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Sample records for lithic assemblage excavated

  1. The Lithic Assemblages of Xiaochangliang, Nihewan Basin: Implications for Early Pleistocene Hominin Behaviour in North China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Xia; Hou, Ya-Mei; Yue, Jian-Ping; Petraglia, Michael D; Deng, Cheng-Long; Zhu, Ri-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Xiaochangliang (XCL), located in the Nihewan Basin of North China, is a key archaeological locality for understanding the behavioural evolution of early humans. XCL dates to ca. 1.36 Ma, making it one of the earliest sites in Northeast Asia. Although XCL represents the first excavation of an Early Pleistocene site in the Nihewan Basin, identified and excavated in the 1970's, the lithic assemblages have never been published in full detail. Here we describe the lithic assemblages from XCL, providing information on stone tool reduction techniques and the influence of raw materials on artefact manufacture. The XCL hominins used both bipolar and freehand reduction techniques to manufacture small flakes, some of which show retouch. Bipolar reduction methods at XCL were used more frequently than previously recognized. Comparison of XCL with other Early Pleistocene sites in the Nihewan Basin indicates the variable use of bipolar and freehand reduction methods, thereby indicating a flexible approach in the utilization of raw materials. The stone tools from XCL and the Nihewan sites are classifiable as Mode I lithic assemblages, readily distinguished from bifacial industries manufactured by hominins in Eastern Asia by ca. 800 ka. PMID:27205881

  2. The Lithic Assemblages of Xiaochangliang, Nihewan Basin: Implications for Early Pleistocene Hominin Behaviour in North China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi-Xia; Hou, Ya-Mei; Yue, Jian-Ping; Petraglia, Michael D.; Deng, Cheng-Long; Zhu, Ri-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Xiaochangliang (XCL), located in the Nihewan Basin of North China, is a key archaeological locality for understanding the behavioural evolution of early humans. XCL dates to ca. 1.36 Ma, making it one of the earliest sites in Northeast Asia. Although XCL represents the first excavation of an Early Pleistocene site in the Nihewan Basin, identified and excavated in the 1970’s, the lithic assemblages have never been published in full detail. Here we describe the lithic assemblages from XCL, providing information on stone tool reduction techniques and the influence of raw materials on artefact manufacture. The XCL hominins used both bipolar and freehand reduction techniques to manufacture small flakes, some of which show retouch. Bipolar reduction methods at XCL were used more frequently than previously recognized. Comparison of XCL with other Early Pleistocene sites in the Nihewan Basin indicates the variable use of bipolar and freehand reduction methods, thereby indicating a flexible approach in the utilization of raw materials. The stone tools from XCL and the Nihewan sites are classifiable as Mode I lithic assemblages, readily distinguished from bifacial industries manufactured by hominins in Eastern Asia by ca. 800 ka. PMID:27205881

  3. The Early Stone Age lithic assemblages of Gadeb (Ethiopia) and the Developed Oldowan/early Acheulean in East Africa.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Ignacio

    2011-06-01

    The Early Stone Age sites of Gadeb (Ethiopian South-East Plateau) were excavated under the direction of Desmond Clark in the 1970s. Dated to between 1.45 and 0.7 Ma, Gadeb proved that humans had already occupied high altitude areas in the Lower Pleistocene. Despite the importance of the Gadeb sites, their lithic assemblages were never published in detail, and no review of the stone tools has ever been reported since the original 1970s study. This paper updates the information available on Gadeb by presenting a systematic review of the lithic technology of several assemblages. The objectives are to evaluate the technological skills of Gadeb knappers and to contextualize them into the current discussion of the origins of the Acheulean and its possible coexistence with the so-called Developed Oldowan in East Africa.

  4. Subsurface geology, ancient hydrothermal systems and crater excavation processes beneath Lake Rotomahana: Evidence from lithic clasts of the 1886 AD Rotomahana Pyroclastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittari, A.; Briggs, R. M.; Bowyer, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    The craters associated with the 1886 AD phreatomagmatic Rotomahana eruption, Okataina Volcanic Centre, New Zealand, and the near-vent geology are now hidden beneath Lake Rotomahana and its post-eruptive sediment fill. Lithic clasts from the near-vent lithic lapilli ash deposits of the Rotomahana Pyroclastics are used in this study to trace geological and geothermal conditions before the eruption, as well as vent excavation dynamics. Near-vent deposit characteristics were described in the field, representative lithic clasts were documented petrographically, and unaltered clasts were analysed for major and trace element compositions. The majority of the lithic clasts were rhyolites with subordinate ignimbrites and hydrothermally altered clasts, and trace siltstone and silicified clasts. The rhyolites were classified into four petrographic groups according to phenocryst content and assemblage and were more diverse with respect to geochemical compositions. Most of the rhyolite lithics in the Rotomahana Pyroclastics did not match the rhyolite domes exposed subaerially around the lake, but did have affinities with the pre-Matahina caldera Wairua Rhyolite, and potentially other older non-exposed domes. Ignimbrites most likely correlated either to the Matahina ignimbrite or older non-exposed units. Hydrothermally altered rhyolite and ignimbrite lithic clasts are common and suggest that there has been a long-lived hydrothermal system in this sector, possibly dating back to early activity of the Okataina Volcanic Centre. The diversity in lithic types indicate a spatial variation in country rock lithology and strength, which probably contributed to the vent position and morphology along the Rotomahana fissure.

  5. Insights into early lithic technologies from ethnography.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Brian

    2015-11-19

    Oldowan lithic assemblages are often portrayed as a product of the need to obtain sharp flakes for cutting into animal carcases. However, ethnographic and experimental research indicates that the optimal way to produce flakes for such butchering purposes is via bipolar reduction of small cryptocrystalline pebbles rather than from larger crystalline cores resembling choppers. Ethnographic observations of stone tool-using hunter-gatherers in environments comparable with early hominins indicate that most stone tools (particularly chopper forms and flake tools) were used for making simple shaft tools including spears, digging sticks and throwing sticks. These tools bear strong resemblances to Oldowan stone tools. Bipolar reduction for butchering probably preceded chopper-like core reduction and provides a key link between primate nut-cracking technologies and the emergence of more sophisticated lithic technologies leading to the Oldowan.

  6. Variation in Lithic Technological Strategies among the Neanderthals of Gibraltar

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Ceri; Clarkson, Christopher; Bernal, Marco Antonio; Boivin, Nicole; Finlayson, Clive; Finlayson, Geraldine; Fa, Darren; Pacheco, Francisco Giles; Petraglia, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The evidence for Neanderthal lithic technology is reviewed and summarized for four caves on The Rock of Gibraltar: Vanguard, Beefsteak, Ibex and Gorham’s. Some of the observed patterns in technology are statistically tested including raw material selection, platform preparation, and the use of formal and expedient technological schemas. The main parameters of technological variation are examined through detailed analysis of the Gibraltar cores and comparison with samples from the classic Mousterian sites of Le Moustier and Tabun C. The Gibraltar Mousterian, including the youngest assemblage from Layer IV of Gorham’s Cave, spans the typical Middle Palaeolithic range of variation from radial Levallois to unidirectional and multi-platform flaking schemas, with characteristic emphasis on the former. A diachronic pattern of change in the Gorham’s Cave sequence is documented, with the younger assemblages utilising more localized raw material and less formal flaking procedures. We attribute this change to a reduction in residential mobility as the climate deteriorated during Marine Isotope Stage 3 and the Neanderthal population contracted into a refugium. PMID:23762312

  7. Lithic raw material variability in the Central Duck River Basin: Reflections of Middle and Late Archaic organizational strategies: Report of Investigations No. 46

    SciTech Connect

    Amick, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose was to develop a model for understanding prehistoric chipped-stone distribution in the central Duck River Basin region located in Middle Tennessee. The model design consists of theoretical and empirical observation which are integrated to form an interpretive framework. Seven lithic assemblages ranging from middle to late Archaic periods (ca. 7000 to 3000 years B.P.) in age were analyzed to assess the model. The first stage of model-building was the development of a theoretical foundation for approaching the problem. A cultural adaptation paradigm is the foundation cornerstone. Lithic technology is viewed as an integral part of prehistoric cultural adaptation and lithic remains are regarded as critical indicators of behavioral variability. Environmental variables are stressed in interpreting lithic debris patterning across the landscape. The second stage of model-building involved the construction of a set of observations on lithic resource types and their distributions in the study area. A regional lithic resource survey was implemented. Application of the model to archaeological data was the last stage of model-building. Seven Middle-Late Archaic assemblages are compared. Results of the interassemblage analysis suggest that Late Archaic settlement systems were more logisically organized and technological systems were less expediently organized than those of Middle Archaic groups. Differences between Middle and Late Archaic adaptations are viewed as response to regional environmental and demographic trends. These trends are documented and their implications for subsistence, settlement, and social organization are considered.

  8. Matuyama-age lithic tools from the Sima del Elefante site, Atapuerca (northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Parés, Josep M; Pérez-González, Alfredo; Rosas, Antonio; Benito, A; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Carbonell, E; Huguet, R

    2006-02-01

    Paleomagnetic results obtained from the sedimentary fill at the Sima del Elefante site in Atapuerca, Spain, reveal a geomagnetic reversal, interpreted as the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary (0.78 Ma). The uppermost lithostratigraphic units (E17 through E19), which contain Mode II and III archaeological assemblages, display normal polarity magnetization, whereas the six lowermost units (E9 through E16) yield negative latitudinal virtual geomagnetic pole positions. Units E9 through E13, all of which display reverse magnetic polarity, contain Mode I (Oldowan) lithic tools, testifying to the presence of humans in the early Pleistocene (0.78-1.77 Ma). PMID:16249015

  9. Lithic fragments, glasses and chondrules from Luna 16 fines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, K.; Prinz, M.; Green, J. A.; Kurat, G.

    1972-01-01

    Electron probe determination of the bulk compositions of igneous and microbreccia lithic fragments, glasses and chondrules from Luna 16 fines and of the compositions of minerals in basaltic lithic fragments. It is found that the Luna 16 fines have a composition more similar to that of Apollo 11 than to those of Apollo 12 and 14 materials. The compositions of lithic fragments, glasses and chondrules from Luna 16 core tube layers A and D are similar. The glasses are compositional analogs of the lithic fragments and are produced largely from igneous rocks. The Luna 16 chondrules have an anorthositic-noritic-troctolitic composition. Evidence for the presence of ferric iron and water-bearing minerals in the Luna 16 material is not obtained. The occurrence of a great variety of igneous rocks in the material confirms an earlier conclusion that large-scale melting or partial melting to a considerable depth and an extensive igneous differentiation must have occurred on the moon.

  10. Refining Our Understanding of Howiesons Poort Lithic Technology: The Evidence from Grey Rocky Layer in Sibudu Cave (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa)

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    The detailed technological analysis of the youngest Howiesons Poort occupation in Sibudu Cave, layer Grey Rocky, has shown the importance of blade production (with different knapping methods involved), but also of flaking methods in coarse grained rock types. Moreover, new strategies of bifacial production and microlithism were important. Grey Rocky lithic technology shows a really versatile example of reduction strategies that were highly influenced by the characteristics of the rock types. This lithic assemblage is another example of the technological variability linked to the Howiesons Poort technocomplex. The reasons for this variability are still difficult to elucidate. Discrepancies between sites might be for different reasons: diachronic variations, functional variations, organizational variations or maybe different regional variations within what has been recognized traditionally and typologically as Howiesons Poort. The technological comparison of the Grey Rocky assemblage with assemblages from other Howiesons Poort sites demonstrates that there are common technological trends during the late Pleistocene, but they still need to be properly circumscribed chronologically. On the one hand, Howiesons Poort characteristics such as the bifacial production in quartz are reminiscent of production in some Still Bay or pre-Still Bay industries and the flake production or the prismatic blade production described here could be a point in common with pre-Still Bay and post-Howiesons Poort industries. On the other hand, the detailed analysis of the Grey Rocky lithics reinforces the particular character of this Howiesons Poort technocomplex, yet it also shows clear technological links with other Middle Stone Age assemblages. PMID:26633008

  11. Refining Our Understanding of Howiesons Poort Lithic Technology: The Evidence from Grey Rocky Layer in Sibudu Cave (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa).

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    The detailed technological analysis of the youngest Howiesons Poort occupation in Sibudu Cave, layer Grey Rocky, has shown the importance of blade production (with different knapping methods involved), but also of flaking methods in coarse grained rock types. Moreover, new strategies of bifacial production and microlithism were important. Grey Rocky lithic technology shows a really versatile example of reduction strategies that were highly influenced by the characteristics of the rock types. This lithic assemblage is another example of the technological variability linked to the Howiesons Poort technocomplex. The reasons for this variability are still difficult to elucidate. Discrepancies between sites might be for different reasons: diachronic variations, functional variations, organizational variations or maybe different regional variations within what has been recognized traditionally and typologically as Howiesons Poort. The technological comparison of the Grey Rocky assemblage with assemblages from other Howiesons Poort sites demonstrates that there are common technological trends during the late Pleistocene, but they still need to be properly circumscribed chronologically. On the one hand, Howiesons Poort characteristics such as the bifacial production in quartz are reminiscent of production in some Still Bay or pre-Still Bay industries and the flake production or the prismatic blade production described here could be a point in common with pre-Still Bay and post-Howiesons Poort industries. On the other hand, the detailed analysis of the Grey Rocky lithics reinforces the particular character of this Howiesons Poort technocomplex, yet it also shows clear technological links with other Middle Stone Age assemblages. PMID:26633008

  12. The TD6 level lithic industry from Gran Dolina, Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain): production and use.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, E; García-Antón, M D; Mallol, C; Mosquera, M; Ollé, A; Rodríguez, X P; Sahnouni, M; Sala, R; Vergès, J M

    1999-01-01

    Technological analysis of lithic artefacts recovered at the Aurora stratum of Atapuerca-TD6 shows that this Lower Pleistocene assemblage is similar to Mode I Technology (=Oldowan tradition) documented at many African sites. Diachronic comparison of the different levels of Gran Dolina allows us to conclude that this particular form of early European technology lacks the production of big flakes to manufacture large tools such as bifaces and cleavers. Rather, it is characterized by the presence of small artefacts, including flakes, denticulates, notches, and side-scrapers, many of which bear use-wear traces of butchery and woodworking. The dominant production technique is orthogonal, which is also reflected in the core recovered at the slightly older level of TD4. The raw materials also found in the Middle Pleistocene occupations at Atapuerca, though with significant proportion differences, have a local origin and include varieties of flint, quartzite and sandstone as well as limestone and quartz. TD6 small artefacts were made from most of these, although the retouched pieces seem to have been preferentially made of the best quality flint, i.e., Cretaceous flint, pointing to the existence of differential use of lithic material, and therefore, some degree of planned knapping behaviour. Most of the "chaînes opératoires" or reduction sequences took place inside the cave, although some artefacts, elaborated on Cretaceous flint, seem to have been retouched off site, possibly near the supply sources.

  13. Crane and Excavator Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on crane and excavator operation is designed to enable the crane and excavator operator to perform his/her duties more proficiently. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI students, a course introduction, and a study guide…

  14. Thermomechanical milling of accessory lithics in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Michelle E.; Russell, James K.; Porritt, Lucy A.

    2013-09-01

    Accessory lithic clasts recovered from pyroclastic deposits commonly result from the failure of conduit wall rocks, and represent an underutilized resource for constraining conduit processes during explosive volcanic eruptions. The morphological features of lithic clasts provide distinctive 'textural fingerprints' of processes that have reshaped them during transport in the conduit. Here, we present the first study focused on accessory lithic clast morphology and show how the shapes and surfaces of these accessory pyroclasts can inform on conduit processes. We use two main types of accessory lithic clasts from pyroclastic fallout deposits of the 2360 B.P. subplinian eruption of Mount Meager, British Columbia, as a case study: (i) rough and subangular dacite clasts, and (ii) variably rounded and smoothed monzogranite clasts. The quantitative morphological data collected on these lithics include: mass, volume, density, 2-D image analysis of convexity (C), and 3-D laser scans for sphericity (Ψ) and smoothness (S). Shaping and comminution (i.e. milling) of clasts within the conduit are ascribed to three processes: (1) disruptive fragmentation due to high-energy impacts between clasts or between clasts and conduit walls, (2) ash-blasting of clasts suspended within the volcanic flux, and (3) thermal effects. We use a simplified conduit eruption model to predict ash-blasting velocities and lithic residence times as a function of clast size and source depth, thereby constraining the lithic milling processes. The extent of shape and surface modification (i.e. rounding and honing) is directly proportional to clast residence times within the conduit prior to evacuation. We postulate that the shallow-seated dacite clasts remain subangular and rough due to short (<2 min) residence times, whereas monzogranite clasts are much more rounded and smoothed due to deeper source depths and consequently longer residence times (up to ˜1 h). Larger monzogranite clasts are smoother than

  15. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  16. Techno-Cultural Characterization of the MIS 5 (c. 105 – 90 Ka) Lithic Industries at Blombos Cave, Southern Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Douze, Katja; Wurz, Sarah; Henshilwood, Christopher Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Blombos Cave is well known as an important site for understanding the evolution of symbolically mediated behaviours among Homo sapiens during the Middle Stone Age, and during the Still Bay in particular. The lower part of the archaeological sequence (M3 phase) contains 12 layers dating to MIS 5 with ages ranging from 105 to 90 ka ago (MIS 5c to 5b) that provide new perspectives on the technological behaviour of these early humans. The new data obtained from our extensive technological analysis of the lithic material enriches our currently limited knowledge of this time period in the Cape region. By comparing our results with previously described lithic assemblages from sites south of the Orange River, we draw new insights on the extent of the techno-cultural ties between these sites and the M3 phase at Blombos Cave and highlight the importance of this phase within the Middle Stone Age cultural stratigraphy. PMID:26580219

  17. Techno-Cultural Characterization of the MIS 5 (c. 105 - 90 Ka) Lithic Industries at Blombos Cave, Southern Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Douze, Katja; Wurz, Sarah; Henshilwood, Christopher Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Blombos Cave is well known as an important site for understanding the evolution of symbolically mediated behaviours among Homo sapiens during the Middle Stone Age, and during the Still Bay in particular. The lower part of the archaeological sequence (M3 phase) contains 12 layers dating to MIS 5 with ages ranging from 105 to 90 ka ago (MIS 5c to 5b) that provide new perspectives on the technological behaviour of these early humans. The new data obtained from our extensive technological analysis of the lithic material enriches our currently limited knowledge of this time period in the Cape region. By comparing our results with previously described lithic assemblages from sites south of the Orange River, we draw new insights on the extent of the techno-cultural ties between these sites and the M3 phase at Blombos Cave and highlight the importance of this phase within the Middle Stone Age cultural stratigraphy. PMID:26580219

  18. Spatial and chronological patterns of the lithics of hearth 1 at the Gravettian site Krems-Wachtberg

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roswitha; Ziehaus, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    A spatial and micro-stratigraphic interpretation of the Gravettian open-air site Krems-Wachtberg in Lower Austria uses analysis of the lithic artefacts of an area of the excavations. The results are based on conclusive aspects of the artefact morphology and raw material attribution. Investigations focus on the acquisition of the spatial structure of living floor AH (archaeological horizon) 4.4 with a well-preserved hearth. Different utilization phases of hearth 1 with their relationships to the surrounding areas are discussed and a comparison of the in situ AH 4.4 and the post-occupational deposition of AH 4.11 presented. The examination of the artefact typology supports an attribution to the Early Gravettian of Central Europe (Pavlovian, 30–24 ka BP). PMID:25642117

  19. Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liles, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition is a new competition that needs graphics, logos, rules, as well as an arena. Although this is the first year of the competition, the competition is modeled after an existing competition, the Centennial Lunar Excavator Challenge. This competition however is aimed at college students. This makes the challenge identifying key aspects of the original competition and modeling them to fit into an easier task, and creating exciting advertisement that helps encourage participation. By using a youth focus group, young insight, as well as guiding advice from experts in the field, hopefully an arena can be designed and built, rules can be molded and created to fit, and alluring graphics can be printed to bring about a successful first year of the Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition.

  20. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, João; Banks, William E; d'Errico, Francesco; Gioia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy), assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site's 1963-66 excavations shows that (a) Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b) even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c) the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex's start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence.

  1. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, João; Banks, William E; d'Errico, Francesco; Gioia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy), assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site's 1963-66 excavations shows that (a) Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b) even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c) the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex's start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence. PMID:26154139

  2. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo

    PubMed Central

    Zilhão, João; Banks, William E.; d’Errico, Francesco; Gioia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy), assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site’s 1963–66 excavations shows that (a) Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b) even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c) the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex’s start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence. PMID:26154139

  3. Overview and new results from large-scale excavations in Schöningen.

    PubMed

    Serangeli, Jordi; Böhner, Utz; Van Kolfschoten, Thijs; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    Archaeological finds including spears, other wooden artifacts, lithic artifacts, and bones with impact scars and cut marks document the repeated presence of hominins on the shoreline of an approximately 300,000 year old lake near Schöningen in Northern Germany. Continuing excavations have uncovered in the locality "Schöningen" at least 20 sites dating to the late Lower Paleolithic. Schöningen is therefore not only a singular archaeological site with remarkable finds; it is a vast locality that preserves a multifaceted archaeological landscape with numerous sites. Ongoing excavations have exposed several large surfaces with organic materials dating to MIS 9. In particular, recent excavations have uncovered new sections belonging to the original Spear Horizon from Schöningen 13 II-4 (the Horse Butchery Site). Current research in Schöningen places the exceptional artifacts within a spatial and environmental context, and provides a wealth of new information on the subsistence strategies and settlement dynamics of the inhabitants of these short-term lakeside occupations. Schöningen, with an overall excavated area of 9400 m(2), is one of the largest excavated archaeological localities from MIS 9. Here we present a summary of all the sites, as well as the most relevant excavated areas since 2008 (excavations Tübingen/NLD).

  4. Overview and new results from large-scale excavations in Schöningen.

    PubMed

    Serangeli, Jordi; Böhner, Utz; Van Kolfschoten, Thijs; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    Archaeological finds including spears, other wooden artifacts, lithic artifacts, and bones with impact scars and cut marks document the repeated presence of hominins on the shoreline of an approximately 300,000 year old lake near Schöningen in Northern Germany. Continuing excavations have uncovered in the locality "Schöningen" at least 20 sites dating to the late Lower Paleolithic. Schöningen is therefore not only a singular archaeological site with remarkable finds; it is a vast locality that preserves a multifaceted archaeological landscape with numerous sites. Ongoing excavations have exposed several large surfaces with organic materials dating to MIS 9. In particular, recent excavations have uncovered new sections belonging to the original Spear Horizon from Schöningen 13 II-4 (the Horse Butchery Site). Current research in Schöningen places the exceptional artifacts within a spatial and environmental context, and provides a wealth of new information on the subsistence strategies and settlement dynamics of the inhabitants of these short-term lakeside occupations. Schöningen, with an overall excavated area of 9400 m(2), is one of the largest excavated archaeological localities from MIS 9. Here we present a summary of all the sites, as well as the most relevant excavated areas since 2008 (excavations Tübingen/NLD). PMID:26596727

  5. Petrology of some lithic fragments from Luna 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1973-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies were made of polished thin sections of part of a 30-mg sample of 250-500 ??m lunar soil returned by Luna 20 from a point between Mare Fecunditatis and Mare Crisium. Very fine-grained lithic (crystalline) rock fragments, composing about one fifth of the total sample, have mineralogical compositions equivalent to various types of gabbro, anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite and troctolite, with minor basalt. The textures now observed in these fragments are in large part metamorphic. Twentyseven electron microprobe analyses of minerals from these fragments are presented, including olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, spinel, nickel-iron and a Zr-Ti-REE mineral possibly similar to 'phase B' of Lovering and Wark (1971). Analyses of seven melt inclusions and twenty-eight defocused beam analyses of lithic fragments are also given. Some of the fragments contain 'gas' inclusions which, along with the fine grain size, are believed to indicate final crystallization under low pressure near surface conditions. The almost complete absence of granophyric material in this sample raises the question of whether or not there are at least two distinct magmas for the plagioclase-rich terrae rocks from which this soil sample was derived in part. ?? 1973.

  6. Petrology of some lithic fragments from Luna 20.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies were made of polished thin sections of part of a 30-mg sample of 250- to 500-micron lunar soil returned by Luna 20 from a point between Mare Fecunditatis and Mare Crisium. Very fine-grained lithic (crystalline) rock fragments, composing about one-fifth of the total sample, have mineralogical compositions equivalent to various types of gabbro, anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite, and troctolite, with minor basalt. The textures now observed in these fragments are in large part metamorphic. Twenty-seven electron microprobe analyses of minerals from these fragments are presented, including olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, spinel, nickel-iron, and a Zr-Ti-REE mineral possibly similar to 'phase B' of Lovering and Wark (1971). Analyses of seven melt inclusions and 28 defocused beam analyses of lithic fragments are also given. Some of the fragments contain 'gas' inclusions which, along with the fine grain size, are believed to indicate final crystallization under low pressure near surface conditions.

  7. Excavator Design Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pholsiri, Chalongrath; English, James; Seberino, Charles; Lim, Yi-Je

    2010-01-01

    The Excavator Design Validation tool verifies excavator designs by automatically generating control systems and modeling their performance in an accurate simulation of their expected environment. Part of this software design includes interfacing with human operations that can be included in simulation-based studies and validation. This is essential for assessing productivity, versatility, and reliability. This software combines automatic control system generation from CAD (computer-aided design) models, rapid validation of complex mechanism designs, and detailed models of the environment including soil, dust, temperature, remote supervision, and communication latency to create a system of high value. Unique algorithms have been created for controlling and simulating complex robotic mechanisms automatically from just a CAD description. These algorithms are implemented as a commercial cross-platform C++ software toolkit that is configurable using the Extensible Markup Language (XML). The algorithms work with virtually any mobile robotic mechanisms using module descriptions that adhere to the XML standard. In addition, high-fidelity, real-time physics-based simulation algorithms have also been developed that include models of internal forces and the forces produced when a mechanism interacts with the outside world. This capability is combined with an innovative organization for simulation algorithms, new regolith simulation methods, and a unique control and study architecture to make powerful tools with the potential to transform the way NASA verifies and compares excavator designs. Energid's Actin software has been leveraged for this design validation. The architecture includes parametric and Monte Carlo studies tailored for validation of excavator designs and their control by remote human operators. It also includes the ability to interface with third-party software and human-input devices. Two types of simulation models have been adapted: high-fidelity discrete

  8. Variability in Early Ahmarian lithic technology and its implications for the model of a Levantine origin of the Protoaurignacian.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Seiji; Omori, Takayuki; Nishiaki, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    This paper re-examines lithic technological variability of the Early Ahmarian, one of the early Upper Palaeolithic cultural entities in the Levant, which has often been regarded as a precursor of the Protoaurignacian (the early Upper Palaeolithic in Europe) in arguments for the occurrence of a cultural spread in association with the dispersal of Homo sapiens from the Levant to Europe. Using quantitative data on several lithic techno-typological attributes, we demonstrate that there is a significant degree of variability in the Early Ahmarian between the northern and southern Levant, as previously pointed out by several researchers. In addition, we suggest that the technology similar to the southern Early Ahmarian also existed in the northern Levant, i.e., the Ksar Akil Phase 4 group (the KA 4 group), by introducing new Upper Palaeolithic assemblages from Wadi Kharar 16R, inland Syria. We then review currently available stratigraphic records and radiocarbon dates (including a new date from Wadi Kharar 16R), with special attention to their methodological background. As a result, we propose alternative chronological scenarios, including one that postulates that the southern Early Ahmarian and the KA 4 group appeared later than the northern Early Ahmarian with little or no overlap. On the basis of the alternative scenarios of chronological/geographical patterns of the Early Ahmarian variability, we propose four possible relationships between the Protoaurignacian and the Early Ahmarian, including a new scenario that the appearance of the Protoaurignacian preceded those of similar technological entities in the Levant, i.e., the southern Early Ahmarian and the KA 4 group. If the last hypothesis is substantiated, it requires us to reconsider the model of a Levantine origin of the Protoaurignacian and its palaeoanthropological implications.

  9. Shoring pumping station excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.B.; Reardon, D.J. )

    1991-11-01

    The city of San Mateo, Calif., operates three 12- to 50-year old wastewater pumping stations on a 24-m (80-ft) wide lot located in a residential area near San Francisco Bay. Because the aging stations have difficulty pumping peak 2.19-m{sup 3}/s (50-mgd) wet-weather flows and have structural and maintenance problems, a new 2.62-m{sup 3}/s (60-mgd) station was proposed - the Dale Avenue Pumping Station - to replace the existing ones. To prevent potential damage to adjacent homes, the new station was originally conceived as a circular caisson type; however, a geotechnical investigation recommended against this type of structure because the stiff soils could make sinking the structure difficult. This prompted an investigation of possible shoring methods for the proposed structure. Several shoring systems were investigated, including steel sheeting, soldier beams and lagging, tieback systems, open excavation, and others; however, each had disadvantages that prevented its use. Because these conventional techniques were unacceptable, attention was turned to using deep soil mixing (DSM) to create a diaphragm wall around the area to be excavated before constructing the pumping station. Although this method has been used extensively in Japan since 1983, the Dale Avenue Pumping Station would be the technology's first US application. The technology's anticipated advantages were its impermeability, its fast and efficient installation that did not require tiebacks under existing homes, its adaptability to subsurface conditions ranging from soft ground to stiff clay to gravels, and its lack of pile-driving requirements that would cause high vibration levels during installation.

  10. Electron Microprobe Analyses of Lithic Fragments and Their Minerals from Luna 20 Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, G. H.; Hlava, P. F.; Green, J. A.; Moore, R. B.; Moreland, G.; Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.; Nehru, C. E.; Bunch, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The bulk analyses (determined with the broad beam electron microprobe technique) of lithic fragments are given in weight percentages and are arranged according to the rock classification. Within each rock group the analyses are arranged in order of increasing FeO content. Thin section and lithic fragment numbers are given at the top of each column of analysis and correspond to the numbers recorded on photo mosaics on file in the Institute of Meteoritics. CIPW molecular norms are given for each analysis. Electron microprobe mineral analyses (given in oxide weight percentages), structural formulae and molecular end member values are presented for plagioclase, olivine, pyroxene and K-feldspar. The minerals are selected mostly from lithic fragments that were also analyzed for bulk composition. Within each mineral group the analyses are presented according to the section number and lithic fragment number. Within each lithic fragment the mineral analyses are arranged as follows: Plagioclase in order of increasing CaO; olivine and pyroexene in order of increasing FeO; and K-feldspar in order of increasing K2O. The mineral grains are identified at the top of each column of analysis by grain number and lithic fragment number.

  11. Percussive Excavation of Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested using a percussive motion could improve the efficiency of excavation by up to 90%. If this is proven to be true it would be very beneficial to excavation projects on the Moon and Mars. The purpose of this study is to design, build and test a percussive tool which could dig a trench and then compare this data against that of a non-percussive tool of the same shape and size. The results of this test thus far have been inconclusive due to malfunctions in the testbed and percussive bucket; however, experimental results from small scale experiments confirm this higher efficiency and support further testing.

  12. Remote Excavation System test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, S.; Hyde, R.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Office of Technology Development (OTD) established the Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) to integrate robotic development activities on a national basis; provide needs-oriented, timely, and economical robotics technology to support environmental and waste operations activities at Department of Energy (DOE) sites; and provide the focus and direction for the near term (less than five years) and guidance for the tong-term (five to twenty years) research and development efforts for site-specific problems. The RTDP consists of several programs including the Buried Waste Robotics Program (BWRP), which addresses remote buried waste applications. The Remote Excavation System (RES) was developed under the RTDP to provide a safer method of excavating hazardous materials for both the DOE and the Department of Defense (DOD). The excavator, initially developed by the DOD as a manually-operated small excavator, has been modified for teleoperation with joint funding from the BWRP and the DOD. The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) and the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) are funding the demonstration, testing, and evaluation of the RES covered in this test plan. This document covers testing both at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), as funded by BWID and USID. This document describes the tests planned for the RES demonstration for the BWRP. The purposes of the test plan are (1) to establish test parameters to ensure that the demonstration results are deemed useful and usable and (2) to demonstrate performance in a safe manner within all regulatory requirements.

  13. Evidence for a Lithic Unit Within the North Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, B.; Smith, I.; Seelos, F.

    2016-09-01

    Orbital spectra suggest that sediments on Planum Boreum are pyroxene-bearing, and the source unit for these "veneers" may be associated with a radar reflection within the PLD. A lithic unit within the PLD may have influenced their thermal stability.

  14. Reduce costs with vacuum excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, S.A.

    1983-09-01

    Although vacuum excavation equipment and methods are in their infancy, this developing technology offers tremendous promise for the future. The author explains Brooklyn Union Gas Co.'s experience with five vacuum trucks and the procedures that are used. In recent years, the higher cost of natural gas has increased the need for gas utilities to reduce their operating expenses. One way, which has been successful at Brooklyn Union Gas, is the use of vacuum excavation. Although vacuum excavation equipment and techniques are in their infancy, this developing technology offers substantial savings today and tremendous promise for the future. Brooklyn Union started its vacuum digging program by locating keyhole cutoffs--small surface openings ranging from 1 ft by 1 ft to 1 1/2 ft by 1 1/2 ft (0.3 m to 0.45 m square). It is no easy task to accurately locate a service that was installed 60 years ago. Reading the street indications, locating an existing curb valve or repair opening, gaining access to the building, making a physical lineup, and using an M-scope, plus any other tools available, have produced a high success rate.

  15. New Experiments and a Model-Driven Approach for Interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function Using the Edge Damage Distribution Method

    PubMed Central

    Schoville, Benjamin J.; Brown, Kyle S.; Harris, Jacob A.; Wilkins, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    The Middle Stone Age (MSA) is associated with early evidence for symbolic material culture and complex technological innovations. However, one of the most visible aspects of MSA technologies are unretouched triangular stone points that appear in the archaeological record as early as 500,000 years ago in Africa and persist throughout the MSA. How these tools were being used and discarded across a changing Pleistocene landscape can provide insight into how MSA populations prioritized technological and foraging decisions. Creating inferential links between experimental and archaeological tool use helps to establish prehistoric tool function, but is complicated by the overlaying of post-depositional damage onto behaviorally worn tools. Taphonomic damage patterning can provide insight into site formation history, but may preclude behavioral interpretations of tool function. Here, multiple experimental processes that form edge damage on unretouched lithic points from taphonomic and behavioral processes are presented. These provide experimental distributions of wear on tool edges from known processes that are then quantitatively compared to the archaeological patterning of stone point edge damage from three MSA lithic assemblages—Kathu Pan 1, Pinnacle Point Cave 13B, and Die Kelders Cave 1. By using a model-fitting approach, the results presented here provide evidence for variable MSA behavioral strategies of stone point utilization on the landscape consistent with armature tips at KP1, and cutting tools at PP13B and DK1, as well as damage contributions from post-depositional sources across assemblages. This study provides a method with which landscape-scale questions of early modern human tool-use and site-use can be addressed. PMID:27736886

  16. Metasomatism, titanian acmite, and alkali amphiboles in lithic- wacke inclusions within the Coyote Peak diatreme, Humboldt County, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, S.A.; Atkin, G.K.

    1985-01-01

    Lithic-wacke inclusions within the alkali-ultramafic diatreme at Coyote Peak record a history of pronounced metasomatism and crystal growth. The dominant metasomatic changes were loss of Si from the inclusions and mass influx of K, due to an unusually high K activity in the ultramafic host. The reaction with K converted much of the clay, quartz and lithic fraction of the lithic wacke into microcline, and exchanged Na from abundant clastic albite. Probe analyses are tabulated for cores and rims of titanian acmites, augites and alkali amphiboles. -J.A.Z.

  17. Incorporation and redistribution of locally derived lithic fragments within a pyroclastic flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buesch, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The lower Miocene Peach Springs Tuff exposed in the Newberry Mountains, California, was deposited within a paleovalley trending S65??W. A model is proposed whereby a turbulent boundary layer at the base of the pyroclastic flow is induced by surface roughness of the substrate and incorporates loose material from the substrate to produce a high-density ground layer that decouples from the lower-density, ash-rich pyroclastic flow. After decoupling has occurred, the high-density, lithic-rich ground layer moves independently from the ash-rich pyroclastic flow. The lithic breccia horizons have many characteristics of proximal (lag) breccias, and caution must be used when inferring distance from vent in ancient ignimbrites based on the occurrence of coarse breccias. -from Author

  18. Zero Horizontal Reaction Force Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P. (Inventor); Nick, Andrew J. (Inventor); Schuler, Jason M. (Inventor); Smith, Jonathan D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An excavator includes a mobile chassis with a first bucket drum and a second bucket drum coupled thereto. The first bucket drum and second bucket drum are coupled to the chassis for positioning thereof on the surface at opposing ends of the chassis. Each first scoop on the first bucket drum is a mirror image of one second scoop on the second bucket drum when (i) the first bucket drum and second bucket drum are on the surface adjacent opposing ends of the chassis, and (ii) the first bucket drum is rotated in one direction and the second bucket drum is simultaneously rotated in an opposing direction.

  19. Conduit evolution during the Avellinio Plinian eruption (Vesuvius): insights from fieldwork, lithic grain size distributions and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jonathan; Rust, Alison; Phillips, Jeremy; Sulpizio, Roberto; Engwell, Samantha; Costa, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale explosive eruptions are modulated by a combination of magmatic and conduit processes, including changes in the geometry of the conduit as host rocks are eroded from the conduit walls and vent region. This study of deposits 1-45 km from source of the main, quasi-steady Plinian phases of the 3949 ± 10 yBP Avellino eruption of Vesuvius (EU2 and EU3) demonstrates the potential for measurements of lithics and xenoliths to constrain subsurface eruption processes. The lithics comprise volcanic rocks derived from the upper ˜2700 m of the conduit, carbonates from the lower conduit and magma reservoir wall rocks. The lithics (free clasts) are thought to be incorporated into the erupting mixture by conduit wall implosion around and above the fragmentation depth as well as shallow vent spalling, whilst xenoliths are interpreted to result from viscous shear stresses applied to the conduit walls pre-fragmentation. The lithology of xenoliths indicates that they are sourced from relatively deep in the conduit, and their scarcity indicates that there is only minor conduit erosion below magma fragmentation during the Plinian eruptions. In contrast total lithic volumes calculated for EU2 and EU3 are 0.002 and 0.02 km3, respectively, which corresponds to 8 % and 18 % of the total erupted volume. Lava lithics dominate, making up 69 and 74 % of the total lithic volume for EU2 and EU3, respectively. The majority of conduit erosion occurred above the fragmentation depth, in the upper few kilometers of the conduit, and scales approximately with the increase in mass discharge rate between the two phases. Individual component (total lithic, carbonate, lava) Lithic Total Grain Size Distributions (L-TGSDs) provide insights into rock failure mechanisms. The fractal dimensions of the majority of the L-TGSDs are approximately 2 (grain size in φ against log2 no. of grains), inferred to be the result of conduit implosion modified by initial rock characteristics. The lava lithics from

  20. Lithic breccia and ignimbrite erupted during the collapse of Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Bacon, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The climactic eruption of Mount Mazama (6845 y.B.P.) vented a total of ???50 km3 of compositionally zoned rhyodacitic to basaltic magma from: (a) a single vent as a Plinian pumice fall deposit and the overlying Wineglass Welded Tuff, and (b) ring vents as ignimbrite and coignimbrite lithic breccia accompanying the collapse of Crater Lake caldera. New field and grain-size data for the ring-vent products are presented in this report. The coarse-grained, poorly bedded, clast-supported lithic breccia extends as far as 18 km from the caldera center. Like the associated ignimbrite, the breccia is compositionally zoned both radially and vertically, and silicic, mixed, and mafic types can be recognized, based on the proportion of rhyodacitic pumice. Matrix fractions in silicic breccias are depleted of fines and are lithic- and crystal-enriched relative to silicic ignimbrite due to vigorous gas sorting during emplacement. Ignimbrite occurs as a proximal veneer deposit overlying the breccia, a medial (??? 8 to ??? 25 km from the caldera center), compositionally zoned valley fill as much as > 110 m thick, and an unzoned distal ({slanted equal to or greater-than} 20 km) facies which extends as far as 55 km from the caldera. Breccia within ??? 9 km of the caldera center is interpreted as a coignimbrite lag breccia formed within the deflation zone of the collapsing ring-vent eruption columns. Expanded pyroclastic flows of the deflation zone were probably vertically graded in both size and concentration of blocks, as recently postulated for some turbidity currents. An inflection in the rate of falloff of lithic-clast size within the lithic breccia at ??? 9 km may mark the outer edge of the deflation zone or may be an artifact of incomplete exposure. The onset of ring-vent activity at Mt. Mazama was accompanied by a marked increase in eruptive discharge. Pyroclastic flows were emplaced as a semicontinuous stream, as few ignimbrite flow-unit boundaries are evident. As eruption from

  1. Mechanical tunnel excavation in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Sperry, P.E.

    1991-12-31

    The Technical Review Board for the US high-level radioactive waste facility at Yucca Mountain has recommended maximum use of {open_quotes}the most modern mechanical excavation techniques...in order to reduce disturbance to the rock walls and to achieve greater economy of time and cost.{close_quotes} Tunnels for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain can be economically constructed with mechanical excavation equipment. This paper presents the results of mechanical excavation of a tunnel in welded tuff, similar to the tuffs of Yucca Mountain. These results are projected to excavation of emplacement drifts in Yucca Mountain using a current state-of-the-art tunnel boring machine (TBM).

  2. Flow direction indicators in lithic-rich, basal ground layers in western exposures of the Miocene Peach Spring Tuff, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesch, D.

    2012-12-01

    Lithic-rich, basal ground layer (BGL) deposits occur in three western exposures of the 18.7 Ma Peach Spring Tuff (PST), and structures indicate directions of transport in the pyroclastic flow. Locations include (1) Kane Wash (Newberry Mountains), (2) "West Gem" (Daggett Ridge), and (3) Alvord Mountain area. These locations are 190-225 km from the PST source in the Silver Creek Caldera, southwest Black Mountain, Arizona (Pearthree and others, 2009); however, ~50 km is from extension across the Lower Colorado River Extensional Corridor. In each location, many lithic clasts were locally derived. Lithic-rich horizons in Kane Wash exposures of the PST were described by Buesch (1991). Total thickness of valley-filling ignimbrite ranges from <1-30 m and was deposited on alluvial fan and axial stream sandstone. Thickness of 8 individual lithic-rich horizons (a type of BGL) range from 4-300 cm with lithic clasts 2-472 cm. Clast size-grading, imbrication, and elongation indicate directions of flow. Each horizon was attributed to (1) incorporation and concentration of local clasts into a boundary layer of the pyroclastic flow as it traversed topography, (2) decoupling of a lithic-rich layer from the over riding flow, (3) independent movement of a lithic-rich flow along local topography (180°±30°) with the ash-rich pyroclastic flow direction probably independent of local topography, but along the main paleovalley (245°±20°), and (4) introduction and westward deflection of lithic-rich flows into the main, valley-filling, pyroclastic flow. Multiple lithic-rich horizons indicate repeated, locally developed boundary layers from the body of the pyroclastic flow throughout the flow history. In the West Gem exposure, the PST is 5.3 m thick and was deposited on alluvial sandstone. The 60-cm thick, lithic-rich, BGL contains lithic clasts <25 cm. Poorly developed clast imbrication and elongation, and a rip-up flap from the BGL folded into the lower part of the ignimbrite, indicate

  3. Comprehensive multigene phylogenies of excavate protists reveal the evolutionary positions of "primitive" eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alastair G B; Inagaki, Yuji; Roger, Andrew J

    2006-03-01

    Many of the protists thought to represent the deepest branches on the eukaryotic tree are assigned to a loose assemblage called the "excavates." This includes the mitochondrion-lacking diplomonads and parabasalids (e.g., Giardia and Trichomonas) and the jakobids (e.g., Reclinomonas). We report the first multigene phylogenetic analyses to include a comprehensive sampling of excavate groups (six nuclear-encoded protein-coding genes, nine of the 10 recognized excavate groups). Excavates coalesce into three clades with relatively strong maximum likelihood bootstrap support. Only the phylogenetic position of Malawimonas is uncertain. Diplomonads, parabasalids, and the free-living amitochondriate protist Carpediemonas are closely related to each other. Two other amitochondriate excavates, oxymonads and Trimastix, form the second monophyletic group. The third group is comprised of Euglenozoa (e.g., trypanosomes), Heterolobosea, and jakobids. Unexpectedly, jakobids appear to be specifically related to Heterolobosea. This tree topology calls into question the concept of Discicristata as a supergroup of eukaryotes united by discoidal mitochondrial cristae and makes it implausible that jakobids represent an independent early-diverging eukaryotic lineage. The close jakobids-Heterolobosea-Euglenozoa connection demands complex evolutionary scenarios to explain the transition between the presumed ancestral bacterial-type mitochondrial RNA polymerase found in jakobids and the phage-type protein in other eukaryotic lineages, including Euglenozoa and Heterolobosea.

  4. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  5. Archaeology Excavation Simulation: Correcting the Emphasis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistle, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Museums offering archaeological programs often attempt to use the "sandbox approach" to simulate archaeological excavation work. However, in light of the definition of simulation, and given the realities of actual professional practice in archaeological excavation, the author argues that the activity of troweling for artifacts in loose sand places…

  6. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Ebert, Thomas; Cox, Rachel; Rahmatian, Laila; Wood, James; Schuler, Jason; Nick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) excavator robot is a teleoperated mobility platform with a space regolith excavation capability. This more compact, lightweight design (<50 kg) has counterrotating bucket drums, which results in a net-zero reaction horizontal force due to the self-cancellation of the symmetrical, equal but opposing, digging forces.

  7. Lithic landscapes: early human impact from stone tool production on the central Saharan environment.

    PubMed

    Foley, Robert A; Lahr, Marta Mirazón

    2015-01-01

    Humans have had a major impact on the environment. This has been particularly intense in the last millennium but has been noticeable since the development of food production and the associated higher population densities in the last 10,000 years. The use of fire and over-exploitation of large mammals has also been recognized as having an effect on the world's ecology, going back perhaps 100,000 years or more. Here we report on an earlier anthropogenic environmental change. The use of stone tools, which dates back over 2.5 million years, and the subsequent evolution of a technologically-dependent lineage required the exploitation of very large quantities of rock. However, measures of the impact of hominin stone exploitation are rare and inherently difficult. The Messak Settafet, a sandstone massif in the Central Sahara (Libya), is littered with Pleistocene stone tools on an unprecedented scale and is, in effect, a man-made landscape. Surveys showed that parts of the Messak Settafet have as much as 75 lithics per square metre and that this fractured debris is a dominant element of the environment. The type of stone tools--Acheulean and Middle Stone Age--indicates that extensive stone tool manufacture occurred over the last half million years or more. The lithic-strewn pavement created by this ancient stone tool manufacture possibly represents the earliest human environmental impact at a landscape scale and is an example of anthropogenic change. The nature of the lithics and inferred age may suggest that hominins other than modern humans were capable of unintentionally modifying their environment. The scale of debris also indicates the significance of stone as a critical resource for hominins and so provides insights into a novel evolutionary ecology. PMID:25760999

  8. Lithic Landscapes: Early Human Impact from Stone Tool Production on the Central Saharan Environment

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Robert A.; Lahr, Marta Mirazón

    2015-01-01

    Humans have had a major impact on the environment. This has been particularly intense in the last millennium but has been noticeable since the development of food production and the associated higher population densities in the last 10,000 years. The use of fire and over-exploitation of large mammals has also been recognized as having an effect on the world’s ecology, going back perhaps 100,000 years or more. Here we report on an earlier anthropogenic environmental change. The use of stone tools, which dates back over 2.5 million years, and the subsequent evolution of a technologically-dependent lineage required the exploitation of very large quantities of rock. However, measures of the impact of hominin stone exploitation are rare and inherently difficult. The Messak Settafet, a sandstone massif in the Central Sahara (Libya), is littered with Pleistocene stone tools on an unprecedented scale and is, in effect, a man-made landscape. Surveys showed that parts of the Messak Settafet have as much as 75 lithics per square metre and that this fractured debris is a dominant element of the environment. The type of stone tools—Acheulean and Middle Stone Age—indicates that extensive stone tool manufacture occurred over the last half million years or more. The lithic-strewn pavement created by this ancient stone tool manufacture possibly represents the earliest human environmental impact at a landscape scale and is an example of anthropogenic change. The nature of the lithics and inferred age may suggest that hominins other than modern humans were capable of unintentionally modifying their environment. The scale of debris also indicates the significance of stone as a critical resource for hominins and so provides insights into a novel evolutionary ecology. PMID:25760999

  9. The surveillant assemblage.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, K D; Ericson, R V

    2000-12-01

    George Orwell's 'Big Brother' and Michel Foucault's 'panopticon' have dominated discussion of contemporary developments in surveillance. While such metaphors draw our attention to important attributes of surveillance, they also miss some recent dynamics in its operation. The work of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari is used to analyse the convergence of once discrete surveillance systems. The resultant 'surveillant assemblage' operates by abstracting human bodies from their territorial settings, and separating them into a series of discrete flows. These flows are then reassembled in different locations as discrete and virtual 'data doubles'. The surveillant assemblage transforms the purposes of surveillance and the hierarchies of surveillance, as well as the institution of privacy. PMID:11140886

  10. The lithic industry of Sima del Elefante (Atapuerca, Burgos, Spain) in the context of Early and Middle Pleistocene technology in Europe.

    PubMed

    de Lombera-Hermida, Arturo; Bargalló, Amèlia; Terradillos-Bernal, Marcos; Huguet, Rosa; Vallverdú, Josep; García-Antón, Maria-Dolores; Mosquera, Marina; Ollé, Andreu; Sala, Robert; Carbonell, Eudald; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Xosé-Pedro

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the lithic assemblages documented at Sima del Elefante (TE) and their importance in the context of the Early and Middle Pleistocene human occupation of Europe. We also study changes in human behaviour within the context of the palaeoenvironmental evolution of the Sierra de Atapuerca. This site has characteristics that are of great value for the study of human evolution. The lower levels of TE (Units TE7-TE14) are an essential reference for understanding the early stages of the colonization of Europe. The TE9c level has provided stone tools (Mode 1), faunal remains, and human fossils dated to 1.22 Ma (millions of years ago). Moreover, this is one of the few European sites with a stratigraphic sequence that includes remains of human occupations predating the Jaramillo subchron (Early Pleistocene) and from the Late Middle Pleistocene (Units TE18-TE19). Despite this, the presence of archaeologically sterile units (TE15-17) prevents us from establishing a continuous relationship between the Early and Middle Pleistocene human settlements and, consequently, between their technological and behavioural differences. We can, however compare the technological and palaeoeconomic strategies adopted by different species of hominins during two key phases of the occupation of Europe.

