; 95%CI 1.3–3.5) and pre-sliced cheese (OR 2.2; 95%CI 1.3–3.7) were significantly associated with N-PA listeriosis. These foods accounted for 59% of all cases. Typical high risk foods, e.g. cold seafood, certain types of cheeses, tended to be negatively associated with disease. In conclusion, immunosuppressive therapy and frequently consumed ready-to-eat foods are the main risk factors for sporadic N-PA listeriosis in Germany. To reduce their risk, immunocompromised persons should consume the identified foods well before the

  11. Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A; Ahmed, Wamda

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, seizures, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, postpartum angiopathy, cerebral sinus thrombosis, amniotic fluid emboli, choriocarcinoma, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are rare but can be devastating. These conditions can present a challenge to physicians because pregnancy is a unique physiologic state, most therapeutic options available in the intensive care unit were not studied in pregnant patients, and in many situations, physicians need to deliver care to both the mother and the fetus, simultaneously. Timely recognition and management of critical neurologic complications of pregnancy/puerperum can be life saving for both the mother and fetus.

  12. Third-trimester pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Newfield, Emily

    2012-03-01

    Complications arising in the third trimester often challenge the clinician to balance the concern for maternal well-being with the consequences of infant prematurity. The most serious and challenging antepartum issues relate to preterm labor and birth, hypertensive disorders, and bleeding events. This article guides the practitioner through decision-making and management of these problems.

  13. Placental exosomes in normal and complicated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Murray D; Peiris, Hassendrini N; Kobayashi, Miharu; Koh, Yong Q; Duncombe, Gregory; Illanes, Sebastian E; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    While there is considerable contemporary interest in elucidating the role of placenta-derived extracellular vesicles in normal and complicated pregnancies and their utility as biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, progress in the field is hindered by a lack of standardized extracellular vesicle taxonomy and isolation protocols. The term "extracellular vesicle" is nonspecific and refers to all membrane-bound vesicles from nanometer to micrometer diameters and of different biogenic origins. To meaningfully ascribe biological function and/or diagnostic and therapeutic utility to extracellular vesicles, and in particular exosomes, greater specificity and vesicle characterization is required. The current literature relating to exosome biology must be interpreted in this context. Exosomes are a subtype of extracellular vesicle that are specifically defined by an endosomal biogenesis and particle size (40-120 nm) and density (1.13-1.19 g/mL(-1)). Exosomes are specifically package with signaling molecules (including protein, messenger RNA, microRNA, and noncoding RNA) and are released by exocytosis into biofluid compartments. Exosomes regulate the activity of both proximal and distal target cells, including translational activity, angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis. As such, exosomal signaling represents an integral pathway mediating intercellular communication. During pregnancy, the placenta releases exosomes into the maternal circulation from as early as 6 weeks of gestation. Release is regulated by factors that include both oxygen tension and glucose concentration and correlates with placental mass and perfusion. The concentration of placenta-derived exosomes in maternal plasma increases progressively during gestation. Exosomes isolated from maternal plasma are bioactive in vitro and are incorporated into target cells by endocytosis. While the functional significance of placental exosomes in pregnancy remains to be fully elucidated, available

  14. Telomerase activity in pregnancy complications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FRAGKIADAKI, PERSEFONI; TSOUKALAS, DIMITRIOS; FRAGKIADOULAKI, IRINI; PSYCHARAKIS, CHRISTOS; NIKITOVIC, DRAGANA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDES M.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are specific DNA regions positioned at the ends of chromosomes and composed of functional non-coding repeats. Upon cell division, the telomeres decrease in length by a preordained amount. When the telomeres become critically short, cells lose the ability to divide and enter a specific functioning mode designated as 'cellular senescence'. However, human tissues express an enzyme that deters the shrinking of the telomeres, the telomerase. Due to its ability to maintain telomere length, the telomerase slows down and possibly suspends the aging of the cells. In regard to this, solid evidence demonstrates that female human fertility decreases with increased maternal age and that various adverse factors, including alterations in telomerase activity, can contribute to age-associated infertility in women. The fact that telomerase activity is regulated in a time- and location-dependent manner in both embryo and placental tissues, highlights it potential importance to the successful completion of pregnancy. Since maternal age is a crucial determining factor for the success of in vitro and in vivo fertilization, numerous studies have focused on telomerase activity and its correlation with mammalian fertilization, as well as the following cleavage and pre-implantation developmental processes. Associations between telomerase activity and pregnancy complications have been previously observed. Our aim in this review was to summarize and critically discuss evidence correlating telomerase activity with pregnancy complications. PMID:27175856

  15. Vascular complications in the diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leguizamón, Gustavo; Trigubo, Denise; Pereira, Juan Ignacio; Vera, María Fernanda; Fernández, José Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Long-standing hyperglycemia frequently leads to vasculopathy. Microvascular disease is characterized by retinopathy and nephropathy, while macrovascular involvement can affect coronary arteries. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy, when present, is generally associated with retinal and/or renal involvement. Early identification of these diabetic complications allows appropriate counseling and early treatment. Among women with diabetic vasculopathy, nephropathy, chronic hypertension, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and fetal growth restriction are frequently observed. Furthermore, women with impaired renal function in early pregnancy have increased risk of long-term deterioration of glomerular filtration rate. Proliferative retinopathy can progress during pregnancy and 1 year after delivery, but long-term effects are not likely to occur. When coronary artery disease or gastroparesis diabeticorum are present, excessive maternal and fetal morbidity is observed. When modern management is synchronized with early medical care, favorable maternal and perinatal outcomes can be expected.

  16. Listeriosis Prevention Knowledge Among Pregnant Women in the USA

    DOE PAGES

    Ogunmodede, Folashade; Jones, Jeffery L.; Scheftel, Joni; ...

    2005-01-01

    Background: Listeriosis is a food-borne disease often associated with ready-to-eat foods. It usually causes mild febrile gastrointestinal illness in immunocompetent persons. In pregnant women, it may cause more severe infection and often crosses the placenta to infect the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, fetal death or neonatal morbidity. Simple precautions during pregnancy can prevent listeriosis. However, many women are unaware of these precautions and listeriosis education is often omitted from prenatal care. Methods: Volunteer pregnant women were recruited to complete a questionnaire to assess their knowledge of listeriosis and its prevention, in two separate studies. One study was a nationalmore » survey of 403 women from throughout the USA, and the other survey was limited to 286 Minnesota residents. Results: In the multi-state survey, 74 of 403 respondents (18%) had some knowledge of listeriosis, compared with 43 of 286 (15%) respondents to the Minnesota survey. The majority of respondents reported hearing about listeriosis from a medical professional. In the multi-state survey, 33% of respondents knew listeriosis could be prevented by not eating delicatessen meats, compared with 17% in the Minnesota survey ( p = 0.01). Similarly, 31% of respondents to the multi-state survey compared with 19% of Minnesota survey respondents knew listeriosis could be prevented by avoiding unpasteurized dairy products (p = 0.05). As for preventive behaviors, 18% of US and 23% of Minnesota respondents reported avoiding delicatessen meats and ready-to-eat foods during pregnancy, whereas 86% and 88%, respectively, avoided unpasteurized dairy products. Conclusions: Most pregnant women have limited knowledge of listeriosis prevention. Even though most respondents avoided eating unpasteurized dairy products, they were unaware of the risk associated with ready-to-eat foods. Improved education of pregnant women regarding the risk and sources of listeriosis in pregnancy is needed.« less

  17. What Is New in Listeriosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Milian, Almudena; Payeras-Cifre, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Listeriosis is a disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes). L. monocytogenes is bacteria that usually infects some determined inhabitants, especially high risk patients such as the elderly, immunosuppressed patients and pregnant women. However, it can also affect people who do not have these risk factors. L. monocytogenes is widespread in nature being part of the faecal flora of many mammals and it is a common foodborne source. It is acquired by humans primarily through consumption of contaminated food. Besides, between 1% and 10% of the population is a faecal carrier of L.monocytogenes. Listeriosis may occur sporadically or in outbreaks. Infection causes a spectrum of illness, ranging from febrile gastroenteritis to invasive disease, including bacteraemia, sepsis, and meningoencephalitis. This infection has a low incidence, although it is undeniably increasing, particularly due to the rise of population of over 60 years old or of under 60 years olds with a predisposing condition. The diagnosis is complicated because of its incubation period and the different clinical manifestations. Also listeriosis has a high mortality despite adequate and early treatment. The importance of bacteraemia for L. monocytogenes lies in the infrequency of this bacterium and the high mortality, even with appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:24822197

  18. Concurrent conditions and human listeriosis, England, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Mook, Piers; O'Brien, Sarah J; Gillespie, Iain A

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of listeriosis in England and Wales changed during 2001-2008; more patients ≥60 years of age had bacteremia than in previous years. To investigate these changes, we calculated risk for listeriosis by concurrent condition for non-pregnancy-associated listeriosis cases reported to the national surveillance system in England during 1999-2009. Conditions occurring with L. monocytogenes infection were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, and compared with appropriate hospital episode statistics inpatient denominator data to calculate incidence rates/million consultations. Malignancies (especially of the blood), kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, alcoholism, and age ≥60 years were associated with an increased risk for listeriosis. Physicians should consider a diagnosis of listeriosis when treating patients who have concurrent conditions. Providing cancer patients, who accounted for one third of cases, with food safety information might help limit additional cases.

  19. LMWH to prevent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications: an update.

    PubMed

    Duffett, Lisa; Rodger, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Placenta-mediated pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia, placental abruption, intrauterine growth restriction/small for gestational age and recurrent or late pregnancy loss, affect over 5% of pregnancies and can result in significant maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. These complications have been suggested to at least partly arise from placental insufficiency, possibly as a result of inappropriate coagulation activation. This association has led to the hypothesis that anticoagulant therapy, such as low molecular weight heparin, might reduce their occurrence. The following review will attempt to summarize the extensive research that has been performed to date exploring this hypothesis and provide guidance on the current and future role of low molecular weight heparin in women at risk for placenta-mediated pregnancy complications. A case will be made to question the widely adopted practice of prescribing low molecular weight heparin to women with prior placenta-mediated pregnancy complications and suggest possible areas for future research.

  20. Complications in adolescent pregnancy: systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Walter Fernandes; Diniz, Michele Baffi; da Fonseca, Eduardo Sérgio Valério Borges; de Azevedo, Lícia Maria Ricarte; Evangelista, Carla Braz

    2015-01-01

    Sexual activity during adolescence can lead to unwanted pregnancy, which in turn can result in serious maternal and fetal complications. The present study aimed to evaluate the complications related to adolescent pregnancy, through a systematic review using the Medical Subject Headings: “pregnancy complication” AND “adolescent” OR “pregnancy in adolescence”. Only full original articles in English or Portuguese with a clearly described methodology, were included. No qualitative studies, reviews or meta-analyses, editorials, case series, or case reports were included. The sample consisted of 15 articles; in that 10 were cross-sectional and 5 were cohort studies. The overall prevalence of adolescent pregnancy was 10%, and among the Brazilian studies, the adolescent pregnancy rate was 26%. The cesarean delivery rate was lower than that reported in the general population. The main maternal and neonatal complications were hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, prematurity and low birth weight, respectively. Adolescent pregnancy is related to increased frequency of neonatal and maternal complications and lower prevalence of cesarean delivery. PMID:26061075

  1. Pregnancy Vaccination with Gold Glyco-Nanoparticles Carrying Listeria monocytogenes Peptides Protects against Listeriosis and Brain- and Cutaneous-Associated Morbidities

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Terán-Navarro, Héctor; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Ferrández-Fernández, Eva; Freire, Javier; Penadés, Soledad; Marradi, Marco; García, Isabel; Gomez-Román, Javier; Yañez-Díaz, Sonsoles; Álvarez-Domínguez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Listeriosis is a fatal infection for fetuses and newborns with two clinical main morbidities in the neonatal period, meningitis and diffused cutaneous lesions. In this study, we vaccinated pregnant females with two gold glyconanoparticles (GNP) loaded with two peptides, listeriolysin peptide 91–99 (LLO91–99) or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1–22 peptide (GAPDH1–22). Neonates born to vaccinated mothers were free of bacteria and healthy, while non-vaccinated mice presented clear brain affections and cutaneous diminishment of melanocytes. Therefore, these nanoparticle vaccines are effective measures to offer pregnant mothers at high risk of listeriosis interesting therapies that cross the placenta. PMID:28335280

  2. Critical pneumonia complicating early-stage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mercieri, Marco; Di Rosa, Roberta; Pantosti, Annalisa; De Blasi, Roberto Alberto; Pinto, Giovanni; Arcioni, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia, Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive, in a woman at 14 weeks of pregnancy. To our knowledge, this is the first case reporting this critical lung infection occurring during an early phase of pregnancy. This case study alerts physicians to the increasing worldwide spread of these uncommon yet virulent and potentially lethal infections. In our patient, antibiotic therapy with linezolid plus rifampin started at 14 weeks of pregnancy had a successful outcome without inducing toxicity or teratogenesis in the fetus.

  3. An update on thrombophilia and placenta mediated pregnancy complications: what should we tell our patients?

    PubMed

    Rodger, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The placenta mediated pregnancy complications, including pre-eclampsia, birth of a small for gestational age child, placental abruption or late pregnancy loss, are common and often devastating pregnancy complications leading to important maternal/fetal/neonatal morbidity and mortality. In this narrative review I examine two common questions related to women with prior placenta mediated pregnancy complications. Do thrombophilias cause placenta mediated pregnancy complications? Does low molecular weight heparin prevent recurrent placenta mediated pregnancy complications?

  4. Intestinal dysbiosis: an emerging cause of pregnancy complications?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxin; Huang, Yinping; Ye, Duyun

    2015-03-01

    The gut microbiota is intimately involved in numerous aspects of normal human physiology, including nutrition and metabolism, immunomodulation and behavior and stress response. Intestinal dysbiosis can be a contributing cause of many diseases, altering the function of both near and far organ systems. During pregnancy, the maternal body undergoes dramatic physiological changes to support the growth of fetus-placenta, while intestinal dysbiosis may directly or indirectly disturb the remodeling of physiological balance, leading to maternal maladaptation. Thus, intestinal dysbiosis, i.e., altered composition or metabolism of microbiota may adversely affect pregnancy outcome and lead to pregnancy complications via disrupting maternal adaptation. Indeed, pregnant women with potential maladaptations are at high risk of developing pregnancy disorders, which is increasingly observed in clinical cases. Here we discuss the hypothesis that intestinal dysbiosis may induce pregnancy complications via affecting maternal adaptation and the possible mechanistic pathways.

  5. Environmental pollutants in relation to complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Tabacova, S; Balabaeva, L

    1993-01-01

    Certain complications of pregnancy, e.g., threatened spontaneous abortion, toxemia, emesis, and anemia, were studied in pregnant women living in industrial areas contaminated by smelters and the petrochemical industry. Exposure to lead or aromatic hydrocarbons was assessed in parallel by the determination of these agents or their metabolites in blood and urine. Comparison of respective exposure levels was made between women with normal pregnancies and those with complications. Significantly higher levels of lead in blood and increased excretion of the metabolic products of organic solvents were found in women with complicated pregnancies compared to those with normal pregnancies. Threatened spontaneous abortion, toxemia, and anemia were associated with higher lead exposure in the vicinity of smelters. In these patients, evidence of disturbances of blood glutathione equilibrium and increased lipid peroxidation were found indicating a decreased ability to compensate for the effects of exposure. Styrene exposure in a petrochemical industrial area was associated mainly with late toxemia and nephropathy. Patients with these complications also had a tendency to elevated exposure to other aromatic hydrocarbons. It is suggested that complications of pregnancy may be induced by environmental agents at levels lower than those that result in pregnancy loss or preterm birth. PMID:8243397

  6. Canadian listeriosis reference service.

    PubMed

    Pagotto, Franco; Ng, Lai-King; Clark, Clifford; Farber, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a psychrotrophic organism capable of growing at refrigeration temperatures, is of major concern in extended shelf life, refrigerated foods. Considering that as much as 80-90% of human listeriosis cases are linked to the ingestion of contaminated food, human cases are predominantly seen in high-risk individuals, including organ-transplant recipients, patients with AIDS and HIV-infected individuals, pregnant women, cancer patients, and the elderly. In 2001, the Canadian Listeriosis Reference Service (LRS) was created by the Bureau of Microbial Hazards (Health Canada) and the National Microbiology Laboratory (now part of the Public Health Agency of Canada). Major goals of the LRS include investigation of listeriosis cases and maintenance of a national collection of isolates. The LRS intends to create a comprehensive molecular epidemiological database of all isolates in Canada for use as a resource for outbreak investigations, research and other microbiological investigations. The PFGE profiles are being established and stored for clinical, food, environmental, and possibly animal strains of L. monocytogenes. The LRS pursues research activities for investigation and implementation of other molecular methods for characterizing L. monocytogenes isolates. Ribotyping, Multi-locus Sequence Typing (MLST), Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR), Multi-locus virulence sequence typing (MLVA), microarray- based technologies and sequence-based typing schemes, are being investigated on selected diversity sets. The LRS has also used PFGE typing for outbreak investigations. The molecular epidemiological data, timely coordination and exchange of information should help to reduce the incidence of listeriosis in Canada. In Canada, listeriosis is not a national notifiable disease, except for the province of Quebec, where it has been since 1999. The LRS, Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network, and federal epidemiologists are currently working on making human

  7. Pregnancy Complications: Cervical Insufficiency and Short Cervix

    MedlinePlus

    ... and those who urgently need you. GO Stay up-to-date! Get our emails about zika and all other pregnancy concerns. News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our ...

  8. Pregnancy Complications: Placental Accreta, Increta and Percreta

    MedlinePlus

    ... and those who urgently need you. GO Stay up-to-date! Get our emails about zika and all other pregnancy concerns. News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our ...

  9. Maternal and fetal complications of the hypothyroidism-related pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Tudosa, Rodica; Vartej, P; Horhoianu, Irina; Ghica, C.; Mateescu, Stela; Dumitrache, I

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thyroid pathology worsens during pregnancy. Hypothyroidism can be pre-existent or may begin during pregnancy period. Most of the patients who presented hypothyroidism during pregnancy have a history of thyroid disease for which they have undergone treatment (medical, surgical or radioisotopes). Hypothyroidism is difficult to be diagnosed during pregnancy as the signs can belong to pregnancy itself. Changes in thyroid function have a major negative impact on both mother and fetus. Complications that arise depend on the severity of hypothyroidism, on how appropriately and early the treatment will be initiated, on other obstetrical and extragenital pathologies associated with the present pregnancy. Clinical symptoms are polymorphic, often nonspecific, and are related mainly to the time of occurrence and to the severity of thyroid hormone deficiency. The appropriate, early administered treatment and maintenance of a normal level of thyroid hormones minimize the risk of maternal and fetal complications and make it possible that the pregnancy may be carried to term without severe complications. PMID:21977134

  10. Pregnancy complicated by psittacosis acquired from sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Beer, R J; Bradford, W P; Hart, R J

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of chlamydial infection in pregnant women are described, the first serologically proved and the second suspected. In both cases the infection was probably contracted from sheep suffering with enzootic abortion. Both patients were farmers' wives who had helped their husbands and lambing and developed a non-specific febrile illness in late pregnancy. In the first case as there was no clinical improvement after 26 hours the patient was delivered by caesarean section of a live infant in good condition; the patient recovered fully. The second patient had presented a year earlier, the fetus had died in the uterus, and the patient himself died after spontaneous labour and forceps delivery 14 hours after admission. Both patients developed disseminated intravascular coagulation. As the casual agent in enzootic abortion in ewes has a predilection for the placenta, early delivery may be the management of choice in late pregnancy if infection with this organism if suspected. PMID:6803874

  11. Inter-Pregnancy Weight Change and the Risk of Recurrent Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Jacqueline M.; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Campbell, Doris M.; Horgan, Graham W.

    2016-01-01

    Women with specific adverse pregnancy outcomes in their first pregnancy may be receptive to inter-pregnancy weight management guidance aimed at preventing these complications reoccurring in subsequent pregnancies. Thus the association between inter-pregnancy weight change and the risk of recurrent pregnancy complications at the second pregnancy was investigated in a retrospective cohort study of 24,520 women with their first-ever and second consecutive deliveries in Aberdeen using logistic regression. Compared with women who were weight stable, weight loss (>2BMI units) between pregnancies was associated with an increased risk of recurrent small for gestational age (SGA) birth and elective Cesarean-section, and was protective against recurrent pre-eclampsia, placental oversize and large for gestational age (LGA) birth. Conversely weight gain (>2BMI units) between pregnancies increased the risk of recurrent gestational hypertension, placental oversize and LGA birth and was protective against recurrent low placental weight and SGA birth. The relationships between weight gain, and placental and birth weight extremes were evident only in women with a healthy weight at first pregnancy (BMI<25units), while that between weight gain and the increased risk of recurrent gestational hypertension was largely independent of first pregnancy BMI. No relationship was detected between inter-pregnancy weight change and the risk of recurrent spontaneous preterm delivery, labour induction, instrumental delivery, emergency Cesarean-section or postpartum hemorrhage. Therefor inter-pregnancy weight change impacts the risk of recurrent hypertensive disorders, SGA and LGA birth and women with a prior history of these specific conditions may benefit from targeted nutritional advice to either lose or gain weight after their first pregnancy. PMID:27145132

  12. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  13. Erythema infectiosum and pregnancy-related complications.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, M; Read, S E

    1990-01-01

    Erythema infectiosum, an acute, communicable viral disease with a highly distinctive exanthem, follows the usual course of a self-limiting benign disease. In pregnant women, however, it may be associated with fetal death and nonimmune hydrops fetalis. Because of the association of human parvovirus (HPV) B19 infection with fetal damage we reviewed the current knowledge of the clinical aspects of erythema infectiosum, focusing on pregnancy and fetal outcome, to determine the magnitude of fetal risk and offer recommendations for management. Among 180 infected pregnant women 44 fetal deaths (24%) occurred, 1 to 12 weeks after the infection was noted. Pregnant women should be advised that (a) because of the high prevalence (up to 65%) of anti-HPV B19 IgG antibody among adults most of them are not at risk and (b) if maternal infection does occur therapeutic abortion is not indicated since intrauterine infection causes fetal death more often than abnormal development. Infection should be suspected in pregnant women who exhibit the symptoms of erythema infectiosum with or without arthropathy. They should be monitored for an elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein level (indicating fetal aplastic crisis) and undergo serial ultrasonography for the detection of hydrops fetalis. Although the incidence of congenital malformation is no higher than the expected rate in the general population (3% to 5%), the precise incidence of fetal adverse outcomes remains unknown and requires investigation in larger, prospective studies. PMID:2171743

  14. The effect of physiological urine dilution on pregnancy test results in complicated early pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Ikomi, A; Matthews, M; Kuan, A M; Henson, G

    1998-04-01

    This study addresses the likelihood of false negative urine pregnancy test results, due to physiological urine dilution as described in some anecdotal reports. In this prospective study 320 pregnancy tests were performed on urine samples of varying concentrations obtained from 40 women, with suspected complications of early pregnancy, who had presented for ultrasound scans. Four different pregnancy tests were used and serum betahCG levels were measured quantitatively. Despite a mean fivefold increase in urine dilution, the pregnancy tests with low betahCG detection limits maintained maximal sensitivity. The detection of betahCG in dilute urine was adversely affected by using pregnancy tests with higher betahCG detection limits and these tests should be used with caution when assessing gynaecological emergencies.

  15. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  16. Paternal influences on pregnancy complications and birth outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Cleghorn de Rohrmoser, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of selected characteristics of the paternal work environment and occupational history to the incidence of complications in pregnancy, complications in labor and anomalies in birth outcomes. The literature suggested that male exposure to teratogenic hazards in the form of radiation and chemical compounds, primarily in the form of solvents, has been implicated in reproductive disorders and malformed offspring in animals. Similarly, some recent research suggests that the exposure of male workers to such hazards on their job may have consequences for their spouses and children. Based on these experimental research studies and analyses of persons working in high risk occupations, a broader study of the potential contribution of paternal work environment variables to the success of pregnancy and birth outcomes seemed warranted. Based upon the literature review, a model was proposed for predicting complications in pregnancy, complications in labor and birth outcome (normal birth, low birth weight, congenital malformations and fetal death). From the 1980 National Natality Survey and the 1980 National Fetal Mortality Survey, four sub-samples of married couples, with both husband and wife employed, were selected on the basis of one of the four birth outcomes. The model called for controlling a range of maternal intrinsic and extrinsic health and behavioral variables known to be related to birth outcomes. Multiple logistic regression procedures were used to analyze the effects of father's exposure to radiation and solvents on the job, to complications in pregnancy and labor, and to birth outcome, while controlling for maternal variables. The results indicated that none of the paternal variables were predictors of complications in labor. Further, there was no clear pattern of results, though father's degree of exposure to solvents, and exposures to radiation did reach significance in some analyses.

  17. Pregnancy Complicated by Portal Hypertension Secondary to Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, O. E.; Crosby, D.; Byrne, B.; Regan, C.

    2013-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare idiopathic neonatal cholestatic disease characterized by the destruction of both the intra- and extrahepatic biliary ducts. As the disease is progressive all cases will develop portal fibrosis, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension with the sequelae of varices, jaundice, and eventually liver failure requiring a transplant. Survival rates have improved considerably with many females living well in to be childbearing age. Due to the complexity of the disease these pregnancies are considered, high risk. We report the antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum managements of a pregnancy complicated by biliary atresia. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach in optimizing obstetric care for this high risk group. PMID:24459595

  18. A complicated multisystem flare of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Webster, Philip; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Lightstone, Liz

    2017-02-08

    We report a case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a young woman who became pregnant amid a severe flare. She continued to have active disease in the face of aggressive treatments complicated by several side effects of immunosuppressive drugs including recurrent sepsis and gestational diabetes. Her fetus was at risk for congenital heart block during the second and third trimesters. Despite an extremely guarded prognosis, she delivered a healthy baby girl. This case highlights the complexities of SLE management during pregnancy. We discuss the therapeutic options available in pregnancy, and highlight the importance of cross-specialty multidisciplinary care in these women.

  19. Pregnancy termination: techniques, risks, and complications and their management.

    PubMed

    Castadot, R G

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the current modalities of pregnancy termination, as well as their risks and complications, in 3 phases of pregnancy: 1) up to 49 days past the last menstrual period, 2) 8-15 weeks, and 3) 16-24 weeks. Before 8 weeks of pregnancy, suction dilatation and curettage (D and C) is the preferred method. However, a medical approach, possibly self-administered, is viewed as more satisfactory and requires only an improvement in side effects. From 8-15 weeks' gestation, suction D and C and dilatation and evacuation (D and E) are the methods of choice. The use of laminaria tents improves both the facility and safety of these procedures in nulliparous patients and perhaps in multiparous patients. Priming of the cervix with prostaglandin could further decrease the difficulty and risks of these procedures. The use of a hydrogel compound is especially worthy of consideration. There is controversy about the preferred method between 16-20 weeks' gestation. D and E appears to have fewer complications and to be more cost-effective than hypertonic saline injection. Urea-prostaglandin has fewer and less severe complications than saline injection, and seems to be more cost-effective than saline injection in terms of duration of hospitalization. The high frequency of failure and side effects, combined with the possibility of expulsion of a live fetus, make prostaglandin-only injection less desirable. After 20 weeks' gestation, urea-prostaglandin injection is probably the safer method. Given the rapid increase in complications with passing weeks, any delay in providing late abortion services should be avoided. 2nd trimester pregnancy terminations, especially those after 18 weeks' gestation, are associated with increased mortality and morbidity and should be performed at specialized centers where providers are better equipped to manage complications.

  20. Amniotic fluid secretory immunoglobulin A in normal pregnancy and in pregnancy complicated by rhesus isoimmunization.

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Straube, W; Brock, J; Stark, K H; Lorenz, U

    1982-01-01

    Amniotic fluid levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) were measured by simple radial immunodiffusion according to the method of Mancini using a monospecific antiserum against the human secretory component. We examined 256 samples from healthy pregnant women and 149 samples from mothers suffering from rhesus isoimmunization. During normal pregnancy amniotic fluid S-IgA increased significantly and showed a loose correlation with the phospholipid levels. This was not observed in pregnancies complicated by rhesus isoimmunization.

  1. Coagulation and Fibrinolytic System Protein Profiles in Women with Normal Pregnancies and Pregnancies Complicated by Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Sarah A.; Sobel, Burton; Benvenuto, Anna; Schonberg, Adrienne; Badger, Gary J.; Bernstein, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The current study longitudinally evaluated concentrations of fibrinogen (Fib), D-Dimer, plasminogen activator type-1 (PAI-1) and tissue type plasminogen activator (T-Pa) before pregnancy and in the first and third trimesters of pregnancy with a focus on the pregnancy transition. Study design Twenty healthy, nonsmoking, nulliparous women, aged 29.8 ± 3.0 years, BMI 23.3 ± 3.2 kg/m2 were studied during menstrual cycle day 8 ± 4 and again in early (11 – 15 wks) and late (31 – 34 wks) pregnancy. Seventeen women had singleton conceptions and delivered at term with uncomplicated pregnancies (CTL) and three women developed complicated hypertension (CH) during pregnancy after the third trimester (late pregnancy) evaluation. Data are means ± SEM, Significance was based on p < 0.05. Results Fib was the only protein evaluated that increased in early pregnancy relative to the prepregnancy assessment. D-dimer, PAI-1 and T-Pa increased in the third trimester compared with prepregnant and early pregnant values (p < .001). T-PA was significantly higher during late pregnancy in CH subjects compared with CTL (8.1 ± 0.7 ng/ml vs. 5.0 ± 0.2 ng/ml, p = .02). There were no other differences between groups. Conclusions Increases in fibrinogen are evident in early pregnancy whereas fibrinolysis, perhaps in response to the procoagulant environment of pregnancy, is increased during late pregnancy. Before development of clinically overt hypertension, T-Pa is increased without concomitant changes in other proteins assessed. This is consistent with altered endothelial function with preeclampsia that may contribute to, or reflect, the vasculopathy accompanying this disorder. PMID:22712057

  2. Coagulation and Fibrinolytic System Protein Profiles in Women with Normal Pregnancies and Pregnancies Complicated by Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hale, Sarah A; Sobel, Burton; Benvenuto, Anna; Schonberg, Adrienne; Badger, Gary J; Bernstein, Ira M

    2012-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study longitudinally evaluated concentrations of fibrinogen (Fib), D-Dimer, plasminogen activator type-1 (PAI-1) and tissue type plasminogen activator (T-Pa) before pregnancy and in the first and third trimesters of pregnancy with a focus on the pregnancy transition. STUDY DESIGN: Twenty healthy, nonsmoking, nulliparous women, aged 29.8 ± 3.0 years, BMI 23.3 ± 3.2 kg/m(2) were studied during menstrual cycle day 8 ± 4 and again in early (11 - 15 wks) and late (31 - 34 wks) pregnancy. Seventeen women had singleton conceptions and delivered at term with uncomplicated pregnancies (CTL) and three women developed complicated hypertension (CH) during pregnancy after the third trimester (late pregnancy) evaluation. Data are means ± SEM, Significance was based on p < 0.05. RESULTS: Fib was the only protein evaluated that increased in early pregnancy relative to the prepregnancy assessment. D-dimer, PAI-1 and T-Pa increased in the third trimester compared with prepregnant and early pregnant values (p < .001). T-PA was significantly higher during late pregnancy in CH subjects compared with CTL (8.1 ± 0.7 ng/ml vs. 5.0 ± 0.2 ng/ml, p = .02). There were no other differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Increases in fibrinogen are evident in early pregnancy whereas fibrinolysis, perhaps in response to the procoagulant environment of pregnancy, is increased during late pregnancy. Before development of clinically overt hypertension, T-Pa is increased without concomitant changes in other proteins assessed. This is consistent with altered endothelial function with preeclampsia that may contribute to, or reflect, the vasculopathy accompanying this disorder.

  3. Pregnancy Complicated by Gorham–Stout Disease and Refractory Chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Hellyer, Jessica; Oliver-Allen, Hunter; Shafiq, Majid; Tolani, Alisha; Druzin, Maurice; Jeng, Michael; Rockson, Stanley; Lowsky, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gorham–Stout Disease (GSD) is a rare disorder of bony destruction due to lymphangiomatosis, and is often triggered by hormones. One complication of GSD is the development of chylothorax, which carries a high mortality rate. Very little experience has been published to guide management in GSD during pregnancy to optimize both fetal and maternal health. Case Study A 20-year-old woman with known GSD presented with shortness of breath at 18 weeks of pregnancy, due to bilateral chylothoraces which required daily drainage. To minimize chylous fluid formation, she was placed on bowel rest with total parenteral nutrition (limiting lipid intake) and received octreotide to decrease splanchnic blood flow and chylous fluid drainage. Treatment options were limited due to her pregnancy. Twice daily home chest tube drainage of a single lung cavity, total parenteral nutrition, octreotide, and albumin infusions allowed successful delivery of a healthy 37 weeks' gestation infant by cesarean delivery. Discussion This case illustrates the management of a rare clinical disease of bone resorption and lymphangiomatosis complicated by bilateral, refractory chylothoraces, triggered by pregnancy, in whom treatment options are limited, and the need for a multidisciplinary health care team to ensure successful maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:27708981

  4. Pregnancy complications in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Carolien M; Fauser, Bart C J M; Macklon, Nick S

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. There is an increasing body of evidence indicating that PCOS may have significant implications for pregnancy outcomes and long-term health of a woman and her offspring. Whether or not PCOS itself or the symptoms that coincide with PCOS, like obesity and fertility treatment, are responsible for these increased risks is a continuing matter of debate. Miscarriage rates among women with PCOS are believed to be increased compared with normal fertile women, although supporting evidence is limited. Pregnant women with PCOS experience a higher incidence of perinatal morbidity from gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and preeclampsia. Their babies are at an increased risk of neonatal complications, such as preterm birth and admission at a neonatal intensive care unit. Pre-pregnancy, antenatal, and intrapartum care should be aimed at reducing these risks. The use of insulin sensitizing drugs to decrease hyperinsulinemic insulin resistance has been proposed during pregnancy to reduce the risk of developing preeclampsia or gestational diabetes. Although metformin appears to be safe, there are too few data from prospective, randomized controlled trials to support treatment during pregnancy.

  5. [Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnancy: experience of Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Larraín de la C, Demetrio; Abarzúa C, Fernando; Jourdan H, Francisca de; Merino O, Paulina; Belmar J, Cristián; García C, Patricia

    2008-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen often foodborne and found elsewhere. It is an uncommon cause of illness in the general population. However, it is an important cause of severe infection in neonates, pregnant women, elderly and immunosuppressed patients. Listeriosis has unique preference for pregnant women. Maternal listeriosis is a diagnostic challenge, and intrauterine infection can lead to severe complications such as amnionitis, preterm labor, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and neonatal sepsis. From 2001 to 2005, 16 patients with L. monocytogenes were identified in this hospital; four (25%) were pregnant women. Clinical and laboratory findings are described. There were 3 preterm deliveries and 1 spontaneous second trimester abortion. Three women with listeriosis had no predisposing factors other than pregnancy. One patient was on immunosupressive drugs for ulcerative colitis. Fever was the most common symptom. Infected neonates were most commonly diagnosed with early-onset listeriosis (two cases) or fetal demise (one case). Pregnancy can be the only risk factor for listeriosis. Listeriosis should be considered during the evaluation of febrile syndrome in pregnancy as this condition can be the only risk factor. Blood and amniotic fluid cultures are useful diagnostic tests. Perinatal complications remains high.

  6. Tretinoin in pregnancy complicated with acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Leong, K W; Teh, A; Bosco, J J

    2000-06-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in pregnancy poses serious danger to both the mother and fetus. Cytotoxic chemotherapy may cause teratogenicity to the fetus. APL is unique because it is usually associated with a coagulopathy that markedly increases the risk for the mother and fetus. A 21 year old lady with APL in her third trimester of pregnancy was treated with oral tretinoin. Tretinoin reversed the coagulopathy and normalised her blood counts without causing cytotoxic damage associated with cancer chemotherapy. Fetal distress occurred at 37 weeks of gestation and an emergency caesarean section was performed without complications and no blood transfusion support was needed as her coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia had resolved. A remission was achieved with only tretinoin induction. She subsequently had consolidation and maintenance chemotherapy. The mother and baby remain well at 4 years from completion of chemotherapy. A total of 10 pregnancies associated with APL have been reported in the current literature. Premature delivery and a fetal arrhythmia were the only complications. Although retinoin is considered teratogenic, its use so far in second and third trimester has been safe.

  7. Fetal Outcomes in Pregnancies Complicated by Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy in a Northern California Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rook, Michelle; Vargas, Juan; Caughey, Aaron; Bacchetti, Peter; Rosenthal, Philip; Bull, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) has important fetal implications. There is increased risk for poor fetal outcomes, including preterm delivery, meconium staining of amniotic fluid, respiratory distress, fetal distress and demise. Methods One hundred and one women diagnosed with ICP between January 2005 and March 2009 at San Francisco General Hospital were included in this study. Single predictor logistic regression models were used to assess the associations of maternal clinical and biochemical predictors with fetal complications. Clinical predictors analyzed included age, race/ethnicity, gravidity, parity, history of liver or biliary disease, history of ICP in previous pregnancies, and induction. Biochemical predictors analyzed included serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, albumin, total protein, and total bile acids (TBA). Results The prevalence of ICP was 1.9%. Most were Latina (90%). Labor was induced in the majority (87%) and most were delivered by normal spontaneous vaginal delivery (84%). Fetal complications occurred in 33% of the deliveries, with respiratory distress accounting for the majority of complications. There were no statistically significant clinical or biochemical predictors associated with an increased risk of fetal complications. Elevated TBA had little association with fetal complications until reaching greater than 100 µmoL/L, with 3 out of 5 having reported complications. ICP in previous pregnancies was associated with decreased risk of fetal complications (OR 0.21, p = 0.046). There were no cases of late term fetal demise. Conclusions Maternal clinical and laboratory features, including elevated TBA, did not appear to be substantial predictors of fetal complications in ICP. PMID:22403605

  8. Fertility disorders and pregnancy complications in hairdressers - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hairdressers often come into contact with various chemical substances which can be found in hair care products for washing, dyeing, bleaching, styling, spraying and perming. This exposure can impair health and may be present as skin and respiratory diseases. Effects on reproduction have long been discussed in the literature. Method A systematic review has been prepared in which publications from 1990 to 2010 were considered in order to specifically investigate the effects on fertility and pregnancy. The results of the studies were summarised separately in accordance with the type of study and the examined events. Results A total of 2 reviews and 26 original studies on fertility disorders and pregnancy complications in hairdressers were found in the relevant databases, as well as through hand searches of reference lists. Nineteen different outcomes concerning fertility and pregnancy are analysed in the 26 original studies. Most studies looked into malformation (n = 7), particularly orofacial cleft. Two of them found statistically significant increased risks compared to five that did not. Small for gestational age (SGA), low birth weight (LBW) and spontaneous abortions were frequently investigated but found different results. Taken together the studies are inconsistent, so that no clear statements on an association between the exposure as a hairdresser and the effect on reproduction are possible. The different authors describe increased risks of infertility, congenital malformations, SGA, LBW, cancer in childhood, as well as effects from single substances. Conclusion On the basis of the identified epidemiological studies, fertility disorders and pregnancy complications in hairdressers cannot be excluded. Although the evidence for these risks is low, further studies on reproductive risks in hairdressers should be performed as there is a high public health interest. PMID:20723211

  9. Uterine disorders and pregnancy complications: insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunjung Jade; Wang, Haibin

    2010-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of human uterine physiology and pathology has been extrapolated from the study of diverse animal models, as there is no ideal system for studying human uterine biology in vitro. Although it remains debatable whether mouse models are the most suitable system for investigating human uterine function(s), gene-manipulated mice are considered by many the most useful tool for mechanistic analysis, and numerous studies have identified many similarities in female reproduction between the two species. This Review brings together information from studies using animal models, in particular mouse models, that shed light on normal and pathologic aspects of uterine biology and pregnancy complications. PMID:20364098

  10. Subhuman Primate Pregnancy Complicated by Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, Daniel H.; Chez, Ronald A.; Hutchinson, Donald L.

    1972-01-01

    streptozotocin-treated pregnancies. These data provide evidence that maternal glucose intolerance during pregnancy is associated with enhanced fetal and neonatal pancreatic islet cell responsiveness to glucose and mixed amino acids. Although the specific mechanism(s) that alters both the sensitivity and responsiveness of the normal pancreatic fetal islet to insulinogenic stimuli remains unclear, the data do indicate that insulin-dependent maternal hyperglycemia and hyperaminoacidemia, separately or in combination could contribute to the fetal hyperinsulinemia of pregnancies complicated by diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the overall experiences with these streptozotocin-treated animals suggest that a subhuman primate model may be available to examine directly the antenatal pathophysiology of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:4259254

  11. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause pregnancy complications in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Mimura, Kazuya; Morishita, Yuki; Nozaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Ogura, Toshinobu; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Aoshima, Hisae; Shishido, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Yuichi; Mayumi, Tadanori; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Itoh, Norio; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Yanagihara, Itaru; Saito, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2011-05-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials has raised concerns about their potential risks to human health. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles can cross the placenta barrier in pregnant mice and cause neurotoxicity in their offspring, but a more detailed understanding of the effects of nanoparticles on pregnant animals remains elusive. Here, we show that silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm and 35 nm, respectively, can cause pregnancy complications when injected intravenously into pregnant mice. The silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were found in the placenta, fetal liver and fetal brain. Mice treated with these nanoparticles had smaller uteri and smaller fetuses than untreated controls. Fullerene molecules and larger (300 and 1,000 nm) silica particles did not induce these complications. These detrimental effects are linked to structural and functional abnormalities in the placenta on the maternal side, and are abolished when the surfaces of the silica nanoparticles are modified with carboxyl and amine groups.

  12. Management of listeriosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hof, H; Nichterlein, T; Kretschmar, M

    1997-01-01

    Determination of the MIC in vitro is often used as the basis for predicting the clinical efficacy of antibiotics. Listeriae are uniformly susceptible in vitro to most common antibiotics except cephalosporins and fosfomycin. However, the clinical outcome is poor. This is partially because listeriae are refractory to the bactericidal mechanisms of many antibiotics, especially to ampicillin-amoxicillin, which still is regarded as the drug of choice. A true synergism can be achieved by adding gentamicin. Another point is that listeriae are able to reside and multiply within host cells, e.g., macrophages, hepatocytes, and neurons, where they are protected from antibiotics in the extracellular fluid. Only a few agents penetrate, accumulate, and reach the cytosol of host cells, where the listeriae are found. Furthermore, certain host cells may exclude antibiotics from any intracellular compartment. Thus, determination of the antibacterial efficacy of a drug against listeriae in cell cultures may be a better approximation of potential therapeutic value. Certain host cells may have acquired the property of excluding certain antibiotics, for example macrolides, from intracellular spaces, which might explain therapeutic failures of antibiotic therapy in spite of low MICs. Animal models do not completely imitate human listeriosis, which is characterized by meningitis, encephalitis, soft tissue and parenchymal infections, and bacteremia. Meningitis produced in rabbits is a hyperacute disease, whereby most listeriae lie extracellularly, fairly accessible to antibiotics that can cross the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In the murine model of systemic infection, Listeria monocytogenes is located mainly within macrophages and parenchymal cells of the spleen and liver, hardly accessible to certain drugs, such as ampicillin and gentimicin. The therapeutic efficacy of drugs clearly depends on the model used. Thus, for example, the combination of ampicillin with gentamicin acts

  13. Outbreak of Nosocomial Listeriosis — Texas, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Invasive listeriosis is a potentially fatal foodborne disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes. In February 2010, a listeriosis cluster was identified in Texas. We investigated to confirm the outbreak, identify the source, and prevent additional infections. Methods: All clinical isol...

  14. Hydrogen inhibits cytotrophoblast cells apoptosis in hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Guan, Z; Li, H; Yang, X

    2016-05-30

    Hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy (HDCP) is one of the most serious medical disorders during pregnancy. Hydrogen is a therapeutic antioxidant and used to treat HDCP effectively. However, the molecular mechanism about the effect of hydrogen on HDCP still remains unclear. In this study, we found ROS content in HDCP group was significantly higher than that in the control and was reduced markedly in the presence of 100μmol/L hydrogen. IL6, Caspase3, Bax1, P-JAK2, P-Stat3 and P-p38 expression was much higher than the control, and was notably decreasedby the application of 100μmol/L hydrogen. Bcl2 expression in HDCP group was notably lower than the control and was increased by 100 μmol/L hydrogen. The apoptosis rate of cytotrophoblast cells was decreased, andratio of cytotrophoblast cells at G1 and G2 phase was increased and decreased by hydrogen, respectively. All those data indicated a potential molecular mechanism of hydrogen-mediated treatment in HDCP.

  15. Novel nanoparticle vaccines for Listeriosis

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Marradi, Marco; Garcia, Isabel; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nanomedicine has transformed many areas of traditional medicine, and enabled fresh insights into the prevention of previously difficult to treat diseases. An example of the transformative power of nanomedicine is a recent nano-vaccine against listeriosis, a serious bacterial infection affecting not only pregnant women and their neonates, but also immune-compromised patients with neoplastic or chronic autoimmune diseases. There is a major unmet need for an effective and safe vaccine against listeriosis, with the challenge that an effective vaccine needs to generate protective T cell immunity, a hitherto difficult to achieve objective. Now utilizing a gold nanoparticle antigen delivery approach together with a novel polysaccharide nanoparticulate adjuvant, an effective T-cell vaccine has been developed that provides robust protection in animal models of listeriosis, raising the hope that one day this nanovaccine technology may protect immune-compromised humans against this serious opportunistic infection. PMID:26252360

  16. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods.

  17. Endometriosis-associated Maternal Pregnancy Complications – Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Petresin, J.; Wolf, J.; Emir, S.; Müller, A.; Boosz, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of endometriosis is increasing. Particularly during pregnancy and labour, clinicians should be alert to possible endometriosis-associated complications or complications of previous endometriosis treatment, despite a low relative risk. In addition to an increased rate of early miscarriage, complications such as spontaneous bowel perforation, rupture of ovarian cysts, uterine rupture and intraabdominal bleeding from decidualised endometriosis lesions or previous surgery are described in the literature. Unfavourable neonatal outcomes have also been discussed. We report on an irreducible ovarian torsion in the 16th week of pregnancy following extensive endometriosis surgery, and an intraabdominal haemorrhage due to endometriosis of the bowel in the 29th week of pregnancy. PMID:27570252

  18. Atenolol and fetal growth in pregnancies complicated by hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lydakis, C; Lip, G Y; Beevers, M; Beevers, D G

    1999-06-01

    Atenolol use may be associated with growth retardation when given in pregnancy, although the relationship to trimester of initiation, duration of treatment, and its use as monotherapy is still uncertain. To compare the obstetric and fetal outcome between women receiving atenolol (as monotherapy) and other antihypertensive drug monotherapies, and also to investigate the effect of duration of treatment on fetal growth, we performed a retrospective cohort study of 312 pregnancies in 223 women attending an Antenatal Hypertension Clinic. Atenolol (as monotherapy) was given in 78 pregnancies (25.0%), other types of antihypertensive drugs as monotherapy were given in 53 pregnancies (17.0%), and multiple drug combinations were given in 90 pregnancies (28.8%). In 91 pregnancies (29.2%) no antihypertensive drugs were given. Atenolol was found to be associated with lower birth weight and ponderal index values, with a trend toward a higher prevalence of preterm (<37 weeks) delivery and small-for-gestational-age babies when compared to other antihypertensive drugs as monotherapy, or to no treatment. The adverse effect of atenolol was more pronounced in women receiving the drug earlier in their pregnancy, and continuing the drug for a longer duration. In conclusion, atenolol should be avoided in the early stages of pregnancy and given with caution at the later stages, as it is associated with fetal growth retardation, which is related to duration of treatment.

  19. From Pre-Clinical Studies to Clinical Trials: Generation of Novel Therapies for Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Elizabeth C.; Sibley, Colin P.

    2015-01-01

    Complications of pregnancy represent a significant disease burden, with both immediate and lasting consequences for mother and baby. Two key pregnancy complications, fetal growth restriction (FGR) and preeclampsia (PE), together affect around 10%–15% of all pregnancies worldwide. Despite this high incidence, there are currently no therapies available to treat these pregnancy disorders. Early delivery remains the only intervention to reduce the risk of severe maternal complications and/or stillbirth of the baby; however early delivery itself is associated with increased risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity. As such, there is a pressing need to develop new and effective treatments that can prevent or treat FGR and PE. Animal models have been essential in identifying and screening potential new therapies in this field. In this review, we address recent progress that has been made in developing therapeutic strategies for pregnancy disorders, some of which are now entering clinical trials. PMID:26062129

  20. Outcome of children born out of pregnancies complicated by unexplained polyhydramnios.

    PubMed

    Touboul, C; Boileau, P; Picone, O; Foix-l'Hélias, L; Frydman, R; Senat, M V

    2007-04-01

    Our aim was to assess the long-term outcomes of infants born out of a pregnancy complicated by unexplained polyhydramnios. We retrospectively analysed a cohort of 173 singleton pregnancies with polyhydramnios. There were 24 singletons with unexplained polyhydramnios, defined as polyhydramnios where prenatal testing was negative. Infants were examined by a paediatrician at a median age of 12 months (range 12-64 months). Of the 24 infants, 19 (79%) had a normal outcome. West syndrome, polyuria and pulmonary stenosis were diagnosed in three children during follow up, while there were two perinatal deaths. Paediatric follow up of children born out of pregnancies complicated by unexplained polyhydramnios should be carried out systematically.

  1. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome and the risk of pregnancy complications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Hong-Su; Rao, Da-Pang; Gong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is inconsistently associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to summarize the evidence regarding the strength of the association between pregnancy in women with PCOS and pregnancy complications. Methods: We systematically searched PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library to identify observational studies up to January 2016. The primary focus was pregnancy outcomes, including gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), preterm delivery, cesarean delivery, oligohydramnios, and polyhydramnios. Effect estimates were pooled using the random-effects model. The analysis was further stratified by factors that could affect these associations. Results: We included 40 observational studies that reported data on a total of 17,816 pregnancies with PCOS and 123,756 pregnancies without PCOS. Overall, PCOS in pregnancy was associated with greater risk of GDM, preeclampsia, PIH, preterm delivery, cesarean delivery, miscarriage, hypoglycemia, and perinatal death. However, PCOS in pregnancy had little or no effect on oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, large-for-gestational age (LGA), small-for-gestational-age (SGA), fetal growth restriction (FGR), preterm premature membrane rupture, fasting blood glucose (FBG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride, total cholesterol, congenital malformation, macrosomia, and respiratory distress syndrome. Subgroup analysis suggested that these associations might be influenced by study design and pre-BMI. Conclusion: PCOS in pregnancy is associated with a significantly increased risk of adverse pregnancy, fetal, and neonatal outcomes. PMID:28002314

  2. Neurological Disorders Complicating Pregnancy - Focus on Obstetric Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Renukesh, Sandya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neurological disorders in pregnancy can be pregnancy related or can be caused by exacerbation of a pre-existing neurological condition or sometimes may even be detected for the first time during pregnancy in which it might be an incidental finding. The diagnosis and management of the neurological disorders in pregnancy is always a challenging task due to varied symptomatology and risks to the fetus. The evaluation and management should be performed in a stepwise fashion and requires multidisciplinary approach. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to study the influence of neurological disorders on outcome of pregnancy. Material and Methods This was a prospective observational study conduted over a period of 1 year (2013-2014) including 54 pregnant women with neurological manifestations. The spectrum of neurological manifestations was divided into-pregnancy specific, incidental and pre-existing neurological disorders for analysis. Five unusual cases with varied manifestations were studied in detail. Any pregnant woman presenting with neurological manifestation, irrespective of gestational age were included in the present study. The neurological manifestation and the obstetric outcome were analysed in the present study. Results There were 54 women with varied neurological manifestations, majority (74%) of them being primigravida. Seizure was the most common (63%) manifestation. The incidence of pregnancy specific disorder (eclampsia), pre-existing disease (epilepsy) and incidental causes were 40.8%, 37% and 22.2% respectively. Of the 22 women with eclampsia, 15(68%) had seizure during antepartum period and 7(32%) in the postpartum period. Three patients out of 22 who had eclampsia had intrauterine fetal demise on arrival itself, whereas the perinatal outcome was good in the other 19 patients who had live born babies. The most common incidental cause in the present study was tubercular meningitis (44%). There was however a maternal and

  3. Pregnancy complicated by triploidy: a comparison of the three karyotypes.

    PubMed

    McWeeney, Dennis T; Munné, Santiago; Miller, Richard C; Cekleniak, Natalie A; Contag, Stephen A; Wax, Joseph R; Polzin, William J; Watson, William J

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated triploid pregnancy to determine whether there are clinically important differences between the three karyotypes: 69,XXX, 69,XXY, and 69,XYY. Prospectively maintained cytogenetic databases at five tertiary care centers were retrospectively reviewed over a 10-year period to identify all triploid pregnancies. Targeted ultrasounds were reviewed to identify fetal and placental findings. Sonographic findings were compared by karyotype. There was a total of 549 triploid gestations; preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) detected 413 triploid embryos, and the cytogenetic databases provided 136 clinical pregnancies with triploidy. In triploid embryos with PGD, the frequency of the 69,XYY karyotype was 8.7% (36/413), compared with 0.74% (1/136) during the first trimester of clinical pregnancies (p = 0.002). In clinical pregnancies, 60% (36/60) of 69,XXY fetuses survived the first trimester of development compared with 69% (52/75) of 69,XXX fetuses (p = NS). No clinically important differences were observed between 69,XXX and 69,XXY karyotypes in terms of type, number, or severity of fetal or placental anomalies. Gestations with a 69,XYY karyotype are found less frequently compared with gestations with a 69,XXX or 69,XXY karyotype. The decline in fetal survival of the 69,XYY triploid karyotype needs further investigation. There are significant abnormalities detected during prenatal sonography in most all clinically recognized cases of triploidy. Sonography cannot reliably distinguish between the 69,XXY and 69,XXX karyotypes.

  4. Pregnancy Complications and Neonatal Outcomes in Multiple Pregnancies: A Comparison between Assisted Reproductive Techniques and Spontaneous Conception

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, Mahbod; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Davari Tanha, Fatemeh; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Keramati, Zahra; Shariat, Mamak; Ghaheri, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Background This study compared neonatal outcome and maternal complications in multiple pregnancies after assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to spontaneous pregnancies. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, we reviewed medical records of 190 multiple pregnancies and births conceived by ART or spontaneous conceptions between 2004 and 2009 in Women Hospital. Obstetric history and outcomes were recorded and compared between these two groups. SPSS version 13 was used for data analysis. The results were analyzed using student’s t test, chi square and logistic regression (p<0.05). Results There were 106 deliveries from spontaneous conceptions and 84 that resulted from ART. Parity history and mode of delivery significantly differed between the two groups (p<0.001). The ART group had significantly higher preterm labor and premature rupture of membranes (PROM) whereas pregnanc-induced hypertension (PIH) was higher in the spontaneous group (p=0.01). Newborn intensive care unit (NICU) admission, duration of hospitalization, still birth and low gestational age were significantly higher in the ART group while neonatal jaundice was higher in the spontaneous group. Logistic regression analysis by considering neonatal complications as the dependent variable showed that respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), NICU admission and Apgar score were independent predictors for neonatal complications. Conclusion Obstetric and neonatal outcomes must be considered in multiple pregnancies conceived by ART. PMID:25780517

  5. Pregnancy Complications: Bleeding and Spotting from the Vagina

    MedlinePlus

    ... and those who urgently need you. GO Stay up-to-date! Get our emails about zika and all other pregnancy concerns. News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our ...

  6. Assisted reproductive technology and pregnancy-related hypertensive complications: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, C; Tsioufis, C; Michalopoulou, H; Makris, T; Papademetriou, V; Stefanadis, C

    2013-03-01

    Hypertensive complications in pregnancy are the leading cause of maternal morbidity, at least in the developed countries. In recent years, infertility issues are managed with ever growing therapeutic options namely assisted reproductive technologies (ART), which improve the ratio of successful induction of pregnancy. It is still debated whether various ART modalities are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including hypertensive complications, particularly with higher incidence of preeclampsia. The main source of controversy stems from the diversity of effect modifiers modulating the association between ART-oriented pregnancy and hypertensive disorders. Indeed, women undergoing an ART procedure are affected by diverse causes of infertility, are frequently characterized by different genetic patterns with respect to their artificially conceived embryo and experienced multiple gestations. In order to investigate whether ART modalities are associated with increased incidence of hypertensive complications in pregnancy, we reviewed all published studies carried out before the end of 2010 and identified in the PubMed database. Among the 47 studies finally selected and by acknowledging the potential of shortcomings related to the different study design and populations, the overall evidence suggests that ART-oriented pregnancies-especially the in-vitro fertilization techniques-are accompanied by increased risk for gestational hypertension and preeclampsia as compared with non-ART pregnancies, even after adjustment for confounders. Multiple gestations, advanced age and underlying polycystic ovary syndrome resulted in constant confounders of the questioned association. Reducing multiple gestations by implementing single embryo techniques might be the therapeutic limiting step to lower the rate of hypertensive complications in assisted pregnancies.

  7. Cell-free fetal DNA and pregnancy-related complications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SIFAKIS, STAVROS; KOUKOU, ZETA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA (cff-DNA) is a novel promising biomarker that has been applied in various aspects of obstetrical research, notably in prenatal diagnosis and complicated pregnancies. It is easily detected by semi-quantitative PCR for the SRY target gene. It is well recognized that the levels of circulating cff-DNA play a role in various complications of pregnancy. In this review, we explore the implications of the detection of cff-DNA in a range of pregnancy-related complications, such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), preterm labor, placenta previa and hyperemesis gravidarum. cff-DNA is released due to apoptotic mechanisms occurring on trophoblastic cells, although recent in vivo studies support the existence of additional mechanisms. The increase in the levels of cff-DNA can be used to predict pregnancy-related complications and has great value in the field of prenatal diagnosis and in common pregnancy-related complications, as it precedes the clinical symptoms of the disease. Gestational age is a factor that determines the elevation in cff-DNA levels in response to pathological conditions. In conclusion, the detection of cff-DNA levels has a number of valuable applications in prenatal screening; however, the detection of cff-DNA levels has not yet been applied in clinical practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy-related disorders. Thus, studies are focusing on unraveling the etiology of alterations in its levels under pathological conditions during pregnancy, in order to determine the potenial predictive and diagnostic applications of this biomarker. PMID:25530428

  8. Management Considerations for Ongoing Pregnancies Complicated by Trisomy 13 and 18.

    PubMed

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Kuller, Jeffrey A; Grace, Matthew R; Laifer, Steven A; Strauss, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancies complicated by trisomy 13 (T13) or trisomy 18 (T18) present unique challenges for obstetric management. From the initial diagnosis, the task of counseling these women and families is difficult because fetal and neonatal outcomes vary depending on the phenotype and degree of intervention chosen by the family. A literature review was performed using PubMed to gather information regarding obstetric management and outcomes of pregnancies complicated by T13 and T18. Spontaneous abortion and in uterofetal demise occur at rates well above those seen in chromosomally normal pregnancies. In addition, infants with T13 or T18 frequently have structural anomalies, which lead to worse prognoses and long-term survival. In cases in which a woman and her family desire to continue the pregnancy, multidisciplinary consultation with obstetrics, social work, genetics, and pediatrics can optimize care of both the fetus and the mother. Most commonly, prenatal care does not differ from routine. A detailed delivery plan should be generated, specifically discussing interventions for the patient and her fetus. When managing pregnancies complicated by T13 and T18, active, open, and frequent communication between the patient, her family, and a multidisciplinary health care team throughout the pregnancy is crucial.

  9. Pregnancy and the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Fertility, Treatment, Delivery, and Complications.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Ryan A; Mahadevan, Uma

    2016-06-01

    For many women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the illness coincides with their childbearing years. IBD increases the risk of pregnancy complications and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The multidisciplinary care team should emphasize the importance of medication adherence to achieve preconception disease control and maintain corticosteroid-free remission throughout pregnancy. Medication adjustments to reduce fetal exposure may be considered on an individualized basis in quiescent disease; however, any benefits of such adjustments remain theoretic and there is risk of worsening disease activity. Mode of delivery is determined by obstetric indications, except for women with active perianal disease who should consider cesarean delivery.

  10. Listeriosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... may occur in a milder form as: Abscesses Conjunctivitis Gastroenteritis Skin lesion Symptoms In infants, symptoms of ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 208. Read More Abscess Conjunctivitis or pink eye Endocarditis Fatigue Meningitis Pneumonia - adults ( ...

  11. Anticoagulants to prevent recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications: Is it time to put the needles away?

    PubMed

    Skeith, Leslie; Rodger, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Placenta-mediated pregnancy complications, such as pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, birth of a small-for-gestational age infant and late pregnancy loss, are common and carry significant morbidity and mortality. The etiology of placenta-mediated pregnancy complications is likely multifactorial and may include abnormal coagulation activation of the maternal-fetal interface. The use of antepartum low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) prophylaxis to prevent recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications has become common practice despite limited and conflicting evidence to support its use. This paper reviews the evidence, including recently published data from an individual patient level meta-analysis, which challenges the role of LMWH in preventing recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications. Incorporating this recent evidence, we recommend against the use of LMWH to prevent recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications in women with and without inherited thrombophilia.

  12. Prospective risk of stillbirth and neonatal complications in twin pregnancies: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheong-See, Fiona; Schuit, Ewoud; Arroyo-Manzano, David; Khalil, Asma; Barrett, Jon; Joseph, K S; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Hack, Karien; Lewi, Liesbeth; Lim, Arianne; Liem, Sophie; Norman, Jane E; Morrison, John; Combs, C Andrew; Garite, Thomas J; Maurel, Kimberly; Serra, Vicente; Perales, Alfredo; Rode, Line; Worda, Katharina; Nassar, Anwar; Aboulghar, Mona; Rouse, Dwight; Thom, Elizabeth; Breathnach, Fionnuala; Nakayama, Soichiro; Russo, Francesca Maria; Robinson, Julian N; Dodd, Jodie M; Newman, Roger B; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Tang, Selphee; Mol, Ben Willem J; Thilaganathan, Basky; Thangaratinam, Shakila

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the risks of stillbirth and neonatal complications by gestational age in uncomplicated monochorionic and dichorionic twin pregnancies. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases (until December 2015). Review methods Databases were searched without language restrictions for studies of women with uncomplicated twin pregnancies that reported rates of stillbirth and neonatal outcomes at various gestational ages. Pregnancies with unclear chorionicity, monoamnionicity, and twin to twin transfusion syndrome were excluded. Meta-analyses of observational studies and cohorts nested within randomised studies were undertaken. Prospective risk of stillbirth was computed for each study at a given week of gestation and compared with the risk of neonatal death among deliveries in the same week. Gestational age specific differences in risk were estimated for stillbirths and neonatal deaths in monochorionic and dichorionic twin pregnancies after 34 weeks’ gestation. Results 32 studies (29 685 dichorionic, 5486 monochorionic pregnancies) were included. In dichorionic twin pregnancies beyond 34 weeks (15 studies, 17 830 pregnancies), the prospective weekly risk of stillbirths from expectant management and the risk of neonatal death from delivery were balanced at 37 weeks’ gestation (risk difference 1.2/1000, 95% confidence interval −1.3 to 3.6; I2=0%). Delay in delivery by a week (to 38 weeks) led to an additional 8.8 perinatal deaths per 1000 pregnancies (95% confidence interval 3.6 to 14.0/1000; I2=0%) compared with the previous week. In monochorionic pregnancies beyond 34 weeks (13 studies, 2149 pregnancies), there was a trend towards an increase in stillbirths compared with neonatal deaths after 36 weeks, with an additional 2.5 per 1000 perinatal deaths, which was not significant (−12.4 to 17.4/1000; I2=0%). The rates of neonatal morbidity showed a consistent reduction with increasing

  13. Effect of dietary factors in pregnancy on risk of pregnancy complications: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Nilsen, Roy M; Magnus, Per; Alexander, Jan; Haugen, Margareta

    2011-12-01

    There has been a thrilling development , as well as profound changes, in our understanding of the effect of fetal nutrition on the development and health of the child. The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is an ongoing nationwide population-based pregnancy cohort study that between 1999 and 2008 recruited 90,723 women with 106,981 pregnancies and 108,487 children. The objective of MoBa is to test specific etiologic hypotheses by estimating the association between exposures and diseases with a special focus on disorders that may originate in early life. An important aspect in this regard is maternal diet and nutritional status during pregnancy. Nutritional factors have long been considered to be important determinants of maternal and fetal health, and dietary information is currently being collected in a number of pregnancy cohorts in Europe and the United States. Thus far, pregnancy complications studied in MoBa are preterm birth, preeclampsia, and fetal growth; and the aim of this article is to report results of recently published studies of dietary factors in relation to these outcomes. Numerous studies are planned using MoBa data, and the aim is to add to the knowledge of the interplay between dietary factors, nonnutrients, and toxic dietary substances and epigenetic modulation on fetal development and health later in life.

  14. Impact of caesarean section on mode of delivery, pregnancy-induced and pregnancy-associated disorders, and complications in the subsequent pregnancy in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Louis; Taskan, Sevil; Macharey, George; Sechet, Ingeborg; Ziller, Volker; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the impact of caesarean section (CS) on mode of delivery, pregnancy-induced and pregnancy-associated disorders, as well as complications in the subsequent pregnancy within German gynecological practices. Methods: 1,801 women with CS and 1,801 matched women with vaginal delivery (VD) from the IMS Disease Analyzer database were included. The impact of previous CS on the mode of delivery and pregnancy-associated disorders as well as complications prior to or during birth in the subsequent pregnancy were analyzed. Cox regressions were used to determine the influence of CS with regard to these outcomes. Results: Medical abortion and single spontaneous delivery were significantly less frequent in women with a history of CS compared to VD (OR equal to 0.52 and 0.04 respectively), whereas CS after CS was the significantly more common mode of delivery (79.0% versus 9.3%, OR=36.47). Gestational hypertension without significant proteinuria, gestational hypertension with significant proteinuria, and polyhydramnios were more frequent in women with CS than in women with VD (OR equal to 6.80, 1.71, and 2.29). Hemorrhage and maternal care for known or suspected disproportion were more common in the CS group than in the VD group (OR equal to 1.34 and 3.75). Prolonged pregnancy, preterm labor, abnormalities arising from forces of labor, and perineal laceration during delivery were significantly less frequent in women with CS than in women with VD (OR between 0.32 and 0.75), whereas long labor was more common (OR=2.09). Conclusion: Women with CS were more likely to undergo further CS and to develop major pregnancy-associated diseases in the following pregnancy compared to women with VD. PMID:27346991

  15. Acid- and alkaline phosphatase in amniotic fluid in normal and complicated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Beckman, G; Beckman, L; Löfstrand, T

    1978-01-01

    171 samples of amniotic fluid were obtained by abdominal amniocentesis from 67 women with complicated pregnancies (isoimmunization, diabetes mellitus or toxaemia). The levels of heat-labile alkaline phosphatase (HLAP), heat-stable alkaline phosphatase (HSAP) and acid phosphatase (AcP) were determined and compared to the enzyme levels in 179 samples from women with normal pregnancies of corresponding gestational ages. HLAP showed two "peaks" of activity, one in the 5th-22nd week and the other at term. HSAP and AcP showed increased activity at term. HSAP was decreased (p less than 0.01) in isoimmunization between the 36th and 40th week. 11 cases of toxaemia with placental insufficiency showed no differences in the levels of HLAP and HSAP compared with normal pregnancy. AcP showed no differences between normal and complicated pregnancy. Samples contaminated by blood showed no significant increase in the acid- and alkaline phosphatase levels. Samples contaminated by meconium showed a complex pattern. Some samples had normal enzyme levels, some had high levels of HLAP only and some had high levels of HSAP and AcP. The origin of the enzymes is not known with certainty. HSAP in amniotic fluid is most likely not of placental but intestinal origin. Determinations of acid- and alkaline phosphatase in amniotic fluid seem to be of little values in the clinical management of complicated pregnancy.

  16. Benign multiple diffuse neonatal hemangiomatosis after a pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios and a placental chorioangioma.

    PubMed

    Witters, Ingrid; Van Damme, Marie Therèse; Ramaekers, Paul; Van Assche, Frans André; Fryns, Jean Pierre

    2003-01-10

    A male newborn with multiple cutaneous hemangiomatosis is described. Pregnancy was complicated by polyhydramnios and a large placental chorioangioma. After an initial outburst of the hemangiomas in the first two weeks of life, spontaneous and almost complete regression occurred before the age of 3 months. The relationship between hemangiomas and placental chorioangioma is briefly discussed.

  17. Prenatal Pregnancy Complications and Psychiatric Symptoms: Children with ASD versus Clinic Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudor, Megan E.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the association between prenatal pregnancy complications (PPC) and childhood psychiatric symptoms in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and non-ASD children who were referred to a psychiatric clinic (Controls). Parents completed a "DSM-IV"-referenced rating scale and developmental history questionnaire.…

  18. Spontaneous labor curves in women with pregnancies complicated by diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Julia; Huang, Chun-Chih; Singh, Jasbir; Driggers, Rita W.; Landy, Helain J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the first stage of labor will be longer in nulliparous and multiparous women with diabetes compared to non-diabetic counterparts. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed from 228,668 deliveries between 2002–2008 from the Consortium of Safe Labor (NICHD, NIH). Patients with spontaneous onset of labor from 37 0/7 – 41 6/7 weeks gestation were included (71,282) and classified as nulliparous or multiparous. Pregnancies were further subdivided regarding presence of preexisting diabetes (preDM) or gestational diabetes (GDM), and normal controls. Labor curves were created matching for body mass index (BMI) and neonatal birth weight. Statistical analysis was performed on descriptive variables using χ2 with significance designated as p<0.05. Results Among nulliparous patients, there were 118 women with preDM and 475 women with GDM; 25,771 patients served as normal controls. Among multiparous women, there were 311 with preDM and 1,079 with GDM and 43,528 in the control group. Although differences in dilatation rates were observed in nulliparous and multiparous women with and without diabetes, labor curves were similar between the subgroups when matched for maternal BMI and birth weight. Conclusions Labor curves of women with preDM and GDM approximate those of non-diabetics, regardless of BMI, birth weight, or parity. PMID:21955108

  19. Obstetric complications and psychological well-being: experiences of Bangladeshi women during pregnancy and childbirth.

    PubMed

    Gausia, K; Ryder, D; Ali, M; Fisher, C; Moran, A; Koblinsky, M

    2012-06-01

    Women in developing countries experience postnatal depression at rates that are comparable with or higher than those in developed countries. However, their personal experiences during pregnancy and childbirth have received little attention in relation to postnatal depression. In particular, the contribution of obstetric complications to their emotional well-being during the postpartum period is still not clearly understood. This study aimed to (a) describe the pregnancy and childbirth experiences among women in Bangladesh during normal childbirth or obstetric complications and (b) examine the relationship between these experiences and their psychological well-being during the postpartum period. Two groups of women--one group with obstetric complications (n=173) and the other with no obstetric complications (n=373)--were selected from a sample of women enrolled in a community-based study in Matlab, Bangladesh. The experiences during pregnancy and childbirth were assessed in terms of a five-point rating scale from 'severely uncomfortable=1' to 'not uncomfortable at all=5'. The psychological status of the women was assessed using a validated local version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at six weeks postpartum. Categorical data were analyzed using the chi-square test and continuous data by analysis of variance. Women with obstetric complications reported significantly more negative experiences during their recent childbirth [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.61, p<0.001] compared to those with normal childbirth. There was a significant main effect on emotional well-being due to experiences of pregnancy [F (4,536)=4.96, p=0.001] and experiences of childbirth [F (4,536)=3.29, p=0.01]. The EPDS mean scores for women reporting severe uncomfortable pregnancy and childbirth experiences were significantly higher than those reporting no such problems. After controlling for the background characteristics, postpartum depression was significantly associated

  20. Case of twin pregnancy complicated by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with intravenous immunoglobulin: Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W X; Yang, X F; Lin, J H

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acquired thrombocytopenia without other clear cause of thrombocytopenia. It is not common in a singleton pregnancy and less common in twin pregnancy. We report a 33-year-old ITP pluripara whose first pregnancy was uneventful. She carried twin pregnancy, complicated by recurrent very low platelets, and gave birth to preterm twins. This patient received multiple courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and showed a significant platelet count improvement with IVIG therapy.

  1. Clinical features and pregnancy outcome in antiphospholipid syndrome patients with history of severe pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yuko; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Koushi; Hisano, Michi; Arata, Naoko; Oku, Kenji; Watanabe, Noriyoshi; Sago, Haruhiko; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Murashima, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Objective. To clarify the clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) profile in patients with obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Methods. Clinical records of 13 pregnant patients (15 pregnancies) with obstetrical APS were reviewed over 10 years. Patients who met the Sapporo Criteria fully were studied, whereas those with only early pregnancy loss were excluded. In addition to classical aPL: lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin antibody (aCL), and anti-β2-glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI); phosphatidylserine-dependent anti-prothrombin antibody (aPS/PT) and kininogen-dependent anti-phosphatidylethanolamine antibody (aPE) were also examined in each case. Results. Cases were divided into two groups according to patient response to standard treatment: good and poor outcome groups. All cases with poor outcome presented LA, with IgG aβ2GPI and IgG aPS/PT were also frequently observed. IgG aPE did not correlate with pregnancy outcome. Conclusion. aPL profile may predict pregnancy outcome in patients with this subset of obstetric APS.

  2. Meta-analysis of low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Marc A; Carrier, Marc; Le Gal, Grégoire; Martinelli, Ida; Perna, Annalisa; Rey, Evelyne; de Vries, J I P; Gris, Jean-Christophe

    2014-02-06

    A 35-year-old woman with recurrent severe placenta-mediated pregnancy complications in her 2 pregnancies asks: Will low-molecular-weight heparin help prevent recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications in my next pregnancy? We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) vs no LMWH for the prevention of recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications. We identified six RCTs that included a total of 848 pregnant women with prior placenta-mediated pregnancy complications. The primary outcome was a composite of pre-eclampsia (PE), birth of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) newborn (<10th percentile), placental abruption, or pregnancy loss >20 weeks. Overall, 67 (18.7%) of 358 of women being given prophylactic LMWH had recurrent severe placenta-mediated pregnancy complications compared with 127 (42.9%) of 296 women with no LMWH (relative risk reduction, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.86; P = .01; I(2), 69%, indicating moderate heterogeneity). We identified similar relative risk reductions with LMWH for individual outcomes, including any PE, severe PE, SGA <10th percentile, SGA <5th percentile, preterm delivery <37 weeks, and preterm delivery <34 weeks with minimal heterogeneity. LMWH may be a promising therapy for recurrent, especially severe, placenta-mediated pregnancy complications, but further research is required.

  3. Maternal characteristics, pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes among women with disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Karen M.; Zhang, Jianying; Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Long-Bellil, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study is to describe the maternal characteristics, pregnancy complications, and birth outcomes among a representative sample of Rhode Island women with disabilities who recently gave birth. Methods Data from the 2002–2011 Rhode Island Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey were analyzed. Results Approximately 7% of women in Rhode Island reported a disability. Women with disabilities reported significant disparities in their health care utilization, health behaviors and health status before and during pregnancy and during the postpartum period. Compared to nondisabled women, they were significantly more likely to report stressful life events and medical complications during their most recent pregnancy, were less likely to receive prenatal care in the first trimester, and more likely to have preterm births (13.4%; 95% CI, 11.6–15.6 compared to 8.9%; 95% CI, 8.5–9.3 for women without disabilities) and low birth weight babies (10.3%; 95% CI, 9.4–11.2 compared to 6.8%; 95% CI, 6.8–6.9). There was no difference in the rates of cesarean section between women with and without disabilities. Conclusion These findings support the need for clinicians providing care to pregnant women with disabilities to be aware of the increased risk for medical problems during pregnancy and factors that increase the risk for poor infant outcomes. PMID:26492209

  4. Web recruitment and internet use and preferences reported by women with postpartum depression after pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Maloni, Judith A; Przeworski, Amy; Damato, Elizabeth G

    2013-04-01

    Nearly one million women each year have pregnancy complications that cause antepartum and postpartum anxiety and depression. This exploratory study determined 1) feasibility of using social media to recruit women with depressive symptoms following high risk pregnancy, 2) women's barriers to treatment, 3) use of online resources for assistance with PPD, and 4) preferences for internet treatment. Among a national sample of 53 women, nearly 70% had major depression. Common barriers were lack of time and stigma. Over 90% of women would use the internet to learn coping strategies for PPD. Women expressed interest in web-based PPD treatment and identified desired characteristics of an intervention.

  5. Dichorionic triamniotic triplet pregnancy complicated by twin anemia polycythemia sequence: the place of fetal therapy.

    PubMed

    Griersmith, Thérèse H; Fung, Alison M; Walker, Susan P

    2014-12-01

    Monochorionic twins as part of a high order multiple pregnancy can be an unintended consequence of the increasingly common practice of blastocyst transfer for couples requiring in vitro fertilisation (IVF) for infertility. Dichorionic triamniotic (DCTA) triplets is the most common presentation, and these pregnancies are particularly high risk because of the additional risks associated with monochorionicity. Surveillance for twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, including twin anemia polycythemia sequence, may be more difficult, and any intervention to treat the monochorionic pair needs to balance the proposed benefits against the risks posed to the unaffected singleton. Counseling of families with DCTA triplets is therefore complex. Here, we report a case of DCTA triplets, where the pregnancy was complicated by threatened preterm labour, and twin anemia polycythemia sequence (TAPS) was later diagnosed at 28 weeks. The TAPS was managed with a single intraperitoneal transfusion, enabling safe prolongation of the pregnancy for over 2 weeks until recurrence of TAPS and preterm labour supervened. Postnatal TAPS was confirmed, and all three infants were later discharged home at term corrected age, and were normal at follow-up. This case highlights that in utero therapy has an important role in multiple pregnancies of mixed chorionicity, and can achieve safe prolongation of pregnancy at critical gestations.

  6. Epidemiology of human listeriosis and seafoods.

    PubMed

    Rocourt, J; Jacquet, C; Reilly, A

    2000-12-20

    While rarely diagnosed prior to 1960, more than 10,000 cases of listeriosis were recorded in the medical literature between 1960 and 1982, and thousands more have been reported annually world-wide [Rocourt J., 1991. Human listeriosis, 1989. WHO/HPP/FOS/91.3, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; Rocourt, J., Brosch, R., 1992. Human listeriosis, 1990. WHO/HPP/FOS/92.3, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; Rocourt, J., Jacquet, Ch., Bille, J., 1997. Human listeriosis, 1991/1992. WHO/FNU/FOS/97.1, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland]. This widespread increase in reporting is most likely due to demographic trends and changes in food production, processing and storage, especially the extended cold food chain and the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at low temperatures: L. monocytogenes is a bacterium responsible for opportunistic infections, preferentially affecting individuals whose immune system is perturbed, including pregnant women, newborns, people over 65 years, immunocompromised patients, such as cancer victims, transplant recipients, people on hemodialysis and AIDS patients. Thus, the increasing lifespan and medical progress allowing immunodeficient individuals to survive, partially explains the increasing incidence of listeriosis. Moreover, L. monocytogenes is ubiquitous and can grow at temperatures as low as 0 degrees C. At this temperature growth is very slow. The expansion of the agro-food industry, the widespread use of systems of cold storage and changes in consumers demands have led to a large increase in the pool of Listeria that can cause foodborne infections.

  7. [Incidence study of listeriosis in Spain].

    PubMed

    Valero, Fernando Parrilla; Rafart, Josep Vaqué

    2014-01-01

    We performed a descriptive retrospective study of cases of listeriosis occurring in Spain from 2001 to 2007 to determine the burden and trend of this disease in our setting. Several sources of information were used. Epidemiological information was collected from 1.242 cases of listeriosis, representing a mean incidence rate of 0,56 cases per 100.000 inhabitants per year, which was extrapolated as an overall estimate for Spain. The annual incidence showed a statistically significant increasing trend (p <0,001) over the study period. This figure was higher than that reported in Spain (0,16) by the Microbiological Information System, which is voluntary, showing that underreporting exists. The inclusion of listeriosis in the Mandatory Notification System would allow determination of the distribution and characteristics of this infection in humans, as well as promotion of effective prevention and control.

  8. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO presented at 31 + 3/7 weeks with eclampsia, HELLP and subsequent fetal death. MRI confirmed PRES. NMO may be associated with eclampsia and leads to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Posited mechanisms include antibody-mediated placental damage and a heightened risk of eclampsia-associated PRES. Further characterization of the course of NMO and its relationship with pregnancy outcomes in larger series would be invaluable. PMID:25584107

  9. Management of reproduction and pregnancy complications in maternal obesity: which role for dietary polyphenols?

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Carmela; Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Filesi, Carmelina; Masella, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a global and dramatic public health problem; maternal obesity represents one of the main risk factors of infertility and pregnancy complications as it is associated with adverse maternal and offspring outcomes. In the last few years, adipose tissue dysfunction associated with altered adipocytokine secretion has been suggested to play a critical role in all the phases of reproductive process. Obesity is a nutrition-related disorder. In this regard, dietary intervention strategies, such as high intake of fruit and vegetables, have shown significant effects in both preserving health and counteracting obesity-associated diseases. Evidence has been provided that polyphenols, important constituents of plant-derived food, can influence developmental program of oocyte and embryo, as well as pregnancy progression by modulating several cellular pathways. This review will examine the controversial results so far obtained on adipocytokine involvement in fertility impairment and pregnancy complications. Furthermore, the different effects exerted by polyphenols on oocyte, embryo, and pregnancy development will be also taken in account.

  10. [Subcapsular liver hematoma, severe complication of pregnancy toxemia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Chenoufi, Mohamed Badis; Ouerhani, Radhia; el Hitmi, Nadia; Tbatou, Adnane; Smaili, Lamia; Sfar, Ezzedine; Chelli, Hela

    2002-04-01

    Subcapsular liver hematoma is a rare and severe complication of pregnancy. This event is already known to have a poor maternal and foetal prognosis. The authors report a case of spontaneous rupture of subcapsular hematoma of the liver in 40 year old multiparous. Confirmation of diagnosis is obtained by abdominal echotomography or TOM. The surgical treatment of this hematoma joints the traumatic surgery of the liver. In every case foetal extraction by cesarean section constitutes the first therapeutic procedure.

  11. Clinical and scientific results in perinatal care of pregnancy complicated by insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Djelmis, J

    1998-01-01

    At the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Perinatal Unit for Diabetes and Fetal Growth, School of Medicine, Zagreb, perinatal care of pregnancies complicated with insulin dependent diabetes melitus (IDDM), has been performed for more than 36 years. The intention of this review is to show our own results in the management of IDDM pregnancies and the latest clinical advances in perinatal care of such pregnancies. Pregnancy complicated with IDDM is at risk because of numerous maternal, fetal and neonatal complications. Recent advances in medicine, especially in diabetology and perinatology, helps clinician avoid or lessen antenatal or perinatal complications in IDDM pregnancies. The main result of improved perinatal care is that today fetal and neonatal mortality in IDDM pregnancy is almost equal to that of healthy pregnant population. Intensive preconceptual care and optimal regulation of IDDM have resulted not only in decreased perinatal mortality but also in a decreased rate of congenital malformation. Tight glycemia control during pregnancy has a beneficial effect on fetal growth. Intensive control of fetal growth, verification of lung maturation at term by amniocenthesis, and control of fetal oxygenation will result in delivery of a mature eutrophic newborn with the lowest rate of neonatal complications possible. Perinatal mortality of less than 2% in IDDM pregnancy can be obtained by planned delivery between 38 and 39 weeks of gestation by either vaginal route or cesarean section, depending on indications. After delivery, intensive care of the newborn is necessary.

  12. The influence of social and political violence on the risk of pregnancy complications.

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, B C; Rebolledo, A; Atalah, E; Newman, B; King, M C

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Events in Chile provided an opportunity to evaluate health effects associated with exposure to high levels of social and political violence. METHODS. Neighborhoods in Santiago, Chile, were mapped for occurrences of sociopolitical violence during 1985-86, such as bomb threats, military presence, undercover surveillance, and political demonstrations. Six health centers providing prenatal care were then chosen at random: three from "high-violence" and three from "low-violence" neighborhoods. The 161 healthy, pregnant women due to deliver between August 1 and September 7, 1986, who attended these health centers were interviewed twice about their living conditions. Pregnancy complications and labor/delivery information were subsequently obtained from clinic and hospital records. RESULTS. Women living in the high-violence neighborhoods were significantly more likely to experience pregnancy complications than women living in lower violence neighborhoods (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.9-12.6; p less than 0.01). Residence in a high-violence neighborhood was the strongest risk factor observed; results persisted after controlling for several sets of potential confounders. CONCLUSION. Living in areas of high social and political violence increased the risk of pregnancy complications among otherwise healthy women. PMID:1566947

  13. Mortality of mothers from cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes following pregnancy complications in first delivery.

    PubMed

    Lykke, Jacob A; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Lockwood, Charles J; Triche, Elizabeth W; Paidas, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    The combined effects of preterm delivery, small-for-gestational-age offspring, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, placental abruption and stillbirth on early maternal death from cardiovascular causes have not previously been described in a large cohort. We investigated the effects of pregnancy complications on early maternal death in a registry-based retrospective cohort study of 782 287 women with a first singleton delivery in Denmark 1978-2007, followed for a median of 14.8 years (range 0.25-30.2) accruing 11.6 million person-years. We employed Cox proportional hazard models of early death from cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes following preterm delivery, small-for-gestational-age offspring and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. We found that preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age were both associated with subsequent death of mothers from cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes. Severe pre-eclampsia was associated with death from cardiovascular causes only. There was a less than additive effect on cardiovascular mortality hazard ratios with increasing number of pregnancy complications: preterm delivery 1.90 [95% confidence intervals 1.49, 2.43]; preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age offspring 3.30 [2.25, 4.84]; preterm delivery, small-for-gestational-age offspring and pre-eclampsia 3.85 [2.07, 7.19]. Thus, we conclude that, separately and combined, preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age are strong markers of early maternal death from both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes, while hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are markers of early death of mothers from cardiovascular causes.

  14. Obstetric complications in women with IVF conceived pregnancies and polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tandulwadkar, Sunita R; Lodha, Pooja A; Mangeshikar, Nirzari T

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is often accompanied by infertility that necessitates ovulation induction using clomiphene citrate, gonadotropins or even in vitro fertilization (IVF). These treatment methods are known to increase the incidence of multiple pregnancies as well as some negative consequences, including a rise in the risk for gestational diabetes mellitus, pre-eclampsia, etc., Furthermore, pregnancies established after IVF carry an increased risk for maternal complications. However, the increased risk of developing adverse obstetric complications has been suggested to occur independently of obesity as well as in populations without assisted reproductive techniques. Many studies have been performed to study the effect of PCOS on pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on PCOS. The hormonal milieu that is exaggerated in PCOS women is quite well understood at the biochemical and genetic levels. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of PCOS women who have undergone in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) have not been widely studied till date. This review aims to evaluate the current evidence regarding adverse obstetric outcomes of PCOS women undergoing IVF-ET. The rationale of this review is to study whether the adverse obstetric outcomes are increased in PCOS women in general, or particularly in those PCOS women who are undergoing IVF-ET. It is also important to analyze via a literature review whether the increased adverse outcomes are due to infertility in general or PCOS per se. An attempt has been made to give evidence regarding preventive strategies for obstetric complications in PCOS women who have undergone IVF-ET.

  15. Mechanisms Involved in the Association between Periodontitis and Complications in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Marcela Yang Hui; Longo, Priscila Larcher; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2015-01-01

    The association between periodontitis and some of the problems with pregnancy such as premature delivery, low weight at birth, and preeclampsia (PE) has been suggested. Nevertheless, epidemiological data have shown contradictory data, mainly due to differences in clinical parameters of periodontitis assessment. Furthermore, differences in microbial composition and immune response between aggressive and chronic periodontitis are not addressed by these epidemiological studies. We aimed to review the current data on the association between some of these problems with pregnancy and periodontitis, and the mechanisms underlying this association. Shifts in the microbial composition of the subgingival biofilm may occur during pregnancy, leading to a potentially more hazardous microbial community. Pregnancy is characterized by physiological immune tolerance. However, the infection leads to a shift in maternal immune response to a pathogenic pro-inflammatory response, with production of inflammatory cytokines and toxic products. In women with periodontitis, the infected periodontal tissues may act as reservoirs of bacteria and their products that can disseminate to the fetus-placenta unit. In severe periodontitis patients, the infection agents and their products are able to activate inflammatory signaling pathways locally and in extra-oral sites, including the placenta-fetal unit, which may not only induce preterm labor but also lead to PE and restrict intrauterine growth. Despite these evidences, the effectiveness of periodontal treatment in preventing gestational complications was still not established since it may be influenced by several factors such as severity of disease, composition of microbial community, treatment strategy, and period of treatment throughout pregnancy. This lack of scientific evidence does not exclude the need to control infection and inflammation in periodontitis patients during pregnancy, and treatment protocols should be validated. PMID:25688342

  16. Risk screening, emergency care, and lay concepts of complications during pregnancy in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Ojanguren, Rolando; Glantz, Namino M; Martinez-Hernandez, Imelda; Ovando-Meza, Ismael

    2008-03-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality are widespread in Chiapas, Mexico's southernmost state, as in many developing regions. Globally, the utility of three approaches to addressing such problems has been debated: (a) obstetric risk screening (i.e. screening women for risk during pregnancy and channeling those at risk to preventive care); (b) emergency obstetric care (i.e. identifying complications during pregnancy or birth and providing prompt effective treatment); and (c) combined risk screening and emergency care. Unaddressed to date in peer-reviewed journals are the lay perceptions of complications and risk that precede and incite the quest for obstetric care in Mexico. High incidence of maternal mortality in Chiapas, exacerbated by the predominantly rural, highly indigenous, geographically dispersed, and economically marginalized nature of the state's southern Border Region, prompted us to conduct 45 open-ended interviews with a convenience sample of women and their close relative/s, including indigenous and non-indigenous informants in urban and rural areas of four municipalities in this region. Interviews suggest that none of the three approaches is effective in this context, and we detail reasons why each approach has fallen short. Specific obstacles identified include that (1) many women do not access adequate prenatal screening care on a regular basis; (2) emergency obstetric care in this region is severely circumscribed; and (3) lay notions of pregnancy-related risk and complications contrast with official clinical criteria, such that neither clinical nor extra-clinical prenatal monitoring encompasses the entire range of physical and social risk factors and danger signs. Findings reported here center on a rich description of the latter: lay versus clinical criteria for risk of antepartum complication.

  17. Association between Maternal Zinc Status, Dietary Zinc Intake and Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rebecca L; Grieger, Jessica A; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Roberts, Claire T

    2016-10-15

    Adequate zinc stores in the body are extremely important during periods of accelerated growth. However, zinc deficiency is common in developing countries and low maternal circulating zinc concentrations have previously been associated with pregnancy complications. We reviewed current literature assessing circulating zinc and dietary zinc intake during pregnancy and the associations with preeclampsia (PE); spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB); low birthweight (LBW); and gestational diabetes (GDM). Searches of MEDLINE; CINAHL and Scopus databases identified 639 articles and 64 studies were reviewed. In 10 out of 16 studies a difference was reported with respect to circulating zinc between women who gave birth to a LBW infant (≤2500 g) and those who gave birth to an infant of adequate weight (>2500 g), particularly in populations where inadequate zinc intake is prevalent. In 16 of our 33 studies an association was found between hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and circulating zinc; particularly in women with severe PE (blood pressure ≥160/110 mmHg). No association between maternal zinc status and sPTB or GDM was seen; however; direct comparisons between the studies was difficult. Furthermore; only a small number of studies were based on women from populations where there is a high risk of zinc deficiency. Therefore; the link between maternal zinc status and pregnancy success in these populations cannot be established. Future studies should focus on those vulnerable to zinc deficiency and include dietary zinc intake as a measure of zinc status.

  18. Complications during pregnancy, delivery, and postnatal stages and place of delivery in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Ataharul; Chowdhury, Rafiqul I; Akhter, Halida H

    2006-10-01

    The utilization of safe motherhood services including maternity care in Bangladesh is very poor. Only a very small proportion of deliveries takes place in a hospital/clinic. This study is based on data from a follow-up study on maternal morbidity in rural Bangladesh. Analysis is performed on the nature of complications by place of delivery. Most of the deliveries have taken place in the women's own or her mother's home. In addition, home deliveries are mostly assisted either by an untrained birth attendant or by relatives or others. Education, economic status, whether pregnancy was wanted or not, regular visits for antenatal care, past history of breathing problems and liver diseases, and palpitation during pregnancy appear to have significant association with place of delivery in rural Bangladesh. The utilization of a hospital/clinic instead of birth at home is higher among women with secondary or higher level of education, who desired the pregnancy, and who made regular visits for antenatal care. Delivery at a mother's home appears to be positively associated with higher economic status, desired pregnancy, gainful employment, and visits for antenatal care. If the respondents suffer from diseases/symptoms, then it is more likely that the delivery would take place in the mother's home.

  19. A possible role of polycystic ovary syndrome for pregnancy complications in women with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Clara; Caldarola, Giacomo; Corbeddu, Marialuisa; Moro, Francesca; Tropea, Anna; Moretta, Gaia; Apa, Rosanna

    2014-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, relapsing immune-mediated inflammatory disease (IMID) of the skin. IMIDs are multifactorial diseases characterized by common molecular pathways leading to a systemic inflammation. Patients with an IMID are also at higher risk of developing co-morbidities, such as adverse pregnancy outcomes, than the general population. A higher rate of pregnancy complications have been seen in inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The data for psoriasis are inconsistent but it appears that women with moderate-to-severe psoriasis may also have an increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. The cause of this association is unknown, although it may be related to elevated proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α, the high prevalence of comorbidities and other unhealthy behaviours, or the high prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In a recent study, PCOS prevalence in a psoriatic cohort (n = 51) was higher than in non-psoriatic women (n = 102) (47% versus 11%), and women with PCOS and psoriasis had a greater probability of insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia, and dyslipidaemia as well as a more severe skin condition, than those with psoriasis alone. Further studies are necessary to clarify the impact of psoriasis on pregnancy and in particular if these effects are mediated by concomitant PCOS.

  20. Association between Maternal Zinc Status, Dietary Zinc Intake and Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rebecca L.; Grieger, Jessica A.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Roberts, Claire T.

    2016-01-01

    Adequate zinc stores in the body are extremely important during periods of accelerated growth. However, zinc deficiency is common in developing countries and low maternal circulating zinc concentrations have previously been associated with pregnancy complications. We reviewed current literature assessing circulating zinc and dietary zinc intake during pregnancy and the associations with preeclampsia (PE); spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB); low birthweight (LBW); and gestational diabetes (GDM). Searches of MEDLINE; CINAHL and Scopus databases identified 639 articles and 64 studies were reviewed. In 10 out of 16 studies a difference was reported with respect to circulating zinc between women who gave birth to a LBW infant (≤2500 g) and those who gave birth to an infant of adequate weight (>2500 g), particularly in populations where inadequate zinc intake is prevalent. In 16 of our 33 studies an association was found between hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and circulating zinc; particularly in women with severe PE (blood pressure ≥160/110 mmHg). No association between maternal zinc status and sPTB or GDM was seen; however; direct comparisons between the studies was difficult. Furthermore; only a small number of studies were based on women from populations where there is a high risk of zinc deficiency. Therefore; the link between maternal zinc status and pregnancy success in these populations cannot be established. Future studies should focus on those vulnerable to zinc deficiency and include dietary zinc intake as a measure of zinc status. PMID:27754451

  1. [Hyperemesis gravidarum: a rare but potentially severe complication of the first trimester of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Macle, Lucie; Varlet, Marie-Noëlle; Cathébras, Pascal

    2010-06-20

    Although nausea and vomiting are common symptoms in early pregnancy, hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a rare complication of the first trimester of pregnancy. This condition is defined as intractable vomiting occurring before 20 weeks of gestation, with fluid and electrolyte disturbance, significant weight loss, and ketonuria, leading to hospitalization in the absence of other cause than pregnancy. Some biological disturbances found in HG, such as hyperthyroidism and hepatic cytolysis, which are correlated with the importance of vomiting, are without severe clinical consequences, but may represent diagnostic pitfalls. The aetiology is unknown, but human chorionic gonadotropin hormones likely play the first role. Psychological disturbance is currently seen as the result of the burden and stress of HG rather than a causal factor. Maternal outcome may be severe in the absence of treatment, but pregnancy outcome seems good, as far as the condition has been adequately controlled. The management of HG includes IV rehydration, thiamine supplementation, antiemetic drugs (doxylamine, metoclopramide and chlorpromazine being the first-line choices), and in severe cases, nasogastric or parenteral nutrition. A psychological support is often necessary.

  2. Multidisciplinary management of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency in pregnancy: essential to prevent hyperammonemic complications.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Stephanie; Aye, Christina Yi Ling; Murphy, Elaine; Mackillop, Lucy

    2013-01-02

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common inborn error in the metabolism of the urea cycle with an incidence of 1 in 14,000 live births. Pregnancy can trigger potentially fatal hyperammonemic crises. We report a successful pregnancy in a 29-year-old primiparous patient with a known diagnosis of OTC deficiency since infancy. Hyperammonemic complications were avoided due to careful multidisciplinary management which included a detailed antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal plan. Management principles include avoidance of triggers, a low-protein diet and medications which promote the removal of nitrogen by alternative pathways. Triggers include metabolic stress such as febrile illness, particularly gastroenteritis, fasting and any protein loading. In our case the patient, in addition to a restricted protein intake, was prescribed sodium benzoate 4 g four times a day, sodium phenylbutyrate 2 g four times a day and arginine 500 mg four times a day to aid excretion of ammonia and reduce flux through the urea cycle.

  3. Perinatal outcome in singleton pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and eclampsia in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Phoa, K Y N; Chedraui, P; Pérez-López, F R; Wendte, J F; Ghiabi, S; Vrijkotte, T; Pinto, P

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia in Ecuador is an understudied subject since available epidemiological data are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe perinatal outcomes among singleton pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and eclampsia in a sample of low-income Ecuadorian women. Pregnant women complicated with preeclampsia (mild and severe) and eclampsia (defined according to criteria of the ACOG) delivering at the Enrique C. Sotomayor Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador were surveyed with a structured questionnaire containing maternal (socio-demographic) and neonatal data. Perinatal outcomes were compared according to severity of clinical presentation. A total of 163 women with preeclampsia [mild (23.9%), severe (68.7%) and eclampsia (7.4%)] were surveyed. Perinatal mortality and stillbirth rate was similar among studied groups (mild vs. severe preeclampsia/eclampsia cases). However, severe cases displayed higher rates of adverse perinatal outcomes: lower birth Apgar scores, more preterm births, and more low birth weight and small for gestational age infants. Caesarean-section rate and the number of admissions to intensive or intermediate neonatal care were higher in severe cases. A similar trend was found when analysis excluded preterm gestations. In conclusion, in this specific low-income Ecuadorian population perinatal outcome was adverse in pregnancies complicated with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia.

  4. Plasma homocysteine in late pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and in newborns.

    PubMed

    Baksu, Alparslan; Taskin, Mehtap; Goker, Nimet; Baksu, Basak; Uluocak, Aygul

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between maternal serum homocysteine levels in preeclampsia and the severity of the disease, neonatal serum homocysteine levels, maternal complications, and fetal outcome. Fifty pregnant women were included in this prospective study, of which 25 were severe (group I) and 25 were non-severe preeclamptic (group II). Maternal and neonatal serum homocysteine levels were measured by the fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) method. Maternal homocysteine levels in both groups were compared. The association of maternal and neonatal serum homocysteine levels with maternal complications and fetal outcome was investigated. When the maternal serum homocysteine cut-off value was accepted as 15 micromol/L, significant differences in relation to maternal (eclampsia; hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome) and fetal (in utero mort fetalis, low birthweight) complications were observed between the group with maternal serum homocysteine level > 15 micromol/L and the group with maternal serum homocysteine level < or = 15 micromol/L ( p < 0.05). Hyperhomocysteinemia during pregnancy is a risk factor for both development of preeclampsia and its complications. Given that the diagnosis and treatment of hyperhomocysteinemia is possible, clinical trials to determine whether treatment to reduce homocysteine would be valuable in the prevention of both maternal and fetal complications in preeclampsia should be designed.

  5. The role of telemedicine in the management of the pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiannis, Dimitrios S; Igwe, Elena; Homko, Carol J

    2013-02-01

    The use of technology to deliver health care over a distance has drawn considerable attention and shown dramatic growth over the last decade because of the possibility it has to reduce cost and improve access to modern medical care. Diabetes in pregnancy, which requires tight glycemic control in order to reduce perinatal complications, is a prime telemedicine intervention target. A review of the literature suggests that telemedicine, although not perfect, can potentially play a role in reducing patient visits and could improve quality of life without jeopardizing the outcome.

  6. Polyhydramnios, an unusual complication in pregnancy with hyperreactio luteinalis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hanprasertpong, Tharangrut; Hanpresertpong, Jitti

    2013-02-01

    Reports of hyperreactio luteinalis in a spontaneously conceived pregnancy are uncommon. Hyperreactio luteinalis complicated by polyhydramnios without an identifiable cause has never been reported. The authors report a case of a 25-year-old, gravida 4, para 2-0-1-2, 16-week pregnant woman who presented with bilateral ovarian enlargement. The beta-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone was at a normal level. An exploratory laparotomy with biopsy was performed at 17 weeks of gestation. Polyhydramnios without an identifiable cause was detected at 30 weeks of gestation. A full-term healthy baby was delivered. Intrapartum and postpartum were unremarkable and both ovaries spontaneously regressed.

  7. Sickle cell disease in pregnancy: maternal complications in a Medicaid-enrolled population.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Sheree L; Okoroh, Ekwutosi M; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Grant, Althea; Craig Hooper, W

    2013-02-01

    Higher frequencies of pregnancy complications have been reported among women with sickle cell disease (SCD) compared with those without SCD; however, past studies are limited by small sample size, narrow geographic area, and use of hospital discharge data. We compared the prevalence of maternal complications among intrapartum and postpartum women with SCD to those without SCD in a large, geographically diverse sample. Data from the 2004-2010 Truven Health MarketScan(®) Multi-State Medicaid databases were used to assess the prevalence of maternal complications among intrapartum and postpartum women 15-44 years of age with and without SCD whose race was reported as black. The comparison group of women without SCD was further divided into those with chronic conditions associated with multi-organ failure and those without chronic conditions. Multivariable log-binomial regression models were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for outcomes for women with SCD compared with women in the two comparison groups. Of the 335,348 black women with a delivery during 2004-2010, 1,526 had a diagnosis of SCD (0.5 %). Compared with women without SCD who had chronic conditions, women with SCD had higher prevalence of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, obstetric shock, pneumonia, sepsis, postpartum infection, and transfusions. SCD was also positively associated with acute renal failure, cerebrovascular disorder, respiratory distress syndrome, eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, preterm birth, and ventilation when compared with women without SCD and chronic conditions. Overall, women with SCD have increased prevalence of pregnancy complications, even when compared with a group of women with similar risk for multi-organ failure.

  8. The Salivary Scavenger and Agglutinin (SALSA) in Healthy and Complicated Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, Martin Parnov; Jarva, Hanna; Lokki, Anna Inkeri; Laivuori, Hannele; Vuorela, Piia; Loimaranta, Vuokko; Glasner, Andreas; Siwetz, Monika; Huppertz, Berthold; Meri, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. The etiology is not clear, but an immune attack towards components of placenta or fetus has been indicated. This involves activation of the complement system in the placenta. We have previously described the presence of the complement-regulating protein salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA) in amniotic fluid. In this study we investigated the potential role of SALSA in pregnancy by analyzing its presence in amniotic fluid and placental tissue during healthy and complicated pregnancies. SALSA levels in amniotic fluid increased during pregnancy. Before 20 weeks of gestation the levels were slightly higher in patients who later developed pre-eclampsia than in gestation age-matched controls. In the placenta of pre-eclamptic patients syncytial damage is often followed by the formation of fibrinoid structures. SALSA was found clustered into these fibrinoid structures in partial co-localization with complement C1q and fibronectin. In vitro analysis showed direct protein binding of SALSA to fibronectin. SALSA binds also to fibrin/fibrinogen but did not interfere with the blood clotting process in vitro. Thus, in addition to antimicrobial defense and epithelial differentiation, the data presented here suggest that SALSA, together with fibronectin and C1q, may be involved in the containment of injured placental structures into fibrinoids.

  9. [Production and reception of growth factors in the placenta during physiological and gestosis complicated pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Krukier, I I; Pogorelova, T N; Orlov, V I

    2007-01-01

    30 women with physiological pregnancy and 28 women with gestosis were examined. In the early chorion obtained after abortion and on the full-term placenta the content of the epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and their receptors were studied by means of the ELISA method. In the process of normal gestation the increase of the placental production both of the EGF and VEGF was found. During the pregnancy complicated with gestosis and miscarriage in the first trimester the content of EGF and its receptor was lower compared to the physiological values. For VEGF and its receptor opposite changes were found: the increase of quantity of the growth factor and the decrease of its receptor. In the case of gestosis and term pregnancy the content of the both growth factors and their receptors was lower than in controls. The revealed changes in production of the angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in the placenta may have the pathogenic importance in the development of gestosis.

  10. Normal adrenal function in an infant following a pregnancy complicated by maternal adrenal cortical carcinoma and mitotane exposure.

    PubMed

    Kojori, Fatemeh; Cronin, Catherine M G; Salamon, Elizabeth; Burym, Craig; Sellers, Elizabeth Ann Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Maternal adrenal cortical carcinoma in pregnancy is rare. We report a case of an infant born to a mother with a history of adrenal cortical carcinoma. The pregnancy was complicated by fetal exposure to mitotane and dexamethasone. Despite the potential teratogenic exposures, there was no evidence of adrenal dysfunction in the infant. Growth and development at 12 months of age are normal and prognosis appears favorable. The long-term impact of fetal exposure to mitotane and glucocorticoid requires further investigation.

  11. [Detecting high risk pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Doret, Muriel; Gaucherand, Pascal

    2009-12-20

    Antenatal care is aiming to reduce maternal land foetal mortality and morbidity. Maternal and foetal mortality can be due to different causes. Their knowledge allows identifying pregnancy (high risk pregnancy) with factors associated with an increased risk for maternal and/or foetal mortality and serious morbidity. Identification of high risk pregnancies and initiation of appropriate treatment and/or surveillance should improve maternal and/or foetal outcome. New risk factors are continuously described thanks to improvement in antenatal care and development in biology and cytopathology, increasing complexity in identifying high risk pregnancies. Level of risk can change all over the pregnancy. Ideally, it should be evaluated prior to the pregnancy and at each antenatal visit. Clinical examination is able to screen for intra-uterin growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, threatened for preterm labour; ultrasounds help in the diagnosis of foetal morphological anomalies, foetal chromosomal anomalies, placenta praevia and abnormal foetal growth; biological exams are used to screen for pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, trisomy 21 (for which screening method just changed), rhesus immunisation, seroconversion for toxoplasmosis or rubeola, unknown infectious disease (syphilis, hepatitis B, VIH). During pregnancy, most of the preventive strategies have to be initiated during the first trimester or even before conception. Prevention for neural-tube defects, neonatal hypocalcemia and listeriosis should be performed for all women. On the opposite, some measures are concerning only women with risk factors such as prevention for toxoplasmosis, rhesus immunization (which recently changed), tobacco complications and pre-eclampsia and intra-uterine growth factor restriction.