  11. Lithic technology and behavioural modernity: new results from the Still Bay site, Hollow Rock Shelter, Western Cape Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Högberg, Anders; Larsson, Lars

    2011-08-01

    The Hollow Rock Shelter site in Western Cape Province, South Africa, was excavated in 1993 and 2008. This study presents new results from a technological analysis of Still Bay points and bifacial flakes from the site. The results show that Still Bay points from the site are standardized tools. The points in the assemblage consist of a complex mixture of whole and fragmented points in all phases of production. The fragmentation degree is high; approximately 80% of the points are broken. A high proportion of bending fractures shows that several of the points were discarded due to production failures, and points with impact damage or hafting traces show that used points were left in the cave. This illustrates that the production of points as well as replacement of used points took place at the site. The result also shows that worked but not finished preforms and points were left at the site, suggestive of future preparation. The points were produced within the framework of three different chaînes opératoires, all ending up in a typologically uniform tool. This shows that the manufacture of Still Bay points should be regarded as a special bifacial technology, only partly comparable with other bifacial technologies. A raw material analysis shows that locally available quartz and quartzite were used in the production, and that points made of silcrete were brought to the site. Based on the technological analysis, a discussion of behavioural modernity, focusing on hypotheses about social interaction, experimentation, different strategies for learning to knap, and landscape memories, results in an interpretation that behavioural modernity was established at Hollow Rock Shelter in the Still Bay phase of the southern African Middle Stone Age.

  12. Petrology and geochemistry of lithic fragments separated from the Apollo 15 deep-drill core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Nielsen, R. L.; Drake, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Petrological and geochemical analysis of lithic fragments separated from the Apollo 15 deep-drill core showed these fragments to fall into the essentially the same range of rock types as observed in surface soil samples and large rock samples. Three particles are singled out as being of special interest. One sample is a mare basalt containing extremely evolved phases. The particle may represent small-scale imperfect crystal/liquid separation in a lava flow. A green glass particle is not the ultramafic emerald green glass described from the Apollo 15 site, but rather an ANT-like light green color, and has a quite different chemical composition from the ultramafic variety. One mare basalt displays a positive Eu anomaly and is enriched in plagioclase relative to olivine plus pyroxene.

  13. "15 Minutes Of Fame": exploring the temporal dimension of middle pleistocene lithic technology.

    PubMed

    Hallos, J

    2005-08-01

    This paper addresses the spatial and temporal dimensions of knapping routines through analysis of refit data. Many reconstructions of lithic tool production utilising refit data concentrate upon 'how' a piece of stone is taken apart, and less often consider the 'when' and 'where'. Lower Palaeolithic artefacts are frequently viewed as belonging to simplistic technical systems in which tools were made and used as and when required, showing little temporal depth. Modern knappers can replicate the components of the Acheulean toolkit, such as a biface, in around 15 minutes. The predominant use of local raw materials and the relatively simple reduction sequences observed on many Middle Pleistocene sites has given rise to the view that Acheulean hominins possessed an immediate approach to technology, and that artefacts did not stay in the technological system very long. In contrast, other researchers have stressed the increased planning abilities of hominins in relation to their stone tool-making and using routines. Increased planning abilities are often cited as a diagnostic feature of modern human cognition. As such, tracing the emergence of these abilities is an important avenue of research in human evolution. The aim of this paper is to investigate how the process of lithic production was organised on several Middle Pleistocene sites in northwest Europe. By comparing refitting sequences from several primary context sites, the different stages of reduction present at these locations can be reconstructed. Since refit sets record the work carried out in one place and time by an individual, they can be used to reconstruct the spatial and temporal dimension of these past technological activities. The analysis shows fragmentation of reduction sequences was a common occurrence, suggesting a more dynamic approach to tool-making and using activities than has previously been recognised. The analysis provides a description of these artefact dynamics, and discusses the underlying

  14. Dolomite diagenesis and porosity preservation in lithic reservoirs: Carmopolis member, Sergipe-Alagoas Basin, northeastern Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, R.S. de; De Ros, L.F.; Morad, S.

    1995-05-01

    The lithic sandstones and conglomerates of the Carmopolis Member of the Muribeca Formation (Aptian) were deposited by fan deltas, alluvial fans, and braid deltas that prograded from low-grade metamorphic terrains into the Sergipe-Alagoas rift basin during the opening of the South Atlantic. Initial carbonates in the Carmopolis reservoirs (presently at depths of 180-2200 m) were marine (high-Mg calcite/aragonite) grain rims, allochems, stromatolitic laminites, and meteoric calcite. These carbonates were subsequently replaced by dolomite/ankerite ({delta}18O{sub PDB} = -7.3 to -4.1{per_thousand}; {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} = -15 to +16.2{delta}) derived from ascending thermobaric fluids prior to oil emplacement. These fluids also caused the direct precipitation of dolomite/ankerite cements and the replacement of dolomite/ankerite cements and the replacement of nonferroan dolomite by ferroan dolomite/ankerite. Rocks lacking early cements were strongly compacted, losing their primary intergranular porosity and permeability, whereas massively cemented rocks show only minor compaction and further diagenetic modifications. Partial cementation has greatly limited the compaction and preserved intergranular porosity, allowing the partial dissolution of carbonates and framework grains and the precipitation of replacive ferroan dolomite/ankerite and pyrite. Offshore reservoirs show late porosity reduction by the precipitation of quartz, kaolinite/dickite, saddle dolomite, and ferroan calcite. Experimental analyses of porosity and permeability reduction under pressure confirmed the importance of early cementation in the preservation of porosity in lithic rocks with ductile framework.

  15. "15 Minutes Of Fame": exploring the temporal dimension of middle pleistocene lithic technology.

    PubMed

    Hallos, J

    2005-08-01

    This paper addresses the spatial and temporal dimensions of knapping routines through analysis of refit data. Many reconstructions of lithic tool production utilising refit data concentrate upon 'how' a piece of stone is taken apart, and less often consider the 'when' and 'where'. Lower Palaeolithic artefacts are frequently viewed as belonging to simplistic technical systems in which tools were made and used as and when required, showing little temporal depth. Modern knappers can replicate the components of the Acheulean toolkit, such as a biface, in around 15 minutes. The predominant use of local raw materials and the relatively simple reduction sequences observed on many Middle Pleistocene sites has given rise to the view that Acheulean hominins possessed an immediate approach to technology, and that artefacts did not stay in the technological system very long. In contrast, other researchers have stressed the increased planning abilities of hominins in relation to their stone tool-making and using routines. Increased planning abilities are often cited as a diagnostic feature of modern human cognition. As such, tracing the emergence of these abilities is an important avenue of research in human evolution. The aim of this paper is to investigate how the process of lithic production was organised on several Middle Pleistocene sites in northwest Europe. By comparing refitting sequences from several primary context sites, the different stages of reduction present at these locations can be reconstructed. Since refit sets record the work carried out in one place and time by an individual, they can be used to reconstruct the spatial and temporal dimension of these past technological activities. The analysis shows fragmentation of reduction sequences was a common occurrence, suggesting a more dynamic approach to tool-making and using activities than has previously been recognised. The analysis provides a description of these artefact dynamics, and discusses the underlying

  16. Formation of composite pyroclasts by welding inside a lithic-rich mafic eruption column (Los Marteles Caldera, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrionandia, F.; Carracedo Sánchez, M.; Arostegui, J.; Gil Ibarguchi, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    The tuff ring of the Los Marteles phreatomagmatic maar (Gran Canaria, Canary Islands) includes a particular unit that comprises abundant composite spheroidal clasts. However, these clasts differ from cored clasts elsewhere that consist of erupted lithic pyroclasts with an adhering rim of coherent chilled magma. The composite clasts here studied range from lapilli to bombs, and are cored or concentrically banded. Among the welded components, several types of primary clasts are discerned that include: (i) juvenile clasts, resultant of the magma inertial fragmentation, and (ii) cognate or accessory lithic clasts. Juvenile clasts include glass spheres (nano- and microachneliths) and crystals. Lithic clasts include lava fragments, scoriae and olivine xenocrysts. Primary clasts are interpreted to have been produced by the explosion of a partially crystallized mafic (SiO2 ≈ 50-55%) magma that erupted into a maar, filled-up with scoriae plus lava fragments. The explosion would have originated as a dense and turbulent gas thrust into which the repeated collisions of melt droplets with solid clasts generated droplet-coated crystals, lithic clasts and single glass spheres. We interpret the cored and concentrically banded pyroclasts to be made of coalesced and/or agglutinated particles coated with a melt rim to the rest of the components. These composite clasts developed spheroidal shapes during transport within a violent Strombolian eruption column due to spin effect and, finally, landed in solid state.

  17. Experimental testing of the transport-durability of shale lithics and its implications for interpreting the rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Detailed petrographic studies of shales show that they consist of a wide range of components, including a wide spectrum of composite particles that were contributed to the precursor muds in the form of high-water-content suspended floccules, bedload floccules, rip-up intraclasts, pedogenic aggregates, and fully lithified shale clasts. Experimental studies show that shale clasts of sand to silt size (shale lithics) can survive hundreds to thousands of kilometers of bedload transport. Observations of modern river and shelf muds reveal the common presence of shale lithics in these sediments, and suggest that a significant portion of ancient shale formations could potentially consist of reworked shale lithics and not, as commonly assumed, of primary composite particles such as clay floccules and organo-minerallic aggregates. Identification of shale lithics in the rock record presents challenges, but careful petrographic examination (using SEM and ion-milled samples) and case studies will help to develop robust criteria for recognition. The presented observations have manifold implications for the interpretation of many aspects of shales: mud transport and accumulation, sediment compaction and basin-fill modeling, and geochemical proxies. They emphasize the essential need for petrographic examination of shale samples before more advanced analyses are undertaken.

  18. Mechanical excavator performance in Yucca Mountain tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdemir, L.; Hansen, F.D.

    1991-01-01

    A research effort of four phases is in progress at the Colorado School of Mines. The overall program will evaluate the cutability of welded tuff and other lithologies likely to be excavated at Yucca Mountain in the site characterization process. Several mechanical systems are considered with emphasis given to the tunnel boring machine. The research comprises laboratory testing, linear drag bit and disc cutter tests and potentially large-scale laboratory demonstrations to support potential use of a tunnel boring machine in welded tuff. Preliminary estimates of mechanical excavator performance in Yucca Mountain tuff are presented here. As phases of the research project are completed, well quantified estimates will be made of performance of mechanical excavators in the Yucca Mountain tuffs. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Efficacy of Carisolv-assisted caries excavation.

    PubMed

    Cederlund, A; Lindskog, S; Blomlöf, J

    1999-10-01

    As a possible alternative to conventional techniques for excavating caries chemomechanical methods have been developed. Caridex has so far been the dominating product. However, a new system, Carisolv, was recently introduced. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the caries-dissolving efficacy of Carisolv in vitro. After excavation with Carisolv all dentin surfaces were caries free. However, 6 of the 10 cavities showed residual caries in the dentinoenamel junction. The dentin and enamel surfaces were covered by smear and debris. Since there may be a risk of leaving caries in the dentinoenamel junction proper case selection appears to be of importance to ensure a successful result. PMID:10709512

  20. Pajarito Plateau archaeological surveys and excavations. II

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, C R

    1982-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory continues its archaeological program of data gathering and salvage excavations. Sites recently added to the archaeological survey are described, as well as the results of five excavations. Among the more interesting and important discoveries are (1) the apparently well-established local use of anhydrous lime, and (2) a late pre-Columbian use of earlier house sites and middens for garden plots. Evidence indicated that the local puebloan population was the result of an expansion of upper Rio Grande peoples, not an influx of migrants.

  1. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2002-10-12

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant investigated for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the progress made in the program during the past quarter. It reports on projectile development and the development of the electric launch system design.

  2. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2002-01-09

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant considered for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the progress made in the program during the past quarter. It reports on projectile development experiments and the development of the electric launch system design.

  3. Radiometric dating of the Earlier Stone Age sequence in excavation I at Wonderwerk Cave, South Africa: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Chazan, Michael; Ron, Hagai; Matmon, Ari; Porat, Naomi; Goldberg, Paul; Yates, Royden; Avery, Margaret; Sumner, Alexandra; Horwitz, Liora Kolska

    2008-07-01

    We present here the results of 44 paleomagnetic measurements, and single cosmogenic burial and optically stimulated luminescence ages for the Earlier Stone Age deposits from Wonderwerk Cave, Northern Cape, South Africa. The resulting paleomagnetic sequence: N>R>N>R>N constrains the Earlier Stone Age strata in this part of the site to between approximately 0.78-1.96 Ma. A single cosmogenic date of approximately 2.0 Ma from the base of the section offers some corroboration for the paleomagnetic sequence. Preliminary results indicate that the small lithic assemblage from the basal stratum may contain an Oldowan facies. This is overlain by several strata containing Acheulean industries. The preliminary radiometric dates reported here place the onset of the Acheulean at this site to approximately 1.6 Ma, which is roughly contemporaneous with that of East Africa.

  4. 18 CFR 1304.303 - Channel excavation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... within the flood control zone of a TVA reservoir requires TVA review and approval. (c) TVA shall... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Channel excavation. 1304.303 Section 1304.303 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY...

  5. 18 CFR 1304.303 - Channel excavation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... within the flood control zone of a TVA reservoir requires TVA review and approval. (c) TVA shall... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Channel excavation. 1304.303 Section 1304.303 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY...

  6. 100 area excavation treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Development and screening of remedial alternatives for the 100 Area, using existing data, have been completed and are documented in the 100 Area Feasibility Study, Phases 1 and 2 (DOE-RL 1992a). Based on the results of the FS, the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE-RL 1992b) identifies and prioritizes treatability studies for the 100 Area. The data from the treatability study program support future focused FS, interim remedial measures (IRM) selection, operable unit final remedy selection, remedial design, and remedial actions. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992b). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications.

  7. Excavations and Foundations in Soft Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempfert, Hans-Georg; Gebreselassie, Berhane

    The book reviews the experiences with, as well as recent developments and research results on excavations and foundations in and on soft soil deposits. Geotechnical design and execution of civil engineering structures on very soft soils are usually associated with substantial difficulties.

  8. 4. VIEW SHOWING EXCAVATION IN ARIZONA CANAL, 8 MILES NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SHOWING EXCAVATION IN ARIZONA CANAL, 8 MILES NORTHEAST OF PHOENIX. NOTE MEN DRILLING AND EXCAVATING IN OPERATION; CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN IN THE DISTANCE Photographer: Walter J. Lubken. No date - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. Attribute Studies of Points, Perforators, Knives, and Lithic Caches from Ayn Ab$\\bar{u}$ Nukhayla

    SciTech Connect

    Nowell, April; Gutzeit, Jennifer L.; Bell, Colleen; Henry, Donald O.

    2014-03-19

    This is an in-depth study of two distinct tool types recovered from the Early Neolithic site of Ayn Abu Nukhayla, located in southern Jordan. This occupation dates to 9,500 to 7,500 BP in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B and is comprised of regionally varied settlements reflecting a range of economic adaptations. The two tool types of concern are Nahal Hemar Knives (so named for their resemblance to a similar tool found in the Israeli site of Nahal Hemar Cave) and Nukhayla perforators. The analyses focus on creating an overall description of the tool assemblages themselves while also attempting to identify changes in tool morphology through space and time. The tools are compared with similar types from across the Neolithic Levant in an attempt to draw comparisons between the assemblages found at Ayn Abu Nykhayla and other sites from the same period.

  10. 29 CFR 1926.651 - Specific excavation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specific excavation requirements. 1926.651 Section 1926.651..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Excavations § 1926.651 Specific excavation requirements. (a) Surface encumbrances. All surface encumbrances that are located so...

  11. Clast assemblages of possible deep-seated /77517/ and immiscible-melt /77538/ origins in Apollo 17 breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Mansker, W. L.; Keil, K.

    1978-01-01

    Breccia samples 77517 and 77538 are composed of abundant mineral and lithic clasts set in porous, poorly sintered matrices. Clast assemblages in the two rocks are of contrasting composition and origin. Breccia 77517 has Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene and calcic plagioclase clasts, indicating limited, almost exclusively ANT-suite parentage. A significant feature is the presence of an assemblage (aluminous enstatite, forsterite, anorthite, aluminous spinel) corresponding to spinel cataclasite, a rock type of deep-seated (about 60 km) crustal origin. Breccia 77538 contains Fe-rich pyroxene and rather sodic plagioclase clasts, indicative of predominantly KREEP and/or mare derivation. An important feature is the occurrence of high-K and high-Fe lithic clasts whose compositions resemble those of immiscible-melts produced during late-stage magmatic crystallization, and which probably originated via silicate liquid immiscibility in a KREEP or mare basalt magma. Both rocks contain numerous fine-grained breccia clasts which represent material that has been modified by impact processes at or very near the moon's surface.

  12. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Hanford 118-B-1 Burial Ground Treatability Study has been required by milestone change request {number_sign}M-15-93-04, dated September 30, 1993. The change request requires that a treatability test be conducted at the 100-B Area to obtain additional engineering information for remedial design of burial grounds receiving waste from 100 Area removal actions. This treatability study has two purposes: (1) to support development of the Proposed Plan (PP) and Record of Decision (ROD), which will identify the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and (2) to provide specific engineering information for receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test also will provide critical performance and cost information necessary for remedy evaluation in the detailed analysis of alternatives during preparation of the focused feasibility study (FFS). This treatability testing supports the following 100 Area alternatives: (1) excavation and disposal, and (2) excavation, sorting, (treatment), and disposal.

  13. Busted Butte Phase II Excavation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Keifer

    2000-11-29

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an engineering excavation and ground support design for the Busted Butte phase II mine back. The analysis will apply engineering practices and previous proven design methods for pillar design and ground support in accordance with applicable Integrated Safety Management principles and functions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Busted Butte Test Facility. The intended use of this analysis is to provide testing excavation boundaries, ground support and pillar design input to drawing(s) to support test operations implementation. This design activity has been prepared under ''Technical Work Plan For Test Facilities Design FY01 Work Activities'' (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2000b). No deviations from the TWP have been necessary for this analysis.

  14. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2003-06-06

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant considered for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the program findings through the first two phases. It presents projectile design and experiment data and the preliminary design for electric launch system. Advanced Power Technologies, Inc., now BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technologies, Inc., was forced to withdraw from the program with the loss of one of our principal mining partners, however, the experiments conducted suggest that the approach is feasible and can be made cost effective.

  15. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE EXCAVATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface excavation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  16. Lunar Regolith Excavation Student Competition Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nething, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The Surface Systems team is working to learn about lunar regolith and how we can use it as a source of air, water, and fuel for spacecrafts. However, excavation of this valuable regolith is difficult because the robot has to conform to many specifications (mass limit, efficiency level, etc.). NASA has therefore decided to include college students and companies in the search to create the best robot by making it into a competition.

  17. Legionellosis associated with artesian well excavation.

    PubMed

    Miragliotta, G; Del Prete, R; Sabato, R; Cassano, A; Carnimeo, N

    1992-09-01

    In October 1990 pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila was diagnosed in two employees working in the area of Apulia, southern Italy, where artesian wells were in construction. Although the exposure to excavation has been associated with Legionnaires' disease, in our investigation the illness occurred only in those employees who were present when the water emerged from the ground under high pressure. On the basis of this report, water appears as the most likely reservoir of the organism and the main route of infection.

  18. Telerobotic excavation system for unexploded ordnance retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; Killough, S.M.; Thompson, D.H.; Rossi, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    The small emplacement excavator (SEE) is a ruggedized military vehicle with backhoe and front loader used by the US Army for unexploded ordnance (UXO) retrieval and general utility excavation activities. In order to evaluate the feasibility of removing personnel from the vehicle during high-risk excavation tasks a development and demonstration project was initiated to evaluate performance capabilities of the SEE under telerobotic control. A technology demonstration of the TSEE was conducted at McKinley Range, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama on 13--17 September, 1993. The primary objective of the demonstration was to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of remote UXO retrieval. During the demonstration, explosive ordnance disposal specialists were instructed on telerobotic operation of the TSEE, and then were asked to complete a simulated UXO retrieval task. Participants then submitted an evaluation of the system including human factors performance data. This presentation will describe the TSEE, retrieval demonstration, and summarize results of the performance evaluations. Some examples of the results are given below. Seventy percent of the demonstration participants found the tasks were as easy or easier to accomplish utilizing the remote system than with an unmodified system. Similarly, eighty percent of the participants found the TSEE hand controller was as easy or easier to use than the normal manual controls.

  19. National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    1993-06-15

    The second meeting of Federal agency representatives interested in the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program took place on June 15, 1993. The Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted the meeting at the Washington, D.C., offices of DOE. Representatives from the National Science Foundation, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Bureau of Mines, National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and various offices within the Department of Energy attended. For a complete list of attendees see Attachment A. The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to cover the status of efforts to gain formal approval for NADET, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, especially two recent workshops that explored research needs in drilling and excavation, (3) to review some recent technological advances, and (4) to solicit statements of the importance of improving drilling and excavation technologies to the missions of the various agencies. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  20. Excavation of Regolith by Impinging Jets of Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.; Vu, Bruce T.; Donahue, Carly M.

    2006-01-01

    There are many situations in nature and technology where particulate matter is excavated by a fluid jet. Such a process is often used to excavate soil or to dig wells. Air jets are often used to transport particulate matter such as powders in various industrial processes. Similar situations occur in nature, as when waterfalls scour holes in sand. In other cases, the excavation is unwanted such as when a rocket lands on the sandy or dusty surface of a planet or moon. Recent research into regolith excavation by gas jets has obtained new insights into the physical processes of that excavation, and these may lead to new advances in technology for more efficient fluid-jet excavation processes and for better control of the unwanted excavation effects of landing rockets. This talk will explain the new insights and point to future work supporting lunar exploration.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar and cosmic ray exposure ages of plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith, 78461

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J. P.; Baldwin, S. L.; Delano, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Argon isotopic data is used to assess the potential of low-mass samples collected by sample return missions on planetary objects (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids), to reveal planetary surface processes. We report the first 40Ar/39Ar ages and 38Ar cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, determined for eleven submillimeter-sized (ranging from 0.06 to 1.2 mg) plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith sample 78461 collected at the base of the Sculptured Hills. Total fusion analysis was used to outgas argon from the lithic fragments. Three different approaches were used to determine 40Ar/39Ar ages and illustrate the sensitivity of age determination to the choice of trapped (40Ar/36Ar)t. 40Ar/39Ar ages range from ~4.0 to 4.4 Ga with one exception (Plag#10). Surface CRE ages, based on 38Ar, range from ~1 to 24 Ma. The relatively young CRE ages suggest recent re-working of the upper few centimeters of the regolith. The CRE ages may result from the effect of downslope movement of materials to the base of the Sculptured Hills from higher elevations. The apparent 40Ar/39Ar age for Plag#10 is >5 Ga and yielded the oldest CRE age (i.e., ~24 Ma). We interpret this data to indicate the presence of parentless 40Ar in Plag#10, originating in the lunar atmosphere and implanted in lunar regolith by solar wind. Based on a chemical mixing model, plagioclase compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar ages, we conclude that lithic fragments originated from Mg-suite of highland rocks, and none were derived from the mare region.

  2. The dynamics of the Breccia Museo eruption (Campi Flegrei, Italy) and the significance of spatter clasts associated with lithic breccias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio

    1994-02-01

    The Breccia Museo Member is a pyroclastic deposit produced during an eruptive event that occurred in the southwestern sector of Campi Flegrei about 20,000 years ago. Two depositional units divided by a co-ignimbrite ash-fall deposit have been recognized. Facies variations in the deposits resulted from the interaction between the flow and paleomorphology, from the relative abundance of the lithic and juvenile components supplied by the source, and from the variations of the flow regime. The Lower Depositional Unit is a pyroclastic flow deposit characterized by a thick, coarse valley facies laterally grading into a thin, layered and fine-grained overbank facies. These different facies are due to the interaction between a density-stratified flow and topography. The more basal, high-concentration part of the flow was deposited along the axis of the paleovalleys (valley facies), whereas the upper, low-concentration part was deposited on the slopes (overbank facies). Vertical variations of the structures observed in the deposits of the Lower Depositional Unit resulted from flow unsteadiness during emplacement and, hence, on the variations of the suspended load fallout from the low-concentration upper part of the flow to the high-concentration boundary layer. The Upper Depositional Unit, made up of the Breccia, Spatter and Upper Pumice Flow Units, consists of horizons of lithic breccias and coarse welded spatter which thicken into the valleys. They are closely related to a gas-pipe-rich ash and pumice flow deposit. The strongly fines-poor character of the breccias and spatter beds is due to a very rapid segregation of the dense and coarse clasts and to the high rates of gas ascent through the hindered-settling zone in the basal part of the flow. After deposition of the majority of the dense and coarse material, the subsequent high-density depositional system came to rest immediately, thus yielding a pyroclastic flow deposit that is closely associated with the breccia. The

  3. Selection of operating machinery parameters for a bucket excavator

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrichnyi, Y.F.; Baboshin, K.V.; Etinger, I.M.; Mekk, V.A.

    1985-05-01

    The mining industry uses extensively single-bucket excavators of the straight shovel type, like the EKG-4.6, as the most effective way of loading previously loosened hard and abrasive excavated rocks. Therefore, an increase in their working efficiency, mainly as regards increasing productivity, reducing load on the operating machinery, and reducing wear of the operating machinery elements, is of particular importance. Analysis shows that the possibilities for this lie in the correct selection of movement trajectory parameters for the excavator bucket, which for existing excavators are inadequate for loading excavated rock. The authors study here the effect of trajectory parameters on excavator bucket filling, and on their basis they select parameters for the operating machinery.

  4. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  5. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-10-12

    The hypothesis to be tested is that the addition of steel or other synthetic fiber and/or high strength, low cost aggregate to strong grouts or concrete will result in a projectile of sufficient strength to produce cracking and spall enough to make its use cost effective for mining. Based on experiments conducted to date, no conclusions can yet be reached. Results of the experiments conducted suggest that reinforcement of a concrete projectile can yield performance that portends cost effective projectile based excavation. It is recognized that the projectile is but one component of the matrix. The electric launch system to be developed in the next phase of the program is the other factor that weighs heavily in the cost effectiveness equation. At this point, however, emerging low cost options for the projectile are very promising.

  6. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Frain, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    This treatability study has two purposes: to support development of the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and to provide specific engineering information for the design of burial grounds receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test will also provide performance and cost information necessary for detailed analysis of alternatives for burial ground remediation. Further details on the test requirements, milestones and data quality objectives are described in detail in the 118-B-1 Excavation Treatability Test Plan (DOE/RL-94-43). These working procedures are intended for use by field personnel to implement the requirements of the milestone. A copy of the detailed Test Plan will be kept on file at the on-site field support trailer, and will be available for review by field personnel.

  7. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of... objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony that are excavated intentionally from Federal or... excavation of human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony from...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.651 - Specific excavation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (f) Warning system for mobile equipment. When mobile equipment is operated adjacent to an excavation... have a clear and direct view of the edge of the excavation, a warning system shall be utilized such as... subparts D and E of this part (29 CFR 1926.50-1926.107) to prevent exposure to harmful levels...

  9. Pre-excavation studies of prehistoric cave sites by magnetic prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis., Sonia; Matskevich, Zinovii; Meshveliani, Tengiz

    2014-05-01

    lithic material to Mesolithic and Early Neolithic periods. The upper layer is ca 50 cm thick, consists of fine grey silt with few pebbles and includes numerous bones and lithic implements. In this layer two circular dense concentrations of charcoal, possibly fireplaces were discovered. Conclusions 1. The results of magnetic survey obtained in prehistoric cave sites in Israel and Georgia show the high efficiency of the magnetic method for revealing and detailed characterization of caves. 2. The presence of organic materials, e.g. bones, charcoals and ceramics in caves enhances magnetic contrast between non-magnetic bedrock and the cave's fill, increasing the potential of the magnetic method. 3. Revealing enhanced magnetization of soil within studied caves allowed us to develop an approach to reliable interpretation of magnetic data in studied areas References Bar-Oz, G., Belfer-Cohen, A, Meshvelliani, T., Jakeli, N., Matskevich, Z. and Bar-Yosef, O. 2009. Bear in mind: bear hunting in the Mesolithic of the Southern Caucasus, the case of Kotias Klde rockshelter, western Georgia. Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia 37 (1): 15-24. Dalan, R. A. and Banerjee, S. K. 1998. Solving archaeological problems using techniques of soil magnetism. Geoarchaeology: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No.1, pp.1-36. Fassbinder, J.W. E. , Stanijek, H. and Vali, H. 1990. Occurence of magnetic bacteria in soil. Nature 343, 161-163. Itkis, S. 2003. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements of Soil: A Diagnostic Tool for Location of Human Activity Areas (Ch. 14) In: Khalaily, H. and Marder, O. (editors). The Neolithic Site of Abu Ghosh: The 1995 Excavations. IAA Reports, No.19. Jerusalem. p. 129-131. Itkis, S. 2011..Magnetic survey at Ramat Bet Shemesh. In: Dagan Y. (editor). The Ramat Bet Shemesh Regional Project: Landscapes of Settlement from the Paleolithic to the Ottoman Period, IAA Reports, No. 47, Israel Antiquites Authority, Jerusalem 2011, pp. 95-104. Itkis S.E and Eppelbaum L

  10. Rational design and synthesis of excavated trioctahedral Au nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiaoli; Jia, Yanyan; Shen, Wei; Xie, Shuifen; Yang, Yanan; Cao, Zhenming; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2015-06-01

    Excavated polyhedral nanostructures, possessing the features of high surface area and well-defined surface structure with a specific crystal facet and avoidance of aggregation, could be one of the best choices for the purpose of reducing consumption and improving performance of noble metals in many application fields. However, the formation of the excavated structures is thermodynamically unfavourable and its rational synthesis is far beyond our knowledge. In this work, taking overgrowth of Pd onto trioctahedral Au nanocrystals as a model, we present a deep insight study for synthesizing an excavated structure relying on the protection role of surfactants under suitable crystal growth kinetics. Based on the abovementioned understanding, we designed a simple and effective strategy to synthesize Au nanocrystals with excavated trioctahedral structure in one step. Due to the novel feature of the excavated structure and exposed high energy {110} facets, excavated trioctahedral Au NCs exhibited optical extinction at the near-infrared region and showed high catalytic activity towards the reduction of p-nitrophenol. Moreover, the synthetic strategy can be extended to the synthesis of excavated Au-Pd alloys.Excavated polyhedral nanostructures, possessing the features of high surface area and well-defined surface structure with a specific crystal facet and avoidance of aggregation, could be one of the best choices for the purpose of reducing consumption and improving performance of noble metals in many application fields. However, the formation of the excavated structures is thermodynamically unfavourable and its rational synthesis is far beyond our knowledge. In this work, taking overgrowth of Pd onto trioctahedral Au nanocrystals as a model, we present a deep insight study for synthesizing an excavated structure relying on the protection role of surfactants under suitable crystal growth kinetics. Based on the abovementioned understanding, we designed a simple and effective

  11. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert; Schuler, Jason M.; Smith, Jonathan Drew; Nick, Andrew J.; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached at the end of the arm simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of movement. Impact energies from 13.6J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 BPM to 700 BPM were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 50% was achieved in this experimental investigation.

  12. Development of Field Excavator with Embedded Force Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K.; Creager, C.; Izadnegahdar, A.; Bauman, S.; Gallo, C.; Abel, P.

    2012-01-01

    A semi-intelligent excavation mechanism was developed for use with the NASA-built Centaur 2 rover prototype. The excavator features a continuously rotatable large bucket supported between two parallel arms, both of which share a single pivot axis near the excavator base attached to the rover. The excavator is designed to simulate the collection of regolith, such as on the Moon, and to dump the collected soil into a hopper up to one meter tall for processing to extract oxygen. Because the vehicle can be autonomous and the terrain is generally unknown, there is risk of damaging equipment or using excessive power when attempting to extract soil from dense or rocky terrain. To minimize these risks, it is critical for the rover to sense the digging forces and adjust accordingly. It is also important to understand the digging capabilities and limitations of the excavator. This paper discusses the implementation of multiple strain gages as an embedded force measurement system in the excavator's arms. These strain gages can accurately measure and resolve multi-axial forces on the excavator. In order to validate these sensors and characterize the load capabilities, a series of controlled excavation tests were performed at Glenn Research Center with the excavator at various depths and cut angles while supported by a six axis load cell. The results of these tests are both compared to a force estimation model and used for calibration of the embedded strain gages. In addition, excavation forces generated using two different types of bucket edge (straight vs. with teeth) were compared.

  13. Reconstructing Grazer Assemblages for Protected Area Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Jan A.; Prins, Herbert H. T.; Balfour, David A.; Slotow, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Protected area management agencies often struggle to reliably reconstruct grazer assemblages due to a lack of historical distribution data for their regions. Wrong predictions of grazing assemblages could potentially affect biodiversity negatively. The objective of the study was to determine how well grazing herbivores have become established since introduction to the Mkambati Nature Reserve, South Africa, how this was influenced by facilitation and competition, and how indigenous grazer assemblages can best be predicted for effective ecological restoration. Population trends of several grazing species were investigated in in order to determine how well they have become established since introduction. Five different conceivable grazing assemblages reflecting a range of approaches that are commonly encountered during conservation planning and management decision making were assessed. Species packing was used to predict whether facilitation, competition or co-existence were more likely to occur, and the species packing of the different assemblages were assessed using ANCOVA. Reconstructing a species assemblage using biogeographic and biological information provides the opportunity for a grazer assemblage that allows for facilitatory effects, which in turn leads to an ecosystem that is able to maintain its grazer assemblage structure. The strength of this approach lies in the ability to overcome the problem of depauperate grazer assemblages, resulting from a lack of historical data, by using biogeographical and biological processes, to assist in more effectively reconstructing grazer assemblages. Adaptive management of grazer assemblage restoration through reintroduction, using this approach would further mitigate management risks. PMID:24603663

  14. Relative Importance of Modularity and Other Morphological Attributes on Different Types of Lithic Point Weapons: Assessing Functional Variations

    PubMed Central

    González-José, Rolando; Charlin, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The specific using of different prehistoric weapons is mainly determined by its physical properties, which provide a relative advantage or disadvantage to perform a given, particular function. Since these physical properties are integrated to accomplish that function, examining design variables and their pattern of integration or modularity is of interest to estimate the past function of a point. Here we analyze a composite sample of lithic points from southern Patagonia likely formed by arrows, thrown spears and hand-held points to test if they can be viewed as a two-module system formed by the blade and the stem, and to evaluate the degree in which shape, size, asymmetry, blade: stem length ratio, and tip angle explain the observed variance and differentiation among points supposedly aimed to accomplish different functions. To do so we performed a geometric morphometric analysis on 118 lithic points, departing from 24 two-dimensional landmark and semi landmarks placed on the point's contour. Klingenberg's covariational modularity tests were used to evaluate different modularity hypotheses, and a composite PCA including shape, size, asymmetry, blade: stem length ratio, and tip angle was used to estimate the importance of each attribute to explaining variation patterns. Results show that the blade and the stem can be seen as “near decomposable units” in the points integrating the studied sample. However, this modular pattern changes after removing the effects of reduction. Indeed, a resharpened point tends to show a tip/rest of the point modular pattern. The composite PCA analyses evidenced three different patterns of morphometric attributes compatible with arrows, thrown spears, and hand-held tools. Interestingly, when analyzed independently, these groups show differences in their modular organization. Our results indicate that stone tools can be approached as flexible designs, characterized by a composite set of interacting morphometric attributes, and

  15. Relative importance of modularity and other morphological attributes on different types of lithic point weapons: assessing functional variations.

    PubMed

    González-José, Rolando; Charlin, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The specific using of different prehistoric weapons is mainly determined by its physical properties, which provide a relative advantage or disadvantage to perform a given, particular function. Since these physical properties are integrated to accomplish that function, examining design variables and their pattern of integration or modularity is of interest to estimate the past function of a point. Here we analyze a composite sample of lithic points from southern Patagonia likely formed by arrows, thrown spears and hand-held points to test if they can be viewed as a two-module system formed by the blade and the stem, and to evaluate the degree in which shape, size, asymmetry, blade: stem length ratio, and tip angle explain the observed variance and differentiation among points supposedly aimed to accomplish different functions. To do so we performed a geometric morphometric analysis on 118 lithic points, departing from 24 two-dimensional landmark and semi landmarks placed on the point's contour. Klingenberg's covariational modularity tests were used to evaluate different modularity hypotheses, and a composite PCA including shape, size, asymmetry, blade: stem length ratio, and tip angle was used to estimate the importance of each attribute to explaining variation patterns. Results show that the blade and the stem can be seen as "near decomposable units" in the points integrating the studied sample. However, this modular pattern changes after removing the effects of reduction. Indeed, a resharpened point tends to show a tip/rest of the point modular pattern. The composite PCA analyses evidenced three different patterns of morphometric attributes compatible with arrows, thrown spears, and hand-held tools. Interestingly, when analyzed independently, these groups show differences in their modular organization. Our results indicate that stone tools can be approached as flexible designs, characterized by a composite set of interacting morphometric attributes, and evolving

  16. Rational design and synthesis of excavated trioctahedral Au nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiaoli; Jia, Yanyan; Shen, Wei; Xie, Shuifen; Yang, Yanan; Cao, Zhenming; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2015-06-28

    Excavated polyhedral nanostructures, possessing the features of high surface area and well-defined surface structure with a specific crystal facet and avoidance of aggregation, could be one of the best choices for the purpose of reducing consumption and improving performance of noble metals in many application fields. However, the formation of the excavated structures is thermodynamically unfavourable and its rational synthesis is far beyond our knowledge. In this work, taking overgrowth of Pd onto trioctahedral Au nanocrystals as a model, we present a deep insight study for synthesizing an excavated structure relying on the protection role of surfactants under suitable crystal growth kinetics. Based on the abovementioned understanding, we designed a simple and effective strategy to synthesize Au nanocrystals with excavated trioctahedral structure in one step. Due to the novel feature of the excavated structure and exposed high energy {110} facets, excavated trioctahedral Au NCs exhibited optical extinction at the near-infrared region and showed high catalytic activity towards the reduction of p-nitrophenol. Moreover, the synthetic strategy can be extended to the synthesis of excavated Au-Pd alloys.

  17. 100 Area excavation treatability test plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992f). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications. The most recent applications are excavation of the 618-9 burial ground and partial remediation of the 316-5 process trenches (DOE-RL 1992a, 1992b). Both projects included excavation of soil and dust control (using water sprays). Excavation is a well-developed technology and equipment is readily available; however, certain aspects of the excavation process require testing before use in full-scale operations. These include the following: Measurement and control of excavation-generated dust and airborne contamination; verification of field analytical system capabilities; demonstration of soil removal techniques specific to the 100 Area waste site types and configurations. The execution of this treatability test may produce up to 500 yd{sub 3} of contaminated soil, which will be used for future treatability tests. These tests may include soil washing with vitrification of the soil washing residuals. Other tests will be conducted if soil washing is not a viable alternative.

  18. COLLISIONAL EXCAVATION OF ASTEROID (596) SCHEILA

    SciTech Connect

    Bodewits, D.; Kelley, M. S.; Li, J.-Y.; Besse, S.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Landsman, W. B. E-mail: msk@astro.umd.edu E-mail: sbesse@astro.umd.edu E-mail: Wayne.B.Landsman@nasa.gov

    2011-05-20

    We observed asteroid (596) Scheila and its ejecta cloud using the Swift UV-optical telescope. We obtained photometry of the nucleus and the ejecta, and for the first time measured the asteroid's reflection spectrum between 290 and 500 nm. Our measurements indicate significant reddening at UV wavelengths (13% per 10{sup 3} A) and a possible broad, unidentified absorption feature around 380 nm. Our measurements indicate that the outburst has not permanently increased the asteroid's brightness. We did not detect any of the gases that are typically associated with either hypervolatile activity thought responsible for cometary outbursts (CO{sup +}, CO{sub 2} {sup +}), or for any volatiles excavated with the dust (OH, NH, CN, C{sub 2}, C{sub 3}). We estimate that 6 x 10{sup 8} kg of dust was released with a high ejection velocity of 57 m s{sup -1} (assuming 1 {mu}m sized particles). While the asteroid is red in color and the ejecta have the same color as the Sun, we suggest that the dust does not contain any ice. Based on our observations, we conclude that (596) Scheila was most likely impacted by another main belt asteroid less than 100 m in diameter.

  19. Pre-excavation studies of prehistoric cave sites by magnetic prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis., Sonia; Matskevich, Zinovii; Meshveliani, Tengiz

    2014-05-01

    Detailed magnetic survey was performed for caves study in Israel (1995-1996) within the framework of the Beit Shemesh Regional Project (Judean Shephelah). The experience accumulated in Israel we applied later (2010) in two Georgian prehistoric cave sites: Cherula and Kotias-Klde. The magnetic method is based on the contrast in magnetic properties between a target object (e.g., buried archaeological feature) and the host medium (i.e, the surrounding bedrock and soil). The feasibility of the magnetic method for cave revealing was evaluated by magnetic susceptibility (κ) measurements of surrounding soil and rocks, and archaeological features: stones making up the walls, ceramic fragments and cave fill. According to data obtained, the κ of soil within caves (cave fill) is higher than that of surrounding soil. The enhancement of cave fill κ occurs because processes associated with human habitation: repeated heating and accumulation of organic debris. Both these processes provide good conditions for the conversion of the iron oxide found within the soil to a strongly ferromagnetic form (Mullins, 1977; Maher, 1986; Dalan and Banerjee, 1998, Itkis and Eppelbaum, 1999; Itkis, 2003) The presence of highly magnetic ceramics in caves also enhances magnetic contrast between practically non-magnetic bed rock (chalk in Ramat Beit Shemesh Site (Israel) and limestone (Georgian sites) and the cave fill, increasing the potential of the magnetic method to reveal caves (Itkis, 2011). Based on magnetic survey results, an excavation revealed a cave with a large amount of well preserved pottery and finds typical of the Early Bronze Age. Both studied cave sites in Georgia were located in Chiatura region of Imeretia province. Cherula site is a karstic rockshelter with a single chamber, ca 100 sq. m. The site was briefly tested in 1970s'. The area excavated in 2010 went to the depth of 60 cm below the present day surface; the limestone bedrock was not reached. The excavation revealed

  20. Changes in rock salt permeability due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J C; Howard, C L

    1991-07-01

    Changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation (mine-by) have been measured from the underground workings of the WIPP facility. Prior to the mine-by, the formation responds as a porous medium with a very low brine permeability, a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The mine-by excavation creates a dilated, partially saturated zone in the immediate vicinity of the excavation with an increased permeability to brine and a measurable permeability to gas. The changes in hydrologic properties are discussed in the context of pore structure changes.

  1. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, Jason; Mueller, Robert; Smith, Drew; Nick, Andrew; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. The goal of percussive excavation is to fluidize dry regolith in front of the leading edge of the tool by mechanically separating the microscopic interlocking grains resulting in a reduced force needed to shear the soil. There are several variables involved with this technique; this experiment varied: Impact energy, frequency, and excavation speed and held constant: impact direction, depth of cut, angle of tool, and soil bulk density. The test apparatus consisted of an aluminum truss bridge with a central pivoting arm. Attached to the arm was a winch with a load cell in line that recorded the tension in the cable and therefore the excavation load. The arm could be adjusted for excavation depth which was recorded along with the arm angle relative to the bridge. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached at the end of the arm simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of . movement. Internally the mechanism used a set of die springs and barrel cam to produce the percussive blow. By changing the springs and the speed of the motor the impact energy and frequency of percussion could be varied independently. Impact energies from 11.2J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 BPM to 700 BPM were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 51% was achieved in this experimental investigation. Smaller percussive digging implements, tested by others, have achieved a

  2. Quantity of remaining bacteria and cavity size after excavation with FACE, caries detector dye and conventional excavation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Aine M; Attin, Thomas; Buchalla, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    In this in vitro study, quantitative confocal microscopy was used to show differences in the quantity of bacteria remaining in dentin after excavation with different methods. A further parameter was the cavity volume after excavation relative to the original lesion size. Teeth with dentin caries were divided into three groups of 20 each. The caries was removed by a single operator using a slow handpiece and a round bur. In the first group, Fluorescence Aided Caries Excavation (FACE) was carried out: violet light was used to illuminate the operating field and the operator observed the cavity through a high-pass filter and removed the orange-red fluorescing areas. The second group was excavated using Caries Detector, while the third group used conventional excavation. After excavation, cavity volume was measured; samples were stained for bacteria with ethidium bromide, and they were examined using confocal microscopy under standardized conditions. The bound stain was quantified in terms of fluorescence intensity on the confocal images. Total pixel intensity was significantly lower in the FACE Group than in the Caries Detector group (p = 0.046) and in the conventional excavation group (p = 0.021). Differences in cavity volume relative to original lesion size were not statistically significant (p = 0.86, 0.35 and 0.51). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that FACE is more effective in removing infected dentin without significantly increasing cavity size when compared to conventional excavation and excavation with the aid of caries detector dye.

  3. Urban amphibian assemblages as metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Parris, Kirsten M

    2006-05-01

    1. Urban ecosystems are expanding throughout the world, and urban ecology is attracting increasing research interest. Some authors have questioned the value of existing ecological theories for understanding the processes and consequences of urbanization. 2. In order to assess the applicability of metacommunity theory to urban systems, I evaluated three assumptions that underlie the theory - the effect of patch area, the effect of patch isolation, and species-environment relations - using data on assemblages of pond-breeding amphibians in the Greater Melbourne area of Australia. I also assessed the relative impact of habitat fragmentation, habitat isolation, and changes to habitat quality on these assemblages. 3. Poisson regression modelling provided support for an important increase in species richness with patch area (pond size) and a decrease in species richness with increasing patch isolation, as measured by surrounding road cover. Holding all other variables constant, species richness was predicted to be 2.8-5.5 times higher at the largest pond than at the smallest, while the most isolated pond was predicted to have 12-19% of the species richness of the least isolated pond. Thus, the data were consistent with the first two assumptions of metacommunity theory evaluated. 4. The quality of habitat at a pond was also important, with a predicted 44-56% decrease in the number of species detected at ponds with a surrounding vertical wall compared with those with a gently sloping bank. This demonstrates that environmental differences between habitat patches were also influencing amphibian assemblages, providing support for the species-sorting and/or mass-effect perspectives of metacommunity theory. 5. Without management intervention, urbanization may lead to a reduction in the number of amphibian species persisting in urban ponds, particularly where increasing isolation of ponds by roads and associated infrastructure reduces the probability of re-colonization following

  4. 4. VIEW OF AREA EXCAVATED FOR ACCESS TO MERCURY RETORT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF AREA EXCAVATED FOR ACCESS TO MERCURY RETORT. VIEW SOUTH FROM RETORT. (OCTOBER, 1995) - McCormick Group Mine, Mercury Retort, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  5. 41. Upstream end of emergency spillway excavation. Photographer unknown, 1929. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Upstream end of emergency spillway excavation. Photographer unknown, 1929. Source: Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR). - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING EXCAVATION PIT FOR MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING EXCAVATION PIT FOR MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601) LOOKING SOUTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-50-693. Unknown Photographer, 1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing the steps leading down into the eighteenth-century burial vault - Harry Buck House, North of Main Street (14800 Governor Oden Bowie Drive), Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, MD

  8. 42. View of emergency spillway excavation looking downstream from spillway. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. View of emergency spillway excavation looking downstream from spillway. Photographer unknown, 1929. Source: ADWR. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 9. Excavation work at Pleasant Dam (now called Waddell Dam). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Excavation work at Pleasant Dam (now called Waddell Dam). Photographer unknown, July, 22, 1926. Source: Maricopa County Municipal Water Conservation District Number One (MWD). - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 16. TAILRACE ARCH FROM 1814 MILL BROKEN THROUGH DURING EXCAVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. TAILRACE ARCH FROM 1814 MILL BROKEN THROUGH DURING EXCAVATION FOR A SURFACE WATER RUNOFF POLLUTION TRAP, SUBSEQUENTLY FILLED. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  11. 20. photographer unknown undated EXCAVATION AND ROCK TRIMMING FOR LOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. photographer unknown undated EXCAVATION AND ROCK TRIMMING FOR LOCK AND GATE SILL COMPLETED. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  12. 22. photographer unknown 8 May 1935 EXCAVATION FOR MAIN CULVERT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. photographer unknown 8 May 1935 EXCAVATION FOR MAIN CULVERT AND LATERALS IN LOCK FLOOR. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  13. 14. FLOODED POWER HOUSE FOUNDATION EXCAVATION BEING PUMPED OUT. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. FLOODED POWER HOUSE FOUNDATION EXCAVATION BEING PUMPED OUT. NOTE KEYS IN FOREBAY ABUTMENT TO INTERLOCK WITH POWER HOUSE FOUNDATION, March 1918. - Dam No. 5 Hydroelectric Plant, On Potomac River, Hedgesville, Berkeley County, WV

  14. 48. EXCAVATING AND DRIVING PILES FOR SHOOFLY BRIDGE, YOLO COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. EXCAVATING AND DRIVING PILES FOR SHOOFLY BRIDGE, YOLO COUNTY SIDE OF RIVER, November 7, 1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  15. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ARCHED ENTRY INTO BASEMENT UNDER FRONT ENTRY IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTH (NOTE GALLETING IN BRICK FOUNDATION) - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  16. 13. AERIAL VIEW SHOWING IN THE FOREGROUND, EXCAVATION FOR THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. AERIAL VIEW SHOWING IN THE FOREGROUND, EXCAVATION FOR THE SPILLWAY APRON.... Volume XVII, No. 12, December 26, 1939. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  17. Telerobotic Excavator Designed to Compete in NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Rodney; Santin, Cara; Yousef, Ahmed; Nguyen, Thien; Helferty, John; Pillapakkam, Shriram

    2011-01-01

    The second annual NASA Lunabotics Mining competition is to be held in May 23-28, 2011. The goal of the competition is for teams of university level students to design, build, test and compete with a fully integrated lunar excavator on a simulated lunar surface. Our team, named Lunar Solutions I, will be representing Temple University's College of Engineering in the competition. The team's main goal was to build a robot which is able to compete with other teams, and ultimately win the competition. The main challenge of the competition was to build a wireless robot that can excavate and collect a minimum of 10 kilograms of the regolith material within 15 minutes. The robot must also be designed to operate in conditions similar to those found on the lunar surface. The design of the lunar excavator is constrained by a set of requirements determined by NASA and detailed in the competition's rulebook. The excavator must have the ability to communicate with the "main base" wirelessly, and over a Wi-Fi network. Human operators are located at a remote site approximately 60 meters away from the simulated lunar surface upon which the robot must excavate the lunar regolith surface. During the competition, the robot will operate in a separate area from the control room in an area referred to as the "Lunarena." From the control room, the operators will have to control the robot using visual feedback from cameras placed both within the arena and on the robot. Using this visual feedback the human operators control the robots movement using both keyboard and joystick commands. In order to place in the competition, a minimum of 10 kg of regolith material has to be excavated, collected, and dumped into a specific location. For that reason, the robot must be provided with an effective and powerful excavation system. Our excavator uses tracks for the drive system. After performing extensive research and trade studies, we concluded that tracks would be the most effective method for

  18. Impact-Actuated Digging Tool for Lunar Excavation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jak; Chu, Philip; Craft, Jack; Zacny, Kris; Santoro, Chris

    2013-01-01

    NASA s plans for a lunar outpost require extensive excavation. The Lunar Surface Systems Project Office projects that thousands of tons of lunar soil will need to be moved. Conventional excavators dig through soil by brute force, and depend upon their substantial weight to react to the forces generated. This approach will not be feasible on the Moon for two reasons: (1) gravity is 1/6th that on Earth, which means that a kg on the Moon will supply 1/6 the down force that it does on Earth, and (2) transportation costs (at the time of this reporting) of $50K to $100K per kg make massive excavators economically unattractive. A percussive excavation system was developed for use in vacuum or nearvacuum environments. It reduces the down force needed for excavation by an order of magnitude by using percussion to assist in soil penetration and digging. The novelty of this excavator is that it incorporates a percussive mechanism suited to sustained operation in a vacuum environment. A percussive digger breadboard was designed, built, and successfully tested under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The breadboard was run in vacuum to more than 2..times the lifetime of the Apollo Lunar Surface Drill, throughout which the mechanism performed and held up well. The percussive digger was demonstrated to reduce the force necessary for digging in lunar soil simulant by an order of magnitude, providing reductions as high as 45:1. This is an enabling technology for lunar site preparation and ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilization) mining activities. At transportation costs of $50K to $100K per kg, reducing digging forces by an order of magnitude translates into billions of dollars saved by not launching heavier systems to accomplish excavation tasks necessary to the establishment of a lunar outpost. Applications on the lunar surface include excavation for habitats, construction of roads, landing pads, berms, foundations, habitat shielding, and ISRU.

  19. NOVEL EXCAVATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMIC SURFACE MINING

    SciTech Connect

    Vladislav Kecojevic; Samuel Frimpong

    2005-05-01

    Ground excavation constitutes a significant component of production costs in any surface mining operation. The excavation process entails material digging and removal in which the equipment motion is constrained by the workspace geometry. A major excavation problem is the variability of material properties, resulting in varying mechanical energy input and stress loading of shovel dipper-and-tooth assembly across the working bench. This variability has a huge impact on the shovel dipper and tooth assembly in hard formations. With this in mind, the primary objectives of the project were to (i) provide the theoretical basis to develop the Intelligent Shovel Excavation (ISE) technology to solve the problems associated with excavation in material formations; (ii) advance knowledge and frontiers in shovel excavation through intelligent navigation; and (iii) submit proposal for the design, development and implementation of the ISE technology for shovel excavation at experimental surface mining sites. The mathematical methods were used to (i) develop shovel's kinematics and dynamics, and (ii) establish the relationship between shovel parameters and the resistive forces from the material formation during excavation process. The ADAMS simulation environment was used to develop the hydraulic and cable shovel virtual prototypes. Two numerical examples are included to test the theoretical hypotheses and the obtained results are discussed. The area of sensor technology was studied. Application of specific wrist-mounted sensors to characterize the material, bucket and frame assembly was determined. Data acquisition, display and control system for shovel loading technology was adopted. The concept of data acquisition and control system was designed and a shovel boom stresses were simulated. A multi-partner collaboration between research organizations, shovel manufacturer, hardware and sensor technology companies, and surface mining companies is proposed to test design features

  20. Identification of New Lithic Clasts in Lunar Breccia 14305 by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.; Carpenter, Paul K.; Jolliff, Bradley L.

    2014-01-01

    From 1969 to 1972, Apollo astronauts collected 382 kg of rocks, soils, and core samples from six locations on the surface of the Moon. The samples were initially characterized, largely by binocular examination, in a custom-built facility at Johnson Space Center (JSC), and the samples have been curated at JSC ever since. Despite over 40 years of study, demand for samples remains high (500 subsamples per year are allocated to scientists around the world), particularly for plutonic (e.g., anorthosites, norites, etc.) and evolved (e.g., granites, KREEP basalts) lithologies. The reason for the prolonged interest is that as new scientists and new techniques examine the samples, our understanding of how the Moon, Earth, and other inner Solar System bodies formed and evolved continues to grow. Scientists continually clamor for new samples to test their emerging hypotheses. Although all of the large Apollo samples that are igneous rocks have been classified, many Apollo samples are complex polymict breccias that have previously yielded large (cm-sized) igneous clasts. In this work we present the initial efforts to use the non-destructive techniques of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and micro x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) to identify large lithic clasts in Apollo 14 polymict breccia sample 14305. The sample in this study is 14305,483, a 150 g slab of regolith breccia 14305 measuring 10x6x2 cm (Figure 1a). The sample was scanned at the University of Texas High-Resolution X-ray CT Facility on an Xradia MicroXCT scanner. Two adjacent overlapping volumes were acquired at 49.2 micrometer resolution and stitched together, resulting in 1766 slices. Each volume was acquired at 100 kV accelerating voltage and 98 mA beam current with a 1 mm CaF2 filter, with 2161 views gathered over 360deg at 3 seconds acquisition time per view. Micro-XRF analyses were done at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on an EDAX Orbis PC micro-XRF instrument. Multiple scans were made at 40 k

  1. Intelligent excavator control system for lunar mining system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lever, Paul J. A.; Wang, Fei-Yue

    1995-01-01

    A major benefit of utilizing local planetary resources is that it reduces the need and cost of lifting materials from the Earth's surface into Earth orbit. The location of the moon makes it an ideal site for harvesting the materials needed to assist space activities. Here, lunar excavation will take place in the dynamic unstructured lunar environment, in which conditions are highly variable and unpredictable. Autonomous mining (excavation) machines are necessary to remove human operators from this hazardous environment. This machine must use a control system structure that can identify, plan, sense, and control real-time dynamic machine movements in the lunar environment. The solution is a vision-based hierarchical control structure. However, excavation tasks require force/torque sensor feedback to control the excavation tool after it has penetrated the surface. A fuzzy logic controller (FLC) is used to interpret the forces and torques gathered from a bucket mounted force/torque sensor during excavation. Experimental results from several excavation tests using the FLC are presented here. These results represent the first step toward an integrated sensing and control system for a lunar mining system.

  2. Cratos: A Simple Low Power Excavation and Hauling System for Lunar Oxygen Production and General Excavation Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, John J.; Greer, Lawrence C.; John, Wentworth T.; Spina, Dan C.; Krasowski, Mike J.; Abel, Phillip B.; Prokop, Norman F.; Flatico, Joseph M.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a robust excavating and hauling system for lunar and planetary excavation is critical to the NASA mission to the Moon and Mars. Cratos was developed as a low center of gravity, small (.75m x .75m x 0.3m), low power tracked test vehicle. The vehicle was modified to excavate and haul because it demonstrated good performance capabilities in a laboratory and field testing. Tested on loose sand in the SLOPE facility, the vehicle was able to pick up, carry, and dump sand, allowing it to accomplish the standard requirements delivery of material to a lunar oxygen production site. Cratos can pick up and deliver raw material to a production plant, as well as deliver spent tailings to a disposal site. The vehicle can complete many other In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) excavation chores and in conjunction with another vehicle or with additional attachments may be able to accomplish all needed ISRU tasks.

  3. Cyanobacteria are confined to dewless habitats within a dew desert: Implications for past and future climate change for lithic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidron, Giora J.; Starinsky, Abraham; Yaalon, Dan H.

    2014-11-01

    Although covering almost all rock outcrops around the world, little is known regarding the factors that govern the spatial distribution of lithic cyanobacteria and lichens. This is also the case in the Negev Desert, where cyanobacteria predominate on the rock outcrops of the south-facing slopes and lichens on the rock outcrops of the north-facing slopes. Hypothesizing that abiotic conditions determine their distribution, radiation, temperature, rain, dew and fog were monitored over a two-year period (2008-2010) at cyanobacteria- and lichen-dwelling habitats within a first-order drainage basin in the Negev Highlands. While non-significant differences characterized the rain amounts, substantial differences in substrate temperatures were recorded which resulted in turn in fundamental differences in the non-rainfall water regime. While dew condensed at the rock outcrops of the lichen habitat, no condensation took place at the cyanobacteria habitat. Contrary to the common belief, cyanobacteria were found to inhabit dewless habitats. As a result, cyanobacteria solely rely on rain precipitation for growth and can therefore serve as bioindicators for dewless habitats within the dewy Negev Desert. The findings may have important implications regarding Earth colonization, soil forming processes and geochemical processes following climate warming. They may explain lichen expansion and subsequent O2 increase during the mid Neoproterozoic providing indirect support for substantial photosynthetic activity and high weathering rates during this era.

  4. SIMULATING FISH ASSEMBLAGE DYNAMICS IN RIVER NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    My recently retired colleague, Joan Baker, and I have developed a prototype computer simulation model for studying the effects of human and non-human alterations of habitats and species availability on fish assemblage populations. The fish assemblage model, written in R, is a sp...

  5. Excavations at Schöningen and paradigm shifts in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Conard, Nicholas J; Serangeli, Jordi; Böhner, Utz; Starkovich, Britt M; Miller, Christopher E; Urban, Brigitte; Van Kolfschoten, Thijs

    2015-12-01

    The exceptional preservation at Schöningen together with a mixture of perseverance, hard work, and sheer luck led to the recovery of unique finds in an exceptional context. The 1995 discovery of numerous wooden artifacts, most notably at least 10 carefully made spears together with the skeletons of at least 20 to 25 butchered horses, brought the debate about hunting versus scavenging among late archaic hominins and analogous arguments about the purportedly primitive behavior of Homo heidelbergensis and Neanderthals to an end. Work under H. Thieme's lead from 1992 to 2008 and results from the current team since 2008 demonstrate that late H. heidelbergensis or early Neanderthals used sophisticated artifacts made from floral and faunal materials, in addition to lithic artifacts more typically recovered at Lower Paleolithic sites. The finds from the famous Horse Butchery Site and two dozen other archaeological horizons from the edges of the open-cast mine at Schöningen provide many new insights into the technology and behavioral patterns of hominins about 300 ka BP during MIS 9 on the Northern European Plain. An analysis of the finds from Schöningen and their contexts shows that the inhabitants of the site were skilled hunters at the top of the food chain and exhibited a high level of planning depth. These hominins had command of effective means of communication about the here and now, and the past and the future, that allowed them to repeatedly execute well-coordinated and successful group activities that likely culminated in a division of labor and social and economic patterns radically different from those of all non-human primates. The unique preservation and high quality excavations have led to a major paradigm shift or "Schöningen Effect" that changed our views of human evolution during the late Lower Paleolithic. In this respect, we can view the behaviors documented at Schöningen as a plausible baseline for the behavioral sophistication of archaic hominins

  6. Excavations at Schöningen and paradigm shifts in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Conard, Nicholas J; Serangeli, Jordi; Böhner, Utz; Starkovich, Britt M; Miller, Christopher E; Urban, Brigitte; Van Kolfschoten, Thijs

    2015-12-01

    The exceptional preservation at Schöningen together with a mixture of perseverance, hard work, and sheer luck led to the recovery of unique finds in an exceptional context. The 1995 discovery of numerous wooden artifacts, most notably at least 10 carefully made spears together with the skeletons of at least 20 to 25 butchered horses, brought the debate about hunting versus scavenging among late archaic hominins and analogous arguments about the purportedly primitive behavior of Homo heidelbergensis and Neanderthals to an end. Work under H. Thieme's lead from 1992 to 2008 and results from the current team since 2008 demonstrate that late H. heidelbergensis or early Neanderthals used sophisticated artifacts made from floral and faunal materials, in addition to lithic artifacts more typically recovered at Lower Paleolithic sites. The finds from the famous Horse Butchery Site and two dozen other archaeological horizons from the edges of the open-cast mine at Schöningen provide many new insights into the technology and behavioral patterns of hominins about 300 ka BP during MIS 9 on the Northern European Plain. An analysis of the finds from Schöningen and their contexts shows that the inhabitants of the site were skilled hunters at the top of the food chain and exhibited a high level of planning depth. These hominins had command of effective means of communication about the here and now, and the past and the future, that allowed them to repeatedly execute well-coordinated and successful group activities that likely culminated in a division of labor and social and economic patterns radically different from those of all non-human primates. The unique preservation and high quality excavations have led to a major paradigm shift or "Schöningen Effect" that changed our views of human evolution during the late Lower Paleolithic. In this respect, we can view the behaviors documented at Schöningen as a plausible baseline for the behavioral sophistication of archaic hominins

  7. The function of prehistoric lithic tools: a combined study of use-wear analysis and FTIR microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunziante Cesaro, Stella; Lemorini, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    The application of combined use-wear analysis and FTIR micro spectroscopy for the investigation of the flint and obsidian tools from the archaeological sites of Masseria Candelaro (Foggia, Italy) and Sant'Anna di Oria (Brindisi, Italy) aiming to clarify their functional use is described. The tools excavated in the former site showed in a very high percentage spectroscopically detectable residues on their working edges. The identification of micro deposits is based on comparison with a great number of replicas studied in the same experimental conditions. FTIR data confirmed in almost all cases the use-wear analysis suggestions and added details about the material processed and about the working procedures.

  8. Collective workload organization in confined excavation of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaenkova, Daria; Linevich, Vadim; Goodisman, Michael A.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    Many social insects collectively construct large nests in complex substrates; such structures are often composed of narrow tunnels. The benefits of collective construction, including reduced construction costs per worker come with challenges of navigation in crowded, confined spaces. Here we study the workforce organization of groups of S. invicta fire ants creating tunnels in wet granular media. We monitor the activity levels of marked (painted) workers-defined as a number of tunnel visits over 12 hours- during initiation of tunnels. The activity levels are described by a Lorenz curve with a Gini coefficient of ~ 0 . 7 indicating that a majority of the excavation is performed by a minority of workers. We hypothesize that this workload distribution is beneficial for excavation in crowded conditions, and use a 2D cellular automata (CA) model to reproduce behaviors of the excavating ants. CA simulations reveal that tunnel construction rates decrease in groups of equally active animals compared to groups with the natural workload distribution. We use predictions of the CA model to organize collective excavation of granular material by teams of digging robots, and use the robots to test hypotheses of crowded excavation in the physical world. We acknowledge support of National Science Foundation, Physics of Living Systems division.

  9. Addressing the Consequences of Dynamic Rock Failure in Underground Excavations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, T. R.

    2016-10-01

    Rockbursts are violent events that result in the ejection of volumes of rock from the walls of underground excavations. They can be extremely hazardous and have been responsible for many accidents in underground excavations. They also are responsible for significant direct and indirect costs in mining and civil engineering projects. The occurrence of rockbursting can be reduced by optimising the design with regard to excavation layout, excavation geometry and size, excavation sequence, and by the application of destressing/preconditioning measures. Thereafter, containment of damage relies on rock support. Conventional design of rock support for the containment of rockburst damage is not possible since neither the demand that is generated, nor the capacity of support systems, are known, and thus there is a state of design indeterminacy. The approach recommended in this paper is a risk-consequence one: evaluation of the risk (the product of the probability of occurrence of a rockburst and its consequence, in financial terms), and use of this quantified risk as a decision making tool regarding the justification for significant dynamically capable rock support. A typically suitable rock support system for rockbursting conditions is suggested in the paper.

  10. A novel energy recovery system for parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cao, Baoyu; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic excavator energy saving is important to relieve source shortage and protect environment. This paper mainly discusses the energy saving for the hybrid hydraulic excavator. By analyzing the excess energy of three hydraulic cylinders in the conventional hydraulic excavator, a new boom potential energy recovery system is proposed. The mathematical models of the main components including boom cylinder, hydraulic motor, and hydraulic accumulator are built. The natural frequency of the proposed energy recovery system is calculated based on the mathematical models. Meanwhile, the simulation models of the proposed system and a conventional energy recovery system are built by AMESim software. The results show that the proposed system is more effective than the conventional energy saving system. At last, the main components of the proposed energy recovery system including accumulator and hydraulic motor are analyzed for improving the energy recovery efficiency. The measures to improve the energy recovery efficiency of the proposed system are presented.

  11. A Novel Energy Recovery System for Parallel Hybrid Hydraulic Excavator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Cao, Baoyu; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic excavator energy saving is important to relieve source shortage and protect environment. This paper mainly discusses the energy saving for the hybrid hydraulic excavator. By analyzing the excess energy of three hydraulic cylinders in the conventional hydraulic excavator, a new boom potential energy recovery system is proposed. The mathematical models of the main components including boom cylinder, hydraulic motor, and hydraulic accumulator are built. The natural frequency of the proposed energy recovery system is calculated based on the mathematical models. Meanwhile, the simulation models of the proposed system and a conventional energy recovery system are built by AMESim software. The results show that the proposed system is more effective than the conventional energy saving system. At last, the main components of the proposed energy recovery system including accumulator and hydraulic motor are analyzed for improving the energy recovery efficiency. The measures to improve the energy recovery efficiency of the proposed system are presented. PMID:25405215

  12. Remotely operated excavator needs assessment/site visit summary

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, J.; Haller, S.; Worsley, R.; King, M.

    1992-12-02

    The Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration requested an assessment of soil excavation needs relative to soil remediation. The following list identifies the DOE sites assessed: Mound Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, and Fernald Site. The reviewed sites fall into one or more of the following three categories: production, EPA National Priorities List, or CERCLA (superfund) designation. Only three of the sites appear to have the need for a remotely operated excavator rope. Hanford and Idaho Falls have areas of high-level radioactive contamination either buried or in/under buildings. The Fernald site has a need for remote operated equipment of different types. It is their feeling that remote equipment can be used to remove the health dangers to humans by removing them from the area. Most interviewees stated that characterization technologies needs are more immediate concern over excavation. In addition, the sites do not have similar geographic conditions which would aid in the development of a generic precision excavator. The sites visited were not ready to utilize or provide the required design information necessary to draft a performance specification. This creates a strong case against the development of one type of ROPE for use at these sites. Assuming soil characterization technology/methodology is improved sufficiently to allow accurate and real time field characterization then development of a precision excavator might be pursued based on FEMP needs, since the FEMP`s sole scope of work is remediation. The excavator could then be used/tested and then later modified for other sites as warranted.

  13. Remote Excavation System technology evaluation report: Buried Waste Robotics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This document describes the results from the Remote Excavation System demonstration and testing conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during June and July 1993. The purpose of the demonstration was to ascertain the feasibility of the system for skimming soil and removing various types of buried waste in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements, and to compare the performances of manual and remote operation of a backhoe. The procedures and goals of the demonstration were previously defined in The Remote Excavation System Test Plan, which served as a guideline for evaluating the various components of the system and discussed the procedures used to conduct the tests.

  14. Calculation of Excavation Force for ISRU on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Xiangwu (David); Burnoski, Louis; Agui, Juan H.; Wilkinson, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Accurately predicting the excavation force that will be encountered by digging tools on the lunar surface is a crucial element of in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). Based on principles of soil mechanics, this paper develops an analytical model that is relatively simple to apply and uses soil parameters that can be determined by traditional soil strength tests. The influence of important parameters on the excavation force is investigated. The results are compared with that predicted by other available theories. Results of preliminary soil tests on lunar stimulant are also reported.

  15. Geotechnical characterization and construction methods for SSC tunnel excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.P.; Lundin, T.K. Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX )

    1990-06-01

    The site for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) facility was selected in 1988 after a nationwide proposal competition. The selected site is located in Ellis County, Texas, surrounding the town of Waxahachie which is about 30 miles (48 km) south of the City of Dallas central business district. This paper will describe the geotechnical conditions anticipated for excavation at the SSC site. A general geologic and geomechanical description of the rock present will be followed by a summary of the site-specific conceptual design for the tunneled components of the SSC machine. The Supercollider project will include about 70 miles (113) km of tunnel excavation.

  16. Asteroid Icy Regolith Excavation and Volatile Capture Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Mantovani, James; Swanger, Adam; Townsend, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Icy regolith simulants will be produced in a relevant vacuum environment using various minerals, including hydrated minerals, that are found in C-type meteorites and in other types of planetary regolith. This will allow us to characterize the mechanical strength of the icy regolith as a function of ice content using penetration, excavation, and sample capture devices. The results of this study will benefit engineers in designing efficient regolith excavators and ISRU processing systems for future exploration missions to asteroids and other planetary bodies.

  17. The nature of organic records in impact excavated rocks on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, W.; Bromiley, G. D.; Sephton, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Impact ejected rocks are targets for life detection missions to Mars. The Martian subsurface is more favourable to organic preservation than the surface owing to an attenuation of radiation and physical separation from oxidising materials with increasing depth. Impact events bring materials to the surface where they may be accessed without complicated drilling procedures. On Earth, different assemblages of organic matter types are derived from varying depositional environments. Here we assess whether these different types of organic materials can survive impact events without corruption. We subjected four terrestrial organic matter types to elevated pressures and temperatures in piston-cylinder experiments followed by chemical characterisation using whole-rock pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that long chain hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter (types I and II; mainly microbial or algal) are unresistant to pressure whereas aromatic hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter types (types III and IV; mainly land plant, metamorphosed or degraded, displaying some superficial chemical similarities to abiotic meteoritic organic matter) are relatively resistant. This suggests that the impact excavated record of potential biology on Mars will be unavoidably biased, with microbial organic matter underrepresented while metamorphosed, degraded or abiotic meteoritic organic matter types will be selectively preserved. PMID:27492071

  18. The nature of organic records in impact excavated rocks on Mars.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, W; Bromiley, G D; Sephton, M A

    2016-08-05

    Impact ejected rocks are targets for life detection missions to Mars. The Martian subsurface is more favourable to organic preservation than the surface owing to an attenuation of radiation and physical separation from oxidising materials with increasing depth. Impact events bring materials to the surface where they may be accessed without complicated drilling procedures. On Earth, different assemblages of organic matter types are derived from varying depositional environments. Here we assess whether these different types of organic materials can survive impact events without corruption. We subjected four terrestrial organic matter types to elevated pressures and temperatures in piston-cylinder experiments followed by chemical characterisation using whole-rock pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that long chain hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter (types I and II; mainly microbial or algal) are unresistant to pressure whereas aromatic hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter types (types III and IV; mainly land plant, metamorphosed or degraded, displaying some superficial chemical similarities to abiotic meteoritic organic matter) are relatively resistant. This suggests that the impact excavated record of potential biology on Mars will be unavoidably biased, with microbial organic matter underrepresented while metamorphosed, degraded or abiotic meteoritic organic matter types will be selectively preserved.

  19. The nature of organic records in impact excavated rocks on Mars.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, W; Bromiley, G D; Sephton, M A

    2016-01-01

    Impact ejected rocks are targets for life detection missions to Mars. The Martian subsurface is more favourable to organic preservation than the surface owing to an attenuation of radiation and physical separation from oxidising materials with increasing depth. Impact events bring materials to the surface where they may be accessed without complicated drilling procedures. On Earth, different assemblages of organic matter types are derived from varying depositional environments. Here we assess whether these different types of organic materials can survive impact events without corruption. We subjected four terrestrial organic matter types to elevated pressures and temperatures in piston-cylinder experiments followed by chemical characterisation using whole-rock pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that long chain hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter (types I and II; mainly microbial or algal) are unresistant to pressure whereas aromatic hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter types (types III and IV; mainly land plant, metamorphosed or degraded, displaying some superficial chemical similarities to abiotic meteoritic organic matter) are relatively resistant. This suggests that the impact excavated record of potential biology on Mars will be unavoidably biased, with microbial organic matter underrepresented while metamorphosed, degraded or abiotic meteoritic organic matter types will be selectively preserved. PMID:27492071

  20. The nature of organic records in impact excavated rocks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, W.; Bromiley, G. D.; Sephton, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Impact ejected rocks are targets for life detection missions to Mars. The Martian subsurface is more favourable to organic preservation than the surface owing to an attenuation of radiation and physical separation from oxidising materials with increasing depth. Impact events bring materials to the surface where they may be accessed without complicated drilling procedures. On Earth, different assemblages of organic matter types are derived from varying depositional environments. Here we assess whether these different types of organic materials can survive impact events without corruption. We subjected four terrestrial organic matter types to elevated pressures and temperatures in piston-cylinder experiments followed by chemical characterisation using whole-rock pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that long chain hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter (types I and II; mainly microbial or algal) are unresistant to pressure whereas aromatic hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter types (types III and IV; mainly land plant, metamorphosed or degraded, displaying some superficial chemical similarities to abiotic meteoritic organic matter) are relatively resistant. This suggests that the impact excavated record of potential biology on Mars will be unavoidably biased, with microbial organic matter underrepresented while metamorphosed, degraded or abiotic meteoritic organic matter types will be selectively preserved.

  1. Archean geotherms and supracrustal assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, Kent C.

    1984-06-01

    Metamorphic mineral assemblages suggest the existence of variable geotherms and lithospheric thicknesses beneath late Archean continental crust. Archean granite-greenstone terranes reflect steep geotherms (50-70°C/km) while high-grade terranes reflect moderate geotherms similar to present continental crust with high heat flow (25-40°C/km). Corresponding lithosphere thicknesses for each terrane during the late Archean are 35-50 km and 50-75 km, respectively. Early Archean (⩾ 3.0 b.y.) greenstones differ from late Archean (˜ 2.7 b.y.) greenstones by the rarity or absence of andesite and graywacke and the relative abundance of pelite, quartzite, and komatiite. Mature clastic sediments in early greenstones reflect shallow-water, stable-basin deposition. Such rocks, together with granite-bearing conglomerate and felsic volcanics imply the existence of still older granitic source terranes. The absence or rarity of andesite in early greenstones reflects the absence of tectonic conditions in which basaltic and tonalitic magmas are modified to produce andesite. A model is presented in which early Archean greenstones form at the interface between tonalite islands and oceanic lithosphere, over convective downcurrents; high-grade supracrustals form on stable continental edges or interiors; and late Archean greenstones form in intracontinental rifts over mantle plumes.

  2. Giardia duodenalis genetic assemblages and hosts

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    Techniques for sub-classifying morphologically identical Giardia duodenalis trophozoites have included comparisons of the electrophoretic mobility of enzymes and of chromosomes, and sequencing of genes encoding β-giardin, triose phosphate isomerase, the small subunit of ribosomal RNA and glutamate dehydrogenase. To date, G. duodenalis organisms have been sub-classified into eight genetic assemblages (designated A–H). Genotyping of G. duodenalis organisms isolated from various hosts has shown that assemblages A and B infect the largest range of host species, and appear to be the main (or possibly only) G. duodenalis assemblages that undeniably infect human subjects. In at least some cases of assemblage A or B infection in wild mammals, there is suggestive evidence that the infection had resulted from environmental contamination by G. duodenalis cysts of human origin. PMID:26984116

  3. A new bee species that excavates sandstone nests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many wonder why animals act in seemingly injurious ways. Understanding the behavior of pollinators such as bees is especially important because of the necessary ecosystem service they provide. The new species Anthophora pueblo, discovered excavating sandstone nests, provides a model system for addre...

  4. Neutron emissions from a lunar-based reactor: Excavation siting

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, A.C. ); Bloomfield, H.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Lunar surface operations, such as deep space observatories, mineral extraction facilities, and oxygen production factories, will require large amounts of electrical power. Compact nuclear reactor power sources are possible for such applications where the demand exceeds 25 kW(electric) and will be required above 500 kW(electric). One scenario for the siting of a lunar reactor power system is to place the reactor at the bottom of an excavation and locate the power conversion and heat rejection systems on the lunar surface. The lunar soil provides the necessary radiation shielding for equipment and personnel, and this configuration minimizes the amount of shielding material that must be transported from Earth. Such a configuration, however, allows neutrons to be scattered around the primary instrument shields and to be emitted from the top of the hole. A parametric study of excavation configurations has been completed using MCNP. Variations of the excavation design include increasing the depth and the diameter of the excavation and the inclusion of neutron absorbing materials in the bulkheads, which support the reactor power system and restrain the lunar soil.

  5. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING EXCAVATION PIT FOR MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING EXCAVATION PIT FOR MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601) LOOKING NORTHWEST. INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-50-885. Unknown Photographer, 10/30/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. 55. Historic photo of excavation work at Building 202, shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Historic photo of excavation work at Building 202, shows facility with detention tank in foreground, February 24, 1969. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-69-711. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  7. 56. Historic photo of excavation work at Building 202, shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Historic photo of excavation work at Building 202, shows facility with exhaust scrubber in foreground, February 24, 1969. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-69-712. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  8. Development and demonstration of a telerobotic excavation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Barry L.; Thompson, David H.; Killough, Stephen M.; Dinkins, Marion A.

    1994-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing remote excavation technologies for the Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of Technology Development, Robotics Technology Development Program, and also for the Department of Defense (DOD) Project Manager for Ammunition Logistics. This work is being done to meet the need for remote excavation and removal of radioactive and contaminated buried waste at several DOE sites and unexploded ordnance at DOD sites. System requirements are based on the need to uncover and remove waste from burial sites in a way that does not cause unnecessary personnel exposure or additional environmental contamination. Goals for the current project are to demonstrate dexterous control of a backhoe with force feedback and to implement robotic operations that will improve productivity. The Telerobotic Small Emplacement Excavator is a prototype system that incorporates the needed robotic and telerobotic capabilities on a commercially available platform. The ability to add remote dexterous teleoperation and robotic operating modes is intended to be adaptable to other commercially available excavator systems.

  9. 9. VIEW NORTH, EXCAVATED LOCK FROM WATER STREET (Numbers painted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW NORTH, EXCAVATED LOCK FROM WATER STREET (Numbers painted on stones for reconstruction purposes) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  10. 7. DETAIL OF WEST WALL, FLOOR FULLY EXCAVATED, FIRST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF WEST WALL, FLOOR FULLY EXCAVATED, FIRST AND SECOND LAYER OF PLANKS (Original Fabric) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  11. 6. VIEW WEST, INTERIOR CANAL WALL, FLOOR FULLY EXCAVATED (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW WEST, INTERIOR CANAL WALL, FLOOR FULLY EXCAVATED (Original Fabric) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  12. 8. DETAIL OF WEST WALL, FLOOR FULLY EXCAVATED, CROSS MEMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF WEST WALL, FLOOR FULLY EXCAVATED, CROSS MEMBER (Original Fabric) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  13. STARTING EXCAVATION PIER 2. This view is roughly northeast, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STARTING EXCAVATION PIER 2. This view is roughly northeast, with Pier 2 on the Trinity County end of the bridge. The old suspension bridge, at upper right, was upstream of new bridge - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  14. CUTS FOR MTR EXCAVATION ILLUSTRATE SEDIMENTARY MANTLE OF SOIL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CUTS FOR MTR EXCAVATION ILLUSTRATE SEDIMENTARY MANTLE OF SOIL AND GRAVEL OVERLAYING LAVA ROCK FIFTY FEET BELOW. SAGEBRUSH HAS BEEN SCOURED FROM REST OF SITE. CAMERA PROBABLY FACES SOUTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 67. Unknown Photographer, 6/4/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. 40. Photocopied August 1978. EXCAVATION IN THE FOREBAY, VIEW LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Photocopied August 1978. EXCAVATION IN THE FOREBAY, VIEW LOOKING WEST, MARCH 31, 1899. THE EQUIPMENT USED IN THIS AREA WAS MAINLY MAN-OR HORSE-POWERED SINCE SOIL CONDITIONS HERE (NEAR THE RIVER) WERE TOO SOFT TO PERMIT HEAVY EQUIPMENT. (28) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  16. 30. DETAILED FRONTAL VIEW WEST OF EXCAVATION AT SUSPECTED MICA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAILED FRONTAL VIEW WEST OF EXCAVATION AT SUSPECTED MICA PIT, SHOWING SOIL MIXED WITH MICA FLAKES AT REAR, AND DEEPER HOLE OF VIRGIN SOIL AT FRONT. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Building No. 3, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  17. 10. View looking northwest at excavation into serpentine rock. Formwork ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View looking northwest at excavation into serpentine rock. Formwork at left is for pump room. Partially completed caisson is in foreground. Portion of Point Avisadero visible at right (12/17/42). Photographer unknown. - Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 4, East terminus of Palou Avenue, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. 17. Photocopy of photograph showing excavation of South Bank Substation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph showing excavation of South Bank Substation site, 15 May 1939 (from the BPA Photo Archives, Portland, Oregon, Negative No. 345), LOOKING WEST - Bonneville Power Administration South Bank Substation, I-84, South of Bonneville Dam Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  19. An Analysis of Excavation Support Safety Based on Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorska, Karolina; Wyjadłowski, Marek

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of inclinometric measurements and numerical analyses of soldier-pile wall displacements. The excavation under investigation was made in cohesive soils. The measurements were conducted at points located at the edge of the cantilever excavation support system. The displacements of the excavation support observed over the period of three years demonstrated the pattern of steady growth over the first two months, followed by a gradual levelling out to a final plateau. The numerical analyses were conducted based on 3D FEM models. The numerical analysis of the problem comprise calculations of the global structural safety factor depending on the displacement of the chosen points in the lagging and conducted by means of the φ/c reduction procedure. The adopted graphical method of safety estimation is very conservative in the sense that it recognizes stability loss quite early, when one could further load the medium or weaken it by further strength reduction. The values of the Msf factor are relatively high. This is caused by the fact that the structure was designed for excavation twice as deep. Nevertheless, the structure is treated as a temporary one.

  20. VIEW OF SOUTH GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE THE EXCAVATED EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTH GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE THE EXCAVATED EDGE OF THE GUN BLOCK IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, South Gun Emplacement, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. 29 CFR 1926.651 - Specific excavation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... excavation. (g) Hazardous atmospheres—(1) Testing and controls. In addition to the requirements set forth in subparts D and E of this part (29 CFR 1926.50-1926.107) to prevent exposure to harmful levels of... apply: (i) Where oxygen deficiency (atmospheres containing less than 19.5 percent oxygen) or a...

  2. The function of prehistoric lithic tools: a combined study of use-wear analysis and FTIR microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunziante Cesaro, Stella; Lemorini, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    The application of combined use-wear analysis and FTIR micro spectroscopy for the investigation of the flint and obsidian tools from the archaeological sites of Masseria Candelaro (Foggia, Italy) and Sant'Anna di Oria (Brindisi, Italy) aiming to clarify their functional use is described. The tools excavated in the former site showed in a very high percentage spectroscopically detectable residues on their working edges. The identification of micro deposits is based on comparison with a great number of replicas studied in the same experimental conditions. FTIR data confirmed in almost all cases the use-wear analysis suggestions and added details about the material processed and about the working procedures. PMID:22074884

  3. The Châtelperronian conundrum: Blade and bladelet lithic technologies from Quinçay, France.

    PubMed

    Roussel, M; Soressi, M; Hublin, J-J

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of an almost complete Neanderthal skeleton in a Châtelperronian context at Saint-Césaire 35 years ago changed our perspective on the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic in western Europe. Since then, the Châtelperronian has generally been considered a "transitional" industry rather than an Upper or a Middle Paleolithic industry because of its chronological position, and the association of Neanderthal remains with blades, bone tools and personal ornaments. Several competing hypotheses have been proposed to explain the association between Neanderthals and these types of artefacts including post-depositional mixing, acculturation from anatomically modern human populations, or an independent technological evolution by local Neanderthal populations. Quinçay Cave is the only Châtelperronian site where personal ornaments have been found that does not contain an overlying Upper Paleolithic layer. This means that the post-depositional mixing of later elements into the Châtelperronian may not be used as an explanation for the presence of these materials. We report here on a detailed technological analysis of lithic artefacts from the three Châtelperronian layers at Quinçay Cave. We compare our results with the technology of Mousterian blade industries dating to OIS (oxygen isotope stage) 5, the Mousterian of Acheulian Tradition type B, and the Proto-Aurignacian. We show that the Châtelperronian is sufficiently divergent from the Middle Paleolithic to be classified as a fully Upper Paleolithic industry, with a focus on blade and bladelet production. We also show that the Quinçay Châtelperronian includes retouched bladelets that resemble those found in the Proto-Aurignacian, but were produced in a different manner. We argue that a technological convergence cannot account for these behaviors, since the specific type of retouched bladelet associated with the Châtelperronian was also regularly used by Proto-Aurignacian of neighboring regions. We suggest

  4. Recycling of quartz-poor/lithic-rich foreland-basin sediments in arid climate (Euphrates-Tigris-Karun river system)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Juboury, Ali Ismail Al; Zoleikhaei, Yousef; Vermeesch, Pieter; Hamzah Abdulhussein Jotheri, Jaafar; Akkoca, Dicle Bal; Allen, Mark; Andò, Sergio; Limonta, Mara; Padoan, Marta; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In this detailed petrological analysis of a large source-to-sink sediment-routing system (catchment area > 1 million km2) we document its several peculiarities, and illustrate a rich petrographic and heavy-mineral dataset integrated by bulk-sediment geochemistry and detrital-zircon U-Pb geochronological data that widens the spectrum of compositions generally assumed as paradigmatic for orogenic settings. We test traditional versus upgraded sedimentary-petrology models in the endeavor to derive a more refined conceptual model of reference, in order to enhance the power of provenance analysis but also to define its limitations and understand which secret of nature is likely to remain beyond reach in our efforts to reconstruct orogenic landscapes of the past. Sands derived from the Zagros-Southeast Anatolian fold-thrust belt contain an abundance of lithic grains derived not only first-cycle from carbonates, cherts, mudrocks, arc volcanics, and obducted mantle serpentinites representing the exposed shallow structural level of the orogen, but also recycled from Neogene molassic strata exposed in the foothills. Quartz, K-feldspar and mica are equally scarce in first-cycle and recycled sediments. This quartz-poor petrographic signature, characterizing the broad undissected tectonic domain of the Anatolia-Iranian plateau, is markedly distinct from that of sands shed by highly elevated and dissected collision orogens of the same mountain system such as the Himalaya or the Alps. Arid climate in the region allows full preservation of chemically unstable grains including carbonate and mafic/ultramafic rock fragments even through more than a single sedimentary cycle. Also, it reduces transport capacity of fluvial systems, which dump most of their load in Mesopotamian marshlands upstream of the Arabian/Persian Gulf allochemical carbonate factory. Quartz-poor orogenic sediments from the Zagros-Southeast Anatolian range mix with quartz-rich recycled sands ultimately derived from

  5. The Châtelperronian conundrum: Blade and bladelet lithic technologies from Quinçay, France.

    PubMed

    Roussel, M; Soressi, M; Hublin, J-J

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of an almost complete Neanderthal skeleton in a Châtelperronian context at Saint-Césaire 35 years ago changed our perspective on the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic in western Europe. Since then, the Châtelperronian has generally been considered a "transitional" industry rather than an Upper or a Middle Paleolithic industry because of its chronological position, and the association of Neanderthal remains with blades, bone tools and personal ornaments. Several competing hypotheses have been proposed to explain the association between Neanderthals and these types of artefacts including post-depositional mixing, acculturation from anatomically modern human populations, or an independent technological evolution by local Neanderthal populations. Quinçay Cave is the only Châtelperronian site where personal ornaments have been found that does not contain an overlying Upper Paleolithic layer. This means that the post-depositional mixing of later elements into the Châtelperronian may not be used as an explanation for the presence of these materials. We report here on a detailed technological analysis of lithic artefacts from the three Châtelperronian layers at Quinçay Cave. We compare our results with the technology of Mousterian blade industries dating to OIS (oxygen isotope stage) 5, the Mousterian of Acheulian Tradition type B, and the Proto-Aurignacian. We show that the Châtelperronian is sufficiently divergent from the Middle Paleolithic to be classified as a fully Upper Paleolithic industry, with a focus on blade and bladelet production. We also show that the Quinçay Châtelperronian includes retouched bladelets that resemble those found in the Proto-Aurignacian, but were produced in a different manner. We argue that a technological convergence cannot account for these behaviors, since the specific type of retouched bladelet associated with the Châtelperronian was also regularly used by Proto-Aurignacian of neighboring regions. We suggest

  6. Phytoplankton assemblage characteristics in recurrently fluctuating environments.

    PubMed

    Roelke, Daniel L; Spatharis, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Annual variations in biogeochemical and physical processes can lead to nutrient variability and seasonal patterns in phytoplankton productivity and assemblage structure. In many coastal systems river inflow and water exchange with the ocean varies seasonally, and alternating periods can arise where the nutrient most limiting to phytoplankton growth switches. Transitions between these alternating periods can be sudden or gradual and this depends on human activities, such as reservoir construction and interbasin water transfers. How such activities might influence phytoplankton assemblages is largely unknown. Here, we employed a multispecies, multi-nutrient model to explore how nutrient loading switching mode might affect characteristics of phytoplankton assemblages. The model is based on the Monod-relationship, predicting an instantaneous growth rate from ambient inorganic nutrient concentrations whereas the limiting nutrient at any given time was determined by Liebig's Law of the Minimum. Our simulated phytoplankton assemblages self-organized from species rich pools over a 15-year period, and only the surviving species were considered as assemblage members. Using the model, we explored the interactive effects of complementarity level in trait trade-offs within phytoplankton assemblages and the amount of noise in the resource supply concentrations. We found that the effect of shift from a sudden resource supply transition to a gradual one, as observed in systems impacted by watershed development, was dependent on the level of complementarity. In the extremes, phytoplankton species richness and relative overyielding increased when complementarity was lowest, and phytoplankton biomass increased greatly when complementarity was highest. For low-complementarity simulations, the persistence of poorer-performing phytoplankton species of intermediate R*s led to higher richness and relative overyielding. For high-complementarity simulations, the formation of phytoplankton

  7. Phytoplankton Assemblage Characteristics in Recurrently Fluctuating Environments

    PubMed Central

    Roelke, Daniel L.; Spatharis, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Annual variations in biogeochemical and physical processes can lead to nutrient variability and seasonal patterns in phytoplankton productivity and assemblage structure. In many coastal systems river inflow and water exchange with the ocean varies seasonally, and alternating periods can arise where the nutrient most limiting to phytoplankton growth switches. Transitions between these alternating periods can be sudden or gradual and this depends on human activities, such as reservoir construction and interbasin water transfers. How such activities might influence phytoplankton assemblages is largely unknown. Here, we employed a multispecies, multi-nutrient model to explore how nutrient loading switching mode might affect characteristics of phytoplankton assemblages. The model is based on the Monod-relationship, predicting an instantaneous growth rate from ambient inorganic nutrient concentrations whereas the limiting nutrient at any given time was determined by Liebig’s Law of the Minimum. Our simulated phytoplankton assemblages self-organized from species rich pools over a 15-year period, and only the surviving species were considered as assemblage members. Using the model, we explored the interactive effects of complementarity level in trait trade-offs within phytoplankton assemblages and the amount of noise in the resource supply concentrations. We found that the effect of shift from a sudden resource supply transition to a gradual one, as observed in systems impacted by watershed development, was dependent on the level of complementarity. In the extremes, phytoplankton species richness and relative overyielding increased when complementarity was lowest, and phytoplankton biomass increased greatly when complementarity was highest. For low-complementarity simulations, the persistence of poorer-performing phytoplankton species of intermediate R*s led to higher richness and relative overyielding. For high-complementarity simulations, the formation of phytoplankton

  8. Scrapheap Challenge: A novel bulk-bone metabarcoding method to investigate ancient DNA in faunal assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Dáithí C.; Haile, James; Dortch, Joe; White, Nicole E.; Haouchar, Dalal; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Allcock, Richard J.; Prideaux, Gavin J.; Bunce, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Highly fragmented and morphologically indistinct fossil bone is common in archaeological and paleontological deposits but unfortunately it is of little use in compiling faunal assemblages. The development of a cost-effective methodology to taxonomically identify bulk bone is therefore a key challenge. Here, an ancient DNA methodology using high-throughput sequencing is developed to survey and analyse thousands of archaeological bones from southwest Australia. Fossils were collectively ground together depending on which of fifteen stratigraphical layers they were excavated from. By generating fifteen synthetic blends of bulk bone powder, each corresponding to a chronologically distinct layer, samples could be collectively analysed in an efficient manner. A diverse range of taxa, including endemic, extirpated and hitherto unrecorded taxa, dating back to c.46,000 years BP was characterized. The method is a novel, cost-effective use for unidentifiable bone fragments and a powerful molecular tool for surveying fossils that otherwise end up on the taxonomic “scrapheap”. PMID:24288018

  9. The statistical upper mantle assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Anders; Anderson, Don L.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in modern mantle geochemistry is to link geochemical data with geological and geophysical observations. Most of the early geochemical models involved a layered mantle and the concept of geochemical reservoirs. Indeed, the two layer mantle model has been implicit in almost all geochemical literature and the provenance of oceanic island basalt (OIB) and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) [van Keken et al., Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 30 (2002) 493-525]. Large-scale regions in the mantle, such as the 'convective' (i.e. well-stirred, homogeneous) upper mantle, sub-continental lithosphere, and the lower mantle were treated as distinct and accessible geochemical reservoirs. Here we discuss evidence for a ubiquitous distribution of small- to moderate-scale (i.e. 10 2-10 5 m) heterogeneity in the upper mantle, which we refer to as the statistical upper mantle assemblage (SUMA). This heterogeneity forms as the result of long-term plate tectonic recycling of sedimentary and crustal components. The SUMA model does not require a convectively homogenized MORB mantle reservoir, which has become a frequently used concept in geochemistry. Recently, Kellogg et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 204 (2002) 183-202] modeled MORB and OIB Sr and Nd isotopic compositions as local mantle averages of random distributions of depleted residues and recycled continental crustal material. In this model, homogenization of the MORB source region is achieved by convective stirring and mixing. In contrast, in the SUMA model, the isotopic compositions of MORB and OIB are the outcome of homogenization during sampling, by partial melting and magma mixing (e.g. [Helffrich and Wood, Nature 412 (2001) 501-507]), of a distribution of small- to moderate-scale upper mantle heterogeneity, as predicted by the central limit theorem. Thus, the 'SUMA' acronym also captures what we consider the primary homogenization process: sampling upon melting and averaging. SUMA does not require the

  10. 43 CFR 15.3 - Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. 15.3 Section 15.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.3 Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. No dredging, excavating,...

  11. 43 CFR 15.3 - Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. 15.3 Section 15.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.3 Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. No dredging, excavating,...

  12. 43 CFR 15.3 - Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. 15.3 Section 15.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.3 Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. No dredging, excavating,...

  13. 43 CFR 15.3 - Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. 15.3 Section 15.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.3 Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. No dredging, excavating,...

  14. 29 CFR 570.68 - Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). 570.68...-Being § 570.68 Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). (a) Finding and declaration of fact. The following occupations in excavation operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of...

  15. 29 CFR 570.68 - Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). 570.68...-Being § 570.68 Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). (a) Finding and declaration of fact. The following occupations in excavation operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of...

  16. 29 CFR 570.68 - Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). 570.68...-Being § 570.68 Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). (a) Finding and declaration of fact. The following occupations in excavation operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of...

  17. 29 CFR 570.68 - Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). 570.68...-Being § 570.68 Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). (a) Finding and declaration of fact. The following occupations in excavation operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of...

  18. 29 CFR 570.68 - Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). 570.68...-Being § 570.68 Occupations in excavation operations (Order 17). (a) Finding and declaration of fact. The following occupations in excavation operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of...

  19. 43 CFR 15.3 - Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. 15.3 Section 15.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.3 Dredging, filling, excavating and building activities. No dredging, excavating,...

  20. A Review of Lunar Regolith Excavation Robotic Device Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Van Susante, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The excavation of lunar regolith is desirable for use as a feedstock for oxygen production processes as well as civil engineering purposes and for the fabrication of parts and structures. This is known as In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). More recently, there has been mounting evidence that water ice exists at the poles of the Moon, buried in the regolith where thermally stable conditions exist. This means that regolith excavation will be required to mine the water ice which is believed to be. mixed in with the regolith, or bonded to it. The mined water ice can then be electrolyzed to produce hydrogen and oxygen propellants which could form the basis of a cis-lunar transportation system using in-situ derived propellants. In 2007, the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition as part of its Centennial Challenges program, The competition was not won and it was held again in 2008 and 2009, when it was won by a university team. A $500,000 prize was awarded to the winning team by NASA. In 2010, NASA continued the competition as a spinoff of the Centennial Challenges, which is restricted to university participation only. This competition is known as the "Lunabotics Mining Competition" and is hosted by NASA at Kennedy Space Center. Twenty three American university teams competed in the 2010 Lunabotics Mining Competition. The competition was held again in May 2011 with over 60 teams registered, including international participation. The competition will be held again in May 2012 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. . This paper contains a thorough review of the various regolith eX,cavation robotic device prototypes that competed in these NASA competitions, and will. classify the machines and their methods of excavation to document the variety of ideas that were spawned and built to compete at these events. It is hoped that documentation of these robots will serve to help future robotic excavation designers and

  1. Multidimensional chemical optimization of protein assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Shock, E.

    2010-12-01

    The formation of biomolecular assemblages, at all levels of organization from ecosystems to cellular protein complexes, is a crucial biological phenomenon that has complex physical and chemical requirements. Observations on the makeup and dynamics of gene and protein assemblages in natural environments are advancing at an astounding pace, but theoretical models are needed to interpret the chemical requirements of their formation and place them into a geochemical context. A chemical equilibrium model, while requiring relative few input variables, nevertheless gives a plethora of predictions for the relative abundances of proteins. We have implemented a computer algorithm for optimizing predictions of metastable assemblages of proteins by varying combinations of chemical activities of basis species, temperature and/or pressure. The target predictions include species richness, coefficient of variation, and correlation with a (log)normal distribution. Results of simulations for ribosomal protein assemblages from model organisms provide a foundation for interpreting metagenomic sequences from a hot spring environment. The optimization method was used at different temperatures to compute the chemical potentials of basis species that contain hydrogen, oxygen and other major elements in proteins. The results show that different protein assemblages can be distiguished on the basis of their chemical potential requirements as a function of temperature. Unlike many cluster analysis methods commonly used in bioinformatics, the variables in the equilibrium model are explicitly chemical variables that allow comparisons with geochemical measurements. These comparisons aid in interpretations of metagenomic data including documenting the emergence of scatter around the central trends of the chemical variables.

  2. End effectors and attachments for buried waste excavation equipment

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Their efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Department`s needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex-situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment, and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. This report presents a literature search on the state-of-the-art in end effectors and attachments in support of excavator of buried transuranic waste. Included in the report are excavator platforms and a discussion of the various attachments. Also included is it list of vendors and specifications.