  12. Lower Plasma Ghrelin Levels are Found in Women with Diabetes-Complicated Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Díaz, Rita Angélica; Gómez-Medina, Monica P.; Ramírez-Soriano, Eleazar; López-Robles, Lucio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Saucedo, Renata; Zarate, Arturo; Valladares-Salgado, Adan; Wacher, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the associations of glycemic control and gestational age with ghrelin and proinsulin levels in cord blood and mothers’ peripheral blood during pregnancy. Methods: This is a cross-sectional comparative study of twenty-four pregnant women with gestational diabetes (GD), 18 with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 36 without diabetes, as well as their neonates. Levels of proinsulin, ghrelin, and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were measured from maternal blood during the last week before caesarian delivery and in neonatal umbilical cord blood samples. Results: Mothers with GD and T2DM had significantly lower ghrelin levels compared to the healthy mothers (p<0.001). Maternal proinsulin was lower in women with GD than in women without diabetes (p<0.001). Proinsulin was significantly elevated in the neonates of women with GD and in women with HbA1c ≥6.5% (p<0.001). However, maternal ghrelin levels were higher (p=0.031) and neonate proinsulin levels lower in the pre-term offspring of mothers with GD (p=0.033). There was a negative correlation between HbA1c levels and birth weight (r=–0.407, p<0.001). Conclusion: Ghrelin levels were lower in pregnant women with diabetes, although pre-term birth appeared to reverse this trend in GD. Proinsulin levels were also low in pregnant women with diabetes and even lower in pre-term vs. at-term births. Both ghrelin and proinsulin levels were lower in pregnant women with diabetes and HbA1c of <6.5%. Thus, ghrelin participates in the adaptation to the caloric imbalance of diabetic pregnancy and may play a similar role in pregnancy-related complications, since high ghrelin concentrations may be necessary for normal fetal development. PMID:27476441

  13. Rapid one step urine test for human chorionic gonadotrophin in evaluating suspected complications of early pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kingdom, J C; Kelly, T; MacLean, A B; McAllister, E J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the ability of a sensitive one step urine test to detect human chorionic gonadotrophin in women with suspected complications of early pregnancy. DESIGN--Test on women presenting to accident and emergency department with gynaecological problems over six months. Results were validated using a quantitative assay for human chorionic gonadotrophin in serum and urine. SETTING--Accident and emergency department and gynaecology wards of a university teaching hospital. SUBJECTS--130 unselected women. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Detection of human chorionic gonadotrophin by one step test, presence of ectopic pregnancy, and results of quantitative analysis of chorionic gonadotrophin in serum and urine. RESULTS--79 women had a positive urine test result and 51 a negative result. All 12 women with ectopic pregnancy had a positive test result, although urinary concentration varied from 191 IU/l to 47,800 IU/l. Only one woman, who had a faintly positive result, was found not to be pregnant on subsequent examination. The sensitivity and negative predictive values of the urine test were 100% respectively. 33 women were sent home from the accident and emergency department with normal clinical findings after a negative urine test result. All these women had undetectable concentrations of chorionic gonadotrophin in matched samples of urine and serum. CONCLUSIONS--A simple, rapid one step test for chorionic gonadotrophin should be available for the initial evaluation of emergency gynaecological problems. The additional cost of the test is offset by not admitting those patients whose clinical findings are normal and who have a negative urine test result and by reducing the number of women requiring quantitative assays of chorionic gonadotrophin. Images FIG 1 PMID:2059687

  14. Oral cancer, fever of unknown origin, and listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Morritt, A N; Mclean, N R; Snow, M H

    2002-10-01

    Listeriosis is a rare cause of fever of unknown origin in patients with oral cancer. We report two patients who, because of pain and discomfort, ate large quantities of soft cheeses; this caused listeriosis and fever. Both cases responded to high doses of amoxycillin.

  15. Relationship between ABO blood group and pregnancy complications: a systematic literature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Mengoli, Carlo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Given the expression of ABO blood group antigens on the surface of a wide range of human cells and tissues, the putative interplay of the ABO system in human biology outside the area of transfusion and transplantation medicine constitutes an intriguing byway of research. Thanks to evidence accumulated over more than 50 years, the involvement of the ABO system in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including cardiovascular, infectious and neoplastic disorders, is now acknowledged. However, there is controversial information on the potential association between ABO blood type and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia and related disorders (eclampsia, HELLP syndrome and intrauterine growth restriction), venous thromboembolism, post-partum haemorrhage and gestational diabetes. To elucidate the role of ABO antigens in pregnancy-related complications, we performed a systematic review of the literature published in the past 50 years. A meta-analytical approach was also applied to the existing literature on the association between ABO status and pre-eclampsia. The results of this systematic review are presented and critically discussed, along with the possible pathogenic implications. PMID:27177402

  16. Relationship between ABO blood group and pregnancy complications: a systematic literature analysis.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mengoli, Carlo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Given the expression of ABO blood group antigens on the surface of a wide range of human cells and tissues, the putative interplay of the ABO system in human biology outside the area of transfusion and transplantation medicine constitutes an intriguing byway of research. Thanks to evidence accumulated over more than 50 years, the involvement of the ABO system in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including cardiovascular, infectious and neoplastic disorders, is now acknowledged. However, there is controversial information on the potential association between ABO blood type and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia and related disorders (eclampsia, HELLP syndrome and intrauterine growth restriction), venous thromboembolism, post-partum haemorrhage and gestational diabetes. To elucidate the role of ABO antigens in pregnancy-related complications, we performed a systematic review of the literature published in the past 50 years. A meta-analytical approach was also applied to the existing literature on the association between ABO status and pre-eclampsia. The results of this systematic review are presented and critically discussed, along with the possible pathogenic implications.

  17. Hospital-based perinatal outcomes and complications in teenage pregnancy in India.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Prianka; Chaudhuri, R N; Paul, Bhaskar

    2010-10-01

    Teenage pregnancy is a worldwide problem bearing serious social and medical implications relating to maternal and child health. A cross-sectional observational study was undertaken to compare the different sociodemographic characteristics and perinatal outcomes of teenage primigravida mothers with those of adult primigravida mothers in a tertiary-care hospital in eastern India. A sample of 350 each in cases and comparison group comprised the study subjects. Data were collected through interviews and by observations using a pretested and predesigned schedule. Results revealed that the teenage mothers had a higher proportion (27.7%) of preterm deliveries compared to 13.1% in the adult mothers and had low-birthweight babies (38.9% vs 30.4% respectively). Stillbirth rate was also significantly higher in teenage deliveries (5.1% vs 0.9% respectively). The teenage mothers developed more adverse perinatal complications, such as preterm births, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and delivered low-birthweight babies, when compared with those of the adult primigravida mothers. Teenage pregnancy is still a rampant and important public-health problem in India with unfavourable perinatal outcomes and needs to be tackled on a priority basis.

  18. Aspirin: The Mechanism of Action Revisited in the Context of Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid, Angela P.

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is one of the most frequently used and cheapest drugs in medicine. It belongs to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with a wide range of pharmacological activities, including analgesic, antipyretic, and antiplatelet properties. Currently, it is accepted to prescribe a low dose of aspirin to pregnant women who are at high risk of preeclampsia (PE) because it reduces the onset of this complication. Another pregnancy alteration in which a low dose of aspirin is recommended is the obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The most recognized mechanism of action of aspirin is to inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins but this by itself does not explain the repertoire of anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin. Later, another mechanism was described: the induction of the production of aspirin-triggered lipoxins (ATLs) from arachidonic acid by acetylation of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2. The availability of a stable analog of ATL has stimulated investigations on the use of this analog and it has been found that, similar to endogenously produced lipoxins, ATL resolves inflammation and acts as antioxidant and immunomodulator. If we consider that in PE and in the obstetric APS, there is an underlying inflammatory process, aspirin might be used based on the induction of ATL. The objective of this review is to revisit the old and new mechanisms of action of aspirin. In particular, it intends to show other potential uses of this drug to prevent certain pregnancy complications in the light of its ability to induce anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid-derived mediators. PMID:28360907

  19. Placental microRNA expression in pregnancies complicated by superimposed pre-eclampsia on chronic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    VASHUKOVA, ELENA S.; GLOTOV, ANDREY S.; FEDOTOV, PAVEL V.; EFIMOVA, OLGA A.; PAKIN, VLADIMIR S.; MOZGOVAYA, ELENA V.; PENDINA, ANNA A.; TIKHONOV, ANDREI V.; KOLTSOVA, ALLA S.; BARANOV, VLADISLAV S.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a complication of pregnancy that affects 5–8% of women after 20 weeks of gestation. It is usually diagnosed based on the de novo onset of hypertension and proteinuria. Preexisting hypertension in women developing PE, also known as superimposed PE on chronic hypertension (SPE), leads to elevated risk of maternal and fetal mortality. PE is associated with an altered microRNA (miRNA) expression pattern in the placenta, suggesting that miRNA deregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of PE. Whether and how the miRNA expression pattern is changed in the SPE placenta remains unclear. The present study analyzed the placental miRNA expression profile in pregnancies complicated by SPE. miRNA expression profiles in SPE and normal placentas were investigated using an Ion Torrent sequencing system. Sequencing data were processed using a comprehensive analysis pipeline for deep miRNA sequencing (CAP-miRSeq). A total of 22 miRNAs were identified to be deregulated in placentas from patients with SPE. They included 16 miRNAs previously known to be associated with PE and 6 novel miRNAs. Among the 6 novel miRNAs, 4 were upregulated (miR-518a, miR-527, miR-518e and miR-4532) and 2 downregulated (miR-98 and miR-135b) in SPE placentas compared with controls. The present results suggest that SPE is associated with specific alterations in the placental miRNA expression pattern, which differ from alterations detected in PE placentas, and therefore, provide novel targets for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying SPE pathogenesis. PMID:27176897

  20. Identification of a Monoclonal Antibody That Attenuates Antiphospholipid Syndrome-Related Pregnancy Complications and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mineo, Chieko; Lanier, Lane; Jung, Eunjeong; Sengupta, Samarpita; Ulrich, Victoria; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Tarango, Cristina; Osunbunmi, Olutoye; Shen, Yu-Min; Salmon, Jane E.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Huang, Xianming; Shaul, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    In the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), patients produce antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) that promote thrombosis and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Current therapy with anticoagulation is only partially effective and associated with multiple complications. We previously discovered that aPL recognition of cell surface β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) initiates apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2)-dependent signaling in endothelial cells and in placental trophoblasts that ultimately promotes thrombosis and fetal loss, respectively. Here we sought to identify a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to β2-GPI that negates aPL-induced processes in cell culture and APS disease endpoints in mice. In a screen measuring endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity in cultured endothelial cells, we found that whereas aPL inhibit eNOS, the mAb 1N11 does not, and instead 1N11 prevents aPL action. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed that 1N11 decreases pathogenic antibody binding to β2-GPI, and it blocks aPL-induced complex formation between β2-GPI and apoER2. 1N11 also prevents aPL antagonism of endothelial cell migration, and in mice it reverses the impairment in reendothelialization caused by aPL, which underlies the non-thrombotic vascular occlusion provoked by disease-causing antibodies. In addition, aPL inhibition of trophoblast proliferation and migration is negated by 1N11, and the more than 6-fold increase in fetal resorption caused by aPL in pregnant mice is prevented by 1N11. Furthermore, the promotion of thrombosis by aPL is negated by 1N11. Thus, 1N11 has been identified as an mAb that attenuates APS-related pregnancy complications and thrombosis in mice. 1N11 may provide an efficacious, mechanism-based therapy to combat the often devastating conditions suffered by APS patients. PMID:27463336

  1. Association between primary Sjögren's syndrome and pregnancy complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Upala, Sikarin; Yong, Wai Chung; Sanguankeo, Anawin

    2016-08-01

    Systemic autoimmune disorders may interfere with normal reproductive function resulting in negative outcome of pregnancy. Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a common rheumatic disease that mostly affects females. There are many reports that this condition may increase risk of pregnancy complications and fetal loss. However, data regarding these adverse outcomes are scarce and inconclusive. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available articles that assess the association between pSS and adverse pregnancy outcome. We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE and EMBASE from their dates of inception to March 2016 and reviewed papers with validity criteria. A random-effects model was used to evaluate pregnancy complications in patients with pSS and healthy controls. From 20 full-text articles, 7 studies involving 544 patients and 1586 pregnancies were included in the meta-analysis. Fetal complications included spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, neonatal deaths, and intrauterine growth retardation. Compared with healthy pregnancy, patients with pSS had significantly higher chance of neonatal deaths (pooled odds ratio (OR) = 1.77, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.28 to 1.46, p = 0.01). However, there were no significant associations between pSS and premature birth (OR = 2.10, 95 % CI 0.59-7.46, p = 0.25), spontaneous abortion (OR = 1.46, 95 % CI 0.72-2.93, p = 0.29), artificial abortion (OR = 1.12, 95 % CI 0.52-2.61, p = 0.71), or stillbirth (OR = 1.05, 95 % CI 0.38-2.97, p = 0.92). There is an increased risk of fetal loss in pregnant patients with pSS. The presented evidence further supports multidisciplinary care for these patients to prevent complications during pregnancy.

  2. Mid-trimester maternal ADAM12 levels differ according to fetal gender in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jenny E; Thomas, Grégoire; Tuytten, Robin; Van Herrewege, Yven; Djiokep, Raoul O; Roberts, Claire T; Kenny, Louise C; Simpson, Nigel A B; North, Robyn A; Baker, Philip N

    2015-02-01

    An overrepresentation of adverse pregnancy outcomes has been observed in pregnancies associated with a male fetus. We investigated the association between fetal gender and candidate biomarkers for preeclampsia. Proteins were quantified in samples taken at 20 weeks from women recruited to the SCreening fOr Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study (preeclampsia n = 150; no preeclampsia n = 450). In contrast to placental growth factor, soluble endoglin, and insulin-like growth factor acid labile subunit, levels of metallopeptidase domain 12 (ADAM12) at 20 weeks were dependent on fetal gender in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, for male (n = 73) fetuses the multiples of the median (MoM; interquartile range [IQR] 1.1-1.5) was 1.3, whereas for female fetuses (n = 75) MoM was 1.1 (1.0-1.3); P < .01. Prediction of preeclampsia using ADAM12 levels was improved for pregnancies associated with a male fetus (area under receiver-operator curve [AUC] 0.73 [95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.80]) than that of a female fetus (AUC 0.62 [0.55-0.70]); P = .03. The data presented here fit a contemporary hypothesis that there is a difference between the genders in response to an adverse maternal environment and suggest that an alteration in ADAM12 may reflect an altered placental response in pregnancies subsequently complicated by preeclampsia.

  3. Pregnancy and delivery complications and treatment approach in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Aktepe, Evrim; Ozkorumak, Evrim; Tanriöver-Kandil, Sema

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy, delivery complications and treatment approach were evaluated in 153 cases diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in the State Hospital of Antalya in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Polyclinic. Most of the cases had been delivered vaginally (74.5%). The most frequent delivery complication was asphyxia/hypoxia (15.6%). The agent most frequently preferred in the treatment regimen was methylphenidate (82.4%), which is a psychostimulant. The other drugs used were risperidone (29.4%), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (16.4%) and imipramine (4.6%). The most frequent side effect resulting from methylphenidate use was a decrease in appetite (34.9%). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder often presents with comorbid disorders; in these cases, nonstimulant agents had to be added to methylphenidate for better treatment outcomes. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in combined treatment and in cases with comorbidities is in agreement with the literature. Further studies of combined treatment regimens in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are needed.

  4. Genome-Wide Identification of Epigenetic Hotspots Potentially Related to Cardiovascular Risk in Adult Women after a Complicated Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Oudejans, Cees; Poutsma, Ankie; Michel, Omar; Mulders, Joyce; Visser, Allerdien; van Dijk, Marie; Nauta, Tessa; Bokslag, Anouk; Paulus, Walter; de Haas, Andreas; Koolwijk, Pieter; de Groot, Christianne J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The physiological demands of pregnancy on the maternal cardiovascular system can catapult women into a metabolic syndrome that predisposes to atherosclerosis in later life. We sought to identify the nature of the epigenomic changes associated with the increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adult women following pre-eclampsia. Findings We assessed the genome wide epigenetic profile by methyl-C sequencing of monozygotic parous twin sister pairs discordant for a severe variant of pre-eclampsia. In the adult twin sisters at risk for CVD as a consequence of a complicated pregnancy, a set of 12 differentially methylated regions with at least 50% difference in methylation percentage and the same directional change was found to be shared between the affected twin sisters and significantly different compared to their unaffected monozygous sisters. Conclusion The current epigenetic marker set will permit targeted analysis of differentially methylated regions potentially related to CVD risk in large cohorts of adult women following complicated pregnancies. PMID:26870946

  5. Morphological Characteristics of Placental Complex in Pregnant Women without Complications in Pregnancy and in the Presence of Severe Preeclampsia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbetov, Turakbai Zh.; Berdalinova, Akzhenis K.; Tusupkalieyv, Akylbek B.; Koishybayev, Arip K.; Zharilkasynov, Karaman Ye.

    2016-01-01

    According to the WHO data, preeclampsia develops during late pregnancy in 2-8% of women. Preeclampsia is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, therefore, the study of the morphological features of placental complex, taking into account gestational complications in postpartum women with severe preeclampsia is an important…

  6. Extreme Elevation of Alkaline Phosphatase in a Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes and Infant with Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There have been few case reports of isolated elevation of alkaline phosphatase beyond the normal physiologic amount with subsequent return to baseline after delivery. Here we present a similar case of extreme elevation of alkaline phosphatase in a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes and subsequently by neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). PMID:27610256

  7. Serum 25(OH) Vitamin D Levels in Polish Women during Pregnancies Complicated by Hypertensive Disorders and Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Domaracki, Piotr; Sadlecki, Pawel; Odrowaz-Sypniewska, Grazyna; Dzikowska, Ewa; Walentowicz, Pawel; Siodmiak, Joanna; Grabiec, Marek; Walentowicz-Sadlecka, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Background: An association between the level of vitamin D and the risk of pregnancy-related complications remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine concentrations of 25(OH) vitamin D in Polish women with normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by gestational hypertension, preeclampsia or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Moreover, we analyzed an association between maternal serum 25(OH)D and the risk of gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and GDM. Material and Methods: The study included 207 pregnant women, among them 171 with pregnancy-related complications: gestational hypertension (n = 45), preeclampsia (n = 23) or GDM (n = 103). The control group consisted of 36 women with normal pregnancies. Concentrations of serum 25(OH)D were measured at admission to the hospital prior to delivery Results: Patients with hypertension did not differ significantly from the controls in terms of their serum 25(OH)D concentrations (18.20 vs. 22.10 ng/mL, p = 0.15). Highly significant differences were found in 25(OH)D concentrations of women with preeclampsia and the controls (14.75 vs. 22.10 ng/mL, p = 0.0021). GDM was not associated with significant differences in 25(OH)D concentration. A low level of 25(OH)D turned out to be associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia during pregnancy on both univariate and multivariate regression analysis, and was a significant predictor of this condition on ROC (receiver operating characteristic) analysis (AUC = 0.70, p < 0.01). Conclusions: 25(OH)D deficiency is common among pregnant Polish women. Low concentrations of 25(OH)D may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of preeclampsia. Routine assessment of the 25(OH)D level during pregnancy may be crucial for the identification of women at increased risk of preeclampsia. PMID:27690002

  8. [The comparative evaluation of information value of traditionally analyzed indicators of total blood test and leucocytes index of intoxication in women with physiological and complicated course of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Skriabina, V V

    2013-12-01

    The article demonstrates that on the basis of retrospective analysis of 34 cases of physiological and 218 cases of complicated course of pregnancy the evaluation of leucocytes index of intoxication is more informative than the standard analysis of leukogram. The increase of leucocytes index of intoxication and tendency of increase of percentage of concentration of leucocytes at early stage of pregnancy are detected mainly in women with complicated course of pregnancy.

  9. Analysis of the Placental Tissue Transcriptome of Normal and Preeclampsia Complicated Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Trifonova, E. A.; Gabidulina, T. V.; Ershov, N. I.; Serebrova, V. N.; Vorozhishcheva, A. Yu.; Stepanov, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the most severe gestational complications which is one of the leading causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. A growth in the incidence of severe and combined forms of the pathology has been observed in recent years. According to modern concepts, inadequate cytotrophoblast invasion into the spiral arteries of the uterus and development of the ischemia-reperfusion syndrome in the placental tissue play the leading role in the development of preeclampsia, which is characterized by multipleorgan failure. In this regard, our work was aimed at studying the patterns of placental tissue transcriptome that are specific to females with PE and with physiological pregnancy, as well as identifying the potential promising biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of this pathology. We have identified 63 genes whose expression proved to differ significantly in the placental tissue of females with PE and with physiological pregnancy. A cluster of differentially expressed genes (DEG) whose expression level is increased in patients with preeclampsia includes not only the known candidate genes that have been identified in many other genome-wide studies (e.g., LEP, BHLHB2, SIGLEC6, RDH13, BCL6), but also new genes (ANKRD37, SYDE1, CYBA, ITGB2, etc.), which can be considered as new biological markers of preeclampsia and are of further interest. The results of a functional annotation of DEG show that the development of preeclampsia may be related to a stress response, immune processes, the regulation of cell-cell interactions, intracellular signaling cascades, etc. In addition, the features of the differential gene expression depending on preeclampsia severity were revealed. We have found evidence of the important role of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the failure of immunological tolerance and initiation of the pro-inflammatory cascade in the development of severe preeclampsia. The results obtained elaborate the concept of the

  10. Symptoms associated with pregnancy complications along the Thai-Burma border: the role of conflict violence and intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Falb, Kathryn L; McCormick, Marie C; Hemenway, David; Anfinson, Katherine; Silverman, Jay G

    2014-01-01

    To assess the association between lifetime violence victimization and self-reported symptoms associated with pregnancy complications among women living in refugee camps along the Thai-Burma border. Cross-sectional survey of partnered women aged 15-49 years living in three refugee camps who reported a pregnancy that resulted in a live birth within the past 2 years with complete data (n = 337). Variables included the lifetime prevalence of any violence victimization, conflict victimization, intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization, self-reported symptoms of pregnancy complications, and demographic covariates. Logistic generalized estimating equations, accounting for camp-level clustering, were used to assess the relationships of interest. Approximately one in six women (16.0 %) reported symptoms related to pregnancy complications for their most recent birth within the last 2 years and 15 % experienced violence victimization. In multivariable analyses, any form of lifetime violence victimization was associated with 3.1 times heightened odds of reporting symptoms (95 % CI 1.8-5.2). In the final adjusted model, conflict victimization was associated with a 3.0 increase in odds of symptoms (95 % CI 2.4-3.7). However, lifetime IPV victimization was not associated with symptoms, after accounting for conflict victimization (aOR: 1.8; 95 % CI 0.4-9.0). Conflict victimization was strongly linked with heightened risk of self-reported symptoms associated with pregnancy complications among women in refugee camps along the Thai-Burma border. Future research and programs should consider the long-term impacts of conflict victimization in relation to maternal health to better meet the needs of refugee women.

  11. Perinatal outcomes of Southeast Asians with pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus or preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Swee May; O'Brien, William; Gelaye, Bizu; Williams, Michelle A

    2012-10-01

    To examine risks for adverse perinatal outcomes among Southeast Asian women with pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or preeclampsia. Perinatal outcomes of singleton births of Cambodian (3,489), Laotian (2,038), Vietnamese (11,605), Japanese (3,083) and non-Hispanic White women (33,088) were analyzed using Washington state linked birth certificate and hospitalization discharge records (1993-2006). Both Cambodian (aOR = 1.68) and Laotian (aOR = 1.71) women with GDM had increased odds of macrosomia when compared with Japanese women with GDM. Southeast Asian women with GDM had reduced odds of macrosomia when compared with White women. Southeast Asian women with preeclampsia had increased odds for preterm delivery when compared with Japanese and White women with preeclampsia. Research is needed to understand why Southeast Asian women with GDM are more likely to have better perinatal outcomes when compared with White women. Vigilant monitoring and culturally sensitive care for Southeast Asian women with preeclampsia is needed.

  12. Feto-maternal outcomes of pregnancy complicated by ovarian malignant germ cell tumor: a systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Michiko; Grubbs, Brendan H; Blake, Erin A; Cahoon, Sigita S; Murakami, Ryusuke; Kimura, Tadashi; Matsuo, Koji

    2014-10-01

    Malignant germ cell tumors (MGCT) are a rare type of ovarian cancer with poorly understood behavior during pregnancy. This systematic review evaluated feto-maternal outcomes and management patterns of 102 ovarian MGCT-complicated pregnancies identified in PubMed/MEDLINE. Mean age was 25.8. The most common histology type was dysgerminoma (38.2%) followed by yolk sac tumor (30.4%). Abdomino-pelvic pain (35.3%) was the most common symptom. The majority were stage I disease (76.4%) with a mean tumor size of 17.9cm. Most cases had live births (77.5%) at term (56.6%). Tumor surgery without fetal conservation took place in 22 (21.6%) cases (Group 1). This group was characterized by the first trimester tumor detection and intervention, non-viable pregnancy, and frequent concurrent hysterectomy. There were 59 (57.8%) cases which underwent expectant management of pregnancy: mean delay 16.4 weeks for 46 (45.1%) cases with tumor surgery and fetal conservation (Group 2); and 7.8 weeks for 13 (12.7%) cases with tumor surgery after delivery (Group 3). The live birth rate in Groups 2 and 3 was 98.3%. There were 21 (20.6%) cases in which the tumor was incidentally found intra/postpartum (Group 4). Group 2 showed the highest 5-year overall survival rate (92.8%) followed by Group 4 (79.5%), Group 3 (71.4%), and Group 1 (56.2%, p=0.028). Group 1 had more advanced-stage disease when compared to Group 2 (proportion of stages II-IV disease, 36.4% versus 11.4%, p=0.023). In multivariate analysis, age ≤20 (p=0.032) and stages II-IV (p=0.02) remained independent prognosticators for decreased overall survival in all cases. Expectant management of pregnancy was not associated with poor survival outcome in multivariate analysis (p=0.43). In conclusion, our analysis demonstrated that timing of tumor intervention and delivery significantly impacted feto-maternal outcome of ovarian MGCT-complicated pregnancies. It is suggested that early detection and tumor intervention with expectant

  13. [A case of Edwards' syndrome in pregnancy complicated by serologic incompatibility and preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Murawski, Marek; Gryboś, Marian; Zalewska, Dominika; Symonowicz, Krzysztof

    2006-12-01

    A case of Edwards' syndrome (trisomy 18) diagnosed in the third pregnancy trimester is described. The diagnosis was based on sonographic examination and cytogenetic amniocentesis. Lethal genetic fetal malformation determined the medical indication to preterm delivery. Additionally, serologic incompatibility during pregnancy was observed, as well as pregnancy induced hypertension turning into preeclampsia after the labour action was evoked. A caesarean section due to obstetric indications was done. Phenotype and lethal congenital malformations in the newborn have confirmed of the chromosome aberration prenatally diagnosed.

  14. The prevalence and incidence of perinatal anxiety disorders among women experiencing a medically complicated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Nichole; Young, Allan H; Zhang, Areiyu; Janssen, Patricia; Antony, Martin M

    2017-04-01

    Over 20% of pregnancies involve medical difficulties that pose some threat to the health and well-being of the mother, her developing infant, or both. We report on the first comparison of the prevalence and incidence of maternal anxiety disorders (AD) in pregnancy and the postpartum, across levels of medical risk in pregnancy. Pregnant women (N = 310) completed postnatal screening measures for anxiety. Women who scored at or above cutoff on one or more of the screening measures were administered a diagnostic interview (n = 115) for AD. Pregnancies were classified into low, moderate, or high risk based on self-report and contact with high-risk maternity clinics. The incidence of AD in pregnancy was higher among women classified as experiencing a medically moderate or high-risk pregnancy, compared with women classified as experiencing a medically low-risk pregnancy. Across risk groups, there were no differences in AD prevalence or in the incidence of AD in the postpartum. Demographic characteristics and parity did not contribute meaningfully to outcomes. Pregnancies characterized by medical risks are associated with an increased likelihood of new onset AD. Women experiencing medically complex pregnancies should be screened for anxiety and offered appropriate treatment.

  15. Pregnancy complications in spontaneous and assisted conceptions of women with infertility and subfertility factors. A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Santagni, Susanna; Gibbins, Karen; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Silver, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    In the literature, there is growing evidence that assisted reproductive techniques increase the risk of pregnancy complications in subfertile couples. Moreover, many concomitant preconception risk factors for subfertility are frequently present in the same subject and increase the risk of pregnancy complications. This review aimed to summarize in a systematic fashion the best current evidence regarding the effects of preconception maternal factors on maternal and neonatal outcomes. A literature search up to March 2016 was performed in IBSS, SocINDEX, Institute for Scientific Information, PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar. An evidence-based hierarchy was used to determine which articles to include and analyse. Available data show that the risk of pregnancy complications in spontaneous and assisted conceptions is likely multifactorial, and the magnitude of this risk is probably very different according specific subgroups of patients. Notwithstanding the only moderate level and quality of the available evidence, available data suggest that the presence and the treatment of specific preconception cofactors of subfertility should be always taken into account both in clinical practice and for scientific purposes.

  16. The Assessment of Diet Quality and Its Effects on Health Outcomes Pre-pregnancy and during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julie C; Zhou, Shao J; Flynn, Angela C; Malek, Lenka; Greco, Rebecca; Moran, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Overweight and obesity pre pregnancy or during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for maternal obstetric and fetal complications. Diet is one modifiable risk factor that women may be motivated to improve. General healthy eating guidelines, micronutrient sufficiency and macronutrient quantity and quality are important nutrition considerations pre and during pregnancy. With regards to specific nutrients, health authorities have recommendations for folate and/or iodine supplementation; but not consistently for iron and omega-3 despite evidence for their association with health outcomes. There are modest additional requirements for energy and protein, but not fat or carbohydrate, in mid-late pregnancy. Diet indices and dietary pattern analysis are additional tools or methodologies used to assess diet quality. These tools have been used to determine dietary intakes and patterns and their association with pregnancy complications and birth outcomes pre or during pregnancy. Women who may unnecessarily resist foods due to fear of food contamination from listeriosis and methylmercury may limit their diet quality and a balanced approached is required. Dietary intake may also vary according to certain population characteristics. Additional support for women who are younger, less educated, overweight and obese, from socially disadvantaged areas, smokers and those who unnecessarily avoid healthy foods, is required to achieve a higher quality diet and optimal lifestyle peri conception.

  17. M1/M2 Macrophage Polarity in Normal and Complicated Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mary B.; von Chamier, Maria; Allam, Ayman B.; Reyes, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    Tissue macrophages play an important role in all stages of pregnancy, including uterine stromal remodeling (decidualization) before embryo implantation, parturition, and post-partum uterine involution. The activation state and function of utero-placental macrophages are largely dependent on the local tissue microenvironment. Thus, macrophages are involved in a variety of activities such as regulation of immune cell activities, placental cell invasion, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. Disruption of the uterine microenvironment, particularly during the early stages of pregnancy (decidualization, implantation, and placentation) can have profound effects on macrophage activity and subsequently impact pregnancy outcome. In this review, we will provide an overview of the temporal and spatial regulation of utero-placental macrophage activation during normal pregnancy in human beings and rodents with a focus on more recent findings. We will also discuss the role of M1/M2 dysregulation within the intrauterine environment during adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25505471

  18. High-risk pregnancy in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): a case of ectopic, abdominal pregnancy with birth of a live, term infant, and a case of gestational diabetes complicated by pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Luck, Melissa; Hartley, Deborah; Crispen, Heather M.; Lubach, Gabriele R.; Coe, Christopher L.

    2009-01-01

    Several cases of abdominal pregnancy have been described in nonhuman primates. These previous occurrences have been mummified fetuses found in the abdominal cavity. This report describes a case of abdominal pregnancy in a timed-bred rhesus monkey with delivery of a live term infant. The mother died 14 days later from complications of septic peritonitis. At necropsy, the monkey had an intestinal adenocarcinoma that may have allowed leakage of intestinal contents into the abdomen. The second case of pregnancy complication was a rhesus monkey found to have gestational diabetes that later developed pre-eclampsia. She was treated for 5 days with a regimen similar to that used in women, and a live infant was delivered at day 157 of gestation by Caesarian section. These cases of high-risk pregnancy underscore the value of timed-breeding and careful monitoring of pregnant monkeys and the similarities between pregnancy complications in women and in nonhuman primates. PMID:19490364

  19. Increased psychological trauma and decreased desire to have children after a complicated pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Pınar; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Soydinç, Hatice Ender; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Özler, Ali; Turgut, Abdulkadir; Bez, Yasin; Gül, Talip

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Information about fertility desire and psychological sequelae after high-risk pregnancies are scarce in the literature. The aim of the present study is to investigate the psychological effects of high-risk pregnancies. Material and Methods: The patients who had a history of severe preeclampsia, eclampsia or major hemorrhage during the peripartum period were enrolled as the study group and compared with the control subjects with respect to fear about new pregnancy, anxiety/ depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) scores. The study was carried out by submitting a questionnaire form to the participants. Numbers of planned children before and after the last delivery were evaluated in both groups. Results: Fear about a new pregnancy was found to be significantly higher in the study group compared with the controls. There were no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of anxiety and depression. In terms of re-experience and avoidance in PTSD was significantly higher in the study group, however no significant difference was found for hyper-arousal. Conclusion: Fear regarding new pregnancy is high and planning more children is decreased after high-risk pregnancies and PTSD symptom scores were higher after high-risk pregnancies. PMID:24592063

  20. Conception, complicated pregnancy, and labour of gods and heroes in Greek mythology.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, Christos; Trompoukis, Constantinos; Sardi, Thalia; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy and labour are holy moments in a woman's life. Even in Greek mythology we can find descriptions of them. We searched in the Greek myths to find descriptions of labours of ancient heroes and gods. We identified descriptions of extracorporeal fertilization, superfecundation, ectopic pregnancy, preterm labour, prolonged pregnancy and Caesarean section. The use of imagination could help the reader to find similarities in present or future developments in the field of obstetrics. It could be concluded that various aspects of modern obstetrical practice are described in Greek mythology.

  1. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use during pregnancy and possible neonatal complications.

    PubMed

    Cantor Sackett, Jillan; Weller, Ronald A; Weller, Elizabeth B

    2009-06-01

    This paper reviews the risks and benefits of using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in pregnant women. The effects of SSRI use on pregnant women and fetuses are discussed, and the need for SSRI treatment is explained. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, teratogenic risks of SSRI treatment during pregnancy, neonatal adaptations, and long-term outcomes for children whose mothers used SSRIs during pregnancy are specifically considered. Due to conflicting results from current studies, there are no clear guidelines for SSRI treatment in pregnancy. Patients and doctors must discuss together the risks and benefits of SSRI use during pregnancy and decide on a course of treatment. Potential risks must be balanced against the effects of untreated maternal depression.

  2. Postpartum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in a twin pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia-eclampsia: case report.

    PubMed

    Papoutsis, D; El-Attabi, N; Sizer, A

    2014-01-01

    This is the second case in literature of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in a twin pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia-eclampsia. A 27-year-old primigravida with dichorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy was admitted at 36 weeks of gestation for induction of labour due to preeclampsia. On the second day postpartum, the patient developed severe hypertension, visual symptoms, confusion, headache, and eclamptic fits. Head computed tomography (CT) showed hypodense basal ganglia lesions. The patient was treated in the intensive treatment unit with hydralazine and labetalol infusions and anticonvulsants. Five days later, there was complete clinical improvement and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was normal. The patient was discharged 11 days post-delivery. Diagnosis of PRES is based on the presence of clinical features of acute neurologic compromise, abnormal neuroimaging findings, and complete reversibility of findings after prompt treatment. Early recognition and proper treatment result in complete reversibility of this condition.

  3. Appendectomy during the third trimester of pregnancy in a 27-year old patient: case report of a "near miss" complication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The management of acute appendicitis during pregnancy is not fully established, especially regarding the choice between open and laparoscopic surgery during the third trimester. We report herein the case of a major uterine variecele hemorrhage during a laparoscopic appendectomy in a 27-year old pregnant patient at 33 weeks of amenorrhea. After conversion to a Pfannenstiel incision, the baby was delivered, the bleeding stopped and the appendectomy completed. While both mother and child fully recovered, this «near miss» complication underlines the challenges linked to the management of acute appendicitis during pregnancy. Based on a literature review, we propose an algorithm favoring the laparoscopic approach during the first and second trimesters, and the open approach during the third trimester (especially after the 26th week of amenorrhea). In case of unclear pre-operative diagnosis, a laparoscopy should be conducted even during the third trimester with a Mc Burney conversion when the diagnosis of appendicitis is confirmed. PMID:21575272

  4. Septicemic listeriosis in wild hares from Saskatchewan, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rothenburger, Jamie L; Bennett, Katarina R; Bryan, Lorraine; Bollinger, Trent K

    2015-04-01

    The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causes disease in a wide variety of mammals including rabbits and hares. We describe naturally acquired metritis and septicemic listeriosis in wild female hares from Saskatchewan, Canada. Between April 2012 and July 2013, two white-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus townsendii) and a snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) were presented to the Veterinary Medical Centre at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada with nonspecific neurologic signs. The hares were euthanized and autopsied. Necrotizing fibrinosuppurative metritis was present in all. Additional findings in individual hares included fetal maceration, multifocal necrotizing myocarditis, multifocal hepatic necrosis, and nonsuppurative encephalitis. Listeria monocytogenes was cultured from multiple tissues in each hare. Although listeriosis in pregnant domestic rabbits has been studied, this is the first detailed description in wild North American hares. The epidemiology of listeriosis, including prevalence and the role of environmental sources and coprophagy in transmission among hares, requires further investigation.

  5. Impact of lactobacilli on orally acquired listeriosis

    PubMed Central

    Archambaud, Cristel; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Soubigou, Guillaume; Bécavin, Christophe; Laval, Laure; Lechat, Pierre; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe; Lecuit, Marc; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that crosses the intestinal barrier and disseminates within the host. Here, we report a unique comprehensive analysis of the impact of two Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-3689 and Lactobacillus casei BL23, on L. monocytogenes and orally acquired listeriosis in a gnotobiotic humanized mouse model. We first assessed the effect of treatment with each Lactobacillus on L. monocytogenes counts in host tissues and showed that each decreases L. monocytogenes systemic dissemination in orally inoculated mice. A whole genome intestinal transcriptomic analysis revealed that each Lactobacillus changes expression of a specific subset of genes during infection, with IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) being the most affected by both lactobacilli. We also examined microRNA (miR) expression and showed that three miRs (miR-192, miR-200b, and miR-215) are repressed during L. monocytogenes infection. Treatment with each Lactobacillus increased miR-192 expression, whereas only L. casei association increased miR-200b and miR-215 expression. Finally, we showed that treatment with each Lactobacillus significantly reshaped the L. monocytogenes transcriptome and up-regulated transcription of L. monocytogenes genes encoding enzymes allowing utilization of intestinal carbon and nitrogen sources in particular genes involved in propanediol and ethanolamine catabolism and cobalamin biosynthesis. Altogether, these data reveal that the modulation of L. monocytogenes infection by treatment with lactobacilli correlates with a decrease in host gene expression, in particular ISGs, miR regulation, and a dramatic reshaping of L. monocytogenes transcriptome. PMID:23012479

  6. Ectopic pregnancies in a Caesarean scar: review of the medical approach to an iatrogenic complication.

    PubMed

    Maymon, R; Halperin, R; Mendlovic, S; Schneider, D; Herman, A

    2004-01-01

    Implantation of a pregnancy within a Caesarean fibrous tissue scar is considered to be the rarest form of ectopic pregnancy and a life-threatening condition. We conducted a computer search of the English literature of all studies since 2002 to gather updated data on the outcome of such pregnancies. Sixty-six new cases were reported since 2002, possibly reflecting the increasing number of Caesareans currently being performed as well as the more widespread use of the transvaginal scan allowing their earlier detection. Analysis of these women's obstetric history revealed that those at risk for pregnancy in a Caesarean scar appear to have a history of dilatation and curettage, placental pathology, ectopic pregnancy, and IVF. Twenty-one out of 39 for which this information was available (54%) had undergone multiple (> or =2) Caesareans and 13 had previous dilatation and curettage, which might also be an associated factor. We review and discuss the features of contemporary work-ups, including a high index of awareness, a detailed history and a skillful ultrasound examination for an early and accurate diagnosis. Healthcare professionals should be familiar with the possibility of untoward sequelae and how a modern work-up can help in guiding conservative options, thus reducing morbidity and preserving fertility.

  7. Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: Improvements in birth outcomes and complications through direct genomic alteration.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Bruce W; Wagner, Carol L

    2017-02-07

    Pregnancy represents a time of rapid change, including dramatic shifts in vitamin D metabolism. Circulating concentrations of the active form of vitamin D-1,25(OH)2D skyrocket early in pregnancy to levels that would be toxic to a nonpregnant adult, signaling a decoupling of vitamin D from the classic endocrine calcium metabolic pathway, likely serving an immunomodulatory function in the mother and her developing fetus. In this review, we summarize the unique aspects of vitamin D metabolism and the data surrounding vitamin D requirements during this important period. Both observational and clinical trials are reviewed in the context of vitamin D's health effects during pregnancy that include preeclampsia, preterm birth, and later disease states such as asthma and multiple sclerosis. With enhanced knowledge about vitamin D's role as a preprohormone, it is clear that recommendations about supplementation must mirror what is clinically relevant and evidence-based. Future research that focuses on the critical period(s) leading up to conception and during pregnancy to correct deficiency or maintain optimal vitamin D status remains to be studied. In addition, what effects vitamin D has on genetic signatures that minimize the risk to the mother and her developing fetus have not been elucidated. Clearly, while there is much more research that needs to be performed, our understanding of vitamin D requirements during pregnancy has advanced significantly during the last few decades.

  8. Pregnancy complications and birth outcomes of pregnant women with urinary tract infections and related drug treatments.

    PubMed

    Bánhidy, Ferenc; Acs, Nándor; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2007-01-01

    Maternal urinary tract infections in pregnancy showed an association with a higher rate of preterm birth in previous studies. The aim of this study was to check this relationship, and in addition to evaluate the efficacy of recent medical treatments. The population-based large control (without any defects) data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities was evaluated. Of 38,151 newborn infants, 2188 (5.7%) had mothers with urinary tract infections during pregnancy, and 90% of these maternal diseases were prospectively and medically recorded. The prevalence of pre-eclampsia and polyhydramnios showed an association with urinary tract infections during pregnancy. Pregnant women with urinary tract infections in pregnancy had a somewhat shorter gestational age (0.1 week) and a higher proportion of preterm births (10.4% vs 9.1%). These differences were correlated with the severity of urinary tract infections. However, the preterm-inducing effect of maternal urinary tract infections is preventable by some antimicrobial drugs such as ampicillin, cefalexin and cotrimoxazole. In conclusion, maternal urinary tract infections during pregnancy increase pre-eclampsia and polyhydramnios, and in addition the rate of preterm birth; however, the latter is preventable by appropriate drug treatments.

  9. The potential role of HPV vaccination in the prevention of infectious complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Ulla; Joergensen, Jan Stener; Mogensen, Ole; Lamont, Ronald F

    2014-11-01

    There is now incontrovertible evidence that HPV is the cause of almost all cases of genital warts, cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer. Moreover the current review of the recent literature on HPV in relation to pregnancy found strong indications that HPV plays an important role in adverse outcomes of pregnancy. HPV may contribute to infertility and may increase the risk of miscarriage. Recent studies indicate a significant rate of vertical transmission of HPV between mother and child but whether the mode of delivery makes a difference to the risk of transmission remains unknown. HPV infection appears to be correlated with both spontaneous preterm birth and preterm prelabor rupture of the membranes.

  10. Listeriosis Phytotherapy: A Review Study on the Effectiveness of Iranian Medicinal Plants in Treatment of Listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Saki, Kourosh; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-12-17

    Listeria monocytogenes can be found in many processed foods, raw milk, dairy products, meat and meat products such as sausages, beef and fish products, seafoods, eggs, fruits, and vegetables such as radish and cabbage. This article is a review study on the Iranian medicinal plants applied for treatment of listeriosis. Information of this review article was obtained by searching various key words such as Listeria monocytogenes, medicinal plants, plant extracts and essential oils among scientific articles published in databases of Google scholar, ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus, SID and Magiran. Thyme, German chamomile, great chamomile, yarrow, onion, oregano, nutmeg, sage, sagebrush, hyssop, rosemary, St John's wort, safflower, ajowan, cumin, peppermint, shallot, anise, and parsnip are known antilisteriosis medicinal plants. Bioactive phytochemicals, antioxidants and monoterpenes, sesquiterpene, coumarin, flavonoids, tannins, saponins, alkaloids, and terpenoids are the main ingredients of antilisteriosis medicinal plants.

  11. Maternal obesity in females born small: Pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk.

    PubMed

    Mahizir, Dayana; Briffa, Jessica F; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wadley, Glenn D; Moritz, Karen M; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health crisis, with 1.6 billion adults worldwide being classified as overweight or obese in 2014. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number of women who are overweight or obese at the time of conception is increasing. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis proposes that perturbations during critical stages of development can result in adverse fetal changes that leads to an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Of particular concern, children born to obese mothers are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. One subset of the population who are predisposed to developing obesity are children born small for gestational age, which occurs in 10% of pregnancies worldwide. Epidemiological studies report that these growth-restricted children have an increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Importantly during pregnancy, growth-restricted females have a higher risk of developing cardiometabolic disease, indicating that they may have an exacerbated phenotype if they are also overweight or obese. Thus, the development of early pregnancy interventions targeted to obese mothers may prevent their children from developing cardiometabolic disease in adulthood.

  12. Acute Intestinal Obstruction Complicating Abdominal Pregnancy: Conservative Management and Successful Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Udigwe, Gerald Okanandu; Ihekwoaba, Eric Chukwudi; Udegbunam, Onyebuchi Izuchukwu; Egeonu, Richard Obinwanne; Okwuosa, Ayodele Obianuju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is a very challenging and unusual nonobstetric surgical entity often linked with considerable fetomaternal morbidity and mortality. When it is synchronous with abdominal pregnancy, it is even rarer. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old lady in her second pregnancy was referred to Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, at 27 weeks of gestation due to vomiting, constipation, and abdominal pain. Examination and ultrasound scan revealed a single live intra-abdominal extrauterine fetus. Plain abdominal X-ray was diagnostic of intestinal obstruction. Conservative treatment was successful till the 34-week gestational age when she had exploratory laparotomy. At surgery, the amniotic sac was intact and the placenta was found to be adherent to the gut. There was also a live female baby with birth weight of 2.3 kg and Apgar scores of 9 and 10 in the 1st and 5th minutes, respectively, with the baby having right clubbed foot. Adhesiolysis and right adnexectomy were done. The mother and her baby were well and were discharged home nine days postoperatively. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of abdominal pregnancy as the cause of acute intestinal obstruction in the published literature. Management approach is multidisciplinary. PMID:27313923

  13. Intrauterine fallopian tube incarceration: an uncommon complication of termination of pregnancy by vacuum aspiration.

    PubMed

    Deffieux, Xavier; Kane, Aminata; Faivre, Erika; Gervaise, Amélie; Frydman, René; Fernandez, Hervé

    2008-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with an intermittent abdominal pain 5 years after voluntary vacuum aspiration for interruption of a first-trimester pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete septate uterus and a cystic mass that infiltrated the posterior myometrial wall of the right side of the uterus. Laparoscopy and hysteroscopy revealed an intra uterine fallopian tube incarceration.

  14. A Case Report and Literature Review of Midtrimester Termination of Pregnancy Complicated by Placenta Previa and Placenta Accreta.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Satoko; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Ueda, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yusuke; Kakuda, Mamoru; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-04-01

    Objective Concurrent placenta previa and placenta accreta increase the risk of massive obstetric hemorrhage. Despite extensive research on the management of placenta previa (including placenta accreta, increta, and percreta), the number and quality of previous studies are limited. We present a case of placenta accreta requiring an induced second-trimester abortion because of premature rupture of the membranes (PROM). Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Results A 41-year-old female presented at 20 weeks of gestation with placenta previa and PROM. Ultrasonography revealed placenta accreta with multiple placental lacunae. She then developed massive hemorrhaging just prior to a planned termination of pregnancy. We performed a hysterectomy with the intent of preserving life because of the failure of the placenta to detach and blood loss totaling 4,500 mL. Conclusion Previous studies suggest that second-trimester pregnancy terminations in cases of placenta previa which are not complicated with placenta accreta do not have a particularly high risk of hemorrhage. However, together with our case, the literature suggests that placenta previa complicated with placenta accreta presents a significant risk of hemorrhage both during delivery and intraoperatively. Further reports are needed to evaluate the most appropriate treatment options.

  15. A Case Report and Literature Review of Midtrimester Termination of Pregnancy Complicated by Placenta Previa and Placenta Accreta

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Satoko; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Ueda, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yusuke; Kakuda, Mamoru; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Concurrent placenta previa and placenta accreta increase the risk of massive obstetric hemorrhage. Despite extensive research on the management of placenta previa (including placenta accreta, increta, and percreta), the number and quality of previous studies are limited. We present a case of placenta accreta requiring an induced second-trimester abortion because of premature rupture of the membranes (PROM). Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Results A 41-year-old female presented at 20 weeks of gestation with placenta previa and PROM. Ultrasonography revealed placenta accreta with multiple placental lacunae. She then developed massive hemorrhaging just prior to a planned termination of pregnancy. We performed a hysterectomy with the intent of preserving life because of the failure of the placenta to detach and blood loss totaling 4,500 mL. Conclusion Previous studies suggest that second-trimester pregnancy terminations in cases of placenta previa which are not complicated with placenta accreta do not have a particularly high risk of hemorrhage. However, together with our case, the literature suggests that placenta previa complicated with placenta accreta presents a significant risk of hemorrhage both during delivery and intraoperatively. Further reports are needed to evaluate the most appropriate treatment options. PMID:26199801

  16. Listeriosis Prevention for Older Adults: Effective Messages and Delivery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Sheryl C.; Kosa, Katherine M.; Moore, Christina M.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Ten Eyck, Toby A.; Cowen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Individuals aged 60 years and older are at an increased risk for listeriosis and other foodborne illnesses. They can reduce their risk by following recommended food safety practices. A total of 8 focus groups were conducted to characterize older adults' food safety knowledge and practices, their impressions of educational materials on listeriosis…

  17. Perinatal Management of Pregnancy Complicated by Autosomal Dominant Emery–Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Megumi; Shirasawa, Hiromitsu; Makino, Kenichi; Miura, Hiroshi; Sato, Wataru; Shimizu, Dai; Sato, Naoki; Kumagai, Jin; Sato, Akira; Terada, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autosomal dominant Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (AD-EDMD) is rare compared with other forms of muscular dystrophy and is characterized by cardiac conduction defects. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with AD-EDMD during the first trimester of pregnancy who developed acute preeclampsia and subsequently, congestive heart failure (CHF) following cesarean section. Case A 36-year-old, gravida 0 para 0 woman was diagnosed with AD-EDMD by genetic testing during the first trimester of pregnancy, and she suddenly developed preeclampsia and partial HELLP (hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) syndrome at 33 weeks of gestation. The patient subsequently developed CHF following cesarean section. Conclusion CHF can occur as a direct result of the cardiac defects arising due to EDMD, and therefore, careful prenatal and postpartum management is recommended for such cases. PMID:27054045

  18. The Impact of Inherited Thrombophilia Types and Low Molecular Weight Heparin Treatment on Pregnancy Complications in Women with Previous Adverse Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Aracic, Nada; Roje, Damir; Jakus, Ivana Alujevic; Bakotin, Marinela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the distribution of births and spontaneous abortions, first-trimester abortion (FTA) and mid-trimester abortion (MTA), in untreated (n=128) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) treated pregnancies (n=50) of the same women with inherited thrombophilias and adverse pregnancy outcome (APO) in previous pregnancies. We particularly investigated the impact of LMWH on reducing the pregnancy complications in two thrombophilia types, "Conventional" and "Novel". Materials and Methods 50 women with inherited thrombophilia (26 Conventional and 24 Novel) and APO in previous pregnancies were included in the study. Conventional group included factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A (PT) mutations and antithrombin (AT), protein S (PS), and protein C (PC) deficiency, while the Novel group included methylentetrahydrofolate-reductase (MTHFR), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism. APO was defined as one of the following: preterm birth (PTB), fetal growth restriction (FGR), preeclampsia (PE), intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), placental abruption (PA) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Results There was no difference in distribution of births and spontaneous abortions between Conventional and Novel thrombophilia in untreated pregnancies (χ2=2.7; p=0.100) and LMWH treated pregnancies (χ2=0.442; p=0.506). In untreaed pregnancies thrombophilia type did not have any impact on the frequency of FTA and MTA (χ2=0.14; p=0.711). In birth-ended pregnancies LMWH treatement reduced the incidence of IUFD (p=0.011) in Conventional and FGR, IUFD, and PTB in Novel thrombophilia group. Conclusion The equal impact of two thrombophilia types on the pregnancy outcomes and a more favorable effect of LMWH therapy on pregnancy complications in Novel thrombophilia group point the need for Novel thrombophilias screening and the future studies on this issue should be recommended. PMID:27401656

  19. Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Bacteremia Complicating Pregnancy in the Third Trimester

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krunal; Gittens-Williams, Lisa; Apuzzio, Joseph J.; Martimucci, Kristina; Williams, Shauna F.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is an anaerobic gram-negative enteric rod that causes infection when contaminated food or water is ingested and may cause illness in pregnancy. Case. This is a patient who presented at 31 weeks' gestation with abdominal pain and fever and was diagnosed with S. Typhi bacteremia. Conclusion. S. Typhi should be considered in febrile patients with recent travel presenting with abdominal discomfort with or without elevated liver enzymes. PMID:28203469

  20. Prospective assessment of neurodevelopment in children following a pregnancy complicated by severe pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Warshafsky, Chelsie; Walker, Mark; Wen, Shi-Wu; Smith, Graeme N

    2016-01-01

    Objective To prospectively examine whether children of women with a pregnancy affected by severe pre-eclampsia (PE), compared to children of women without a PE-affected pregnancy, have differences in neurodevelopmental performance up to 5 years of age. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care centre. Participants Women were recruited following a PE-affected pregnancy. After each PE participant was recruited, the next normotensive woman without a prior history of PE and matched by parity, maternal age and race was invited to participate. Women with a history of chronic hypertension, diabetes or renal disease were excluded. Total enrolment included 129 PE-affected and 140 normotensive mothers. Outcome measures The primary outcome measure was failure of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ). The ASQ was completed yearly, until age 5. Results A significant difference was found in the proportion of ASQ categories failed in year 3 (p<0.05), and this approached significance in years 1 and 4 (p<0.10 and p<0.15, respectively). At year 1, the number of ASQ categories failed was significantly greater among children born to PE mothers. A subgroup analysis revealed that a significant proportion of PE children born preterm (<37 weeks) failed the ASQ in years 3 and 4 (p<0.05), and when failed, those who were preterm failed significantly more categories (p<0.05). A trend towards increased failure in the gross motor category was found. There was a significant positive correlation between maternal lifetime CVD risk score and number of ASQ categories failed at years 1 and 3 (p<0.05). Conclusions Severe PE is associated with other adverse pregnancy outcomes, including intrauterine growth restriction and preterm birth, all of which are associated with increased neurodevelopment delays. Thus, PE indicates a need for early screening and intervention at the neurodevelopmental level to improve children's long-term health, with larger studies required to tease out

  1. Glucose Fluctuations during Gestation: An Additional Tool for Monitoring Pregnancy Complicated by Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dalfrà, M. G.; Chilelli, N. C.; Di Cianni, G.; Mello, G.; Lencioni, C.; Biagioni, S.; Scalese, M.; Sartore, G.; Lapolla, A.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) gives a unique insight into magnitude and duration of daily glucose fluctuations. Limited data are available on glucose variability (GV) in pregnancy. We aimed to assess GV in healthy pregnant women and cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes (GDM) and its possible association with HbA1c. CGM was performed in 50 pregnant women (20 type 1, 20 GDM, and 10 healthy controls) in all three trimesters of pregnancy. We calculated mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), standard deviation (SD), interquartile range (IQR), and continuous overlapping net glycemic action (CONGA), as parameters of GV. The high blood glycemic index (HBGI) and low blood glycemic index (LBGI) were also measured as indicators of hyperhypoglycemic risk. Women with type 1 diabetes showed higher GV, with a 2-fold higher risk of hyperglycemic spikes during the day, than healthy pregnant women or GDM ones. GDM women had only slightly higher GV parameters than healthy controls. HbA1c did not correlate with GV indicators in type 1 diabetes or GDM pregnancies. We provided new evidence of the importance of certain GV indicators in pregnant women with GDM or type 1 diabetes and recommended the use of CGM specifically in these populations. PMID:24319455

  2. NOTE: Haemodynamic resistance model of monochorionic twin pregnancies complicated by acardiac twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umur, Asli; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Ross, Michael G.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2004-07-01

    An acardiac twin is a severely malformed monochorionic twin fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart. It grows during pregnancy, because it is perfused by its developmentally normal co-twin (called the pump twin) via a set of placental arterioarterial and venovenous anastomoses. The pump twin dies intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases due to congestive heart failure, polyhydramnios and prematurity. Because the pathophysiology of this pregnancy is currently incompletely understood, we modified our previous haemodynamic model of monochorionic twins connected by placental vascular anastomoses to include the analysis of acardiac twin pregnancies. We incorporated the fetoplacental circulation as a resistance circuit and used the fetal umbilical flow that perfuses the body to define fetal growth, rather than the placental flow as done previously. Using this modified model, we predicted that the pump twin has excess blood volume and increased mean arterial blood pressure compared to those in the acardiac twin. Placental perfusion of the acardiac twin is significantly reduced compared to normal, as a consequence of an increased venous pressure, possibly implying reduced acardiac placental growth. In conclusion, the haemodynamic analysis may contribute to an increased knowledge of the pathophysiologic consequences of an acardiac body mass for the pump twin.