  3. 3. "TEST STAND NO. 13, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications No. ENG 04-353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-0906; no sheet number within title block; D.O. SERIES 1109/10. Stamped: AS BUILT. No revisions or revision dates. Last work date on this drawing "Checked by EAG, 1/31/49." Though this drawing is specific to Test Stand 1-3, it also illustrates the general methods used for excavation design and retaining wall construction at Test Stand 1-5. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. The Montana ALE (Autonomous Lunar Excavator) Systems Engineering Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    On May 2 1-26, 20 12, the third annual NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition will be held at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This event brings together student teams from universities around the world to compete in an engineering challenge. Each team must design, build and operate a robotic excavator that can collect artificial lunar soil and deposit it at a target location. Montana State University, Bozeman, is one of the institutions selected to field a team this year. This paper will summarize the goals of MSU's lunar excavator project, known as the Autonomous Lunar Explorer (ALE), along with the engineering process that the MSU team is using to fulfill these goals, according to NASA's systems engineering guidelines.

  5. Behavioral and mechanical determinants of collective subsurface nest excavation.

    PubMed

    Monaenkova, Daria; Gravish, Nick; Rodriguez, Greggory; Kutner, Rachel; Goodisman, Michael A D; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-05-01

    Collective construction of topologically complex structures is one of the triumphs of social behavior. For example, many ant species construct underground nests composed of networks of tunnels and chambers. Excavation by these 'superorganisms' depends on the biomechanics of substrate manipulation, the interaction of individuals, and media stability and cohesiveness. To discover principles of robust social excavation, we used X-ray computed tomography to monitor the growth in three dimensions of nests built by groups of fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) in laboratory substrates composed of silica particles, manipulating two substrate properties: particle size and gravimetric moisture content. Ants were capable of nest construction in all substrates tested other than completely dry or fully saturated; for a given particle size, nest volume was relatively insensitive to moisture content. Tunnels were deepest at intermediate moisture content and the maximum tunnel depth correlated with measured yield force on small rod-shaped intruders (a proxy for cohesive strength). This implies that increased cohesive strength allowed creation of tunnels that were resistant to perturbation but did not decrease individual excavation ability. Ants used two distinct behaviors to create pellets composed of wetted particles, depending on substrate composition. However, despite the ability to create larger stable pellets in more cohesive substrates, pellet sizes were similar across all conditions. We posit that this pellet size balances the individual's load-carrying ability with the need to carry this pellet through confined crowded tunnels. We conclude that effective excavation of similarly shaped nests can occur in a diversity of substrates through sophisticated digging behaviors by individuals which accommodate both differing substrate properties and the need to work within the collective. PMID:25954041

  6. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ARCHED ENTRY INTO BASEMENT UNDER FRONT ENTRY IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTH (NOTE GALLETING IN BRICK FOUNDATION) BUT CLOSER RANGE SHOWING BRICK STRUCTURE WHICH CARRIED WATER FROM THE GUTTER DRAIN PIPE INTO THE BRICK DRAIN ALONG THE GROUND AND AWAY FROM THE FOUNDATION OF THE HOUSE - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  7. Rapid biotic homogenization of marine fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Magurran, Anne E; Dornelas, Maria; Moyes, Faye; Gotelli, Nicholas J; McGill, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The role human activities play in reshaping biodiversity is increasingly apparent in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the responses of entire marine assemblages are not well-understood, in part, because few monitoring programs incorporate both spatial and temporal replication. Here, we analyse an exceptionally comprehensive 29-year time series of North Atlantic groundfish assemblages monitored over 5° latitude to the west of Scotland. These fish assemblages show no systematic change in species richness through time, but steady change in species composition, leading to an increase in spatial homogenization: the species identity of colder northern localities increasingly resembles that of warmer southern localities. This biotic homogenization mirrors the spatial pattern of unevenly rising ocean temperatures over the same time period suggesting that climate change is primarily responsible for the spatial homogenization we observe. In this and other ecosystems, apparent constancy in species richness may mask major changes in species composition driven by anthropogenic change. PMID:26400102

  8. Lunar Excavation Experiments in Simulant Soil Test Beds-Revisiting the Surveyor Geotechnical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2012-01-01

    (1) Establishing ISRU technologies on planetary bodies is an important long-term goal of NASA; (2) Excavation is a key component of these ISRU processes; (3) Lack of flight data relevant to lunar excavation; (4) Existing models of the excavation-cutting phenomenon give varying results; (5) The lack of predictive models of the dynamic behavior of soils in excavation implements is a major driver for these studies; and (6) Objective: Need to develop robust models of excavation cutting phenomena that generate predictive capabilities to aid the designer and engineer.

  9. Soil Lysimeter Excavation for Coupled Hydrological, Geochemical, and Microbiological Investigations.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Aditi; Wang, Yadi; Meira Neto, Antonio A; Matos, Katarena A; Dontsova, Katerina; Root, Rob; Neilson, Julie W; Maier, Raina M; Chorover, Jon; Troch, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Studying co-evolution of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in the subsurface of natural landscapes can enhance the understanding of coupled Earth-system processes. Such knowledge is imperative in improving predictions of hydro-biogeochemical cycles, especially under climate change scenarios. We present an experimental method, designed to capture sub-surface heterogeneity of an initially homogeneous soil system. This method is based on destructive sampling of a soil lysimeter designed to simulate a small-scale hillslope. A weighing lysimeter of one cubic meter capacity was divided into sections (voxels) and was excavated layer-by-layer, with sub samples being collected from each voxel. The excavation procedure was aimed at detecting the incipient heterogeneity of the system by focusing on the spatial assessment of hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological properties of the soil. Representative results of a few physicochemical variables tested show the development of heterogeneity. Additional work to test interactions between hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological signatures is planned to interpret the observed patterns. Our study also demonstrates the possibility of carrying out similar excavations in order to observe and quantify different aspects of soil-development under varying environmental conditions and scale. PMID:27684738

  10. Shallow-seated explosions in the construction of the Motukorea tuff ring (Auckland, New Zealand): Evidence from lithic and sedimentary characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustín-Flores, Javier; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Kereszturi, Gábor

    2015-10-01

    At least 52 eruption centres are scattered within the ~ 360 km2 Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF). Motukorea, now an island in the Waitemata Harbour, is one of 39 AVF volcanoes that experienced a phreatomagmatic explosive phase, before a magmatic phase. The volcano erupted through a ~ 200-300 m-thick, consolidated, mudstone/sandstone sequence of the Miocene Waitemata Group, which overlies the Waipapa Terrane greywacke basement. Detailed field descriptions of the sedimentary characteristics of the early phreatomagmatic deposits were carried out, along with examination of lithics. The ejecta ring deposit comprises 55 to 60 vol.% lithics, of which Waitemata Group fragments constitute approximately 90 vol.%, whereas < 10 vol.% are Waipapa fragments, suggesting a dominance of shallow fragmentation. The sedimentary characteristics of the stratigraphic sequence at Motukorea suggest a dominance of wet surges at the beginning of the eruption with progression into drier sequences upwards. This is reflected in increasing inter-bedded juvenile-pyroclast-dominated fall deposits up-sequence. These characteristics are attributed to the changing hydrogeological conditions within the diatreme and the host rocks. These findings shed light on the eruption dynamics of phreatomagmatic eruptions through consolidated rocks in the AVF and enable the depiction of a scenario of future eruptions within the field in similar substrates.

  11. Chemistry and petrology of Luna 24 lithic fragments and less than 250-micron soils - Constraints on the origin of VLT mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, M.-S.; Schmitt, R. A.; Taylor, G. J.; Warner, R. D.; Lange, D. E.; Keil, K.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported on a combined INAA-petrologic study of 17 small (0.2-1.5 mg) Luna 24 lithic and mineral fragments and INAA study of 5 bulk soils and mineral separates from gabbro 24170. Lithic and mineral fragments are classified into VLT mare basalts (ferrobasalt and metabasalts), low-Ti, variolitic mare basalt, gabbros, melt rock and soil breccia. Data indicate 5 possible magma types, represented by: (1) VLT ferrobasalt and gabbro fragments, with low-TiO2 (about 1%), slightly bow-shaped REE pattern, and low REE concentrations (5-10X chondritic); (2) a ferrobasalt (Laul et al., 1978) and metabasalt fragments with major and trace element contents similar to (1), but positive Eu anomalies; (3) one gabbro fragment with distinctive pyroxene compositional trend (increasing Ti with nearly constant Fe/Fe + Mg) and highest REE contents of any Luna 24 mare basaltic sample, (4) a gabbro fragment with considerably less V and Cr2O3 than ferrobasalt and metabasalt fragments; and (5) variolitic basalt fragment with higher Ti2(2.3%) than other Luna 24 basalts and pyroxene that has increasing then decreasing Ti with increasing Fe/Fe + Mg. Trace element data place constraints on the nature of the source region and possible parent magmas for the Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt.

  12. Silica exposure to excavation workers during the excavation of a low level radiological waste pit and tritium disposal shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated the task-length average (TLA) respirable dust and respirable silica airborne concentrations to which construction workers excavating volcanic tuff at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were exposed. These workers were excavating a low level radiological waste disposal pit of final dimensions 720 feet long, 132 feet wide and 60 feet deep. The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) evaluate exposures; (2) determine if the type of machinery used affects the respirable dust concentration in the breathing zone of the worker; (3) evaluate the efficacy of wetting the pit to reduce the respirable dust exposure; and (4) determine if exposure increases with increasing depth of pit due to the walls of the pit blocking the cross wind ventilation.

  13. Native American lithic procurement along the international border in the boot heel region of southwestern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Hughes, C.; Kurota, A.; Hogan, P.

    2010-12-01

    Multidisciplinary field projects can be very useful to a more fundamental understanding of the world around us, though these projects are not as common as they should be. In particular, the combination of archeology and geology combines our understanding of human behavior and human use of the landscape with an intimate knowledge of geologic processes and the materials available for human use in order to gain a broader understanding of human-Earth interaction. Here we present data from a cross-disciplinary project that uses a common dataset, archeological artifacts, to explore the anthropological and geologic implications of useage patterns. Archeological excavations and surveys conducted by the Office of Contract Archeology in 2007 along the route of the proposed international border fence reveal patterns of use of geologic materials by Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric Native Americans in the Boot Heel of southwestern New Mexico. Thousands of artifacts were recorded in multiple sites from Guadalupe Pass in the southern Peloncillo Mountains to the Carrizalillo Hills west of Columbus. We identified the lithologies of artifacts, ranging from projectile points to groundstones, and then constructed material movement maps based on either known procurement sites ("quarries") or outcrops identified as the closest source to a given site for each lithology. Not unexpectedly, the majority of the rock types utilized by native peoples are local siliceous volcanic materials. However, several artifacts constructed from obsidian were transported into the region from northern Mexico and eastern Arizona, indicating long-distance travel and/or trade routes. We also examine useage pattern difference between Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric sites. Additionally, a dramatic change in distribution of sources for geologic materials occurs between one pre-Spanish site and one post-Spanish site that are adjacent to one another.

  14. Native American lithic procurement along the international border in the boot heel region of southwestern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Hogan, P.; Hughes, C.; Kurota, A.

    2011-06-01

    Multidisciplinary field projects can be very useful to a more fundamental understanding of the world around us, though these projects are not as common as they should be. In particular, the combination of archeology and geology combines our understanding of human behavior and human use of the landscape with an intimate knowledge of geologic processes and the materials available for human use in order to gain a broader understanding of human-Earth interaction. Here we present data from a cross-disciplinary project that uses a common dataset, archeological artifacts, to explore the anthropological and geologic implications of useage patterns. Archeological excavations and surveys conducted by the Office of Contract Archeology in 2007 along the route of the proposed international border fence reveal patterns of use of geologic materials by Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric Native Americans in the Boot Heel of southwestern New Mexico. Thousands of artifacts were recorded in multiple sites from Guadalupe Pass in the southern Peloncillo Mountains to the Carrizalillo Hills west of Columbus. We identified the lithologies of artifacts, ranging from projectile points to groundstones, and then constructed material movement maps based on either known procurement sites ("quarries") or outcrops identified as the closest source to a given site for each lithology. Not unexpectedly, the majority of the rock types utilized by native peoples are local siliceous volcanic materials. However, several artifacts constructed from obsidian were transported into the region from northern Mexico and eastern Arizona, indicating long-distance travel and/or trade routes. We also examine useage pattern difference between Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric sites. Additionally, a dramatic change in distribution of sources for geologic materials occurs between one pre-Spanish site and one post-Spanish site that are adjacent to one another.

  15. Simulating fish assemblages in riverine networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a modeling approach for simulating assemblages of fish in riverine landscapes. The approach allows a user to determine the grain and extent of river networks within which fish populations reproduce, move, and survive in response to both environmental drivers and assem...

  16. Machinic Assemblages: Women, Art Education and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboukou, Maria

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I explore connections between women, art education and spatial relations drawing on the Deleuzo-Guattarian concept of "machinic assemblage" as a useful analytical tool for making sense of the heterogeneity and meshwork of life narratives and their social milieus. In focusing on Mary Bradish Titcomb, a fin-de-siecle Bostonian woman…

  17. Patterns of Assemblage Structure Indicate a Broader Conservation Potential of Focal Amphibians for Pond Management

    PubMed Central

    Soomets, Elin; Rannap, Riinu; Lõhmus, Asko

    2016-01-01

    Small freshwater ponds host diverse and vulnerable biotic assemblages but relatively few conspicuous, specially protected taxa. In Europe, the amphibians Triturus cristatus and Pelobates fuscus are among a few species whose populations have been successfully restored using pond restoration and management activities at the landscape scale. In this study, we explored whether the ponds constructed for those two target species have wider conservation significance, particularly for other species of conservation concern. We recorded the occurrence of amphibians and selected aquatic macro-invertebrates (dragonflies; damselflies; diving beetles; water scavenger beetles) in 66 ponds specially constructed for amphibians (up to 8 years post construction) and, for comparison, in 100 man-made ponds (created by local people for cattle or garden watering, peat excavation, etc.) and 65 natural ponds in Estonia. We analysed nestedness of the species assemblages and its dependence on the environment, and described the co-occurrence patterns between the target amphibians and other aquatic species. The assemblages in all ponds were significantly nested, but the environmental determinants of nestedness and co-occurrence of particular species differed among pond types. Constructed ponds were most species-rich irrespective of the presence of the target species; however, T. cristatus was frequent in those ponds and rare elsewhere, and it showed nested patterns in every type of pond. We thus conclude that pond construction for the protected amphibians can serve broader habitat conservation aims in the short term. However, the heterogeneity and inconsistent presence of species of conservation concern observed in other types of ponds implies that long-term perspectives on pond management require more explicit consideration of different habitat and biodiversity values. We also highlight nestedness analysis as a tool that can be used for the practical task of selecting focal species for

  18. Patterns of Assemblage Structure Indicate a Broader Conservation Potential of Focal Amphibians for Pond Management.

    PubMed

    Soomets, Elin; Rannap, Riinu; Lõhmus, Asko

    2016-01-01

    Small freshwater ponds host diverse and vulnerable biotic assemblages but relatively few conspicuous, specially protected taxa. In Europe, the amphibians Triturus cristatus and Pelobates fuscus are among a few species whose populations have been successfully restored using pond restoration and management activities at the landscape scale. In this study, we explored whether the ponds constructed for those two target species have wider conservation significance, particularly for other species of conservation concern. We recorded the occurrence of amphibians and selected aquatic macro-invertebrates (dragonflies; damselflies; diving beetles; water scavenger beetles) in 66 ponds specially constructed for amphibians (up to 8 years post construction) and, for comparison, in 100 man-made ponds (created by local people for cattle or garden watering, peat excavation, etc.) and 65 natural ponds in Estonia. We analysed nestedness of the species assemblages and its dependence on the environment, and described the co-occurrence patterns between the target amphibians and other aquatic species. The assemblages in all ponds were significantly nested, but the environmental determinants of nestedness and co-occurrence of particular species differed among pond types. Constructed ponds were most species-rich irrespective of the presence of the target species; however, T. cristatus was frequent in those ponds and rare elsewhere, and it showed nested patterns in every type of pond. We thus conclude that pond construction for the protected amphibians can serve broader habitat conservation aims in the short term. However, the heterogeneity and inconsistent presence of species of conservation concern observed in other types of ponds implies that long-term perspectives on pond management require more explicit consideration of different habitat and biodiversity values. We also highlight nestedness analysis as a tool that can be used for the practical task of selecting focal species for

  19. Patterns of Assemblage Structure Indicate a Broader Conservation Potential of Focal Amphibians for Pond Management.

    PubMed

    Soomets, Elin; Rannap, Riinu; Lõhmus, Asko

    2016-01-01

    Small freshwater ponds host diverse and vulnerable biotic assemblages but relatively few conspicuous, specially protected taxa. In Europe, the amphibians Triturus cristatus and Pelobates fuscus are among a few species whose populations have been successfully restored using pond restoration and management activities at the landscape scale. In this study, we explored whether the ponds constructed for those two target species have wider conservation significance, particularly for other species of conservation concern. We recorded the occurrence of amphibians and selected aquatic macro-invertebrates (dragonflies; damselflies; diving beetles; water scavenger beetles) in 66 ponds specially constructed for amphibians (up to 8 years post construction) and, for comparison, in 100 man-made ponds (created by local people for cattle or garden watering, peat excavation, etc.) and 65 natural ponds in Estonia. We analysed nestedness of the species assemblages and its dependence on the environment, and described the co-occurrence patterns between the target amphibians and other aquatic species. The assemblages in all ponds were significantly nested, but the environmental determinants of nestedness and co-occurrence of particular species differed among pond types. Constructed ponds were most species-rich irrespective of the presence of the target species; however, T. cristatus was frequent in those ponds and rare elsewhere, and it showed nested patterns in every type of pond. We thus conclude that pond construction for the protected amphibians can serve broader habitat conservation aims in the short term. However, the heterogeneity and inconsistent presence of species of conservation concern observed in other types of ponds implies that long-term perspectives on pond management require more explicit consideration of different habitat and biodiversity values. We also highlight nestedness analysis as a tool that can be used for the practical task of selecting focal species for

  20. Logs of Paleoseismic Excavations Across the Central Range Fault, Trinidad

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosby, Christopher J.; Prentice, Carol S.; Weber, John; Ragona, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This publication makes available maps and trench logs associated with studies of the Central Range Fault, part of the South American-Caribbean plate boundary in Trinidad. Our studies were conducted in 2001 and 2002. We mapped geomorphic features indicative of active faulting along the right-lateral, Central Range Fault, part of the South American-Caribbean plate boundary in Trinidad. We excavated trenches at two sites, the Samlalsingh and Tabaquite sites. At the Samlalsingh site, sediments deposited after the most recent fault movement bury the fault, and the exact location of the fault was unknown until we exposed it in our excavations. At this site, we excavated a total of eleven trenches, six of which exposed the fault. The trenches exposed fluvial sediments deposited over a strath terrace developed on Miocene bedrock units. We cleaned the walls of the excavations, gridded the walls with either 1 m X 1 m or 1 m X 0.5 m nail and string grid, and logged the walls in detail at a scale of 1:20. Additionally, we described the different sedimentary units in the field, incorporating these descriptions into our trench logs. We mapped the locations of the trenches using a tape and compass. Our field logs were scanned, and unit contacts were traced in Adobe Illustrator. The final drafted logs of all the trenches are presented here, along with photographs showing important relations among faults and Holocene sedimentary deposits. Logs of south walls were reversed in Illustrator, so that all logs are drafted with the view direction to the north. We collected samples of various materials exposed in the trench walls, including charcoal samples for radiocarbon dating from both faulted and unfaulted deposits. The locations of all samples collected are shown on the logs. The ages of seventeen of the charcoal samples submitted for radiocarbon analysis at the University of Arizona Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory in Tucson, Ariz., are given in Table 1. Samples found in

  1. A new bee species that excavates sandstone nests.

    PubMed

    Orr, Michael C; Griswold, Terry; Pitts, James P; Parker, Frank D

    2016-09-12

    Humanity has long been fascinated by animals with apparently unfavorable lifestyles [1]. Nesting habits are especially important because they can limit where organisms live, thereby driving population, community, and even ecosystem dynamics [2]. The question arises, then, why bees nest in active termite mounds [3] or on the rim of degassing volcanoes, seemingly preferring such hardship [4]. Here, we present a new bee species that excavates sandstone nests, Anthophora (Anthophoroides) pueblo Orr (described in Supplemental Information, published with this article online), despite the challenges already inherent to desert life. Ultimately, the benefits of nesting in sandstone appear to outweigh the associated costs in this system. PMID:27623257

  2. A new bee species that excavates sandstone nests.

    PubMed

    Orr, Michael C; Griswold, Terry; Pitts, James P; Parker, Frank D

    2016-09-12

    Humanity has long been fascinated by animals with apparently unfavorable lifestyles [1]. Nesting habits are especially important because they can limit where organisms live, thereby driving population, community, and even ecosystem dynamics [2]. The question arises, then, why bees nest in active termite mounds [3] or on the rim of degassing volcanoes, seemingly preferring such hardship [4]. Here, we present a new bee species that excavates sandstone nests, Anthophora (Anthophoroides) pueblo Orr (described in Supplemental Information, published with this article online), despite the challenges already inherent to desert life. Ultimately, the benefits of nesting in sandstone appear to outweigh the associated costs in this system.

  3. New age estimates for the Palaeolithic assemblages and Pleistocene succession of Casablanca, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. J.; Singarayer, J. S.; Raynal, J.-P.; Westaway, K. E.; Sbihi-Alaoui, F. Z.

    2006-10-01

    Marine and aeolian Quaternary sediments from Casablanca, Morocco were dated using the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal of quartz grains. These sediments form part of an extensive succession spanning the Pleistocene, and contain a rich faunal and archaeological record, including an Acheulian lithic assemblage from before the Brunhes-Matayama boundary, and a Homo erectus jaw from younger cave deposits. Sediment samples from the sites of Reddad Ben Ali, Oulad J'mel, Sidi Abderhamane and Thomas Quarries have been dated, in order to assess the upper limits of OSL. The revision of previously measured mammalian tooth enamel electron spin resonance (ESR) dates from the Grotte des Rhinocéros, Oulad Hamida Quarry 1, incorporating updated environmental dose rate measurements and attenuation calculations, also provide chronological constraint for the archaeological material preserved at Thomas Quarries. Several OSL age estimates extend back to around 500,000 years, with a single sample providing an OSL age close to 1 Ma in magnetically reversed sediments. These luminescence dates are some of the oldest determined, and their reliability is assessed using both internal criteria based on stratigraphic consistency, and external lithostratigraphic, morphostratigraphic and independent chronological constraints. For most samples, good internal agreement is observed using single aliquot regenerative-dose OSL measurements, while multiple aliquot additive-dose measurements generally have poorer resolution and consistency. Novel slow-component and component-resolved OSL approaches applied to four samples provide significantly enhanced dating precision, and an examination of the degree of signal zeroing at deposition. A comparison of the OSL age estimates with the updated ESR dates and one U-series date demonstrate that this method has great potential for providing reliable age estimates for sediments of this antiquity. We consider the cause of some slight age inversion

  4. The taphonomy of a Middle Devensian (MIS 3) vertebrate assemblage from Lynford, Norfolk, UK, and its implications for Middle Palaeolithic subsistence strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreve, Danielle C.

    2006-07-01

    The association of a rich lithic assemblage with a Middle Devensian mammalian assemblage at Lynford was initially thought indicative of a mammoth butchery locality, a rare occurrence for a European Middle Palaeolithic open site. However, taphonomic analyses suggest that the specimens have very different depositional histories and were incorporated into a palaeochannel in several stages. Most specimens are extremely fragmentary, probably the result of extensive trampling, and signs of weathering and root-damage provide further indications of exposure before burial. Carnivore damage is minimal but establishing the degree of interaction between the mammal fauna and alternative predators, such as Neanderthals, is problematic. Direct evidence of butchery is not present and the best indication of any form of mammoth exploitation lies in more circumstantial evidence such as the virtual absence of long bones from the main channel deposit and the mammoth age profiles. Instances of pathologies are also unusually common in the mammoths, implying that their greater vulnerability may have led to an accelerated demise either naturally or at the hands of a predator. The best evidence for direct faunal exploitation at the site is from green bone fractures and broken teeth that suggest marrow extraction in horse, reindeer and woolly rhinoceros. Copyright

  5. Environmental problems caused by Istanbul subway excavation and suggestions for remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocak, Ibrahim

    2009-10-01

    Many environmental problems caused by subway excavations have inevitably become an important point in city life. These problems can be categorized as transporting and stocking of excavated material, traffic jams, noise, vibrations, piles of dust mud and lack of supplies. Although these problems cause many difficulties, the most pressing for a big city like Istanbul is excavation, since other listed difficulties result from it. Moreover, these problems are environmentally and regionally restricted to the period over which construction projects are underway and disappear when construction is finished. Currently, in Istanbul, there are nine subway construction projects in operation, covering approximately 73 km in length; over 200 km to be constructed in the near future. The amount of material excavated from ongoing construction projects covers approximately 12 million m3. In this study, problems—primarily, the problem with excavation waste (EW)—caused by subway excavation are analyzed and suggestions for remediation are offered.

  6. Joint orientation and characteristics as observed in a trench excavated near TA-3 and a basement excavated at TA-55

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Koenig, E.; Morgan, T.; Sagon, E.

    1995-10-01

    Walls of excavations in the Bandelier Tuff for pipelines and foundations for structures provide excellent areas to determine the orientation (strike and dip) and characteristics of the joints (frequency, width, and type of material filling the joint). Joints or fractures are commonly associated with structural adjustments such as faulting; however, joints formed in the tuff mainly result from the shrinkage of the ash-flow tuff as it cools. The presence of faults can restrict the siting of buildings or structures. In waste disposal operations, open joints can be pathways for the transport of contaminants.

  7. Target and Projectile: Material Effects on Crater Excavation and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L. B.; Burleson, T.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling relationships allow the initial conditions of an impact to be related to the excavation flow and final crater size and have proven useful in understanding the various processes that lead to the formation of a planetary-scale crater. In addition, they can be examined and tested through laboratory experiments in which the initial conditions of the impact are known and ejecta kinematics and final crater morphometry are measured directly. Current scaling relationships are based on a point-source assumption and treat the target material as a continuous medium; however, in planetary-scale impacts, this may not always be the case. Fragments buried in a megaregolith, for instance, could easily approach or exceed the dimensions of the impactor; rubble-pile asteroids could present similar, if not greater, structural complexity. Experiments allow exploration into the effects of target material properties and projectile deformation style on crater excavation and dimensions. This contribution examines two of these properties: (1) the deformation style of the projectile, ductile (aluminum) or brittle (soda-lime glass) and (2) the grain size of the target material, 0.5-1 mm vs. 1-3 mm sand.

  8. A study experiment of auto idle application in the excavator engine performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Wawan; Maksum, Hasan; Putra, Dwi Sudarno; Azmi, Meri; Wahyudi, Retno

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of applying auto idle to excavator engine performance, such as machine unitization and fuel consumption in Excavator. Steps to be done are to modify the system JA 44 and 67 in Vehicle Electronic Control Unit (V-ECU). The modifications will be obtained from the pattern of the engine speed. If the excavator attachment is not operated, the engine speed will return to the idle speed automatically. From the experiment results the auto idle reduces fuel consumption in excavator engine.

  9. Analysis of Mineral Assemblages Containing Unstable Hydrous Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Wilson, S. A.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S.

    2011-12-01

    Minerals in many environments can be treated as durable phases that preserve a record of their formation. However many minerals, especially those with hydrogen-bonded H2O molecules as part of their structure, are ephemeral and are unlikely to survive disturbance let alone removal from their environment of formation. Minerals with exceptionally limited stability such as meridianiite (Mg-sulfate 11 hydrate), ikaite (Ca-carbonate 6 hydrate), and mirabilite (Na-sulfate 10 hydrate) are very susceptible to destabilization during analysis, and even modest changes in temperature or relative humidity can lead to change in hydration state or deliquescence. The result may be not only loss of the salt hydrate but dissolution of other salts present, precipitation of new phases, and ion exchange between the concentrated solution and otherwise unaffected phases. Exchange of H2O molecules can also occur in solid-vapor systems without any liquid involvement; moreover, recent work has shown that cation exchange between smectite and sulfate hydrates can occur without any liquid phase present other than a presumed thin film at the salt-silicate interface. Among hydrous silicates, clay minerals are susceptible to cation exchange and similar alteration can be expected for zeolites, palagonite, and possibly other hydrous silicate alteration products. Environmentally sensitive phases on Mars, such as meridianiite, may occur at higher latitudes or in the subsurface where permafrost may be present. Accurate determination of the presence and paragenesis of such minerals will be important for understanding the near-surface hydrogeology of Mars, and in situ analysis may be the only way to obtain this information. Access to the subsurface may be required, yet the act of exposure by excavation or drilling can itself lead to rapid degradation as the sample is exposed or brought to the surface for analysis. Mars is not the only body with which to be concerned, for similar concerns can be raised

  10. Characterization of enameled glass excavated from Laem Pho, southern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanmanonda, W.; Won-in, K.; Tancharakorn, S.; Tantanuch, W.; Thongleurm, C.; Kamwanna, T.; Dararutana, P.

    2012-07-01

    Laem Pho in Surat Thani, southern province of Thailand is one of the most important historic site on the eastern shore of the Gulf of Thailand. In this work, the enameled glass fragments which looked-like Islamic glass mainly excavated from this site were analyzed using SEM-EDS, PIXE and μ-XRF, in order to understand the chemical composition by comparing the archaeological data and topology. The structure of the enameled decoration was also studied. The resulting data indicated that high-magnesia alkali-lime silicate glass was produced. The presence of transition metals such as copper, iron and manganese were affected on the glass colorations. Typological classifications, technological observations and comparative studies serve to clarify the development and cultural inter-relationships of various glass objects along the trade and exchange networks in ancient maritime.

  11. Excavated substrate modulates growth instability during nest building in ants

    PubMed Central

    Toffin, Etienne; Kindekens, Jonathan; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    In social insects, the nests of the same species can show a large difference in size and shape. Despite these large variations, the nests share the same substructures, some appearing during nest growth. In ants, the interplay between nest size and digging activity leads to two successive morphological transitions from circular to branched shapes (budding along the perimeter of the circular cavity and tunnelling of the galleries). Like several other self-organized collective behaviours, this phenomenon, as well as the entire nest-digging process, is thought to be modulated by environmental properties. The present study investigates the effect of excavated substrate on the nest morphogenesis and the morphological transitions by using two materials with different cohesions. Here, we show that the two morphological transitions occur more frequently with a cohesive substrate than with a granular one: 96 per cent of cohesive experiments showed both transitions, whereas only 50 per cent did in granular experiments. We found that transitions and excavation cessation follow area–response thresholds: the shape transitions take place and the digging activity stops when the dug area reaches the corresponding threshold values. The shape transition thresholds are lower with the cohesive substrate and that of stopping digging is independent of nest shape and material. According to simulations, the experimental frequencies of transitions found their origin in the competition between transitions and activity cessation and in the difference between the transition threshold values of each substrate. Our results demonstrate how the substrate properties modulate the collective response and lead to various patterns. Considering the non-specific mechanisms at work, such effects of substrate coarseness have their counterparts in various collective behaviours, generating alternative patterns to colonize and exploit the environment. PMID:20410036

  12. 29 CFR 1926.913 - Blasting in excavation work under compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rock face is approaching mixed face, and when tunnel excavation is in mixed face, blasting shall be performed with light charges and with light burden on each hole. Advance drilling shall be performed as tunnel excavation in rock face approaches mixed face, to determine the general nature and extent of...

  13. Variable Contributions to Shear Strength Reduction for Percussive Excavation in Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A.; Zacny, K.; Lieu, D.; Pestana, J.; Johnson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Computer generated robotic mobility modeling is an essential tool for future design. A critical part of that design tool is the empirical data to be used to corroborate and validate numeric models. Recently, Honeybee Robotics performed extensive testing to document how different variables change the effectiveness of percussive excavation in lunar simulant JSC1A. This test data will be used in future work to help develop a physically based discrete element model (DEM). The DEM will in turn be means by which engineers can theoretically predict interaction forces associated with different excavation devices in lunar regolith. Earlier work has already shown that percussive excavation has a dramatic effect on reducing the shear strength of dry granular soils, including lunar regolith JSC 1A. The purpose of this current research is to thoroughly study the variables involved in percussive excavation and determine to what degree each of those variables contribute to the shear strength reduction. The variables studied in this work include: frequency of percussion, magnitude of percussive impact energy, angle of excavation and applied percussion, speed of excavation, depth of excavation, relative soil density, and environmental pressure during excavation.

  14. Trade Study of Excavation Tools and Equipment for Lunar Outpost Development and ISRU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. P.; King, R. H.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Lunar Architecture Team (LAT) has developed a candidate architecture to establish a lunar outpost that includes in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). Outpost development requires excavation for landing and launch sites, roads, trenches, foundations, radiation and thermal shielding, etc. Furthermore, ISRU requires excavation as feed stock for water processing and oxygen production plants. The design environment for lunar excavation tools and equipment including low gravity, cost of launching massive equipment, limited power, limited size, high reliability, and extreme temperatures is significantly different from terrestrial excavation equipment design environment. Consequently, the lunar application requires new approaches to developing excavation tools and equipment in the context of a systems engineering approach to building a Lunar Outpost. Several authors have proposed interesting and innovative general excavation approaches in the literature, and the authors of this paper will propose adaptations and/or new excavation concepts specific to the Lunar Outpost. The requirements for excavation from the LAT architecture will be examined and quantified with corresponding figures of merit and evaluation criteria. This paper will evaluate the proposed approaches using traditional decision making with uncertainty techniques.

  15. Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2012-11-16

    Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

  16. Fish assemblages of Mediterranean marine caves.

    PubMed

    Bussotti, Simona; Di Franco, Antonio; Francour, Patrice; Guidetti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fish assemblages associated with 14 marine caves and adjacent external rocky reefs were investigated at four Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) along the coasts of Italy. Within the caves sampling was carried out in different sub-habitats: walls, ceilings, bottoms and ends of caves. On the whole, 38 species were recorded inside the 14 caves investigated. Eighteen species were exclusively found inside the caves: they were mainly represented by speleophilic (i.e. species preferentially or exclusively inhabiting caves) gobids (e.g. Didogobius splechtnai) and nocturnal species (e.g. Conger conger). Forty-one species were censused outside, 20 of which were shared with cave habitats. Apogon imberbis was the most common fish found in all 14 caves investigated, followed by Thorogobius ephippiatus (recorded in 13 caves), and Diplodus vulgaris and Scorpaena notata (both censused in 12 caves). Distinct fish assemblages were found between external rocky reefs and the different cave sub-habitats. New data on the distribution of some speleophilic gobids were collected, showing the existence of a pool of species shared by marine caves on a large scale (i.e. hundreds of km). Considering the uniqueness of cave fishes (18 exclusive species and different assemblage structures), the inclusion of marine caves among the habitats routinely investigated for fish biodiversity monitoring could facilitate the achievement of more comprehensive inventories. Due to their contribution to local species diversity and the shelter they provide to species valuable for conservation, marine caves should be prioritized for their inclusion not only within future MPAs through the Mediterranean Sea, but also into larger management spatial planning. PMID:25875504

  17. Fish Assemblages of Mediterranean Marine Caves

    PubMed Central

    Bussotti, Simona; Di Franco, Antonio; Francour, Patrice; Guidetti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fish assemblages associated with 14 marine caves and adjacent external rocky reefs were investigated at four Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) along the coasts of Italy. Within the caves sampling was carried out in different sub-habitats: walls, ceilings, bottoms and ends of caves. On the whole, 38 species were recorded inside the 14 caves investigated. Eighteen species were exclusively found inside the caves: they were mainly represented by speleophilic (i.e. species preferentially or exclusively inhabiting caves) gobids (e.g. Didogobius splechtnai) and nocturnal species (e.g. Conger conger). Forty-one species were censused outside, 20 of which were shared with cave habitats. Apogon imberbis was the most common fish found in all 14 caves investigated, followed by Thorogobius ephippiatus (recorded in 13 caves), and Diplodus vulgaris and Scorpaena notata (both censused in 12 caves). Distinct fish assemblages were found between external rocky reefs and the different cave sub-habitats. New data on the distribution of some speleophilic gobids were collected, showing the existence of a pool of species shared by marine caves on a large scale (i.e. hundreds of km). Considering the uniqueness of cave fishes (18 exclusive species and different assemblage structures), the inclusion of marine caves among the habitats routinely investigated for fish biodiversity monitoring could facilitate the achievement of more comprehensive inventories. Due to their contribution to local species diversity and the shelter they provide to species valuable for conservation, marine caves should be prioritized for their inclusion not only within future MPAs through the Mediterranean Sea, but also into larger management spatial planning. PMID:25875504

  18. Nonlinear neutral inclusions: assemblages of coated ellipsoids

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños, Silvia Jiménez; Vernescu, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    The problem of determining nonlinear neutral inclusions in (electrical or thermal) conductivity is considered. Neutral inclusions, inserted in a matrix containing a uniform applied electric field, do not disturb the field outside the inclusions. The well-known Hashin-coated sphere construction is an example of a neutral inclusion. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing neutral inclusions from nonlinear materials. In particular, we discuss assemblages of coated ellipsoids. The proposed construction is neutral for a given applied field. PMID:26064633

  19. Nonlinear sequential laminates reproducing hollow sphere assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiart, Martín I.

    2007-07-01

    A special class of nonlinear porous materials with isotropic 'sequentially laminated' microstructures is found to reproduce exactly the hydrostatic behavior of 'hollow sphere assemblages'. It is then argued that this result supports the conjecture that Gurson's approximate criterion for plastic porous materials, and its viscoplastic extension of Leblond et al. (1994), may actually yield rigorous upper bounds for the hydrostatic flow stress of porous materials containing an isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary, distribution of porosity. To cite this article: M.I. Idiart, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  20. Phylogenetic composition of Arctic Ocean archaeal assemblages and comparison with Antarctic assemblages.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nasreen; Ruffin, Shomari; Ransom, Briana; Hollibaugh, James T

    2004-02-01

    Archaea assemblages from the Arctic Ocean and Antarctic waters were compared by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA genes amplified using the Archaea-specific primers 344f and 517r. Inspection of the DGGE fingerprints of 33 samples from the Arctic Ocean (from SCICEX submarine cruises in 1995, 1996, and 1997) and 7 Antarctic samples from Gerlache Strait and Dallman Bay revealed that the richness of Archaea assemblages was greater in samples from deep water than in those from the upper water column in both polar oceans. DGGE banding patterns suggested that most of the Archaea ribotypes were common to both the Arctic Ocean and the Antarctic Ocean. However, some of the Euryarchaeota ribotypes were unique to each system. Cluster analysis of DGGE fingerprints revealed no seasonal variation but supported depth-related differences in the composition of the Arctic Ocean Archaea assemblage. The phylogenetic composition of the Archaea assemblage was determined by cloning and then sequencing amplicons obtained from the Archaea-specific primers 21f and 958r. Sequences of 198 clones from nine samples covering three seasons and all depths grouped with marine group I Crenarchaeota (111 clones), marine group II Euryarchaeota (86 clones), and group IV Euryarchaeota (1 clone). A sequence obtained only from a DGGE band was similar to those of the marine group III Euryarchaeota: PMID:14766555

  1. Fish Assemblages on Estuarine Artificial Reefs: Natural Rocky-Reef Mimics or Discrete Assemblages?

    PubMed Central

    Folpp, Heath; Lowry, Michael; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M.

    2013-01-01

    If the primary goal of artificial reef construction is the creation of additional reef habitat that is comparable to adjacent natural rocky-reef, then performance should be evaluated using simultaneous comparisons with adjacent natural habitats. Using baited remote underwater video (BRUV) fish assemblages on purpose-built estuarine artificial reefs and adjacent natural rocky-reef and sand-flat were assessed 18 months post-deployment in three south-east Australian estuaries. Fish abundance, species richness and diversity were found to be greater on the artificial reefs than on either naturally occurring reef or sand-flat in all estuaries. Comparisons within each estuary identified significant differences in the species composition between the artificial and natural rocky-reefs. The artificial reef assemblage was dominated by sparid species including Acanthopagrus australis and Rhabdosargus sarba. The preference for a range of habitats by theses sparid species is evident by their detection on sand-flat, natural rocky reef and artificial reef habitats. The fish assemblage identified on the artificial reefs remained distinct from the adjacent rocky-reef, comprising a range of species drawn from naturally occurring rocky-reef and sand-flat. In addition, some mid-water schooling species including Trachurus novaezelandiae and Pseudocaranx georgianus were only identified on the artificial reef community; presumably as result of the reef's isolated location in open-water. We concluded that estuarine artificial reef assemblages are likely to differ significantly from adjacent rocky-reef, potentially as a result of physical factors such as reef isolation, coupled with species specific behavioural traits such as the ability of some species to traverse large sand flats in order to locate reef structure, and feeding preferences. Artificial reefs should not be viewed as direct surrogates for natural reef. The assemblages are likely to remain distinct from naturally occurring

  2. Fish assemblages on estuarine artificial reefs: natural rocky-reef mimics or discrete assemblages?

    PubMed

    Folpp, Heath; Lowry, Michael; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M

    2014-01-01

    If the primary goal of artificial reef construction is the creation of additional reef habitat that is comparable to adjacent natural rocky-reef, then performance should be evaluated using simultaneous comparisons with adjacent natural habitats. Using baited remote underwater video (BRUV) fish assemblages on purpose-built estuarine artificial reefs and adjacent natural rocky-reef and sand-flat were assessed 18 months post-deployment in three south-east Australian estuaries. Fish abundance, species richness and diversity were found to be greater on the artificial reefs than on either naturally occurring reef or sand-flat in all estuaries. Comparisons within each estuary identified significant differences in the species composition between the artificial and natural rocky-reefs. The artificial reef assemblage was dominated by sparid species including Acanthopagrus australis and Rhabdosargus sarba. The preference for a range of habitats by theses sparid species is evident by their detection on sand-flat, natural rocky reef and artificial reef habitats. The fish assemblage identified on the artificial reefs remained distinct from the adjacent rocky-reef, comprising a range of species drawn from naturally occurring rocky-reef and sand-flat. In addition, some mid-water schooling species including Trachurus novaezelandiae and Pseudocaranx georgianus were only identified on the artificial reef community; presumably as result of the reef's isolated location in open-water. We concluded that estuarine artificial reef assemblages are likely to differ significantly from adjacent rocky-reef, potentially as a result of physical factors such as reef isolation, coupled with species specific behavioural traits such as the ability of some species to traverse large sand flats in order to locate reef structure, and feeding preferences. Artificial reefs should not be viewed as direct surrogates for natural reef. The assemblages are likely to remain distinct from naturally occurring

  3. Reservoir floodplains support distinct fish assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Wigen, S. L.; Dagel, Jonah D.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs constructed on floodplain rivers are unique because the upper reaches of the impoundment may include extensive floodplain environments. Moreover, reservoirs that experience large periodic water level fluctuations as part of their operational objectives seasonally inundate and dewater floodplains in their upper reaches, partly mimicking natural inundations of river floodplains. In four flood control reservoirs in Mississippi, USA, we explored the dynamics of connectivity between reservoirs and adjacent floodplains and the characteristics of fish assemblages that develop in reservoir floodplains relative to those that develop in reservoir bays. Although fish species richness in floodplains and bays were similar, species composition differed. Floodplains emphasized fish species largely associated with backwater shallow environments, often resistant to harsh environmental conditions. Conversely, dominant species in bays represented mainly generalists that benefit from the continuous connectivity between the bay and the main reservoir. Floodplains in the study reservoirs provided desirable vegetated habitats at lower water level elevations, earlier in the year, and more frequently than in bays. Inundating dense vegetation in bays requires raising reservoir water levels above the levels required to reach floodplains. Therefore, aside from promoting distinct fish assemblages within reservoirs and helping promote diversity in regulated rivers, reservoir floodplains are valued because they can provide suitable vegetated habitats for fish species at elevations below the normal pool, precluding the need to annually flood upland vegetation that would inevitably be impaired by regular flooding. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Rock mass characterisation and stability analyses of excavated slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerl, Christian; Lechner, Heidrun

    2016-04-01

    Excavated slopes in fractured rock masses are frequently designed for open pit mining, quarries, buildings, highways, railway lines, and canals. These slopes can reach heights of several hundreds of metres and in cases concerning open pit mines slopes larger than 1000 m are not uncommon. Given that deep-seated slope failures can cause large damage or even loss of life, the slope design needs to incorporate sufficient stability. Thus, slope design methods based on comprehensive approaches need to be applied. Excavation changes slope angle, groundwater flow, and blasting increases the degree of rock mass fracturing as well as rock mass disturbance. As such, excavation leads to considerable stress changes in the slopes. Generally, slope design rely on the concept of factor of safety (FOS), often a requirement by international or national standards. A limitation of the factor of safety is that time dependent failure processes, stress-strain relationships, and the impact of rock mass strain and displacement are not considered. Usually, there is a difficulty to estimate the strength of the rock mass, which in turn is controlled by an interaction of intact rock and discontinuity strength. In addition, knowledge about in-situ stresses for the failure criterion is essential. Thus, the estimation of the state of stress of the slope and the strength parameters of the rock mass is still challenging. Given that, large-scale in-situ testing is difficult and costly, back-calculations of case studies in similar rock types or rock mass classification systems are usually the methods of choice. Concerning back-calculations, often a detailed and standardised documentation is missing, and a direct applicability to new projects is not always given. Concerning rock mass classification systems, it is difficult to consider rock mass anisotropy and thus the empirical estimation of the strength properties possesses high uncertainty. In the framework of this study an approach based on

  5. Heavily-hydrated lithic clasts in CH chondrites and the related, metal-rich chondrites Queen Alexandra Range 94411 and Hammadah al Hamra 237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshake, A.; Krot, A. N.; Meibom, A.; Weisberg, M. K.; Zolensky, M. E.; Keil, K.

    2002-02-01

    Fine-grained, heavily-hydrated lithic clasts in the metal-rich (CB) chondrites Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94411 and Hammadah al Hamra 237 and CH chondrites, such as Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 and Allan Hills (ALH) 85085, are mineralogically similar suggesting genetic relationship between these meteorites. These clasts contain no anhydrous silicates and consist of framboidal and platelet magnetite, prismatic sulfides (pentlandite and pyrrhotite), and Fe-Mn-Mg-bearing Ca-carbonates set in a phyllosilicate-rich matrix. Two types of phyllosilicates were identified: serpentine, with basal spacing of ?0.73 nm, and saponite, with basal spacings of about 1.1-1.2 nm. Chondrules and FeNi-metal grains in CB and CH chondrites are believed to have formed at high temperature (>1300 K) by condensation in a solar nebula region that experienced complete vaporization. The absence of aqueous alteration of chondrules and metal grains in CB and CH chondrites indicates that the clasts experienced hydration in an asteroidal setting prior to incorporation into the CH and CB parent bodies. The hydrated clasts were either incorporated during regolith gardening or accreted together with chondrules and FeNi-metal grains after these high-temperature components had been transported from their hot formation region to a much colder region of the solar nebula.

  6. SLOPE STABILITY EVALUATION AND EQUIPMENT SETBACK DISTANCES FOR BURIAL GROUND EXCAVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MCSHANE DS

    2010-03-25

    After 1970 Transuranic (TRU) and suspect TRU waste was buried in the ground with the intention that at some later date the waste would be retrieved and processed into a configuration for long term storage. To retrieve this waste the soil must be removed (excavated). Sloping the bank of the excavation is the method used to keep the excavation from collapsing and to provide protection for workers retrieving the waste. The purpose of this paper is to document the minimum distance (setback) that equipment must stay from the edge of the excavation to maintain a stable slope. This evaluation examines the equipment setback distance by dividing the equipment into two categories, (1) equipment used for excavation and (2) equipment used for retrieval. The section on excavation equipment will also discuss techniques used for excavation including the process of benching. Calculations 122633-C-004, 'Slope Stability Analysis' (Attachment A), and 300013-C-001, 'Crane Stability Analysis' (Attachment B), have been prepared to support this evaluation. As shown in the calculations the soil has the following properties: Unit weight 110 pounds per cubic foot; and Friction Angle (natural angle of repose) 38{sup o} or 1.28 horizontal to 1 vertical. Setback distances are measured from the top edge of the slope to the wheels/tracks of the vehicles and heavy equipment being utilized. The computer program utilized in the calculation uses the center of the wheel or track load for the analysis and this difference is accounted for in this evaluation.

  7. Oxymonads are closely related to the excavate taxon Trimastix.

    PubMed

    Dacks, J B; Silberman, J D; Simpson, A G; Moriya, S; Kudo, T; Ohkuma, M; Redfield, R J

    2001-06-01

    Despite intensive study in recent years, large-scale eukaryote phylogeny remains poorly resolved. This is particularly problematic among the groups considered to be potential early branches. In many recent systematic schemes for early eukaryotic evolution, the amitochondriate protists oxymonads and Trimastix have figured prominently, having been suggested as members of many of the putative deep-branching higher taxa. However, they have never before been proposed as close relatives of each other. We amplified, cloned, and sequenced small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes from the oxymonad Pyrsonympha and from several Trimastix isolates. Rigorous phylogenetic analyses indicate that these two protist groups are sister taxa and are not clearly related to any currently established eukaryotic lineages. This surprising result has important implications for our understanding of cellular evolution and high-level eukaryotic phylogeny. Given that Trimastix contains small, electron-dense bodies strongly suspected to be derived mitochondria, this study constitutes the best evidence to date that oxymonads are not primitively amitochondriate. Instead, Trimastix and oxymonads may be useful organisms for investigations into the evolution of the secondary amitochondriate condition. All higher taxa involving either oxymonads or Trimastix may require modification or abandonment. Affected groups include four contemporary taxa given the rank of phylum (Metamonada, Loukozoa, Trichozoa, Percolozoa), and the informal excavate taxa. A new "phylum-level" taxon may be warranted for oxymonads and Trimastix. PMID:11371592

  8. Oxymonads are closely related to the excavate taxon Trimastix.

    PubMed

    Dacks, J B; Silberman, J D; Simpson, A G; Moriya, S; Kudo, T; Ohkuma, M; Redfield, R J

    2001-06-01

    Despite intensive study in recent years, large-scale eukaryote phylogeny remains poorly resolved. This is particularly problematic among the groups considered to be potential early branches. In many recent systematic schemes for early eukaryotic evolution, the amitochondriate protists oxymonads and Trimastix have figured prominently, having been suggested as members of many of the putative deep-branching higher taxa. However, they have never before been proposed as close relatives of each other. We amplified, cloned, and sequenced small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes from the oxymonad Pyrsonympha and from several Trimastix isolates. Rigorous phylogenetic analyses indicate that these two protist groups are sister taxa and are not clearly related to any currently established eukaryotic lineages. This surprising result has important implications for our understanding of cellular evolution and high-level eukaryotic phylogeny. Given that Trimastix contains small, electron-dense bodies strongly suspected to be derived mitochondria, this study constitutes the best evidence to date that oxymonads are not primitively amitochondriate. Instead, Trimastix and oxymonads may be useful organisms for investigations into the evolution of the secondary amitochondriate condition. All higher taxa involving either oxymonads or Trimastix may require modification or abandonment. Affected groups include four contemporary taxa given the rank of phylum (Metamonada, Loukozoa, Trichozoa, Percolozoa), and the informal excavate taxa. A new "phylum-level" taxon may be warranted for oxymonads and Trimastix.