  3. Combined blood purification for treating acute fatty liver of pregnancy complicated by acute kidney injury: a case series.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wan Xin; Huang, Zhong Ying; Chen, Ze Jun; Cui, Tian Lei; Zhang, Ling; Fu, Ping

    2012-06-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) complicated by acute kidney injury (AKI) is serious and life-threatening for the mother. The present study aimed to determine the clinical efficacy of combined blood purification treatment (CBPT) in patients with AFLP complicated by AKI. The CBPT involves plasma exchange (PE) combined with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH). The subjects were 17 patients with AFLP complicated by AKI. The CBPT was implemented based on the timely termination of pregnancy and general treatment. Changes in clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, liver ultrasounds, as well as Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and Glasgow scores were evaluated. The efficacy and adverse reactions of the CBPT were also assessed. The CBPT was smoothly performed without any obvious adverse reaction. After treatment, the clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, and liver ultrasonography significantly improved. Therefore, the SOFA scores correspondingly decreased 1 week after treatment [9 (range 5-11) vs. 3 (range 0-10), P = 0.002], and the median was close to normal by the second week. The clearance rate of the total bilirubin in PE was significantly higher than that in CVVH (37.2 vs. 7.9%, P = 0.000). The incidence of acute pulmonary edema in CVVH was less than that in PE (0 vs. 41.2%, P = 0.007). Finally, the maternal mortality was 5.88% (95% CI: 0-29%). Overall, we think that CBPT aids in the recovery of liver and kidney function. Different blood purification methods may be combined to integrate and maximize their advantages to improve the prognoses of patients with serious AFLP.

  4. Low-molecular-weight heparin for prevention of placenta-mediated pregnancy complications: protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis (AFFIRM)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Placenta-mediated pregnancy complications include pre-eclampsia, late pregnancy loss, placental abruption, and the small-for-gestational age newborn. They are leading causes of maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality in developed nations. Women who have experienced these complications are at an elevated risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies. However, despite decades of research no effective strategies to prevent recurrence have been identified, until recently. We completed a pooled summary-based meta-analysis that strongly suggests that low-molecular-weight heparin reduces the risk of recurrent placenta-mediated complications. The proposed individual patient data meta-analysis builds on this successful collaboration. The project is called AFFIRM, An individual patient data meta-analysis oF low-molecular-weight heparin For prevention of placenta-medIated pRegnancy coMplications. Methods/Design We conducted a systematic review to identify randomized controlled trials with a low-molecular-weight heparin intervention for the prevention of recurrent placenta-mediated pregnancy complications. Investigators and statisticians representing eight trials met to discuss the outcomes and analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis. An additional trial has since been added for a total of nine eligible trials. The primary analyses from the original trials will be replicated for quality assurance prior to recoding the data from each trial and combining it into a common dataset for analysis. Using the anonymized combined data we will conduct logistic regression and subgroup analyses aimed at identifying which women with previous pregnancy complications benefit most from treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin during pregnancy. Discussion The goal of the proposed individual patient data meta-analysis is a thorough estimation of treatment effects in patients with prior individual placenta-mediated pregnancy complications and

  5. Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... each trimester are described below. 1 First Trimester (Week 1 to Week 12) The events that lead to pregnancy begin ... and oxygen to the fetus. 2 Second Trimester (Week 13 to Week 28) At 16 weeks, and ...

  6. Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels in pregnancies complicated by diabetes: implications for screening programs.

    PubMed

    Martin, A O; Dempsey, L M; Minogue, J; Liu, K; Keller, J; Tamura, R; Freinkel, N

    1990-10-01

    Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein may be reduced in diabetic pregnancies, but the association with elevated glycosylated hemoglobin has been controversial. We tested the hypothesis that reductions in maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein may reflect the same phenomena that can also impair normal rates of embryo growth in the presence of poorly compensated maternal diabetes. If so, associations would be expected among maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, embryo rates of growth, and levels of glycosylated hemoglobin reflective of regulation of maternal diabetes during the period of organogenesis. We found maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels in 93 pregnant patients with diabetes to be negatively associated with the earliest (4 to 12 weeks) glycosylated hemoglobin determinations. At glycosylated hemoglobin values greater than 9.6% (which approximates the upper quartile), all maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein values fell below the median for patients without diabetes (below 0.8 multiple of the median after weight adjustment). Moreover, there was a trend for pregnancies with lower maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and higher glycosylated hemoglobin values to also demonstrate early fetal growth delay as measured by ultrasonography.

  7. Intrauterine growth correlation to postnatal growth--influence of risk factors and complications in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T; Greisen, G; Petersen, S

    1997-01-20

    In a population of 616 pregnant women with increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, we examined the relationship of third trimester fetal growth to maternal and pregnancy risk factors, the infants condition at birth, and postnatal growth. Intrauterine growth velocity was calculated from repeated estimations of fetal weight using ultrasound. Postnatal growth up to 3 months was measured in 313 of the infants. Intrauterine growth velocity was directly correlated to birth weight deviation (R = 0.35, P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated to postnatal growth (R = 0.21, P = 0.0001). Heavy smoking throughout pregnancy was the most pronounced factor associated with loss of fetal growth percentiles (P = 0.006), and it was also associated with postnatal catchup (P = 0.01). Infants who needed neonatal care had significantly lower intrauterine growth velocities compared to the rest of the study group; no correlation was found between intrauterine growth velocity and Apgar scores or umbilical pH. It is concluded that growth retardation in the third trimester can be identified by ultrasound fetometry, and is associated with maladaptation at birth and postnatal catchup. However, the correlations were weak suggesting that deviation at birth reflects, only to a limited degree, acceleration or deceleration of growth in the third trimester.

  8. Spontaneous left main coronary artery dissection complicated by pseudoaneurysm formation in pregnancy: role of CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shahid; Abdul-Waheed, Mohammed; Helmy, Tarek; Huffman, Lynn C; Koshal, Vipin; Guitron, Julian; Merrill, Walter H; Lewis, David F; Dunlap, Stephanie; Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Weintraub, Neal L; Meyer, Christopher; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2009-04-01

    We report a case of a 26-year-old female, who presented at 34 weeks of an uncomplicated pregnancy with an acute ST elevation anterior wall myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization suggested a left main coronary artery dissection with pseudoaneurysm formation. The patient's course was complicated by congestive heart failure. She was initially managed conservatively by a multidisciplinary team including heart failure specialists, obstetricians, and cardiovascular surgeons. 4 days after admission, her LMC was imaged by dual-source 64 slice Cardiac computed tomography, coronary dissection was identified extending to the lumen, and the presence of pseudoaneurysm was confirmed. She underwent subsequently a staged procedure, which included placement of an intra-aortic balloon pump, cesarean section, and coronary artery bypass grafting. This case illustrates the utility of coronary artery CT imaging to assess the complexity and stability of coronary artery dissections, thereby helping to determine the need for, and timing of revascularization procedures.

  9. The emerging role of telemedicine in managing glycemic control and psychobehavioral aspects of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chilelli, Nino Cristiano; Dalfrà, Maria Grazia; Lapolla, Annunziata

    2014-01-01

    There is a gradual decline in concern of specialists who follow up the care of pregnant women with diabetes. In addition, due to the dwindling economic resources allocated to health services, access to specialized healthcare facilities is becoming more difficult. Telemedicine, or medicine practiced at a distance, is inserted in this context with applications differing for type of interaction (real-time or deferred, i.e., videoconferencing versus store-and-forward data transmission), type of monitoring (automatic versus requesting cooperation from the patient), and type of devices used (web connections and use of mobile phones or smartphones). Telemedicine can cope with the current lack of ability to ensure these patients frequent direct contact with their caregivers. This approach may have an impact not only on the classical maternal-fetal outcome, but also on some underestimated aspects of patients with diabetes in pregnancy, in this case their quality of life, the perception of "diabetes self-efficacy," and the glycemic variability. In this paper, we will analyze the current evidence regarding the use of telemedicine in pregnancies complicated by diabetes, trying to highlight the main limitations of these studies and possible strategies to overcome them in order to improve the effectiveness of future clinical interventions with these medical applications.

  10. Successful Management of Pregnancy Complicated by Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome Using MR Angiography-Based Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Reiko; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Ishibashi Hiasa, Kana; Yumoto, Yasuo; Hidaka, Nobuhiro; Fukushima, Kotaro; Wake, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare congenital disease, and extensive cutaneous hemangiomas and abnormal venous vessels are characteristic. In our case, to manage her pregnancy with KTS, whole-body MRA was performed before delivery. A 29-year-old woman was referred at 28 weeks because of prominent vulvovaginal varicosities due to KTS. At 35 weeks, hypertrophy and multiple venous varicosities of her leg as well as massive vulvovaginal varicosities became prominent with a normal coagulation profile. Systematic MRAs revealed hemangiomas and varicosities in the right leg, the lower abdomen, and the pubic region, while no obvious AVM was detected around the bronchial tube and spine. We decided to deliver her baby by cesarean section at 37 weeks under general anesthesia, and a healthy baby was delivered. No blood transfusion was required. Prophylaxis against thrombosis was performed after the operation. She was discharged with her baby. Her vulvovaginal varicosities shrunk considerably one month later. PMID:22567516

  11. Semaphorin 3F expression is reduced in pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia. An observational clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Stallone, Giovanni; Matteo, Maria; Netti, Giuseppe Stefano; Infante, Barbara; Di Lorenzo, Adelaide; Prattichizzo, Clelia; Carlucci, Stefania; Trezza, Federica; Gesualdo, Loreto; Greco, Pantaleo

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective Preeclampsia is a systemic disorder, affecting 2–10% of pregnancies, characterized by a deregulated pro- and anti-angiogenic balance. Semaphorin 3F is an angiogenesis inhibitor. We aimed to investigate whether semaphorin 3F expression is modulated in preeclampsia. Design, setting, participants, and measurements We performed two observational single center cohort studies between March 2013 and August 2014. In the first we enrolled 110 consecutive women, undergoing an elective cesarean section; in the second we included 150 consecutive women undergoing amniocentesis for routine clinical indications at 16–18 week of gestation. Semaphorin 3F concentration was evaluated in maternal peripheral blood, venous umbilical blood and amniotic fluid, along with its placenta protein expression at the time of delivery in the first study group and in the amniotic fluid at 16–18 weeks of gestation in the second study group. Results In the first study 19 patients presented at delivery with preeclampsia. Semaphorin 3F placenta tissue expression was significantly reduced in preeclampsia. In addition, semaphorin 3F level at delivery was significantly lower in serum, amniotic fluid and venous umbilical blood of preeclamptic patients compared with normal pregnant women. In the prospective cohort study 14 women developed preeclampsia. In this setting, semaphorin 3F amniotic level at 16–18 weeks of gestation was reduced in women who subsequently developed preeclampsia compared to women with a normal pregnancy. ROC curve analysis showed that semaphorin 3F amniotic levels could identify women at higher risk of preeclampsia. Conclusions Semaphorin 3F might represent a predictive biomarker of preeclampsia. PMID:28350837

  12. Effectiveness of combining plasma exchange with continuous hemodiafiltration on acute Fatty liver of pregnancy complicated by multiple organ dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yu-Feng; Meng, Mei; Zeng, Juan; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Jin-Jiao; Ren, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Ji-Cheng; Zhu, Wen-Ying; Wang, Chun-Ting

    2012-06-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare disease of progressive hepatic insufficiency and secondary systemic complications that induce significant maternal risk. The application of combining plasma exchange (PE) and continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) is a novel concept for patients with AFLP. Since 2002, we have utilized the combination of PE with CHDF as adjunctive medical therapy for 11 AFLP patients with multiple organ dysfunction. Before PE and CHDF initiation, four patients had signs and symptoms of encephalopathy, four required ventilatory support, and all 11 were developing liver failure, significant renal compromise, and coagulopathy. PE combined with CHDF for patients was initiated a mean of 2 days postpartum (range, days 0-3). Daily or every other day PE combined with CHDF was undertaken on two to eight occasions for each of the 11 patients. Ten patients responded with composite clinical and laboratory improvement and were discharged to the ward, then cured and discharged from hospital; one patient died of septic shock. Average duration of hospitalization was 17 days (range, days 9-38) from time of admission to discharge; the average duration of intensive care unit was 10 days (range, days 4-23). No significant PE- and CHDF-related complications occurred. These results indicate that combing PE and CHDF in a series-parallel circuit is an effective and safe treatment for patients with severe AFLP. This finding may have important implications for the development of an effective treatment for patients with AFLP suffering multiple organ dysfunction.

  13. Poor Vitamin C Status Late in Pregnancy Is Associated with Increased Risk of Complications in Type 1 Diabetic Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Juhl, Bente; Lauszus, Finn Friis; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin C (vitC) is essential for normal pregnancy and fetal development and poor vitC status has been related to complications of pregnancy. We have previously shown lower vitC status in diabetic women throughout pregnancy compared to that of non-diabetic controls. Here, we evaluate the relationship between vitC status late in diabetic pregnancy in relation to fetal outcome, complications of pregnancy, diabetic characteristics, and glycemic control based on data of 47 women from the same cohort. We found a significant relationship between the maternal vitC level > or ≤ the 50% percentile of 26.6 μmol/L, respectively, and the umbilical cord blood vitC level (mean (SD)): 101.0 μmol/L (16.6) versus 78.5 μmol/L (27.8), p = 0.02; n = 12/16), while no relation to birth weight or Apgar score was observed. Diabetic women with complications of pregnancy had significantly lower vitC levels compared to the women without complications (mean (SD): 24.2 μmol/L (10.6) vs. 34.6 μmol/L (14.4), p = 0.01; n = 19 and 28, respectively) and the subgroup of women (about 28%) characterized by hypovitaminosis C (<23 μmol/L) had an increased relative risk of complications of pregnancy that was 2.4 fold higher than the one found in the group of women with a vitC status above this level (p = 0.02, 95% confidence interval 1.2–4.4). No correlation between diabetic characteristics of the pregnant women and vitC status was observed, while a negative association of maternal vitC with HbA1c at delivery was found at regression analysis (r = −0.39, p < 0.01, n = 46). In conclusion, our results may suggest that hypovitaminosis C in diabetic women is associated with increased risk of complications of pregnancy. PMID:28241487

  14. Gestational Gigantomastia Complicating Pregnancy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rezai, Shadi; Nakagawa, Jenna T.; Tedesco, John; Chadee, Annika; Gottimukkala, Sri; Mercado, Ray; Henderson, Cassandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Gestational gigantomastia is a rare disorder without clear etiology or well-established risk factors. Several pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the disease process have been proposed, all of which can lead to a similar phenotype of breast hypertrophy. Case. A 28-year-old Guinean woman presented at 37 weeks of gestation with bilateral gigantomastia, mastalgia, peau d'orange, and back pain. Prolactin levels were 103.3 μg/L (with a normal reference value for prolactin in pregnancy being 36–372 μg/L). The patient was treated with bromocriptine (2.5 mg twice daily), scheduled for a repeat cesarean, and referred to surgery for bilateral mammoplasty. Conclusion. Gestational gigantomastia is a rare disorder, characterized by enlargement and hypertrophy of breast tissue. Our patient presented with no endocrine or hematological abnormalities, adding to a review of the literature for differential diagnoses, workup, and management of cases of gestational gigantomastia with normal hormone levels. PMID:26713166

  15. Review: Fetal-maternal communication via extracellular vesicles - Implications for complications of pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Adam, Stefanie; Elfeky, Omar; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Dutta, Suchismita; Lai, Andrew; Jayabalan, Nanthini; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2016-12-05

    The maternal physiology experiences numerous changes during pregnancy which are essential in controlling and maintaining maternal metabolic adaptations and fetal development. The human placenta is an organ that serves as the primary interface between the maternal and fetal circulation, thereby supplying the fetus with nutrients, blood and oxygen through the umbilical cord. During gestation, the placenta continuously releases several molecules into maternal circulation, including hormones, proteins, RNA and DNA. Interestingly, the presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) of placental origin has been identified in maternal circulation across gestation. EVs can be categorised according to their size and/or origin into microvesicles (∼150-1000 nm) and exosomes (∼40-120 nm). Microvesicles are released by budding from the plasmatic membrane, whereas exosome release is by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasmatic membrane. Exosomes released from placental cells have been found to be regulated by oxygen tension and glucose concentration. Furthermore, maternal exosomes have the ability to stimulate cytokine release from endothelial cells. In this review, we will discuss the role of EVs during fetal-maternal communication during gestation with a special emphasis on exosomes.

  16. Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you.

  17. Increased endoplasmic reticulum stress in decidual tissue from pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction with and without pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Lian, I.A.; Løset, M.; Mundal, S.B.; Fenstad, M.H.; Johnson, M.P.; Eide, I.P.; Bjørge, L.; Freed, K.A.; Moses, E.K.; Austgulen, R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in both pre-eclampsia (PE) and fetal growth restriction (FGR), and is characterised by activation of three signalling branches: 1) PERK-pEIF2α, 2) ATF6 and 3) splicing of XBP1(U) into XBP1(S). To evaluate the contribution of ER stress in the pathogenesis of PE relative to FGR, we compared levels of ER stress markers in decidual tissue from pregnancies complicated by PE and/or FGR. Study design Whole-genome transcriptional profiling was performed on decidual tissue from women with PE (n = 13), FGR (n = 9), PE+FGR (n = 24) and controls (n = 58), and used for pathway- and targeted transcriptional analyses of ER stress markers. The expression and cellular localisation of ER stress markers was assesses by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Results Increased ER stress was observed in FGR and PE+FGR, including both the PERK-pEIF2α and ATF6 signalling branches, whereas ER stress was less evident in isolated PE. However, these cases demonstrated elevated levels of XBP1(U) protein. ATF6 and XBP1 immunoreactivity was detected in most (> 80%) extravillous trophoblasts, decidual cells and macrophages. No difference in the proportion of immunopositive cells or staining pattern was observed between study groups. Conclusions Increased PERK-pEIF2α and ATF6 signalling have been associated with decreased cellular proliferation and may contribute to the impaired placental growth characterising pregnancies with FGR and PE+FGR. XBP1(U) has been proposed as a negative regulator of ER stress, and increased levels in PE may reflect a protective mechanism against the detrimental effects of ER stress. PMID:21907405

  18. Characterizing the lipid and metabolite changes associated with placental function and pregnancy complications using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-03-29

    A successful pregnancy is dependent upon discrete biological events, which include embryo implantation, decidualization, and placentation. Furthermore, problems associated with each of these events can cause infertility or conditions such as preeclampsia. A greater understanding of the molecular changes associated with these complex processes is necessary to aid in identifying treatments for each condition. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies have been used to identify metabolites and lipids associated with pregnancy-related complications. However, due to limitations associated with conventional implementations of both techniques, novel technology developments are needed to more fully understand the initiation and development ofmore » pregnancy related problems at the molecular level. Here, we describe current analytical techniques for metabolomic and lipidomic characterization of pregnancy complications and discuss the potential for new technologies such as ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular changes that affect the placenta and pregnancy outcomes.« less

  19. Pregnancy outcomes and maternal and perinatal complications of pregnancies following in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection using own oocytes, donor oocytes, and vitrified embryos: A prospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Manish; Mehta, Vidhisha; Sorathiya, Dipesh; Dave, Mira; Shah, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several global studies have assessed maternal and perinatal outcomes and complications with the type of embryo transfer (ET) following in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI). The present study assessed the incidence of maternal and perinatal outcomes and complications following IVF/ICSI associated with the type of embryo transferred. METHODOLOGY: A total of 2112 ETs were performed in 2092 female patients aged 21–50 years between January 1 and December 31, 2014 (Group A: Fresh ET using self-oocytes: 691; Group B: Fresh ET using donor oocytes: 810; and Group C: Thaw ET using vitrified-warmed embryos: 611). RESULTS: Incidence of clinical pregnancy rate, abortion rate, ectopic pregnancy rate, multiple pregnancy rate, live birth rate, and maternal complications was: Group A: 40.8%, 15.9%, 2.8%, 27.3%, 31.9%, and 17.7%; Group B: 50.2%, 21.8%, 1.6%, 32.5%, 36.9%, and 23.7%; and Group C: 42.9%, 25.2%, 1.1%, 31.3%, 29.6%, and 17.8%, respectively. Incidence of prematurity (<36 weeks of pregnancy), lower birth weight (<2500 g), perinatal mortality, and congenital abnormalities was as follows: Group A (29.52%, 36.2%, 5.22%, and 1.39%), Group B (42.58%, 46.2%, 4.6%, and 1.32%), and Group C (35.74%, 32.4%, 7.85%, and 0.94%), respectively. CONCLUSION: The higher incidence of the pregnancy outcomes in oocyte donation (OD) cycles can mainly be attributed to the younger age of oocyte donors. The higher incidence of complications in OD cycles could be due to advanced maternal age, different placentation, and immune tolerance. PMID:28216912

  20. Galectins: Double-edged Swords in the Cross-roads of Pregnancy Complications and Female Reproductive Tract Inflammation and Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nandor Gabor; Romero, Roberto; Balogh, Andrea; Karpati, Eva; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Staretz-Chacham, Orna; Hahn, Sinuhe; Erez, Offer; Papp, Zoltan; Kim, Chong Jai

    2015-01-01

    Galectins are an evolutionarily ancient and widely expressed family of lectins that have unique glycan-binding characteristics. They are pleiotropic regulators of key biological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, signal transduction, and pre-mRNA splicing, as well as homo- and heterotypic cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Galectins are also pivotal in immune responses since they regulate host-pathogen interactions, innate and adaptive immune responses, acute and chronic inflammation, and immune tolerance. Some galectins are also central to the regulation of angiogenesis, cell migration and invasion. Expression and functional data provide convincing evidence that, due to these functions, galectins play key roles in shared and unique pathways of normal embryonic and placental development as well as oncodevelopmental processes in tumorigenesis. Therefore, galectins may sometimes act as double-edged swords since they have beneficial but also harmful effects for the organism. Recent advances facilitate the use of galectins as biomarkers in obstetrical syndromes and in various malignancies, and their therapeutic applications are also under investigation. This review provides a general overview of galectins and a focused review of this lectin subfamily in the context of inflammation, infection and tumors of the female reproductive tract as well as in normal pregnancies and those complicated by the great obstetrical syndromes. PMID:26018511

  1. Cellular vaccines in listeriosis: role of the Listeria antigen GAPDH

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-González, Ricardo; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Bronchalo-Vicente, Lucía; Lecea-Cuello, M. Jesús; Pareja, Eduardo; Bosch-Martínez, Alexandre; Fanarraga, Mónica L.; Yañez-Díaz, Sonsoles; Carrasco-Marín, Eugenio; Álvarez-Domínguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The use of live Listeria-based vaccines carries serious difficulties when administrated to immunocompromised individuals. However, cellular carriers have the advantage of inducing multivalent innate immunity as well as cell-mediated immune responses, constituting novel and secure vaccine strategies in listeriosis. Here, we compare the protective efficacy of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and their safety. We examined the immune response of these vaccine vectors using two Listeria antigens, listeriolysin O (LLO) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and several epitopes such as the LLO peptides, LLO189−201 and LLO91−99 and the GAPDH peptide, GAPDH1−22. We discarded macrophages as safe vaccine vectors because they show anti-Listeria protection but also high cytotoxicity. DCs loaded with GAPDH1−22 peptide conferred higher protection and security against listeriosis than the widely explored LLO91−99 peptide. Anti-Listeria protection was related to the changes in DC maturation caused by these epitopes, with high production of interleukin-12 as well as significant levels of other Th1 cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ, and with the induction of GAPDH1−22-specific CD4+ and CD8+ immune responses. This is believed to be the first study to explore the use of a novel GAPDH antigen as a potential DC-based vaccine candidate for listeriosis, whose efficiency appears to highlight the relevance of vaccine designs containing multiple CD4+ and CD8+ epitopes. PMID:24600592

  2. Cellular vaccines in listeriosis: role of the Listeria antigen GAPDH.

    PubMed

    Calderón-González, Ricardo; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Bronchalo-Vicente, Lucía; Lecea-Cuello, M Jesús; Pareja, Eduardo; Bosch-Martínez, Alexandre; Fanarraga, Mónica L; Yañez-Díaz, Sonsoles; Carrasco-Marín, Eugenio; Alvarez-Domínguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The use of live Listeria-based vaccines carries serious difficulties when administrated to immunocompromised individuals. However, cellular carriers have the advantage of inducing multivalent innate immunity as well as cell-mediated immune responses, constituting novel and secure vaccine strategies in listeriosis. Here, we compare the protective efficacy of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and their safety. We examined the immune response of these vaccine vectors using two Listeria antigens, listeriolysin O (LLO) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and several epitopes such as the LLO peptides, LLO189-201 and LLO91-99 and the GAPDH peptide, GAPDH1-22. We discarded macrophages as safe vaccine vectors because they show anti-Listeria protection but also high cytotoxicity. DCs loaded with GAPDH1-22 peptide conferred higher protection and security against listeriosis than the widely explored LLO91-99 peptide. Anti-Listeria protection was related to the changes in DC maturation caused by these epitopes, with high production of interleukin-12 as well as significant levels of other Th1 cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ, and with the induction of GAPDH1-22-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) immune responses. This is believed to be the first study to explore the use of a novel GAPDH antigen as a potential DC-based vaccine candidate for listeriosis, whose efficiency appears to highlight the relevance of vaccine designs containing multiple CD4(+) and CD8(+) epitopes.

  3. Spontaneous Rectus Sheath Hematoma in Pregnancy Complicated by the Development of Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Jennifer; Bridges, Firas; Trivedi, Kiran; Vullo, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) represents a rare, but serious cause of abdominal pain. Case Here we discuss the case of a healthy multigravida female who presented at 28 weeks gestation with spontaneous RSH. Conservative management with multiple blood transfusions led to the development of transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and intensive care unit admission. She was managed with noninvasive ventilatory support, gradually improved, and was weaned of ventilation. After hospital discharge, she progressed to full term and delivered a viable male infant vaginally at 37 weeks gestation. Conclusion Review of the literature demonstrates 13 cases of RSH in pregnancy, including our own. No other cases were complicated by transfusion related morbidity. RSH and TRALI are rare, but life threatening entities that can complicate pregnancy. PMID:27651980

  4. A rare case of listeriosis, acute cholecystitis and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Thais O; Alothman, Sara; Depaz, Hector; Ramcharan, Alexius

    2016-05-11

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is an aerobic, motile, intracellular gram-positive bacterium. Most invasive systemic infections caused by LM are commonly seen in patients at both extremes of age, during pregnancy or in immunocompromised hosts. Common clinical manifestations of LM infection in immunocompromised adults are bacteremia, infections of central nervous system, such as meningitis, and self-limiting febrile gastroenteritis. Focal infections of listeria are rare, especially cholecystitis, with only few cases reported in the last 33 years. A 62-year-old man presented with multiple myeloma, cholecystitis and LM bacteremia. Due to prompt surgical treatment and antibiotics (amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid and gentamycin), this high-risk patient recovered without any complications.

  5. A rare case of listeriosis, acute cholecystitis and multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Thais O.; Alothman, Sara; Depaz, Hector; Ramcharan, Alexius

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is an aerobic, motile, intracellular gram-positive bacterium. Most invasive systemic infections caused by LM are commonly seen in patients at both extremes of age, during pregnancy or in immunocompromised hosts. Common clinical manifestations of LM infection in immunocompromised adults are bacteremia, infections of central nervous system, such as meningitis, and self-limiting febrile gastroenteritis. Focal infections of listeria are rare, especially cholecystitis, with only few cases reported in the last 33 years. A 62-year-old man presented with multiple myeloma, cholecystitis and LM bacteremia. Due to prompt surgical treatment and antibiotics (amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid and gentamycin), this high-risk patient recovered without any complications. PMID:27170703

  6. Pregnancy Complications: Placenta Previa

    MedlinePlus

    ... what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our Cause Our mission Fighting premature birth About us Annual report Our work Community impact Global programs Research Need help? Frequently asked questions Contact us Tools & ...

  7. Pregnancy Complications: Salmonellosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... carry Salmonella include reptiles (turtles, lizards, snakes) and poultry (chickens, ducks, geese). By eating foods that are ... that often have Salmonella include: Raw or undercooked poultry, meat or fish. Cooking these items fully kills ...

  8. Pregnancy Complications: Placental Abruption

    MedlinePlus

    ... page It's been added to your dashboard . The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus (womb) ... abruption is a serious condition in which the placenta separates from the wall of the uterus before ...

  9. Pregnancy Complications: Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems March ... a sore you can see. If you have direct contact with an infected person’s sores or skin, ...

  10. Pregnancy Complications: Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems March ... sex. You can get syphilis by being in direct contact with someone’s syphilis sore. Sores usually are ...

  11. Differences in pregnancy outcomes, prenatal care utilization, and maternal complications between teenagers and adult women in Korea: A nationwide epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyung; Lee, Seung Mi; Lim, Nam Gu; Kim, Hyun Joo; Bae, Sung-Hee; Ock, Minsu; Kim, Un-Na; Lee, Jin Yong; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Teenage mothers are at high risk for maternal and neonatal complications. This study aimed to evaluate the socioeconomic circumstances of teenage pregnancy, and determine whether these increased risks remained after adjustment for socioeconomic circumstances in Korea. Using the National Health Insurance Corporation database, we selected women who terminated pregnancy, by delivery or abortion, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. Abortion, delivery type, and maternal complications were defined based on the International Classification of Diseases-10th Revision. We compared teenagers (13-19 years at the time of pregnancy termination) with other age groups and investigated differences based on socioeconomic status, reflected by Medical Aid (MA) and National Health Insurance (NHI) beneficiaries. We used multivariate analysis to define the factors associated with preterm delivery. Among 463,847 pregnancies, 2267 (0.49%) involved teenagers. Teenage mothers were more likely to have an abortion (33.4%) than deliver a baby when compared with other age groups (20.8%; P < 0.001). About 14.4% of teenage mothers had never received prenatal care throughout pregnancy. Among teenage mothers, 61.7% of MA recipients made fewer than 4 prenatal care visits (vs 38.8% of NHI beneficiaries) (P < 0.001). Teenage mothers more often experienced preterm delivery and perineal laceration (P < 0.001). Teenage mothers (<20 years) were 2.47 times more likely to have preterm delivery than older mothers (20-34 years; P < 0.001). Teenage mothers had higher risk of inadequate prenatal care and subsequently of preterm delivery, which remained significantly higher after adjusting for socioeconomic confounding variables and adequacy of prenatal care in Korean teenagers (P < 0.001).

  12. Antenatal melatonin as an antioxidant in human pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction—a phase I pilot clinical trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Alers, Nicole O; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L; Wallace, Euan M

    2013-01-01

    Background Fetal growth restriction complicates about 5% of pregnancies and is commonly caused by placental dysfunction. It is associated with increased risks of perinatal mortality and short-term and long-term morbidity, such as cerebral palsy. Chronic in utero hypoxaemia, inflammation and oxidative stress are likely culprits contributing to the long-term neurological sequelae of fetal growth restriction. In this regard, we propose that melatonin, a powerful antioxidant, might mitigate morbidity and/or mortality associated with fetal growth restriction. Melatonin has an excellent biosafety profile and crosses the placenta and blood–brain barrier. We present the protocol for a phase I clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of maternal oral melatonin administration in women with a pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. Methods and analysis The proposed trial is a single-arm, open-label clinical trial involving 12 women. Severe, early onset fetal growth restriction will be diagnosed by an estimated fetal weight ≤10th centile in combination with abnormal fetoplacental Doppler studies, occurring before 34 weeks of pregnancy. Baseline measurements of maternal and fetal well-being, levels of oxidative stress and ultrasound and Doppler measurements will be obtained at the time of diagnosis of fetal growth restriction. Women will then start melatonin treatment (4 mg) twice daily until birth. The primary outcomes are the levels of oxidative stress in the maternal and fetal circulation and placenta. Secondary outcomes are fetoplacental Doppler studies (uterine artery, umbilical artery middle cerebral artery and ductus venosus), fetal biometry, fetal biophysical profile and a composite determination of neonatal outcome. A historical cohort of gestational-matched fetal growth restriction and a healthy pregnancy cohort will be used as comparators. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from Monash Health Human Research Ethics

  13. Behavioral risk factors associated with listeriosis in the home: a review of consumer food safety studies.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ellen W; Redmond, Elizabeth C

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes human listeriosis, which is associated with the highest hospitalization and mortality rates of all foodborne illnesses. In recent years, the incidence of listeriosis has doubled in Europe, almost exclusively among older adults (≥ 60 years of age). Food safety factors associated with increased risk of listeriosis include lack of adherence to "use by" dates and ineffective refrigerated storage of foods. Consequently, older adult consumers' implementation of safe food practices should be evaluated. This article is a review of consumer food safety cognitive and behavioral data relating to risk factors associated with listeriosis in the home as reported in 165 consumer food safety studies. Overall, only 41% of studies included assessment of consumer cognitive or behavioral data associated with listeriosis; of these studies 59% included data on safe refrigeration, 54% included data on storage time for opened ready-to-eat foods, and 49% included data on adherence to use-by dates. In most (83%) of the studies, survey-based data collection methods (questionnaires/interviews) were used; thus, the majority of findings were based on self-report (74%) and knowledge (44%). Observation (31%) and focus groups (12%) were less commonly used, resulting in a lack of actual behaviors and attitudinal data relating to listeriosis risk factors. Only 7% of studies included food safety data for older adults. Although older adults may fail to implement recommended practices, this review reveals a need for in-depth research to determine food safety attitudes and actual behaviors of older adults in conjunction with knowledge and selfreport of practices linked to increased risks of listeriosis. Such data combined with review findings would inform targeted food safety education to reduce risks associated with listeriosis in the home.

  14. Male involvement during pregnancy and childbirth: men’s perceptions, practices and experiences during the care for women who developed childbirth complications in Mulago Hospital, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of appropriate interventions to increase male involvement in pregnancy and childbirth is vital to strategies for improving health outcomes of women with obstetric complications. The objective was to gain a deeper understanding of their experiences of male involvement in their partners’ healthcare during pregnancy and childbirth. The findings might inform interventions for increasing men’s involvement in reproductive health issues. Methods We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with men who came to the hospital to attend to their spouses/partners admitted to Mulago National Referral Hospital. All the spouses/partners had developed severe obstetric complications and were admitted in the high dependency unit. We sought to obtain detailed descriptions of men’s experiences, their perception of an ideal “father” and the challenges in achieving this ideal status. We also assessed perceived strategies for increasing male participation in their partners’ healthcare during pregnancy and childbirth. Data was analyzed by content analysis. Results The identified themes were: Men have different descriptions of their relationships; responsibility was an obligation; ideal fathers provide support to mothers during childbirth; the health system limits male involvement in childbirth; men have no clear roles during childbirth, and exclusion and alienation in the hospital environment. The men described qualities of the ideal father as one who was available, easily reached, accessible and considerate. Most men were willing to learn about their expected roles during childbirth and were eager to support their partners/wives/spouses during this time. However, they identified personal, relationship, family and community factors as barriers to their involvement. They found the health system unwelcoming, intimidating and unsupportive. Suggestions to improve men’s involvement include creating more awareness for fathers, male-targeted antenatal education and

  15. Treatment of genital mycoplasma in colonized pregnant women in late pregnancy is associated with a lower rate of premature labour and neonatal complications.

    PubMed

    Vouga, M; Greub, G; Prod'hom, G; Durussel, C; Roth-Kleiner, M; Vasilevsky, S; Baud, D

    2014-10-01

    Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma spp. may colonize the human genital tract and have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm labour and preterm premature rupture of membranes. However, as these bacteria can reside in the normal vaginal flora, there are controversies regarding their true role during pregnancy and so the need to treat these organisms. We therefore conducted a retrospective analysis to evaluate the treatment of genital mycoplasma in 5377 pregnant patients showing symptoms of potential obstetric complications at 25-37 weeks of gestation. Women presenting with symptoms were routinely screened by culture for the presence of these bacteria and treated with clindamycin when positive. Compared with uninfected untreated patients, women treated for genital mycoplasma demonstrated lower rates of premature labour. Indeed preterm birth rates were, respectively, 40.9% and 37.7% in women colonized with Ureaplasma spp. and M. hominis, compared with 44.1% in uncolonized women (Ureaplasma spp., p 0.024; M. hominis, p 0.001). Moreover, a reduction of neonatal complications rates was observed, with 10.9% of newborns developing respiratory diseases in case of Ureaplasma spp. colonization and 5.9% in the presence of M. hominis, compared with 12.8% in the absence of those bacteria (Ureaplasma spp., p 0.050; M. hominis, p <0.001). Microbiological screening of Ureaplasma spp. and/or M. hominis and pre-emptive antibiotic therapy of symptomatic pregnant women in late pregnancy might represent a beneficial strategy to reduce premature labour and neonatal complications.

  16. Sigmoid volvulus during pregnancy: A rare non-obstetric complication. Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed M.; Barsoum, Adel K.; Moneer, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sigmoid volvulus is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction during pregnancy associated with high maternal and foetal mortality. Effective management represents a challenge due to delayed presentation, obstructive symptoms regarded as pregnancy-related and hesitation in using radiological evaluation. Presentation of case We report a case of a lady, pregnant for 26 weeks and with a 5 day history of abdominal pain and constipation. She underwent concomitant caesarean section and laparotomy for intestinal obstruction. Intra-operatively, the sigmoid colon was extensively dilated and gangrenous. The ischemic colon was resected and a Hartmann’s procedure was performed. A preterm male child was delivered and admitted to neonatal intensive care. The post operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged home on the 9th post-operative day. Six months later she underwent an uneventful reversal of the Hartmann’s procedure. Discussion Sigmoid volvulus is the most common cause of bowel obstruction during pregnancy, accounting for up to 44% of reported cases. We have reviewed the available literature on this topic and present another case managed at our institution. Conclusion Diagnosis of sigmoid volvulus in pregnancy is a challenge, but a delay in diagnosis increases the rates of feto-maternal mortality. A high incidence of clinical suspicion and timely surgical intervention are the key to a favourable outcome. PMID:26551555

  17. Placental weight and efficiency in relation to maternal body mass index and the risk of pregnancy complications in women delivering singleton babies.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J M; Horgan, G W; Bhattacharya, S

    2012-08-01

    Herein we report placental weight and efficiency in relation to maternal BMI and the risk of pregnancy complications in 55,105 pregnancies. Adjusted placental weight increased with increasing BMI through underweight, normal, overweight, obese and morbidly obese categories and accordingly underweight women were more likely to experience placental growth restriction [OR 1.69 (95% CI 1.46-1.95)], while placental hypertrophy was more common in overweight, obese and morbidly obese groups [OR 1.59 (95% CI 1.50-1.69), OR 1.97 (95% CI 1.81-2.15) and OR 2.34 (95% CI 2.08-2.63), respectively]. In contrast the ratio of fetal to placental weight (a proxy for placental efficiency) was lower (P < 0.001) in overweight, obese and morbidly obese than in both normal and underweight women which were equivalent. Relative to the middle tertile reference group (mean 622 g), placental weight in the lower tertile (mean 484 g) was associated with a higher risk of pre-eclampsia, induced labour, spontaneous preterm delivery, stillbirth and low birth weight (P < 0.001). Conversely placental weight in the upper tertile (mean 788 g) was associated with a higher risk of caesarean section, post-term delivery and high birth weight (P < 0.001). With respect to assumed placental efficiency a ratio in the lower tertile was associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia, induced labour, caesarean section and spontaneous preterm delivery (P < 0.001) and a ratio in both the lower and higher tertiles was associated with an increased risk of low birth weight (P < 0.001). Placental efficiency was not related to the risk of stillbirth or high birth weight. No interactions between maternal BMI and placental weight tertile were detected suggesting that both abnormal BMI and placental growth are independent risk factors for a range of pregnancy complications.

  18. Oxygen tension regulates the miRNA profile and bioactivity of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells - Liquid biopsies for monitoring complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Truong, Grace; Guanzon, Dominic; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Elfeky, Omar; Lai, Andrew; Longo, Sherri; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Menon, Ramkumar; Mol, Ben W; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift since the recent recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. In this study, we investigated whether oxygen tension alters the exosome release and miRNA profile from extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells, modifying their bioactivity on endothelial cells (EC). Furthermore, we have established the exosomal miRNA profile at early gestation in women who develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). HTR-8/SVneo cells were used as an EVT model. The effect of oxygen tension (i.e. 8% and 1% oxygen) on exosome release was quantified using nanocrystals (Qdot®) coupled to CD63 by fluorescence NTA. A real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™) was used to establish the effect of exosomes on EC. Plasma samples were obtained at early gestation (<18 weeks) and classified according to pregnancy outcomes. An Illumina TrueSeq Small RNA kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from EVT and plasma samples. The number of exosomes was significantly higher in EVT cultured under 1% compared to 8% oxygen. In total, 741 miRNA were identified in exosomes from EVT. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these miRNA were associated with cell migration and cytokine production. Interestingly, exosomes isolated from EVT cultured at 8% oxygen increased EC migration, whilst exosomes cultured at 1% oxygen decreased EC migration. These changes were inversely proportional to TNF-α released from EC. Finally, we have identified a set of unique miRNAs in exosomes from EVT cultured at 1% oxygen and exosomes isolated from the circulation of mothers at early gestation, who later developed PE and SPTB. We suggest that aberrant exosomal signalling by placental cells is a common aetiological factor in pregnancy complications characterised by incomplete SpA remodeling and is therefore a clinically relevant biomarker of pregnancy complications.

  19. Oxygen tension regulates the miRNA profile and bioactivity of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells – Liquid biopsies for monitoring complications of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Grace; Guanzon, Dominic; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Elfeky, Omar; Lai, Andrew; Longo, Sherri; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Menon, Ramkumar; Mol, Ben W.; Rice, Gregory E.; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift since the recent recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. In this study, we investigated whether oxygen tension alters the exosome release and miRNA profile from extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells, modifying their bioactivity on endothelial cells (EC). Furthermore, we have established the exosomal miRNA profile at early gestation in women who develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). HTR-8/SVneo cells were used as an EVT model. The effect of oxygen tension (i.e. 8% and 1% oxygen) on exosome release was quantified using nanocrystals (Qdot®) coupled to CD63 by fluorescence NTA. A real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™) was used to establish the effect of exosomes on EC. Plasma samples were obtained at early gestation (<18 weeks) and classified according to pregnancy outcomes. An Illumina TrueSeq Small RNA kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from EVT and plasma samples. The number of exosomes was significantly higher in EVT cultured under 1% compared to 8% oxygen. In total, 741 miRNA were identified in exosomes from EVT. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these miRNA were associated with cell migration and cytokine production. Interestingly, exosomes isolated from EVT cultured at 8% oxygen increased EC migration, whilst exosomes cultured at 1% oxygen decreased EC migration. These changes were inversely proportional to TNF-α released from EC. Finally, we have identified a set of unique miRNAs in exosomes from EVT cultured at 1% oxygen and exosomes isolated from the circulation of mothers at early gestation, who later developed PE and SPTB. We suggest that aberrant exosomal signalling by placental cells is a common aetiological factor in pregnancy complications characterised by incomplete SpA remodeling and is therefore a clinically relevant biomarker of pregnancy complications. PMID:28350871

  20. Placental endoplasmic reticulum stress negatively regulates transcription of placental growth factor via ATF4 and ATF6β: implications for the pathophysiology of human pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Masahito; Cindrova-Davies, Tereza; Olovsson, Matts; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Burton, Graham J; Yung, Hong Wa

    2016-03-01

    Low maternal circulating concentrations of placental growth factor (PlGF) are one of the hallmarks of human pregnancy complications, including fetal growth restriction (FGR) and early-onset pre-eclampsia (PE). Currently, PlGF is used clinically with other biomarkers to screen for high-risk cases, although the mechanisms underlying its regulation are largely unknown. Placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has recently been found to be elevated in cases of FGR, and to an even greater extent in early-onset PE complicated with FGR. ER stress activates the unfolded protein response (UPR); attenuation of protein translation and a reduction in cell growth and proliferation play crucial roles in the pathophysiology of these complications of pregnancy. In this study, we further identified that ER stress regulates release of PlGF. We first observed that down-regulation of PlGF protein was associated with nuclear localization of ATF4, ATF6α and ATF6β in the syncytiotrophoblast of placentae from PE patients. Transcript analysis showed a decrease of PlGF mRNA, and an increase from genes encoding those UPR transcription factors in placentae from cases of early-onset PE, but not of late-onset (>34 weeks) PE, compared to term controls. Further investigations indicated a strong correlation between ATF4 and PlGF mRNA levels only (r = - 0.73, p < 0.05). These results could be recapitulated in trophoblast-like cells exposed to chemical inducers of ER stress or hypoxia-reoxygenation. The stability of PlGF transcripts was unchanged. The use of small interfering RNA specific for transcription factors in the UPR pathways revealed that ATF4 and ATF6β, but not ATF6α, modulate PlGF transcription. To conclude, ATF4 and ATF6β act synergistically in the negative regulation of PlGF mRNA expression, resulting in reduced PlGF secretion by the trophoblast in response to stress. Therefore, these results further support the targeting of placental ER stress as a potential new therapeutic

  1. Urinary Tract Infection as a Preventable Cause of Pregnancy Complications: Opportunities, Challenges, and a Global Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nicole M.; O'Brien, Valerie P.; Hultgren, Scott; Macones, George; Lewis, Warren G.

    2013-01-01

    The urinary tract is a common site of infection in humans. During pregnancy, urinary tract infection (UTI) is associated with increased risks of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, even when the infection is asymptomatic. By mapping available rates of UTI in pregnancy across different populations, we emphasize this as a problem of global significance. Many countries with high rates of preterm birth and neonatal mortality also have rates of UTI in pregnancy that exceed rates seen in more developed countries. A global analysis of the etiologies of UTI revealed familiar culprits as well as emerging threats. Screening and treatment of UTI have improved birth outcomes in several more developed countries and would likely improve maternal and neonatal health worldwide. However, challenges of implementation in resource-poor settings must be overcome. We review the nature of the barriers occurring at each step of the screening and treatment pipeline and highlight steps necessary to overcome these obstacles. It is our hope that the information compiled here will increase awareness of the global significance of UTI in maternal and neonatal health and embolden governments, nongovernmental organizations, and researchers to do their part to make urine screening and UTI treatment a reality for all pregnant women. PMID:24416696

  2. Urinary tract infection as a preventable cause of pregnancy complications: opportunities, challenges, and a global call to action.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nicole M; O'Brien, Valerie P; Hultgren, Scott; Macones, George; Lewis, Warren G; Lewis, Amanda L

    2013-09-01

    The urinary tract is a common site of infection in humans. During pregnancy, urinary tract infection (UTI) is associated with increased risks of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, even when the infection is asymptomatic. By mapping available rates of UTI in pregnancy across different populations, we emphasize this as a problem of global significance. Many countries with high rates of preterm birth and neonatal mortality also have rates of UTI in pregnancy that exceed rates seen in more developed countries. A global analysis of the etiologies of UTI revealed familiar culprits as well as emerging threats. Screening and treatment of UTI have improved birth outcomes in several more developed countries and would likely improve maternal and neonatal health worldwide. However, challenges of implementation in resource-poor settings must be overcome. We review the nature of the barriers occurring at each step of the screening and treatment pipeline and highlight steps necessary to overcome these obstacles. It is our hope that the information compiled here will increase awareness of the global significance of UTI in maternal and neonatal health and embolden governments, nongovernmental organizations, and researchers to do their part to make urine screening and UTI treatment a reality for all pregnant women.

  3. Maternal marijuana use has independent effects on risk for spontaneous preterm birth but not other common late pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Leemaqz, Shalem Y; Dekker, Gustaaf A; McCowan, Lesley M; Kenny, Louise C; Myers, Jenny E; Simpson, Nigel A B; Poston, Lucilla; Roberts, Claire T

    2016-07-01

    Widespread legalisation of marijuana raises safety concerns for its use in pregnancy. This study investigated the association of marijuana use prior to and during pregnancy with pregnancy outcomes in a prospective cohort of 5588 nulliparous women from the international SCOPE study. Women were assessed at 15±1 and 20±1 weeks' gestation. Cases [278 Preeclampsia, 470 gestational hypertension, 633 small-for-gestational-age, 236 spontaneous preterm births (SPTB), 143 gestational diabetes] were compared separately with 4114 non-cases. Although the numbers are small, continued maternal marijuana use at 20 weeks' gestation was associated with SPTB independent of cigarette smoking status [adj OR 2.28 (95% CI:1.45-3.59)] and socioeconomic index (SEI) [adj OR 2.17 (95% CI:1.41-3.34)]. When adjusted for maternal age, cigarette smoking, alcohol and SEI, continued maternal marijuana use at 20 weeks' gestation had a greater effect size [adj OR 5.44 (95% CI 2.44-12.11)]. Our data indicate that increasing use of marijuana among young women of reproductive age is a major public health concern.

  4. Listeriosis associated with gorgonzola (Italian blue-veined cheese).

    PubMed

    Gianfranceschi, M; D'Ottavio, M C; Gattuso, A; Pourshaban, M; Bertoletti, I; Bignazzi, R; Manzoni, P; Marchetti, M; Aureli, P

    2006-01-01

    We describe a case of listeriosis in Italy associated with the consumption of cheese. Opened samples of two brands of gorgonzola (Italian blue-veined cheese; referred to as brands "B" and "C") were collected from the patient's refrigerator. Unopened samples of the brand suspected to be the source of infection (brand B) were taken from the store where the cheese had been purchased, other local stores, and the production plant. Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2b was isolated from the patient and from the opened and unopened cheese samples. The contamination level varied from <100 to 1,200 cfu g(-1). Molecular typing of the isolates, using both randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), demonstrated that the isolates from the patient's refrigerator, food stores, and production-plant samples were indistinguishable from the clinical isolate. Molecular typing verified the peristence of closely related L. monocytogenes isolates in the production plant B for 5 months. The results stress the importance of developing a code of hygienic practice for preventing, limiting, and where possible, eliminating this pathogen in processed foods and of educating at-risk persons on foods likely to be contaminated.

  5. Population Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4b Isolates from Sporadic Human Listeriosis in the United States, 2003-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes can cause severe foodborne disease (listeriosis). Serotype 4b strains have resulted in numerous outbreaks, repeatedly involving three epidemic clones (ECI, ECII, and ECIa). Little is known about population structure of L. monocytogenes serotype 4b from sporadic listeriosis, ev...

  6. Genome Sequence of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, a Clinical Isolate from a Food-Borne Listeriosis Outbreak▿

    PubMed Central

    Briers, Yves; Klumpp, Jochen; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic food-borne pathogen and the causative agent of listeriosis in animals and humans. We present the genome sequence of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, a widely distributed and frequently used serovar 4b clinical isolate from the 1983 listeriosis outbreak in Massachusetts. PMID:21685277

  7. Fatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to anti-HLA alloimmunization in a twin pregnancy: A very infrequent complication of assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Meler, Eva; Porta, Roser; Canals, Carme; Serra, Bernat; Lozano, Miguel

    2016-11-02

    The most frequently involved antigen in severe fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the human platelet antigen 1a. Platelets express the HLA-A and B antigens on their membrane and some studies report that maternal anti-HLA class I antibody can also cause FNAIT. We report here a very unusual case of a first twin pregnancy produced in vitro by oocyte and semen donation where the mother developed markedly elevated HLA antibodies, in the absence of anti-platelet or anti-neutrophil antibodies, that provoked in one of the twins a profound thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage and a mild thrombocytopenia and neutropenia in the second twin lasting until the fourth month of life. In addition, anti-D alloimmunization provoked hemolytic disease of the newborn with intrauterus anemia detected in the first twin and post-natal anemia in the second twin that required red blood cell transfusion and phototherapy. We hypothesize that the complete HLA-incompatible twin pregnancy due to the oocyte donation might have contributed to the severity of the clinical manifestations.