  9. ZOOBENTHOS ASSEMBLAGES AS INDICATORS OF LAKE SUPERIOR COASTAL WETLAND CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the diversity or structure of zoobenthos assemblages in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. As part of a comparative study in western Lake Superior we wanted to investigate whether these assemblages might be useful as indicators of wetland condition. We also wante...

  10. Here Comes the Sun ... and I Say, "It' an Assemblage"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how she combines science lesson with a hands-on art project. She used the wonderfully creative suns shown on the Sunday edition of "The CBS Morning Show" to give the students fodder for thought. She describes how to create an assemblage. An assemblage is like a collage, but it moves past the two-dimensional…

  11. The Measurement of Motor Skill Assemblages and Successful Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrall, N. R.

    1974-01-01

    This paper defines the required abilities for a given job as a Task Skill Assemblage (TSA), and the stored skill and knowledge is possessed by a candidate for that job as the Personal Skill Assemblage (PSA). A method is suggested for measuring the degree of match between the TSA and PSA. (Author)

  12. Meiofaunal assemblages associated with native and non-indigenous macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, Puri; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel; Rubal, Marcos

    2016-07-01

    Meiofauna is a useful tool to detect effects of different disturbances; however, its relevance in the frame of biological invasions has been almost fully neglected. Meiofaunal assemblages associated with the invasive macroalga Sargassum muticum were studied and compared with those associated with two native macroalgae (Bifurcaria bifurcata and Chondrus crispus). We used a linear mixed model to determine the influence of habitat size (i.e. macroalgal biomass) in shaping meiofaunal assemblages. Results showed that habitat size (i.e. macroalgal biomass) shaped meiofaunal assemblages influencing its abundance, richness and structure. However, the identity of macroalga (i.e. species) appears also to play a significant role, particularly the differences of complexity among the studied species may shape their meiofaunal assemblages. Finally, the invasive macroalga appears to influence positively species richness. Our results highlight the need of including different faunal components to achieve a comprehensive knowledge on effects of invasive macroalgae and that meiofaunal assemblages may be a valuable tool to examine them.

  13. Phylogenetic and functional diversity in large carnivore assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Dalerum, F.

    2013-01-01

    Large terrestrial carnivores are important ecological components and prominent flagship species, but are often extinction prone owing to a combination of biological traits and high levels of human persecution. This study combines phylogenetic and functional diversity evaluations of global and continental large carnivore assemblages to provide a framework for conservation prioritization both between and within assemblages. Species-rich assemblages of large carnivores simultaneously had high phylogenetic and functional diversity, but species contributions to phylogenetic and functional diversity components were not positively correlated. The results further provide ecological justification for the largest carnivore species as a focus for conservation action, and suggests that range contraction is a likely cause of diminishing carnivore ecosystem function. This study highlights that preserving species-rich carnivore assemblages will capture both high phylogenetic and functional diversity, but that prioritizing species within assemblages will involve trade-offs between optimizing contemporary ecosystem function versus the evolutionary potential for future ecosystem performance. PMID:23576787

  14. Phylogenetic and functional diversity in large carnivore assemblages.

    PubMed

    Dalerum, F

    2013-06-01

    Large terrestrial carnivores are important ecological components and prominent flagship species, but are often extinction prone owing to a combination of biological traits and high levels of human persecution. This study combines phylogenetic and functional diversity evaluations of global and continental large carnivore assemblages to provide a framework for conservation prioritization both between and within assemblages. Species-rich assemblages of large carnivores simultaneously had high phylogenetic and functional diversity, but species contributions to phylogenetic and functional diversity components were not positively correlated. The results further provide ecological justification for the largest carnivore species as a focus for conservation action, and suggests that range contraction is a likely cause of diminishing carnivore ecosystem function. This study highlights that preserving species-rich carnivore assemblages will capture both high phylogenetic and functional diversity, but that prioritizing species within assemblages will involve trade-offs between optimizing contemporary ecosystem function versus the evolutionary potential for future ecosystem performance. PMID:23576787

  15. Molluscan subfossil assemblages reveal the long-term deterioration of coral reef environments in Caribbean Panama.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Katie L; Leonard-Pingel, Jill S; Rodríguez, Félix; Jackson, Jeremy B C

    2015-07-15

    Caribbean reef corals have declined sharply since the 1980s, but the lack of prior baseline data has hindered identification of drivers of change. To assess anthropogenic change in reef environments over the past century, we tracked the composition of subfossil assemblages of bivalve and gastropod mollusks excavated from pits below lagoonal and offshore reefs in Bocas del Toro, Panama. The higher prevalence of (a) infaunal suspension-feeding bivalves and herbivorous and omnivorous gastropods in lagoons and (b) epifaunal and suspension-feeding bivalves and carnivorous and suspension-feeding gastropods offshore reflected the greater influence of land-based nutrients/sediments within lagoons. Temporal changes indicated deteriorating environmental conditions pre-1960 in lagoons and post-1960 offshore, with offshore communities becoming more similar to lagoonal ones since 1960. Relative abundances of dominant bivalve species tracked those of their coral hosts, revealing broader ecosystem effects of coral community change. The nature and timing of changes implicate land-based runoff in reef deterioration. PMID:26031382

  16. Molluscan subfossil assemblages reveal the long-term deterioration of coral reef environments in Caribbean Panama.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Katie L; Leonard-Pingel, Jill S; Rodríguez, Félix; Jackson, Jeremy B C

    2015-07-15

    Caribbean reef corals have declined sharply since the 1980s, but the lack of prior baseline data has hindered identification of drivers of change. To assess anthropogenic change in reef environments over the past century, we tracked the composition of subfossil assemblages of bivalve and gastropod mollusks excavated from pits below lagoonal and offshore reefs in Bocas del Toro, Panama. The higher prevalence of (a) infaunal suspension-feeding bivalves and herbivorous and omnivorous gastropods in lagoons and (b) epifaunal and suspension-feeding bivalves and carnivorous and suspension-feeding gastropods offshore reflected the greater influence of land-based nutrients/sediments within lagoons. Temporal changes indicated deteriorating environmental conditions pre-1960 in lagoons and post-1960 offshore, with offshore communities becoming more similar to lagoonal ones since 1960. Relative abundances of dominant bivalve species tracked those of their coral hosts, revealing broader ecosystem effects of coral community change. The nature and timing of changes implicate land-based runoff in reef deterioration.

  17. A fish assemblage from an early Miocene horizon from Jabal Zaltan, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyriou, Thodoris; Cook, Todd D.; Muftah, Ahmed M.; Pavlakis, Paris; Boaz, Noel T.; Murray, Alison M.

    2015-02-01

    Recent excavations and prospecting in the early to middle Miocene deposits of the Maradah Formation in Jabal Zaltan, Libya, yielded a diverse fish assemblage coming from an early Miocene locality. The material described here includes more than 18 marine and freshwater taxa most of which were previously unreported from the area. Jabal Zaltan is one of the very few early Miocene Afroarabian fossil sites that produced such a diverse fish sample. Therefore, the fossils described here provide a unique insight into the composition of the early Miocene fish faunas from the northern African coast; a critical time period for faunas of the continent, as contact with Eurasia ended 100 million years of African isolation. In addition, the Jabal Zaltan fossils help consolidate the validity of Galeocerdo mayumbensis and extend its geographic range to include the Tethys. The Maradah deposits also host the first occurrences of two genera (Pteromylaeus, Distichodus) in the fossil record. The fish finds support the presumed depositional environment that of tropical shallow estuarine to deltaic conditions, and the freshwater fishes document the presence of a modern-type Nilosudanian fauna containing elements with both African and Asian affinities. The Jabal Zaltan ichthyofauna, with its diversity of taxa, has the potential to become a key reference fauna for future studies of early Miocene African fishes.

  18. Short-term effects of small dam removal on freshwater mussel assemblage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heise, Ryan J.; Cope, W. Gregory; Kwak, Thomas J.; Eads, Chris B.

    2013-01-01

    Dam removal is increasingly used to restore lotic habitat and biota, but its effects on freshwater mussels (family Unionidae) are not well known. We conducted a four-year study to assess short-term effects on mussels after removal of a small hydropower dam on the Deep River (Cape Fear River drainage), North Carolina, USA, in 2006. We conducted annual pre- and post-removal monitoring of mussel density, richness, and survival (post removal only) with transect surveys and quadrat excavation, and assessed changes in substrate composition at two impact sites (tailrace and impoundment) and two reference sites. Before-after-control-impact (BACI) analyses of variance did not detect a significant change in mussel density (total or individually for the three most abundant species), species richness, Eastern Elliptio (Elliptio complanata) mean length, or substrate composition in the tailrace or drained impoundment following dam removal. Apparent annual survival estimates of Eastern Elliptio at the tailrace site did not differ among sampling periods and were similar to control sites. We observed minimal mussel mortality from stranding in the dewatered reservoir. These results demonstrate that adverse short-term impacts of dam removal on downstream mussel assemblages can be minimized with appropriate planning, timing, and removal techniques, but additional monitoring is warranted to determine long-term effects on mussels within the restored river reach.

  19. SIDE ELEVATION, CATERPILLAR 245B SERIES II HYDRAULIC EXCAVATOR ('OR BACKHOE') ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SIDE ELEVATION, CATERPILLAR 245B SERIES II HYDRAULIC EXCAVATOR ('OR BACKHOE') USED FOR LOADING AND MOVING EXTRACTED STONE. - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Excavated Cubic Platinum-Tin Alloy Nanocrystals Constructed from Ultrathin Nanosheets with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiaoli; Yang, Yanan; Cao, Zhenming; Kuang, Qin; Du, Guifen; Jiang, Yaqi; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2016-07-25

    Excavated polyhedral noble-metal materials that were built by the orderly assembly of ultrathin nanosheets have both large surface areas and well-defined facets, and therefore could be promising candidates for diverse important applications. In this work, excavated cubic Pt-Sn alloy nanocrystals (NCs) with {110} facets were constructed from twelve nanosheets by a simple co-reduction method with the assistance of the surface regulator polyvinylpyrrolidone. The specific surface area of the excavated cubic Pt-Sn NCs is comparable to that of commercial Pt black despite their larger particle size. The excavated cubic Pt-Sn NCs exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity in terms of both the specific area current density and the mass current density towards methanol oxidation. PMID:27325395

  1. Initial energy partitioning and some excavation stage phenomenology in laboratory-scale cratering calculations in clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, M. G.; Thomsen, J. M.; Ruhl, S. F.

    1982-01-01

    One impact and two explosive cratering calculations have been analyzed with emphasis on the early excavation stage. The early excavation stage is here defined as that part of the excavation stage that occurs after energy partitioning is 90% complete, but before the cratering flow field can be well described by Z-type flow fields with values of Z uniformly greater than two. Impact generated flow fields seem to have a much longer early excavation stage than explosion generated flow fields, due possibly to the slower momentum transfer versus energy transfer rate between projectile and target. During this time when the projectile retains a significant portion of its original momentum, Z values less than two are observed in the impact generated flow field. Z values less than two are not observed at any time in the explosion generated flow fields.

  2. REQUIREMENTS ALLOCATION ANALYSIS FOR NORTH RAMP EXCAVATION AND LAYOUT, CII: BABEAD000

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Kennedy

    1995-01-03

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to allocate all Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements (ESFDR) (Reference 8.1) applicable to Configuration Item (CI) North Ramp Excavation and Layout, Configuration Item Identifier (CII) BABEAD000.

  3. Energy-saving analysis of hydraulic hybrid excavator based on common pressure rail.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Jiang, Jihai; Su, Xiaoyu; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Energy-saving research of excavators is becoming one hot topic due to the increasing energy crisis and environmental deterioration recently. Hydraulic hybrid excavator based on common pressure rail (HHEC) provides an alternative with electric hybrid excavator because it has high power density and environment friendly and easy to modify based on the existing manufacture process. This paper is focused on the fuel consumption of HHEC and the actuator dynamic response to assure that the new system can save energy without sacrificing performance. Firstly, we introduce the basic principle of HHEC; then, the sizing process is presented; furthermore, the modeling period which combined mathematical analysis and experiment identification is listed. Finally, simulation results show that HHEC has a fast dynamic response which can be accepted in engineering and the fuel consumption can be reduced 21% to compare the original LS excavator and even 32% after adopting another smaller engine.

  4. Performance predictions for mechanical excavators in Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.; Neil, D.; Friant, J.

    1992-09-01

    The performances of several mechanical excavators are predicted for use in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain: Tunnel boring machines, the Mobile Miner, a roadheader, a blind shaft borer, a vertical wheel shaft boring machine, raise drills, and V-Moles. Work summarized is comprised of three parts: Initial prediction using existing rock physical property information; Measurement of additional rock physical properties; and Revision of the initial predictions using the enhanced database. The performance predictions are based on theoretical and empirical relationships between rock properties and the forces-experienced by rock cutters and bits during excavation. Machine backup systems and excavation design aspects, such as curves and grades, are considered in determining excavator utilization factors. Instanteous penetration rate, advance rate, and cutter costs are the fundamental performance indicators.

  5. Energy-Saving Analysis of Hydraulic Hybrid Excavator Based on Common Pressure Rail

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jihai; Su, Xiaoyu

    2013-01-01

    Energy-saving research of excavators is becoming one hot topic due to the increasing energy crisis and environmental deterioration recently. Hydraulic hybrid excavator based on common pressure rail (HHEC) provides an alternative with electric hybrid excavator because it has high power density and environment friendly and easy to modify based on the existing manufacture process. This paper is focused on the fuel consumption of HHEC and the actuator dynamic response to assure that the new system can save energy without sacrificing performance. Firstly, we introduce the basic principle of HHEC; then, the sizing process is presented; furthermore, the modeling period which combined mathematical analysis and experiment identification is listed. Finally, simulation results show that HHEC has a fast dynamic response which can be accepted in engineering and the fuel consumption can be reduced 21% to compare the original LS excavator and even 32% after adopting another smaller engine. PMID:24194683

  6. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF EAST (FRONT) ELEVATION DURING EXCAVATION OF 18TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF EAST (FRONT) ELEVATION DURING EXCAVATION OF 18TH CENTURY BASEMENT ENTRY WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  7. ISRU System Model Tool: From Excavation to Oxygen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Linne, Diane L.

    2007-01-01

    In the late 80's, conceptual designs for an in situ oxygen production plant were documented in a study by Eagle Engineering [1]. In the "Summary of Findings" of this study, it is clearly pointed out that: "reported process mass and power estimates lack a consistent basis to allow comparison." The study goes on to say: "A study to produce a set of process mass, power, and volume requirements on a consistent basis is recommended." Today, approximately twenty years later, as humans plan to return to the moon and venture beyond, the need for flexible up-to-date models of the oxygen extraction production process has become even more clear. Multiple processes for the production of oxygen from lunar regolith are being investigated by NASA, academia, and industry. Three processes that have shown technical merit are molten regolith electrolysis, hydrogen reduction, and carbothermal reduction. These processes have been selected by NASA as the basis for the development of the ISRU System Model Tool (ISMT). In working to develop up-to-date system models for these processes NASA hopes to accomplish the following: (1) help in the evaluation process to select the most cost-effective and efficient process for further prototype development, (2) identify key parameters, (3) optimize the excavation and oxygen production processes, and (4) provide estimates on energy and power requirements, mass and volume of the system, oxygen production rate, mass of regolith required, mass of consumables, and other important parameters. Also, as confidence and high fidelity is achieved with each component's model, new techniques and processes can be introduced and analyzed at a fraction of the cost of traditional hardware development and test approaches. A first generation ISRU System Model Tool has been used to provide inputs to the Lunar Architecture Team studies.

  8. Shock-induced growth and metastability of stishovite and coesite in lithic clasts from suevite of the Ries impact crater (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähle, Volker; Altherr, Rainer; Koch, Mario; Nasdala, Lutz

    2008-04-01

    The microtextures of stishovite and coesite in shocked non-porous lithic clasts from suevite of the Ries impact structure were studied in transmitted light and under the scanning electron microscope. Both high-pressure silica phases were identified in situ by laser-Raman spectroscopy. They formed from silica melt as well as by solid-state transformation. In weakly shocked rocks (stage I), fine-grained stishovite (≤1.8 μm) occurs in thin pseudotachylite veins of quartz-rich rocks, where it obviously nucleated from high-pressure frictional melts. Generally no stishovite was found in planar deformation features (PDFs) within grains of rock-forming quartz. The single exception is a highly shocked quartz grain, trapped between a pseudotachylite vein and a large ilmenite grain, in which stishovite occurs within two sets of lamellae. It is assumed that in this case the small stishovite grains formed by the interplay of conductive heating and shock reverberation. In strongly shocked rocks (stages Ib-III, above ˜30 GPa), grains of former quartz typically contain abundant and variably sized stishovite (<6 μm) embedded within a dense amorphous silica phase in the interstices between PDFs. The formation of transparent diaplectic glass in adjacent domains results from the breakdown of stishovite and the transformation of the dense amorphous phase and PDFs to diaplectic glass in the solid state. Coesite formed during unloading occurs in two textural varieties. Granular micrometre-sized coesite occurs embedded in silica melt glass along former fractures and grain boundaries. These former high-pressure melt pockets are surrounded by diaplectic glass or by domains consisting of microcrystalline coesite and earlier formed stishovite. The latter is mostly replaced by amorphous silica.

  9. A Fish Assemblage from the Middle Eocene from Libya (Dur At-Talah) and the Earliest Record of Modern African Fish Genera

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Olga; Pinton, Aurélie; Cappetta, Henri; Adnet, Sylvain; Valentin, Xavier; Salem, Mustapha; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In the early nineteen sixties, Arambourg and Magnier found some freshwater fish (i.e., Polypterus sp., Siluriformes indet. and Lates sp.) mixed with marine members in an Eocene vertebrate assemblage at Gebel Coquin, in the southern Libyan Desert. This locality, aged ca 37–39Ma and now known under the name of Dur At-Talah, has been recently excavated. A new fish assemblage, mostly composed of teeth, was collected by the Mission Paléontologique Franco-Libyenne. In this paper, we describe freshwater fish members including a dipnoan (Protopterus sp.), and several actinopterygians: bichir (Polypterus sp.), aba fish (Gymnarchus sp.), several catfishes (Chrysichthys sp. and a mochokid indet.), several characiforms (including the tiger fish Hydrocynus sp., and one or two alestin-like fish), and perciforms (including the snake-head fish Parachanna sp. and at least one cichlid). Together with the fossiliferous outcrops at Birket Qarun in Egypt, the Libyan site at Dur At-Talah reduces a 10-Ma chronological gap in the fossil record of African freshwater fish. Their fish assemblages overlap in their composition and thus constitute a rather homogenous, original and significant amount of new elements regarding the Paleogene African ichthyofauna. This supports the establishment of the modern African freshwater fish fauna during this time period because these sites mostly contain the earliest members known in modern genera. PMID:26674637

  10. A Fish Assemblage from the Middle Eocene from Libya (Dur At-Talah) and the Earliest Record of Modern African Fish Genera.

    PubMed

    Otero, Olga; Pinton, Aurélie; Cappetta, Henri; Adnet, Sylvain; Valentin, Xavier; Salem, Mustapha; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In the early nineteen sixties, Arambourg and Magnier found some freshwater fish (i.e., Polypterus sp., Siluriformes indet. and Lates sp.) mixed with marine members in an Eocene vertebrate assemblage at Gebel Coquin, in the southern Libyan Desert. This locality, aged ca 37-39Ma and now known under the name of Dur At-Talah, has been recently excavated. A new fish assemblage, mostly composed of teeth, was collected by the Mission Paléontologique Franco-Libyenne. In this paper, we describe freshwater fish members including a dipnoan (Protopterus sp.), and several actinopterygians: bichir (Polypterus sp.), aba fish (Gymnarchus sp.), several catfishes (Chrysichthys sp. and a mochokid indet.), several characiforms (including the tiger fish Hydrocynus sp., and one or two alestin-like fish), and perciforms (including the snake-head fish Parachanna sp. and at least one cichlid). Together with the fossiliferous outcrops at Birket Qarun in Egypt, the Libyan site at Dur At-Talah reduces a 10-Ma chronological gap in the fossil record of African freshwater fish. Their fish assemblages overlap in their composition and thus constitute a rather homogenous, original and significant amount of new elements regarding the Paleogene African ichthyofauna. This supports the establishment of the modern African freshwater fish fauna during this time period because these sites mostly contain the earliest members known in modern genera. PMID:26674637

  11. A Fish Assemblage from the Middle Eocene from Libya (Dur At-Talah) and the Earliest Record of Modern African Fish Genera.

    PubMed

    Otero, Olga; Pinton, Aurélie; Cappetta, Henri; Adnet, Sylvain; Valentin, Xavier; Salem, Mustapha; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In the early nineteen sixties, Arambourg and Magnier found some freshwater fish (i.e., Polypterus sp., Siluriformes indet. and Lates sp.) mixed with marine members in an Eocene vertebrate assemblage at Gebel Coquin, in the southern Libyan Desert. This locality, aged ca 37-39Ma and now known under the name of Dur At-Talah, has been recently excavated. A new fish assemblage, mostly composed of teeth, was collected by the Mission Paléontologique Franco-Libyenne. In this paper, we describe freshwater fish members including a dipnoan (Protopterus sp.), and several actinopterygians: bichir (Polypterus sp.), aba fish (Gymnarchus sp.), several catfishes (Chrysichthys sp. and a mochokid indet.), several characiforms (including the tiger fish Hydrocynus sp., and one or two alestin-like fish), and perciforms (including the snake-head fish Parachanna sp. and at least one cichlid). Together with the fossiliferous outcrops at Birket Qarun in Egypt, the Libyan site at Dur At-Talah reduces a 10-Ma chronological gap in the fossil record of African freshwater fish. Their fish assemblages overlap in their composition and thus constitute a rather homogenous, original and significant amount of new elements regarding the Paleogene African ichthyofauna. This supports the establishment of the modern African freshwater fish fauna during this time period because these sites mostly contain the earliest members known in modern genera.

  12. A Study on the Vibration Frequency of Blasting Excavation in Highly Stressed Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Jiang, Qinghui; Yao, Chi; Jiang, Shuihua; Tian, Lin

    2016-07-01

    During blasting excavation in deep-buried tunnels and mines characterized by high in situ stress, the rock vibration is attributed not only to blast loading, but also to dynamic unloading caused by transient release of the in situ stress on excavation faces in the process of rock fragmentation by blasting. Understanding the vibration frequency characteristics under these two excitation sources is of important signification to determine appropriate vibration threshold limits for structure damage in deep-buried opening excavations. With a theoretical model developed for a deep-buried circular tunnel excavation by the millisecond delay blasting sequence, frequency characteristics and their influence factors are investigated and discussed for the vibrations induced by the blast loading, the dynamic unloading and the combined effects, respectively. The results show that the rising time of blast loading, the duration of dynamic unloading and the dimension of excavation boundaries are the main factors that affect the vibration frequency of blasting excavation in highly stressed rock masses. It is found that, the blast loading with a much shorter rising time accentuates higher vibration frequency than the dynamic unloading with a long duration, and it causes the blast loading vibration to be more readily attenuated as the propagation distance increases. Thus, the unloading vibration may become the main vibration component at far distances where its low-frequency vibration may exceed the vibration limits. The vibration induced by the combined effects has two distinctly dominant frequency bands corresponding to the two vibration excitation sources. The frequency analyses of the vibration records from two underground projects excavated by blasting are presented to demonstrate this finding. The findings of this study also clearly reveal that, reducing the dimension of excavation boundaries is one of the most effective means to prevent the vibrational damage to structures as it

  13. Controlled drill & blast excavation at AECL`s Underground Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyk, G.W.; Onagi, D.P.; Thompson, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    A controlled drill and blast method has been developed and used to excavate the Underground Research Laboratory, a geotechnical facility constructed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in crystalline rock. It has been demonstrated that the method can effectively reduce the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) and is suitable for the construction of a used fuel disposal vault in the plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield.

  14. Cratering flow fields - Implications for the excavation and transient expansion stages of crater formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical depths, volumes of excavation, hinge radii, ejection angles and transient structural rim uplifts are calculated, for comparison with experimental and field data from impact and explosion craters, by means of a Maxwell Z-model cratering flow field originating at non-zero depths-of-burst. It is found that the formation of a hinge, about which the coherent ejecta flap rotates at the rim of the transient crater, divides material in the flow field into ejected and downward and outward-driven portions. Ejected material originates from an excavation cavity whose geometry is distinct from that of the transient crater. The shallow depths of excavation both observed in impact and explosion craters and predicted by the Z-model flow fields imply that thickness estimates of such lunar geologic units as the maria basalts, which are determined by assuming that excavation depths are similar to (1) final or (2) transient crater depths, must be reduced by factors of two to three respectively. It is concluded that lunar basin excavation cavities exhibit proportional growth, and have maximum depths of excavation near 0.1 the diameter of the basin transient crater.

  15. Recovery of Missing Persons in Cyprus: Heavy Equipment Methods and Techniques for Complex Well Excavations.

    PubMed

    Ceker, Deren; Stevens, William D

    2015-11-01

    This technical note presents the methods and techniques developed by the Bi-communal Forensic Team (BCFT) of the Committee on Missing Persons in Cyprus (CMP) used to excavate and exhume the remains of missing persons, many of whom were buried in deep wells at sites across the island of Cyprus during the conflict period of the 1960s and 1970s. A total of 493 Turkish Cypriots and 1508 Greek Cypriots were officially reported missing by the two communities as a result of the conflict. Since the team's formation, in 2005, the BCFT has excavated 114 wells, resulting in the recovery of 195 missing individuals from 35 of these well excavations. The standard excavation approach used by the BCFT, especially for deep well recovery, consists of "ramp," "pocket," and "pool" components. These excavation features enable CMP archaeologists to excavate deep wells safely and efficiently while simultaneously permitting time for thorough documentation and unimpeded recovery of human remains. The team uses three variants of this approach to cope with the variety of geological, physical, and hydrological contexts faced in Cyprus' wells, including hard and soft landforms, the presence or absence of water, and limitations imposed by surrounding infrastructure. The "terracing", "double-ramp", and "single-ramp" variations are detailed with respect to the environmental contexts which prescribe their use. The BCFT's general procedures for human remains recovery and standard well safety protocols conclude the article.

  16. Forensic archeology and the need for flexible excavation strategies: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hoshower, L M

    1998-01-01

    Anthropologists from the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii (CILHI) are routinely confronted with challenging situations when searching for the remains of American servicemen lost in armed conflicts. All CILHI anthropologists are well-versed and experienced in "textbook" archeological methods. As such, standard excavation techniques and procedures are the foundation for every CILHI recovery. Yet, the inherent nature of the CILHI missions prescribe excavation strategies that depart from those regularly presented in archeology textbooks. The unique nature and grand scale of the CILHI missions; environmental, physical, and geographic hazards; the salvage nature of the missions; time and budget constraints; and the inherent politically and emotionally charged atmospheres of the missions necessitate flexible excavation methods. For example, many CILHI recovery operations in Southeast Asia are excavations of large craters created by the impact of high-speed military aircraft in remote, unpopulated locales. In addition to rugged and dangerous terrain, an abundance of unexploded ordnance and poisonous reptiles and insects typically complicate excavations. These challenging circumstances dictate that the CILHI anthropologist constantly adapt conventional archeological techniques to unconventional excavation situations to maintain the crucial balance between maximum data recovery and scientific protocol. PMID:9456525

  17. Forensic archeology and the need for flexible excavation strategies: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hoshower, L M

    1998-01-01

    Anthropologists from the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii (CILHI) are routinely confronted with challenging situations when searching for the remains of American servicemen lost in armed conflicts. All CILHI anthropologists are well-versed and experienced in "textbook" archeological methods. As such, standard excavation techniques and procedures are the foundation for every CILHI recovery. Yet, the inherent nature of the CILHI missions prescribe excavation strategies that depart from those regularly presented in archeology textbooks. The unique nature and grand scale of the CILHI missions; environmental, physical, and geographic hazards; the salvage nature of the missions; time and budget constraints; and the inherent politically and emotionally charged atmospheres of the missions necessitate flexible excavation methods. For example, many CILHI recovery operations in Southeast Asia are excavations of large craters created by the impact of high-speed military aircraft in remote, unpopulated locales. In addition to rugged and dangerous terrain, an abundance of unexploded ordnance and poisonous reptiles and insects typically complicate excavations. These challenging circumstances dictate that the CILHI anthropologist constantly adapt conventional archeological techniques to unconventional excavation situations to maintain the crucial balance between maximum data recovery and scientific protocol.

  18. [Experimental research of the influences on the development of the hip joints with excavated acetabula].

    PubMed

    Sun, D; Chen, X; Tang, C

    1996-12-01

    There are still arguments about the operation excavated acetabula treatments for the congenital dislocation of the hip. To inquire into the influences on the development of the hip joints with excavated acetabula size, we divided 60 two-month-old chickens into three groups which were given incised dislocation and then reduction partly excavated the cartilages of the acetabula and excavated them totally to the left hips respectively. Contrasting observation of all the experimental chickens was taken on the right ones of their own. The second group achieved a fair function of the joint movement. Limited and slight adhesion was not affecting the development of the joints seriously. The third group had, on the contrary, poor functions because of the comprehensive adhesion in the acetabula. The surfaces of the acetabula were replaced by fabric tissue. The remaining or regenerating cartilage cells vary obviously under the light scope and the electronic scope. The heads of the femurs had changed similarly. It is suggested that in dealing with the congenital dislocation of the hip, excavating the acetabola cartilage is not advisable. Partly excavating is permitted when a limited bony process existing in the bottom of the acetabula. PMID:9590781

  19. Recovery of Missing Persons in Cyprus: Heavy Equipment Methods and Techniques for Complex Well Excavations.

    PubMed

    Ceker, Deren; Stevens, William D

    2015-11-01

    This technical note presents the methods and techniques developed by the Bi-communal Forensic Team (BCFT) of the Committee on Missing Persons in Cyprus (CMP) used to excavate and exhume the remains of missing persons, many of whom were buried in deep wells at sites across the island of Cyprus during the conflict period of the 1960s and 1970s. A total of 493 Turkish Cypriots and 1508 Greek Cypriots were officially reported missing by the two communities as a result of the conflict. Since the team's formation, in 2005, the BCFT has excavated 114 wells, resulting in the recovery of 195 missing individuals from 35 of these well excavations. The standard excavation approach used by the BCFT, especially for deep well recovery, consists of "ramp," "pocket," and "pool" components. These excavation features enable CMP archaeologists to excavate deep wells safely and efficiently while simultaneously permitting time for thorough documentation and unimpeded recovery of human remains. The team uses three variants of this approach to cope with the variety of geological, physical, and hydrological contexts faced in Cyprus' wells, including hard and soft landforms, the presence or absence of water, and limitations imposed by surrounding infrastructure. The "terracing", "double-ramp", and "single-ramp" variations are detailed with respect to the environmental contexts which prescribe their use. The BCFT's general procedures for human remains recovery and standard well safety protocols conclude the article. PMID:26250595

  20. Conceptual design of equipment to excavate and transport regolith from the lunar maria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detwiler, Mark; Foong, Chee Seng; Stocklin, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    NASA hopes to have a manned lunar outpost completed by 2005. In order to establish the base, regolith must be excavated from the lunar surface. Regolith will be used as a source for life-supporting elements and as radiation shielding for the lunar outpost. The design team from the University of Texas at Austin designed excavation and transportation equipment for initial operations of the lunar base. The design team also characterized the elements to be found in the regolith and determined the power required to excavate regolith. The characterization of the soil was based on a literature review of lunar geography. Power requirements for excavation were developed by adapting terrestrial equations for excavation power requirements and adapting them to lunar soil conditions. The design of the excavation and transportation equipment was broken into three functions: loosing, collecting, and transporting. A scarifier was selected to loosen, a bucket was selected to collect, and a load-haul system was selected to transport. The functions are powered by a modular fuel cell powered vehicle that provides power for motion of the equipment.

  1. Clinical, histological and microbiological study of hand-excavated carious dentine in extracted permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Bönecker, M; Grossman, E; Cleaton-Jones, P E; Parak, R

    2003-08-01

    Changes in cultivable flora in dentine samples collected before and after hand excavation were examined in association with clinical status of the cavity surface, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thirty-five extracted permanent molar teeth with an occlusal caries lesion were excavated with hand instruments according to the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach. Excavation pressure, dentine colour and consistency were recorded at the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) prior to carious dentine removal and at the cavity floor after the final excavation; a microbiological sample of dentine was taken at both stages. Twelve restored teeth; six with positive and six with negative bacterial growth on the second sample, were selected for light microscopy and SEM. The hand-excavation removed tooth structure was soft, irreversibly damaged, dark and highly infected. Hand excavation reached dentine of increased hardness with a more normal colour to provide a sound structural base for restoration. Light and SEM examination of the cavity floor showed infected dentinal tubules in all 12 teeth examined. Linear logistic analysis showed a statistical association between light-yellow dentine on the cavity floor and an absence of bacterial growth (P = 0.006). This short-term in vitro study showed that caries-producing bacteria remained in dentine close to the cavity floor in 26/35 teeth despite clinical observations that indicated a suitably prepared cavity floor. PMID:14649040

  2. Past equable climates, mixed assemblages, and the regression fallacy

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.L. )

    1994-06-01

    Equable climates are often invoked to account for Pleistocene mixed (disharmonious) assemblages of plants or animals. However, mixed assemblages are defined by comparison with only modern distributions. Many modern assemblages, such as the western ponderosa pine and the northern hardwoods forests, are mixed assemblages when compared to Pleistocene distributions. Thus, explaining past assemblages with no modern analog by invoking a past equable climate ignores the fact that many modern assemblages have no past analog, yet the modern climate is not considered equable. This logical error is analogous to the regression fallacy in statistics. A change in the variability within assemblages through time cannot be detected if only the presence (and not the absence) of extreme species are considered. Because species also respond to historical and other non-climatic variables, interpretations will inevitably be biased toward equable paleoclimates. A more direct approach is to count those species that presently reside in equable climatic zones. If the species typical of modern equable zones are absent, then the proposed equable paleoclimate becomes tenuous.

  3. 'Domestic' origin of opaque assemblages in refractory inclusions in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Beckett, John R.; Stolper, Edward M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental studies indicate that opaque assemblages rich in refractory siderophile elements were formed within host calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) by exsolution, oxidation and sulphidization of homogeneous alloys, rather than by aggregation of materials in the solar nebula before the formation of CAIs. These opaque assemblages are thus not the oldest known solid materials, as was once thought, and they do not constrain processes in the early solar nebula before CAI formation. Instead, the assemblages record the changing oxygen fugacity experienced by CAIs during slow cooling in nebular and/or planetary environments.

  4. 'Domestic' origin of opaque assemblages in refractory inclusions in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Beckett, J. R.; Stolper, E. M.

    1988-02-01

    Experimental studies indicate that opaque assemblages rich in refractory siderophile elements were formed within host calcium- and aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs) by exsolution, oxidation and sulphidization of homogeneous alloys, rather than by aggregation of materials in the solar nebula before the formation of CAIs. These opaque assemblages are thus not the oldest known solid materials, as was once thought, and they do not constrain processes in the early solar nebula before CAI formation. Instead, the assemblages record the changing oxygen fugacity experienced by CAIs during slow cooling in nebular and/or planetary environments.

  5. Assemblages: Functional units formed by cellular phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The partitioning of intracellular space beyond membrane-bound organelles can be achieved with collections of proteins that are multivalent or contain low-complexity, intrinsically disordered regions. These proteins can undergo a physical phase change to form functional granules or other entities within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm that collectively we term “assemblage.” Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play an important role in forming a subset of cellular assemblages by promoting phase separation. Recent work points to an involvement of assemblages in disease states, indicating that intrinsic disorder and phase transitions should be considered in the development of therapeutics. PMID:25179628

  6. Climatic influence on a marine fish assemblage.

    PubMed

    Attrill, Martin J; Power, Michael

    2002-05-16

    Understanding the fluctuations in marine fish stocks is important for the management of fisheries, and attempts have been made to demonstrate links with oceanographic and climatic variability, including the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The NAO has been correlated with a range of long-term ecological measures, including certain fish stocks. Such environmental influences are most likely to affect susceptible juveniles during estuarine residency, as estuaries are critical juvenile nursery or over-wintering habitats. Here we show that, during a 16-year period, climatic forcing (by means of the NAO) is consistently the most important parameter explaining variation in assemblage composition, abundance and growth of juvenile marine fish during estuarine residency. A possible mechanism for the effect of the NAO is a temperature differential between estuarine and marine waters that allows fish to facultatively exploit optimal thermal habitats. The connection has potentially important implications for the size and numbers of individuals recruited to the fishery, for understanding and predicting the composition of juvenile fish stocks using estuaries, and for the appropriate conservation of estuarine systems in relation to fish stocks.

  7. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Alicia L.; Kelley, Philip M.; Tempero, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Post natal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT+ LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT+ lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  8. Geographical assemblages of European raptors and owls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-López, Pascual; Benavent-Corai, José; García-Ripollés, Clara

    2008-09-01

    In this work we look for geographical structure patterns in European raptors (Order: Falconiformes) and owls (Order: Strigiformes). For this purpose we have conducted our research using freely available tools such as statistical software and databases. To perform the study, presence-absence data for the European raptors and owl species (Class Aves) were downloaded from the BirdLife International website. Using the freely available "pvclust" R-package, we applied similarity Jaccard index and cluster analysis in order to delineate biogeographical relationships for European countries. According to the cluster of similarity, we found that Europe is structured into two main geographical assemblages. The larger length branch separated two main groups: one containing Iceland, Greenland and the countries of central, northern and northwestern Europe, and the other group including the countries of eastern, southern and southwestern Europe. Both groups are divided into two main subgroups. According to our results, the European raptors and owls could be considered structured into four meta-communities well delimited by suture zones defined by Remington (1968) [Remington, C.L., 1968. Suture-zones of hybrid interaction between recently joined biotas. Evol. Biol. 2, 321-428]. Climatic oscillations during the Quaternary Ice Ages could explain at least in part the modern geographical distribution of the group.

  9. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Connor, Alicia L; Kelley, Philip M; Tempero, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Postnatal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage-tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato-positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture-induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT(+) LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT(+) lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  10. Faceless sex: glory holes and sexual assemblages.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dave; O'Byrne, Patrick; Murray, Stuart J

    2010-10-01

    According to our previous research, the use of glory holes in public venues such as saunas and bathhouses is very popular. The popularity of glory holes is due in part to the anonymous sex that these architectural elements allow. This post-structuralist theoretical reflection seeks to understand the specific nature of anonymous public sex among bathhouse patrons, focusing on the links between desire-architecture-place-sexual practices. Drawing on interviews with glory hole users gathered during an ethnographic research project in bathhouses, this essay goes beyond traditional public health discourse to offer an original perspective on anonymous public sex. Utilizing the philosophy of Deleuze and Guattari's concepts of assemblages and machines, we re-theorize glory hole sex--what we call 'faceless sex'--and rethink the ways that desire is imbricated with our understanding of architecture, place, and public. Finally, we reflect upon the particular ethical challenges that are posed by these particular sexual practices, and ask whether a post-structuralist ethic might be possible. PMID:20840136

  11. Response of a seagrass fish assemblage to improved wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ourgaud, M; Ruitton, S; Bell, J D; Letourneur, Y; Harmelin, J G; Harmelin-Vivien, M L

    2015-01-15

    We compared the structure of a seagrass fish assemblage near a sewage outlet before and after improvements to wastewater treatment. To determine whether responses by the fish assemblage were due to changes in water quality or to other factors, comparisons were made with the structure of a fish assemblage from a nearby site unaffected by sewage effluent. Total species richness, density and biomass of fish, decreased at both sites over the 30-year period. An increase in mean trophic level near the sewage outlet following improvements in water quality indicated that wastewater treatment had another important effect. This result is consistent with the reductions in food webs supporting pelagic and benthic fishes that typically accompany decreases in nutrient inputs. Although improvements to wastewater treatment explained much of the variation in the structure of the fish assemblage at PC, our results also suggest that fishing and climate change, at both sites.

  12. Response of a seagrass fish assemblage to improved wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ourgaud, M; Ruitton, S; Bell, J D; Letourneur, Y; Harmelin, J G; Harmelin-Vivien, M L

    2015-01-15

    We compared the structure of a seagrass fish assemblage near a sewage outlet before and after improvements to wastewater treatment. To determine whether responses by the fish assemblage were due to changes in water quality or to other factors, comparisons were made with the structure of a fish assemblage from a nearby site unaffected by sewage effluent. Total species richness, density and biomass of fish, decreased at both sites over the 30-year period. An increase in mean trophic level near the sewage outlet following improvements in water quality indicated that wastewater treatment had another important effect. This result is consistent with the reductions in food webs supporting pelagic and benthic fishes that typically accompany decreases in nutrient inputs. Although improvements to wastewater treatment explained much of the variation in the structure of the fish assemblage at PC, our results also suggest that fishing and climate change, at both sites. PMID:25499183

  13. ANALYSIS OF LOTIC MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using multivariate and cluster analyses, we examined the relaitonships between chemical and physical characteristics and macroinvertebrate assemblages at sites sampled by R-EMAP in California's Central Valley. By contrasting results where community structure was summarized as met...

  14. Determinants of fish assemblage structure in Northwestern Great Plains streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullen, J.A.; Bramblett, R.G.; Guy, C.S.; Zale, A.V.; Roberts, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Prairie streams are known for their harsh and stochastic physical conditions, and the fish assemblages therein have been shown to be temporally variable. We assessed the spatial and temporal variation in fish assemblage structure in five intermittent, adventitious northwestern Great Plains streams representing a gradient of watershed areas. Fish assemblages and abiotic conditions varied more spatially than temporally. The most important variables explaining fish assemblage structure were longitudinal position and the proportion of fine substrates. The proportion of fine substrates increased proceeding upstream, approaching 100% in all five streams, and species richness declined upstream with increasing fine substrates. High levels of fine substrate in the upper reaches appeared to limit the distribution of obligate lithophilic fish species to reaches further downstream. Species richness and substrates were similar among all five streams at the lowermost and uppermost sites. However, in the middle reaches, species richness increased, the amount of fine substrate decreased, and connectivity increased as watershed area increased. Season and some dimensions of habitat (including thalweg depth, absolute distance to the main-stem river, and watershed size) were not essential in explaining the variation in fish assemblages. Fish species richness varied more temporally than overall fish assemblage structure did because common species were consistently abundant across seasons, whereas rare species were sometimes absent or perhaps not detected by sampling. The similarity in our results among five streams varying in watershed size and those from other studies supports the generalization that spatial variation exceeds temporal variation in the fish assemblages of prairie and warmwater streams. Furthermore, given longitudinal position, substrate, and stream size, general predictions regarding fish assemblage structure and function in prairie streams are possible. ?? American

  15. Light-Dependant Biostabilisation of Sediments by Stromatolite Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, David M.; Aspden, Rebecca J.; Visscher, Pieter T.; Consalvey, Mireille; Andres, Miriam S.; Decho, Alan W.; Stolz, John; Reid, R. Pamela

    2008-01-01

    For the first time we have investigated the natural ecosystem engineering capacity of stromatolitic microbial assemblages. Stromatolites are laminated sedimentary structures formed by microbial activity and are considered to have dominated the shallows of the Precambrian oceans. Their fossilised remains are the most ancient unambiguous record of early life on earth. Stromatolites can therefore be considered as the first recognisable ecosystems on the planet. However, while many discussions have taken place over their structure and form, we have very little information on their functional ecology and how such assemblages persisted despite strong eternal forcing from wind and waves. The capture and binding of sediment is clearly a critical feature for the formation and persistence of stromatolite assemblages. Here, we investigated the ecosystem engineering capacity of stromatolitic microbial assemblages with respect to their ability to stabilise sediment using material from one of the few remaining living stromatolite systems (Highborne Cay, Bahamas). It was shown that the most effective assemblages could produce a rapid (12–24 h) and significant increase in sediment stability that continued in a linear fashion over the period of the experimentation (228 h). Importantly, it was also found that light was required for the assemblages to produce this stabilisation effect and that removal of assemblage into darkness could lead to a partial reversal of the stabilisation. This was attributed to the breakdown of extracellular polymeric substances under anaerobic conditions. These data were supported by microelectrode profiling of oxygen and calcium. The structure of the assemblages as they formed was visualised by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser microscopy. These results have implications for the understanding of early stromatolite development and highlight the potential importance of the evolution of photosynthesis in the mat forming

  16. Light-dependant biostabilisation of sediments by stromatolite assemblages.

    PubMed

    Paterson, David M; Aspden, Rebecca J; Visscher, Pieter T; Consalvey, Mireille; Andres, Miriam S; Decho, Alan W; Stolz, John; Reid, R Pamela

    2008-01-01

    For the first time we have investigated the natural ecosystem engineering capacity of stromatolitic microbial assemblages. Stromatolites are laminated sedimentary structures formed by microbial activity and are considered to have dominated the shallows of the Precambrian oceans. Their fossilised remains are the most ancient unambiguous record of early life on earth. Stromatolites can therefore be considered as the first recognisable ecosystems on the planet. However, while many discussions have taken place over their structure and form, we have very little information on their functional ecology and how such assemblages persisted despite strong eternal forcing from wind and waves. The capture and binding of sediment is clearly a critical feature for the formation and persistence of stromatolite assemblages. Here, we investigated the ecosystem engineering capacity of stromatolitic microbial assemblages with respect to their ability to stabilise sediment using material from one of the few remaining living stromatolite systems (Highborne Cay, Bahamas). It was shown that the most effective assemblages could produce a rapid (12-24 h) and significant increase in sediment stability that continued in a linear fashion over the period of the experimentation (228 h). Importantly, it was also found that light was required for the assemblages to produce this stabilisation effect and that removal of assemblage into darkness could lead to a partial reversal of the stabilisation. This was attributed to the breakdown of extracellular polymeric substances under anaerobic conditions. These data were supported by microelectrode profiling of oxygen and calcium. The structure of the assemblages as they formed was visualised by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser microscopy. These results have implications for the understanding of early stromatolite development and highlight the potential importance of the evolution of photosynthesis in the mat forming process

  17. Habitat characteristics affecting fish assemblages on a Hawaiian coral reef

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedlander, A.M.; Parrish, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Habitat characteristics of a reef were examined as potential influences on fish assemblage structure, using underwater visual census to estimate numbers and biomass of all fishes visible on 42 benthic transects and making quantitative measurements of 13 variables of the corresponding physical habitat and sessile biota. Fish assemblages in the diverse set of benthic habitats were grouped by detrended correspondence analysis, and associated with six major habitat types. Statistical differences were shown between a number of these habitat types for various ensemble variables of the fish assemblages. Overall, both for complete assemblages and for component major trophic and mobility guilds, these variables tended to have higher values where reef substratum was more structurally or topographically complex, and closer to reef edges. When study sites were separately divided into five depth strata, the deeper strata tended to have statistically higher values of ensemble variables for the fish assemblages. Patterns with depth varied among the various trophic and mobility guilds. Multiple linear regression models indicated that for the complete assemblages and for most trophic and mobility guilds, a large part of the variability for most ensemble variables was explained by measures of holes in the substratum, with important contributions from measured substratum rugosity and depth. A strong linear relationship found by regression of mean fish length on mean volume of holes in the reef surface emphasized the importance of shelter for fish assemblages. Results of this study may have practical applications in designing reserve areas as well as theoretical value in helping to explain the organization of reef fish assemblages.

  18. Abrupt transitions between macrobenthic faunal assemblages across seagrass bed margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R. S. K.; Hamylton, S.

    2013-10-01

    The nature of the transition from one contrasting macrobenthic assemblage to another across interfaces between intertidal seagrass and unvegetated sand was investigated in the subtropical Moreton Bay Marine Park, eastern Australia, via six two-dimensional core lattices. The same pattern of transition was manifested in each lattice. Macrofaunal abundance, species density (both observed and estimated total) and assemblage composition did not vary with distance away from the interface within the 0.75 m wide marginal bands of each habitat type. Neither were there significant differences in assemblage metrics or composition between the marginal and non-edge regions of either habitat. There were, however, very marked differences in assemblage composition, abundance and species density across the 25 cm wide strip on either side of the actual interface, the interacting assemblages reacting symmetrically. All these differences therefore took place over an ecotone distance of only 0.5 m at most. Spatial trends in assemblage metrics across the boundary zone were captured accurately by second and third order polynomial regression models. It also appeared that edge effects on individual species within the seagrass were a variable local response not a consistent effect of closeness to the bare sand.

  19. Habitat influence in the morphological diversity of coastal fish assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farré, Marc; Lombarte, Antoni; Recasens, Laura; Maynou, Francesc; Tuset, Victor M.

    2015-05-01

    Ecological diversity based on quantitative data is widely used to characterize biological communities, but recently morphological and functional traits have also been used to analyse the structure of fish assemblages. This diversity and structure is usually linked to variables such as habitat complexity and composition, depth, and spatial and temporal variations. In this study, several fish assemblages off the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) were ecologically and morphologically analysed and compared. The morphological analysis was performed from body shape of fish species using geometric morphology. Moreover, a canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to analyse the effect of local environmental variables such as habitat, locality and depth on the composition and abundance of assemblages. The results revealed greater differences among assemblages in the clustering performed from morphological data, which is linked to habitat complexity, than those shown by the ecological analysis. Moreover, the CCA analysis indicated that type of substratum and the location significantly influenced the composition and structure of the fish assemblages. These results evidenced that morphology provides different and complementary information than ecological analysis because it allows to predict the ecological and functional habits of species within the community, helping to improve the understanding of the fish assemblages structure.

  20. Copepod assemblages in a highly complex hydrographic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berasategui, A. D.; Menu Marque, S.; Gómez-Erache, M.; Ramírez, F. C.; Mianzan, H. W.; Acha, E. M.

    2006-02-01

    Community structure and diversity patterns of planktonic copepods were investigated for the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean between 34 and 41°S. Our objectives were (1) to define copepod assemblages, (2) to accurately identify their association to different water masses/hydrodynamic regimes, (3) to characterize the assemblages in terms of their community structure, and (4) to test if frontal boundaries between water masses separate copepod assemblages. Biogeographic patterns were investigated using multivariate analysis (cluster and ANOSIM analyses). Biodiversity patterns were examined using different univariate indexes (point species richness and taxonomic distinctness). Five regions of similar copepod assemblages were defined for our study area each one corresponding to different environments (freshwater, estuarine, continental shelf, Malvinas and Brazil current assemblages). These assemblages have major community structure differences. In spite of the complex oceanographic scenario of our study area, that can lead us to expect a pattern of copepod communities with diffuse boundaries, we found a strong spatial correspondence between these limits and the presence of permanent frontal structures.

  1. DETECTION AND COMPARISON OF GIARDIAVIRUS (GLV) FROM DIFFERENT ASSEMBLAGES OF GIARDIA DUODENALIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five assemblages of Giardia were identified from cysts in cattle, dog, cat, sheep, and reindeer feces using ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing. Assemblage A was present in cattle and reindeer feces, Assemblages C and D were present in dog feces, Assemblage E was present in cattle and sheep feces, and ...

  2. Factors influencing riverine fish assemblages in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, David S.; Richards, Todd A.; Levin, Sara B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, and the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game, conducted an investigation of fish assemblages in small- to medium-sized Massachusetts streams. The objective of this study was to determine relations between fish-assemblage characteristics and anthropogenic factors, including impervious cover and estimated flow alteration, relative to the effects of environmental factors, including physical-basin characteristics and land use. The results of this investigation supersede those of a preliminary analysis published in 2010. Fish data were obtained for 669 fish-sampling sites from the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife fish-community database. A review of the literature was used to select fish metrics - species richness, abundance of individual species, and abundances of species grouped on life history traits - responsive to flow alteration. The contributing areas to the fish-sampling sites were delineated and used with a geographic information system to determine a set of environmental and anthropogenic factors that were tested for use as explanatory variables in regression models. Reported and estimated withdrawals and return flows were used together with simulated unaltered streamflows to estimate altered streamflows and indicators of flow alteration for each fish-sampling site. Altered streamflows and indicators of flow alteration were calculated on the basis of methods developed in a previous U.S. Geological Survey study in which unaltered daily streamflows were simulated for a 44-year period (water years 1961-2004), and streamflow alterations were estimated by use of water-withdrawal and wastewater-return data previously reported to the State for the 2000-04 period and estimated domestic-well withdrawals and septic-system discharges. A variable selection process, conducted using principal

  3. Digging Soil Experiments for Micro Hydraulic Excavators based on Model Predictive Tracking Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatsu, Takumi; Nonaka, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Kazuma; Suzuki, Katsumasa

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the increase of burden to operators and lack of skilled operators are the issue in the work of the hydraulic excavator. These problems are expected to be improved by autonomous control. In this paper, we present experimental results of hydraulic excavators using model predictive control (MPC) which incorporates servo mechanism. MPC optimizes digging operations by the optimal control input which is calculated by predicting the future states and satisfying the constraints. However, it is difficult for MPC to cope with the reaction force from soil when a hydraulic excavator performs excavation. Servo mechanism suppresses the influence of the constant disturbance using the error integration. However, the bucket tip deviates from a specified shape by the sudden change of the disturbance. We can expect that the tracking performance is improved by combining MPC and servo mechanism. Path-tracking controls of the bucket tip are performed using the optimal control input. We apply the proposed method to the Komatsu- made micro hydraulic excavator PC01 by experiments. We show the effectiveness of the proposed method through the experiment of digging soil by comparing servo mechanism and pure MPC with the proposed method.

  4. Light induced fluorescence evaluation: A novel concept for caries diagnosis and excavation.

    PubMed

    Gugnani, Neeraj; Pandit, Ik; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gupta, Monika; Gugnani, Shalini

    2011-10-01

    In the era of minimal invasive dentistry, every effort should be directed to preserve the maximum tooth structure during cavity preparation. However, while making cavities, clinicians usually get indecisive at what point caries excavation should be stopped, so as to involve only the infected dentin. Apparent lack of valid clinical markers, difficulties with the use of caries detector dyes and chemo mechanical caries removal systems carve out a need for an improved system, which would be helpful to differentiate between the healthy and infected dentin during caries excavation. Light induced fluorescence evaluation is a novel concept implicated for caries detection and for making decisions while cavity preparation. This paper describes a few cases that explain the clinical applicability of this concept, using the SoproLife camera that works on this principle. Autofluorescence masking effect was found to be helpful for caries detection and the red fluorescence in the treatment mode was found helpful in deciding 'when to stop the excavation process.' Light induced fluorescence evaluation - Diagnosis - Treatment concept concept can be used as a guide for caries detection and excavation. It also facilitates decision making for stopping the caries excavation so as to involve infected dentin only.

  5. Light induced fluorescence evaluation: A novel concept for caries diagnosis and excavation

    PubMed Central

    Gugnani, Neeraj; Pandit, IK; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gupta, Monika; Gugnani, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    In the era of minimal invasive dentistry, every effort should be directed to preserve the maximum tooth structure during cavity preparation. However, while making cavities, clinicians usually get indecisive at what point caries excavation should be stopped, so as to involve only the infected dentin. Apparent lack of valid clinical markers, difficulties with the use of caries detector dyes and chemo mechanical caries removal systems carve out a need for an improved system, which would be helpful to differentiate between the healthy and infected dentin during caries excavation. Light induced fluorescence evaluation is a novel concept implicated for caries detection and for making decisions while cavity preparation. This paper describes a few cases that explain the clinical applicability of this concept, using the SoproLife camera that works on this principle. Autofluorescence masking effect was found to be helpful for caries detection and the red fluorescence in the treatment mode was found helpful in deciding ‘when to stop the excavation process.’ Light induced fluorescence evaluation – Diagnosis - Treatment concept concept can be used as a guide for caries detection and excavation. It also facilitates decision making for stopping the caries excavation so as to involve infected dentin only. PMID:22144816

  6. Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.J.; Carpenter, M.V.

    1995-12-01

    A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing {sup 227}Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of one- and two-step incomplete and complete excavations.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Stolpe, M; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Paris, S; Dörfer, C E

    2013-10-01

    The treatment of deep caries lesions carries significant risks for the integrity of the pulp and often initiates a cascade of re-interventions. Incomplete caries removal may reduce these risks and avoid or delay re-treatment. The present study analyzed the cost-effectiveness of one- and two-step incomplete as well as complete excavations. We used Markov models to simulate treatment of a molar tooth with a deep caries lesion in a 15-year-old patient. Retention of the tooth and its vitality as effectiveness measures as well as accruing costs were analyzed over the patient's lifetime. The model adopted a public-private-payer perspective within German health care. Transition probabilities were calculated based on literature reviews. Monte-Carlo microsimulations were performed with 6-month cycles. One-step incomplete excavation resulted in lower long-term costs and in longer-retained teeth and their vitality (means: 53.5 and 41.0 yrs) compared with two-step incomplete (52.5 and 37.5 yrs) and complete excavations (49.5 and 31.0 yrs), and dominated the other strategies in 70% to 100% of simulations. Regardless of the assumed willingness-to-pay ceiling value, one-step incomplete excavation had the highest probability of being cost-effective. Despite limited evidence levels of input data, we expect one-step incomplete excavation to reduce costs while retaining deeply carious teeth and their vitality for longer.

  8. Using three dimensional structural simulations to study the interactions of multiple excavations in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1998-02-01

    Three-dimensional quasistatic finite element codes are being used at Sandia National Laboratories to simulate the interactions of multiple large room and pillar mines in rock salt. The calculations presented in this paper are of a salt dome which contains multiple closely-spaced room and pillar mines. One of the mines was used as an oil storage facility, supported by the US DOE under the auspices of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program. The facility has recently been decommissioned due to the discovery of geotechnical instabilities. The model, validated by field observations, has resulted in a better understanding of the mechanisms which can threaten the stability of an underground excavation, as well as the structural interactions of multiple excavations. Although these calculations were performed in the specific interest of the SPR, the results should be of interest to mine designers concerned with the interactions of multiple mines excavated in a common formation.

  9. Bronze and Iron Age Finds from Romuald's Cave, Istria: 2014 Excavation Season.

    PubMed

    Janković, Ivor; Ahern, James C M; Mihelić, Sanjin; Premuzić, Zrinka

    2015-12-01

    Archaeological excavations in Romuald's Cave (Lim Channel, Istria, Croatia) have yielded evidence of human activity stretching back to the Middle Palaeolithic. This paper reports on recent Bronze Age/Early Iron Age discoveries uncovered during excavations as part of the Croatian National Science Foundation funded project: "Archaeological Investigations into the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene of the Lim Channel, Istria". Fragmentary skeletal remains from at least two individuals were excavated, and a direct radiocarbon date from one of the remains is commensurate with a Bronze Age attribution. The recovered ceramics confirm this age attribution, although they range from the Middle Bronze Age to incipient Iron Age in character. Furthermore, the ceramics indicate that the human activities in Romuald's Cave were associated with the nearby settlements of Gradina and St. Martin. PMID:26987164

  10. Alternative cytoskeletal landscapes: cytoskeletal novelty and evolution in basal excavate protists.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Scott C; Paredez, Alexander R

    2013-02-01

    Microbial eukaryotes encompass the majority of eukaryotic evolutionary and cytoskeletal diversity. The cytoskeletal complexity observed in multicellular organisms appears to be an expansion of components present in genomes of diverse microbial eukaryotes such as the basal lineage of flagellates, the Excavata. Excavate protists have complex and diverse cytoskeletal architectures and life cycles-essentially alternative cytoskeletal 'landscapes'-yet still possess conserved microtubule-associated and actin-associated proteins. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed that a subset of excavates, however, lack many canonical actin-binding proteins central to actin cytoskeleton function in other eukaryotes. Overall, excavates possess numerous uncharacterized and 'hypothetical' genes, and may represent an undiscovered reservoir of novel cytoskeletal genes and cytoskeletal mechanisms. The continued development of molecular genetic tools in these complex microbial eukaryotes will undoubtedly contribute to our overall understanding of cytoskeletal diversity and evolution.

  11. Bronze and Iron Age Finds from Romuald's Cave, Istria: 2014 Excavation Season.

    PubMed

    Janković, Ivor; Ahern, James C M; Mihelić, Sanjin; Premuzić, Zrinka

    2015-12-01

    Archaeological excavations in Romuald's Cave (Lim Channel, Istria, Croatia) have yielded evidence of human activity stretching back to the Middle Palaeolithic. This paper reports on recent Bronze Age/Early Iron Age discoveries uncovered during excavations as part of the Croatian National Science Foundation funded project: "Archaeological Investigations into the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene of the Lim Channel, Istria". Fragmentary skeletal remains from at least two individuals were excavated, and a direct radiocarbon date from one of the remains is commensurate with a Bronze Age attribution. The recovered ceramics confirm this age attribution, although they range from the Middle Bronze Age to incipient Iron Age in character. Furthermore, the ceramics indicate that the human activities in Romuald's Cave were associated with the nearby settlements of Gradina and St. Martin.

  12. Occupational fatalities during trenching and excavation work--United States, 1992-2001.

    PubMed

    2004-04-23

    Fatalities associated with trench collapses and other excavation hazards continue to occur despite Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards that specify safe work practices to reduce such hazards to workers. To assess the hazards of trenching and excavation work in the United States, CDC reviewed data from national occupational fatality records and investigative reports of fatal injuries. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that 76% of the deaths were caused by cave-ins and 47% of the deaths occurred among employees of companies with < or =10 workers. Employers can reduce the risk for future deaths by adhering to OSHA standards and by using education and training resources on safe excavation and trenching practices offered by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), OSHA, and labor and trade organizations.

  13. [Diversity and stability of arthropod assemblage in tea orchard].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yigen; Xiong, Jinjun; Huang, Mingdu; Gu, Dejiu

    2004-05-01

    Two tea orchards, simplex tea orchard with weeds removed manually or by herbicides (STO) and complex tea orchard with the weed Hedyotis uncinella (CTO), each with an area of 0. 4 hm2, were established in 1995 in Yingde Hongxing Tea Plantation, Guangdong Province. The primary eigenvalues, species richness index (R), assemblage diversity index (H'), evenness index (J) and species concentration index (C) of arthropod assemblage were employed and compared to assess the efficacy of STO and CTO on the diversity and stabilityof arthropod assemblage. Stability indexes Ss/Si and Sn/Sp and variation coefficient of diversity index ds/dm were utilized as well. The results demonstrated that the R of arthropod assemblage in CTO ranged from 4 to 8, with the highest of 7.7403, while that in STO varied mainly between 4 to 6. The average R of arthropod assemblage in CTO was 5.4672 +/- 0.3483, higher than that in STO (4.8809 +/- 0.3175). The H' of arthropod in CTO (3.8535 +/- 0.1232) was higher, in contrast to the value in STO (3.4654 +/- 0.1856). The J in CTO was higher, while the species concentration index (C) was lower, in comparison to STO. The stability indexes Ss/Si and Sn/Sp of CTO were greater than those of STO, while the ds/dm in CTO (0.1107) was lower than that in STO (0.1855). All these indicated that the diversity of arthropod assemblage was better preserved in CTO, and the assemblage in CTO was more stable.

  14. National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Institute. Status report, March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.

    1997-12-31

    The National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) program is intended to pool support, talent, and technologies of the industries dependent upon drilling and excavation technologies to initiate, coordinate, and sustain programs capable of developing substantial technological advances. The NADET Institute has been funded by the DOE Office of Geothermal Technologies and is now supporting seven projects aimed at advanced geothermal drilling technologies. The Institute seeks to broaden its base of funding and technological support from both government and industry sources. Encouraging progress has been made with the support of dues-paying industrial members and industrial sponsorship of a substantial drilling research study.

  15. Assessment of the Impact of Geomechanical Parameters Variability on Underground Excavations Stability Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytel, Witold; Świtoń, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Recognition of properties of the rock mass surrounding a mineral deposit is particularly important for the mining operations at greater depths. Since the rock mass is usually not homogeneous, and its parameters have characteristics of randomness, underground workings safety issue should always be analysed taking into account the dispersion of the values of these parameters around their mean values. In order to assess the impact of geotechnical parameters uncertainty on the excavation stability one uses the appropriate statistical approach. In this paper, by analysing successive combinations of geomechanical parameters of the rock in the measured range, we examined the effect of their variability on risk of underground excavation instability using response surface method.

  16. Quantifying Assemblage Turnover and Species Contributions at Ecologic Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C.; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA. PMID:24130679

  17. Fouling assemblages on offshore wind power plants and adjacent substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Dan; Malm, Torleif

    2008-09-01

    A significant expansion of offshore wind power is expected in the near future, with thousands of turbines in coastal waters, and various aspects of how this may influence the coastal ecology including disturbance effects from noise, shadows, electromagnetic fields, and changed hydrological conditions are accordingly of concern. Further, wind power plants constitute habitats for a number of organisms, and may locally alter assemblage composition and biomass of invertebrates, algae and fish. In this study, fouling assemblages on offshore wind turbines were compared to adjacent hard substrate. Influences of the structures on the seabed were also investigated. The turbines differed significantly from adjacent boulders in terms of assemblage composition of epibiota and motile invertebrates. Species number and Shannon-Wiener diversity were, also, significantly lower on the wind power plants. It was also indicated that the turbines might have affected assemblages of invertebrates and algae on adjacent boulders. Off shore wind power plant offer atypical substrates for fouling assemblages in terms of orientation, depth range, structure, and surface texture. Some potential ecological implications of the addition of these non-natural habitats for coastal ecology are discussed.

  18. Public sphere as assemblage: the cultural politics of roadside memorialization.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates contemporary academic accounts of the public sphere. In particular, it takes stock of post-Habermasian public sphere scholarship, and acknowledges a lively and variegated debate concerning the multiple ways in which individuals engage in contemporary political affairs. A critical eye is cast over a range of key insights which have come to establish the parameters of what 'counts' as a/the public sphere, who can be involved, and where and how communicative networks are established. This opens up the conceptual space for re-imagining a/the public sphere as an assemblage. Making use of recent developments in Deleuzian-inspired assemblage theory - most especially drawn from DeLanda's (2006) 'new philosophy of society' - the paper sets out an alternative perspective on the notion of the public sphere, and regards it as a space of connectivity brought into being through a contingent and heterogeneous assemblage of discursive, visual and performative practices. This is mapped out with reference to the cultural politics of roadside memorialization. However, a/the public sphere as an assemblage is not simply a 'social construction' brought into being through a logic of connectivity, but is an emergent and ephemeral space which reflexively nurtures and assembles the cultural politics (and political cultures) of which it is an integral part. The discussion concludes, then, with a consideration of the contribution of assemblage theory to public sphere studies. (Also see Campbell 2009a).

  19. Using diatom assemblages to assess urban stream conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, C.E.; Pan, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We characterized changes in diatom assemblages along an urban-to-rural gradient to assess impacts of urbanization on stream conditions. Diatoms, water chemistry, and physical variables of riffles at 19 urban and 28 rural stream sites were sampled and assessed during the summer base flow period. Near stream land use was characterized using GIS. In addition, one urban and one rural site were sampled monthly throughout a year to assess temporal variation of diatom assemblages between the urban and rural stream sites. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that the 1st ordination axis distinctly separated rural and urban sites. This axis was correlated with conductivity (r = 0.75) and % near-stream commercial/industrial land use (r = 0.55). TWINSPAN classified all sites into four groups based on diatom assemblages. These diatom-based site groups were significantly different in water chemistry (e.g., conductivity, dissolved nutrients), physical habitat (e.g., % stream substrate as fines), and near-stream land use. CCA on the temporal diatom data set showed that diatom assemblages had high seasonal variation along the 2nd axis in both urban and rural sites, however, rural and urban sites were well separated along the 1st ordination axis. Our results suggest that changes in diatom assemblages respond to urban impacts on stream conditions. ?? Springer 2006.

  20. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA.

  1. Fish assemblage structure following Impoundment of a Great Plains river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, M.C.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the upstream and downstream effect of impoundments on stream fish assemblages is important in managing fish populations and predicting the effects of future human activities on stream ecosystems. We used information collected over a 41-year period (1960-2001) to assess changes in fish assemblage structure resulting from impoundment of the Laramie River by Grayrocks Reservoir. Prior to impoundment (i.e., 1960-1979), fish assemblages were dominated by native catostomids and cyprinids. After impoundment several exotic species (e.g., smallmouth bass [Micropterus dolomieu], walleye [Sander vitreus; formerly Stizostedion vitreum], yellow perch [Perca flavescens], brown trout [Salmo trutta]) were sampled from reaches upstream and downstream of the reservoir. Suckermouth minnows (Phenacobius mirabilis) were apparently extirpated, and hornyhead chubs (Nocomis biguttatus) and common shiners (Luxilus cornutus) became rare upstream of Grayrocks Reservoir. The lower Laramie River downstream from Grayrocks Reservoir near its mouth retains habitat characteristics similar to those prior to impoundment (e.g., shallow, braided channel morphology) and is the only downstream area where several sensitive species persist, including sucker-mouth minnows, hornyhead chubs, and bigmouth shiners (Notropis dorsalis). Grayrocks Reservoir serves as a source of exotic piscivores to both upstream and downstream reaches and has altered downstream habitat characteristics. These impacts have had a substantial influence on native fish assemblages. Our results suggest that upstream and downstream effects of impoundment on fish assemblage structure are similar and that downstream reaches which retain habitat characteristics similar to pre-impoundment conditions may serve as areas of refuge for native species.

  2. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA. PMID:24130679

  3. Upstream effects of a reservoir on fish assemblages 45 years following impoundment.

    PubMed

    Franssen, N R; Tobler, M

    2013-05-01

    Fish assemblage structure, rarefied species richness, species diversity and evenness of assemblages upstream of a reservoir in Oklahoma, U.S.A., were compared pre and post-impoundment as well as in contemporary collections from streams above and below the reservoir. There were significant shifts in assemblage structure between historical and contemporary collections above the reservoir but not between contemporary assemblages above and below the impoundment. Indicator species analysis revealed that the sand shiner Notropis stramineus and fathead minnow Pimephales promelas have declined, whereas largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis have increased in relative abundance in assemblages upstream of the impoundment. Species richness was lower in contemporary assemblages compared with historical assemblages. Furthermore, contemporary assemblages below the dam had lower species richness, diversity and evenness compared with contemporary collections above the dam. These results highlight the spatial and temporal extent of reservoirs altering fish assemblages upstream of impoundments. PMID:23639160

  4. Faunal assemblage composition and paleoenvironment of Plovers Lake, a Middle Stone Age locality in Gauteng Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Darryl J; Brophy, Juliet K; Lewis, Patrick J; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R

    2008-12-01

    Plovers Lake is a dolomitic cave infill located approximately 45km northwest of Johannesburg in the Bloubank Valley, Gauteng Province, South Africa. Excavations between 2002-2004 revealed a rich and diverse fauna, a moderate-sized stone tool assemblage of Middle Stone Age (MSA) character, and human skeletal remains. Two principal depositional units are recognized: 1) a disturbed ex situ component that was likely displaced from 2) an otherwise relatively undisturbed in situ component from which the human skeletal material was recovered. The in situ depositional unit is bracketed by 2 flowstone layers, with U-series dates of 62.9 (+/-1.3)ka for the capping flowstone and 88.7 (+/-1.6)ka for the underlying flowstone. A single isochron ESR date of 75.6 (+/-5.6)ka corroborates the U-series dates. This paper presents an analysis of the mammalian, bird, and reptile faunas recovered from these two units. The two faunal assemblages show close correspondence in taphonomic, taxonomic, and ecological composition, supporting a common origin for both the ex situ and in situ components. Although human skeletal material, cut-marked bone, and stone tools have been recovered, these indications are too rare to consider Plovers Lake a human occupation site. Instead, a high abundance of carnivores, coprolites, and carnivore damaged bones point to brown hyenas as the principal, though not exclusive, bone accumulating agent. In the absence of a significant taphonomic bias relating to accumulating agent, Plovers Lake allows us to document an environment occupied by MSA humans, even if the humans were not resident in the cave itself. We reconstruct the paleoenvironment of Plovers Lake as predominantly grassland, though it was colder, moister, and more wooded than at present. Paleoclimatic conditions appear to have been as different from historic norms as those seen in several fossil localities in the Western Cape, pointing to greater environmental heterogeneity than has previously been

  5. Threats to macroalgal coralligenous assemblages in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Piazzi, Luigi; Gennaro, Paola; Balata, David

    2012-12-01

    Coralligenous habitat is one of the most important coastal systems of the Mediterranean Sea. This paper evaluates the main threats to macroalgal coralligenous habitats through a review of the relevant literature. Sedimentation, nutrient enrichment and biological invasions can cause severe alterations in the structure of coralligenous assemblages due to the regression of perennial structuring species and increases in populations of ephemeral algae. Under pristine conditions, mechanical disturbance seems to be easily mitigated by the recovery capability of coralligenous assemblages; however, such disturbances seriously affect coralligenous structure if they occur in concert with other stressors. Important synergetic effects among all the studied anthropogenic disturbances are also highlighted. The main consequences of the considered stressors are the loss of the complexity of macroalgal assemblages and the deterioration of both alpha and beta diversity.

  6. Methane Seep Carbonates Host Distinct, Diverse, and Dynamic Microbial Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Pasulka, Alexis L.; Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Levin, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marine methane seeps are globally distributed geologic features in which reduced fluids, including methane, are advected upward from the subsurface. As a result of alkalinity generation during sulfate-coupled methane oxidation, authigenic carbonates form slabs, nodules, and extensive pavements. These carbonates shape the landscape within methane seeps, persist long after methane flux is diminished, and in some cases are incorporated into the geologic record. In this study, microbial assemblages from 134 native and experimental samples across 5,500 km, representing a range of habitat substrates (carbonate nodules and slabs, sediment, bottom water, and wood) and seepage conditions (active and low activity), were analyzed to address two fundamental questions of seep microbial ecology: (i) whether carbonates host distinct microbial assemblages and (ii) how sensitive microbial assemblages are to habitat substrate type and temporal shifts in methane seepage flux. Through massively parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing and statistical analysis, native carbonates are shown to be reservoirs of distinct and highly diverse seep microbial assemblages. Unique coupled transplantation and colonization experiments on the seafloor demonstrated that carbonate-associated microbial assemblages are resilient to seep quiescence and reactive to seep activation over 13 months. Various rates of response to simulated seep quiescence and activation are observed among similar phylogenies (e.g., Chloroflexi operational taxonomic units) and similar metabolisms (e.g., putative S oxidizers), demonstrating the wide range of microbial sensitivity to changes in seepage flux. These results imply that carbonates do not passively record a time-integrated history of seep microorganisms but rather host distinct, diverse, and dynamic microbial assemblages. PMID:26695630

  7. Habitat Specialization in Tropical Continental Shelf Demersal Fish Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Ben M.; Harvey, Euan S.; Heyward, Andrew J.; Twiggs, Emily J.; Colquhoun, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The implications of shallow water impacts such as fishing and climate change on fish assemblages are generally considered in isolation from the distribution and abundance of these fish assemblages in adjacent deeper waters. We investigate the abundance and length of demersal fish assemblages across a section of tropical continental shelf at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to identify fish and fish habitat relationships across steep gradients in depth and in different benthic habitat types. The assemblage composition of demersal fish were assessed from baited remote underwater stereo-video samples (n = 304) collected from 16 depth and habitat combinations. Samples were collected across a depth range poorly represented in the literature from the fringing reef lagoon (1–10 m depth), down the fore reef slope to the reef base (10–30 m depth) then across the adjacent continental shelf (30–110 m depth). Multivariate analyses showed that there were distinctive fish assemblages and different sized fish were associated with each habitat/depth category. Species richness, MaxN and diversity declined with depth, while average length and trophic level increased. The assemblage structure, diversity, size and trophic structure of demersal fishes changes from shallow inshore habitats to deeper water habitats. More habitat specialists (unique species per habitat/depth category) were associated with the reef slope and reef base than other habitats, but offshore sponge-dominated habitats and inshore coral-dominated reef also supported unique species. This suggests that marine protected areas in shallow coral-dominated reef habitats may not adequately protect those species whose depth distribution extends beyond shallow habitats, or other significant elements of demersal fish biodiversity. The ontogenetic habitat partitioning which is characteristic of many species, suggests that to maintain entire species life histories it is necessary to protect corridors of connected

  8. Phytoplankton Assemblage Patterns in the Southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Carla; Moisan, Tiffany A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Wallops Coastal Oceans Observing Laboratory (Wa-COOL) Project, we sampled a time-series transect in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) biweekly. Our 2-year time-series data included physical parameters, nutrient concentrations, and chlorophyll a concentrations. A detailed phytoplankton assemblage structure was examined in the second year. During the 2-year study, chlorophyll a concentration (and ocean color satellite imagery) indicated that phytoplankton blooms occurred in January/February during mixing conditions and in early autumn under stratified conditions. The chlorophyll a concentrations ranged from 0.25 microgram 1(exp -1) to 15.49 microgram 1(exp -1) during the 2-year period. We were able to discriminate approximately 116 different species under phase contrast microscopy. Dominant phytoplankton included Skeletonema costatum, Rhizosolenia spp., and Pseudo-nitzschia pungens. In an attempt to determine phytoplankton species competition/succession within the assemblage, we calculated a Shannon Weaver diversity index for our diatom microscopy data. Diatom diversity was greatest during the winter and minimal during the spring. Diatom diversity was also greater at nearshore stations than at offshore stations. Individual genera appeared patchy, with surface and subsurface patches appearing abruptly and persisting for only 1-2 months at a time. The distribution of individual species differed significantly from bulk variables of the assemblage (chlorophyll a ) and total phytoplankton assemblage (cells), which indicates that phytoplankton species may be limited in growth in ways that differ from those of the total assemblage. Our study demonstrated a highly diverse phytoplankton assemblage throughout the year, with opportunistic species dominating during spring and fall in response to seasonal changes in temperature and nutrients in the southern MAB.

  9. Riparian influences on stream fish assemblage structure in urbanizing streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, A.H.; Freeman, B.J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the influence of land cover at multiple spatial extents on fish assemblage integrity, and the degree to which riparian forests can mitigate the negative effects of catchment urbanization on stream fish assemblages. Riparian cover (urban, forest, and agriculture) was determined within 30 m buffers at longitudinal distances of 200 m, 1 km, and the entire network upstream of 59 non-nested fish sampling locations. Catchment and riparian land cover within the upstream network were highly correlated, so we were unable to distinguish between those variables. Most fish assemblage variables were related to % forest and % urban land cover, with the strongest relations at the largest spatial extent of land cover (catchment), followed by riparian land cover in the 1-km and 200-m reach, respectively. For fish variables related to urban land cover in the catchment, we asked whether the influence of riparian land cover on fish assemblages was dependent on the amount of urban development in the catchment. Several fish assemblage metrics (endemic richness, endemic:cosmopolitan abundance, insectivorous cyprinid richness and abundance, and fluvial specialist richness) were all best predicted by single variable models with % urban land cover. However, endemic:cosmopolitan richness, cosmopolitan abundance, and lentic tolerant abundance were related to % forest cover in the 1-km stream reach, but only in streams that had <15% catchment urban land cover. In these cases, catchment urbanization overwhelmed the potential mitigating effects of riparian forests on stream fishes. Together, these results suggest that catchment land cover is an important driver of fish assemblages in urbanizing catchments, and riparian forests are important but not sufficient for protecting stream ecosystems from the impacts of high levels of urbanization.

  10. Habitat specialization in tropical continental shelf demersal fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Ben M; Harvey, Euan S; Heyward, Andrew J; Twiggs, Emily J; Colquhoun, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The implications of shallow water impacts such as fishing and climate change on fish assemblages are generally considered in isolation from the distribution and abundance of these fish assemblages in adjacent deeper waters. We investigate the abundance and length of demersal fish assemblages across a section of tropical continental shelf at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to identify fish and fish habitat relationships across steep gradients in depth and in different benthic habitat types. The assemblage composition of demersal fish were assessed from baited remote underwater stereo-video samples (n = 304) collected from 16 depth and habitat combinations. Samples were collected across a depth range poorly represented in the literature from the fringing reef lagoon (1-10 m depth), down the fore reef slope to the reef base (10-30 m depth) then across the adjacent continental shelf (30-110 m depth). Multivariate analyses showed that there were distinctive fish assemblages and different sized fish were associated with each habitat/depth category. Species richness, MaxN and diversity declined with depth, while average length and trophic level increased. The assemblage structure, diversity, size and trophic structure of demersal fishes changes from shallow inshore habitats to deeper water habitats. More habitat specialists (unique species per habitat/depth category) were associated with the reef slope and reef base than other habitats, but offshore sponge-dominated habitats and inshore coral-dominated reef also supported unique species. This suggests that marine protected areas in shallow coral-dominated reef habitats may not adequately protect those species whose depth distribution extends beyond shallow habitats, or other significant elements of demersal fish biodiversity. The ontogenetic habitat partitioning which is characteristic of many species, suggests that to maintain entire species life histories it is necessary to protect corridors of connected habitats

  11. The Freeze-Drying of Wet and Waterlogged Materials from Archaeological Excavations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jacqui

    2004-01-01

    Large quantities of wood and leather have been found in the waterlogged layers on archaeological excavations. Centuries of burial, however, have left these materials in a very degraded and vulnerable state such that if they dry out they will fall apart. This paper discusses the physics behind the freeze-drying techniques that allow the…

  12. Characteristics of H2S emission from aged refuse after excavation exposure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dong-Sheng; Du, Yao; Fang, Yuan; Hu, Li-Fang; Fang, Cheng-Ran; Long, Yu-Yang

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S(g)) emission from landfills is a widespread problem, especially when aged refuse is excavated. H2S(g) emission from aged refuse exposed to air was investigated and the results showed that large amounts of H2S(g) can be released, especially in the first few hours after excavation, when H2S(g) concentrations in air near refuse could reach 2.00 mg m(-3). Initial exposure to air did not inhibit the emission of H2S(g), as is generally assumed, but actually promoted it. The amounts of H2S(g) emitted in the first 2 d after excavation can be very dangerous, and the risks associated with the emission of H2S(g) could decrease significantly with time. Unlike a large number of sulfide existed under anaerobic conditions, the sulfide in aged municipal solid waste can be oxidized chemically to elemental sulfur (but not sulfate) under aerobic conditions, and its conversion rate was higher than 80%. Only microorganisms can oxidize the reduced sulfur species to sulfate, and the conversion rate could reach about 50%. Using appropriate techniques to enhance these chemical and biological transformations could allow the potential health risks caused by H2S(g) after refuse excavation to be largely avoided. PMID:25725388

  13. Excavating Silences and Tensions of Agency|Passivity in Science Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

    2010-01-01

    I reflect on studies by Rodriguez and Carlone, Haun-Frank, and Kimmel to emphasize the ways in which they excavate silences in the science education literature related to linguistic and cultural diversity and situating the problem of reform in teachers rather than contextual factors, such as traditional schooling discourses and forces that serve…

  14. Stability Calculation Method of Slope Reinforced by Prestressed Anchor in Process of Excavation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhong; Wei, Jia; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper takes the effect of supporting structure and anchor on the slope stability of the excavation process into consideration; the stability calculation model is presented for the slope reinforced by prestressed anchor and grillage beam, and the dynamic search model of the critical slip surface also is put forward. The calculation model of the optimal stability solution of each anchor tension of the whole process is also given out, through which the real-time analysis and checking of slope stability in the process of excavation can be realized. The calculation examples indicate that the slope stability is changed with the dynamic change of the design parameters of anchor and grillage beam. So it is relatively more accurate and reasonable by using dynamic search model to determine the critical slip surface of the slope reinforced by prestressed anchor and grillage beam. Through the relationships of each anchor layout and the slope height of various stages of excavation, and the optimal stability solution of prestressed bolt tension design value in various excavation stages can be obtained. The arrangement of its prestressed anchor force reflects that the layout of the lower part of bolt and the calculation of slope reinforcement is in line with the actual. These indicate that the method is reasonable and practical. PMID:24683319

  15. Content Literacy for the 21st Century: Excavation, Elevation, and Relational Cosmopolitanism in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damico, James S.; Baildon, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This article makes the a case for conceptualizing content literacy, especially in social studies, as inquiry-based social practices for understanding and addressing complex, multifaceted problems. Two core practices especially needed for a Web-dominated 21st century are then described--excavation and elevation. Next, these two practices are…

  16. Pumice from thera (santorini) identified from a greek mainland archeological excavation.

    PubMed

    Rapp, G; Cooke, S R; Henrickson, E

    1973-02-01

    Pumice fragments recovered from an archeological excavation on the Greek mainland have been correlated by means of index of refraction measurements with the Late Bronze Age volcanic eruption on the island of Thera (Santorini) in the Aegean Sea. Pottery from the strata containing the pumice dates from the 15th century B.C.

  17. 18 CFR 1304.207 - Channel excavation on TVA-owned residential access shoreland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Risk Profile elevation. For those reservoirs that have no flood control storage, dredge spoil must be... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Channel excavation on TVA-owned residential access shoreland. 1304.207 Section 1304.207 Conservation of Power and...

  18. 18 CFR 1304.207 - Channel excavation on TVA-owned residential access shoreland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Risk Profile elevation. For those reservoirs that have no flood control storage, dredge spoil must be... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Channel excavation on TVA-owned residential access shoreland. 1304.207 Section 1304.207 Conservation of Power and...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.913 - Blasting in excavation work under compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... use in wet holes shall be water-resistant and shall be Fume Class 1. (g) When tunnel excavation in... explosives shall not be stored or kept in tunnels, shafts, or caissons. Detonators and explosives for each... of explosives and detonators. (e) All metal pipes, rails, air locks, and steel tunnel lining shall...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.913 - Blasting in excavation work under compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... use in wet holes shall be water-resistant and shall be Fume Class 1. (g) When tunnel excavation in... explosives shall not be stored or kept in tunnels, shafts, or caissons. Detonators and explosives for each... of explosives and detonators. (e) All metal pipes, rails, air locks, and steel tunnel lining shall...

  1. Lightweight Bulldozer Attachment for Construction and Excavation on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert; Wilkinson, R. Allen; Gallo, Christopher A.; Nick, Andrew J.; Schuler, Jason M.; King, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A lightweight bulldozer blade prototype has been designed and built to be used as an excavation implement in conjunction with the NASA Chariot lunar mobility platform prototype. The combined system was then used in a variety of field tests in order to characterize structural loads, excavation performance and learn about the operational behavior of lunar excavation in geotechnical lunar simulants. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate the feasibility of lunar excavation for site preparation at a planned NASA lunar outpost. Once the feasibility has been determined then the technology will become available as a candidate element in the NASA Lunar Surface Systems Architecture. In addition to NASA experimental testing of the LANCE blade, NASA engineers completed analytical work on the expected draft forces using classical soil mechanics methods. The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) team utilized finite element analysis (FEA) to study the interaction between the cutting edge of the LANCE blade and the surface of soil. FEA was also used to examine various load cases and their effect on the lightweight structure of the LANCE blade. Overall it has been determined that a lunar bulldozer blade is a viable technology for lunar outpost site preparation, but further work is required to characterize the behavior in 1/6th G and actual lunar regolith in a vacuum lunar environment.

  2. Supplement analysis for paleontological excavation at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-19

    On December 15, 1997, contractor workers supporting the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction uncovered bones suspected to be of paleontological importance. The NIF workers were excavating a utility trench near the southwest corner of the NIF footprint area, located at the northeast corner of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Livermore Site, and were excavating at a depth of approximately 30 feet. Upon the discovery of bone fragments, the excavation in the immediate vicinity was halted and the LLNL archaeologist was notified. The archaeologist determined that there was no indication of cultural resources. Mark Goodwin, Senior Curator for the University of California Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley, was then contacted. Mr. Goodwin visited the site on December 16th and confirmed that the bones consisted of a section of the skull, a portion of the mandible, several teeth, upper palate, and possibly the vertebrae of a mammoth, genus Mammuthus columbi. This supplement analysis evaluates the potential for adverse impacts of excavating skeletal remains, an activity that was only generally assessed by the NIF Project-Specific Analysis in the Final Programmatic Environmental impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SS and M PEIS) published in September 1996 (DOE/EIS-0236) and its Record of Decision published on December 19, 1996. This supplement analysis has been prepared pursuant to the DOE regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (10 CFR 1021.314).

  3. Subsurface Tiltmeter Observations of Solid Earth Tides and Rock Excavation in Northeastern Illinois

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancelle, C.; Volk, J.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.

    2013-12-01

    Tiltmeter arrays in the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) Near Detector Hall at Fermilab and the Lafarge - Conco Mine record solid earth tides and mechanical unloading due to excavation. The arrays are located approximately 100 meters underground in the Galena-Platteville dolomite in Northeastern Illinois. Just off of the MINOS Near Detector Hall a new cavern was excavated to house the Off-axis Neutrino Appearance Experiment (NOvA) program near detector. The recorded excavation response in the MINOS Near Detector Hall due to the NOvA cavern excavation is approximately thirteen times a point-load estimated response calculated using laboratory-determined properties. This discrepancy is likely due to variations in Young's Modulus in the rock in a field versus laboratory scale, although seasonal effects causing long term trends in the data could be part of this response. Amplitudes of measured solid earth tides differ from the amplitudes of theoretical solid earth tides by up to 40 percent for both arrays. This is likely due to a local heterogeneity or discontinuity.

  4. Radiation measurements of excavated items at a radioactive-waste burial site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromswold, D. C.; Alvarez, J. L.; Ludowise, J. D.

    1995-12-01

    Radiation measurements on items excavated from a radioactive-waste burial ground were part of a field test of excavation techniques for the cleanup of subsurface sites. The waste resulted from plutonium production for nuclear weapons at Hanford, WA. The radiation measurements investigated techniques for classifying bulk waste for placement into a permanent disposal facility. Hand-held γ-ray survey instruments measured exposure rates (mR/h) from contaminated dirt and radioactive objects as they were removed by heavy excavation equipment. Gamma-ray detectors mounted on the excavation equipment provided additional data that were transmitted by radio. Exposure rates from identifiable objects (e.g. specific reactor components) were compared with expected exposure rates calculated from site-disposal records and computer modeling. Selected objects were subjected to additional on-site measurements using a high-purity germanium detector. Detected nuclides included 60Co, 137Cs, 152,154Eu, and 108mAg. A large-volume neutron detector checked for possible transuranic nuclides. Alpha and β spectrometry also were tested. but their utility for this application was limited due to the short range of the particles and the difficulty of maintaining a repeatable measurement geometry in the field.

  5. National advanced drilling and excavation technologies program: Summary of third meeting of interested Federal agencies

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-07

    The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to discuss a proposal by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) outlining a National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, and (3) to hear about drilling research activities funded by the Department of Energy. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  6. Experience of georadar GROT application for mapping of a cultural layer on archaeological excavation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeykin, Vladimir V.; Morozov, Pavel A.; Den, O. E.; Schekotov, Alexander Y.

    2000-04-01

    By the order of Moscow Region archaeological expedition of the Institute of Archaeology, Russian Academy of Science (RAS), GPR inspection of an ancient settlement excavation (D'yakovsky period, early iron age, 4-3 centuries BC) was carried out. This ancient settlement is located near village Myachikovo in Kolomna district of the Moscow Region. The inspection of the excavation was carried out by the georadar GROT (design of the device has been reported at the 6th GPR Conference in Sendai, Japan). The research problem consisted in the mapping of buried earthen fortification structures of the ancient settlement. According to the data of aerial photography, sectors of two concentric strips, distinguishable due to more saturated color of vegetation, were well visible in the territory surrounding the excavation. According to the archaeologists version, the vegetation indicated the borders of the interred fortification structures. The GPR inspection of the territory around the settlement showed, at the depths of 1.5 to 2 meters, some structures similar to a buried ditch. The 'ditch' width was about 5 - 6 meters; radius from the settlement center was 20 meters for the internal, and 30 meters for the external ditch. Georadar cross sections superimposed on the excavation map allowed us to understand the scheme of ditch arrangement in fortification structures of an early iron century settlement.

  7. The Li(f)e of the Self: Missing Persons and Auto/Archeological Excavations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdick, Jake

    2014-01-01

    This article describes and enacts a process of autobiographical inquiry, auto/archeology, which seeks to address problematic confluences of memory and identity in reconstructing one's historical narrative. Drawing on curriculum theory and Lacanian psychoanalysis, the author describes a process of excavation in which understandings of a prior…

  8. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT - DEMONSTRATION OF A TRIAL EXCAVATION AT THE MCCOLL SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In June 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Region IX Superfund Program, in cooperation with EPA’s Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL), and EPA’s Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program performed a trial excavation of approximatel...

  9. Characteristics of H2S emission from aged refuse after excavation exposure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dong-Sheng; Du, Yao; Fang, Yuan; Hu, Li-Fang; Fang, Cheng-Ran; Long, Yu-Yang

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S(g)) emission from landfills is a widespread problem, especially when aged refuse is excavated. H2S(g) emission from aged refuse exposed to air was investigated and the results showed that large amounts of H2S(g) can be released, especially in the first few hours after excavation, when H2S(g) concentrations in air near refuse could reach 2.00 mg m(-3). Initial exposure to air did not inhibit the emission of H2S(g), as is generally assumed, but actually promoted it. The amounts of H2S(g) emitted in the first 2 d after excavation can be very dangerous, and the risks associated with the emission of H2S(g) could decrease significantly with time. Unlike a large number of sulfide existed under anaerobic conditions, the sulfide in aged municipal solid waste can be oxidized chemically to elemental sulfur (but not sulfate) under aerobic conditions, and its conversion rate was higher than 80%. Only microorganisms can oxidize the reduced sulfur species to sulfate, and the conversion rate could reach about 50%. Using appropriate techniques to enhance these chemical and biological transformations could allow the potential health risks caused by H2S(g) after refuse excavation to be largely avoided.

  10. Creative spoil: Design concepts, construction techniques, and disposal of excavated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLindon, Gerald J.

    1985-03-01

    The author discusses some of the construction methods used in building the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, the disposal of surplus excavated materials, and the reclamation of disposal areas along the waterway Emphasis is placed on the steps taken to assure protection of natural resources and to promote overall environmental quality.

  11. Blast-free mining of coal seams by excavators equipped with rotary dynamic buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Labutin, V.N.; Mattis, A.R.; Zaitseva, A.A.

    2005-04-01

    The necessity to equip cable excavators with rotary buckets is substantiated. The results of graphic-analytical analysis of the rotary bucket operation are presented, and its main advantages are determined in comparison with conventional buckets in mining coal seams of complex structure.

  12. Modeling the effect of executive device of a bucket-wheel excavator on the coal face

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, A.A.; Cheskidov, V.I.; Zaitsev, G.D.

    2005-11-15

    An algorithm is proposed and substantiated to calculate the optimum trajectory of scooping for the dynamic bucket-wheel and stationary bucket excavators. The applicability of the developed program in determining mineral losses and impoverishment during selective and bulk-selective mining in bedded deposits is demonstrated.

  13. Ground Stabilization for foundation and excavation construction in Florida karst topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaleh, L. J.; Grob, J. D.; Gorny, R. H.

    1993-12-01

    The construction of additional facilities at the Florida Power Corporation's Crystal River Energy Complex required an extensive stabilization program to construct foundations for approximately one half mile of cooling towers. This paper presents an overview of the techniques and methods used in the construction of additional facilities at the Crystal River Generating Station. Excavations for intake and discharge structures were to be more than 20 ft below the water table. Cooling tower foundations were constructed on extensively solutioned Florida limerock located on the central Gulf Coast of Florida. Hybrid ground modification techniques were used to stabilize soft or loose soils and solution features in the underlying limerock, allowing mat and spread footing foundations to be used for most of the facility. The ground modification techniques were used to detect, collapse, densify, and fill solution features below the structure foundations. The bearing capacity after ground modification was verified by field load tests. Subsurface investigations indicated that sheet pile excavations with grouted seals were the optimal technique for cofferdam excavations in the limerock formation. Existing collapsed caverns were encountered during construction of the cofferdam for the intake structure and the adjacent discharge structure, requiring a fast-track design change, considerable field coordination, and daily modifications to accommodate the varied conditions encountered. Tied-back soldier pile cofferdam construction was combined with grouting, underwater excavation, and a massive, unreinforced, concrete tremie slab with grouted anchors, and installed off a barge to provide a dewatered excavation. This project involved the use of hybrid soil-rock anchors to anchor one of the largest continuous placement tremie seals installed in Florida. Other excavations used sheeting and grouting of the underlying limerock formation to provide a dewatered excavation. Ground modification

  14. A low-cost approach for the documentation and monitoring of an archaeological excavation site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Dirk; Orrin, Joel; Richter, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The documentation of archaeological excavations and in particular a constant monitoring is often time-consuming and depending on humańs capabilities. Thus, remote sensing methods, which allow an objective reproduction of the current state of an excavation and additional information are of interest. Therefore, a low-cost approach was tested on an open-air excavation site for two days in September 2015. The Magdalenian excavation site of Bad Kösen-Lengefeld, Germany is one important site in a system of about 100 sites in the area of the small rivers Saale and Unstrut. The whole site and the surrounding area (200 by 200 m) was first observed by a GoPro Hero 3+ mounted on a DJI-Phantom 2 UAV. Ground control points were set-up in a regular grid covering the whole area. The achieved accuracy is 20 mm with a ground resolution of 45 mm. As a test, the GoPro Hero 3+ camera was additionally mounted on a small, extendable pole. With this second low-cost, easy to apply monitoring approach, pictures were automatically taken every second in a stop-and-go mode. In order to capture the excavation pit (7 by 4 m), two different angles were used for holding the pole, which focused on the middle and on the border of the pit. This procedure was repeated on the following day in order to document the excavation process. For the registration of the images, the already existing and measured excavation nails were used, which are equally distributed over the whole site in a 1 m grid. Thus, a high accurate registration of the images was possible (>10 mm). In order to approve the accuracy of the already derived data, the whole site was also observed by a Faro Focus 3D LS 120 laser scanner. The measurements of this device were registered by spherical targets, which were measured in the same reference system. The accuracy of the registration and the ground resolution for the image based approach for both days was about 4 mm. From these two measurements the process of the excavation was easily

  15. Scaled experimental study on excavation of lunar regolith with rakes/rippers and flat blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iai, Masafumi

    As humanity's activities expand to the Moon, Mars, and other extra-terrestrial bodies, it will be necessary to use local resources rather than bringing everything from the Earth. This concept is called In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), which starts with excavation and earthmoving. The present study focuses on loosening and moving of the lunar regolith by a ripper (or rake) and a wide blade with consideration of gravel content. After characterizing the lunar regolith and two of its simulants (JSC-1A and FJS-1), the relationship between the excavation energy and different conditions, namely gravel content, relative density, and tine spacing on a rake, is investigated with scaled experiments. Geotechnical properties of JSC-1A were determined, in addition to the simulants' stress-strain relationships over a wide range of relative density (13% to near 100%). Gravel content of the lunar regolith, often overlooked in previous studies, is estimated based on the data of 11 Apollo cores, which reveals the maximum local gravel content is about 30% by weight. Also the grain size distribution of the lunar regolith up to 1 m grains is created by combining the data from Apollo and Surveyor missions. In the experiments, gravel (2 mm--10 mm) is added to JSC-1A In addition, a math model of the ripping force is developed as a function of material density, which could be the basis of an instrumented-ripper technique for detailed mapping of construction. Prior ripping decreases total excavation energy by up to 20% if the relative density is ≥ 60% and the gravel content is ≤ 10%. The optimal tine spacing for JSC-1A at a penetration depth of 30 mm is 30 mm. Even a gravel content of 5% increases the reaction force on excavation tools, which underlines the necessity of consideration of gravel content for lunar excavation planning.

  16. The assemblage of compliance in psychiatric case management.

    PubMed

    Brodwin, Paul

    2010-08-01

    In the post-asylum era, case managers perform much of the face-to-face work of pharmaceutical compliance for people with severe and persistent mental illness. Their work demands careful orchestration of the assemblage of compliance, including the actual medications, the ideology of biopsychiatry, the division of professional labor, and certain mundane tools. Ethnographic vignettes from an Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) team show how case managers use this assemblage in their everyday routines, but also how it undercuts key elements of the original ACT mission. Reflecting its roots in the deinstitutionalization movement, the ACT model gives case managers limitless responsibilities for clients' lives, but then narrowly defines their role as the prosthetic extension of psychiatric authority. To produce compliance, case managers depend on the medication cassette, analyzed here as a human/non-human hybrid woven into their ordinary work. The medication cassette has pre-scripted uses that enlist clinicians in biopsychiatric thinking and also silently impose compliant behavior on clients. The elements in the assemblage of compliance depend on each other, but they do not form a seamless whole, as evidenced by the dilemmas and micropolitics of the clinical front-line. Theoretical notions of assemblages and technologies of compliance, drawn from science and technology studies, illuminate a core conundrum of practice in psychiatric case management.