  8. Provision of fertility services for women at increased risk of complications during fertility treatment or pregnancy: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    This opinion addresses the ethics of providing fertility treatment to women at elevated risk from fertility treatment or pregnancy. Providers ethically may treat women at elevated risk provided that they are carefully assessed; that specialists in their medical condition are consulted as appropriate; and that patients are fully informed about risks, benefits, and alternatives, including oocyte and embryo donation, use of a gestational surrogate, not undergoing fertility care, and adoption. Providers also may conclude that the risks are too high for them to treat particular patients ethically; such determinations must be made in a medically objective and unbiased manner and patients must be fully informed of the decision. Counseling of women who wish to initiate fertility treatment with underlying medical conditions that confer increased risk during treatment or pregnancy should incorporate the most current knowledge available, being cognizant of the woman's personal determinants in relation to her reproductive desires. In such a way, both physician and patient will optimize decision making in an ethically sound, patient-supportive context.

  9. Sex during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... results. Health care providers sometimes also recommend avoiding anal sex during pregnancy. If significant complications with your ... October 2016 previous 1 • 2 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Pregnancy & Newborn ...

  10. Histopathological and molecular characterization of encephalitic listeriosis in small ruminants from northern Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Bodnar, Lívia; Fritzen, Juliana T T; Bronkhorst, Dalton Evert; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes; Okano, Werner; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo

    2013-01-01

    Listeriosis is a disease primarily of ruminants caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Ruminants either demonstrate manifestations of the encephalitic, septicemic, or reproductive form of listeriosis. The pathological and molecular findings with encephalitic listeriosis in a 5.5-month-old, male, mixed-breed goat and a 3-year-old Texel-crossed sheep from northern Paraná, Brazil are described. Clinically, the kid demonstrated circling, lateral protrusion of the tongue, head tilt, and convulsions; the ewe presented ataxia, motor incoordination, and lateral decumbency. Brainstem dysfunctions were diagnosed clinically and listeriosis was suspected. Necropsy performed on both animals did not reveal remarkable gross lesions; significant histopathological alterations were restricted to the brainstem (medulla oblongata; rhombencephalitis) and were characterized as meningoencephalitis that consisted of extensive mononuclear perivascular cuffings, neutrophilic and macrophagic microabscesses, and neuroparenchymal necrosis. PCR assay and direct sequencing, using genomic bacterial DNA derived from the brainstem of both animals, amplified the desired 174 base pairs length amplicon of the listeriolysin O gene of L. monocytogenes. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the strains associated with rhombencephalitis during this study clustered with known strains of L. monocytogenes lineage I from diverse geographical locations and from cattle of the state of Paraná with encephalitic listeriosis. Consequently, these strains should be classified as L. monocytogenes lineage I. These results confirm the active participation of lineage I strains of L. monocytogenes in the etiopathogenesis of the brainstem dysfunctions observed during this study, probably represent the first characterization of small ruminant listeriosis by molecular techniques in Latin America, and suggest that ruminants within the state of Paraná were infected by the strains of the same lineage

  11. Living Well with Lupus: Can I Still Plan a Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... History of low platelets History of blood clots History or presence of antiphospholipid antibodies Planning Your Pregnancy Although many lupus pregnancies will have no complications, all lupus pregnancies ...

  12. First trimester exposure to ambient air pollution, pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes in Allegheny County, PA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Chen; Roberts, James M; Catov, Janet M; Talbott, Evelyn O; Ritz, Beate

    2013-04-01

    Despite numerous studies of air pollution and adverse birth outcomes, few studies have investigated preeclampsia and gestational hypertension, two pregnancy disorders with serious consequences for both mother and infant. Relying on hospital birth records, we conducted a cohort study identifying 34,705 singleton births delivered at Magee-Women's Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA between 1997 and 2002. Particle (<10 μm-PM10; <2.5 μm-PM2.5) and ozone (O3) exposure concentrations in the first trimester of pregnancy were estimated using the space-time ordinary Kriging interpolation method. We employed multiple logistic regression estimate associations between first trimester exposures and preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, preterm delivery, and small for gestational age (SGA) infants. PM2.5 and O3 exposures were associated with preeclampsia (adjusted OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.96-1.39 per 4.0 μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5; adjusted OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.89-1.42 per 16.8 ppb increase in O3), gestational hypertension (for PM2.5 OR = 1.11, 95 % CI = 1.00-1.23; for O3 OR = 1.12, 95 % CI = 0.97-1.29), and preterm delivery (for PM2.5 ORs = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.01-1.20; for O3 ORs = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.01-1.50). Smaller 5-8 % increases in risk were also observed for PM10 with gestational hypertension and SGA, but not preeclampsia. Our data suggest that first trimester exposure to particles, mostly PM2.5, and ozone, may increase the risk of developing preeclampsia and gestational hypertension, as well as preterm delivery and SGA.

  13. [Kidney diseases in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kolesárova, Eva; Sirotiaková, Jana; Kozárová, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of important morphological, functional and hemodynamic changes occurring in the kidneys during physiological pregnancy is a prerequisite for proper diagnostics and therapy of renal diseases in pregnancy. Kidney diseases may be kidney diseases complicating pregnancy in previously healthy women, or pre-existing or superposed kidney diseases. Knowledge of renal insufficiency management in pregnancy, including haemodialysis treatment and management of pregnancy in patients who have undergone transplantation, is also important.

  14. Acute Abdomen in the 17th Week of Twin Pregnancy due to Ovarian Torsion – A Late Complication of IVF

    PubMed Central

    Habek, D.; Bauman, R.; Rukavina Kralj, L.; Hafner, T.; Turudic, T.; Vujisic, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A 32-year-old woman with tubal factor infertility due to bilateral laparoscopic salpingectomy conceived twins with in vitro fertilization (IVF). She developed moderate ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome which was treated with anticoagulant therapy. The subsequent course of the twin pregnancy was normal until the 17th week of gestation when she presented to hospital because of a sharp pain in the right lower abdomen which ceased after admission. Case: Except for a single incident of vomiting, patient had no other subjective symptoms. The clinical examination showed tenderness of the lower right abdominal segment on palpation. The surgeon and the urologist found no signs of an acute surgical or urologic condition, and laboratory findings were within normal reference ranges for pregnant women. Two days after admission the pain reappeared; it was now much stronger and colic-like. The pain was initially located supraumbilically but subsequently spread diffusely across the lower abdomen. Abdominal guarding was present and laboratory findings showed an increase in inflammatory parameters. An enlarged and edematous right ovary was found on transvaginal ultrasound. Conclusion: Exploratory laparotomy via a vertical midline abdominal transection revealed a torqued necrotic right ovary with elements of inflammation and inflammatory adhesions involving the entire pelvis. The patient underwent right-sided ovariectomy and adhesiolysis. Recovered was normal and the patient was delivered of healthy twins in the 37th week of gestation. PMID:28017976

  15. Lost opportunities to prevent early onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Judith A; McCloskey, Lois; Gebel, Christina M; Iverson, Ronald E; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) greatly increases the risk of developing diabetes in the decade after delivery, but few women receive appropriately timed postpartum glucose testing (PPGT) or a referral to primary care (PC) for continued monitoring. This qualitative study was designed to identify barriers and facilitators to testing and referral from patient and providers' perspectives. Methods We interviewed patients and clinicians in depth about knowledge, values, priorities, challenges, and recommendations for increasing PPGT rates and PC linkage. Interviews were coded with NVIVO data analysis software, and analyzed using an implementation science framework. Results Women reported motivation to address GDM for the health of the fetus. Most women did not anticipate future diabetes for themselves, and focused on delivery outcomes rather than future health risks. Patients sought and received reassurance from clinicians, and were unlikely to discuss early onset following GDM or preventive measures. PPGT barriers described by patients included provider not mentioning the test or setting it up, transportation difficulties, work responsibilities, fatigue, concerns about fasting while breastfeeding, and timing of the test after discharge from obstetrics, and no referral to PC for follow-up. Practitioners described limited communication among multiple care providers during pregnancy and delivery, systems issues, and separation of obstetrics from PC. Conclusions Patients' barriers to PPGT included low motivation for self-care, structural obstacles, and competing priorities. Providers reported the need to balance risk with reassurance, and identified systems failures related to test timing, limitations of electronic medical record systems (EMR), lack of referrals to PC, and inadequate communication between specialties. Prevention of early onset has great potential for medical cost savings and improvements in quality of life. PMID:27347422

  16. FETAL RENAL ARTERY IMPEDANCE AS ASESSED BY DOPPLER ULTRASOUND IN PREGNANCIES COMPLICATED BY INTRA-AMNIOTIC INFLAMMATION AND PRETERM BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Azpurua, Humberto; Dulay, Antonette T.; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Bahtiyar, Mert O.; Funai, Edmund; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Luo, Guoyang; Bhandari, Vineet; Copel, Joshua A.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the fetal renal artery impedance in the context of inflammation-associated preterm birth (PTB). STUDY DESIGN We conducted a prospective Doppler assessment of the fetal renal artery impedance in 70 singleton fetuses. The study group consisted of 56 premature fetuses (28.1 [25.3–30.6] weeks at enrollment). Gestational age (GA) reference ranges were generated based on fetuses with uncomplicated pregnancies (n=14). Doppler studies included renal artery pulsatility index (PI), resistance index (RI), systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio and presence-or-absence of end-diastolic blood flow. We assessed amniotic fluid (AF) inflammation by proteomic profiling (SELDI-TOF). Data were interpreted in relationship to amniotic fluid index (AFI), cord blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythropoietin (EPO) levels. The cardiovascular and metabolic profiles of the neonates were investigated in the first 24 hours of life. RESULTS Fetuses delivered by mothers with intra-amniotic inflammation had higher cord blood IL-6 but not EPO levels. Fetal inflammation did not affect either renal artery PI,RI,S/D ratio or end-diastolic blood flow. Neonates delivered in the context of intraamniotic inflammation had higher serum blood urea nitrogen levels, which correlated significantly with AF IL-6 levels. The renal artery RI and SD ratio were inversely correlated with the AFI independent of GA, cord blood IL-6 and status of the membranes. CONCLUSION The fetus is capable of sustaining normal renal artery impedance despite inflammation. Resistance in the renal vascular bed affects urine output independent of inflammation. PMID:19185102

  17. The role of gtcA in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal listeriosis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotype 4b strains of Listeria monocytogenes have been responsible for most large outbreaks of listeriosis. In L. monocytogenes serotype 4b, gtcA and gltA have been implicated in serotype-specific glycosylation of the teichoic acid of the cell wall with galactose and glucose. In this study, we inve...

  18. The role of gtcA in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal listeriosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotype 4b strains of Listeria monocytogenes have been implicated in most large outbreaks of listeriosis. The reason for this relationship remains unclear. The gtcA gene is required for glycosylation of teichoic acid on serotype 4b L. monocytogenes. In this study, we investigated two different sero...

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Historical Listeria monocytogenes Strains from Human Listeriosis Cases in 1933

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangmi; Ward, Todd J.; Orwig, Nathane; Altermann, Eric; Jima, Dereje; Parsons, Cameron; Kathariou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two Listeria monocytogenes strains from some of the earliest reported cases of human listeriosis in North America. The strains were isolated in 1933 from patients in Massachusetts and Connecticut, USA, and belong to the widely disseminated hypervirulent clonal complex 1 (CC1) and CC2. PMID:27932656

  20. Surveillance of listeriosis in Los Angeles County, 1985-1986. A first year's report.

    PubMed

    Mascola, L; Sorvillo, F; Neal, J; Iwakoshi, K; Weaver, R

    1989-07-01

    After a large food-borne outbreak of listeriosis in Los Angeles County, California, in 1985, the California State Department of Health Services instituted mandatory reporting of Listeria monocytogenes by clinical laboratories. From September 1, 1985, through August 31, 1986, 94 cases of listeriosis were reported in Los Angeles County for an annual crude incidence rate of 12 cases per million persons. Of the 94 cases, 37 (39%) were in neonates and/or their mothers and 57 (61%) were nonperinatal. The overall case fatality rate was 31%, with a perinatal case fatality of 16% (6 fetal and 23 nonperinatal); this compares with an epidemic perinatal case fatality rate of 32%. No significant differences were observed in age-adjusted, race-specific incidence rates among nonperinatal cases or race-specific incidence rates among perinatal cases. All but 2 of the nonperinatal patients had a known predisposing risk factor for the development of listeriosis, the most common of which was a prior history of steroid therapy. A clustering of cases was not identified. No common food sources were apparent. Patients presenting as perinatal cases were more likely to have ingested Mexican-style cheese, ice cream, and yogurt than those presenting as nonperinatal cases. Improved case ascertainment through mandatory reporting and laboratory-based surveillance will establish meaningful baseline levels of listeriosis.

  1. Outbreak of invasive listeriosis associated with the consumption of hog head cheese, Louisiana, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cluster of eight cases of laboratory-confirmed invasive listeriosis was reported to the Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH) between February and June of 2010. All eight clinical isolates were Listeria monocytogenes, serotype 1/2a and had indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE...

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Historical Listeria monocytogenes from Human Listeriosis, 1933

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two Listeria monocytogenes strains from some of the earliest reported cases of human listeriosis in North America. The strains were isolated in 1933 from patients in Massachusetts and Connecticut, USA, and belong to the widely disseminated hypervirulent c...

  3. Biomarker Tools to Design Clinical Vaccines Determined from a Study of Annual Listeriosis Incidence in Northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Teran-Navarro, Hector; Marimon, José María; González-Rico, Claudia; Calvo-Montes, Jorge; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Alkorta-Gurrutxaga, Miriam; Fariñas, M. C.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Perez-Trallero, Emilio; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Two regions of northern Spain, Gipuzkoa, and Cantabria present high annual incidence of listeriosis (1.86 and 1.71 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively). We report that the high annual incidences are a consequence of infection with highly virulent Listeria monocytogenes isolates linked to fatal outcomes in elderly patients with cancer. In addition, listeriosis patients with cancer present low IL-17A/IL-6 ratios and significantly reduced levels of anti-GAPDH1–22 antibodies, identified as two novel biomarkers of poor prognosis. Analysis of these biomarkers may aid in reducing the incidence of listeriosis. Moreover, GAPDH1–22-activated monocyte-derived dendritic cells of listeriosis patients with cancer seem useful tools to prepare clinical vaccines as they produce mainly Th1 cytokines. PMID:27965668

  4. Biomarker Tools to Design Clinical Vaccines Determined from a Study of Annual Listeriosis Incidence in Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Teran-Navarro, Hector; Marimon, José María; González-Rico, Claudia; Calvo-Montes, Jorge; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Alkorta-Gurrutxaga, Miriam; Fariñas, M C; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Perez-Trallero, Emilio; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Two regions of northern Spain, Gipuzkoa, and Cantabria present high annual incidence of listeriosis (1.86 and 1.71 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively). We report that the high annual incidences are a consequence of infection with highly virulent Listeria monocytogenes isolates linked to fatal outcomes in elderly patients with cancer. In addition, listeriosis patients with cancer present low IL-17A/IL-6 ratios and significantly reduced levels of anti-GAPDH1-22 antibodies, identified as two novel biomarkers of poor prognosis. Analysis of these biomarkers may aid in reducing the incidence of listeriosis. Moreover, GAPDH1-22-activated monocyte-derived dendritic cells of listeriosis patients with cancer seem useful tools to prepare clinical vaccines as they produce mainly Th1 cytokines.

  5. [Initial antibiotic therapy in maternal-fetal infections which include ampicillin even in countries where listeriosis is an incidental disease].

    PubMed

    Boukadida, J; Taher, N Bel Hadj; Seket, B; Monastiri, K; Salem, N; Snoussi, N

    2002-06-01

    Neonatal listeriosis is an exceptional disease in Northern Africa. Hence, protocols for maternal-fetal infection treatment include only a third generation cephalosporin and an aminoside. This protocol does not take into account the possibility of Listeria monocytogenes infection. We report a fatal case of neonatal listeriosis in Tunisia. The use of first antibiotics in maternal-foetal infection must be reconsidered when lacking sufficient bacteriological data and include systematically ampicillin in presumptive antibiotic protocols.

  6. Achieving continuous improvement in reductions in foodborne listeriosis--a risk-based approach.

    PubMed

    2005-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis, a severe disease that can lead to septicemia, meningitis, and spontaneous abortion. Ongoing efforts are needed to further reduce the incidence of listeriosis, due to its high mortality rate. The focus of this report is the use of a risk-based approach to identify strategies that will have the greatest impact on reducing foodborne listeriosis. A continuum of risk for listeriosis is observed in the human population, ranging from exquisitely sensitive groups, who are highly immunocompromised and at very high risk of listeriosis, through the normal healthy population younger than 65 years of age, who appear to have a minimal risk for listeriosis. In addition, unique subpopulations may exist; for example, pregnant Latina women appear to have a higher risk of listeriosis than pregnant women of other ethnic groups, most likely due to consumption of contaminated soft cheeses such as queso fresco and queso blanco. The International Life Sciences Institute Risk Science Institute Expert Panel concluded that certain foods pose a high risk for causing listeriosis. High-risk foods have all of the following properties: (1) have the potential for contamination with L. monocytogenes; (2) support the growth of L. monocytogenes to high numbers; (3) are ready to eat; (4) require refrigeration; and (5) are stored for an extended period of time. Control strategies are needed in the food chain from preharvest through consumption to minimize the likelihood that food will become contaminated by L. monocytogenes and to prevent the growth of the organism to high numbers. The Expert Panel identified three main strategies for ensuring continuous improvement in reducing foodborne listeriosis: (1) preventing contamination of foods with L. monocytogenes; (2) preventing growth of L. monocytogenes to high numbers in foods; and (3) science-based education messages targeted to susceptible populations and their caregivers. Of

  7. [Specific dermatoses of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Vera; Coutinho, Inês; Gameiro, Rita; Vieira, Ricardo; Gonçalo, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    During pregnancy immunological, metabolic, hormonal and vascular changes occur, and can cause specific skin diseases. The specific dermatoses of pregnancy have undergone numerous changes in nomenclature and classification, partly due to advances in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of these skin diseases. Currently the following diseases are considered specific dermatoses of pregnancy: pemphigoid gestations, polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and atopic eruption of pregnancy. Timely diagnosis and specific and safe treatment are essential to prevent complications which, although rare, may be associated with significant maternal-fetal comorbidity.

  8. Ovarian ectopic pregnancy in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Ana Gonçalves; Rocha, Sara; Marques, Catarina O; Simões, Mafalda; Martins, Isabel; Biscaia, Isabel; F Barros, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Ovarian pregnancy is one of the rarest types of extrauterine pregnancy. Its preoperative diagnosis remains a challenge since it presents quite similarly to tubal pregnancy and complicated ovarian cysts. Although in most cases, histology is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, we present an ovarian pregnancy in a teenager, correctly diagnosed during ultrasound examination. PMID:26576271

  9. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Treating Breast Cancer During Pregnancy If you are diagnosed with breast ... treatment more complicated. Is it safe to treat breast cancer during pregnancy? Pregnant women can get treatment for ...

  10. [Infectious complications of biological therapy].

    PubMed

    Holub, M; Rozsypal, H; Chalupa, P

    2011-02-01

    Biological treatment represents a significant progress in the therapy of many serious diseases. Together with the growing knowledge of pathophysiology and subsequent development of new therapeutic agents, this progress will definitely lead to further expansion of biologics. Since biologics interfere with many mechanisms of host defence, which may sometimes be compromised by them, increased risk of infectious complications must be taken into account. Patients treated with biologics are prone to classical virulent infections (e.g. listeriosis, legionellosis and tuberculosis) and opportunistic infections such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Furthermore, suppression of the immune response that is caused by biologics may lead to reactivation of latent infections such as tuberculosis or viral hepatitis B. Therefore, the knowledge of basic mechanisms by which biologics modify the immune response is important for a rapid clinical diagnosis of possible aetiology of infectious complications.

  11. Atypical cerebral listeriosis associated with Listeria innocua in a beef bull.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Paulo Ricardo Dell'Armelina; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Grattarola, Carla; Casalone, Cristina; Del Piero, Fabio; Bottero, Maria Teresa; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2013-02-01

    Natural infections of cattle associated with Listeria innocua have not been reported. This report describes the first case of cerebral listeriosis in a bull due to Listeria innocua. The animal presented neurological signs characterized by weakness, incoordination and recumbency. Histopathologic evaluation of brain tissue revealed multifocal microabscesses, perivascular lymphocytic cuffing, vasculitis, oedema and haemorrhages. All lesions extended from the medulla oblongata to the basal nuclei/parietal cortex area. Indirect immunohistochemistry labelled for Listeria sp. in the brain tissue, but not for Listeria monocytogenes, neurotropic Flaviviruses, BVDV, bovine Herpesvirus 1, Chlamydophila spp. and Histophilus somni. PCR was negative for ovine herpesvirus. L. innocua was isolated from brainstem and identified by biochemical tests (Camp and beta-hemolysis negative). Subsequently, the species was confirmed by a duplex PCR and minisequencing assays. L. innocua should be histologically considered as a differential diagnosis of thrombotic meningoencephalitis, malignant catarrhal fever and cerebral listeriosis due to L. monocytogenes in cattle.

  12. Hospital-acquired listeriosis linked to a persistently contaminated milkshake machine

    PubMed Central

    Mazengia, E.; Kawakami, V.; Rietberg, K.; Kay, M.; Wyman, P.; Skilton, C.; Aberra, A.; Boonyaratanakornkit, J.; Limaye, A. P.; Pergam, S. A.; Whimbey, E.; Olsen, R.; Duchin, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY One case of hospital-acquired listeriosis linked to milkshakes produced in a commercial-grade shake freezer machine that remained contaminated following a previous outbreak of listeriosis associated with a pasteurized, dairy-based ice cream product at the same hospital despite repeated cleaning and sanitation. Healthcare facilities should be aware of the potential for prolonged Listeria contamination of food service equipment. In addition, healthcare providers should consider counseling persons who have an increased risk for Listeria infections regarding foods that have caused Listeria infections. The prevalence of persistent Listeria contamination of commercial-grade milkshake machines in healthcare facilities and the risk associated with serving dairy-based ice cream products to hospitalized patients at increased risk for invasive L. monocytogenes infections should be further evaluated. PMID:28065212

  13. What Health Problems Can Develop during Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who is at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Research Goals Activities and Advances ... Who is at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications ...

  14. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... with cells and generally contain remnants of early embryonic structures. False cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can ... with cells and generally contain remnants of early embryonic structures. False cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can ...

  15. Pregnancy complicated by emphysematous pyonephrosis.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Kecia; Ardite, Andrea; Mason, Tina C

    2005-10-01

    Emphysematous pyonephrosis is a rare, rapidly progressive infection characterized by the presence of exudative material and fermentative gases within a dilated renal collecting system. This unusual clinical entity is noted almost exclusively in diabetic patients, often in conjunction with chronic urinary tract infection and obstruction. In most instances, E. coli is the etiologic agent; however other enterobacteriaceae may be isolated. High fever, leukocytosis, renal parenchymal necrosis and the accumulation of gases in the kidney and perinephric tissues are the hallmark of this condition. Surgical resection of the involved tissue and systemic antibiotic administration are among the primary mainstays of therapy. We present a unique case of a pregnant patient with fulminant emphysematous pyonephrosis and the successful treatment rendered.

  16. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  17. Animal models of listeriosis: a comparative review of the current state of the art and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, Karin; Pouillot, Régis; Dennis, Sherri

    2012-03-14

    Listeriosis is a leading cause of hospitalization and death due to foodborne illness in the industrialized world. Animal models have played fundamental roles in elucidating the pathophysiology and immunology of listeriosis, and will almost certainly continue to be integral components of the research on listeriosis. Data derived from animal studies helped for example characterize the importance of cell-mediated immunity in controlling infection, allowed evaluation of chemotherapeutic treatments for listeriosis, and contributed to quantitative assessments of the public health risk associated with L. monocytogenes contaminated food commodities. Nonetheless, a number of pivotal questions remain unresolved, including dose-response relationships, which represent essential components of risk assessments. Newly emerging data about species-specific differences have recently raised concern about the validity of most traditional animal models of listeriosis. However, considerable uncertainty about the best choice of animal model remains. Here we review the available data on traditional and potential new animal models to summarize currently recognized strengths and limitations of each model. This knowledge is instrumental for devising future studies and for interpreting current data. We deliberately chose a historical, comparative and cross-disciplinary approach, striving to reveal clues that may help predict the ultimate value of each animal model in spite of incomplete data.

  18. Animal models of listeriosis: a comparative review of the current state of the art and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Listeriosis is a leading cause of hospitalization and death due to foodborne illness in the industrialized world. Animal models have played fundamental roles in elucidating the pathophysiology and immunology of listeriosis, and will almost certainly continue to be integral components of the research on listeriosis. Data derived from animal studies helped for example characterize the importance of cell-mediated immunity in controlling infection, allowed evaluation of chemotherapeutic treatments for listeriosis, and contributed to quantitative assessments of the public health risk associated with L. monocytogenes contaminated food commodities. Nonetheless, a number of pivotal questions remain unresolved, including dose-response relationships, which represent essential components of risk assessments. Newly emerging data about species-specific differences have recently raised concern about the validity of most traditional animal models of listeriosis. However, considerable uncertainty about the best choice of animal model remains. Here we review the available data on traditional and potential new animal models to summarize currently recognized strengths and limitations of each model. This knowledge is instrumental for devising future studies and for interpreting current data. We deliberately chose a historical, comparative and cross-disciplinary approach, striving to reveal clues that may help predict the ultimate value of each animal model in spite of incomplete data. PMID:22417207

  19. Could molecular assessment of calcium metabolism be a useful tool to early screen patients at risk for pre-eclampsia complicated pregnancy? Proposal and rationale.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Di Gangi, Stefania; Saccardi, Carlo; Cosmi, Erich; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Plebani, Mario

    2015-06-01

    One of the most frequent causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity is represented by hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Women at high risk must be subjected to a more intensive antenatal surveillance and prophylactic treatments. Many genetic risk factors, clinical features and biomarkers have been proposed but none of these seems able to prevent pre-eclampsia onset. English literature review of manuscripts focused on calcium intake and hypertensive disorders during pregnancy was performed. We performed a critical analysis of evidences about maternal calcium metabolism pattern in pregnancy analyzing all possible bias affecting studies. Calcium supplementation seems to give beneficial effects on women with low calcium intake. Some evidence reported that calcium supplementation may drastically reduce the percentage of pre-eclampsia onset consequently improving the neonatal outcome. Starting from this evidence, it is intuitive that investigations on maternal calcium metabolism pattern in first trimester of pregnancy could represent a low cost, large scale tool to screen pregnant women and to identify those at increased risk of pre-eclampsia onset. We propose a biochemical screening of maternal calcium metabolism pattern in first trimester of pregnancy to discriminate patients who potentially may benefit from calcium supplementation. In a second step we propose to randomly allocate the sub-cohort of patients with calcium metabolism disorders in a treatment group (calcium supplementation) or in a control group (placebo) to define if calcium supplementation may represent a dietary mean to reduce pre-eclampsia onset and to improve pregnancy outcome.

  20. Fresh Produce-Associated Listeriosis Outbreaks, Sources of Concern, Teachable Moments, and Insights.

    PubMed

    Garner, Danisha; Kathariou, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    Foodborne transmission of Listeria monocytogenes was first demonstrated through the investigation of the 1981 Maritime Provinces outbreak involving coleslaw. In the following two decades, most listeriosis outbreaks involved foods of animal origin, e.g., deli meats, hot dogs, and soft cheeses. L. monocytogenes serotype 4b, especially epidemic clones I, II, and Ia, were frequently implicated in these outbreaks. However, since 2008 several outbreaks have been linked to diverse types of fresh produce: sprouts, celery, cantaloupe, stone fruit, and apples. The 2011 cantaloupe-associated outbreak was one of the deadliest foodborne outbreaks in recent U.S. history. This review discusses produce-related outbreaks of listeriosis with a focus on special trends, unusual findings, and potential paradigm shifts. With the exception of sprouts, implicated produce types were novel, and outbreaks were one-time events. Several involved serotype 1/2a, and in the 2011 cantaloupe-associated outbreak, serotype 1/2b was for the first time conclusively linked to a common-source outbreak of invasive listeriosis. Also in this outbreak, for the first time multiple strains were implicated in a common-source outbreak. In 2014, deployment of whole genome sequencing as part of outbreak investigation validated this technique as a pivotal tool for outbreak detection and speedy resolution. In spite of the unusual attributes of produce-related outbreaks, in all but one of the investigated cases (the possible exception being the coleslaw outbreak) contamination was traced to the same sources as those for outbreaks associated with other vehicles (e.g., deli meats), i.e., the processing environment and equipment. The public health impact of farm-level contamination remains uncharacterized. This review highlights knowledge gaps regarding virulence and other potentially unique attributes of produce outbreak strains, the potential for novel fresh produce items to become unexpectedly implicated in outbreaks

  1. Factor XI-deficient mice display reduced inflammation, coagulopathy, and bacterial growth during listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Deyan; Szaba, Frank M; Kummer, Lawrence W; Johnson, Lawrence L; Tucker, Erik I; Gruber, Andras; Gailani, David; Smiley, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    In mice infected sublethally with Listeria monocytogenes, fibrin is deposited at low levels within hepatic tissue, where it functions protectively by limiting bacterial growth and suppressing hemorrhagic pathology. Here we demonstrate that mice infected with lethal doses of L. monocytogenes produce higher levels of fibrin and display evidence of systemic coagulopathy (i.e., thrombocytopenia, fibrinogen depletion, and elevated levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes). When the hepatic bacterial burden exceeds 1×10(6) CFU, levels of hepatic fibrin correlate with the bacterial burden, which also correlates with levels of hepatic mRNA encoding the hemostatic enzyme factor XI (FXI). Gene-targeted FXI-deficient mice show significantly improved survival upon challenge with high doses of L. monocytogenes and also display reduced levels of hepatic fibrin, decreased evidence of coagulopathy, and diminished cytokine production (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and IL-10). While fibrin limits the bacterial burden during sublethal listeriosis in wild-type mice, FXI-deficient mice display a significantly improved capacity to restrain the bacterial burden during lethal listeriosis despite their reduced fibrin levels. They also show less evidence of hepatic necrosis. In conjunction with suboptimal antibiotic therapy, FXI-specific monoclonal antibody 14E11 improves survival when administered therapeutically to wild-type mice challenged with high doses of L. monocytogenes. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of murine listeriosis as a model for dissecting qualitative differences between protective and pathological host responses and reveal novel roles for FXI in exacerbating inflammation and pathogen burden during a lethal bacterial infection.

  2. Diabetic nephropathy and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landon, Mark B

    2007-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, the most common etiology for end-stage renal disease, complicates approximately 5% of insulin-dependent diabetic pregnancies. Assessment for vasculopathy is important before pregnancy because nephropathy can increase perinatal risks including potential for preeclampsia and preterm birth. Counseling women receiving renoprotective medications including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors has recently become complicated in light of new information suggesting a teratogenic risk for these agents. Most reproductive age women with overt diabetic nephropathy have preserved renal function and do not seem to have the progression of their disease affected by pregnancy. Perinatal outcomes are excellent for these women who have received care in tertiary institutions. However, there are relatively few women with significant renal impairment included in case series of pregnancies complicated by diabetic nephropathy. For these women, adverse perinatal outcomes are more common, and the effect of pregnancy on the course of their disease is less certain.

  3. Quantitative risk assessment of listeriosis due to consumption of raw milk.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Alejandra A; Pradhan, Abani K; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Karns, Jeffrey S; Boor, Kathryn J; Rice, Daniel H; Mangione, Kurt J; Gröhn, Yrjo T; Schukken, Ynte H

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the risk of illness for raw milk consumers due to Listeria monocytogenes in raw milk sold by permitted dealers, and the risk for people on farms who consume raw milk. Three scenarios were evaluated for raw milk sold by dealers: raw milk purchased directly from bulk tanks, from on-farm stores, and from retail. To assess the effect of mandatory testing of raw milk by regulatory agencies, the number of listeriosis cases per year was compared where no raw milk testing was done, only a screening test to issue a permit was conducted, and routine testing was conducted and milk was recalled if it was L. monocytogenes positive. The median number of listeriosis cases associated with consumption of raw milk from bulk tanks, farm stores, and retail for an intermediate-age population was 6.6 × 10(-7), 3.8 × 10(-5), and 5.1 × 10(-5) cases per year, respective ly. In populations with high susceptibility, the estimated median number of cases per year was 2.7 × 10(-7) (perinatal, i.e., pregnant women and their fetuses or newborns) and 1.4 × 10(-6) (elderly) for milk purchased from bulk tanks, 1.5 × 10(-5 ) (perinatal) and 7.8 × 10(-5) (elderly) for milk from farm stores, and 2.1 × 10(-5) (perinatal) and 1.0 × 10(-4) (elderly) for milk from retail. For raw milk consumed on farms, the median number of listeriosis cases was 1.4 × 10(-7) cases per year. A greater risk of listeriosis was associated with consumption of raw milk obtained from retail and farm stores as compared with milk obtained from bulk tanks. This was likely due to additional time-temperature combination steps in the retail and farm store models, which increased the chances for growth of L. monocytogenes in raw milk. A close relationship between prevalence of L. monocytogenes in raw milk and the values of disease incidence was observed. Hence, a reduction in the number of cases per year in all populations was observed when a raw milk-testing program was in place

  4. Chemotherapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ngu, Siew-Fei; Ngan, Hextan Y S

    2016-05-01

    Cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is uncommon, complicating between 0.02% and 0.1% of all pregnancies. Nonetheless, due to increasing age of childbearing, the incidence of cancer during pregnancy is likely to increase due to higher incidence of several age-dependent malignancies. The most common malignancies include breast cancer, cervical cancer, malignant melanoma and lymphoma. One of the key challenges in the management of cancer in pregnancy is treating the women with standard chemotherapy regimen, without compromising the safety of the developing foetus. Exposure of chemotherapy in the first trimester is associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, whereas use in the second and third trimesters is associated with intrauterine growth restriction, low birthweight and stillbirth. In this article, we review available data regarding the use of chemotherapeutic agents in pregnancy, and we summarise the neonatal outcomes, including malformations, perinatal complications and long-term follow-up. In addition, the management plan during pregnancy is also discussed.

  5. Herbal medicine in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pinn, Graham; Pallett, Linda

    2002-05-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the frequency of alternative medical usage in an antenatal population. A survey of alternative medicine usage was carried out among 305 consecutive patients over 2 months at their registration in mid-pregnancy at an Australian Antenatal Clinic. The study showed that something like 40% of patients used alternative medical therapy, including 12% herbal therapy. No specific study of pregnancy outcome was carried out, but it is of concern that some herbs taken had the potential to adversely affect pregnancy outcome. The herbal therapies commonly used in pregnancy are reviewed with their potential complications; examples of toxicity are also discussed. It is important to obtain a herbal medicine history at any time but particularly in pregnancy. Herbs may have unrecognised effects on pregnancy or labour, have interactions with prescribed medications and have potentially serious complications for the foetus.

  6. [Antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Karen; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-01-18

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the association of antiphospholipid antibodies with thromboses and/or obstetric morbidity. Obstetric morbidity includes recurrent first trimester loss, stillbirth, intrauterine death, preeclam-psia, premature birth and fetal growth restriction. Although current treatment regimens including aspirin and low-molecular weight heparin have improved pregnancy outcomes, 30% of affected women have pregnancy complica-tions. Women with APS are therefore high-risk pregnancies who should be monitored in specialist centres according to international standards.

  7. Hypertension and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Deak, Teresa M; Moskovitz, Joshua B

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is increasing in prevalence and incidence and its treatment becoming more commonplace. Associated complications of pregnancy, including end-organ damage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia, are leading sources of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, requiring an emergency physician to become proficient with their identification and treatment. This article reviews hypertension in pregnancy as it relates to outcomes, with special emphasis on preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia.

  8. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  9. Benzodiazepines and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggested a higher rate of preterm deliveries and low birth weight in infants when women take benzodiazepines during ... benzodiazepine during breastfeeding, watch your baby for sleepiness, low ... increased risk of birth defects or pregnancy complications is not expected when ...

  10. Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare complication of pregnancy. It is usually transient, being due to increased placental production of vasopressinase that inactivates circulating vasopressin. Gestational, transient DI occurs late in pregnancy and disappears few days after delivery. Acquired central DI can also occur during pregnancy, for example in a patient with hypophysitis or neuroinfundibulitis during late pregnancy or postpartum. Finally, pre-existing central or nephrogenic DI may occasionally be unmasked by pregnancy. Treatment with dDAVP (desmopressin, Minirin(®)) is very effective on transient DI of pregnancy and also on pre-existing or acquired central DI. Contrary to vasopressin, dDAVP is not degraded by vasopressinase. Nephrogenic DI is insensitive to dDAVP and is therefore more difficult to treat during pregnancy if fluid intake needs to be restricted.

  11. Hypopituitarism and successful pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xue; Yuan, Qing; Yao, Yanni; Li, Zengyan; Zhang, Huiying

    2014-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a disorder characterized by the deficiency of one or more of the hormones secreted by the pituitary gland. Hypopituitarism patients may present the symptoms of amenorrhea, poor pregnancy potential, infertility, and no production of milk after delivery. Successful pregnancy in hypopituitarism patient is rare because hypopituitarism is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, placental abruption, premature birth, and postpartum hemorrhage. Hypopituitarism during pregnancy and perinatal period should be managed carefully. The hormone levels should be restored to normal before pregnancy. GH and HMG-hCG are combined to improve follicular growth and the success rate of pregnancy. Hypopituitary patients must be closely monitored as changes may need to be made to their medications, and serial ultrasound measurements are also necessary for fetal growth assessment. PMID:25663963

  12. Use of Antimicrobials during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nicolle, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    The use of any drug during pregnancy is complicated by concerns of adverse effects, not only on the pregnant woman, but also on the fetus. This paper provides an overview of the use of antimicrobials in pregnancy, based on current knowledge of fetal development and on available documented experience. The author also discusses the use of specific antimicrobial agents during pregnancy. PMID:21263935

  13. Listeriosis Outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada, Caused by Soft Ripened Cheese Contaminated from Environmental Sources

    PubMed Central

    Wilcott, Lynn; Naus, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Soft ripened cheese (SRC) caused over 130 foodborne illnesses in British Columbia (BC), Canada, during two separate listeriosis outbreaks. Multiple agencies investigated the events that lead to cheese contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.), an environmentally ubiquitous foodborne pathogen. In both outbreaks pasteurized milk and the pasteurization process were ruled out as sources of contamination. In outbreak A, environmental transmission of L.m. likely occurred from farm animals to personnel to culture solutions used during cheese production. In outbreak B, birds were identified as likely contaminating the dairy plant's water supply and cheese during the curd-washing step. Issues noted during outbreak A included the risks of operating a dairy plant in a farm environment, potential for transfer of L.m. from the farm environment to the plant via shared toilet facilities, failure to clean and sanitize culture spray bottles, and cross-contamination during cheese aging. L.m. contamination in outbreak B was traced to wild swallows defecating in the plant's open cistern water reservoir and a multibarrier failure in the water disinfection system. These outbreaks led to enhanced inspection and surveillance of cheese plants, test and release programs for all SRC manufactured in BC, improvements in plant design and prevention programs, and reduced listeriosis incidence. PMID:25918702

  14. Listeriosis outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada, caused by soft ripened cheese contaminated from environmental sources.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Lorraine; Wilcott, Lynn; Naus, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Soft ripened cheese (SRC) caused over 130 foodborne illnesses in British Columbia (BC), Canada, during two separate listeriosis outbreaks. Multiple agencies investigated the events that lead to cheese contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.), an environmentally ubiquitous foodborne pathogen. In both outbreaks pasteurized milk and the pasteurization process were ruled out as sources of contamination. In outbreak A, environmental transmission of L.m. likely occurred from farm animals to personnel to culture solutions used during cheese production. In outbreak B, birds were identified as likely contaminating the dairy plant's water supply and cheese during the curd-washing step. Issues noted during outbreak A included the risks of operating a dairy plant in a farm environment, potential for transfer of L.m. from the farm environment to the plant via shared toilet facilities, failure to clean and sanitize culture spray bottles, and cross-contamination during cheese aging. L.m. contamination in outbreak B was traced to wild swallows defecating in the plant's open cistern water reservoir and a multibarrier failure in the water disinfection system. These outbreaks led to enhanced inspection and surveillance of cheese plants, test and release programs for all SRC manufactured in BC, improvements in plant design and prevention programs, and reduced listeriosis incidence.

  15. A Norwegian prospective study of preterm mother–infant interactions at 6 and 18 months and the impact of maternal mental health problems, pregnancy and birth complications

    PubMed Central

    Misund, Aud R; Bråten, Stein; Nerdrum, Per; Pripp, Are Hugo; Diseth, Trond H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pregnancy, birth and health complications, maternal mental health problems following preterm birth and their possible impact on early mother–infant interaction at 6 and 18 months corrected age (CA) were explored. Predictors of mother–infant interaction at 18 months CA were identified. Design and methods This prospective longitudinal and observational study included 33 preterm mother–infant (<33 gestational age (GA)) interactions at 6 and 18 months CA from a socioeconomic low-risk, middle-class sample. The Parent–Child Early Relational Assessment (PCERA) scale was used to assess the mother–infant interaction. Results ‘Bleeding in pregnancy’ predicted lower quality in preterm mother–infant interaction in 6 PCERA scales, while high ‘maternal trait anxiety’ predicted higher interactional quality in 2 PCERA scales and ‘family size’ predicted lower interactional quality in 1 PCERA scale at 18 months CA. Mothers with symptoms of post-traumatic stress reactions, general psychological distress and anxiety at 2 weeks postpartum (PP) showed significantly better outcome than mothers without symptoms in 6 PCERA subscales at 6 months CA and 2 PCERA subscales at 18 months CA. Conclusions Our study detected a correspondence between early pregnancy complications and lower quality of preterm mother–infant interaction, and an association between high levels of maternal mental health problems and better quality in preterm mother–infant interaction. PMID:27147380

  16. Genetic determinants for cadmium and arsenic resistance among Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b isolates from sporadic human listeriosis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b from sporadic listeriosis, heavy metal resistance was primarily encountered in certain clonal groups (ECI, ECII, ECIa). All arsenic-resistant isolates harbored the arsenic resistance cassette previously identified in pLI100; ECIa harbored additional arsenic resi...

  17. Hyperthyroidism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gargallo Fernández, Manuel

    2013-11-01

    Association of hyperthyroidism and pregnancy is not an unusual event, and has an impact on both the mother and fetus. After delivery, it may also affect the newborn and the nursing mother. Clinical management of this situation is quite different from that required by non-pregnant hyperthyroid women and poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. This review addresses aspects related to the unique characteristics of biochemical assessment of thyroid function in pregnancy, the potential causes of hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, and the clinical and therapeutic approach in each case. Special attention is paid to pregnancy complicated with Graves' disease and its different the maternal, fetal, neonatal, and postnatal consequences.

  18. Neuromuscular disorders in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Guidon, Amanda C; Massey, E Wayne

    2012-08-01

    Preexisting and coincident neuromuscular disorders in pregnancy are challenging for clinicians because of the heterogeneity of disease and the limited data in the literature. Many questions arise regarding the effect of disease on the pregnancy, delivery, and newborn in addition to the effect of pregnancy on the course of disease. Each disorder has particular considerations and possible complications. An interdisciplinary team of physicians is essential. This article discusses the most recent literature on neuromuscular disorders in pregnancy including acquired root, plexus, and peripheral nerve lesions; acquired and inherited neuropathies and myopathies; disorders of the neuromuscular junction; and motor neuron diseases.

  19. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders.

  20. Venous thromboembolism and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    D’Uva, Maristella; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Strina, Ida; De Placido, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, the association between a hypercoagulable state and its causes and adverse pregnancy outcome, in particular recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) has been studied extensively. Although the first studies were focused only on the association between thrombophilia and RPL, subsequent studies underlined also a potential role of antithrombotic treatment to prevent vascular complication such as venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy. Thromboprophylaxis should be considered also for pregnant subjects carriers of molecular thrombophilia or that previously experienced VTE, in order to prevent VTE during pregnancy, while antithrombotic treatment for VTE should be performed during all pregnant periods. PMID:22282678

  1. Changes in plasma lipids and increased low-density lipoprotein susceptibility to oxidation in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes: consequences of obesity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vera, Isabel; Bonet, Bartolome; Viana, Marta; Quintanar, Amalia; Martín, Maria D; Blanco, Pilar; Donnay, Sergio; Albi, Manuel

    2007-11-01

    Dyslipidemia is associated with increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) susceptibility to oxidation, a phenomenon associated with endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, cell toxicity, and intrauterine growth retardation. The present study was designed to determine if women developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have both increased plasma lipids and LDL susceptibility to oxidation throughout pregnancy. We also wanted to study the effects of obesity upon these parameters. A nested case-control study was carried out in 45 women with uncomplicated pregnancies and 62 women diagnosed with GDM following the criteria of the American Diabetes Association. In all women, blood was drawn at 15, 24, and 32 weeks of gestation. Low-density lipoprotein oxidation was initiated by the addition of CuCl2, and formation of conjugated dienes was monitored. Glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, vitamin E, estradiol, and progesterone were determined. In GDM, elevated levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were observed when compared with the control group even in the first trimester, before the detection of diabetes. In the control group, the lag phase in the LDL oxidation was 85.3, 84.4, and 95.6 minutes at 15, 24, and 32 weeks of pregnancy, compared with 63.3, 63.4, and 74.5 minutes in the GDM group (P < .001 in the 3 periods). These differences remained when adjusted for the body mass index. In a multiple linear regression analysis, a negative correlation was observed between the lag phase and the body mass index (P < .001) and cholesterol (P < .001), whereas a positive one appeared with vitamin E (P < .05) and time of gestation (P < .001). In pregnancy, GDM increases LDL susceptibility to oxidation. Obesity and hypercholesterolemia further exacerbate this effect.

  2. Pregnancy after oocyte donation in 45, X Turner syndrome women, complicated by gestational diabetes and polyhydramnios. Case report and mini-review of literature.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk, Adam; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Katulski, Krzysztof; Breborowicz, Grzegorz H; Genazzani, Andrea R; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2016-08-01

    Patients suffering from Turner syndrome (TS) demonstrate characteristic clinical features, with a short stature and gonadal dysgenesis causing infertility in most patients. Spontaneous pregnancies in women with TS are quite rare and pregnancy outcomes involving an increased risk of miscarriage and stillbirths are observed. In this case report, we present a 28 years old pregnant woman with the diagnosis of TS. Due to hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, she was proposed an in vitro fertilization (IVF) program with an oocyte donor from unrelated anonymous women. After the second transfer, implantation occurred. In the 24th week of gestation, gestational diabetes class 1 was diagnosed. In the 31st week of gestation, polyhydramnios was diagnosed, although other parameters were reassuring. Considering the polyhydramnios, along with the diagnosis of Turner syndrome in the mother, we decided to perform an elective cesarean section. Subsequently, a healthy term male was born. For most women with the diagnosis of TS, the only way to become pregnant is through oocyte donation. The aim of this work was to characterize the course of pregnancy in TS patient and review literature addressing this issue.

  3. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy.

  4. Who Is at Increased Risk of Health Problems during Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who is at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Research Goals Activities and Advances ... Who is at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications ...

  5. Brain-stem Listeriosis: A Comparison of SPECT and MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Sevki; Arisoy, Ayse S.; Topkaya, Aynur E.; Karsidag, Sibel

    2006-01-01

    Abstract and Introduction Abstract Listeria monocytogenes, although uncommon as a cause of illness in the general population, can result in serious illness when it affects pregnant women, neonates, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Typically, it is a food-borne organism. This report describes a case of brain-stem listeriosis in a previously healthy 51-year-old woman. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings, the results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, CSF culture, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MRI demonstrated upper brain stem and cerebellar peduncle involvement. In addition, Tc-99m exametazime (HMPAO)-labeled single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain revealed bilateral cerebellar hypoperfusion. Antibiotic therapy resulted in partial clinical recovery after 3 weeks. At the end of 6 months, brain-stem findings had nearly resolved. However, although minimal residual findings were observed on MRI at 6 months, bilateral diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion remained on Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT. PMID:17415328

  6. Foodborne microbial risks in the press: the framing of listeriosis in Canadian newspapers.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Elisabeth

    2011-03-01

    Outbreaks of foodborne illness generally receive abundant print media coverage. However, the framing of outbreaks and representations of foodborne pathogens in the media discourse are not necessarily homogeneous. Drawing on previous research on media coverage of emerging diseases and on the conceptual tools of framing theory, this paper explores the diversity of frames and representations used in the media coverage of two listeriosis outbreaks that occurred in Canada in fall 2008. In the dominant war against microbes frame, microbes are portrayed as posing serious risks that call for stringent control measures. This frame coexists with other frames which rather emphasize economic, ecosystem or nutrition issues and which are supported by representations of microbial risks that either mitigate these risks, present them as inevitable or as less serious than others. The implications of these observations for the public understanding of foodborne microbial risks are discussed.

  7. A rare case of bilateral tubal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shetty, J P; Shetty, Bhaskar; Makkanavar, J H; Chandrika

    2011-07-01

    Diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy continues to be an important challenge. Here a case of incidental diagnosis of bilateral tubal ectopic pregnancy is reported. There was a ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy on the left side and chronic ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy on the right side. Leading cause of first trimester maternal deaths is due to complications of ectopic pregnancy. Here an unusual case of ectopic pregnancy is reported in which the patient had spontaneous bilateral tubal ectopic pregnancy which presented with left tubal rupture and subsequently emergency exploratory laparotomy revealed bilateral tubal mass, which on histopathological examination confirmed tubal pregnancy.

  8. Responding to bioterror concerns by increasing milk pasteurization temperature would increase estimated annual deaths from listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Martin, Nicole; Laue, Shelley; Gröhn, Yrjo T; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In a 2005 analysis of a potential bioterror attack on the food supply involving a botulinum toxin release into the milk supply, the authors recommended adopting a toxin inactivation step during milk processing. In response, some dairy processors increased the times and temperatures of pasteurization well above the legal minimum for high temperature, short time pasteurization (72 °C for 15 s), with unknown implications for public health. The present study was conducted to determine whether an increase in high temperature, short time pasteurization temperature would affect the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, a potentially lethal foodborne pathogen normally eliminated with proper pasteurization but of concern when milk is contaminated postpasteurization. L. monocytogenes growth during refrigerated storage was higher in milk pasteurized at 82 °C than in milk pasteurized at 72 °C. Specifically, the time lag before exponential growth was decreased and the maximum population density was increased. The public health impact of this change in pasteurization was evaluated using a quantitative microbial risk assessment of deaths from listeriosis attributable to consumption of pasteurized fluid milk that was contaminated postprocessing. Conservative estimates of the effect of pasteurizing all fluid milk at 82 °C rather than 72 °C are that annual listeriosis deaths from consumption of this milk would increase from 18 to 670, a 38-fold increase (8.7- to 96-fold increase, 5th and 95th percentiles). These results exemplify a situation in which response to a rare bioterror threat may have the unintended consequence of putting the public at increased risk of a known, yet severe harm and illustrate the need for a paradigm shift toward multioutcome risk benefit analyses when proposing changes to established food safety practices.

  9. Outbreak of invasive listeriosis associated with the consumption of hog head cheese--Louisiana, 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-04-08

    During January-June 2010, a total of 14 cases of laboratory-confirmed invasive listeriosis were reported to the Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH). Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes from the blood samples of eight patients were identified as serotype 1/2a and had pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern combinations that were indistinguishable from one another. The detection of this cluster prompted an investigation in coordination with CDC, the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry (LDAF), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS). In-depth epidemiologic and environmental investigations of the cluster were initiated on July 26, including food history interviews of four patients. Three patients reported eating hog head cheese (a meat jelly made from swine heads and feet); the product was purchased at two grocery stores in Louisiana. A traceback investigation determined that a single brand of hog head cheese was common between the two grocery stores. L. monocytogenes serotype 1/2a was cultured from one of three product samples and from two of 16 environmental samples collected by LDAF at the processing establishment; the product and one of the two environmental samples yielded isolates with PFGE pattern combinations that were indistinguishable from the patient isolates. On August 14, LDAF coordinated a voluntary recall of approximately 500,000 pounds of hog head cheese and sausage because of possible contamination with L. monocytogenes. This is the first published report of an invasive listeriosis outbreak associated with hog head cheese, which is a ready-to-eat (RTE) meat. USDA-FSIS has a "zero tolerance" policy for L. monocytogenes contamination of RTE food products, requesting recall of such products at any detectable level of L. monocytogenes contamination. LDAF imposes and enforces equivalent requirements in state-inspected establishments.

  10. Ectopic Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Ectopic Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Ectopic Pregnancy Print A A ... lower back pain continue What Causes an Ectopic Pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy usually happens because a fertilized ...

  11. Ectopic pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tubal pregnancy; Cervical pregnancy; Tubal ligation - ectopic pregnancy ... In most pregnancies, the fertilized egg travels through the fallopian tube to the womb (uterus). If the movement of the egg ...

  12. Pregnancy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Home A-Z Health Topics Pregnancy tests Pregnancy tests > A-Z Health Topics Pregnancy test fact ... To receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy tests If you think you may be pregnant , ...

  13. Ectopic Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Ectopic Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Ectopic Pregnancy A A A ... lower back pain continue What Causes an Ectopic Pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy usually happens because a fertilized ...

  14. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  15. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landau, Ester; Amar, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension (HT) is a complication of 8% of all pregnancies and 10% of HT cases are due to primary aldosteronism (PA). There is very little data on PA and pregnancy. Given the changes in the renin angiotensin system during pregnancy, the diagnosis of PA is difficult to establish during gestation. It may be suspected in hypertensive patients with hypokalemia. A comprehensive literature review identified reports covering 40 pregnancies in patients suffering from PA. Analysis of these cases shows them to be high-risk pregnancies leading to maternal and fetal complications. Pregnancy must be programmed, and if the patient has a unilateral form of PA, adrenalectomy should be performed prior to conception. It is customary to stop spironolactone prior to conception and introduce antihypertensive drugs that present no risk of teratogenicity. When conventional antihypertensive drugs used during pregnancy fail to control high blood pressure, diuretics, including potassium-sparing diuretics may be prescribed. Adrenalectomy can be considered during the second trimester of pregnancy exclusively in cases of refractory hypertension. A European retrospective study is currently underway to collect a larger number of cases.