  17. Sewage pollution impact on Mediterranean rocky-reef fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Azzurro, Ernesto; Matiddi, Marco; Fanelli, Emanuela; Guidetti, Paolo; La Mesa, Gabriele; Scarpato, Alfonso; Axiak, Victor

    2010-06-01

    The effects of sewage outfalls on subtidal fish assemblages were studied along the NW coasts of Malta (Sicily channel, Mediterranean Sea) by means of underwater visual census. The presence of two spatially distinct outfalls discharging untreated wastewaters allowed to use a balanced symmetrical after control/impact (ACI) design that consisted of two putatively impacted locations and two controls, with four sites nested in each location. Surveys were performed in 2006 at two random dates. The study highlighted significant changes at both assemblage and individual species levels. Fish assemblages structures were different between controls and sewages, where total abundance of fish were higher. The responses of individual species to sewage pollution were mostly related to an anomalous increase of two small opportunistic species i.e. Gobius bucchichii and Parablennius rouxi and to a decrease of species of the genus Symphodus, particularly S. roissali and S. ocellatus. Moreover in correspondence of the outfalls, significant changes of the fish size distribution were detected for several species. These results support the use of fish assemblages as biological indicators for marine coastal waters and demonstrated the possibility to obtain sharp signals of environmental impact from some individual fish species. PMID:20193961

  18. Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Sanders, Nathan J; Dunn, Robert R; Watson, Simon; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Andersen, Alan N; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Inge; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B; Bishop, Tom R; Boulay, Raphael; Castracani, Cristina; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A; Enríquez, Martha L; Fayle, Tom M; Feener, Donald H; Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Gómez, Crisanto; Grasso, Donato A; Groc, Sarah; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin D; Lach, Lori; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Majer, Jonathan; Menke, Sean B; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Munyai, Thinandavha C; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M; de Souza, Jorge L P; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L; Vonshak, Merav; Parr, Catherine L

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction among temperature, precipitation and disturbance shaped species richness and evenness. The effect was manifested through a failure of species richness to increase substantially with temperature in transformed habitats at low precipitation. At low precipitation levels, evenness increased with temperature in undisturbed sites, peaked at medium temperatures in disturbed sites and remained low in transformed sites. In warmer climates with lower rainfall, the effects of increasing disturbance on species richness and evenness were akin to decreases in temperature of up to 9°C. Anthropogenic disturbance and ongoing climate change may interact in complicated ways to shape the structure of assemblages, with hot, arid environments likely to be at greatest risk.

  19. Freshwater Fish Assemblage Patterns in Rhode Island Streams and Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Patterns in fish assemblages in streams and rivers can inform watershed and water management, yet these patterns are not well characterized for the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Here we relate freshwater fish data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Managemen...

  20. UV EXPOSURE OF CORAL ASSEMBLAGES IN THE FLORIDA KEYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have indicated that solar radiation can be a significant stressor of coral assemblages in tropical and subtropical marine environments. Here we review the scientific literature related to the interactions of solar radiation with coral reefs, with emphasis on harm...

  1. Elk herbivory alters small mammal assemblages in high elevation drainages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Elliott W.R.; Maron, John L.; Martin, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Together, our results show that relaxation of heavy herbivore pressure by a widespread native ungulate can lead to rapid changes in small mammal assemblages. Moreover, exclusion of large herbivores can yield rapid responses by vegetation that may enhance or maintain habitat quality for small mammal populations.

  2. EXAMINING ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN FISH ASSEMBLAGES AND PHYSICAL HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing lotic fish-habitat interactions from regional survey data requires that we consider a comprehensive representation, at the appropriate scale, of the likely controls on fish assemblages. At the scale of stream and river reaches, the important dimensions of physical habi...

  3. Watershed Alteration Impacts to Benthic Diatom Assemblages in Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    To examine the use of diatoms as indicators of urban impacts to streams, we identified relationships of diatom assemblages with water chemistry and land use for 160 sites in New England. The first axis of a nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination showed significant relation...

  4. AN INDEX OF COMPOSITIONAL DISSIMILARITY BETWEEN OBSERVED AND EXPECTED ASSEMBLAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reference-condition approach to bioassessment often uses the observed/expected (O/E) ratio to indicate anthropogenic alteration of aquatic macroinvertebrates, fish, or periphyton assemblages. Given a list of taxa found at 1 or more minimally disturbed reference sites, E is t...

  5. Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Heloise; Sanders, Nathan J.; Dunn, Robert R.; Watson, Simon; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Andersen, Alan N.; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Inge; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B.; Bishop, Tom R.; Boulay, Raphael; Castracani, Cristina; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A.; Enríquez, Martha L.; Fayle, Tom M.; Feener, Donald H.; Fitzpatrick, Matthew C.; Gómez, Crisanto; Grasso, Donato A.; Groc, Sarah; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin D.; Lach, Lori; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Majer, Jonathan; Menke, Sean B.; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Munyai, Thinandavha C.; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M.; de Souza, Jorge L. P.; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.; Vonshak, Merav; Parr, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction among temperature, precipitation and disturbance shaped species richness and evenness. The effect was manifested through a failure of species richness to increase substantially with temperature in transformed habitats at low precipitation. At low precipitation levels, evenness increased with temperature in undisturbed sites, peaked at medium temperatures in disturbed sites and remained low in transformed sites. In warmer climates with lower rainfall, the effects of increasing disturbance on species richness and evenness were akin to decreases in temperature of up to 9°C. Anthropogenic disturbance and ongoing climate change may interact in complicated ways to shape the structure of assemblages, with hot, arid environments likely to be at greatest risk. PMID:25994675

  6. Multiscale variability of amphipod assemblages in Posidonia oceanica meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturaro, Nicolas; Lepoint, Gilles; Vermeulen, Simon; Gobert, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The study of spatial patterns is important in understanding the causes of the distribution and abundance of organisms, and it also provides a valuable basis for management and conservation. Amphipod crustaceans are key organisms in seagrass ecosystems. However, little attention has been paid to the spatial scales at which amphipod assemblages may vary. We examined variability patterns of amphipod populations inhabiting Posidonia oceanica meadows, over spatial scales spanning four orders of magnitude (1 to 1000 meters) and for two consecutive years. This study reports the scales that contributed most to spatial variation of amphipod assemblages and explores the potential processes driving the observed patterns, with particular emphasis on habitat features. The number of species, the diversity, and the density of some species varied substantially across years. For most species the highest spatial variation in density and biomass occurred at small scales (1 and 10 meters). Based on density data, the structure of amphipod assemblages did not differ at any scales investigated. The patchiness that occurred at small scales may have been related to habitat features, but only weakly. Instead, we postulate that amphipod behavioral processes likely represent good explanatory factors. Although, small-scale spatial variability can be an important feature of amphipod assemblages in P. oceanica meadows, some patterns may have gone undetected because they occur at scales smaller than those investigated.

  7. Early cretaceous radiolarian assemblages from the East Sakhalin Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilov, D. V.; Vishnevskaya, V. S.

    2011-02-01

    Three-dimensional radiolarian skeletons isolated from rock matrix in HF solution and then studied under scanning electron microscope substantiate the Early Cretaceous age of volcanogenic-cherty deposits sampled from fragmentary rock successions of the East Sakhalin Mountains. Accordingly the Berriasian age is established for jasper packets formerly attributed to the Upper Paleozoic-Mesozoic Daldagan Group; the Valanginian radiolarians are identified in cherty rock intercalations in the Upper Paleozoic (?) Ivashkino Formation; the Berriasian-Barremian assemblage is macerated from cherty tuffites of the Jurassic-Cretaceous Ostraya Formation; and the Aptian-early Albian radiolarians are characteristic of tuffaceous cherty rocks sampled from the Cretaceous Khoe Formation of the Nabil Group. Photographic documentation of radiolarian skeletons specifies taxonomic composition and age of the Berriasian, Valanginian, Berriasian-Valanginian, Barremian, and Aptian-Albian radiolarian assemblages from the East Sakhalin Mountains, and their evolution as related to abiotic events is considered. Coexistence of Tethyan and Pacific species in the same rock samples evidence origin of radiolarian assemblages in an ecotone. Consequently, the assemblages are applicable for intra- and interregional correlations and paleogeographic reconstructions.

  8. Simulating fish assemblages in riverine networks - September 2013

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a modeling approach for simulating assemblages of fish in riverine landscapes. The approach allows a user to determine the grain and extent of river networks within which fish populations reproduce, move, and survive in response to both environmental drivers and assem...

  9. Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Sanders, Nathan J; Dunn, Robert R; Watson, Simon; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Andersen, Alan N; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Inge; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B; Bishop, Tom R; Boulay, Raphael; Castracani, Cristina; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A; Enríquez, Martha L; Fayle, Tom M; Feener, Donald H; Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Gómez, Crisanto; Grasso, Donato A; Groc, Sarah; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin D; Lach, Lori; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Majer, Jonathan; Menke, Sean B; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Munyai, Thinandavha C; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M; de Souza, Jorge L P; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L; Vonshak, Merav; Parr, Catherine L

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction among temperature, precipitation and disturbance shaped species richness and evenness. The effect was manifested through a failure of species richness to increase substantially with temperature in transformed habitats at low precipitation. At low precipitation levels, evenness increased with temperature in undisturbed sites, peaked at medium temperatures in disturbed sites and remained low in transformed sites. In warmer climates with lower rainfall, the effects of increasing disturbance on species richness and evenness were akin to decreases in temperature of up to 9°C. Anthropogenic disturbance and ongoing climate change may interact in complicated ways to shape the structure of assemblages, with hot, arid environments likely to be at greatest risk. PMID:25994675

  10. Spatiotemporal patterns of fish assemblage structure in a river impounded by low-head dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, David P.; Tiemann, Jeremy S.; Edds, David R.; Wildhaber, Mark L.

    2005-01-01

    We studied spatiotemporal patterns of fish assemblage structure in the Neosho River, Kansas, a system impounded by low-head dams. Spatial variation in the fish assemblage was related to the location of dams that created alternating lotic and lentic stream reaches with differing fish assemblages. At upstream sites close to dams, assemblages were characterized by species associated with deeper, slower-flowing habitat. Assemblages at sites immediately downstream from dams had higher abundance of species common to shallow, swift-flowing habitat. Temporal variation in assemblage structure was stronger than spatial variation, and was associated with fish life history events such as spawning and recruitment, as well as seasonal changes in environmental conditions. Our results suggest that low-head dams can influence spatial patterns of fish assemblage structure in systems such as the Neosho River and that such assemblages also vary seasonally.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF SUBMERGED MACROPHYTES ON SEDIMENTARY DIATOM ASSEMBLAGES(1).

    PubMed

    Vermaire, Jesse C; Prairie, Yves T; Gregory-Eaves, Irene

    2011-12-01

    Submerged macrophytes are a central component of lake ecosystems; however, little is known regarding their long-term response to environmental change. We have examined the potential of diatoms as indicators of past macrophyte biomass. We first sampled periphyton to determine whether habitat was a predictor of diatom assemblage. We then sampled 41 lakes in Quebec, Canada, to evaluate whether whole-lake submerged macrophyte biomass (BiomEpiV) influenced surface sediment diatom assemblages. A multivariate regression tree (MRT) was used to construct a semiquantitative model to reconstruct past macrophyte biomass. We determined that periphytic diatom assemblages on macrophytes were significantly different from those on wood and rocks (ANOSIM R = 0.63, P < 0.01). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the 41-lake data set identified BiomEpiV as a significant (P < 0.05) variable in structuring sedimentary diatom assemblages. The MRT analysis classified the lakes into three groups. These groups were (A) high-macrophyte, nutrient-limited lakes (BiomEpiV ≥525 μg · L(-1) ; total phosphorus [TP] <35 μg · L(-1) ; 23 lakes); (B) low-macrophyte, nutrient-limited lakes (BiomEpiV <525 μg · L(-1) ; TP <35 μg · L(-1) ; 12 lakes); and (C) eutrophic lakes (TP ≥35 μg · L(-1) ; six lakes). A semiquantitative model correctly predicted the MRT group of the lake 71% of the time (P < 0.001). These results suggest that submerged macrophytes have a significant influence on diatom community structure and that sedimentary diatom assemblages can be used to infer past macrophyte abundance.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF SUBMERGED MACROPHYTES ON SEDIMENTARY DIATOM ASSEMBLAGES(1).

    PubMed

    Vermaire, Jesse C; Prairie, Yves T; Gregory-Eaves, Irene

    2011-12-01

    Submerged macrophytes are a central component of lake ecosystems; however, little is known regarding their long-term response to environmental change. We have examined the potential of diatoms as indicators of past macrophyte biomass. We first sampled periphyton to determine whether habitat was a predictor of diatom assemblage. We then sampled 41 lakes in Quebec, Canada, to evaluate whether whole-lake submerged macrophyte biomass (BiomEpiV) influenced surface sediment diatom assemblages. A multivariate regression tree (MRT) was used to construct a semiquantitative model to reconstruct past macrophyte biomass. We determined that periphytic diatom assemblages on macrophytes were significantly different from those on wood and rocks (ANOSIM R = 0.63, P < 0.01). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the 41-lake data set identified BiomEpiV as a significant (P < 0.05) variable in structuring sedimentary diatom assemblages. The MRT analysis classified the lakes into three groups. These groups were (A) high-macrophyte, nutrient-limited lakes (BiomEpiV ≥525 μg · L(-1) ; total phosphorus [TP] <35 μg · L(-1) ; 23 lakes); (B) low-macrophyte, nutrient-limited lakes (BiomEpiV <525 μg · L(-1) ; TP <35 μg · L(-1) ; 12 lakes); and (C) eutrophic lakes (TP ≥35 μg · L(-1) ; six lakes). A semiquantitative model correctly predicted the MRT group of the lake 71% of the time (P < 0.001). These results suggest that submerged macrophytes have a significant influence on diatom community structure and that sedimentary diatom assemblages can be used to infer past macrophyte abundance. PMID:27020346

  13. Depth as an organizer of fish assemblages in floodplain lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Depth reduction is a natural process in floodplain lakes, but in many basins has been accelerated by anthropogenic disturbances. A diverse set of 42 floodplain lakes in the Yazoo River Basin (Mississippi, USA) was examined to test the hypothesis of whether depth reduction was a key determinant of water quality and fish assemblage structure. Single and multiple variable analyses were applied to 10 commonly monitored water variables and 54 fish species. Results showed strong associations between depth and water characteristics, and between depth and fish assemblages. Deep lakes provided less variable environments, clearer water, and a wider range of microhabitats than shallow lakes. The greater environmental stability was reflected by the dominant species in the assemblages, which included a broader representation of large-body species, species less tolerant of extreme water quality, and more predators. Stability in deep lakes was further reflected by reduced among-lake variability in taxa representation. Fish assemblages in shallow lakes were more variable than deep lakes, and commonly dominated by opportunistic species that have early maturity, extended breeding seasons, small adult size, and short lifespan. Depth is a causal factor that drives many physical and chemical variables that contribute to organizing fish assemblages in floodplain lakes. Thus, correlations between fish and water transparency, temperature, oxygen, trophic state, habitat structure, and other environmental descriptors may ultimately be totally or partly regulated by depth. In basins undergoing rapid anthropogenic modifications, local changes forced by depth reductions may be expected to eliminate species available from the regional pool and could have considerable ecological implications. ?? 2010 Springer Basel AG (outside the USA).

  14. Archaeological Excavation Report for Proposed Well 199-K-131 in Support of the 100-KR-4 Pump-and-Treat Project

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, Dave M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.

    2004-06-22

    An archaeological excavation was conducted at the site of proposed groundwater monitoring well 199-K-131 in support of the 100-KR-4 Pump-and-Treat Project between June 2 and 3, 2004. Excavations confirmed that there were no intact cultural deposits at the proposed well location. This report was prepared to document the findings of the test excavation.

  15. A Top Pilot Tunnel Preconditioning Method for the Prevention of Extremely Intense Rockbursts in Deep Tunnels Excavated by TBMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanqing; Feng, Xiating; Zhou, Hui; Qiu, Shili; Wu, Wenping

    2012-05-01

    The headrace tunnels at the Jinping II Hydropower Station cross the Jinping Mountain with a maximum overburden depth of 2,525 m, where 80% of the strata along the tunnels consist of marble. A number of extremely intense rockbursts occurred during the excavation of the auxiliary tunnels and the drainage tunnel. In particular, a tunnel boring machine (TBM) was destroyed by an extremely intense rockburst in a 7.2-m-diameter drainage tunnel. Two of the four subsequent 12.4-m-diameter headrace tunnels will be excavated with larger size TBMs, where a high risk of extremely intense rockbursts exists. Herein, a top pilot tunnel preconditioning method is proposed to minimize this risk, in which a drilling and blasting method is first recommended for the top pilot tunnel excavation and support, and then the TBM excavation of the main tunnel is conducted. In order to evaluate the mechanical effectiveness of this method, numerical simulation analyses using the failure approaching index, energy release rate, and excess shear stress indices are carried out. Its construction feasibility is discussed as well. Moreover, a microseismic monitoring technique is used in the experimental tunnel section for the real-time monitoring of the microseismic activities of the rock mass in TBM excavation and for assessing the effect of the top pilot tunnel excavation in reducing the risk of rockbursts. This method is applied to two tunnel sections prone to extremely intense rockbursts and leads to a reduction in the risk of rockbursts in TBM excavation.

  16. Foraminiferal, lithic, and isotopic changes across four major unconformities at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 548, Goban Spur: Chapter 14 in Initial reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Reynolds, Leslie A.; Mazzullo, James M.; Keigwin, Loyd D.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment samples taken at close intervals across four major unconformities (middle Miocene/upper Miocene, lower Oligocene/upper Oligocene, lower Eocene/upper Eocene, lower Paleocene/upper Paleocene) at DSDP-IPOD Site 548, Goban Spur, reveal that coeval biostratigraphic gaps, sediment discontinuities, and seismic unconformities coincide with postulated low stands of sea level. Foraminiferal, lithic, and isotopic analyses demonstrate that environments began to shift prior to periods of marine erosion, and that sedimentation resumed in the form of turbidites derived from nearby upper-slope sources. The unconformities appear to have developed where a water-mass boundary intersected the continental slope, rhythmically crossing the drill site in concert with sea-level rise and fall.

  17. Demersal Assemblages in the Irish Sea, St George's Channel and Bristol Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. R.; Rogers, S. I.; Freeman, S. M.

    2000-09-01

    Macro-epibenthic invertebrate and demersal fish assemblages are described from 101 beam trawl stations in the Irish Sea, St George's Channel and Bristol Channel. Cluster analysis was used to identify those stations where catches were similar, in terms of species composition and biomass, and six assemblages were identified. The average similarity within these assemblages ranged from 44 to 58%. Species that were indicative of the differences between the six assemblages were used to describe their biological characteristics. Plaice and dab dominated on fine substrates in inshore waters ( Pleuronectes- Limanda assemblage), whereas sea urchins and sun-stars dominated on the coarser substrates further offshore ( Echinus- Crossaster assemblage). Thickback sole and hermit crabs were typical of the transitional area ( Microchirus-Pagurus assemblage). Norway lobster and witch dominated on the muddy sediments in the Irish Sea ( Nephrops- Glyptocephalus assemblage). Dead man's fingers beds ( Alcyonium assemblage) occurred on coarse substrates in inshore waters throughout the study area, whereas common spider crabs were only dominant in the Bristol Channel ( Maja assemblage). The common starfish ( Asterias rubens) was an important component of all assemblages. The distribution of these assemblages was primarily correlated with depth, temperature and substrate type. Their spatial distribution was similar to previously described distribution patterns of sediments and infaunal communities in the area.

  18. Protocol for Monitoring Fish Assemblages in Pacific Northwest National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenkman, Samuel J.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Rivers and streams that drain from Olympic, Mount Rainier, and North Cascades National Parks are among the most protected corridors in the lower 48 States, and represent some of the largest tracts of contiguous, undisturbed habitat throughout the range of several key fish species of the Pacific Northwest. These watersheds are of high regional importance as freshwater habitat sanctuaries for native fish, where habitat conditions are characterized as having little to no disturbance from development, channelization, impervious surfaces, roads, diversions, or hydroelectric projects. Fishery resources are of high ecological and cultural importance in Pacific Northwest National Parks, and significantly contribute to economically important recreational, commercial, and tribal fisheries. This protocol describes procedures to monitor trends in fish assemblages, fish abundance, and water temperature in eight rivers and five wadeable streams in Olympic National Park during summer months, and is based on 4 years of field testing. Fish assemblages link freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. They also serve as focal resources of national parks and are excellent indicators of ecological conditions of rivers and streams. Despite the vital importance of native anadromous and resident fish populations, there is no existing monitoring program for fish assemblages in the North Coast and Cascades Network. Specific monitoring objectives of this protocol are to determine seasonal and annual trends in: (1) fish species composition, (2) timing of migration of adult fish, (3) relative abundance, (4) age and size structure, (5) extent of non-native and hatchery fish, and (6) water temperature. To detect seasonal and annual trends in fish assemblages in reference sites, we rely on repeated and consistent annual sampling at each monitoring site. The general rationale for the repeated sampling of reference sites is to ensure that we account for the high interannual variability in fish

  19. Mechanical excavation systems. 1. Drill-split narrow-vein and longwall mining. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, J.A.; Jude, C.V.

    1994-01-01

    In this U.S. Bureau of Mines report, two drill-split mechanical excavation mining system concepts are described, costed, and cost compared with conventional drill-blast mining systems. The concepts for the two drill-split mechanical excavation mining systems presented are (1) a method for steeply dipping narrow veins 0.6 to 1.2 m wide and (2) a longwall method for flat-lying tabular ores. In the proposed systems, 70 to 80 pct of the ore is disposed of underground as backfill. For sortable ores, face area crushing, sorting, and direct stowage of run-of-mine waste and low-grade ores are proposed. The underground sorting and stowing of waste reduce materials handling, processing, and waste disposal costs by reducing the quality of ore transported to the surface by 70 to 80 pct (by volume).

  20. Presence of a radioactive gas in archaeological excavations, determination and mitigation.

    PubMed

    Balcázar, M; Gómez, S; Peña, P; Zavala Arredondo, J; Gazzola, J; Villamares, A

    2014-01-01

    During recent archaeological discovery and excavation of a tunnel build approximately 2000 years ago by the Teotihuacans under the feathered serpent temple, in Mexico, abnormal radon concentrations up to 700 Bq m(-3) were measured at several excavation stages. The tunnel is at 15m below the earth surface with a vertical rectangular entrance of 4×4 m(2), a semi cylindrical shape of 3m in diameter, with a probable length of 100 m. This study supports the assumption that at the opening of the tunnel radon concentration was around 5500 Bq m(-3); however, although natural convection in the tunnel atmosphere naturally pups radon out, it build up to a maximum concentration of 2000 Bq m(-3). This paper presents the identification of the radon problem in this archaeological site, dose determination, and the mitigation actions that reduced the radon concentration down to 40 Bq m(-3) that ensure a negligible radon risk for archaeologist.

  1. [Characteristics of gaseous pollutants distribution during remedial excavation at a volatile organic compound contaminated site].

    PubMed

    Gan, Ping; Yang, Yue-Wei; Fang, Zeng-Qiang; Guo, Shu-Qian; Yu, Yan; Jia, Jian-Li

    2013-12-01

    Volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs/SVOCs) are commonly identified contaminants in industrial contaminated sites in China. VOCs migrate easily in the environment due to their relatively high volatilities. When disturbed during excavation, for example, VOCs in the soil release to the air in high concentrations within relatively short period of time, joepodizing the health of the sorrounding population, if not appropriately protected. In this study, distribution of gas phase VOCs was monitored during excavation of a site remediation project, using a combined method of field testing instrument and gas phase sampling tubes. Monitoring results indicated that gas phase concentration decreased with distance, exhibiting an alternating peak-and-valley pattern in the down-wind direction. The monitoring results could be stimulated using Gaussian Puff Model. Remediation site health and safety zoning method was developed combining appropriate workplace health and safety air limits and site monitoring results. Personal protection measures deemed appropriated for each safety zone were proposed.

  2. Minimizing soil remediation volume through specification of excavation and materials handling procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Oresik, W.L.S.; Otten, M.T.; Nelson, M.D.

    1994-12-31

    The technologies currently available for treating soils contaminated with the explosives 2,4,6-trinitroluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazene (RDX) are both limited and expensive. Therefore, an important consideration in soils remediation is the preparation of construction specifications and contract drawings which limit the volume of soil that will be required to undergo treatment. Construction specifications and contract drawings were developed for the Contaminated Soil Remediation of the Explosives Washout Lagoons at Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) with the following primary objectives: (1) limit the volume of soil excavated from the Explosives Washout Lagoons and Explosives Washout Plant Areas, (2) minimize materials handling, and (3) reduce the excavated volume of soil which will undergo treatment.

  3. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 and Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 is an excavation robot for mining regolith on a planet like Mars. The robot is programmed using the Robotic Operating System (ROS) and it also uses a physical simulation program called Gazebo. This internship focused on various functions of the program in order to make it a more professional and efficient robot. During the internship another project called the Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator was worked on. This is a robot that is designed to dig through sand and extract sample material. The intern worked on programming the Sand-Swimming robot, and designing the electrical system to power and control the robot.

  4. Optimal Control for a Parallel Hybrid Hydraulic Excavator Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-yun; Guan, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is put forward in a parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator (PHHE). A power-train mathematical model of PHHE is illustrated along with the analysis of components' parameters. Then, the optimal control problem is addressed, and PSO algorithm is introduced to deal with this nonlinear optimal problem which contains lots of inequality/equality constraints. Then, the comparisons between the optimal control and rule-based one are made, and the results show that hybrids with the optimal control would increase fuel economy. Although PSO algorithm is off-line optimization, still it would bring performance benchmark for PHHE and also help have a deep insight into hybrid excavators. PMID:23818832

  5. Aspects to improve cabin comfort of wheel loaders and excavators according to operators.

    PubMed

    Kuijt-Evers, L F M; Krause, F; Vink, P

    2003-05-01

    Comfort plays an increasingly important role in interior design of earth moving equipment. Although research has been conducted on vehicle interiors of wheel loaders and excavators, hardly any information is known about the operator's opinion. In this study a questionnaire was completed by machine operators to get their opinion about aspects which need to be improved in order to design a more comfortable vehicle interior. The results show that almost half of the operators rate the comfort of their cabin "average" or "poor". According to the operators, cab comfort of wheel loaders can be increased by improving seat comfort. Besides improving seat comfort, cabin comfort of excavators can be improved by changing the cab design (including dimensions, ingress/egress), view, reliability, and climate control.

  6. Recognition of deep-water benthic assemblages in the fossil record: Taphonomy and community characteristics of Louisiana continental slope petroleum seep assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    Chemoautotrophic benthic assemblages associated with petroleum seepage form the only substantial shell accumulations below storm wave base on the northern Gulf of Mexico shelf and slope. Five biofacies are associated with petroleum seepage, dominated respectively by vestimentiferan tubeworms, lucinid, thyasirid and vesicomyid clams and mytilid mussels. The taphonomy of petroleum seep death assemblages includes dissolution as the most pervasive mode of shell alteration. The dominant species in each assemblage reflect the taphonomic signature of the assemblage they dominate. The taphonomic attributes of petroleum seep death assemblages are similar to those of ancient autochthonous benthic assemblages. Paleoecological characteristics representative of cold seep assemblages include: high density-low diversity molluscan assemblages dominated by large individuals, high molluscan biomass concentrations aligned in linear trends, carbons with depleted [delta][sup 13]C values associated with faunally depauperate shales, laminated or massive sedimentary structures, variable articulation frequencies, poor shell preservation, and a trophic structure dominated by one trophic group. The Campanian Tepee Buttes share many paleoecological characteristics with recognized ancient seep assemblages. Methane and hydrogen sulfide-rich fluids from underlying strata were transported along fault conduits to supply a localized nutrient source for lucinid-dominated benthic communities. The Tepee Butte assemblages were dominated by dense accumulations of Nymphalucina occidentalis with moderate to high articulation frequencies. The lucinids probably used H[sub 2]S as a nutrient source. Cold seeps can be recognized in the fossil record, based on criteria developed by the study of modern cold seep death assemblages, because the paleoecological characteristics of cold seep assemblages are very conservative.

  7. The role of wood hardness in limiting nest site selection in avian cavity excavators.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Teresa J; Vierling, Kerri T; Johnson, Timothy R; Fischer, Philip C

    2015-06-01

    Woodpeckers and other primary cavity excavators (PCEs) are important worldwide for excavating cavities in trees, and a large number of studies have examined their nesting preferences. However, quantitative measures of wood hardness have been omitted from most studies, and ecologists have focused on the effects of external tree- and habitat-level features on nesting. Moreover, information is lacking on the role of wood hardness in limiting nesting opportunities for this important guild. Here, we used an information theoretic approach to examine the role of wood hardness in multi-scale nest site selection and in limiting nesting opportunities for six species of North American PCEs. We found that interior wood hardness at nests (n = 259) differed from that at random sites, and all six species of PCE had nests with significantly softer interior wood than random trees (F1,517 = 106.15, P < 0.0001). Accordingly, interior wood hardness was the most influential factor in our models of nest site selection at both spatial scales that we examined: in the selection of trees within territories and in the selection of nest locations on trees. Moreover, regardless of hypothesized excavation abilities, all the species in our study appeared constrained by interior wood hardness, and only 4-14% of random sites were actually suitable for nesting. Our findings suggest that past studies that did not measure wood hardness counted many sites as available to PCEs when they were actually unsuitable, potentially biasing results. Moreover, by not accounting for nest site limitations in PCEs, managers may overestimate the amount of suitable habitat. We therefore urge ecologists to incorporate quantitative measures of wood hardness into PCE nest site selection studies, and to consider the limitations faced by avian cavity excavators in forest management decisions.

  8. Contributions of In-Situ Stress Transient Redistribution to Blasting Excavation Damage Zone of Deep Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Lu, Wen-bo; Chen, Ming; Hu, Ying-guo; Zhou, Chuang-bing; Wu, Xin-xia

    2015-03-01

    With the background of construction of the headrace tunnels with the deepest buried depth in China at present, by means of carefully acoustic velocity detection and analysis of Excavation Damage Zone (EDZ), the contributions to damage zones made by the effect of in situ stress transient redistribution are studied and compared with the extent of damage caused by the explosive load. Also, the numerical simulation was adopted to verify detecting the results. It turned out that the in situ stress transient redistribution during blasting has great influence on the development of EDZ of deep tunnels. The blasting excavation-induced damage zone of deep tunnels can be divided into the inner damage zone and the outer damage zone from the excavation surface into surrounding rocks. Although this damage zone dividing method is similar to the work of Martino and Chandler (2004), the consideration of developing a mechanism of the inner damage zone, especially the contribution of in situ stress transient redistribution, is totally different. The inner damage zone, which accounts for 29-57 % of the total damage zone, is mainly caused by explosive load and in situ stress transient adjustment, while the outer damage zone can be mostly attributed to the static redistribution of in situ stress. Field tests and numerical simulation indicate that the in situ stress transient redistribution effect during blasting contributes about 16-51 % to the inner damage zone in the 2# headrace tunnel of Jinping II Hydropower Station. For general cases, it can be concluded that the in situ stress transient redistribution is one of the main contributors of an excavation damage zone, and damage caused by in situ stress transient redistribution effect may exceed the damage caused by explosion load and become the main inducing factor for damage with the rise of in situ stress levels.

  9. Effects of in-channel sand excavation on the hydrology of the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xian-Lin; Zeng, Eddy Y.; Ji, Rong-Yao; Wang, Chao-Pin

    2007-09-01

    SummaryThe hydrology and morphology of the Pearl River Delta (PRD; South China) water system has been predominantly dictated by human activities over the last 20 years. Uncontrolled sand excavation occurred in all 324 tributaries, largely to meet the construction needs arising from the rapid economic growth and urbanization in the region. It was estimated that >8.7 × 10 8 m 3 of sand were excavated from 1986 to 2003 based on field surveys of excavating activities and the river hypsography, resulting in average downcutting depths of 0.59-1.73 m, 0.34-4.43 m, and 1.77-6.48 m in the main channels of the West River, North River, and East River (three major water networks in the PRD), respectively. Consequently, the water levels in upstream of the PRD were decreased by 1.59-3.12 m (Sanshui Station). Uneven sand dredging also caused changes in the divided flow ratio (DFR) between various water courses. For example, the DFR increased by 8.8% at the Sanshui Station on the upper part of the North River network from the early 1980s to 1999. DFRs also increased almost 7.7% at the four major runoff outlets in the eastern side of the PRD. As a result, present brackish-water has intruded upward 10-20 km more than in the 1980s. Apparently, there are two sides to the effects of sand excavation. The positive effects are decreased chances of flooding damages, improved navigating conditions, and more water inputs to rapid economically growing regions. The negative effects include increased grade slope and instability of the riverbank, disruption of navigation in upstream dredging pits during dry seasons, and brackish-water intrusion.

  10. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  11. Remediation of PCB contaminated soils in the Canadian Arctic: excavation and surface PRB technology.

    PubMed

    Kalinovich, Indra; Rutter, Allison; Poland, John S; Cairns, Graham; Rowe, R Kerry

    2008-12-15

    The site BAF-5 is located on the summit of Resolution Island, Nunavut, just southeast of Baffin Island at 61 degrees 35'N and 60 degrees 40'W. The site was part of a North American military defense system established in the 1950s that became heavily contaminated with PCBs during and subsequent, its operational years. Remediation through excavation of the PCB contaminated soil at Resolution Island began in 1999 and at its completion in 2006 approximately 5 tonnes of pure PCBs in approximately 20,000 m3 of soil were remediated. Remediation strategies were based on both quantity of soil and level of contamination in the soil. Excavation removed 96% of the PCB contaminated soil on site. In 2003, a surface funnel-and-gate permeable reactive barrier was design and constructed to treat the remaining contamination left in rock crevices and inaccessible areas of the site. Excavation had destabilized contaminated soil in the area, enabling contaminant migration through erosion and runoff pathways. The barrier was designed to maximize sedimentation through settling ponds. This bulk removal enabled the treatment of highly contaminated fines and water through a permeable gate. The increased sediment loading during excavation required both modifications to the funnel and a shift to a more permeable, granular system. Granulated activated charcoal was chosen for its ability to both act as a particle retention filter and adsorptive filter. The reduction in mass of PCB and volume of soils trapped by the funnel of the barrier indicate that soils are re-stabilizing. In 2007, nonwoven geotextiles were re-introduced back into the filtration system as fine filtering could be achieved without clogging. Monitoring sites downstream indicate that the barrier system is effective. This paper describes the field progress of PCB remediation at Resolution Island.

  12. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    PubMed Central

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered. PMID:23112655

  13. Explosive ordinance disposal technology demonstration using the telerobotic small emplacement excavator

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; Killough, S.M.; Thompson, D.H.; Dinkins, M.A.

    1994-06-01

    The small emplacement excavator (SEE) is a ruggedized military vehicle with backhoe and front loader used by the US Army for explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), combat engineer, and general utility excavation activities. In order to evaluate the feasibility of removing personnel from the vehicle during the high risk EOD excavation tasks a development and demonstration project was initiated to evaluate performance capabilities of the SEE under telerobotic control. This feasibility study was performed at the request of the Ordinance Missile and Munitions Center and School (OMMCS) at the Redstone Arsenal to help define requirements for further joint service development activities. Development of a telerobotic SEE (TSEE) was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a project funded jointly by the US Army Project Manager for Ammunition Logistics (PM-AMMOLOG) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). A technology demonstration of the TSEE was conducted at McKinley Range, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama, on September 13--17, 1993. The primary objective of the demonstration was to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of remote EOD. During the demonstration, approximately 40 EOD specialists were instructed on telerobotic operation of the TSEE and then were asked to complete a series of simulated EOD tasks. Upon completion of the tasks, participants completed an evaluation of the system including human factors performance data.

  14. Elastic Solution for Deep Tunnels. Application to Excavation Damage Zone and Rockbolt Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobet, A.

    2009-04-01

    A new formulation is presented for deep circular tunnels in rock with cylindrical anisotropy. The formulation is an exact solution since it satisfies equilibrium, strain compatibility, and the anisotropic constitutive model. Complete solutions have been found for two scenarios: tunnel with excavation damage zone, and tunnel with rockbolt support. The solution is based on the assumption of a deep, circular tunnel in a medium with two homogeneous zones: an inner zone surrounding the tunnel, which is either isotropic or anisotropic, and an outer zone, for the remainder of the medium, which is isotropic. Plane strain conditions, elastic response of rock, rockbolts and support, and simultaneous excavation and support installation are also assumed. For tunnels surrounded by an excavation damage zone with reduced rock properties, the tangential stresses and the radial deformations at the tunnel wall are very sensitive to both the magnitude of stiffness reduction of the damaged rock and the size of the damaged zone. The effect of the rockbolts on the rock is approximated by treating the rockbolt-rock composite as a material with cylindrical anisotropy with stiffnesses related to the properties of the rock and rockbolts, and spacing of the rockbolts. Comparisons between the analytical solution and a numerical method show small differences and provide confidence in the approach suggested.

  15. New knowledge-based genetic algorithm for excavator boom structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Haiyan; Lin, Shuwen

    2014-03-01

    Due to the insufficiency of utilizing knowledge to guide the complex optimal searching, existing genetic algorithms fail to effectively solve excavator boom structural optimization problem. To improve the optimization efficiency and quality, a new knowledge-based real-coded genetic algorithm is proposed. A dual evolution mechanism combining knowledge evolution with genetic algorithm is established to extract, handle and utilize the shallow and deep implicit constraint knowledge to guide the optimal searching of genetic algorithm circularly. Based on this dual evolution mechanism, knowledge evolution and population evolution can be connected by knowledge influence operators to improve the configurability of knowledge and genetic operators. Then, the new knowledge-based selection operator, crossover operator and mutation operator are proposed to integrate the optimal process knowledge and domain culture to guide the excavator boom structural optimization. Eight kinds of testing algorithms, which include different genetic operators, are taken as examples to solve the structural optimization of a medium-sized excavator boom. By comparing the results of optimization, it is shown that the algorithm including all the new knowledge-based genetic operators can more remarkably improve the evolutionary rate and searching ability than other testing algorithms, which demonstrates the effectiveness of knowledge for guiding optimal searching. The proposed knowledge-based genetic algorithm by combining multi-level knowledge evolution with numerical optimization provides a new effective method for solving the complex engineering optimization problem.

  16. Multirobot Lunar Excavation and ISRU Using Artificial-Neural-Tissue Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangavelautham, Jekanthan; Smith, Alexander; Abu El Samid, Nader; Ho, Alexander; Boucher, Dale; Richard, Jim; D'Eleuterio, Gabriele M. T.

    2008-01-01

    Automation of site preparation and resource utilization on the Moon with teams of autonomous robots holds considerable promise for establishing a lunar base. Such multirobot autonomous systems would require limited human support infrastructure, complement necessary manned operations and reduce overall mission risk. We present an Artificial Neural Tissue (ANT) architecture as a control system for autonomous multirobot excavation tasks. An ANT approach requires much less human supervision and pre-programmed human expertise than previous techniques. Only a single global fitness function and a set of allowable basis behaviors need be specified. An evolutionary (Darwinian) selection process is used to `breed' controllers for the task at hand in simulation and the fittest controllers are transferred onto hardware for further validation and testing. ANT facilitates `machine creativity', with the emergence of novel functionality through a process of self-organized task decomposition of mission goals. ANT based controllers are shown to exhibit self-organization, employ stigmergy (communication mediated through the environment) and make use of templates (unlabeled environmental cues). With lunar in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) efforts in mind, ANT controllers have been tested on a multirobot excavation task in which teams of robots with no explicit supervision can successfully avoid obstacles, interpret excavation blueprints, perform layered digging, avoid burying or trapping other robots and clear/maintain digging routes.

  17. A Completely 3D Model for the Simulation of Mechanized Tunnel Excavation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Janutolo, Michele; Barla, Giovanni

    2012-07-01

    For long deep tunnels as currently under construction through the Alps, mechanized excavation using tunnel boring machines (TBMs) contributes significantly to savings in construction time and costs. Questions are, however, posed due to the severe ground conditions which are in cases anticipated or encountered along the main tunnel alignment. A major geological hazard is the squeezing of weak rocks, but also brittle failure can represent a significant problem. For the design of mechanized tunnelling in such conditions, the complex interaction between the rock mass, the tunnel machine, its system components, and the tunnel support need to be analysed in detail and this can be carried out by three-dimensional (3D) models including all these components. However, the state-of-the-art shows that very few fully 3D models for mechanical deep tunnel excavation in rock have been developed so far. A completely three-dimensional simulator of mechanised tunnel excavation is presented in this paper. The TBM of reference is a technologically advanced double shield TBM designed to cope with both conditions. Design analyses with reference to spalling hazard along the Brenner and squeezing along the Lyon-Turin Base Tunnel are discussed.

  18. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  19. Multirobot Lunar Excavation and ISRU Using Artificial-Neural-Tissue Controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Thangavelautham, Jekanthan; Smith, Alexander; Abu El Samid, Nader; Ho, Alexander; D'Eleuterio, Gabriele M. T.; Boucher, Dale; Richard, Jim

    2008-01-21

    Automation of site preparation and resource utilization on the Moon with teams of autonomous robots holds considerable promise for establishing a lunar base. Such multirobot autonomous systems would require limited human support infrastructure, complement necessary manned operations and reduce overall mission risk. We present an Artificial Neural Tissue (ANT) architecture as a control system for autonomous multirobot excavation tasks. An ANT approach requires much less human supervision and pre-programmed human expertise than previous techniques. Only a single global fitness function and a set of allowable basis behaviors need be specified. An evolutionary (Darwinian) selection process is used to 'breed' controllers for the task at hand in simulation and the fittest controllers are transferred onto hardware for further validation and testing. ANT facilitates 'machine creativity', with the emergence of novel functionality through a process of self-organized task decomposition of mission goals. ANT based controllers are shown to exhibit self-organization, employ stigmergy (communication mediated through the environment) and make use of templates (unlabeled environmental cues). With lunar in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) efforts in mind, ANT controllers have been tested on a multirobot excavation task in which teams of robots with no explicit supervision can successfully avoid obstacles, interpret excavation blueprints, perform layered digging, avoid burying or trapping other robots and clear/maintain digging routes.

  20. Multimodal Imaging Evaluations of Focal Choroidal Excavations in Eyes with Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Qing; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of focal choroidal excavation (FCE) concurrent with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) using multimodal imaging. Methods. This was a retrospective single-institution study. Clinical features and multimodal imaging findings were analyzed in eyes with CSC and FCEs, using imaging methods including optical coherence tomography (OCT), OCT angiography (OCTA), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and multispectral imaging. Results. Seventeen patients (4.8%) with 21 FCEs (19 eyes) were found among 351 consecutive Chinese patients with CSC. Chronic CSC represented 47.1% of those cases. Window defects in 12 lesions identified through FA and hypoautofluorescence in 13 lesions identified through FAF revealed retinal pigment epithelial attenuation. Choroidal hemodynamic disturbances characterized by localized filling defects at the excavation and circumferential hyperperfusion were validated by both ICGA and OCTA, which were similar to the angiographic features of normal chronic CSC. The hyperreflective tissue beneath FCE, observed on B-scan OCT, presented as intensive choroidal flow signals on OCTA. Conclusions. FCE is not uncommon in patients with CSC. Multimodal imaging suggested that the aberrant choroidal circulation might be a contribution factor for leakage from the dysfunctional retinal pigment epithelium at the area of excavation. PMID:27437148

  1. FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled numerical simulation of wavefields near excavation boundaries in underground mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Cai, M.

    2016-11-01

    A nonlinear velocity model that considers the influence of confinement and rock mass failure on wave velocity is developed. A numerical method, which couples FLAC and SPECFEM2D, is developed for ground motion modeling near excavation boundaries in underground mines. The motivation of developing the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled approach is to take merits of each code, such as the stress analysis capability in FLAC and the powerful wave propagation analysis capability in SPECFEM2D. Because stress redistribution and failure of the rock mass around an excavation are considered, realistic non-uniform velocity fields for the SPECFEM2D model can be obtained, and this is a notable feature of this study. Very large differences in wavefields and ground motion are observed between the results from the non-uniform and the uniform velocity models. If the non-uniform velocity model is used, the ground motion around a stope can be amplified up to five times larger than that given by the design scaling law. If a uniform velocity model is used, the amplification factor is only about three. Using the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled modeling approach, accurate velocity models can be constructed and this in turn will assist in predicting ground motions accurately around underground excavations.

  2. Archaeological Geophysics, Excavation, and Ethnographic Approaches Toward a Deeper Understanding of an Eighteenth Century Wichita Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlock, Michael Don

    This research exemplifies a multidirectional approach to an archaeological interpretation of an eighteenth century Wichita village and fortification located on the Red River bordering Oklahoma and Texas. A battle that is believed to have occurred at the Longest site (34JF1) in 1759 between Spanish colonials and a confederation of Native Americans led to several Spanish primary documents describing the people that lived there, the fortification and surrounding village, and of course the battle itself. Investigation of the Longest site (34JF1) in Oklahoma presents a remarkable opportunity to combine extensive historical research, archaeological prospecting using geophysics, and traditional excavation techniques in order to gain a more complete understanding of this important archaeological site. The fortification at the Longest site, as well as possible associated structures and cultural features, were relocated using magnetometry, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistivity methods. Then, previously translated historical documents provided valuable insights in the interpretation of the geophysical data. Finally, archaeological excavation permitted validation of the interpretations and identification of features described in the historical accounts. As interpreted in the geophysical data and excavations, the construction of the fortification and associated interior subterranean rooms suggests that it is indeed the fortification involved in the altercation between the Taovayas and the Spanish in 1759.

  3. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  4. Three-dimensional laser scanning for geometry documentation and construction management of highway tunnels during excavation.

    PubMed

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered. PMID:23112655

  5. The adoption of mechanized excavation techniques for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Laughton, C.; Nelson, P.; Lundin, T.

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is the latest and largest in a line of high-energy physics accelerator projects. The five increasingly energetic accelerators which make up the physics laboratory complex are to be housed almost entirely in subsurface structures, which will include over 100 km of small-diameter tunnel. Among other reasons, the Texas SSC site was chosen from a set of state proposals because of the suitability of the host rock materials for the performance of rapid and efficient excavation work. This site bedrock units are relatively soft and homogeneous and should allow for a maximum use of mechanical excavation plant for the various underground openings. This paper will review the site conditions and describe the developed understanding of geologic material behavior. With completion of planned large-scale in-situ studies of the ground behavior to provide acquisition of early site-specific excavation data, final design and construction detail of critical structures can be undertaken with the necessary degree of confidence to satisfy the stringent performance requirements. 5 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Influence of tuna penning activities on soft bottom macrobenthic assemblages.

    PubMed

    Mangion, Marija; Borg, Joseph A; Thompson, Richard; Schembri, Patrick J

    2014-02-15

    The influence of tuna penning on soft bottom habitat present in the vicinity of tuna pens and at distances 200 m and 1.5 km away, was assessed by comparing attributes of macroinvertebrate assemblages and sediment quality before (November 2000, March 2001) and after (November 2001, April 2002) initiation of the activity. Results from November 2001 indicated a significant increase in sediment organic carbon and organic nitrogen, and a non-significant increase in the abundance of Capitellidae in the vicinity of the cages. Similar results were obtained 200 m from the cages but not 1.5 km away, where the only change was a significant increase in organic nitrogen in sediment. Results from April 2002 indicated no significant change in sediment organic carbon and organic nitrogen, however, mean sediment grain size decreased significantly in the immediate vicinity of the cages. Changes in attributes of the benthic assemblages and sediment resulted from accumulation of uneaten feed-fish on the seabed.

  7. Assemblage time series reveal biodiversity change but not systematic loss.

    PubMed

    Dornelas, Maria; Gotelli, Nicholas J; McGill, Brian; Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Moyes, Faye; Sievers, Caya; Magurran, Anne E

    2014-04-18

    The extent to which biodiversity change in local assemblages contributes to global biodiversity loss is poorly understood. We analyzed 100 time series from biomes across Earth to ask how diversity within assemblages is changing through time. We quantified patterns of temporal α diversity, measured as change in local diversity, and temporal β diversity, measured as change in community composition. Contrary to our expectations, we did not detect systematic loss of α diversity. However, community composition changed systematically through time, in excess of predictions from null models. Heterogeneous rates of environmental change, species range shifts associated with climate change, and biotic homogenization may explain the different patterns of temporal α and β diversity. Monitoring and understanding change in species composition should be a conservation priority. PMID:24744374

  8. A new Lower Triassic ichthyopterygian assemblage from Fossil Hill, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Motani, Ryosuke; Embree, Patrick; Orchard, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We report a new ichthyopterygian assemblage from Lower Triassic horizons of the Prida Formation at Fossil Hill in central Nevada. Although fragmentary, the specimens collected so far document a diverse fauna. One partial jaw exhibits isodont dentition with blunt tipped, mesiodistally compressed crowns and striated enamel. These features are shared with the Early Triassic genus Utatsusaurus known from coeval deposits in Japan and British Columbia. An additional specimen exhibits a different dentition characterized by relatively small, rounded posterior teeth resembling other Early Triassic ichthyopterygians, particularly Grippia. This Nevada assemblage marks a southward latitudinal extension for Early Triassic ichthyopterygians along the eastern margin of Panthalassa and indicates repeated trans-hemispheric dispersal events in Early Triassic ichthyopterygians. PMID:26855868

  9. Effects of a brine discharge over soft bottom Polychaeta assemblage.

    PubMed

    Del-Pilar-Ruso, Yoana; De-la-Ossa-Carretero, Jose Antonio; Giménez-Casalduero, Francisca; Sánchez-Lizaso, Jose Luis

    2008-11-01

    Desalination is a growing activity that has introduced a new impact, brine discharge, which may affect benthic communities. Although the role of polychaetes as indicators to assess organic pollution is well known, their tolerance to salinity changes has not been examined to such a great extent. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of brine discharge over soft bottom polychaete assemblage along the Alicante coast (Southeast Spain) over a two year period. Changes in the polychaete assemblage was analysed using univariate and multivariate techniques. We compared a transect in front of the discharge with two controls. At each transect we sampled at three depths (4, 10 and 15 m) during winter and summer. We have observed different sensitivity of polychaete families to brine discharges, Ampharetidae being the most sensitive, followed by Nephtyidae and Spionidae. Syllidae and Capitellidae showed some resistance initially, while Paraonidae proved to be a tolerant family.

  10. Niche conservatism constrains Australian honeyeater assemblages in stressful environments.

    PubMed

    Miller, E T; Zanne, A E; Ricklefs, R E

    2013-09-01

    The hypothesis of phylogenetic niche conservatism proposes that most extant members of a clade remain in ancestral environments because expansion into new ecological space imposes a selectional load on a population. A prediction that follows is that local assemblages contain increasingly phylogenetically clustered subsets of species with increasing difference from the ancestral environment of a clade. We test this in Australian Meliphagidae, a continental radiation of birds that originated in wet, subtropical environments, but subsequently spread to drier environments as Australia became more arid during the late Cenozoic. We find local assemblages are increasingly phylogenetically clustered along a gradient of decreasing precipitation. The pattern is less clear along a temperature gradient. We develop a novel phyloclimatespace to visualise the expansion of some lineages into drier habitats. Although few species extend into arid regions, those that do occupy larger ranges and thus local species richness does not decline predictably with precipitation.