  16. [Complications of tubal sterilization].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, W E

    1986-05-01

    In Europe and the US, tubal sterilization by laparoscopy has become the most widely used technique for female sterilization. The overall rate of intra- and postoperative complications differs between 0.145% and 0.85% in the numerous studies which have been done. This means 1 severe complication in 120-700 laparoscopic sterilizations. The lethality of tubal sterilization by laparoscopy lies between 3-10 deaths/100,000 interventions. The so-called "post-tubal ligation syndrome" is a rare complication. The overall pregnancy rate after tubal sterilization is 3-10/1000 women. The rate of ectopic pregnancy is very high and varies between 13.6% and 90%. Only 5% of the sterilized women show dissatisfaction. Several factors are relevant with regard to psychological sequelae and must be considered before tubal sterilization can be performed. 1 of the most important is the individual comprehensive counselling of the female or the couple prior to the sterilization.

  17. Prevalence and Level of Listeria monocytogenes in Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y I; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Pouillot, Régis; Strain, Errol; DE Jesus, Antonio J; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Hua; Ali, Laila; Tatavarthy, Aparna; Zhang, Guodong; Hu, Lijun; Day, James; Kang, Jihun; Sahu, Surasri; Srinivasan, Devayani; Klontz, Karl; Parish, Mickey; Evans, Peter S; Brown, Eric W; Hammack, Thomas S; Zink, Donald L; Datta, Atin R

    2016-11-01

    A most-probable-number (MPN) method was used to enumerate Listeria monocytogenes in 2,320 commercial ice cream scoops manufactured on a production line that was implicated in a 2015 listeriosis outbreak in the United States. The analyzed samples were collected from seven lots produced in November 2014, December 2014, January 2015, and March 2015. L. monocytogenes was detected in 99% (2,307 of 2,320) of the tested samples (lower limit of detection, 0.03 MPN/g), 92% of which were contaminated at <20 MPN/g. The levels of L. monocytogenes in these samples had a geometric mean per lot of 0.15 to 7.1 MPN/g. The prevalence and enumeration data from an unprecedented large number of naturally contaminated ice cream products linked to a listeriosis outbreak provided a unique data set for further understanding the risk associated with L. monocytogenes contamination for highly susceptible populations.

  18. [Liver transplantation and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Goarin, A-C; Homer, L

    2010-11-01

    Management during their sexual life of patients with a liver transplantation is a more or less common situation depending centers. Based on literature review, a focus on management of recipient women was conducted, from contraception to pregnancy, describing the complications related to the status of transplant recipient, but also those that may be related to immunosuppressive agents. If fertility and access to contraception are only slightly modified by graft, complications related to graft or immunosuppressive drugs can affect the pregnancy. On the maternal side, hypertension and preeclampsia are more common, as well as renal dysfunction, iatrogenic diabetes and bacterial or viral infections, acute rejection and graft loss do not appear to be influenced by pregnancy. The fetus is also exposed to risks such as induced prematurity and IUGR. Pregnancy in recipients of hepatic grafts therefore requires joint follow-up by transplant specialist and perinatologist, which leads in most cases to successful outcome for mother and child.

  19. Analysis of older adults' domestic kitchen storage practices in the United Kingdom: identification of risk factors associated with listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ellen W; Redmond, Elizabeth C

    2015-04-01

    Increased listeriosis incidence among older adults (≥ 60 years) has been reported internationally, with many cases reported to be sporadic and associated with ready-to-eat (RTE) food products with extended refrigerated shelf life. Given that the home kitchen is recognized as a significant location where foodborne illnesses are acquired, it is important that consumers implement safe food practices to minimize risks. This is crucial for vulnerable consumers, such as older adults. Consumer food safety recommendations in the United Kingdom to reduce the risk of listeriosis at home include (i) following "use-by" dates on unopened prepacked RTE food products, (ii) consuming RTE food products within 2 days of opening, and (iii) ensuring the safe operating temperatures of domestic refrigerators (≤ 5 °C). This study utilized observation, self-reporting, and microbiological analysis to determine actual food storage practices to identify behavioral risk factors. A domestic kitchen survey was conducted in older adult (≥ 60 years) consumers' domestic kitchens (n = 100) in South Wales, United Kingdom. Forty-one percent of foods in home refrigerators were beyond the use-by date, of which 11% were unopened RTE food products commonly associated with listeriosis. Sixty-six percent of opened RTE foods had been or were intended to be stored beyond the recommended 2 days after opening. Older adults failed to ensure safe refrigeration temperatures, with 50% of central storage and 85% of door storage areas operating at temperatures >5 °C. Older refrigerators operated at significantly (P < 0.05) higher temperatures. Given that Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 2% of kitchens, these findings suggest that storage malpractices may have a greater effect on the potential risk of listeriosis than its presence alone. The study has determined that many older adults fail to adhere to recommendations and subject RTE foods associated with L. monocytogenes to prolonged storage at unsafe

  20. [Liver diseases and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Plessier, A; Hillaire, S; Delluc, C; Leroux, G; Le Guern, V; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Liver disease can be observed in pregnant women whether or not related to pregnancy. Liver disorders can be revealed by pruritus, vomiting, jaundice or abnormal liver blood tests during pregnancy. These liver manifestations can lead to the diagnosis of liver disease specifically associated to pregnancy as intrahepatic pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, Hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and preeclampsia-induced liver injury. Pregnancy may also be a risk factor for other liver diseases coincident with pregnancy as viral hepatitis, thrombosis, drug toxicity or gallstone. Finally, pre-existing liver disease must be taken into account given the risk of fœto-maternal transmission risk as well as the risk of decompensation of underlying cirrhosis secondary to the hemodynamic changes caused by pregnancy. The aim of this revue is to perform an update on the various situations that can be observed, the principles of management of these liver diseases, in order to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis.

  1. Urolithiasis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Korkes, Fernando; Rauen, Eduardo Costa; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of urolithiasis during pregnancy is common, even though no additional measures are required in asymptomatic cases. Renal colic or complications of urinary lithiasis occur more frequently during the last months of pregnancy, and there are several particularities for the diagnosis and treatment of this subset of women. The present manuscript aim to review the current knowledge concerning this subject and present authors personal experience.

  2. [Post-rape pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Muhlstein, J; Martrille, L; Guillet-May, F; Routiot, T; Coudane, H; Judlin, P

    2013-02-01

    A rape is a traumatizing circumstance for the victim. This aggression often has, regrettably, immediate repercussions, and then medium and long-term ones. Its complications are psychological, but also sometimes somatic, like pregnancy. Through an international literature review, and the study of the national legislation, we will summarize the main essential elements of the medical and forensic care of a pregnancy arising after a rape.

  3. Listeria and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... well as in some animals, including cattle and poultry. When eaten, the bacterium can cause listeriosis. Listeria ... all raw and undercooked seafood, eggs, meat, and poultry while you are pregnant. Do not eat sushi ...

  4. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vest, Amanda R; Cho, Leslie S

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy represent the second commonest cause of direct maternal death and complicate an estimated 5-10 % of pregnancies. Classification systems aim to separate hypertension similar to that seen outside pregnancy (chronic and gestational hypertension) from the potentially fatal pregnancy-specific conditions. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and eclampsia represent increasing severities of this disease spectrum. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' 2013 guidelines no longer require proteinuria as a diagnostic criterion, because of its variable appearance in the disease spectrum. The cause involves inadequate cytotrophoblastic invasion of the myometrium, resulting in placental hypoperfusion and diffuse maternal endothelial dysfunction. Changes in angiogenic and antiangiogentic peptide profiles precede the onset of clinical preeclampsia. Women with preeclampsia should be closely monitored and receive magnesium sulfate intravenously if severe features, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia occur. Definitive therapy is delivery of the fetus. Hypertension in pregnancy increases future maternal risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.

  5. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Morton, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. Less than 50 cases of pregnancy in women with primary aldosteronism have been reported, suggesting the disorder is significantly underdiagnosed in confinement. Accurate diagnosis is complicated by physiological changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in pregnancy, leading to a risk of false negative results on screening tests. The course of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is highly variable, although overall it is associated with a very high risk of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The optimal management of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is unclear, with uncertainty regarding the safety of mineralocorticoid antagonists and amiloride, their relative efficacy compared with the antihypertensive medications commonly used during pregnancy, and as to whether prognosis is improved by laparoscopic adrenalectomy where an adrenal adenoma can be demonstrated.

  6. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Caren G; Seely, Ellen W

    2011-12-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of pregnancy. Preeclampsia, in particular, is associated with substantial risk to both the mother and the fetus. Several risk factors have been recognized to predict risk for preeclampsia. However, at present no biomarkers have sufficient discriminatory ability to be useful in clinical practice, and no effective preventive strategies have yet been identified. Commonly used medications for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy include methyldopa and labetalol. Blood pressure thresholds for initiating antihypertensive therapy are higher than outside of pregnancy. Women with prior preeclampsia are at increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease.

  7. Valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Anthony, John; Osman, Ayesha; Sani, Mahmoud U

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease may be a pre-existing complication of pregnancy or it may be diagnosed for the first time during pregnancy. Accurate diagnosis, tailored therapy and an understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy are necessary components of management, best achieved through the use of multidisciplinary clinics. This review outlines the management of specific lesions, with particular reference to post-rheumatic valvular heart disease.

  8. Acute kidney injury during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, James W

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates the care of a relatively small number of pregnant and postpartum women. Several pregnancy-related disorders such as preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathies may produce acute kidney injury. Prerenal azotemia is another common cause of acute kidney injury in pregnancy. This manuscript will review pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury from a renal functional perspective. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury will be reviewed. Specific conditions causing acute kidney injury and treatments will be compared.

  9. Do Newborns Have More Complications When Mom Has Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do newborns have more complications when mom has asthma? Published Online: August 5, 2013 Asthma is fairly common in women of reproductive age ... 10% of pregnancies in the US. Mothers with asthma are known to have increased risk of pregnancy ...

  10. Teenage pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Prenatal care - teenage pregnancy ... the baby. If you decide to continue the pregnancy, it is important to have good prenatal care. ... trimester is the first 3 months of your pregnancy. During this time, you will have a prenatal ...

  11. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  12. Renal disease in pregnancy ambulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Sharon T

    2012-09-01

    Acute and chronic renal disease will complicate prenatal care. Normal physiological changes during pregnancy make the urinary tract system more vulnerable to infectious complications or worsening of preexisting disease. Much of the focus of prenatal care includes screening for these concerns both at the onset of prenatal care and through the pregnancy and postpartum course. With careful and attentive care, the pregnancy outcome for women with significant renal disease has improved and the occurrence of renal injury or obstetric complications due to infectious insults has decreased. This manuscript reviews the current ambulatory prenatal care as it relates to the urinary tract in pregnancy.

  13. [Pregestional diabetes mellitus and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Bělobrádková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    There is a groving number of women with pregestational diabetes mellitus. Additionaly, nowadays therapy of diabetes mellitus type I allows gravidity even in patients in whom diabetes manifested itself during their early childhood. Presence of chronic complications of diabetes increases risk of complications during pregnancy. There is incerasing number of patients with DM type II and appearence of it shifts into younger age group. Perinatal mortality and morbidity of children of mothers with pregestional diabets is higher than in comparison with common population and pregnancy planning is important measure to their decrease.Key words: pregnancy - diabetes mellitus - embryopathy - fetopathy.

  14. Pregnancy and Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ami B; DeFaria Yeh, Doreen

    2015-11-01

    Most women with known congenital heart disease can have successful pregnancy, labor, and delivery. Preconception assessment is essential in understanding anatomy, repairs, and current physiology, all of which can influence risk in pregnancy. With that foundation, a multidisciplinary cardio-obstetric team can predict and prepare for complications that may occur with superimposed hemodynamic changes of pregnancy. Individuals with Eisenmenger syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, significant left heart obstruction, ventricular dysfunction, or prior major cardiac event are among the highest risk for complications.

  15. Serodiagnosis of listeriosis based upon detection of antibodies against recombinant truncated forms of listeriolysin O.

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Y; Poyart, C; Juvin, M; Beretti, J L; Croizé, J; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1996-01-01

    Amino-terminal fragments of listeriolysin O (LLO) of 240 and 411 residues (fragments LLO240 and LLO411, respectively) were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion polypeptides with maltose-binding protein (MBP) with the aim of producing specific antigens for use in serological tests. In Western blots (immunoblots) with crude bacterial extracts of the fusion polypeptides, the reactivities of MBP-LLO240 and MBP-LLO411 with anti-LLO antibody (ALLO)- and anti-streptolysin O antibody (ASLO)-positive human sera were first compared with that of the entire LLO (LLO530) also fused to MBP (MBP-LLO530). Sixteen of 17 (94.1%) ALLO-positive samples reacting with MBP-LLO530 also reacted with MBP-LLO411, whereas this proportion dropped to 11 of 17 (64.7%) with MBP-LLO240. Alternatively, 18 of 19 (94.7%) ASLO-positive samples giving an interpretable result reacted with MBP-LLO530, whereas 1 of 19 (5.3%) of these samples reacted with MBP-LLO240 or MBP-LLO411. The fusion polypeptide MBP-LLO411 was purified by maltose affinity chromatography and was further evaluated as a diagnostic antigen in a Western blot assay. Twenty-one of 21 (100%) serum samples obtained from patients with listeriosis and found to be positive for ALLO by a reference dot blot test reacted with MBP-LLO411, whereas 1 of 20 (5%) ASLO-positive serum samples and 1 of 100 (1%) serum samples from healthy adults were reactive. Thus, a polypeptide limited to the 411 amino-terminal residues of LLO is a specific and sensitive antigen for the detection of ALLO. PMID:8735086

  16. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias.

  17. Pemphigus vulgaris in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Salzberg, Kelsey W; Gero, Melanie J; Ragsdale, Bruce D

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who was diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) during pregnancy. The patient presented with widespread blistering dermatitis and associated burning and pruritus. At 6 weeks' gestation the patient was admitted to the hospital to expedite her diagnosis and initiate treatment. A skin biopsy revealed suprabasal acantholysis, and direct immunofluorescence demonstrated diffuse intercellular IgG in the epidermis and basal intercellular C3, which confirmed the diagnosis of PV. Treatment with corticosteroids was instituted after discussions with the patient about possible adverse effects to the fetus. Pemphigus vulgaris is rare in pregnancy and active PV presents potential threats of fetal spread and transient lesion production, which is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in the fetus. Our patient had active PV and required treatment throughout her pregnancy. The pregnancy progressed to premature delivery of the neonate without skin lesions or apparent complications.

  18. Successful outcome in preeclamptic rudimentary horn pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ruchi; Sachan, Shikha; Khanna, Anuradha

    2011-01-01

    Unicornuate uterus with rudimentary horn is an uncommon type of mullerian duct malformation associated with various gynecological and obstetrical complications. Rudimentary horn pregnancy is a rare entity and the majority have rupture of gravid horn leading to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. A case of rudimentary horn pregnancy at 32 weeks and 6 days with pregnancy induced hypertension is reported where proper management results in successful pregnancy outcome.

  19. Anaemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, Malik; Shehata, Mishkat; Hamad, Asma

    2012-02-01

    Anaemia in pregnancy, defined as a haemoglobin concentration (Hb) < 110 g/L, affects more than 56 million women globally, two thirds of them being from Asia. Multiple factors lead to anaemia in pregnancy, nutritional iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) being the commonest. Underlying inflammatory conditions, physiological haemodilution and several factors affecting Hb and iron status in pregnancy lead to difficulties in establishing a definitive diagnosis. IDA is associated with increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, and long-term adverse effects in the new born. Strategies to prevent anaemia in pregnancy and its adverse effects include treatment of underlying conditions, iron and folate supplementation given weekly for all menstruating women including adolescents and daily for women during pregnancy and the post partum period, and delayed clamping of the umbilical cord at delivery. Oral iron is preferable to intravenous therapy for treatment of IDA. B12 and folate deficiencies in pregnancy are rare and may be due to inadequate dietary intake with the latter being more common. These vitamins play an important role in embryo genesis and hence any relative deficiencies may result in congenital abnormalities. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of these deficiencies. Haemolytic anaemias rare also rare in pregnancy, but may have life-threatening complications if the diagnosis is not made in good time and acted upon appropriately.

  20. Thrombophilia, thrombosis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eldor, A

    2001-07-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy is 0.05-1.8%, six times greater than in the non-pregnant state, and pulmonary embolism remains the most common cause of maternal death. Maternal age, previous history of VTE, Caesarean section and the presence of thrombophilia, significantly increase the risk of VTE. Acquired or hereditary thrombophilia occur in almost two-thirds of women presenting with recurrent miscarriages, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, abruptio placentae, or stillbirth, which are associated with microvascular thrombosis in placental blood vessels. Women with VTE during pregnancy and especially those with thrombophilia require individualized management, based on the type of defect, the family history and the presence of additional risk factors. These factors are important in determining the dose and duration of antithrombotic therapy during pregnancy and the puerperium, and the thromboprophylactic strategy for future pregnancies. Oral anticoagulants are now seldom used during pregnancy because of their significant side effects. Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) are increasingly replacing unfractionated heparin in the prevention and treatment of VTE during pregnancy. LMWHs have also been shown to be effective in improving the outcome of pregnancy in women with previous obstetric complications.

  1. Heroin addiction and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bashore, R A; Ketchum, J S; Staisch, K J; Barrett, C T; Zimmermann, E G

    1981-06-01

    Pregnant heroin addicts tend to be younger than nonaddicted pregnant patients, unmarried or separated from spouses, and a disproportionately large number are members of minority ethnic groups. Heroin addiction during pregnancy is associated with several significant medical and obstetrical complications and may result in both acute and chronic abnormalities in neonates. Malnutrition, venereal disease, hepatitis, pulmonary complications, preeclampsia and third-trimester bleeding are the most common maternal complications, while fetal death, intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and withdrawal symptoms affect the fetus and neonate. There is controversy about treating addicts with methadone during pregnancy. The findings of studies in animals suggest that there may be a long-lasting drug-induced syndrome, characterized by growth retardation, delayed motor development and behavior abnormalities in offspring of heroin-addicted or methadone-treated mothers.

  2. Valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Windram, Jonathan D; Colman, Jack M; Wald, Rachel M; Udell, Jacob A; Siu, Samuel C; Silversides, Candice K

    2014-05-01

    In women with valvular heart disease, pregnancy-associated cardiovascular changes can contribute to maternal, foetal and neonatal complications. Ideally, a woman with valvular heart disease should receive preconception assessment and counselling from a cardiologist with expertise in pregnancy. For women with moderate- and high-risk valve lesions, appropriate risk stratification and management during pregnancy will optimise outcomes. Pregnancy in women with high-risk lesions, such as severe aortic stenosis, severe mitral stenosis and those with mechanical valves, requires careful planning and coordination of antenatal care by a multidisciplinary team. The purpose of this overview is to describe the expected haemodynamic changes in pregnancy, review pregnancy risks for women with valvular heart disease and discuss strategies for management.

  3. Obstetric Complications Tied to Slightly Upped Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obstetric Complications Tied to Slightly Upped Risk for Autism Study suggests link, but one expert stressed that most complicated pregnancies result in babies without autism To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  4. Listeriosis in animals, its public health significance (food-borne zoonosis) and advances in diagnosis and control: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo; Malik, Satya Veer Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Listeriosis is an infectious and fatal disease of animals, birds, fish, crustaceans and humans. It is an important food-borne zoonosis caused by Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular pathogen with unique potential to spread from cell to cell, thereby crossing blood-brain, intestinal and placental barriers. The organism possesses a pile of virulence factors that help to infect the host and evade from host immune machinery. Though disease occurrence is sporadic throughout the world, it can result in severe damage during an outbreak. Listeriosis is characterized by septicaemia, encephalitis, meningitis, meningoencephalitis, abortion, stillbirth, perinatal infections and gastroenteritis with the incubation period varying with the form of infection. L. monocytogenes has been isolated worldwide from humans, animals, poultry, environmental sources like soil, river, decaying plants, and food sources like milk, meat and their products, seafood and vegetables. Since appropriate vaccines are not available and infection is mainly transmitted through foods in humans and animals, hygienic practices can prevent its spread. The present review describes etiology, epidemiology, transmission, clinical signs, post-mortem lesions, pathogenesis, public health significance, and advances in diagnosis, vaccines and treatment of this disease. Special attention has been given to novel as well as prospective emerging therapies that include bacteriophage and cytokine therapy, avian egg yolk antibodies and herbal therapy. Various vaccines, including advances in recombinant and DNA vaccines and their modes of eliciting immune response, are also discussed. Due focus has also been given regarding appropriate prevention and control strategies to be adapted for better management of this zoonotic disease.

  5. Pregnancy and Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Karen; Hunt, Beverley J

    2016-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is classified as the association of thrombotic events and/or obstetric morbidity in patients persistently positive for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). APS is also the most frequently acquired risk factor for a treatable cause of recurrent pregnancy loss and increases the risk of conditions associated with ischemic placental dysfunction, such as stillbirth, intrauterine death, preeclampsia, premature birth, and fetal growth restriction. The use of low-dose aspirin and heparin has improved the pregnancy outcome in obstetric APS and approximately 70% of pregnant women with APS will deliver a viable live infant. However, current management does not prevent all maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications of APS and the current treatment fails in 20 to 30% of APS pregnancies, raising the need to explore other treatments to improve obstetrical outcome. Two clinical studies of retrospective design have suggested that the immunomodulator hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) may play a role in the prevention of pregnancy complications in women with aPL and APS. The randomized controlled multicenter trial of hydroxychloroquine versus placebo during pregnancy in women with antiphospholipid antibodies (HYPATIA) of HCQ versus placebo will provide scientific evidence on the use of HCQ in pregnant women with aPL.

  6. Preventing adolescent pregnancy and associated risks.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R.

    1995-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a complex and frustrating problem that exacts a large social and personal cost. This year approximately 40,000 Canadian teenagers will become pregnant. With proper prevention, this number could be reduced. Pregnant teenagers seem to be at increased risk for some obstetric complications and their children for some neonatal complications. Family physicians who see patients over the course of a lifetime are in a good position to prevent adolescent pregnancy and the associated complications. PMID:8520241

  7. Pregnancy, cardiomyopathies, and genetics.

    PubMed

    Van Tintelen, J Peter; Pieper, Petronella G; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Van Den Berg, Maarten P

    2014-03-15

    Although familial forms of cardiomyopathy such as hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy have been recognized for decades, it is only recently that much of the genetic basis of these inherited cardiomyopathies has been elucidated. This has provided important insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease phenotype. This increased knowledge and the availability of genetic testing has resulted in increasing numbers of mutation carriers who are being monitored, including many who are now of child-bearing age. Pregnancy is generally well tolerated in asymptomatic patients or mutation carriers with inherited cardiomyopathies. However, since pregnancy leads to major physiological changes in the cardiovascular system, in women with genetic cardiomyopathies or who carry a mutation pre-disposing to a genetic cardiomyopathy, pregnancy entails a risk of developing heart failure and/or arrhythmias. This deterioration of cardiac function may occur despite optimal medical treatment. Advanced left ventricular dysfunction, poor functional class (NYHA class III or IV), or prior cardiac events appear to increase the risk of maternal cardiac complications. However, there are no large series of cardiomyopathy patients who are regularly evaluated for cardiac complications during pregnancy and for certain types of inherited cardiomyopathy, only case reports on individual pregnancies are available. Pre-conception cardiologic evaluation and genetic counselling are important for every woman with a cardiomyopathy or a cardiomyopathy-related mutation who is considering having a family. In this article, we give an overview of the basic clinical aspects, genetics, and pregnancy outcome in women with different types of inherited cardiomyopathies. We also discuss the genetic aspects of pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy.

  8. [Pregnancy and antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costedoat-Chalumeau, N; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Leguern, V; Leroux, G; Le Thi Huong, D; Wechsler, B; Morel, N; Vauthier-Brouzes, D; Dommergues, M; Cornet, A; Aumaître, O; Pourrat, O; Piette, J-C; Nizard, J

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is associated with a risk of obstetrical complications, affecting both the mother and the fetus. Obstetrical APS is defined by a history of three consecutive spontaneous miscarriages before 10 weeks of gestation (WG), an intra-uterine fetal death after 10 WG, or a premature birth before 34 WG because of severe pre-eclampsia, eclampsia or placental adverse outcomes (intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios). Pregnancy in women with a diagnosis of obstetric APS is at increased risk for placental abruption, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet count) syndrome and thrombosis that may be part of a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). A previous thrombosis and the presence of a lupus anticoagulant are risk factors for pregnancy failure. A multidisciplinary approach, associating the internist, the anesthesiologist and the obstetrician, is recommended for these high-risk pregnancies. Preconception counseling is proposed to identify pregnancy contraindications, and to define and adapt the treatment prior and during the upcoming pregnancy. Heparin and low-dose aspirin are the main treatments. The choice between therapeutic or prophylactic doses of heparin will depend on the patient's medical history. The anticoagulant therapeutic window for delivery should be as narrow as possible and adapted to maternal thrombotic risk. There is a persistent maternal risk in the postpartum period (thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, CAPS) justifying an antithrombotic coverage during this period. We suggest a monthly clinical and biological monitoring which can be more frequent towards the end of pregnancy. The persistence of notches at the Doppler-ultrasound evaluation seems to be the best predictor for a higher risk of placental vascular complications. Treatment optimization and multidisciplinary antenatal care improve the prognosis of pregnancies in women with obstetric APS, leading to a favorable outcome most of the time.

  9. Syphilis in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Genc, M.; Ledger, W.

    2000-01-01

    Syphilis can seriously complicate pregnancy and result in spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, non-immune hydrops, intrauterine growth restriction, and perinatal death, as well as serious sequelae in liveborn infected children. While appropriate treatment of pregnant women often prevents such complications, the major deterrent has been inability to identify the infected women and get them to undergo treatment. Screening in the first trimester with non-treponemal tests such as rapid plasma reagin (RPR) or venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test combined with confirmation of reactive individuals with treponemal tests such as the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) assay is a cost effective strategy. Those at risk should be retested in the third trimester. Treatment during pregnancy should be with penicillin. In determining a penicillin regimen, the clinician must consider the stage of the maternal infection and the HIV status of the mother. Patients who are allergic to penicillin should be desensitised before treatment. Despite appropriate treatment, as many as 14% will have a fetal death or deliver infected infants. Treatment may further be complicated by the Jarich–Herxheimer reaction, a complex allergic response to antigens released from dead micro-organisms, which can cause fetal distress and uterine contractions. Thanks to effective intervention strategies and inexpensive penicillin, syphilis rarely complicates pregnancy in the Western world today. In parts of the world where the traditional sexually transmitted diseases have not been controlled, the magnitude of problems associated with syphilis during pregnancy is reminiscent of that faced by the West during the early 1900s. Key Words: syphilis; pregnancy PMID:10858706

  10. [Thyroid dysfunctions and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology of the thyroid function in normal pregnancy have highlighted the importance of the consequences of abnormal thyroid function on mother and fetal outcomes. Thyroid diseases are common in young women of childbearing age while management of thyroid diseases is relatively straightforward. For each thyroid dysfunction (hypothyroxinemia, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis), the issues with the obstetric complications of the mother and the fetus are considered. Indeed, early recognition of thyroid diseases during pregnancy and appropriate management has the potential to improve outcome for the mother and the fetus.

  11. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Geenes, Victoria; Williamson, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-specific liver disorder characterized by maternal pruritus in the third trimester, raised serum bile acids and increased rates of adverse fetal outcomes. The etiology of ICP is complex and not fully understood, but it is likely to result from the cholestatic effects of reproductive hormones and their metabolites in genetically susceptible women. Equally unclear are the mechanisms by which the fetal complications occur. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, etiology and management of ICP. PMID:19418576

  12. Pregnancy Complications: Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... helps prevent your baby from getting the infection. Penicillin is the best antibiotic for most women. Another ... in 25 women, or 4 percent) treated with penicillin have a mild allergic reaction, like a rash. ...

  13. Thyroid disorders in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ramprasad, Menaka; Bhattacharyya, Shaila Shamanur; Bhattacharyya, Arpandev

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid disorders are common in pregnancy and the most common disorder is subclinical hypothyroidism. Due to the complex hormonal changes during pregnancy, it is important to remember that thyroxine requirements are higher in pregnancy. According to recent American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines, the recommended reference ranges for TSH are 0.1 to 2.5 mIU/L in the first trimester, 0.2 to 3.0 mIU/L in the second trimester, and 0.3 to 3.0 mIU/L in the third trimester. Maternal hypothyroidism is an easily treatable condition that has been associated with increased risk of low birth weight, fetal distress, and impaired neuropsychological development. Hyperthyroidism in pregnancy is less common as conception is a problem. Majority of them are due to Graves’ disease, though gestational hyperthyroidism is to be excluded. Preferred drug is propylthiouracil (PTU) with the target to maintain free T4 in upper normal range. Doses can be reduced in third trimester due to the immune-suppressant effects of pregnancy. Early and effective treatment of thyroid disorder ensures a safe pregnancy with minimal maternal and neonatal complications. PMID:23565370

  14. Molar Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cysts. In a complete molar pregnancy, there's no embryo or normal placental tissue. In a partial molar pregnancy, there's an abnormal embryo and possibly some normal placental tissue. The embryo ...

  15. Ectopic Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman is pregnant. If you have an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg grows in the wrong place, ... tubes. The result is usually a miscarriage. Ectopic pregnancy can be a medical emergency if it ruptures. ...

  16. Pregnancy care

    MedlinePlus

    ... with you about how to manage common pregnancy complaints such as: Morning sickness Backaches, leg pain, and ... getting prenatal care You cannot manage common pregnancy complaints without medicines You might have been exposed to ...

  17. Quantitative risk assessment of listeriosis-associated deaths due to Listeria monocytogenes contamination of deli meats originating from manufacture and retail.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Abani K; Ivanek, Renata; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Bukowski, Robert; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Sofos, John N; Wiedmann, Martin

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the relative risk of listeriosis-associated deaths attributable to Listeria monocytogenes contamination in ham and turkey formulated without and with growth inhibitors (GIs). Two contamination scenarios were investigated: (i) prepackaged deli meats with contamination originating solely from manufacture at a frequency of 0.4% (based on reported data) and (ii) retail-sliced deli meats with contamination originating solely from retail at a frequency of 2.3% (based on reported data). Using a manufacture-to-consumption risk assessment with product-specific growth kinetic parameters (i.e., lag phase and exponential growth rate), reformulation with GIs was estimated to reduce human listeriosis deaths linked to ham and turkey by 2.8- and 9-fold, respectively, when contamination originated at manufacture and by 1.9- and 2.8-fold, respectively, for products contaminated at retail. Contamination originating at retail was estimated to account for 76 and 63% of listeriosis deaths caused by ham and turkey, respectively, when all products were formulated without GIs and for 83 and 84% of listeriosis deaths caused by ham and turkey, respectively, when all products were formulated with GIs. Sensitivity analyses indicated that storage temperature was the most important factor affecting the estimation of per annum relative risk. Scenario analyses suggested that reducing storage temperature in home refrigerators to consistently below 7 degrees C would greatly reduce the risk of human listeriosis deaths, whereas reducing storage time appeared to be less effective. Overall, our data indicate a critical need for further development and implementation of effective control strategies to reduce L. monocytogenes contamination at the retail level.

  18. Women, kidney disease, and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Andrew; Radovic, Milan; Garovic, Vesna D

    2013-09-01

    Several glomerular diseases may occur in women of childbearing age. Pregnancy in such patients should be planned when the disease has been in remission for a minimum of 6 months to minimize maternal and fetal complications. Immunosuppressive agents should be optimized before conception to include those that are safe for pregnancy. The complexity of medical management when caring for these patients calls for a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of a nephrologist, rheumatologist, obstetrician, and pharmacist. This review will address the physiological changes of pregnancy that may affect glomerular disease presentation, activity, and diagnosis; specific glomerular diseases primary and secondary to systemic diseases in the context of pregnancy; fetal and maternal complications and long-term effects; diagnosis and differential diagnosis; and treatment strategies that are considered relatively safe with respect to fetal intrauterine exposure.

  19. The management of hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Garovic, Vesna D

    2013-05-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders complicate 6% to 8% of pregnancies and cause significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The goal of treatment is to prevent significant cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events in the mother without compromising fetal well-being. Current guidelines differentiate between the treatment of women with acute hypertensive syndromes of pregnancy and women with preexisting chronic hypertension in pregnancy. This review will address the management of hypertension in pregnancy, review the various pharmacologic therapies, and discuss the future directions in this field.

  20. Narcolepsy and pregnancy: a retrospective European evaluation of 249 pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Maurovich-Horvat, Eszter; Kemlink, David; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Geisler, Peter; Ettenhuber, Katharina; Mayer, Geert; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Calvo, Elena; Lammers, Gert Jan; Van der Heide, Astrid; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Poli, Francesca; Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Leonthin, Helle; Mathis, Johannes; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Puertas, Francisco J; Beitinger, Pierre A; Arnulf, Isabelle; Riha, Renata L; Tormášiová, Maria; Slonková, Jana; Nevšímalová, Sona; Sonka, Karel

    2013-10-01

    In a retrospective cohort study undertaken in 12 European countries, 249 female narcoleptic patients with cataplexy (n = 216) and without cataplexy (n = 33) completed a self-administrated questionnaire regarding pregnancy and childbirth. The cohort was divided further into patients whose symptoms of narcolepsy started before or during pregnancy (308 pregnancies) and those in whom the first symptoms of narcolepsy appeared after delivery (106 pregnancies). Patients with narcolepsy during pregnancy were older during their first pregnancy (P < 0.001) and had a higher body mass index (BMI) prior to pregnancy (P < 0.01). Weight gain during pregnancy was higher in narcoleptic patients with cataplexy (P < 0.01). More patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy during pregnancy had impaired glucose metabolism and anaemia. Three patients experienced cataplexy during delivery. The rate of caesarean sections was higher in the narcolepsy-cataplexy group compared to the narcolepsy group (P < 0.05). The mean birth weight and gestational age of neonates were within the normal range and did not differ across groups. Neonatal care was affected adversely by symptoms of narcolepsy in 60.1% of those with narcolepsy during pregnancy. This study reports more obstetric complications in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy during pregnancy; however, these were not severe. This group also had a higher BMI and higher incidence of impaired glucose metabolism during pregnancy. Caesarian section was conducted more frequently in narcolepsy-cataplexy patients, despite cataplexy being a rare event during delivery. Furthermore, symptoms of narcolepsy may render care of the infant more difficult.

  1. Heterotopic pregnancy: discovery of ectopic pregnancy after elective abortion.

    PubMed

    DeFrancesch, F; DiLeo, L; Martinez, J

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of combined intrauterine and tubal pregnancy in a 23-year-old woman. The patient came to the emergency department complaining of lower abdominal pain after having had an elective abortion 2 weeks earlier. Her physician had done pelvic ultrasonography, noting an intrauterine pregnancy before the abortion. Our working diagnosis in the emergency department was retained products of conception versus postabortion endometritis. Pelvic ultrasonography in the emergency department revealed an ectopic pregnancy without evidence of retained products of conception, and the patient had a right salpingotomy with removal of the ectopic fetus without complications.

  2. [Diabetes and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-González, S A

    1998-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy could result in severe or fatal complications to mother or the unborn product, like polyhydramnios, preeclampsia, abortion, neonatal asphyxia, macrosomia, stillbirth, and others, therefore is very important the early detection and treatment of diabetes. Gestacional Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is the carbohydrate intolerance of variable severity first recognized during pregnancy. The screening test consist of 50 g of oral glucose and a plasma glucose measurement at one hour, regardless of the time of the last meal, and this may do in all pregnancies between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. If plasma glucose level above 140 mg/dl results, a oral glucose tolerance test with 100 g must be done. This is the GDM diagnostic test. The risk factors for gestacional diabetes (older than 30 years of age, obesity, arterial hypertension, glucosury, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, family history of macrosomia) identify only 50% of pregnancies with gestacional diabetes, therefore, is necessary to screen all pregnancies who become pregnant, a strict control before pregnant is indispensable, with aim to slow congenital malformations probability and another complications. Gestacional diabetes prevalence in hispanic women in the U.S.A. is 12.3 percent. Diabetes mellitus prevalence in Mexico is about 2-6 percent. The goal of management of diabetes during pregnancy is the maintainance of fasting plasma glucose 105 mg/dl and 120 mg/dl two hours after meals. Treatment consist in diabetes education, diet with caloric needs calculation, exercise, and occasionally insulin. Is necessary the prenatal monitoring, the supervision of delivery or cesarean metabolic changes, and the postnatal monitoring of the mother and product.

  3. [Antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Gadó, Klára; Domján, Gyula

    2012-08-05

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by arterial and venous thromboembolic events and persistent laboratory evidence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Obstetric complications such as recurrent miscarriage, early delivery, oligohydramnios, prematurity, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal distress, fetal or neonatal thrombosis, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome are also hallmarks of antiphospholipid syndrome. This syndrome is one of the diseases associated with the most severe thrombotic risk. Changes in the hemostatic system during normal pregnancy also result in a hypercoagulable state resulting in elevated thrombotic risk. Thromboembolic events are responsible of the vast majority of maternal and fetal deaths. Administration of appropriate thromboprophylaxis helps prevent thromboembolic complications during pregnancy in women with antiphospholipid syndrome and also give birth to healthy children. It is important to centralize the medication and management of these patients. It helps in the thoughtful care of these pregnant women encountering serious problems.

  4. Hypothyroidism during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A.; Soldin, Offie P.; Koren, Gideon

    2004-01-01

    QUESTION: I have a 27-year-old patient diagnosed with hypothyroidism in the 8th week of pregnancy. She received conflicting opinions regarding risk for her baby and wants to get more information. I also found conflicting information in the literature. How should I advise her? ANSWER: Pregnant patients with untreated hypothyroidism are at increased risk of obstetric complications. Adequate treatment with thyroid hormones greatly reduces the frequency of these complications. Observational studies suggest that children whose mothers had hypothyroxinemia in early pregnancy have lower IQs than matched controls. Another study has shown that even if levothyroxine therapy is started after the first trimester, there is an excellent chance children will have normal neuropsychologic development. PMID:15116798

  5. A very unusual complication of amniocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Munawar; Hill, Michael; Kelly, David; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The uses of amniocentesis are numerous, including determination of chromosomal abnormalities, lung maturity, and infections. A common complication of amniocentesis is loss of the pregnancy, but rare complications should be considered. The role of patient history and clinical observation of uncommon presentations are critical in the management of the patient. PMID:26185625

  6. Listeria monocytogenes and listeriosis: a review of hazard characterisation for use in microbiological risk assessment of foods.

    PubMed

    McLauchlin, J; Mitchell, R T; Smerdon, W J; Jewell, K

    2004-04-01

    Considerable effort has been put into the application of quantitative microbiological risk assessment for Listeria monocytogenes, and data are available for England and Wales (probably more so than most other countries) on the adverse health effects, together with incidence data on different age and risk groups for human L. monocytogenes infections. This paper reviews aspects of Listeria and human listeriosis, especially from a public health perspective and provide hazard characterisation data, i.e. the qualitative and/or quantitative evaluation of the adverse health effect associated with the hazard, which is the relationship between exposure levels (dose) and frequency of illness. The majority of cases of human listeriosis are food-borne; however, the disease process is complex with multiple routes of infection. The dose-response relationship is poorly understood, and data from human volunteer studies are not available and would be unethical to produce. Data are available from a range of different animal and in vitro models, although these poorly mimic the natural disease process in route of infection, end point, host and history of prior exposure to the bacterium. Epidemiological data provide some information on infective doses and dose responses, but because of the characteristics of the disease (the hugely variable and potentially very long incubation periods, the low attack rates and the rarity of identification of specific food vehicles), this also provides limited data for calculation of dose responses. There is some, albeit limited, evidence for strain variation, but this is an area of considerable uncertainty despite great advances in the genetic basis of the virulence of this bacterium, and almost all strains seem capable of causing serious disease. A variety of mathematical approaches have been used to model dose responses. The review is written to provide a clinical and epidemiological background to the mathematically oriented, as well as to outline

  7. Quantitative risk assessment of human salmonellosis and listeriosis related to the consumption of raw milk in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Federica; Bonilauri, Paolo; Albonetti, Sabrina; Amatiste, Simonetta; Arrigoni, Norma; Bianchi, Manila; Bertasi, Barbara; Bilei, Stefano; Bolzoni, Giuseppe; Cascone, Giuseppe; Comin, Damiano; Daminelli, Paolo; Decastelli, Lucia; Merialdi, Giuseppe; Mioni, Renzo; Peli, Angelo; Petruzzelli, Annalisa; Tonucci, Franco; Bonerba, Elisabetta; Serraino, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative risk assessment (RA) models were developed to describe the risk of salmonellosis and listeriosis linked to consumption of raw milk sold in vending machines in Italy. Exposure assessment considered the official microbiological records monitoring raw milk samples from vending machines performed by the regional veterinary authorities from 2008 to 2011, microbial growth during storage, destruction experiments, consumption frequency of raw milk, serving size, and consumption preference. Two separate RA models were developed: one for the consumption of boiled milk and the other for the consumption of raw milk. The RA models predicted no human listeriosis cases per year either in the best or worst storage conditions and with or without boiling raw milk, whereas the annual estimated cases of salmonellosis depend on the dose-response relationships used in the model, the milk storage conditions, and consumer behavior in relation to boiling raw milk or not. For example, the estimated salmonellosis cases ranged from no expected cases, assuming that the entire population boiled milk before consumption, to a maximum of 980,128 cases, assuming that the entire population drank raw milk without boiling, in the worst milk storage conditions, and with the lowest dose-response model. The findings of this study clearly show how consumer behavior could affect the probability and number of salmonellosis cases and in general, the risk of illness. Hence, the proposed RA models emphasize yet again that boiling milk before drinking is a simple yet effective tool to protect consumers against the risk of illness inherent in the consumption of raw milk. The models may also offer risk managers a useful tool to identify or implement appropriate measures to control the risk of acquiring foodborne pathogens. Quantification of the risks associated with raw milk consumption is necessary from a public health perspective.

  8. [Hereditary thrombophilia and pregnancy: thrombotic risk and pregnancy outcome].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Glória

    2012-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease and obstetric complications related to ischemia of the placenta are currently the major causes of maternal mortality and morbidity. Thrombophilia been implicated in their aetiology and the magnitude of the risk depends on the type of thrombophilia. As the evidence is still unclear and controversial, questions about the clinical management of pregnant women with thrombophilia are a daily issue. We aim to review, bearing in mind the consensus and controversies, the impact of inherited thrombophilia in the risk of thrombosis related to pregnancy and of obstetric complications. Moreover, the diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic approach during pregnancy and puerperium, including the role of antithrombotic pharmacopoeia available, will be discussed.

  9. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  10. High-risk pregnancy and the rheumatologist.

    PubMed

    Soh, May Ching; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Rheumatologists are increasingly involved in the care of young women who, in the age of biologic therapy, are now gaining control of their rheumatic diseases and attempting pregnancy. With careful planning, most women with rheumatic diseases have successful pregnancies. This article focuses specifically on the highest-risk pregnancies and controversial areas. We discuss the women at risk of complications, the types of maternal and fetal complications, the treatments that can be used in pregnancy (and breastfeeding) and longer-term outcomes that could affect the mother. SLE, RA, ANCA-associated vasculitides, large vessel vasculitis (e.g. Takayasu's) and other CTDs (e.g. scleroderma) are among the conditions covered. The evidence and controversies regarding the recommendations for the use of biologics in pregnancy are discussed. The role of the rheumatologist in pregnancy planning and caring for the pregnant and post-partum woman as part of the multidisciplinary team is discussed.

  11. Quantitative risk assessment for Listeria monocytogenes in selected categories of deli meats: impact of lactate and diacetate on listeriosis cases and deaths.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Abani K; Ivanek, Renata; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Sofos, John N; Wiedmann, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Foodborne disease associated with consumption of ready-to-eat foods contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes represents a considerable pubic health concern. In a risk assessment published in 2003, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service estimated that about 90% of human listeriosis cases in the United States are caused by consumption of contaminated deli meats. In this risk assessment, all deli meats were grouped into one of 23 categories of ready-to-eat foods, and only the postretail growth of L. monocytogenes was considered. To provide an improved risk assessment for L. monocytogenes in deli meats, we developed a revised risk assessment that (i) models risk for three subcategories of deli meats (i.e., ham, turkey, and roast beef) and (ii) models L. monocytogenes contamination and growth from production to consumption while considering subcategory-specific growth kinetics parameters (i.e., lag phase and exponential growth rate). This model also was used to assess how reformulation of the chosen deli meat subcategories with L. monocytogenes growth inhibitors (i.e., lactate and diacetate) would impact the number of human listeriosis cases. Use of product-specific growth parameters demonstrated how certain deli meat categories differ in the relative risk of causing listeriosis; products that support more rapid growth and have reduced lag phases (e.g., turkey) represent a higher risk. Although reformulation of deli meats with growth inhibitors was estimated to reduce by about 2.5- to 7.8-fold the number of human listeriosis cases linked to a given deli meat subcategory and thus would reduce the overall risk of human listeriosis, even with reformulation deli meats would still cause a considerable number of human listeriosis cases. A combination of strategies is thus needed to provide continued reduction of these cases. Risk assessment models such as that described here will be critical for evaluation of different control

  12. [Arterial hypertension during pregnancy: Always preeclampsia?

    PubMed

    Torres-Courchoud, I; Alastrue-Del Castaño, V; Cebollada-Del Hoyo, J; Bielsa-Rodrigo, M A; Sancho-Serrano, M A

    2016-04-26

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare condition during pregnancy, but it is associated with serious maternal and fetal complications. The most common etiology during pregnancy is the presence of an adrenocortical adenoma. Urinary free cortisol over 3 times the upper limit of normal usually indicates Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy. The treatment of choice is surgical, and the ideal time for surgery is before the third trimester.

  13. [Late primary abdominal pregnancy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Farías, Emigdio Torres; Gómez, Luis Guillermo Torres; Allegre, René Márquez; Higareda, Salvador Hernández

    2008-09-01

    Abdominal advanced pregnancy is an obstetric complication that put at risk maternal and fetal life. We report a case of advanced abdominal pregnancy with intact ovaries and fallopian tubes, without ureteroperitoneal fistulae and, late prenatal diagnosis, in a multiparous patient without risk factors, with alive newborn, and whose pregnancy was attended at Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad, Hospital de Gineco-Obstetricia, Centro Medico Nacional de Occidente del IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.

  14. Hepatic hematoma and hepatic rupture in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Góngora, Julieta

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic perforation is an unusual complication of woman pregnancy associated with a poor outcome. A comprehensive review of epidemiology, clinical spectrum, diagnostic methods and therapeutic options is presented in this short paper.

  15. Adolescent Pregnancy in America: Causes and Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domenico, Desirae M.; Jones, Karen H.

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy has occurred throughout America's history. Only in recent years has it been deemed an urgent crisis, as more young adolescent mothers give birth outside of marriage. At-risk circumstances associated with adolescent pregnancy include medical and health complications, less schooling and higher dropout rates, lower career…

  16. [The diagnostic algorithm in twin pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ropacka-Lesiak, Mariola; Szaflik, Krzysztof; Breborowicz, Grzegorz H

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the diagnostic algorithm in twin pregnancy. The most important sonographic parameters in the assessment of twins have been discussed. Moreover, the most significant complications of twin pregnancy as well as diagnostic possibilities and management, have been also presented and defined.

  17. Teenage Pregnancy in the Texas Panhandle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvez-Myles, Rosa; Myles, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares rural and small-city teenage and adult pregnancies, with respect to complication rates and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Chart review of Medicaid patients (513 teenage [under 20 years] and 174 adult controls [ages 25-34]) delivered (excluding multiple gestation) in Amarillo, Texas, from January 1999 to April 2001.…

  18. Multistate outbreak of listeriosis caused by imported cheese and evidence of cross-contamination of other cheeses, USA, 2012.

    PubMed

    Heiman, K E; Garalde, V B; Gronostaj, M; Jackson, K A; Beam, S; Joseph, L; Saupe, A; Ricotta, E; Waechter, H; Wellman, A; Adams-Cameron, M; Ray, G; Fields, A; Chen, Y; Datta, A; Burall, L; Sabol, A; Kucerova, Z; Trees, E; Metz, M; Leblanc, P; Lance, S; Griffin, P M; Tauxe, R V; Silk, B J

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause bacteraemia, meningitis, and complications during pregnancy. In July 2012, molecular subtyping identified indistinguishable L. monocytogenes isolates from six patients and two samples of different cut and repackaged cheeses. A multistate outbreak investigation was initiated. Initial analyses identified an association between eating soft cheese and outbreak-related illness (odds ratio 17·3, 95% confidence interval 2·0-825·7) but no common brand. Cheese inventory data from locations where patients bought cheese and an additional location where repackaged cheese yielded the outbreak strain were compared to identify cheeses for microbiological sampling. Intact packages of imported ricotta salata yielded the outbreak strain. Fourteen jurisdictions reported 22 cases from March-October 2012, including four deaths and a fetal loss. Six patients ultimately reported eating ricotta salata; another reported eating cheese likely cut with equipment also used for contaminated ricotta salata, and nine more reported eating other cheeses that might also have been cross-contaminated. An FDA import alert and US and international recalls followed. Epidemiology-directed microbiological testing of suspect cheeses helped identify the outbreak source. Cross-contamination of cheese highlights the importance of using validated disinfectant protocols and routine cleaning and sanitizing after cutting each block or wheel.

  19. Travel during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Travel During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Travel During Pregnancy ... Pregnancy FAQ055, February 2016 PDF Format Travel During Pregnancy Pregnancy When is the best time to travel ...

  20. Management of high-risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coco, L; Giannone, T T; Zarbo, G

    2014-08-01

    Today, 88% of pregnancies has a physiological course during which just basic care, while in 12% of cases there is a high-risk pregnancy that requires additional assistance and specific. The approach that should be used is that of supervision in all pregnant women considering their potential to have a normal pregnancy until there is no clear evidence to the contrary. Pregnancy is considered at risk if there are medical conditions that may affect maternal or fetal health or life of the mother, fetus or both. Among the risk factors for pregnancy there is first the woman's age, in fact the increase in high-risk pregnancies in the last 20 years is attributable to the increase in the average age of women who face pregnancy. In addition, the diet is very important during pregnancy and diabetes or autoimmune diseases often lead to the failure of a pregnancy. Risk factors for pregnancy, also, are the complications that occur during its course as hypertension during pregnancy, and infectious diseases. Fears and anxieties typical of a high-risk pregnancy prevent the couple to live happily in the months of gestation. Effective communication, control and early detection are important tools that doctors must be able to ensure that women in order to plan the best treatment strategies and to minimize the risks of maternal and / or fetal.

  1. Pregnancy Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... and painful this loss can be. You might wonder if you'll ever have a baby to hold and call your own. But surviving the emotional impact of pregnancy loss is possible. And many women go on to have successful pregnancies. Expand all | ...

  2. Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Mary C.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the problems of teenage pregnancy, including the costs to society, the challenge to educators, and the types of preventive programs developing across the country. Programs dealing strictly with reproduction and contraception are the least effective deterrents to teenage pregnancy. (MD)

  3. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Erin; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Pieracci, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Background. Sigmoid volvulus is a rare complication of pregnancy and the puerperium. Case. A 19-year-old patient, gravida 1 para 0 at 41 0/7 weeks of gestation, admitted for late-term induction of labor underwent an uncomplicated primary low transverse cesarean delivery for arrest of descent. Her postoperative period was complicated by sudden onset of abdominal pain and the ultimate diagnosis of sigmoid volvulus. Conclusion. Prompt surgical evaluation of an acute abdomen in the postpartum period is essential; delayed diagnosis and treatment can lead to significant maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:28251004

  4. Pregnancy outcomes in Japanese patients with SLE: retrospective review of 55 pregnancies at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Haruko; Ohno, Shigeru; Uehara, Takeaki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2013-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is mainly a disease of fertile women and the coexistence of pregnancy is by no means a rare event. How SLE and its treatment affect pregnancy outcomes is still a matter of debate. We performed a retrospective analysis of 41 SLE patients (55 pregnancies) who were followed at our university hospital from January 2000 to December 2009. The mean age of patients was 30.6±4.8 years and mean disease duration was 6.6±5.3 years. After exclusion of artificial abortions, live birth rate was 84%. Significantly, more women with stillbirth pregnancies were complicated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) than women with live birth pregnancies (two of eight stillbirth pregnancies (25%) versus one of 42 live birth pregnancies (2%); p=0.014) and hypocomplementemia at conception (four of eight stillbirth pregnancies (50%) versus six of 42 live birth pregnancies (14%); p=0.021). Compared with nonrenal pregnancies, renal pregnancies were younger at SLE disease onset, had a lower positivity of anti-RNP antibody, and were more complicated with pregnancy-induced hypertension. Past maximum dose of prednisolone, the dose of prednisolone at conception, and percentage of past steroid pulse therapy were higher in renal pregnancies. Outcomes of pregnancies were not significantly different both for mothers and for infants between renal and nonrenal pregnancies. We conclude that it is necessary to provide SLE mothers with the proper information before pregnancy. Women with APS or hypocomplementemia should be regarded with particular attention. Optimal management of mothers and infants requires collaborative efforts of rheumatologists and obstetricians.

  5. Migraine in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aubé, M

    1999-01-01

    Migraine does not increase the risk for complications of pregnancy for the mother or for the fetus: the incidences of toxemia, miscarriages, abnormal labour, congenital anomalies, and stillbirths are comparable to those of the general population. Several retrospective studies have shown a tendency for migraine to improve with pregnancy. Between 60 and 70% of women either go into remission or improve significantly, mainly during the second and third trimesters. Women with migraine onset at menarche and those with perimenstrual migraine are more likely to go into remission during pregnancy. The migraine type does not seem to be a significant prognostic factor for improvement. However, in the small number of women (4-8%) whose migraines worsen with pregnancy, migraine with aura appears to be overrepresented. In a small number of cases (1.3-16.5%), migraine appears to start with pregnancy, often in the first trimester; these headaches involve a higher proportion of migraine with aura. Management of migraine during pregnancy should first focus on avoiding potential triggers. Consideration should also be given to nonpharmacologic therapies. If pharmacologic treatment becomes necessary, acetaminophen and codeine can be used safely as abortive agents; ASA and NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen) can be used as a second choice, but not for long periods of time, and they should be avoided during the last trimester. For treatment of severe attacks of migraine, chlorpromazine, dimenhydrinate, and diphenhydramine can be used; metoclopramide should be restricted to the third trimester. According to the United States FDA risk categories, meperidine and morphine show no evidence of risk in humans but should not be used at the end of the third trimester. In some refractory cases, dexamethasone or prednisone can be considered. Should prophylactic treatment become indicated, the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (e.g., propranolol) can be used.

  6. Adrenomedullin and Pregnancy: Perspectives from Animal Models to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Patricia M.; Caron, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    A healthy pregnancy requires strict coordination of genetic, physiologic, and environmental factors. The relatively common incidence of infertility and pregnancy complications has resulted in increased interest in understanding the mechanisms that underlie normal versus abnormal pregnancy. The peptide hormone adrenomedullin has recently been the focus of some exciting breakthroughs in the pregnancy field. Supported by mechanistic studies in genetic animal models, there continues to be a growing body of evidence demonstrating the importance of adrenomedullin protein levels in a variety of human pregnancy complications. With more extensive mechanistic studies and improved consistency in clinical measurements of adrenomedullin, there is great potential for the development of adrenomedullin as a clinically-relevant biomarker in pregnancy and pregnancy complications. PMID:22425034

  7. Work and work-related stress in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Katz, Vern L

    2012-09-01

    Work, in general, does not increase the risks of pregnancy complications. Work that is stressful, physically, psychologically, or both, has deleterious effects on pregnancy. Stressful work increases the risks of miscarriage, preterm labor, preterm birth, low birth weight, and preeclampsia. The greater the stress, the greater the risks of pregnancy complications. Women with a history of pregnancy complications should be counseled about reducing stressful work before pregnancy. Women with stressful jobs should be followed closely during pregnancy, and if signs of preterm labor or delayed fetal growth develop, then occupational stress should be decreased or eliminated. Some occupations expose pregnant women to teratogens such as organic solvents, heavy metals, or pesticides. A careful work history should be part of every preconception and early pregnancy visit.

  8. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: How to manage pregnancy?].

    PubMed

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Morel, N; Vauthier, D; Tsatsaris, V; Pannier, E; Piette, J-C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus patients is a common situation that remains associated with higher maternal and fetal mortality/morbidity than in the general population. Complications include lupus flares, obstetrical complications (fetal loss, in utero growth retardation, prematurity) and neonatal lupus syndrome. The association with antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome increases the risk of obstetrical complications. Improving the care of these pregnancies depends upon a systematic pregnancy planning, ideally during a preconception counseling visit and a multidisciplinary approach (internist/rheumatologist, obstetrician and anesthetist). The absence of lupus activity, the use of appropriate medications during pregnancy adjusted to the patient's medical history and risk factors, and a regular monitoring are the best tools for a favorable outcome for these high-risk pregnancies. The aim of this review article is to perform an update on the medical care of pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis.

  9. Predicting Pregnancy and Pregnancy Attrition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    Test Married Single Pregnancy Prediction Multivariate test for traditionality variables Significant univariate tests ...college students. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 36, 27-32. Olson, M. S . &: Stumpf, S . S . (September 1978). Pregnancy in the Navy; Impact...public release; distribution unlimited. 4 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) NPRDC TR 85-32 5. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S )

  10. Stress and salivary cortisol during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Obel, C; Hedegaard, M; Henriksen, T B; Secher, N J; Olsen, J; Levine, S

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to stressful life events was associated with changes in levels of circulating cortisol during pregnancy in a population of 603 pregnant women. The participating pregnant women filled out a questionnaire and collected a morning and evening sample of saliva in early pregnancy (median 14th gestational week) and in late pregnancy (median and 30th gestational week). They were asked to report the number of life events experienced during first and second trimester, respectively, and were asked to rate the intensity of the experienced events. Complications related to the pregnancy such as vaginal bleeding and suspected growth retardation were registered and the women were asked about concerns about their pregnancy. The salivary samples were analyzed for cortisol and the levels were higher in late than in early pregnancy. In late pregnancy women exposed to more than one life event or were concerned about pregnancy complications during second trimester had a higher evening cortisol level, whereas morning values were unaffected. After adjustment for smoking women who experienced more than one very stressful life event had 27% higher evening cortisol concentrations (95% confidence intervals: 1-59%). Women with worries about pregnancy complications had 27% (95% confidence intervals: 2-57%) higher levels. In early pregnancy women reporting stressful life events did not have higher evening cortisol levels, but tended to have a blunted morning HPA response. In conclusion, we found differences in the associations between chronic stress in early and late pregnancy and cortisol levels indicating that the response to chronic stress is dependent on the stage of the pregnancy.

  11. Vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex? Did you bleed afterward? What is your blood type? Your provider can test your blood type. If it is Rh negative, you will need treatment with a medicine called Rho(D) immune globulin to prevent complications with future pregnancies. ... If something other than blood comes out, call ...

  12. Managing epilepsy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2011-01-01

    There are close to one and half million women with epilepsy (WWE) in reproductive age group in India. WWE have several unique gender-specific problems in the biological and social domains. Women experience more social stigma from epilepsy and have more difficulty with education and employment. They have more difficulty to get married and sustain successful family life. Reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone have opposing effect on seizure threshold. WWE have increased risk of infertility. About 10% of their babies may have major congenital malformations. Most of the adverse biological outcomes for WWE are related to adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Traditional AEDs like phenobarbitone and sodium valproate are probably associated with increased risk of fetal malformations or other adverse fetal outcomes. Polytherapy and use of high dose of any AED is associated with higher risk fetal complications. It is very important that all WWE have a preconception evaluation done by a neurologist, when the need to continue AEDs or possibility of reducing AED load could be assessed. All WWE need to take folic acid 5 mg daily during preconception period and pregnancy. They should undergo a detailed screening for fetal malformations between 12 and 18 weeks of pregnancy. The neurologist, gynecologist, imageologist and pediatrician need to work as a team while managing pregnancy in WWE. It is important to reassure WWE and their relatives that pregnancy is safe in WWE and their children are healthy in more than 90% instances.

  13. [Diabetes and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Graf, U M; Vetter, K

    1999-10-01

    Preexisting type-I-diabetes (incidence 0.8%) and gestational diabetes (3-5%) are the two manifestations of disturbed carbohydrate metabolism in pregnancy. Maternal hyperglycemia and the resulting excessive glucose supply for the fetus leads to fetal hyperinsulinism which is responsible for the complications in the offspring. The most important clinical manifestations are the excessive growth of the fetus (macrosomia), the risk of intrauterine death and the neonatal morbidity caused by hypoglycemia and the delay of maturation of lungs and liver. Women with type-I-diabetes require preconception counseling and optimizing of glucose control to reduce the rate of abortion and of congenital anomalies of the offspring. Furthermore kidney function and retinopathia should be evaluated preconceptionally. The management of diabetic pregnancies requires a tight cooperation of obstetricians and diabetologists. Blood glucose levels have to be lower than outside pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed by a screening test with 50 g glucose for all women followed by a regular 75 g oGTT when the glucose value is > or = 140 mg%. In most of the women euglycemia can be achieved by diet and exercise. Women after pregnancies with gestational diabetes should be retested postnatally and counseled about their increased risk to develop diabetes in later life.

  14. [Appendicitis during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Estrada Altamirano, A; Bolaños Ancona, R; Juárez Garcia, L; Castelazo Morales, E

    1998-03-01

    Acute appendicitis es the most common cause of lapparotomy during pregnancy. The differential diagnosis in the pregnant woman becomes a challenge due to the anatomic changes that take place during the maternal adjustment to pregnancy. We have done a retrospective study between january 1989 and december 1994, at Instituto Nacional de Perinatologia. We found in that period of time 35,080 deliveries reported and 4 cases of acute appendicitis during pregnancy. The maternal age was between 16 and 42 years old, 26 years in average. Three patients were in the 3 trimester at the time of diagnosis, and the most important clinical sign was found to be diffuse abdominal pain. In 3 cases diagnosis was attributed to obstetric pathology rather than appendicitis in first place. Laparotomy and appendicectomy was done to all patients, with on block hysterectomy in only one case, having this particular patient an abscess as a postquirurgical complication. Just one case reported a healthy newborn delivered at term. It is obvious that early diagnosis and quirurgical treatment are important factors for the mother and the fetus prognosis. Appendicectomy as well as cholecystectomy are the two most common causes of laparotomy during pregnancy.

  15. Disorders of coagulation in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Katz, D; Beilin, Y

    2015-12-01

    The process of haemostasis is complex and is further complicated in the parturient because of the physiological changes of pregnancy. Understanding these changes and the impact that they have on the safety profile of the anaesthetic options for labour and delivery is crucial to any anaesthetist caring for the parturient. This article analyses current theories on coagulation and reviews the physiological changes to coagulation that occur during pregnancy and the best methods with which to evaluate coagulation. Finally, we examine some of the more common disorders of coagulation that occur during pregnancy, including von Willebrand disease, common factor deficiencies, platelet disorders, the parturient on anticoagulants, and the more rare acute fatty liver of pregnancy, with a focus on their implications for neuraxial anaesthesia.

  16. Adolescent Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leftwich, Heidi K; Alves, Marcus Vinicius Ortega

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, although on the decline, represents a significant public health concern. Often adolescents present late to prenatal care, either from lack of knowledge, fear of consequences, limited access, stigma, or all of the above. Although multifaceted, there are many risks both to mother and child that are increased in adolescent pregnancy. Many are unintended and are at risk for repeat adolescent pregnancy, especially within the first 2 years. Risks include but are not limited to: low birth weight, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and preeclampsia, as well as feelings of social isolation, delayed or neglected educational goals, and maternal depression.

  17. A woman with GN presenting during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Susan

    2013-06-01

    The combination of kidney disease and pregnancy has long been recognized as a high-risk situation. When renal disease is recognized for the first time during pregnancy, it presents unique problems for both the obstetric and the renal teams. Particularly difficult can be distinguishing preeclampsia from preexisting kidney disease in women presenting for the first time with hypertension, proteinuria, and reduced GFR during pregnancy. Decision-making regarding performing a kidney biopsy and treatment of glomerular disease during pregnancy is often much more complicated by safety concerns for both the mother and the developing fetus.

  18. HELLP syndrome preceded by intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy: one serious itch

    PubMed Central

    Jebbink, Jiska; Tabbers, Merit; Afink, Gijs; Beuers, Ulrich; Elferink, Ronald Oude; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; van der Post, Joris

    2014-01-01

    We present four women with seven ongoing pregnancies. Five pregnancies were complicated by intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and severe haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome with uncommon maternal morbidity. The combination of ICP and HELLP syndrome has not previously been reported. Awareness is warranted to accurately identify this combination of pregnancy-specific diseases with severe maternal morbidity. PMID:24711473

  19. Pregnancy-Induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kintiraki, Evangelia; Papakatsika, Sophia; Kotronis, George; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Kotsis, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) complicates 6-10% of pregnancies. It is defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mmHg. It is classified as mild (SBP 140-149 and DBP 90-99 mmHg), moderate (SBP 150-159 and DBP 100-109 mmHg) and severe (SBP ≥ 160 and DBP ≥ 110 mmHg). PIH refers to one of four conditions: a) pre-existing hypertension, b) gestational hypertension and preeclampsia (PE), c) pre-existing hypertension plus superimposed gestational hypertension with proteinuria and d) unclassifiable hypertension. PIH is a major cause of maternal, fetal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Women with PIH are at a greater risk of abruptio placentae, cerebrovascular events, organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Fetuses of these mothers are at greater risk of intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and intrauterine death. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a period of 24 h seems to have a role in predicting deterioration from gestational hypertension to PE. Antiplatelet drugs have moderate benefits when used for prevention of PE. Treatment of PIH depends on blood pressure levels, gestational age, presence of symptoms and associated risk factors. Non-drug management is recommended when SBP ranges between 140-149 mmHg or DBP between 90-99 mmHg. Blood pressure thresholds for drug management in pregnancy vary between different health organizations. According to 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines, antihypertensive treatment is recommended in pregnancy when blood pressure levels are ≥ 150/95 mmHg. Initiation of antihypertensive treatment at values ≥ 140/90 mmHg is recommended in women with a) gestational hypertension, with or without proteinuria, b) pre-existing hypertension with the superimposition of gestational hypertension or c) hypertension with asymptomatic organ damage or symptoms at any time during pregnancy. Methyldopa is the drug of choice in pregnancy. Atenolol and metoprolol appear to be

  20. [Pregnancy following oocyte donation].

    PubMed

    Boks, D E; Braat, D D

    1997-08-23

    Five women, aged 31, 26, 31, 34, and 28 years, became pregnant after oocyte donation and in-vitro fertilization. One was a carrier of Leber's optical atrophy, three had had an early menopause (in two because of chromosomal abnormalities), and one had had bilateral ovarian extirpation because of a cystadenoma and endometriosis. Three developed (pre-)eclampsia during pregnancy and one had a serious fluxus post partum. One twin died in utero, the other children were healthy. In the Netherlands in-vitro fertilization (with or without egg-donation) takes place up to the age of about 40. Regarding the high incidence of obstetrical complications in women under 40, raising the age limit could lead to even more pregnancy problems. Candidates for oocyte donation should be informed about these risks, furthermore they should not deliver at home.

  1. Primary hyperparathyroidism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kamenický, Peter; Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Chanson, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in the general population but is rarely diagnosed during pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational PHPT may be unrecognized, or masked by physiological changes in calcium homeostasis associated with pregnancy. Gestational PHPT may have severe consequences for both mother and fetus. However, nowadays, gestational PHPT is usually diagnosed in earlier stages and milder forms, with low complication rates. Treatment should be individually tailored according to gestational age, the severity of hypercalcemia, and the risk-benefit balance. The conservative approach is preferred in mild forms, whereas surgery, usually performed during the second trimester, is reserved for symptomatic hypercalcemic PHPT. Given the young age of the patients, genetic causes should be considered.

  2. Endocrine oncology in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, A; Rees, D A

    2011-12-01

    Endocrine tumours occur rarely in pregnant women but present clinicians with unique challenges. A high index of suspicion is often required to make a diagnosis since the symptoms and signs associated with many of these tumours, including insulinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma and phaeochromocytoma, mimic those of normal pregnancy or its complications, such as pre-eclampsia. The evidence base which informs management is very limited hence decisions on investigation and therapy must be individualised and undertaken jointly by the multidisciplinary medical team and the patient. The optimal strategy will depend on the nature and stage of the endocrine tumour, gestational stage, treatments available and patient wishes. Thus, surgical intervention, appropriately timed, may be considered in pregnancy for resectable adrenocortical carcinoma or phaeochromocytoma, but delayed until the postpartum period for well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Medical therapy may be required to reduce the drive to tumour growth, control symptoms of hormone excess and to minimise the risks of surgery, anaesthesia or labour.

  3. Pregnancy test

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 25. Read More Ectopic pregnancy HCG blood test - qualitative HCG blood test - quantitative HCG in urine Miscarriage ...

  4. Immunohistochemical study of constitutive neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the central nervous system of goat with natural listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, T; Weinstock, D; Castro, M D; Acland, H; Walter, M; Kim, H Y; Purchase, H G

    2000-12-01

    The expression of both constitutive and inducible forms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was investigated by immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections in normal and Listeria monocytogenes-infected brains of goats. In normal control goats, a small number of neurons showed immunoreactivity of both iNOS and nNOS, and the number of iNOS-positive neurons was higher than the number of nNOS-positive neurons. In natural listeriosis, listeria antigens were easily immunostained in the inflammatory cells of microabscesses. In this lesion, the immunoreactivity of iNOS in neurons was more intense than the control, but nNOS was not. In microabscesses, nNOS was weakly visualized in macrophages and neutrophils, while iNOS was expressed in macrophages, but not in neutrophils. These findings suggest that normal caprine brain cells, including neurons, constitutively express iNOS and nNOS, and the expressions of these molecules is increased in Listeria monocytogenes infections. Furthermore, inflammatory cells, including macrophages, expressing both nNOS and iNOS may play important roles in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningoencephalitis in goat.

  5. Melanoma and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Morton, Sarah Kym; Morton, Adam Park

    2017-02-10

    Melanoma is the most common cancer in women during their reproductive years and kills more young Australians than any other single cancer. Care of women whose pregnancy is complicated by a diagnosis of malignancy is complex. The risk of delaying treatment to the mother, the short-term and long-term risks of premature delivery to the child, and the immediate risks to the foetus and long-term risks to the child of maternal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy or medical therapies must be considered.

  6. Asthma and pregnancy: a prospective study of 198 pregnancies.

    PubMed Central

    Stenius-Aarniala, B; Piirilä, P; Teramo, K

    1988-01-01

    A study was designed to investigate whether asthma, when carefully managed, is associated with an increased risk of complications in connection with pregnancy. One hundred and eighty one asthmatic women were monitored during 198 pregnancies. Antiasthmatic treatment consisted of inhaled beta 2 adrenergic drugs, beclomethasone, sodium cromoglycate, oral theophylline, and systemic corticosteroids as needed. Postpartum information on asthmatic symptoms and infant feeding was collected by means of a questionnaire. A control group of 198 non-asthmatic pregnant women was matched for age and parity. Atopic women had less severe asthma than non-atopic women. During pregnancy 40% of the patients were managed with the same antiasthmatic medication as before pregnancy; 18% needed less and 42% more medication. Pre-eclampsia occurred more often in asthmatic than control subjects, especially in patients with severe asthma. Hypoglycaemia occurred more often in infants of mothers with severe asthma than in infants of mothers with less severe disease. Theophylline medication at term did not influence labour or delivery. Asthma caused no emergencies during labour. Among the asthmatic subjects 28% of babies were delivered by caesarean section compared with 17% in the control group. There was no difference between asthmatic and control subjects with regard to length of gestation, birth weight, incidence of perinatal deaths, low Apgar scores, neonatal respiratory difficulties, hyperbilirubinaemia, or malformations. It is concluded that severe asthma or systemic corticosteroid treatment (or both) during pregnancy seems to increase the incidence of mild pre-eclampsia in the mother and hypoglycaemia in the infant. The findings suggest that careful supervision of asthma during pregnancy and labour by obstetricians and chest physicians working in close collaboration should prevent most of the serious obstetric and neonatal complications of asthma in pregnancy reported by previous authors

  7. Appendicitis in pregnancy: a case report and a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Chloptsios, C; Stamatiou, K; Kavouras, N; Moustakis, E; Ilias, G; Lebrun, F

    2007-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical problem in pregnancy. Antibiotic treatment does not always improve the outcome and emergency intervention is required. We present a case of appendicitis complicated by a plastron formation occurring during pregnancy and the outcome.

  8. Pregnancy week by week

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Pregnancy week by week Pregnancy week by week Week by week Videos Swipe to advance Learn ... grows each week during pregnancy. Pick your week. Weeks 1-2 Conception (also called fertilization) usually happens ...

  9. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  10. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  11. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... premature birth Zika virus and pregnancy Folic acid Medicine safety and pregnancy Birth defects prevention Learn how ... Is it safe? > Street drugs and pregnancy Street drugs and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ...

  12. Early Pregnancy Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called early pregnancy loss , miscarriage , or spontaneous abortion . How common is early pregnancy loss? Early pregnancy ... testes that can fertilize a female egg. Spontaneous Abortion: The medical term for early pregnancy loss. Trimester: ...

  13. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  14. Sex during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Sex During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Sex During Pregnancy ... satisfying and safe sexual relationship during pregnancy. Is Sex During Pregnancy Safe? Sex is considered safe during ...

  15. Having a Healthy Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Having a Healthy Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Teens > Having a Healthy Pregnancy A ... or she can help you to get treatment. Pregnancy Discomforts Pregnancy can cause some uncomfortable side effects. ...

  16. Teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Murdock, N H

    1998-03-01

    Pregnancy among women under age 15 years is unusual, but not rare. About one third of the approximately 3 million total pregnancies which occur each year in the US are to teenagers. However, only about 30% of all pregnant adolescents receive adequate prenatal care, even though it is women in that age group who most need such care. Teen mothers have a higher rate of anemia and pregnancy-induced hypertension, most probably related to diet. Infants born to teen mothers are more likely to be premature and of low birth weight. Infants born to teen mothers are also more predisposed to mental retardation, brain damage, and birth injuries. Teen mothers are more likely to have poor weight gain, premature labor, abruptio placentae, and preeclampsia. The psychosocial reasons why teenage women become pregnant are considered, as well as the relevant media influences. While teenage pregnancy remains a major problem in the US, 1996 statistics indicate an overall 4% decline to 54.7 births/1000 among women aged 15-19 years. Teenage women need to be taught that there are many options in life other than pregnancy.

  17. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  18. Erotic complications.

    PubMed

    Slochower, J

    1999-12-01

    The author argues that erotic transference-countertransference dynamics present particular complexities when they develop between gender constellations other than male analyst and female patient. She addresses the dynamics of a complicated erotic transference in concert with an aversive countertransference response as it evolved between a female analyst and female patient. The intense erotic transference that developed defied classification as either maternallerotic or oedipallerotic, and instead included both features in a rapidly shifting process that was difficult to address analytically. The analyst's confused, often aversive, response to her patient's erotic wishes ultimately revealed a subtle re-enactment involving split-off and erotised experiences of emotional penetration and scrutiny. When these issues were addressed, the erotic transference dissolved, and the analyst's experience of her patient shifted rather dramatically. It is suggested that complex erotic transference sometimes contains within it evidence of previously repressed object experiences that were not primarily sexual in nature.

  19. Lupus nephritis and renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Germain, S; Nelson-Piercy, C

    2006-01-01

    Management of pregnant women with renal disease involves awareness of, and allowance for, physiological changes including decreased serum creatinine and increased proteinuria. For women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), pregnancy increases likelihood of flare. These can occur at any stage, and are more difficult to diagnose, as symptoms overlap those of normal pregnancy. Renal involvement is no more common in pregnancy. Worsening proteinuria may be lupus flare but differential includes pre-eclampsia. In women with chronic renal disease, pregnancy may accelerate decline in renal function and worsen hypertension and proteinuria, with increased risk of maternal (eg, pre-eclampsia) and fetal (eg, IUGR, IUD) complications, strongly correlating with degree of renal impairment peri-conception. Pregnancy success rate varies from 20% to 95% depending on base-line creatinine. Best outcome is obtained if disease was quiescent for >6 months pre-conception. Women on dialysis or with renal transplants can achieve successful pregnancy but have higher maternal and fetal complication rates. Acute on chronic renal failure can develop secondary to complications such as HELLP and AFLP. Management needs to be by a multidisciplinary team involving physicians and obstetricians, ideally beginning with pre-pregnancy counselling. Treatment of flares includes corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, azothioprine, NSAIDs and MME Blood pressure is controlled with methyldopa, nifedipine or hydralazine.

  20. [Use of chemotherapy during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Benardete-Harari, Denise N; Kershenovich-Gersson, Janisse; Meraz-Ávila, Diego; Galnares-Olalde, Javier Andrés; Olaya-Guzmán, Emilio José

    2016-01-01

    The presence of malignant tumors during pregnancy complicates the management of both tumor and pregnancy, since any diagnostic or therapeutic intervention could imply risks that may bring on detrimental effects to fetus or mother. The risks involved in exposing a fetus to cytotoxic therapy are associated to gestational age and the time of in utero exposure to that therapy. Cancer treatment has two different objectives: local control by surgery and radiotherapy, and one that seeks to eradicate systemic disease through chemotherapy, immunotherapy, hormone therapy, or targeted therapies.

  1. Successful management of pregnancy in an African woman with Klippel Trenaunay syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kemfang, Jean Dupont Ngowa; Dobgima, Walter Pisoh; Motzebo, Regine Mbouopda; Ngassam, Anny; Fokou, Marcus; Kasia, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Klippel Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare congenital disease characterized by a triad of cutaneous hemangioma, varicose veins and bone or soft tissue hypertrophy. Cases of pregnancy complicated by KTS are rare. There is an increased risk of thrombo-embolic disease and hemorrhage during pregnancy. Both obstetric and anesthetic management of KTS in pregnancy can be rather complicated. We present a successful management of pregnancy in an African woman with KTS at Yaounde General Hospital, Cameroon. PMID:24772228

  2. Management of obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Patrick M

    2007-02-01

    Maternal pregravid obesity is a significant risk factor for adverse outcomes during pregnancy. In early pregnancy there is an increased risk of spontaneous abortion and congenital anomalies. In later gestation maternal metabolic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, such as gestational hypertensive disorders and diabetes, become clinically recognized because of the increased insulin resistance in obese compared with nonobese women. In women with pregestational glucose intolerance, hypertension, central obesity, and lipid disorders, the physiologic changes in pregnancy increase the risk of problems previously not routinely encountered during pregnancy. These include chronic cardiac dysfunction, proteinuria, sleep apnea, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. At parturition the obese patient is at an increased risk of cesarean delivery and associated complications of anesthesia, wound disruption, infection, and deep venous thrombophlebitis. For the fetus there are short-term risks of fetal macrosomia, more specifically obesity, and long-term risks of adolescent components of the metabolic syndrome. Although preliminary results of bariatric surgery are encouraging, the procedure is expensive and not for all obese women, and we recognize that long-term follow-up data on offspring of obese women who have undergone bariatric surgery before pregnancy are lacking. In the interim, we need to encourage obese women to lose weight before conception, using lifestyle changes if possible. During pregnancy, weight gain should be limited to Institute of Medicine guidelines (currently under review) and encouragement given for physical activity.

  3. [Hypertension during pregnancy: Epidemiology, definition].

    PubMed

    Fauvel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy has several forms that differ by their mechanisms and their consequences for mothers and fetus. Chronic hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg before pregnancy or before the 20th week of amenorrhea. Gestational hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg during or after the 20th week of amenorrhea. Preeclampsia is the occurrence of hypertension and proteinuria after 20weeks of amenorrhea. Severe preeclampsia is accompanied by clinical signs and symptoms indicating visceral pain. The HELLP syndrome is a severe preeclampsia accompanied by intravascular hemolysis and hepatic cytolysis. Eclampsia is characterized by seizures of the tonic-clonic type. A chronic hypertension is observed in 1-5% of pregnancies. Gestational hypertension without proteinuria appears in 5-6% of pregnancies. A preeclampsia develops in 1-2% of pregnancies, but much more frequently (up 34%) in the presence of risk factors. High blood pressure during pregnancy remains, by its complications, the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality.

  4. [Aplastic anaemia associated with pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Bozhinova, S; Kirovakov, Zl; Porozhanova, K; Kostova, S; Bozhinov, P

    2012-01-01

    Aplastic anaemia is rear disease caused by destruction of pluripotent stem cells in bone marrow. Pregnancy is one of the main factor that lead to immunosuppression. During pregnancy aplastic anaemia could be life-threatening for both mother and child, because of the variety of complications like bleeding and infections. We introduce the first case of pregnant woman with aplastic anaemia in Bulgaria. The woman was diagnosed in 12-13 gestational week. All biometric characteristics of the foetus were normal. The patient was consulted with oncohaematologists, pediatricians, specialists of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and intensivists. Methylprednisolone, antibiotics, packed cells and platelet transfusions were initiated. However, the moment for interruption of the pregnancy was missed (first trimester). The woman developed a fever and vomited bloody material. Despite the optimal supportive treatment, the patient died. The pathoanatomy diagnose is Aplastic anaemia, induced by the pregnancy. From our experience with that case and other references from the literature we conclude that all pregnant woman with aplastic anaemia should interrupt their pregnancy during first trimester. In those patients who are diagnosed at later terms of pregnancy very supportive infusions and immunosuppressive therapy should be made, including antithymocyte globulin and/or cyclosporine. Women with no improvement from that therapy should achieve a bone-marrow transplantation.

  5. Teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Molina Cartes, Ramiro; González Araya, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Teen pregnancy is a social problem not resolved in developing and some developed countries. Adolescent fecundity has become the most exact bio-demographic and health indicator of development. In developing countries that are expected to follow the sexual behaviour patterns of developed countries, without offering the levels of education and services for adolescents, the consequences will be adolescent fecundity and STI prevalence increase. The ignorance about sexuality and reproduction both in parents, teachers and adolescents increases the early initiation of coital relations and of unwanted pregnancies. Extreme poverty and being the son or daughter of an adolescent mother are risk factors of repeating the early pregnancy model. The application of predictive risk criteria in pregnant adolescents to facilitate the rational use of Health Services to diminish the maternal and perinatal mortality is discussed as well as the social factors associated with adolescent pregnancy as socioeconomic levels, structure - types and characteristics of the family, early leaving school, schooling after delivery, female employment, lack of sexual education, parental and family attitudes in different periods of adolescent pregnancy, adolescent decisions on pregnancy and children, unstable partner relationship and adoption as an option. Social consequences are analyzed as: incomplete education, more numerous families, difficulties in maternal role, abandonment by the partner, fewer possibilities of having a stable, qualified and well-paid job, greater difficulty in improving their socioeconomic level and less probability of social advancement, lack of protection of the recognition of the child. Finally, based on evidence, some measures that can reduce adverse consequences on adolescent mothers, fathers and their children are suggested.

  6. Cardiomyopathy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lewey, Jennifer; Haythe, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy during pregnancy is uncommon but potentially catastrophic to maternal health, accounting for up to 11% of maternal deaths. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed in women without a history of heart disease 1 month before delivery or within 5 months postpartum. About half of all women will have full myocardial recovery within 6 months of diagnosis, but complications such as severe heart failure or death are not rare. African-American women have higher rates of diagnosis and adverse events. Women with preexisting cardiomyopathy, such as dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, followed closely during pregnancy often tolerate pregnancy and delivery. Risk factors for adverse outcomes include functional status at baseline, severity of systolic dysfunction or outflow tract gradient, or history of prior cardiac event, such as arrhythmia or stroke. The level of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) can be used to risk stratify women for adverse events. Pregnant women with cardiomyopathy should be followed closely by a multidisciplinary team comprised of nurses, obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthesiologists, and cardiac surgeons.

  7. [Drug use in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U

    2005-01-01

    Drug use in pregnancy is associated with a number of serious complications for mother and fetus. There are safe data on destructive effects of alcohol, cocain, marijuana and tobacco on pregnancy and neonatal outcome. Of importance is the fact that for many drugs similar effects on pregnancy could be observed: vasoconstriction of the placental vessels resulting in placental abruption, preterm labour (mother), spontaneous abortion, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preterm delivery and stillbirth (fetus). Symptoms of withdrawal and neurodevelopmental disorders are the most important problems of the neonate. However, only small data exist about the effects of recently popular party drugs like ecstasy or LSD. In addition, from most drugs, with exception of alcohol, safe information about the risk of congenital malformations doesn't exist. Nevertheless they may be a useful guide in the diagnostic of potential malformations by ultrasound. Most of pregnant women using drugs are poly-drug users and are often in reduced general condition. They need therefore the intensive care of the obstetrician in cooperation with other specialists (internal medicine, psychiatry).

  8. Older Adult Consumer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Self-Reported Storage Practices of Ready-to-Eat Food Products and Risks Associated with Listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ellen W; Redmond, Elizabeth C

    2016-02-01

    Consumer implementation of recommended food safety practices, specifically relating to time and temperature control of ready-to-eat (RTE) food products associated with listeriosis are crucial. This is particularly the case for at-risk consumers such as older adults, given the increased listeriosis incidence reported internationally among adults aged ≥60 years. However, data detailing older adults' cognitive risk factors associated with listeriosis are lacking. Combining data about knowledge, self-reported practices, and attitudes can achieve a cumulative multilayered in-depth understanding of consumer food safety behavior and cognition. This study aims to ascertain older adults' cognition and behavior in relation to domestic food handling and storage practices that may increase the risks associated with L. monocytogenes. Older adults (≥60 years) (n = 100) participated in an interview and questionnaire to determine knowledge, self-reported practices, and attitudes toward recommended practices. Although the majority (79%) had positive attitudes toward refrigeration, 84% were unaware of recommended temperatures (5°C) and 65% self-reported "never" checking their refrigerator temperature. Although most (72%) knew that "use-by" dates indicate food safety and 62% reported "always" taking note, neutral attitudes were held, with 67% believing it was safe to eat food beyond use-by dates and 57% reporting doing so. Attitudes toward consuming foods within the recommended 2 days of opening were neutral, with 55% aware of recommendations and , 84% reporting that they consume RTE foods beyond recommendations. Although knowledgeable of some key practices, older adults self-reported potentially unsafe practices when storing RTE foods at home, which may increase risks associated with L. monocytogenes. This study has determined that older adults' food safety cognition may affect their behaviors; understanding consumer food safety cognition is essential for developing targeted

  9. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carmody, David; Doyle, Aoife; Firth, Richard G R; Byrne, Maria M; Daly, Sean; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Micheal; Coulter-Smith, Samuel; Kinsley, Brendan T

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  10. Delivery Complications Associated With Prenatal Care Access for Medicaid-Insured Mothers in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy complications affect many women. It is likely that some complications can be avoided through routine primary and prenatal care of reasonable quality. The authors examined access to health care during pregnancy for mothers insured by Medicaid. The access indicator is potentially avoidable maternity complications (PAMCs). Potentially…

  11. Early Pregnancy Maternal Blood DNA Methylation in Repeat Pregnancies and Change in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Status—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy; Muhie, Seid; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Lin, Shili; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Repeat pregnancies with different perinatal outcomes minimize underlying maternal genetic diversity and provide unique opportunities to investigate nongenetic risk factors and epigenetic mechanisms of pregnancy complications. We investigated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-related differential DNA methylation in early pregnancy peripheral blood samples collected from women who had a change in GDM status in repeat pregnancies. Six study participants were randomly selected from among women who had 2 consecutive pregnancies, only 1 of which was complicated by GDM (case pregnancy) and the other was not (control pregnancy). Epigenome-wide DNA methylation was profiled using Illumina HumanMethylation 27 BeadChips. Differential Identification using Mixture Ensemble and false discovery rate (<10%) cutoffs were used to identify differentially methylated targets between the 2 pregnancies of each participant. Overall, 27 target sites, 17 hypomethylated (fold change [FC] range: 0.77-0.99) and 10 hypermethylated (FC range: 1.01-1.09), were differentially methylated between GDM and control pregnancies among 5 or more study participants. Novel genes were related to identified hypomethylated (such as NDUFC1, HAPLN3, HHLA3, and RHOG) or hypermethylated sites (such as SEP11, ZAR1, and DDR). Genes related to identified sites participated in cell morphology, cellular assembly, cellular organization, cellular compromise, and cell cycle. Our findings support early pregnancy peripheral blood DNA methylation differences in repeat pregnancies with change in GDM status. Similar, larger, and repeat pregnancy studies can enhance biomarker discovery and mechanistic studies of GDM. PMID:25676578

  12. Safety of colchicine therapy during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Ong; Goldman, Ran D.; Koren, Gideon

    2003-01-01

    QUESTION: A 27-year-old patient in our clinic with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) has been treated with colchicine for the last decade. She is planning her first pregnancy. What recommendations should we give her regarding use of colchicine before and during pregnancy, bearing in mind that discontinuation of colchicine could lead to complications from amyloidosis? ANSWER: Colchicine passes through the placenta in humans, is teratogenic in animals, and raises rates of male and female infertility. Based on several patients with chromosomal anomalies, some authorities recommend that patients who require colchicine therapy during pregnancy undergo amniocentesis with karyotyping. In contrast, an increasing body of evidence suggests that colchicine use throughout pregnancy carries no substantial teratogenic or mutagenic risk when used at recommended doses. Its use prevents febrile attacks of FMF and reduces the frequency of renal complications. PMID:12943352

  13. Intermittent hepatic porphyria in pregnancy with good perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Vidosavljević, Domagoj; Sijanović, Siniša; Rubin, Mirjana; Košuta Petrović, Maja; Abičić Žuljević, Kristina; Simić, Ivana

    2012-02-01

    Porphyrias are rare metabolic diseases caused by enzymatic defects of the haeme biosynthesis. Association of pregnancy and acute porphyria is rare, but mortality rate among pregnant women from acute attack has been reported up to 42%. This paper presents a patient with pregnancy complicated by intermittent hepatic porphyria with good perinatal outcome. The pattern of the attack in pregnancy varies individually and it makes porphyric pregnancies a challenge. Previously diagnosed porphyria patients should be closely monitored during pregnancy and diagnosis of acute porphyria must be also considered in all pregnant women with unexplained abdominal pain.

  14. Pregnancy outcome of five patients with renal amyloidosis regarding familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Turgal, Mert; Selcuk, Ilker; Ozyuncu, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting mainly patients of the Mediterranean basin and its major complication is the development of renal AA amyloidosis. On the other hand pregnancy with amyloidosis is not common; nevertheless, amyloidosis will complicate pregnancies also with the underlying disease and may cause terrible perinatal morbidities and mortalities. We report here the cases of five pregnant women and their pregnancy outcomes, who have been diagnosed with FMF complicated by renal amyloidosis. In the five cases, we observed that increased pregnancy complication such as small for gestational age, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia and preterm birth.

  15. Management of epilepsy during pregnancy: an update

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sima I.; Pennell, Page B.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of women with epilepsy on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy presents unique challenges. The goal of treatment is optimal seizure control with minimal in utero fetal exposure to AEDs in an effort to reduce the risk of structural and neurodevelopmental teratogenic effects. This paper reviews the following key issues pertaining to women with epilepsy during pregnancy: AED pharmacokinetics; clinical management of AEDs; seizure frequency; major congenital malformation; neurodevelopmental outcomes; perinatal complications; and breast feeding. PMID:27006699

  16. Depression During Pregnancy and Postpartum.

    PubMed

    Becker, Madeleine; Weinberger, Tal; Chandy, Ann; Schmukler, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Depression is a common complication of pregnancy and the postpartum period. There are multiple risk factors for peripartum mood disorders, most important of which is a prior history of depression. Both depression and antidepressant medications confer risk upon the infant. Maternal depression has been associated with preterm birth, low birth weight, fetal growth restriction, and postnatal cognitive and emotional complications. Antidepressant exposure has been associated with preterm birth, reductions in birth weight, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and postnatal adaptation syndrome (PNAS) as well as a possible connection with autism spectrum disorder. Paroxetine has been associated with cardiac malformations. Most antidepressant medications are excreted in low levels in breast milk and are generally compatible with breastfeeding. The use of antidepressants during pregnancy and postpartum must be weighed against the risk of untreated depression in the mother.

  17. Termination of second trimester, complicated gestation.

    PubMed

    Al-Taani, M I

    2005-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of intravaginal misoprostol for second trimester uterine evacuation, we studied 70 women with singleton pregnancies complicated by fetal malformation or dead fetuses. Participants received 200 microg misoprostol administered at 4-hour intervals. Gestations with dead fetuses had a shorter induction-abortion interval [14.2 hours, standard deviation (SD) 4.3] than those with live, malformed fetuses (20.2 hours, SD 7.3) (P< 0.001). The abortion rate was significantly higher for gestations with dead fetuses (92.1%) than those with live, malformed fetuses (68.8%) (P< 0.05). There were no major complications and no significant difference in the incidence of side-effects. All women aborted within 38 hours. Administration of misoprostol is an effective clinical method to terminate second trimester, complicated pregnancy.

  18. [Heterotopic pregnancy with intrauterine dizygotic twins following embryo transfer in the blastocyst phase].

    PubMed

    Barrón Vallejo, J; Ortega Díaz, R; Kably Ambe, A

    1999-04-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is a common complication of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). On other hand, heterotopic pregnancy complicates 1-2% of all IVF-ET pregnancies. Tubal damage as reason for treatment and multiple embryo transfer might predispose patients to this complication. We present a successful treated case of an infertile patient that developed simultaneous twin intra- and single extra- uterine pregnancy after blastocyst-stage embryo transfer. In IVF-ET patients presence of an intrauterine gestation not exclude the possibility of a concomitant extrauterine pregnancy. Awareness of the possibility of heterotopic pregnancy after IVF-ET plays an important role in the successful treatment of this reproductive complication. Transfer of good quality embryos can be a risk factor to develop heterotopic pregnancy.

  19. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Singhal, Shashideep; Anand, Sury

    2013-10-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare but serious and potentially fatal complication of pregnancy. It typically presents in the third trimester with microvesicular fatty infiltration of the liver and can lead to multiorgan failure and death. Differentiation from hemolysis-elevated liver enzymes-low platelets syndrome can guide management. A high index of suspicion is necessary in the appropriate clinical setting to identify clinical manifestations and complications and manage them appropriately. In severe cases, prompt delivery can be lifesaving for the mother and fetus. Liver transplantation remains controversial and must be considered individually. Defects in fatty acid oxidation secondary to various enzymatic deficiencies have been associated with acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Women or couples with known defects in fatty acid oxidation and women with a history of previous liver disease during pregnancy or sudden death of a child within the first 2 years of life should be assessed for a defect in fatty acid oxidation and monitored carefully. Our review summarizes the current knowledge in pathophysiology, diagnostic approach and management of this disorder.

  20. Nutrition in pregnancy: basic principles and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Plećas, Draga; Plesinac, Snezana; Kontić Vucinić, Olivera

    2014-01-01

    Healthy diet in pregnancy should guarantee proper fetal growth and development, maintain (and promote) maternal health and enable lactation. Nutritional counseling and interventions need to be an integral part of antenatal care and continue during pregnancy in order to reduce the risk of maternal, fetal and neonatal complications, as well as the short- and long-term adverse outcomes. Adverse pregnancy outcomes are more common in women who begin the gestation as undernourished or obese in comparison to pregnant women whose weight is within normal ranges. Increased nutritional and energy needs in pregnancy are met through numerous metabolic adaptations; pregnancy is successfully achieved within wide range of variations in energy supply and weight gain. However, if nutrient restriction exceeds the limits of adaptive responses, evidence indicates that fetus will develop the alternative metabolic competence that might emerge as a disease (type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease and stroke) in adult life.

  1. Pregnancy outcomes following the use of thiocolchicoside.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Zeynep; Olmez, Ercument; Gurpinar, Tugba; Vural, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Thiocolchicoside is a commonly used muscle relaxant in orthopedic, rheumatologic or musculoskeletal disorders to treat painful muscle spasms. It is contraindicated in pregnancy and lactation. There is no previously published experience with thiocolchicoside exposure during pregnancy. In this observational study, we collected and evaluated 18 pregnancy outcomes of the women referred to our prenatal consultation service for thiocolchicoside exposure between 2007-2012, and offspring were followed up until 2 years of age. There were 16 live births, 1 spontaneous abortion and 1 elective termination of pregnancy. No major birth defect was observed. The mothers and their babies were free of perinatal complications. No growth or developmental abnormalities were found during follow-up period. Our findings add information on inadvertent use of thiocolchicoside in pregnancy. Further large prospective cohort studies are required to investigate this issue.

  2. Severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, O J; Godden, D J; Martin, P D; Danielian, P J

    1999-06-01

    This case study describes a successful pregnancy in a 27-yr-old patient with severe emphysema, secondary to alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, genotype PiZZ. Despite significant respiratory compromise, more severe than previously reported, no complications ensued. Maternal pulmonary function did not deteriorate significantly until the 32nd week of pregnancy, with an elective Caesarean section being performed during the 37th week. This experience suggests that even severe maternal airflow obstruction is, in itself, not an absolute contra-indication to pregnancy. Pre-pregnancy multidisciplinary counselling is likely to be helpful in these patients, including frank discussion on the risks of pregnancy, the prospects of successful completion and the mother's future prognosis in relation to caring for the child.

  3. Epilepsy during pregnancy: focus on management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Borgelt, Laura M; Hart, Felecia M; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L

    2016-01-01

    In the US, more than one million women with epilepsy are of childbearing age and have over 20,000 babies each year. Patients with epilepsy who become pregnant are at risk of complications, including changes in seizure frequency, maternal morbidity and mortality, and congenital anomalies due to antiepileptic drug exposure. Appropriate management of epilepsy during pregnancy may involve frequent monitoring of antiepileptic drug serum concentrations, potential preconception switching of antiepileptic medications, making dose adjustments, minimizing peak drug concentration with more frequent dosing, and avoiding potentially teratogenic medications. Ideally, preconception planning will be done to minimize risks to both the mother and fetus during pregnancy. It is important to recognize benefits and risks of current and emerging therapies, especially with revised pregnancy labeling in prescription drug product information. This review will outline risks for epilepsy during pregnancy, review various recommendations from leading organizations, and provide an evidence-based approach for managing patients with epilepsy before, during, and after pregnancy. PMID:27703396

  4. Sexual behavior before and after pregnancy detection in four microbicide trials.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Wes; Feldblum, Paul J; Taylor, Douglas; Wevill, Silver L

    2012-10-01

    Vaginal microbicide gel trials for HIV prevention may require withdrawal of study product when a woman becomes pregnant. We assessed the potential impact of withdrawals in four trials by comparing self-reported sexual behavior pre- and post-pregnancy detection: (1) behavior in the month prior to positive pregnancy test versus behavior reported at the subsequent monthly visit; (2) behavior changes according to pregnancy status at the subsequent visit (continuing pregnancy versus not); (3) average sexual behaviors reported for all months prior to pregnancy detection versus all months after pregnancy was no longer detected; and (4) behavior changes among participants never testing positive for pregnancy. Pregnancy detection was associated with immediate reductions in self-reported numbers of partners and sex acts. The proportion of acts in which study gel was used following a negative pregnancy test did not return to pre-pregnancy levels. Pregnancies complicate the conduct and interpretation of vaginal microbicide trials when product must be withdrawn.

  5. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Melissa; Bricker, Leanne; Neilson, James P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnostic ultrasound is a sophisticated electronic technology, which utilises pulses of high frequency sound to produce an image. Diagnostic ultrasound examination may be employed in a variety of specific circumstances during pregnancy such as after clinical complications, or where there are concerns about fetal growth. Because adverse outcomes may also occur in pregnancies without clear risk factors, assumptions have been made that routine ultrasound in all pregnancies will prove beneficial by enabling earlier detection and improved management of pregnancy complications. Routine screening may be planned for early pregnancy, late gestation, or both. The focus of this review is routine early pregnancy ultrasound. Objectives To assess whether routine early pregnancy ultrasound for fetal assessment (i.e. its use as a screening technique) influences the diagnosis of fetal malformations, multiple pregnancies, the rate of clinical interventions, and the incidence of adverse fetal outcome when compared with the selective use of early pregnancy ultrasound (for specific indications). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009). Selection criteria Published, unpublished, and ongoing randomised controlled trials that compared outcomes in women who experienced routine versus selective early pregnancy ultrasound (i.e. less than 24 weeks’ gestation). We have included quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data for each included study. We used the Review Manager software to enter and analyse data. Main results Routine/revealed ultrasound versus selective ultrasound/concealed: 11 trials including 37505 women. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy reduces the failure to detect multiple pregnancy by 24 weeks’ gestation (risk ratio (RR) 0.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.17). Routine scan is associated with a reduction in

  6. Recovery and Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes in Temperature Abused Milkshakes Prepared from Naturally Contaminated Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Allard, Emma; Wooten, Anna; Hur, Minji; Sheth, Ishani; Laasri, Anna; Hammack, Thomas S.; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The recovery and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in three flavors of milkshakes (vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate) that were prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the U.S. in 2015, and were subsequently held at room temperature for 14 h. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes was 9.05 h; the average generation time was 1.67 h; and the average population level increase per sample at 14 h was 1.14 log CFU/g. Milkshake flavors did not significantly affect these parameters. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes in milkshakes with initial contamination levels ≤ 3 CFU/g (9.50 h) was significantly longer (P < 0.01) than that with initial contamination levels > 3 CFU/g (8.60 h). The results highlight the value of using samples that are contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes for recovery and growth evaluations. The behavior of L. monocytogenes populations in milkshakes prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to the listeriosis outbreak should be taken into account when performing risk based analysis using this outbreak as a case study. PMID:27242775

  7. Recovery and Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes in Temperature Abused Milkshakes Prepared from Naturally Contaminated Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Allard, Emma; Wooten, Anna; Hur, Minji; Sheth, Ishani; Laasri, Anna; Hammack, Thomas S; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The recovery and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in three flavors of milkshakes (vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate) that were prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the U.S. in 2015, and were subsequently held at room temperature for 14 h. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes was 9.05 h; the average generation time was 1.67 h; and the average population level increase per sample at 14 h was 1.14 log CFU/g. Milkshake flavors did not significantly affect these parameters. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes in milkshakes with initial contamination levels ≤ 3 CFU/g (9.50 h) was significantly longer (P < 0.01) than that with initial contamination levels > 3 CFU/g (8.60 h). The results highlight the value of using samples that are contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes for recovery and growth evaluations. The behavior of L. monocytogenes populations in milkshakes prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to the listeriosis outbreak should be taken into account when performing risk based analysis using this outbreak as a case study.

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Invasive Listeriosis due to Listeria monocytogenes in a Spanish Hospital over a Nine-Year Study Period, 2006–2014

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Miguel, Jaime; Fernández-Natal, María Isabel; Soriano, Francisco; Hernández, Marta; Stessl, Beatrix; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the pathogenicity, invasiveness, and genetic relatedness of 17 clinical Listeria monocytogenes stains isolated over a period of nine years (2006–2014). All isolates were phenotypically characterised and growth patterns were determined. The antimicrobial susceptibility of L. monocytogenes isolates was determined in E-tests. Invasion assays were performed with epithelial HeLa cells. Finally, L. monocytogenes isolates were subtyped by PFGE and MLST. All isolates had similar phenotypic characteristics (β-haemolysis and lecithinase activity), and three types of growth curve were observed. Bacterial recovery rates after invasion assays ranged from 0.09% to 7.26% (1.62 ± 0.46). MLST identified 11 sequence types (STs), and 14 PFGE profiles were obtained, indicating a high degree of genetic diversity. Genetic studies unequivocally revealed the occurrence of one outbreak of listeriosis in humans that had not previously been reported. This outbreak occurred in October 2009 and affected three patients from neighbouring towns. In conclusion, the molecular epidemiological analysis clearly revealed a cluster (three human cases, all ST1) of not previously reported listeriosis cases in northwestern Spain. Our findings indicate that molecular subtyping, in combination with epidemiological case analysis, is essential and should be implemented in routine diagnosis, to improve the tracing of the sources of outbreaks. PMID:26539467

  9. [Gestational diabetes insipidus during a twin pregnancy].

    PubMed

    De Mesmay, M; Rigouzzo, A; Bui, T; Louvet, N; Constant, I

    2013-02-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is an uncommon clinical disease whose prevalence is approximately two to three pregnancies per 100,000. It may be isolated or associated with preeclampsia. We report a case of gestational diabetes insipidus in a twin pregnancy, originally isolated during two months, and secondarily complicated by HELLP-syndrome. We recall the specific pathophysiology of polyuric-polydipsic syndrome during pregnancy and summarize its various causes. Finally, we discuss the indications, in case of isolated gestational diabetes insipidus, of treatment by dDAVP.

  10. [Prevention of complications of IUDs].

    PubMed

    Henrion, R

    1980-11-01

    Complications resulting from IUD use are essentially of 4 types: 1) uterine perforation, either at the time of insertion or by translocation of the device. Perforations can be avoided by exercising the utmost attention at time of insertion, and by choosing the proper time of insertion, usually postmentruation. It is also imperative that the IUD be right for the uterine cavity size; 2) pelvic infection, the most serious of IUD complications, since it can, however rarely, cause death; it is absolutely necessary to observe the strictest asepsy during IUD insertion; 3) menorrhagia, which, when severe, can cause anemia. Women with heavy menstrual flow should not wear an IUD; and, 4) ectopic pregnancy, which usually ends in spontaneous abortion, but which can cause infection.

  11. [Teenage pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mora-Cancino, María; Hernández-Valencia, Varcelino

    2015-05-01

    In Mexico, 20% of the annual births are presented in women younger than 20 years old. Pregnancy in adolescents puts at risk mother and child health. This risk is major while the woman is younger, especially when the social and economic conditions are not favorable, which is decisive in later psychosocial development. It has been pointed out that the youths with low education, with minor academic and laboral expectations, with low self-esteem and assertiveness, tend to begin early their active sexual life, to use less frequently contraceptives, and in the case of younger women, to be pregnant, with the risk of abortion because they cannot to make the best decision. It is important to take into account the social context and the special characteristics of the family to understand situation of adolescent at risk of pregnancy.

  12. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis Using JSpecies Tool Establishes Clonal Relationships between Listeria monocytogenes Strains from Epidemiologically Unrelated Listeriosis Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Burall, Laurel S.; Grim, Christopher J.; Mammel, Mark K.; Datta, Atin R.

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to build a comprehensive genomic approach to food safety challenges, the FDA has implemented a whole genome sequencing effort, GenomeTrakr, which involves the sequencing and analysis of genomes of foodborne pathogens. As a part of this effort, we routinely sequence whole genomes of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) isolates associated with human listeriosis outbreaks, as well as those isolated through other sources. To rapidly establish genetic relatedness of these genomes, we evaluated tetranucleotide frequency analysis via the JSpecies program to provide a cursory analysis of strain relatedness. The JSpecies tetranucleotide (tetra) analysis plots standardized (z-score) tetramer word frequencies of two strains against each other and uses linear regression analysis to determine similarity (r2). This tool was able to validate the close relationships between outbreak related strains from four different outbreaks. Included in this study was the analysis of Lm strains isolated during the recent caramel apple outbreak and stone fruit incident in 2014. We identified that many of the isolates from these two outbreaks shared a common 4b variant (4bV) serotype, also designated as IVb-v1, using a qPCR protocol developed in our laboratory. The 4bV serotype is characterized by the presence of a 6.3 Kb DNA segment normally found in serotype 1/2a, 3a, 1/2c and 3c strains but not in serotype 4b or 1/2b strains. We decided to compare these strains at a genomic level using the JSpecies Tetra tool. Specifically, we compared several 4bV and 4b isolates and identified a high level of similarity between the stone fruit and apple 4bV strains, but not the 4b strains co-identified in the caramel apple outbreak or other 4b or 4bV strains in our collection. This finding was further substantiated by a SNP-based analysis. Additionally, we were able to identify close relatedness between isolates from clinical cases from 1993–1994 and a single case from 2011 as well as links between

  13. Health after pregnancy in the mother with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kaaja, Risto; Gordin, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Progression of retinopathy and nephropathy in women with diabetes occurs, at least temporarily, during pregnancy and postpartum. However, normotensive pregnancy seems to have no detrimental effects regarding the long-term progression of any microvascular complication. Increased risk from pregnancy induced hypertension without proteinuria and with proteinuria (pre-eclampsia) relates mainly to the association with kidney disease in diabetes, and poor glycemic control. A history of pre-eclampsia or pregnancy induced hypertension is an important prognostic factor for micro- and macro-vascular complications later in life. Data regarding the long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late complications of diabetes suggest that women with diabetes should be monitored regularly and nephroprotective treatment initiated early.

  14. Preeclampsia and Pregnancy-Related Hypertensive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of hypertension during pregnancy and in particular, preeclampsia has changed dramatically over the last decade. During the last year (2014–15), several articles published in Hypertension have provided important insights into the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and its related complications1–38. In addition, Hypertension also published some key research communications that translated important basic science observations into the clinic. Some of these articles are briefly discussed, highlighting their significance to our understanding of the mechanism of the disease, to predict the disease and treat or prevent hypertension during pregnancy and other preeclampsia related complications. PMID:26693822

  15. Fish intake during pregnancy and foetal neurodevelopment--a systematic review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Starling, Phoebe; Charlton, Karen; McMahon, Anne T; Lucas, Catherine

    2015-03-18

    Fish is a source of several nutrients that are important for healthy foetal development. Guidelines from Australia, Europe and the USA encourage fish consumption during pregnancy. The potential for contamination by heavy metals, as well as risk of listeriosis requires careful consideration of the shaping of dietary messages related to fish intake during pregnancy. This review critically evaluates literature on fish intake in pregnant women, with a focus on the association between neurodevelopmental outcomes in the offspring and maternal fish intake during pregnancy. Peer-reviewed journal articles published between January 2000 and March 2014 were included. Eligible studies included those of healthy pregnant women who had experienced full term births and those that had measured fish or seafood intake and assessed neurodevelopmental outcomes in offspring. Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, ScienceDirect and the Cochrane Library were searched using the search terms: pregnant, neurodevelopment, cognition, fish and seafood. Of 279 papers sourced, eight were included in the final review. Due to heterogeneity in methodology and measured outcomes, a qualitative comparison of study findings was conducted. This review indicates that the benefits of diets providing moderate amounts of fish during pregnancy outweigh potential detrimental effects in regards to offspring neurodevelopment. It is important that the type of fish consumed is low in mercury.

  16. Gestational weight gain and medical outcomes of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Zachary M; Contador, Fernanda; Tawfiq, Afaf; Adamo, Kristi B

    2015-01-01

    This narrative review discusses gestational weight gain (GWG) and medical outcomes of pregnancy, including metabolic, cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal and psychiatric systems. Taken as a whole, the available evidence shows that excessive GWG increases the risk of all medical complications of pregnancy, and negatively impacts the long-term health and weight of both mothers and their offspring. Briefly, interventions to encourage appropriate GWG are discussed and readers are directed to resources to facilitate discussion of pregnancy weight. PMID:27512468

  17. Successful treatment of Graves disease in pregnancy with Lugol's iodine.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, A; Semple, C G

    2000-02-01

    We report a case of Grave's disease in pregnancy complicated by intolerance of standard antithyroid drug therapy. We describe the success of prolonged use of organic iodine as a primary treatment prior to surgical intervention.

  18. Pregnancy and Fifth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cheek Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Pregnancy and Fifth Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... half of pregnancy. Testing for Parvovirus B19 during Pregnancy A blood test for parvovirus B19 can show ...

  19. Pregnancy and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Home > Resources > Pregnancy and IBD Go Back Pregnancy and IBD Email Print + Share If you have ... on the developing fetus or newborn. EFFECT OF PREGNANCY ON WOMEN WITH IBD Women should be well ...

  20. Nutrition during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... being overweight or obese affect my pregnancy? • Can caffeine in my diet affect my pregnancy? • What are ... with possible birth injury, and childhood obesity. Can caffeine in my diet affect my pregnancy? Although there ...

  1. Ending a Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Ending a Pregnancy Ending a PregnancyWhat is abortion?Abortion means ending a pregnancy early. In some cases, ... This is called a miscarriage, or a spontaneous abortion. In other cases, a woman chooses to end ...

  2. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arrives Trouble Getting Pregnant Avoiding Pregnancy Articles Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  3. Can maternal serum C-reactive protein levels predict successful labour induction with intravenous oxytocin in term pregnancies complicated with premature rupture of the membranes? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kahyaoğlu, Serkan; Timur, Hakan; Eren, Remzi; Kahyaoğlu, İnci; Eyi, Elif Gül Yapar; Engin-Üstün, Yaprak

    2014-01-01

    Objective High sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is a serum marker for acute inflammation and/or infection. The diagnostic value of serum levels of this protein has been investigated among patients with preterm delivery, premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) and preeclampsia. In this study, the predictive value of hs-CRP for successful labour induction in patients with PROM has been evaluated. Material and Methods Eighty-six term pregnant patients who experienced pre-labour amniotic membrane rupture from 37–41 weeks of gestation were selected for the study. Maternal serum hs-CRP levels were determined upon admission to the delivery unit and low dose intravenous oxytocin infusion was started to induce labour. The mode of delivery and time interval from labour induction to delivery were the primary endpoints of the study. Results Twenty-five (29%) out of 86 patients had delivered by caesarean section, while the remaining 61 (71%) had delivered vaginally. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve for testing the significance of higher hs-CRP values and lower probability of vaginal delivery revealed that higher hs-CRP values were found to be insignificant for predicting the need for caesarean section. No statistically significant correlation between high serum hs-CRP levels and the probability of caesarean delivery has been established (Spearman rho:−.126; p=0.24). The mean maternal serum hs-CRP levels during PROM were found to be similar between vaginal and abdominal deliveries. Conclusion Hs-CRP, as an inflammatory marker, was found to be neither specific nor sensitive for the prediction of successful labour induction in term pregnancies with pre-labour rupture of the membranes. PMID:24790515

  4. Managing hyperthyroidism in pregnancy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Laurberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism in women who are of childbearing age is predominantly of autoimmune origin and caused by Graves’ disease. The physiological changes in the maternal immune system during a pregnancy may influence the development of this and other autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, pregnancy-associated physiological changes influence the synthesis and metabolism of thyroid hormones and challenge the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy. Thyroid hormones are crucial regulators of early development and play an important role in the maintenance of a normal pregnancy and in the development of the fetus, particularly the fetal brain. Untreated or inadequately treated hyperthyroidism is associated with pregnancy complications and may even program the fetus to long-term development of disease. Thus, hyperthyroidism in pregnant women should be carefully managed and controlled, and proper management involves different medical specialties. The treatment of choice in pregnancy is antithyroid drugs (ATDs). These drugs are effective in the control of maternal hyperthyroidism, but they all cross the placenta, and so need careful management and control during the second half of pregnancy considering the risk of fetal hyper- or hypothyroidism. An important aspect in the early pregnancy is that the predominant side effect to the use of ATDs in weeks 6–10 of pregnancy is birth defects that may develop after exposure to available types of ATDs and may be severe. This review focuses on four current perspectives in the management of overt hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, including the etiology and incidence of the disease, how the diagnosis is made, the consequences of untreated or inadequately treated disease, and finally how to treat overt hyperthyroidism in pregnancy. PMID:27698567

  5. Physiologic and pathologic changes of platelets in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Valera, Marie-Cecile; Parant, Olivier; Vayssiere, Christophe; Arnal, Jean-François; Payrastre, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Platelets are key players in haemostasis and thrombus formation. Defects affecting platelets during pregnancy can lead to heterogeneous complications, such as thrombosis, first trimester miscarriage and postpartum haemorrhage. The incidence of complications is increased in women who have heritable platelet function disorders. Modifications of platelet count or platelet functions during normal pregnancy and preeclampsia will be summarized and the management of pregnant women with heritable platelet function disorders will be discussed.

  6. Pregnancy Loss and Miscarriage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Condition Information What are common symptoms? How many people are ... Pregnancy Loss: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is pregnancy ...

  7. Multiple sclerosis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, C D

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the main reasons for invalidation of young adults of both sexes. The disease is more common in women than in men. The illness begins most frequently in patients between the ages of 20 and 40 years, which is also the most fertile period for women. MS is an immune-mediated disease with chronic evolution marked by exacerbations and remissions that amplify the degree of disability. The most common clinical picture is the one with relapse and remission whose evolution is greatly improved after immunomodulatory treatment. We have revised the literature together with the data from the national multiple sclerosis society and the cases that are in the National Programme of Multiple Sclerosis, mainly the ones that are assigned to the regional center of Iaşi, at the Neurology Clinic inside the Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital Iaşi. Pregnancy is quite frequent in female patients with MS. Certain risks are present during pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding and certain protocols must be applied, such as interrupting the immunomodulatory treatment before the conception. Child delivery must be closely monitored and it must take into consideration the dysfunction that the patient has and be adapted to the existing deficits. There are some methods that may be used during delivery for female patients with multiple sclerosis in order to make this process smooth and reduce the risk of postpartum complications. Multiple sclerosis is an invalidating disease, with a high prevalence in women. Pregnancy in patients with MS is not such a natural phenomenon as in a healthy female and it requires a multidisciplinary team in order to ensure the safety of both the mother and the newborn.

  8. Maternal and Live-birth Outcomes of Pregnancies following Assisted Reproductive Technology: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Linling; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yifeng; Zhang, Runjv; Wu, Yiqing; Huang, Yun; Liu, Feng; Li, Meigen; Sun, Saijun; Xing, Lanfeng; Zhu, Yimin; Chen, Yiyi; Xu, Li; Zhou, Liangbi; Huang, Hefeng; Zhang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore associations between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and maternal and neonatal outcomes compared with similar outcomes following spontaneously conceived births. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pregnancies conceived by ART (N = 2641) during 2006–2014 compared to naturally conceived pregnancies (N = 5282) after matching for maternal age and birth year. Pregnancy complications, perinatal complications and neonatal outcomes of enrolled subjects were investigated and analysed by multivariate logistic regression. We found that pregnancies conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) were associated with a significantly increased incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, placenta previa, placental abruption, preterm premature rupture of membranes, placental adherence, postpartum haemorrhage, polyhydramnios, preterm labour, low birth weight, and small-for-date infant compared with spontaneously conceived births. Pregnancies conceived by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) showed similar elevated complications, except some of the difference narrowed or disappeared. Singleton pregnancies or nulliparous pregnancies following ART still exhibited increased maternal and neonatal complications. Therefore, we conclude that pregnancies conceived following ART are at increased risks of antenatal complications, perinatal complications and poor neonatal outcomes, which may result from not only a higher incidence of multiple pregnancy, but also the manipulation involved in ART processes. PMID:27762324

  9. Thalassaemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leung, Tak Yeung; Lao, Terence T

    2012-02-01

    Thalassaemia is the most common monogenetic disease worldwide. Antenatal screening is effective and simple, and accurate genetic prenatal diagnosis can be achieved in early gestation. Less invasive methods are feasible with ultrasound fetal assessment for alpha-thalassaemia, analysis of circulating fetal nucleic acid in maternal plasma, and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. Women with thalassaemia major and intermedia are at risk of various maternal complications, such as cardiac failure, alloimmunisation, viral infection, thrombosis, endocrine and bone disturbances. Therefore, it is prudent to adhere to a standard management plan in this group of pregnant women. Close monitoring of the maternal and fetal condition during pregnancy is essential, and various treatments, such as blood transfusion or postpartum prophylaxis for thromboembolism, may be indicated. After birth, resumption of iron chelation and bisphosphonates treatment is needed, and counselling on breast feeding and contraception should be given.

  10. Healthy Pregnancies. Healthy Moms, Healthy Kids: A Series on Maternal and Child Health in Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A woman's behaviors during pregnancy can have a significant influence on her baby's healthy development. Women who smoke or drink alcohol during pregnancy, go without prenatal care or suffer from poor nutrition are more likely to experience complications during pregnancy or childbirth, and their babies are at increased risk for developing a number…

  11. A pregnancy-associated nonfamilial case of PAPA (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Isao; Fukatsu, Yuko; Ushijima, Junko; Nakamura, Eishin; Samajima, Koki; Kadowaki, Kanako; Takagi, Kenjiro

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the influence of pregnancy on pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) syndrome. We experienced a rare case of pregnancy complicated with PAPA syndrome. The patient had various histories of skin and joint disorders and experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage during pregnancy; however, her skin lesion was unaffected.

  12. Prevention of Listeriosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Curves Signs & Symptoms Key Resources Blue Bell Creameries Ice Cream Products Advice to Consumers, Institutions & Retailers Information for ... outbreaks to soft cheeses, celery, sprouts, cantaloupe, and ice cream. Read on to learn which foods are more ...

  13. Listeria Infection (Listeriosis)

    MedlinePlus

    Listeria infection Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Listeria infection is a foodborne bacterial illness that can be very serious for pregnant women and people with impaired immune systems. Listeria infection is ...

  14. A comparative study of teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mahavarkar, S H; Madhu, C K; Mule, V D

    2008-08-01

    Teenage pregnancy is a global problem and is considered a high-risk group, in spite of conflicting evidence. Our objective was to compare obstetric outcomes of pregnancy in teenagers and older women. This was a retrospective study of case records of pregnancies from August 2000 to July 2001. Girls aged < or =19 years were compared with pregnancy outcomes in older women (19-35 years) in the same hospital. The study took place in the Government General Hospital, Sangli, India, a teaching hospital in rural India, with an annual delivery rate of over 3,500. A total of 386 teenage pregnancies were compared with pregnancies in 3,326 older women. Socioeconomic data, age, number of pregnancies, antenatal care and complications, mode of delivery, and neonatal outcomes were considered. The incidence of teenage pregnancy in the study was 10%. A significant proportion of teenage pregnant mothers were in their first pregnancies. The teenage mothers were nearly three times more at risk of developing anaemia (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 2.2-3.7, p < 0.0001) and delivering pre-term (OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 2.4-3.7, p < 0.0001). Teenage mothers were twice as likely to develop hypertensive problems in pregnancy (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.5-3.2, p < 0.0001) and were more likely to deliver vaginally with no significant increase in the risk of assisted vaginal delivery or caesarean section. Young mothers were nearly twice at risk of delivering low birth weight babies (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.5-2.2, p < 0.0001) and 50% less likely to have normal birth weight babies (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 1.2-2.9, p < 0.0001). The outcome of this study showed that teenage pregnancies are still a common occurrence in rural India in spite of various legislations and government programmes and teenage pregnancy is a risk factor for poor obstetric outcome in rural India. Cultural practices, poor socioeconomic conditions, low literacy rate and lack of awareness of the risks are some of the main contributory factors. Early booking

  15. Laparoscopic Treatment of Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Felsingerová, Zuzana; Felsinger, Michal; Jandakova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: An ectopic pregnancy within a Cesarean scar represents a rare type of extrauterine pregnancy in which the fertilized egg nidates in the myometrium of the uterine wall within a scar left from a previous Cesarean delivery. An unrecognized growing Cesarian scar pregnancy may result in uterine rupture, uncontrollable metrorrhagia, and bleeding into the abdominal cavity; therefore, early diagnosis and therapy are necessary to prevent the development of severe complications. Case: A 34-year-old woman after a previous Cesarean delivery presented with amenorrhoa of 7 weeks' duration. Transvaginal ultrasonography revealed an ectopic pregnancy in the Cesarean scar, and a laparoscopic removal of the gestational sac was performed with no complications. Results: Three months later, another laparoscopy with chromopertubation showed no signs of penetration in the suture, both the Fallopian tubes being bilaterally passable. The patient was advised that she could try to achieve pregnancy through spontaneous conception, after which monitoring of the gestational development and a careful assessment of the nidation site would be needed. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgical management of a viable ectopic pregnancy is technically simple, and is followed by a good recovery. (J GYNECOL SURG 30:309) PMID:25336858

  16. Uterine torsion in second trimester of pregnancy followed by a successful-term pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fatih, Farah Farouq; Gowri, Vaidyanathan; Rao, Kuntal

    2012-01-01

    Uterine torsion is defined as rotation of the uterus of more than 45° on its long axis. It is an unusual complication of pregnancy and for most obstetricians it probably represents a ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ diagnosis. Fetal mortality up to 12% and occasional maternal mortality are reported. A 22-year-old second gravida presented at 22+ weeks gestation with severe abdominal pain and shock. Laparotomy was done for suspected abruptio placenta, when torsion of the uterus to 180° was diagnosed. Posterior hysterotomy was performed. She conceived the next year and was delivered at term by caesarean section. Uterine torsion is a rare complication of pregnancy and obstetricians should have this complication in mind when performing a caesarean section for undiagnosed severe abdominal pain in pregnancy. Anatomical landmarks should be defined if possible, prior to uterine incision during a caesarean section, to avoid posterior hysterotomy PMID:22914233

  17. Uterine preservation in placenta percreta complicated by unscarred uterine rupture at second trimester in a patient with repeated molar pregnancies: a case report and brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, A; Ertas, I E; Gungorduk, K; Kaya, C; Solmaz, U; Yildirim, G

    2014-01-01

    Placenta-percreta causing uterine rupture in unscarred uterus is a rare obstetric surgical emergency that can cause maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. A 25-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain for four days. Previously, she had undergone two suction curettages for complete hydatiform moles. Ultrasound revealed a non-viable fetus with an estimated gestational age of 21 weeks and free fluid and coagulum in the abdominal cavity. An emergency laparotomy was performed because of the acute abdomen. At exploration, the placenta had invaded the entire thickness of the myometrium and the non-viable fetus was in the abdominal cavity. The uterus was closed with a double-layer of interrupted sutures and uterine-sparing surgery was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day seven. The authors present a case of placenta-percreta in an unscarred uterus complicated with uterine rupture during the second-trimester that was managed successfully with uterine repair. They also review the literature briefly and discuss similar cases managed conservatively in the second-trimester.

  18. End-stage renal disease and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nadeau-Fredette, Annie-Claire; Hladunewich, Michelle; Hui, Dini; Keunen, Johannes; Chan, Christopher T

    2013-05-01

    Pregnancy in patients with ESRD is rare and remains especially challenging. Because endocrine abnormalities and sexual dysfunction decrease fertility, conception rates have been remarkably low in this patient population. Moreover, when pregnancy does occur, hypertension, preeclampsia, anemia, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and other complications can decrease the rate of a successful outcome. However, recent experiences with intensive hemodialysis managed by a multidisciplinary team are encouraging with respect to better overall outcomes for mothers and infants. In this article, we discuss the main causes of decreased fertility in dialysis-dependent women, review outcomes and complications of pregnancy among dialysis patients with a special focus on recent intensive hemodialysis data, and summarize the current best strategy to manage pregnant women on dialysis.

  19. Consumer assessment of safety and date labeling statements on ready-to-eat meat and poultry products designed to minimize risk of listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Jenna; Kendall, Patricia; Medeiros, Lydia; Doorn, Jessica; Schroeder, Mary; Sofos, John

    2008-01-01

    Point-of-purchase safety-based labeling guidance on the proper storage and handling of refrigerated ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products could help reduce the risk of listeriosis. Seniors and pregnant women are two population groups at increased risk of listeriosis due to suppressed or compromised immune systems. We conducted 11 focus groups with senior-aged women and women of childbearing age in Colorado and Ohio to assess consumer awareness of Listeria, storage practices of RTE meat products, perceptions regarding the acceptability and usefulness of common date and potential food safety labeling statements on RTE meat and poultry products, and food safety information needs. Storage times for opened and unopened RTE products varied widely, with opened products often being stored longer than recommended. Women in both age groups paid attention to date labels on packages but varied highly in their interpretation of the statements. "Use by" statements were considered clearer and more helpful than "Sell by" or "Best if used by" labels. Proposed food safety-based labeling statements listing "antilisterial" agents used in RTE products were not well received. However, labels giving consumers instructions on how long they could keep RTE products and when to discard them after opening were considered helpful and well received. Participants indicated the need for further information about Listeria and its control. Educational information at point-of-purchase and where seniors and pregnant women congregate are suggested. Manufacturers are encouraged to provide more complete information on the safe storage and use of ready-to-eat meat and poultry products on package labels.

  20. Whole genome sequencing as a tool to investigate a cluster of seven cases of listeriosis in Austria and Germany, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Schmid, D; Allerberger, F; Huhulescu, S; Pietzka, A; Amar, C; Kleta, S; Prager, R; Preußel, K; Aichinger, E; Mellmann, A

    2014-05-01

    A cluster of seven human cases of listeriosis occurred in Austria and in Germany between April 2011 and July 2013. The Listeria monocytogenes serovar (SV) 1/2b isolates shared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP) patterns indistinguishable from those from five food producers. The seven human isolates, a control strain with a different PFGE/fAFLP profile and ten food isolates were subjected to whole genome sequencing (WGS) in a blinded fashion. A gene-by-gene comparison (multilocus sequence typing (MLST)+) was performed, and the resulting whole genome allelic profiles were compared using SeqSphere(+) software version 1.0. On analysis of 2298 genes, the four human outbreak isolates from 2012 to 2013 had different alleles at ≤6 genes, i.e. differed by ≤6 genes from each other; the dendrogram placed these isolates in between five Austrian unaged soft cheese isolates from producer A (≤19-gene difference from the human cluster) and two Austrian ready-to-eat meat isolates from producer B (≤8-gene difference from the human cluster). Both food products appeared on grocery bills prospectively collected by these outbreak cases after hospital discharge. Epidemiological results on food consumption and MLST+ clearly separated the three cases in 2011 from the four 2012-2013 outbreak cases (≥48 different genes). We showed that WGS is capable of discriminating L. monocytogenes SV1/2b clones not distinguishable by PFGE and fAFLP. The listeriosis outbreak described clearly underlines the potential of sequence-based typing methods to offer enhanced resolution and comparability of typing systems for public health applications.

  1. Pituitary tumours during pregnancy in mothers treated with bromocriptine.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, R W; Turkalj, I; Braun, P

    1979-01-01

    1 Out of 805 previously infertile women in whom pregnancy was achieved on bromocriptine treatment, 137 were diagnosed as having pituitary tumours. 2 In nine of these, tumour-related complications occurred during pregnancy, chiefly visual field impairment. Surgical intervention was considered necessary in two patients. In a third patient reinstitution of bromocriptine produced remission of symptoms. 3 Although the frequency of serious complications was low, the present state of knowledge indicates that surgery or irradiation of pituitary tumours should be preferred, at least as the first line of treatment, for patients contemplating pregnancy. PMID:444358

  2. Pregnancy outcome in a woman with prune belly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hillman, R Tyler; Garabedian, Matthew James; Wallerstein, Robert J

    2012-11-30

    Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome that primarily affects male fetuses. Affected men are universally infertile; however, there is a paucity of information published on the reproductive potential of affected women. Pregnancy outcomes in affected women have not been described in the literature. We describe the case of pregnancy in an affected woman. Her pregnancy progressed without complication. Her fetus had no stigmata of the syndrome. Her labour and delivery were, however, complicated by a prolonged second stage of labour and need for vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery.

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Macejko, Amanda M; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2007-02-01

    Urinary tract infections are common complications of pregnancy; upper tract infections in particular may lead to significant morbidity for both the mother and fetus. Bacteriuria is a significant risk factor for developing pyelonephritis in pregnant women. Therefore, proper screening and treatment of bacteriuria during pregnancy is necessary to prevent complications. All women should be screened for bacteriuria in the first trimester, and women with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections or anomalies should have repeat bacteriuria screening throughout pregnancy. Treatment of bacteriuria should include 3-day therapy with appropriate antimicrobials, and women should be followed closely after treatment because recurrence may occur in up to one third of patients.

  4. Neurofibromatosis and pregnancy. An update.

    PubMed

    Weissman, A; Jakobi, P; Zaidise, I; Drugan, A

    1993-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis is one of the most frequent genetic diseases in humans. Pregnancy in neurofibromatosis patients is, however, less common. Most current information on pregnancy and neurofibromatosis is derived from case reports, which may not reflect the true situation. In the past 15 years only two series of pregnant neurofibromatosis patients were reported in the English-language literature. We present our experience with 34 pregnancies in nine neurofibromatosis patients who delivered at our medical center. While fertility does not seem to be impaired in neurofibromatosis, these patients experience a higher-than-expected rate of first-trimester spontaneous abortions (20.7%), stillbirths (8.7%) and intrauterine growth retardation (13.0%). A high rate of cesarean section (26%) was also observed in our series. We conclude that pregnant neurofibromatosis patients constitute a high-risk group, in danger of developing life-threatening complications. However, with proper antenatal care, most pregnant neurofibromatosis patients can deliver safety if the pregnancy continues beyond the first trimester.

  5. [Anticoagulation and antiaggregation during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Biasiutti, F Demarmels; Strebel, J Kremer Hovinga

    2003-01-01

    For haemostatic and circulatory reasons pregnancy is associated with an about 6-fold relative increase of thrombotic risk which is further raised by additional risk factors, such as history of thrombosis or acquired and hereditary thrombophilia, respectively. Recently, the thrombophilias have been revealed as risk factors for severe preeclampsia, abruptio placentae, fetal growth retardation, abortion and still birth as well. Thus, there are several situations in which the question for the need of antithrombotic medication is raised in a pregnant woman, either for therapy of acute thromboembolism or for prophylaxis of thrombosis and obstetrical complications, respectively. While acute thromboembolism has to be treated in every case, indication for prophylaxis has to be weighed in the light of the individual risk profile of the pregnant woman and the potential side effects and inconvenience of the medication. The first part of this article deals with the pregnancy related problems of coumarins, heparins and aspirin and demonstrates that the low molecular weight heparins are the anticoagulants of choice for most indications in pregnancy. The second part of this overview shows in which specific situations and how the antithrombotic medications mentioned above are used in pregnancy.

  6. Routine CMV screening during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Collinet, P; Subtil, D; Houfflin-Debarge, V; Kacet, N; Dewilde, A; Puech, F

    2004-05-10

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) screening during pregnancy has been widely discussed for several years, but still no consensus has been agreed. With a number of live births of 750,000 per year in France, we would expect 7500 infected infants at birth per year (rate of congenital infection of 1%). Among infected infants at birth, the number of severely infected foetuses would be approximately 75, the number of infants with severe sequelae would be 480, 675 approximately would present with hearing loss and the number of asymptomatic infants would be 6270. Five different preventive methods for congenital CMV infection are possible: (1) Routine CMV screening at the beginning of pregnancy for primary prevention. (2) Secondary prevention by antenatal diagnosis of congenital CMV infection complications. (3) Tertiary prevention by serological testing during pregnancy. (4) Tertiary prevention by serological screening at birth. (5) Tertiary prevention: Hearing loss screening at birth. The aims of this review are to define the advantages and disadvantages of these different methods of CMV screening during pregnancy and to determine if the current available information would make systematic testing acceptable.

  7. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  8. Pregnancy in pancreas–kidney transplant recipients: report of three cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bramham, Kate; Lightstone, Liz; Taylor, John; Hakim, Nadey S; Harding, Kate; McCarthy, Andrew; Chowdhury, Paramit; Duncan, Neil; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-three pregnancies in 43 women with SPK have now been described by the US National Transplantation Pregnancy Registry (NTPR) (established in 1991), which contains self-reported data from questionnaires and hospital records. These women have high rates of complications despite normoglycaemia and restoration of renal function. We describe the pregnancies of three SPK recipients in the UK managed in joint renal obstetric clinics and discuss the antenatal and postnatal complications specific to SPK transplants. PMID:27582847

  9. Prevention of preterm delivery in twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rode, Line; Tabor, Ann

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of twin gestation has increased markedly over the past decades, mostly because of increased use of assisted reproductive technologies. Twin pregnancies are at increased risk of preterm delivery (i.e. birth before 37 weeks of gestation). Multiple gestations therefore account for 2-3% of all pregnancies but constitute at least 10% of cases of preterm delivery. Complications from preterm birth are not limited to the neonatal period, such as in retinopathy of prematurity, intraventricular haemorrhage, necrotising enterocolitis, respiratory disorder and sepsis; they can also constitute sequelae such as abnormal neurophysiological development in early childhood and underachievement in school. Several treatment modalities have been proposed in singleton high-risk pregnancies. The mechanism of initiating labour may, however, be different in singleton and twin gestations. Therefore, it is mandatory to evaluate the proposed treatments in randomised trials of multiple gestations. In this chapter, we describe the results of trials to prevent preterm delivery in twin pregnancies.

  10. [Bariatric surgery and pregnancy: literature review].

    PubMed

    Ferrand Miranda, Pedro; Contreras Rivas, Tomas; Leigh Pacciarini, Stephanie

    2014-02-14

    Obesity has currently reached epidemic proportions, both in Chile and in the world. This condition is associated to a variety of maternal complications in all stages of the vital cycle and during pregnancy. Medical treatment has not proved successful thus resulting in an increase in bariatric surgery in recent years, even when it is not first line treatment. This literature review aims to report updated results of surgical treatment for obesity before and during pregnancy with respect to fertility, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. It also looks into the possible effects of surgery on fetal development, and its relation to premature delivery, fetal macrosomy, low birth weight and neural tube defects, as well as effects on maternal and fetal outcomes, mainly in nutrition. Lastly, we suggest some recommendations that arise from this review on the role of contraception, nutrition and time between surgery and pregnancy.

  11. [Dermatoses in pregnancy. Presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Uceda, M E; Guillén, M

    2014-01-01

    Family physicians usually follow up pregnancies in which no special incidences are expected to occur. Cutaneous pruritus is a common symptom in pregnant women, on most occasions without further consequences. However, noteworthy is a group of very rare pathologies known as pregnancy dermatoses, some of which may have potentially severe complications, mainly for the fetus and the pregnancy outcome, and also, to a lesser degree, for the mothers and other future pregnancies. It is essential to know how to manage the pruritus, and how to take an adequate clinical history in order to diagnose these severe conditions. The case of a pregnant woman who consulted for pruriginous dermatoses (pemphigoid gestationis) is presented to illustrate this topic. A description of the diagnostic process, differential diagnosis, treatment and outcome, is included.

  12. Management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Hind N; Arian, Sara E; Sibai, Baha M

    2014-07-01

    Hypertensive disorders are the most common medical complication of pregnancy, with an incidence of 5-10%, and a common cause of maternal mortality in the USA. Incidence of pre-eclampsia has increased by 25% in the past two decades. In addition to being among the lethal triad, there are likely up to 100 other women who experience 'near miss' significant maternal morbidity that stops short of death for every pre-eclampsia-related mortality. The purpose of this review is to present the new task force statement and novel definitions, as well as management approaches to each of the hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. The increased understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension in pregnancy, as well as advances in medical therapy to minimize risks of fetal toxicity and teratogenicity, will improve our ability to prevent and treat hypertension in pregnancy. Fetal programming and fetal origins of adult disease theories extrapolate the benefit of such therapy to future generations.

  13. Pharmacological Therapy of Tachyarrhythmias During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yaksh, Ameeta; van der Does, Lisette JME; Lanters, Eva AH; de Groot, Natasja MS

    2016-01-01

    Tachyarrhythmias are the most frequently observed cardiac complications during pregnancy. The majority of these maternal and foetal arrhythmias are supraventricular tachyarrhythmias; ventricular tachyarrhythmias are rare. The use of anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) during pregnancy is challenging due to potential foetal teratogenic effects. Maintaining stable and effective therapeutic maternal drug levels is difficult due to haemodynamic and metabolic alterations. Pharmacological treatment of tachyarrhythmias is indicated in case of maternal haemodynamic instability or hydrops fetalis. Evidenc e regarding the efficacy and safety of AAD therapy during pregnancy is scarce and the choice of AAD should be based on individual risk assessments for both mother and foetus. This review outlines the current knowledge on the development of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy, the indications for and considerations of pharmacological treatment and its potential side-effects. PMID:27408722

  14. Pregnancy in Women With CKD: A Success Story.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    In women with chronic kidney disease (CKD), pregnancy outcomes have improved over the last 50 years, particularly in the developed world. Maternal mortality is now extremely low, fetal survival has markedly increased (even in women with CKD stages 4-5), and it is now the exception for women with CKD to be advised against embarking on a pregnancy. However, pregnancies are rarely free from complications, and there are unanswered questions about the longer term effects on maternal and infant health. The developments have led to a more optimistic attitude to pregnancy in women with CKD not requiring renal replacement treatment. The remaining problems are described in this World Kidney Forum.

  15. The Treatment of Allergic Respiratory Disease During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Namazy, Jai; Schatz, M

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy may be complicated by new-onset or preexisting asthma and allergic rhinitis.This article reviews the recognition and management of asthma and allergic rhinitis during pregnancy, paying close attention to the general principles of allergy and use of asthma medication during pregnancy. Both allergic rhinitis and asthma can adversely affect both maternal quality of life and, in the case of maternal asthma, perinatal outcomes. Optimal management is thus important for both mother and baby. This article reviews the safety of asthma and allergy medications commonly used during pregnancy.

  16. Life style, work and stress, and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, M

    1999-12-01

    Several environmental factors affect the fetus and thereby the outcome of pregnancy. Recent studies have confirmed a relation between stress and pregnancy outcome; furthermore they have indicated that biological measures of stress may predict risk of complications. Altered sex ratio may be an interesting way of measuring the effect of stress during pregnancy. Stress and work load during pregnancy seem to be related to time until conception and to becoming pregnant through assisted reproduction. Drinking large amounts of alcohol is hazardous, but drinking one drink per day appears to be safe. The effect of passive smoking continues to be a matter of debate.

  17. THE DERMATOSES OF PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Silonie

    2008-01-01

    The skin changes in pregnancy can be either physiological (hormonal), changes in pre-existing skin diseases or development of new pregnancy specific dermatoses. Pregnancy-specific skin dermatoses include an ill-defined heterogeneous group of pruritic skin eruptions which are seen only in pregnancy. These include atopic eruption of pregnancy, polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, pemphigoid gestationis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Atopic eruption of pregnancy is the most common of these disorders. Most skin eruptions resolve postpartum and require only symptomatic treatment. Antepartum surveillance is recommended for patients with pemphigoid gestationis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy as they carry fetal risk. This article deals with the classification, clinical features and treatment of the specific dermatoses of pregnancy. PMID:19882004

  18. Pregnancy and contraception in systemic and cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Morel, N; Le Guern, V; Plu-Bureau, G; Frances, C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2016-10-01

    A causal link has long been described between estrogen and systemic lupus erythematosus activity. Contraceptive and pregnancy management is now common for lupus patients, but pregnancy continues to be associated with higher maternal and fetal mortality/morbidity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients than among the general population. Potential complications include lupus flares, obstetric complications (fetal loss, in utero growth retardation, premature birth) and neonatal lupus syndrome. Association with antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome increases the risk of obstetric complications. Anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies put fetuses at risk for neonatal lupus. Improving the outcome of such pregnancies depends upon optimal systematic planning of pregnancy at a preconception counseling visit coupled with a multidisciplinary approach. Absence of lupus activity, use of appropriate medication during pregnancy based on the patient's medical history and risk factors, and regular monitoring constitute the best tools for achieving a favorable outcome in such high-risk pregnancies. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the management of contraception and pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus, cutaneous lupus and/or antiphospholipid syndrome in order to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis.

  19. Sjögren Syndrome and Pregnancy: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Suruchi; Gupta, Nikhil

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Autoimmune diseases do not impair fertility, and women with autoimmune diseases who become pregnant are likely to experience more complicated pregnancies than are women without the disease. Pregnancies complicated by these disorders have a high clinical impact on both the pregnancy and the disease. The effect of autoimmune disease on pregnancy differs according to the type of maternal disease, disease activity, severity of organ damage, antibody profile, and drug treatment. Sjögren syndrome is an autoimmune disease with a high prevalence of anti-SS-A (anti-Ro) and anti-SS-B (anti-La) antibodies. Anti-SS-A antibodies are associated with congenital heart block. Data on pregnancy outcomes in primary Sjögren syndrome are scarce. Methods We performed a review of the literature regarding pregnancy outcomes in women with Sjögren syndrome. Results Women with Sjögren syndrome are likely to experience more complications during pregnancy than women without an autoimmune disease. Studies show a high incidence of poor fetal outcomes for these patients. Conclusion Women with Sjögren syndrome require prenatal counseling explaining the risks involved and the need to control the disease well before conception. High-risk pregnancies can be optimally managed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:28080954

  20. Dilatation and nontraumatic rupture of the urinary tract during pregnancy: a review.

    PubMed

    Meyers, S J; Lee, R V; Munschauer, R W

    1985-12-01

    Rupture of the urinary tract during pregnancy is uncommonly reported. Nevertheless, pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract predispose to tears and leaks in the renal parenchyma or collecting system. Pyelonephritis, painful overdistension, and rupture are consequences of the effects of pregnancy on the urinary tract. Thirteen cases of urinary tract rupture from the literature and one from the authors' experience illustrate the clinical manifestations of this serious complication of pregnancy.

  1. Pharmacotherapy for Mood Disorders in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Byatt, Nancy; Freeman, Marlene P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pharmacotherapy for mood disorders during pregnancy is often complicated by pregnancy-related pharmacokinetic changes and the need for dose adjustments. The objectives of this review are to summarize the evidence for change in perinatal pharmacokinetics of commonly used pharmacotherapies for mood disorders, discuss the implications for clinical and therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), and make clinical recommendations. Methods The English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE/PubMed was searched for original observational studies (controlled and uncontrolled, prospective and retrospective), case reports, and case series that evaluated or described pharmacokinetic changes or TDM during pregnancy or the postpartum period. Results Pregnancy-associated changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination may result in lowered psychotropic drug levels and possible treatment effects, particularly in late pregnancy. Mechanisms include changes in both phase 1 hepatic cytochrome P450 and phase 2 uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase enzyme activities, changes in hepatic and renal blood flow, and glomerular filtration rate. Therapeutic drug monitoring, in combination with clinical monitoring, is indicated for tricyclic antidepressants and mood stabilizers during the perinatal period. Conclusions Substantial pharmacokinetic changes can occur during pregnancy in a number of commonly used antidepressants and mood stabilizers. Dose increases may be indicated for antidepressants including citalopram, clomipramine, imipramine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, nortriptyline, paroxetine, and sertraline, especially late in pregnancy. Antenatal dose increases may also be needed for lithium, lamotrigine, and valproic acid because of perinatal changes in metabolism. Close clinical monitoring of perinatal mood disorders and TDM of tricyclic antidepressants and mood stabilizers are recommended. PMID:24525634

  2. Diagnosis and management of intramural ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Kimberly; Fernandez, Carlos; Rojas, David; Levine, Elliot M; Locher, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Intramural pregnancy, a gestation completely surrounded by the myometrium located within the uterine wall with separation from the uterine cavity, is an extremely unusual form of pregnancy. Complications resulting from intramural pregnancy include inevitable uterine rupture with resultant hemorrhage and possible hysterectomy if diagnosis is not made early and treatment is not initiated. An asymptomatic patient was initially diagnosed with a missed abortion at approximately 6 weeks of gestation after a routine ultrasound. Suction curettage was performed approximately 1 month after the initial diagnosis. The pathology specimen failed to reveal placental villi. Ultimately, the diagnosis of intramural pregnancy was made via ultrasound and a computed tomography scan. She was treated with a single dose of systemically administered methotrexate. Over a period of 4 months, β-human chorionic gonadotropin levels trended downward; however, the intramural pregnancy failed to resolve completely, and a persistent mass remained. The intramural pregnancy was removed using the da Vinci laparoscopic procedure (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). If the diagnosis of intramural ectopic pregnancy is made sufficiently early, conservative measures can be taken, which can preserve a patient's future fertility.

  3. Thrombophilia and its treatment in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eldor, A

    2001-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common cause of maternal death during pregnancy and the puerperium in the industrialized world. The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy is 0.05%-1.8%, 6 times greater than in the non-pregnant state. The risk is increased in women over 35 years and those with obesity, previous VTE, operative delivery, or underlying thrombophilia. Women presenting with recurrent miscarriages, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, abruptio placentae, or stillbirth (all associated with microvascular thrombosis in placental blood vessels) have high incidence (65%) of thrombophilia. About 70% of the women who present with VTE during pregnancy are carriers of hereditary or acquired thrombophilia. Treatment of women with VTE during pregnancy, and especially those with thrombophilia, requires individualized dosing and duration of antithrombotic therapy and the formulation of thromboprophylactic strategies for future pregnancies. Warfarin is contraindicated during the first trimester due to fetotoxicity; unfractionated heparin (UFH) is associated with practical disadvantages and the risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and osteoporosis with long-term use. Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are convenient to use, do not cross the placenta, carry a lower risk of HIT and osteoporosis, and are safe and effective. LMWHs are replacing UFH as the anticoagulant of choice during pregnancy and improve pregnancy outcome in women with a history of obstetric complications and confirmed thrombophilia.

  4. Reproductive hormones and blood pressure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kristiansson, P; Wang, J X

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in cardiovasular changes during human pregnancy and the complicated aetiology of gestational hypertension are unclear. Reproductive hormones have known effects on the cardiovascular system in the non-pregnant state and in animal systems, but their effects in human pregnancy are uncertain. In this study of pregnant women, the effects of serum concentrations of relaxin, progesterone and oestradiol on arterial blood pressure were studied. Higher serum concentrations of progesterone and relaxin, but not oestradiol, in early pregnancy were related to lower mean systolic blood pressures in the second and third trimesters. No relationship was found between hormonal concentrations and diastolic blood pressures. However, women with a diastolic blood pressure of >90 mmHg in late pregnancy showed statistically significant lower relaxin concentrations in early pregnancy in comparison with women whose diastolic blood pressure was pregnancy, but not progesterone, were independently related to systolic blood pressure in late pregnancy. The results support previous experimental and clinical studies. The effect of relaxin may be explained by a possible vasodilatatory action seen in animal studies and appears to be moderate.

  5. Relationship between lupus anticoagulant (LAC) and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Sagawa, N; Ihara, Y; Kobayashi, F; Itoh, H; Mori, T

    1995-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulant (LAC), a serum antiphospholipid autoantibody, is believed to be one of the causes of infertility or fetal loss. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of LAC in the pathogenesis of hypertension during pregnancy. In this study, 20 pregnant women with hypertension were classified into two groups: 14 patients who did not have hypertension before the pregnancy but developed it during the pregnancy (pregnancy-induced hypertension; Group A) and 6 patients who had hypertensive or renal disease before the pregnancy, and developed further hypertension during the pregnancy (pregnancy-aggravated hypertension; Group B). A LAC coagulation assay was performed, and the presence of LAC in each group was compared. All 14 patients in group A were LAC-negative. In contrast, 3 of the 6 patients in group B were LAC-positive, and had clinical autoimmune diseases. The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was also examined in 15 pregnancies from 9 LAC-positive women who had a history of repeated fetal loss but no systemic autoimmune disease (Group C). None of these 15 pregnancies had hypertensive complications, even when they reached term. In the placentas of LAC-positive women, no characteristic changes other than fibrinoid degeneration and microscopic infarction were observed upon histological examination. These results suggest that LAC does not relate with the onset of hypertension during pregnancy.

  6. Diagnostic Dilemma in Ovarian Pregnancy: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pallavee, P.; Samal, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy but it is the most common type of nontubal ectopic pregnancy. Many times it is operated with a misdiagnosis of ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy or hemorrhagic corpus luteum. The high resolution transvaginal ultrasonography is a valuable tool for diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy but ovarian pregnancy still remains a diagnostic problem and a continuous challenge to the gynecologist. The correct diagnosis is made at the time of surgery and confirmation is by histopathological report. Here we report three cases of primary ovarian ectopic pregnancies, consistent with the Spiegelberg’s criteria. Out of this, two cases have corroboration of ovarian ectopic pregnancy with use of intrauterine contraceptive device and one case by chance without any preexisting risk factors, probably due to interference in the release of ovum from the follicle. In all the three cases, emergency laparotomy was done for ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy and the diagnosis of ruptured primary ovarian pregnancy was made at the time of surgery, this was subsequently confirmed by histopathology report. In the era where wider usage of intrauterine devices, ovulatory drugs and assisted reproductive techniques are rife, there is a possibility of an increase in the incidence of this rare entity, so ovarian ectopic pregnancy should be kept in mind as a possibility. Thereby early diagnosis by high resolution transvaginal ultrasound and laparoscopy can decrease the risk of complications like rupture, secondary implantation, hemorrhagic shock and maternal mortality. PMID:26023609

  7. Management of hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mudjari, Nurike S; Samsu, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension-related maternal mortality reaches 16% when it is compared to other causes of maternal mortality such as sepsis, bleeding or abortus. Pregnant women with hypertension disorder are at increased risk for experiencing numerous complications including disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), cerebral hemorrhage, liver dysfunction and acute renal failure; while to the fetus, it may cause intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and perinatal mortality. Hypertension in pregnancy should be managed appropriately to reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality rate, i.e. by preventing women from getting the risks of increased blood pressure, preventing disease progression and preventing the development of seizure and considering termination of pregnancy in life-threatening situation for maternal and fetal health.

  8. Drugs in pregnancy. Renal disease.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J E; Maclean, D; Pattison, J M

    2001-12-01

    The management of pregnant women with renal impairment presents a major challenge to obstetricians, nephrologists, and ultimately paediatricians. As renal failure progresses there is an increase in both maternal and fetal complications. Often these women have intercurrent medical conditions and, prior to conception, are receiving a broad range of prescribed medications. A successful obstetric outcome relies upon careful pre-pregnancy counselling and planning, obsessive monitoring during pregnancy, and close liaison between different specialist teams. Experience is mounting in the management of pregnant transplant recipients, but the introduction of newer immunosuppressive agents which have great promise in prolonging graft survival present new problems for those recipients of a kidney transplant who are planning to conceive. We review drug prescription for pregnant patients with renal impairment, end-stage renal failure, or a kidney transplant.

  9. Comprehensive approach to systemic sclerosis patients during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rueda de León Aguirre, Alexandra; Ramírez Calvo, José Antonio; Rodríguez Reyna, Tatiana Sofía

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that usually affects women, with a male:female ratio of 1:4-10. It was thought that there was a prohibitive risk of fatal complications in the pregnancies of patients with SSc. It is now known that the majority of these women undergo a normal progression of pregnancy if the right time is chosen and a close obstetric care is delivered. The obstetric risk will depend on the subtype and clinical stage of the disease, and the presence and severity of the internal organ involvement during the pregnancy. The management of these pregnancies should be provided in a specialized center, with a multidisciplinary team capable of identifying and promptly treating complications. Treatment should be limited to drugs with no teratogenic potential, except when renal crises or severe cardiovascular complications develop.

  10. Complications of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bladé, Joan; Rosiñol, Laura

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma, also known as myeloma or plasma cell myeloma, is a progressive hematologic disease. Complications of multiple myeloma include renal insufficiency, hematologic complications (anemia, bone marrow failure, bleeding disorders), infections, bone complications (pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hyercalcemia), and neurologic complications (spinal cord and nerve root compression, intracranial plasmacytomas, leptomeningeal involvement, among others). This article reviews these various complications connected to multiple myeloma, examining their various causes and possible treatment.

  11. Postural balance and the risk of falling during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Bulent; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Inanir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological process and many changes occur in a woman's body during pregnancy. These changes occur in all systems to varying degrees, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems. The hormonal, anatomical, and physiological changes occurring during pregnancy result in weight gain, decreased abdominal muscle strength and neuromuscular control, increased ligamentous laxity, and spinal lordosis. These alterations shift the centre of gravity of the body, altering the postural balance and increasing the risk of falls. Falls during pregnancy can cause maternal and foetal complications, such as maternal bone fractures, head injuries, internal haemorrhage, abruption placenta, rupture of the uterus and membranes, and occasionally maternal death or intrauterine foetal demise. Preventative strategies, such as physical exercise and the use of maternity support belts, can increase postural stability and reduce the risk of falls during pregnancy. This article reviews studies that have investigated changes in postural balance and risk of falling during pregnancy.

  12. Primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma and tracheal tumors during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abike, Faruk; Bingol, Banu; Temizkan, Osman; Dunder, Ilkkan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami; Cetin, Guven; Gundogdu, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Cancer complicates approximately 0.1% of all pregnancies. Primary tracheal carcinoma is one of very rarely seen tumors and the rate of its being seen makes up approximately % 0.2 of all tumors of respiratory tract. The patient, 28 years old, who has 28-weeks-pregnant, was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma. Patient was made operation as thoracotomy and tracheal tumor was removed at the 28th week of pregnancy. Patient was delivered with sectio abdominale at the 39th week of pregnancy. Primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma is very rarely seen tumors and it is the first tracheal ACC with pregnancy case in literature to have been detected and surgically treated during pregnancy. We discussed primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma and tracheal tumors during pregnancy with literature. PMID:22066040

  13. Case Report of Ectopic Ovarian Pregnancy Following Fresh Embryo Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Samara, Nivin; Bentov, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ovarian pregnancy is a rare and challenging clinical phenomenon. Recent studies have identified assisted reproductive treatments and infertility as risk factors. However, neither a definite mechanism nor clear risk factors were identified and therefore prevention strategies are yet unavailable. CLINICAL CASE In this article, we present a case of ovarian pregnancy occurring following in vitro fertilization treatment and a fresh embryo transfer. The couple was diagnosed with unexplained infertility and no identifiable risk factors for extrauterine pregnancy. The diagnosis of ovarian pregnancy was made during explorative laparoscopy performed due to suspected extrauterine pregnancy. The patient had normal intra- and postoperative course. CONCLUSION Ovarian pregnancy is an infrequent and a challenging diagnosis. Yet, late diagnosis and lack of appropriate intervention may have long-term implications. Several mechanisms and risk factors are proposed, and their acknowledgment may improve early diagnosis and prevention of complications. PMID:27867306

  14. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman.

  15. Pregnancy management of women with kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Dávid Ágoston; Szabó, László; Jenei, Katalin; Fedor, Roland; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Kabai, Krisztina; Záhonyi, Anita; Asztalos, László; Nemes, Balázs

    2015-12-01

    Women with renal disease, besides many dysfunctions, face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy due to uremia and changes of the hormonal functions. After renal transplantation, sexual dysfunction improves, providing the possibility of successful pregnancy for women of childbearing age. However, kidney transplanted patients are high-risk pregnant patients with increased maternal and fetal risks, and the graft also may be compromised during pregnancy; most studies report on several successive deliveries due to multidisciplinary team management. In clinical practice, the graft is rarely affected during the period of gestation. Fetal development disorders are also rare although preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation are common. For now, several studies and clinical investigations proved that, under multidisciplinary control, kidney transplanted female patients are also possible to have safe pregnancy and successful delivery. There are conflicting data in the literature about the prevention of complications and the timing of pregnancy. Herein, we would like to present some experience of our centre. A total of 847 kidney transplantations have been performed between June 1993 and December 2013 with 163 childbearing aged females (18-45 years) in our center. We report on three kidney transplanted patients who have given birth to healthy newborns. In our practice, severe complications have not been observed.

  16. Thyroid hormone dysfunction during pregnancy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Aynadis; Terefe, Betelihem; Abebe, Molla; Biadgo, Belete

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunctions such as hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and thyroid nodules may develop during pregnancy leading to abortion, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Epidemiological data have shown the significant role of maternal thyroid hormone in fetal neurologic development and maternal health. It has been suggested that the deleterious effects of thyroid dysfunction can also extend beyond pregnancy and delivery to affect neuro-intellectual development in the early life of the child. Pregnancy poses an important challenge to the maternal thyroid gland as hormone requirements are increased during gestation as a result of an increase in thyroid- binding globulin, the stimulatory effect of HCG on TSH receptors, and increased peripheral thyroid hormone requirements. Maternal thyroid dysfunction is associated with increased risk for early abortion, preterm delivery, neonatal morbidity and other obstetrical complications. Early diagnosis for thyroid dysfunction of pregnant women and treatment of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy is important and cost effective to avoid both fetal and maternal complications secondary to thyroid dysfunction. Therefore the aim of this review was to assess the thyroid function changes occurring during pregnancy, the different disorders with their maternal and fetal implications, the laboratory diagnosis and the best ways of management of these conditions. PMID:27981252

  17. Pregnancy management of women with kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Dávid ágoston; Szabó, László; Jenei, Katalin; Fedor, Roland; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Kabai, Krisztina; Záhonyi, Anita; Asztalos, László; Nemes, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease, besides many dysfunctions, face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy due to uremia and changes of the hormonal functions. After renal transplantation, sexual dysfunction improves, providing the possibility of successful pregnancy for women of childbearing age. However, kidney transplanted patients are high-risk pregnant patients with increased maternal and fetal risks, and the graft also may be compromised during pregnancy; most studies report on several successive deliveries due to multidisciplinary team management. In clinical practice, the graft is rarely affected during the period of gestation. Fetal development disorders are also rare although preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation are common. For now, several studies and clinical investigations proved that, under multidisciplinary control, kidney transplanted female patients are also possible to have safe pregnancy and successful delivery. There are conflicting data in the literature about the prevention of complications and the timing of pregnancy. Herein, we would like to present some experience of our centre. A total of 847 kidney transplantations have been performed between June 1993 and December 2013 with 163 childbearing aged females (18–45 years) in our center. We report on three kidney transplanted patients who have given birth to healthy newborns. In our practice, severe complications have not been observed. PMID:26767122

  18. Update on the Management of Thyroid Disease during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy can result in serious complications for both the mother and infant; however, these complications can be prevented by optimal treatment of maternal overt thyroid dysfunction. Although several studies have demonstrated that maternal subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with obstetric complications and neurocognitive impairments in offspring, there is limited evidence that levothyroxine treatment can improve these complications. Therefore, most professional societies do not recommend universal screening for thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy, and instead recommend a case-finding approach in which only high-risk women are tested. However, recent studies have estimated that targeted thyroid function testing misses approximately 30% to 55% of hypothyroidism cases in pregnant women, and some associations and researchers have recommended universal screening of pregnant women to facilitate the early detection and treatment of overt hypothyroidism. This review summarizes recent data on thyroid function test changes, thyroid functional disorder management, and thyroid screening during pregnancy. PMID:27546871

  19. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  20. Antibiotics and Pregnancy: What's Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take antibiotics during pregnancy? Answers from Roger W. Harms, M. ... 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/antibiotics-and-pregnancy/ ...