  11. Niche conservatism constrains Australian honeyeater assemblages in stressful environments.

    PubMed

    Miller, E T; Zanne, A E; Ricklefs, R E

    2013-09-01

    The hypothesis of phylogenetic niche conservatism proposes that most extant members of a clade remain in ancestral environments because expansion into new ecological space imposes a selectional load on a population. A prediction that follows is that local assemblages contain increasingly phylogenetically clustered subsets of species with increasing difference from the ancestral environment of a clade. We test this in Australian Meliphagidae, a continental radiation of birds that originated in wet, subtropical environments, but subsequently spread to drier environments as Australia became more arid during the late Cenozoic. We find local assemblages are increasingly phylogenetically clustered along a gradient of decreasing precipitation. The pattern is less clear along a temperature gradient. We develop a novel phyloclimatespace to visualise the expansion of some lineages into drier habitats. Although few species extend into arid regions, those that do occupy larger ranges and thus local species richness does not decline predictably with precipitation. PMID:23848846

  12. Composition of the Primary Crust of Mars: Observations of Deeply Excavated Crater Central Peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skok, J. R.; Mustard, J. F.; Tornabene, L. L.; Murchie, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    It is predicted that the primary crust of Mars crystallized from a magma ocean and would be well preserved at depth on a single plate planet but poorly exposed as impacts, volcanism and alteration has reworked the upper crust. In a few select locations, extensive excavation by impact or erosion has exposed unaltered mafic minerals of the Martian crust. The majority of these exposures occur within the uplifted central peaks and peak rings of Southern Highland craters. We examine the mafic compositions of these deeply excavated crustal rocks in an attempt to constrain the composition of the Martian crust and test models of planetary formation. The search for deeply excavated bedrock from HiRISE images is ongoing and has so far resulted in nearly 200 potential locations. Over half of these currently have CRISM spectroscopic observations with ~50 locations having good exposures of crustal rocks showing little to no alteration. It is this combination of deeply excavated minerals that has potential to tap the preserved primary crust of Mars. We focus our analysis on olivine and pyroxene as crustal formation models predict that these two minerals would dominate the modal mineralogy of the crystallizing crust with a garnet layer potentially stable at depth. The high-resolution visible and near-infrared spectroscopic data provided by the CRISM instrument is ideally suited for examining these compositional characteristics. Initial in-depth analysis of the central peak of Alga Crater shows excellent exposures of lithologies characterized by both olivine and pyroxene. The olivine-bearing unit here has a fayalitic composition and a dunite lithology. This ancient Fe-rich olivine is in stark contrast to the Mg-enriched olivine of the primitive mantle of Earth. The primary pyroxene-bearing unit was determined to be a low-calcium, high-Fe enstatite orthopyroxenite, consistent with the mineralogy of the ancient Mars meteorite ALH84001. These observations suggest that the crust

  13. Nestedness in centipede (Chilopoda) assemblages on continental islands (Aegean, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simaiakis, Stylianos Michail; Martínez-Morales, Miguel Angel

    2010-05-01

    In natural ecosystems, species assemblages among isolated ecological communities such as continental islands often show a nested pattern in which biotas of sites with low species richness are non-random subsets of biotas of richer sites. The distribution of centipede (Chilopoda) species in the central and south Aegean archipelago was tested for nestedness. To achieve this aim we used distribution data for 53 species collected on 24 continental Aegean islands (Kyklades and Dodekanisa). Based on the first-order jackknife estimator, most of islands were comprehensively surveyed. In order to quantify nestedness, we used the nestedness temperature calculator (NTC) as well as the nestedness metric based on overlap and decreasing Fill (NODF). NTC indicated that data exhibited a high degree of nestedness in the central and south Aegean island complexes. As far as the Kyklades and Dodekanisa are concerned, NTC showed less nested centipede structures than the 24 islands. Likewise, NODF revealed a significant degree of nestedness in central and south Aegean islands. It also showed that biotas matrices without singletons were more nested than the complete ones (Aegean, Kyklades and Dodekanisa). The two commonest centipede taxa (lithobiomorphs and geophilomorphs) contributed differently to centipede assemblages. In the Kyklades and Dodekanisa, geophilomorphs did not show a reliable nested arrangement unlike lithobiomorphs. In relation to the entire data set, nestedness was positively associated with the degree of isolation. In the Kyklades altitudinal range best explained nestedness patterns, while in Dodekanisa habitat heterogeneity proved to be more important for the centipede communities. Island area does not seem to be a significant explanatory variable. Some of our results from the Kyklades were critically compared with those for terrestrial isopod and land snail nested assemblages from the same geographical area. The complex geological and palaeogeographical history of

  14. Characterizing lentic freshwater fish assemblages using multiple sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing fish assemblages in lentic ecosystems is difficult, and multiple sampling methods are almost always necessary to gain reliable estimates of indices such as species richness. However, most research focused on lentic fish sampling methodology has targeted recreationally important species, and little to no information is available regarding the influence of multiple methods and timing (i.e., temporal variation) on characterizing entire fish assemblages. Therefore, six lakes and impoundments (48–1,557 ha surface area) were sampled seasonally with seven gear types to evaluate the combined influence of sampling methods and timing on the number of species and individuals sampled. Probabilities of detection for species indicated strong selectivities and seasonal trends that provide guidance on optimal seasons to use gears when targeting multiple species. The evaluation of species richness and number of individuals sampled using multiple gear combinations demonstrated that appreciable benefits over relatively few gears (e.g., to four) used in optimal seasons were not present. Specifically, over 90 % of the species encountered with all gear types and season combinations (N = 19) from six lakes and reservoirs were sampled with nighttime boat electrofishing in the fall and benthic trawling, modified-fyke, and mini-fyke netting during the summer. Our results indicated that the characterization of lentic fish assemblages was highly influenced by the selection of sampling gears and seasons, but did not appear to be influenced by waterbody type (i.e., natural lake, impoundment). The standardization of data collected with multiple methods and seasons to account for bias is imperative to monitoring of lentic ecosystems and will provide researchers with increased reliability in their interpretations and decisions made using information on lentic fish assemblages.

  15. Barrier backbeach shell assemblages from the central Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Albertzart, L.S.; Wilkinson, B.H. )

    1990-08-01

    Lateral variation in the abundance, taxonomic composition and amount of abrasion of approximately 14,000 mollusc shells, from 135 km of backbeach along Matagorda Island and Matagorda Peninsula of the central Texas coast, primarily reflect long-term patterns of shoreline progradation and recession. Disarticulated shell is concentrated as a gravel lag during landward transport of barrier island/peninsula sediment from storm washover and during lateral transport by fairweather longshore currents. Taxonomic dominance within any backbeach area directly relates to long-term Holocene patterns of shoreline migration. Shell along progradational Matagorda Island is largely derived from gulfward shoreface communities and valves of normal marine species are predominant. Shell along recessive beaches of Matagorda Peninsula, on the other hand, is primarily derived from the erosion of older bay-estuarine facies now exposed to shoreface currents, and values of brackish lagoonal species are predominant. Degree of valve abrasion reflects both the residence time of shell in shoreface settings and occurrence of shell with coarse, poorly sorted sediment. Central Texas coast backbeach molluscan death assemblages largely reflect a time-averaged census of both living communities and older shell assemblages that are sampled over an along-shore length of several kilometers and over a shore-to-basin distance of several hundred meters. These assemblages, accumulated over a time span of several thousand years, reflect the spatial and the temporal proximity of specific sedimentary environments to sites of sediment accumulation. Backbeach shell assemblages record both the ecologic preference of individual taxonomic groups to specific environmental parameters as well as the dominant processes of sediment transport in littoral depositional systems.

  16. Unlocking the bacterial and fungal communities assemblages of sugarcane microbiome

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; Jorrín, Beatriz; Lozano, Núria; da Silva, Márcio José; González-Guerrero, Manuel; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Verza, Natália Cristina; Bagheri, Homayoun Chaichian; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Plant microbiome and its manipulation herald a new era for plant biotechnology with the potential to benefit sustainable crop production. However, studies evaluating the diversity, structure and impact of the microbiota in economic important crops are still rare. Here we describe a comprehensive inventory of the structure and assemblage of the bacterial and fungal communities associated with sugarcane. Our analysis identified 23,811 bacterial OTUs and an unexpected 11,727 fungal OTUs inhabiting the endophytic and exophytic compartments of roots, shoots, and leaves. These communities originate primarily from native soil around plants and colonize plant organs in distinct patterns. The sample type is the primary driver of fungal community assemblage, and the organ compartment plays a major role in bacterial community assemblage. We identified core bacterial and fungal communities composed of less than 20% of the total microbial richness but accounting for over 90% of the total microbial relative abundance. The roots showed 89 core bacterial families, 19 of which accounted for 44% of the total relative abundance. Stalks are dominated by groups of yeasts that represent over 12% of total relative abundance. The core microbiome described here comprise groups whose biological role underlies important traits in plant growth and fermentative processes. PMID:27358031

  17. Quantity and quality components of effectiveness in insular pollinator assemblages.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, María C; Jordano, Pedro; Valido, Alfredo

    2013-09-01

    Ecologically isolated habitats (e.g., oceanic islands) favor the appearance of small assemblages of pollinators, generally characterized by highly contrasted life modes (e.g., birds, lizards), and opportunistic nectar-feeding behavior. Different life modes should promote a low functional equivalence among pollinators, while opportunistic nectar feeding would lead to reduced and unpredictable pollination effectiveness (PE) compared to more specialized nectarivores. Dissecting the quantity (QNC) and quality (QLC) components of PE, we studied the opportunistic bird-lizard pollinator assemblage of Isoplexis canariensis from the Canary Islands to experimentally evaluate these potential characteristics. Birds and lizards showed different positions in the PE landscape, highlighting their low functional equivalence. Birds were more efficient than lizards due to higher visitation frequency (QNC). Adult lizards differed from juveniles in effecting a higher production of viable seeds (QLC). The disparate life modes of birds and lizards resulted in ample intra- and inter-specific PE variance. The main sources of PE variance were visitation frequency (both lizards and birds), number of flowers probed (lizards) and proportion of viable seeds resulting from a single visit (birds). The non-coincident locations of birds and lizards on the PE landscape indicate potential constraints for effectiveness. Variations in pollinator abundance can result in major effectiveness shifts only if QLC is relatively high, while changes in QLC would increase PE substantially only at high QNC. The low functional equivalence of impoverished, highly contrasted pollinator assemblages may be an early diagnostic signal for pollinator extinction potentially driving the collapse of mutualistic services.

  18. Macromolecular Assemblage in the Design of a Synthetic AIDS Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defoort, Jean-Philippe; Nardelli, Bernardetta; Huang, Wolin; Ho, David D.; Tam, James P.

    1992-05-01

    We describe a peptide vaccine model based on the mimicry of surface coat protein of a pathogen. This model used a macromolecular assemblage approach to amplify peptide antigens in liposomes or micelles. The key components of the model consisted of an oligomeric lysine scaffolding to amplify peptide antigens covalently 4-fold and a lipophilic membrane-anchoring group to further amplify noncovalently the antigens many-fold in liposomal or micellar form. A peptide antigen derived from the third variable domain of glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), consisting of neutralizing, T-helper, and T-cytotoxic epitopes, was used in a macromolecular assemblage model (HIV-1 linear peptide amino acid sequence 308-331 in a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide system linked to tripalmitoyl-S-glycerylcysteine). The latter complex, in liposome or micelle, was used to immunize mice and guinea pigs without any adjuvant and found to induce gp120-specific antibodies that neutralize virus infectivity in vitro, elicit cytokine production, and prime CD8^+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vivo. Our results show that the macromolecular assemblage approach bears immunological mimicry of the gp120 of HIV virus and may lead to useful vaccines against HIV infection.

  19. Ecological release in lizard assemblages of neotropical savannas.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Daniel Oliveira; Colli, Guarino Rinaldi; Vitt, Laurie J

    2007-08-01

    We compare lizard assemblages of Cerrado and Amazonian savannas to test the ecological release hypothesis, which predicts that niche dimensions and abundance should be greater in species inhabiting isolated habitat patches with low species richness (Amazonian savannas and isolated Cerrado patches) when compared with nonisolated areas in central Cerrado with greater species richness. We calculated microhabitat and diet niche breadths with data from 14 isolated Cerrado patches and Amazon savanna areas and six central Cerrado populations. Morphological data were compared using average Euclidean distances, and lizard abundance was estimated using the number of lizards captured in pitfall traps over an extended time period. We found no evidence of ecological release with respect to microhabitat use, suggesting that historical factors are better microhabitat predictors than ecological factors. However, data from individual stomachs indicate that ecological release occurs in these areas for one species (Tropidurus) but not others (Ameiva ameiva, Anolis, Cnemidophorus, and Micrablepharus), suggesting that evolutionary lineages respond differently to environmental pressures, with tropidurids being more affected by ecological factors than polychrotids, teiids, and gymnophthalmids. We found no evidence that ecological release occurs in these areas using morphological data. Based on abundance data, our results indicate that the ecological release (density compensation) hypothesis is not supported: lizard species are not more abundant in isolated areas than in nonisolated areas. The ecology of species is highly conservative, varying little from assemblage to assemblage. Nevertheless, increases in niche breadth for some species indicate that ecological release occurs as well. PMID:17437128

  20. Aquatic vertebrate assemblages of the upper Clear Creek Watershed, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.; May, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    We sampled streams in the Upper Clear Creek Watershed in northwestern California in fall 2004 and fall 2005 to document assemblages of aquatic vertebrates and to provide resource managers with information on the importance of these assemblages in terms of regional biodiversity. We used single-pass backpack electrofishing to sample 15 sites in fall 2004 and the same 15 sites plus 4 new sites in fall 2005. We captured 10 fish taxa and 2 species of larval amphibians. Seven of the fish taxa were native species. Of the exotic species, only brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) occurred at more than 1 site. Ordinations by nonmetric multidimensional scaling indicated a gradient from sites with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Pacific giant salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus), and tailed frog (Ascaphus truei) to sites dominated by riffle sculpin (Cottus gulosus), California roach (Hesperoleucas symmetricus), and Sacramento sucker (Catostomus occidentalis). The gradient in species composition was associated with changes in elevation, gradient, discharge, and substrate. The Upper Clear Creek Watershed represents a unique area of overlap between the North Coast California amphibian fauna and the Central Valley fish fauna with a notable paucity of exotic fishes and amphibians. Preservation of the integrity of native aquatic assemblages is an important goal for aquatic resource management in the region; our results provide a critcial baseline to gauge future management actions.

  1. Phytoplankton assemblages in lateral lagoons of a large tropical reservoir.

    PubMed

    Ferrareze, M; Nogueira, M G

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to analyse the composition and ecological attributes of the phytoplankton assemblages in four lateral lagoons and in the main channel of Rosana Reservoir (Paranapanema River, SE Brazil). Fieldwork was carried out in September and November/2004 and January, March, May and August/2005. A total of 283 taxa was identified. Zygnemaphyta was the most specious group, followed by Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta. Higher richness, abundance and biomass were observed in the lagoons when compared with the river-reservoir sampling point, especially during the rainy period. Cryptophyceae and Bacillariophyceae dominated numerically. Cryptomonas brasiliensis Castro, Bicudo and Bicudo was the main species of the phytoplankton in terms of abundance and frequency of occurrence. The dynamics of the most important taxa are discussed and the results showed that the phytoplankton assemblages are mainly influenced by meteorological factors and nutrient availability (the main driving forces). Correlation analyses indicated that the assemblage abundance was limited by nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus). The phytoplankton abundance influenced positively the zooplankton abundance, what indicates the prevalence of bottom-up control routes in the lateral lagoons system. The results validate the hypotheses that lateral lagoons have a prominent ecological role on the phytoplankton diversity, as already previously demonstrated for fish and zooplankton. Therefore, the incorporation of the lateral lagoons in environmental programmes should be a target strategy for the conservation of the regional aquatic biota, minimising the negative impact of the dam.

  2. Temporal changes of a macrobenthic assemblage in harsh lagoon sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Como, Serena; Magni, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    An opportunistic macrobenthic assemblage was studied from 2001 to 2003 in a central area of the Cabras lagoon (western Sardinia, Italy), known to be affected by environmental disturbances (i.e. organic over-enrichment of sediments, and episodic events of hypoxia/anoxia and sulphide development). We identified recurrent seasonal changes in this macrobenthic assemblage, with a general impoverishment in summer and a recovery in winter/spring. The nereids Neanthes succinea and Hediste diversicolor were found to replace the spionid Polydora ciliata as the most dominant species in the summer for 3 consecutive years. Occasional, unsynchronized appearances of small-sized deposit feeders, such as Tubificidae, Capitella cf. capitata, chironomid larvae and Hydrobia spp., were observed in winter/spring. We suggest that these changes are driven by the interplay of environmental conditions (worse in summer) with numerous biotic factors. This includes different tolerance levels of taxa to low oxygen concentrations and sulphides, variability in larval supply and post-larval transport, as well as competition for space and food between and within different functional groups, and facilitation through animal bioturbation and sediment reoxidation. A conceptual model is proposed to demonstrate how environmental conditions and biotic interactions may control the benthic assemblage in such a harsh lagoon environment.

  3. Unlocking the bacterial and fungal communities assemblages of sugarcane microbiome.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; Jorrín, Beatriz; Lozano, Núria; da Silva, Márcio José; González-Guerrero, Manuel; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Verza, Natália Cristina; Bagheri, Homayoun Chaichian; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-06-30

    Plant microbiome and its manipulation herald a new era for plant biotechnology with the potential to benefit sustainable crop production. However, studies evaluating the diversity, structure and impact of the microbiota in economic important crops are still rare. Here we describe a comprehensive inventory of the structure and assemblage of the bacterial and fungal communities associated with sugarcane. Our analysis identified 23,811 bacterial OTUs and an unexpected 11,727 fungal OTUs inhabiting the endophytic and exophytic compartments of roots, shoots, and leaves. These communities originate primarily from native soil around plants and colonize plant organs in distinct patterns. The sample type is the primary driver of fungal community assemblage, and the organ compartment plays a major role in bacterial community assemblage. We identified core bacterial and fungal communities composed of less than 20% of the total microbial richness but accounting for over 90% of the total microbial relative abundance. The roots showed 89 core bacterial families, 19 of which accounted for 44% of the total relative abundance. Stalks are dominated by groups of yeasts that represent over 12% of total relative abundance. The core microbiome described here comprise groups whose biological role underlies important traits in plant growth and fermentative processes.

  4. Unlocking the bacterial and fungal communities assemblages of sugarcane microbiome.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; Jorrín, Beatriz; Lozano, Núria; da Silva, Márcio José; González-Guerrero, Manuel; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Verza, Natália Cristina; Bagheri, Homayoun Chaichian; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Plant microbiome and its manipulation herald a new era for plant biotechnology with the potential to benefit sustainable crop production. However, studies evaluating the diversity, structure and impact of the microbiota in economic important crops are still rare. Here we describe a comprehensive inventory of the structure and assemblage of the bacterial and fungal communities associated with sugarcane. Our analysis identified 23,811 bacterial OTUs and an unexpected 11,727 fungal OTUs inhabiting the endophytic and exophytic compartments of roots, shoots, and leaves. These communities originate primarily from native soil around plants and colonize plant organs in distinct patterns. The sample type is the primary driver of fungal community assemblage, and the organ compartment plays a major role in bacterial community assemblage. We identified core bacterial and fungal communities composed of less than 20% of the total microbial richness but accounting for over 90% of the total microbial relative abundance. The roots showed 89 core bacterial families, 19 of which accounted for 44% of the total relative abundance. Stalks are dominated by groups of yeasts that represent over 12% of total relative abundance. The core microbiome described here comprise groups whose biological role underlies important traits in plant growth and fermentative processes. PMID:27358031

  5. Historic changes in fish assemblage structure in midwestern nonwadeable rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parks, Timothy P.; Quist, Michael C.; Pierce, Clay L.

    2014-01-01

    Historical change in fish assemblage structure was evaluated in the mainstems of the Des Moines, Iowa, Cedar, Wapsipinicon, and Maquoketa rivers, in Iowa. Fish occurrence data were compared in each river between historical and recent time periods to characterize temporal changes among 126 species distributions and assess spatiotemporal patterns in faunal similarity. A resampling procedure was used to estimate species occurrences in rivers during each assessment period and changes in species occurrence were summarized. Spatiotemporal shifts in species composition were analyzed at the river and river section scale using cluster analysis, pairwise Jaccard's dissimilarities, and analysis of multivariate beta dispersion. The majority of species exhibited either increases or declines in distribution in all rivers with the exception of several “unknown” or inconclusive trends exhibited by species in the Maquoketa River. Cluster analysis identified temporal patterns of similarity among fish assemblages in the Des Moines, Cedar, and Iowa rivers within the historical and recent assessment period indicating a significant change in species composition. Prominent declines of backwater species with phytophilic spawning strategies contributed to assemblage changes occurring across river systems.

  6. Short-term exposure to aqueous endosulfan affects macroinvertebrate assemblages.

    PubMed

    Hose, Grant C; Lim, Richard P; Hyne, Ross V; Pablo, Fleur

    2003-10-01

    The toxicity of the organochlorine pesticide endosulfan to macroinvertebrate assemblages was tested using a system of 24 artificial streams. In separate experiments, the effects of 12- and 48-h exposure to aqueous endosulfan were assessed. No-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC) for endosulfan on macroinvertebrate assemblages were 8.69 and 1.00 microg/L for the 12- and 48-h exposure studies, respectively. In both studies, changes were driven by reduced abundances of the mayfly, Jappa kutera. Algal blooms occurred in the 48-h exposure experiment in streams that received the 6.87 or 30.70 microg/L treatments. These effects occurred at concentrations that might occur as a result of episodic events such as accidental overspray or rainstorms. By establishing a causal link between endosulfan and changes to macroinvertebrate assemblages, this study adds further weight to the hypothesis that endosulfan is a major contributor to changes observed in rivers of the cotton-growing region of New South Wales, Australia during the pesticide spray season.

  7. The Excavation and Remediation of the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    KWIECINSKI,DANIEL ALBERT; METHVIN,RHONDA KAY; SCHOFIELD,DONALD P.; YOUNG,SHARISSA G.

    1999-11-23

    The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a 1.9-acre disposal site that was used for the disposal of chemical wastes generated by many of SNL/NM research laboratories from 1962 until 1985. These laboratories were primarily involved in the design, research and development of non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons and the waste generated by these labs included small quantities of a wide assortment of chemical products. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan for the Chemical Waste Landfill was approved by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in 1992. Subsequent site characterization activities identified the presence of significant amounts of chromium in the soil as far as 80 feet below ground surface (fbgs) and the delineation of a solvent plume in the vadose zone that extends to groundwater approximately 500 fbgs. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in some groundwater samples at concentrations slightly above the drinking water limit of 5 parts per billion. In 1997 an active vapor extraction system reduced the size of the TCE vapor plume and for the last six quarterly sampling events groundwater samples have not detected TCE above the drinking water standard. A source term removal, being conducted as a Voluntary Corrective Measure (VCM), began in September 1998 and is expected to take up to two years. Four distinct disposal areas were identified from historical data and the contents of disposal pits and trenches in these areas, in addition to much of the highly contaminated soil surrounding the disposal cells, are currently being excavated. Buried waste and debris are expected to extend to a depth of 12 to 15 fbgs. Excavation will focus on the removal of buried debris and contaminated soil in a sequential, area by area manner and will proceed to whatever depth is required in order to remove all pit contents. Up to 50,000 cubic yards of soil and debris will be removed and managed during

  8. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  9. Black liquor and the hangover effect: fish assemblage recovery dynamics following a pulse disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Piller, Kyle R; Geheber, Aaron D

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic perturbations impact aquatic systems causing wide-ranging responses, from assemblage restructuring to assemblage recovery. Previous studies indicate the duration and intensity of disturbances play a role in the dynamics of assemblage recovery. In August 2011, the Pearl River, United States, was subjected to a weak black liquor spill from a paper mill which resulted in substantial loss of fish in a large stretch of the main channel. We quantified resilience and recovery of fish assemblage structure in the impacted area following the event. We compared downstream (impacted) assemblages to upstream (unimpacted) assemblages to determine initial impacts on structure. Additionally, we incorporated historic fish collections (1988–2011) to examine impacts on assemblage structure across broad temporal scales. Based on NMDS, upstream and downstream sites generally showed similar assemblage structure across sample periods with the exception of the 2 months postdischarge, where upstream and downstream sites visually differed. Multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) indicated significant seasonal variation among samples, but found no significant interaction between impacted and unimpacted assemblages following the discharge event. However, multivariate dispersion (MVDISP) showed greater variance among assemblage structure following the discharge event. These results suggest that 2 months following the disturbance represent a time period of stochasticity in regard to assemblage structure dynamics, and this was followed by rapid recovery. We term this dynamic the “hangover effect” as it represents the time frame from the cessation of the perturbation to the assemblage's return to predisturbance conditions. The availability and proximity of tributaries and upstream refugia, which were not affected by the disturbance, as well as the rapid recovery of abiotic parameters likely played a substantial role in assemblage recovery. This study not only

  10. Performance prediction of mechanical excavators from linear cutter tests on Yucca Mountain welded tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsch, R.; Ozdemir, L.

    1992-09-01

    The performances of mechanical excavators are predicted for excavations in welded tuff. Emphasis is given to tunnel boring machine evaluations based on linear cutting machine test data obtained on samples of Topopah Spring welded tuff. The tests involve measurement of forces as cutters are applied to the rock surface at certain spacing and penetrations. Two disc and two point-attack cutters representing currently available technology are thus evaluated. The performance predictions based on these direct experimental measurements are believed to be more accurate than any previous values for mechanical excavation of welded tuff. The calculations of performance are predicated on minimizing the amount of energy required to excavate the welded tuff. Specific energy decreases with increasing spacing and penetration, and reaches its lowest at the widest spacing and deepest penetration used in this test program. Using the force, spacing, and penetration data from this experimental program, the thrust, torque, power, and rate of penetration are calculated for several types of mechanical excavators. The results of this study show that the candidate excavators will require higher torque and power than heretofore estimated.

  11. Fish assemblages of the upper Little Sioux River basin, Iowa, USA: Relationships with stream size and comparison with historical assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palic, D.; Helland, L.; Pedersen, B.R.; Pribil, J.R.; Grajeda, R.M.; Loan-Wilsey, Anna; Pierce, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    We characterized the fish assemblages in second to fifth order streams of the upper Little Sioux River basin in northwest Iowa, USA and compared our results with historical surveys. The fish assemblage consisted of over twenty species, was dominated numerically by creek chub, sand shiner, central stoneroller and other cyprinids, and was dominated in biomass by common carp. Most of the species and the great majority of all individuals present were at least moderately tolerant to environmental degradation, and biotic integrity at most sites was characterized as fair. Biotic integrity declined with increasing stream size, and degraded habitat in larger streams is a possible cause. No significant changes in species richness or the relative distribution of species' tolerance appear to have occurred since the 1930s.

  12. Ichthyoplankton assemblage structure of springs in the Yangtze Estuary revealed by biological and environmental visions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Xian, Weiwei; Liu, Shude

    2015-01-01

    The ichthyoplankton assemblage structure in the Yangtze Estuary was analyzed based on four springs in 1999, 2001, 2004 and 2007 in order to provide detailed characterizations of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in springs, examine the long-term dynamics of spring ichthyoplankton assemblages, and evaluate the influence of environmental factors on the spatial distribution and inter-annual variations of ichthyoplankton assemblages associated with the Yangtze Estuary. Forty-two ichthyoplankton species belonging to 23 families were collected. Engraulidae was the most abundant family, including six species and comprising 67.91% of the total catch. Only four species (Coilia mystus, Engraulis japonicus, Trachidermis fasciatus and Allanetta bleekeri) could be considered dominant, accounting for 88.70% of total abundance. The structure of the ichthyoplankton spring assemblage persisted on an annual basis, with the dominant species reappearing consistently even though their abundance fluctuated from year to year. This inter-annual variation probably reflects variable environmental conditions influenced by jellyfish blooms, declining river flow, and overfishing. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated aspatial structure of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in three areas: (1) an inner assemblage dominated by C. mystus; (2) a central assemblage dominated by A. bleekeri and T. fasciatus; and (3) a shelf assemblage featuring E. japonicus. The observed ichthyoplankton assemblage structure appears to be strongly influenced by depth, salinity and suspended particulate matter gradients. PMID:26312180

  13. Ichthyoplankton assemblage structure of springs in the Yangtze Estuary revealed by biological and environmental visions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Shude

    2015-01-01

    The ichthyoplankton assemblage structure in the Yangtze Estuary was analyzed based on four springs in 1999, 2001, 2004 and 2007 in order to provide detailed characterizations of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in springs, examine the long-term dynamics of spring ichthyoplankton assemblages, and evaluate the influence of environmental factors on the spatial distribution and inter-annual variations of ichthyoplankton assemblages associated with the Yangtze Estuary. Forty-two ichthyoplankton species belonging to 23 families were collected. Engraulidae was the most abundant family, including six species and comprising 67.91% of the total catch. Only four species (Coilia mystus, Engraulis japonicus, Trachidermis fasciatus and Allanetta bleekeri) could be considered dominant, accounting for 88.70% of total abundance. The structure of the ichthyoplankton spring assemblage persisted on an annual basis, with the dominant species reappearing consistently even though their abundance fluctuated from year to year. This inter-annual variation probably reflects variable environmental conditions influenced by jellyfish blooms, declining river flow, and overfishing. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated aspatial structure of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in three areas: (1) an inner assemblage dominated by C. mystus; (2) a central assemblage dominated by A. bleekeri and T. fasciatus; and (3) a shelf assemblage featuring E. japonicus. The observed ichthyoplankton assemblage structure appears to be strongly influenced by depth, salinity and suspended particulate matter gradients. PMID:26312180

  14. Ichthyoplankton assemblage structure of springs in the Yangtze Estuary revealed by biological and environmental visions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Xian, Weiwei; Liu, Shude

    2015-01-01

    The ichthyoplankton assemblage structure in the Yangtze Estuary was analyzed based on four springs in 1999, 2001, 2004 and 2007 in order to provide detailed characterizations of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in springs, examine the long-term dynamics of spring ichthyoplankton assemblages, and evaluate the influence of environmental factors on the spatial distribution and inter-annual variations of ichthyoplankton assemblages associated with the Yangtze Estuary. Forty-two ichthyoplankton species belonging to 23 families were collected. Engraulidae was the most abundant family, including six species and comprising 67.91% of the total catch. Only four species (Coilia mystus, Engraulis japonicus, Trachidermis fasciatus and Allanetta bleekeri) could be considered dominant, accounting for 88.70% of total abundance. The structure of the ichthyoplankton spring assemblage persisted on an annual basis, with the dominant species reappearing consistently even though their abundance fluctuated from year to year. This inter-annual variation probably reflects variable environmental conditions influenced by jellyfish blooms, declining river flow, and overfishing. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated aspatial structure of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in three areas: (1) an inner assemblage dominated by C. mystus; (2) a central assemblage dominated by A. bleekeri and T. fasciatus; and (3) a shelf assemblage featuring E. japonicus. The observed ichthyoplankton assemblage structure appears to be strongly influenced by depth, salinity and suspended particulate matter gradients.

  15. [Spatial distribution pattern of carabid assemblage in agricultural landscape of Miyun County, Beijing].

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong; Zhang, Xu-Zhu; Duan, Mei-Chun; Yu, Zhen-Rong; Liu, Yun-Hui

    2012-06-01

    By the method of pitfall trap sampling, an investigation was conducted on the carabid assemblage in four typical habitats (maize field, peanut field, orchard, and semi-natural woodland) in the agricultural landscape in Xitiange Village of Miyun County, Beijing. Among the four habitats, orchard had the highest alpha-diversity of carabid assemblage, followed by woodland and maize field, and peanut field had the lowest one. The species composition of the assemblage in woodland, peanut field, and orchard had evident difference, but was similar to that in maize field to some extent. The number of the individuals of predatory and omnivorous carabid sub-assemblages was larger in orchard, and the predatory sub-assemblage presented more distinct difference in its species turnover rate than the omnivore sub-assemblage among the habitats. This study showed that low-intensively managed orchard habitat could sustain higher alpha-diversity of carabid assemblage than semi-natural woodland habitat, and the landscape with diversified habitats could benefit the beta-diversity of carabid assemblage and its predatory sub-assemblage. To attach importance to the conservation of diversified habitats and low-intensively managed farmland habitat would have significance for the conservation of carabid assemblage diversity and its pest control function in agricultural landscape.

  16. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  17. Focal choroidal excavation: a preliminary interpretation based on clinic and review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guang-Hui; Lin, Bing; Sun, Xin-Quan; He, Zi-Fang; Li, Ji-Rong; Zhou, Rong; Liu, Xiao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    AIM To describe the clinical and imaging characteristics associated with focal choroidal excavation (FCE), analyze the possible complication, and interpret its probable etiopathogenesis. METHODS Retrospective descriptive case series of 37 eyes of 32 patients with FCE. Findings of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and clinical features were analyzed. RESULTS All patients were Chinese. Five patients (15.6%) were bilaterally involved. Patients' ages ranged from 7 to 66y. Refractive error ranged between +2.0 D and −11.0 D. Mean best-corrected visual acuity was 0.6 (range, 0.1 to 1.2). Fundus examinations exhibited mild-moderate localized pigmentary disturbances in the corresponding area of 17 eyes. Fluorescein angiography performed in 18 patients showed varying degrees of hyperfluorescence and hypofluorescence related to a range of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) alterations. Indocyanine green angiography performed in 7 patients showed hypofluorescence at the excavation. SD-OCT demonstrated choroidal excavation in all 37 eyes. Twenty-nine eyes showed a single lesion of FCE, and three eyes showed 2-3 separated lesions. Fifteen eyes showed separation between the photoreceptor tips and RPE consistent with nonconforming FCE. Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC, n=1) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV, n=1) developed during follow-up. CONCLUSION FCE could be interpreted as congenital focal choroidal dysplasia involving the RPE, choriocapillaris, and photoreceptor associated with the faulty anatomy. The abnormal anatomy of FCE was similar to anatomy at risk of CSC and CNV. PMID:26086000

  18. In situ measurements of rock salt permeability changes due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C. ); Howard, C.L. ); Daemen, J.J.K. . Mackay School of Mines)

    1991-07-01

    The Small-Scale Mine-By was an in situ experiment to measure changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation. A series of small-volume pressurized brine- and gas-filled test intervals were established 8 m beneath the floor of Room L1 in the WIPP underground. The test intervals were isolated in the bottom of the 4.8-cm diameter monitoring boreholes with inflatable rubber packers, and are initially pressurized to about 2 MPa. Both brine- and gas-filled test intervals were located 1.25, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4 r from the center of a planned large-diameter hole, where r is the radius of the large-diameter hole. Prior to the drilling of the large-diameter borehole, the responses of both the brine- and gas-filled test intervals were consistent with the formation modeled as a very low permeability, low porosity porous medium with a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The drilling of the mine-by borehole created a zone of dilated, partially saturated rock out to about 1.5 r. The formation pressure increases from near zero at 1.5 r to the pre-excavation value at 4 r. Injection tests reveal a gradient of brine permeabilities from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} at 1.25 r to about the pre-excavation value (10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2}) by 3 r. Gas-injection tests reveal measurable gas permeability is limited to within 1.5 r. 17 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Design of Intelligent Hydraulic Excavator Control System Based on PID Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Jiao, Shengjie; Liao, Xiaoming; Yin, Penglong; Wang, Yulin; Si, Kuimao; Zhang, Yi; Gu, Hairong

    Most of the domestic designed hydraulic excavators adopt the constant power design method and set 85%~90% of engine power as the hydraulic system adoption power, it causes high energy loss due to mismatching of power between the engine and the pump. While the variation of the rotational speed of engine could sense the power shift of the load, it provides a new method to adjust the power matching between engine and pump through engine speed. Based on negative flux hydraulic system, an intelligent hydraulic excavator control system was designed based on rotational speed sensing method to improve energy efficiency. The control system was consisted of engine control module, pump power adjusted module, engine idle module and system fault diagnosis module. Special PLC with CAN bus was used to acquired the sensors and adjusts the pump absorption power according to load variation. Four energy saving control strategies with constant power method were employed to improve the fuel utilization. Three power modes (H, S and L mode) were designed to meet different working status; Auto idle function was employed to save energy through two work status detected pressure switches, 1300rpm was setting as the idle speed according to the engine consumption fuel curve. Transient overload function was designed for deep digging within short time without spending extra fuel. An increasing PID method was employed to realize power matching between engine and pump, the rotational speed's variation was taken as the PID algorithm's input; the current of proportional valve of variable displacement pump was the PID's output. The result indicated that the auto idle could decrease fuel consumption by 33.33% compared to work in maximum speed of H mode, the PID control method could take full use of maximum engine power at each power mode and keep the engine speed at stable range. Application of rotational speed sensing method provides a reliable method to improve the excavator's energy efficiency and

  20. Excavation of Tunnel Valleys and Inner Gorges by Subglacial Meltwater Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaud, F.; Flowers, G. E.; Venditti, J. G.; Koppes, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Subglacial meltwater erosion (SME) is thought to contribute to the excavation of tunnel valleys and inner gorges, yet the underpinnings of the formation of these landforms remain obscure. Tunnel valleys are large channel-like features (100s of metres to few kilometres wide and up to 10s of kilometres in length) commonly found in the vicinity of former continental ice-sheet margins. The main question concerning their formation is: does SME excavate them gradually or by large subglacial floods? Inner gorges are V-shaped incisions in an otherwise glacially overprinted landscape. The initial assertion of their fluvial origin has recently been disputed, as they have been shown to persist through multiple glaciations and SME has been invoked to explain some inner gorges in Scandinavia and the Alps. The question is therefore: can SME explain the excavation of an inner gorge? In order to test these hypotheses related to the genesis of tunnel valleys and inner gorges, we use a 1-D model of subglacial hydrology to drive a model of bedrock erosion by total sediment load based on the tools and cover effect. Calculated values of subglacial transport stage in response to ordinary seasonal processes are comparable to those during large floods in rivers. Subglacial floods therefore limit bedrock erosion by transporting sediment farther from the bed, thus inhibiting impacts. Consequently, we find that gradual SME is likely to produce more incision over a glacial cycle. When we simulate the total SME that occurs through a glacial cycle under a synthetic ice-sheet margin, we are able to produce tunnel valleys or inner gorges over the timespan of a glaciation. Based on these results, we propose that (1) tunnel valleys and inner gorges can both be the result of SME, (2) tunnel valleys in bedrock can be formed through gradual processes rather than floods, and (3) SME enhances inner gorge relief.

  1. Natural Diet of Coral-Excavating Sponges Consists Mainly of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC)

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin; de Goeij, Jasper M.; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Mulders, Yannick; van der Ent, Esther; Ribes, Marta; van Duyl, Fleur C.

    2014-01-01

    Coral-excavating sponges are the most important bioeroders on Caribbean reefs and increase in abundance throughout the region. This increase is commonly attributed to a concomitant increase in food availability due to eutrophication and pollution. We therefore investigated the uptake of organic matter by the two coral-excavating sponges Siphonodictyon sp. and Cliona delitrix and tested whether they are capable of consuming dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as part of their diet. A device for simultaneous sampling of water inhaled and exhaled by the sponges was used to directly measure the removal of DOC and bacteria in situ. During a single passage through their filtration system 14% and 13% respectively of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the inhaled water was removed by the sponges. 82% (Siphonodictyon sp.; mean±SD; 13±17 μmol L−1) and 76% (C. delitrix; 10±12 μmol L−1) of the carbon removed was taken up in form of DOC, whereas the remainder was taken up in the form of particulate organic carbon (POC; bacteria and phytoplankton) despite high bacteria retention efficiency (72±15% and 87±10%). Siphonodictyon sp. and C. delitrix removed DOC at a rate of 461±773 and 354±562 μmol C h−1 respectively. Bacteria removal was 1.8±0.9×1010 and 1.7±0.6×1010 cells h−1, which equals a carbon uptake of 46.0±21.2 and 42.5±14.0 μmol C h−1 respectively. Therefore, DOC represents 83 and 81% of the TOC taken up by Siphonodictyon sp. and C. delitrix per hour. These findings suggest that similar to various reef sponges coral-excavating sponges also mainly rely on DOC to meet their carbon demand. We hypothesize that excavating sponges may also benefit from an increasing production of more labile algal-derived DOC (as compared to coral-derived DOC) on reefs as a result of the ongoing coral-algal phase shift. PMID:24587253

  2. Geotechnical issues and guidelines for storage of compressed air in excavated hard rock caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Fossum, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    The results of a literature survey on the stability of excavated hard rock caverns are presented. The objective of the study was to develop geotechnical criteria for the design of compressed air energy storage (CAES) caverns in hard rock formations. These criteria involve geologic, hydrological, geochemical, geothermal, and in situ stress state characteristics of generic rock masses. Their relevance to CAES caverns, and the identification of required research areas, are identified throughout the text. This literature survey and analysis strongly suggests that the chief geotechnical issues for the development and operation of CAES caverns in hard rock are impermeability for containment, stability for sound openings, and hydrostatic balance.

  3. Natural diet of coral-excavating sponges consists mainly of dissolved organic carbon (DOC).

    PubMed

    Mueller, Benjamin; de Goeij, Jasper M; Vermeij, Mark J A; Mulders, Yannick; van der Ent, Esther; Ribes, Marta; van Duyl, Fleur C

    2014-01-01

    Coral-excavating sponges are the most important bioeroders on Caribbean reefs and increase in abundance throughout the region. This increase is commonly attributed to a concomitant increase in food availability due to eutrophication and pollution. We therefore investigated the uptake of organic matter by the two coral-excavating sponges Siphonodictyon sp. and Cliona delitrix and tested whether they are capable of consuming dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as part of their diet. A device for simultaneous sampling of water inhaled and exhaled by the sponges was used to directly measure the removal of DOC and bacteria in situ. During a single passage through their filtration system 14% and 13% respectively of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the inhaled water was removed by the sponges. 82% (Siphonodictyon sp.; mean ± SD; 13 ± 17 μmol L(-1)) and 76% (C. delitrix; 10 ± 12 μmol L(-1)) of the carbon removed was taken up in form of DOC, whereas the remainder was taken up in the form of particulate organic carbon (POC; bacteria and phytoplankton) despite high bacteria retention efficiency (72 ± 15% and 87 ± 10%). Siphonodictyon sp. and C. delitrix removed DOC at a rate of 461 ± 773 and 354 ± 562 μmol C h(-1) respectively. Bacteria removal was 1.8 ± 0.9 × 10(10) and 1.7 ± 0.6 × 10(10) cells h(-1), which equals a carbon uptake of 46.0 ± 21.2 and 42.5 ± 14.0 μmol C h(-1) respectively. Therefore, DOC represents 83 and 81% of the TOC taken up by Siphonodictyon sp. and C. delitrix per hour. These findings suggest that similar to various reef sponges coral-excavating sponges also mainly rely on DOC to meet their carbon demand. We hypothesize that excavating sponges may also benefit from an increasing production of more labile algal-derived DOC (as compared to coral-derived DOC) on reefs as a result of the ongoing coral-algal phase shift.

  4. Temporal Assemblage Turnovers of Foraminiferal Communities from the Caribbean, United Kingdom and Mediterranean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costelloe, Ashleigh; Wilson, Brent

    2016-04-01

    Temporal assemblage turnovers of intertidal foraminiferal communities were quantitatively determined using the assemblage turnover index (ATI), and contributing species were identified using the conditioned on-boundary index (CoBI). The live foraminiferal communities were examined as metacommunities (all stations) and assemblages (groups of stations defined by cluster analysis) over one and two year periods at Caroni Swamp, Claxton Bay (E Trinidad), Cowpen Marsh (NE England) and Bay of Cádiz (SW Spain). Major assemblage turnovers (when ATI > x + σ) of the Caroni Swamp metacommunity and assemblages coincided with seasonal changes from dry to wet conditions in 2011 and 2012. The abundant species (Ammonia tepida, Ammotium salsum, Arenoparella mexicana, Trochammina advena, Trochammina laevigata and Trochammina inflata) contributed the most to assemblage turnovers but showed no preference to either dry or wet conditions. At Claxton Bay major assemblage turnovers of the metacommunity and mid assemblage coincided with seasonal change and calcareous species (A. tepida and Triloculina oblonga) increased during wet conditions and decreased during dry conditions, while agglutinated species (T. advena and A. salsum) fluctuated oppositely. At Cowpen Marsh major assemblage turnovers of the metacommunity coincided with the start of summer and winter. Assemblages at higher elevations (mainly Jadammina macrescens and Haplophragmoides spp.) were responsible for the summer turnover, while the winter turnover was led by the assemblage at lower elevations (mainly Haynesina germanica, Elphidium earlandi, Elphidium williamsoni, Elphidium excavatum and Quinqueloculina spp.). At Bay of Cádiz, the foraminiferal assemblage at a tidal height of 1.5 to 1.7 m above the hydrographic zero was examined within three separate plots, and the seasonal occurrence of assemblage turnovers differed between plots. Thus, replicate samples and multiple plots may be necessary to overcome spatial

  5. Variation in Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages among coral colonies.

    PubMed

    Stat, Michael; Bird, Christopher E; Pochon, Xavier; Chasqui, Luis; Chauka, Leonard J; Concepcion, Gregory T; Logan, Dan; Takabayashi, Misaki; Toonen, Robert J; Gates, Ruth D

    2011-01-01

    Endosymbiotic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are fundamentally important to the biology of scleractinian corals, as well as to a variety of other marine organisms. The genus Symbiodinium is genetically and functionally diverse and the taxonomic nature of the union between Symbiodinium and corals is implicated as a key trait determining the environmental tolerance of the symbiosis. Surprisingly, the question of how Symbiodinium diversity partitions within a species across spatial scales of meters to kilometers has received little attention, but is important to understanding the intrinsic biological scope of a given coral population and adaptations to the local environment. Here we address this gap by describing the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages recovered from colonies of the reef building coral Montipora capitata sampled across Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i. A total of 52 corals were sampled in a nested design of Coral Colony(Site(Region)) reflecting spatial scales of meters to kilometers. A diversity of Symbiodinium ITS2 sequences was recovered with the majority of variance partitioning at the level of the Coral Colony. To confirm this result, the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence diversity in six M. capitata colonies were analyzed in much greater depth with 35 to 55 clones per colony. The ITS2 sequences and quantitative composition recovered from these colonies varied significantly, indicating that each coral hosted a different assemblage of Symbiodinium. The diversity of Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages retrieved from individual colonies of M. capitata here highlights the problems inherent in interpreting multi-copy and intra-genomically variable molecular markers, and serves as a context for discussing the utility and biological relevance of assigning species names based on Symbiodinium ITS2 genotyping. PMID:21246044

  6. Quantity and quality components of effectiveness in insular pollinator assemblages.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, María C; Jordano, Pedro; Valido, Alfredo

    2013-09-01

    Ecologically isolated habitats (e.g., oceanic islands) favor the appearance of small assemblages of pollinators, generally characterized by highly contrasted life modes (e.g., birds, lizards), and opportunistic nectar-feeding behavior. Different life modes should promote a low functional equivalence among pollinators, while opportunistic nectar feeding would lead to reduced and unpredictable pollination effectiveness (PE) compared to more specialized nectarivores. Dissecting the quantity (QNC) and quality (QLC) components of PE, we studied the opportunistic bird-lizard pollinator assemblage of Isoplexis canariensis from the Canary Islands to experimentally evaluate these potential characteristics. Birds and lizards showed different positions in the PE landscape, highlighting their low functional equivalence. Birds were more efficient than lizards due to higher visitation frequency (QNC). Adult lizards differed from juveniles in effecting a higher production of viable seeds (QLC). The disparate life modes of birds and lizards resulted in ample intra- and inter-specific PE variance. The main sources of PE variance were visitation frequency (both lizards and birds), number of flowers probed (lizards) and proportion of viable seeds resulting from a single visit (birds). The non-coincident locations of birds and lizards on the PE landscape indicate potential constraints for effectiveness. Variations in pollinator abundance can result in major effectiveness shifts only if QLC is relatively high, while changes in QLC would increase PE substantially only at high QNC. The low functional equivalence of impoverished, highly contrasted pollinator assemblages may be an early diagnostic signal for pollinator extinction potentially driving the collapse of mutualistic services. PMID:23404070

  7. Clearcut stand size and scrub-successional bird assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Christie, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of clearcut stand size on species richness, reproductive effort, and relative abundance of scrub-successional birds and the entire bird assemblage at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. We used standardized mist-net grids to mark and recapture birds in clearcuts replanted with longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) in stands of 2 to 57 ha that were two to six years old. Species richness for the entire bird assemblage was not explained by stand size (P = 0.67), stand age (P = 0.95), or the interaction of these two variables (P = 0.90). Similarly, species richness of scrub-successional birds was not explained by stand size (P = 0.63), stand age (P = 0.55), or the interaction of stand size and stand age (P = 0.35). Regressing species richness on clearcut stand size, we found a significant negative relationship between these variables for the entire bird assemblage (P = 0.01) and for scrub-successional birds (P = 0.02). The ratio of juveniles to adults in mist-net samples varied by year (P = 0.04), but neither clearcut size (P = 0.23) nor the interaction of clearcut size and year (P = 0.25) was related to the ratio of juveniles to adults in the sample. We found no relationship between the frequency of capture of any category of birds and stand size (scrub-successional, P = 0.52; woodland, P = 0.77; combined sample, P = 0.55). Neither bird-species richness, reproductive effort, nor relative abundance differed across clearcut stand sizes. Clearcut stand size does not appear to be an important management variable if variation in species richness, reproductive effort, or relative abundance are objectives. We suggest that even-aged forestry is a useful tool for managing birds in the southeastern United States.

  8. Distinguishing primary and secondary inclusion assemblages in Jack Hills zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Elizabeth A.; Boehnke, Patrick; Hopkins-Wielicki, Michelle D.; Harrison, T. Mark

    2015-10-01

    Detrital igneous zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia, range in age from ~ 3.0 to nearly 4.4 Ga and contain an inclusion assemblage dominated by quartz and muscovite, cited as evidence of their derivation from peraluminous granitoids. However, some phosphate inclusions in these zircons are known to be secondary from their post-depositional U-Pb ages and manifest mineralization along cracks. We undertook a survey of mineral inclusions in 4.3-3.0 Ga Jack Hills zircons with particular emphasis on their relationship to possible alteration features (e.g., cracks, disturbed internal zonation, and visual turbidity). Mineral inclusions revealed at polished surfaces show variations in modal mineralogy, mostly corresponding to their relationship with cracks. Muscovite is common both on and away from cracks, although the chemistry of muscovite inclusions shows little relationship with other potential alteration features. Inclusions filling cracks (secondary) and inclusions isolated from cracks differ in their modal mineralogy, although both suites are rich in muscovite and quartz. The higher incidence of crack-intersecting inclusions among younger zircons may reflect effects of the (generally larger) inclusion size among younger zircons. Mismatches between the isolated and crack-intersecting populations indicate selective loss of certain phases (e.g., feldspar, apatite) and over-representation of quartz and muscovite along cracks likely due to the effects of larger inclusion size and varying degrees of overpressure following zircon cooling and decompression. Inclusions not associated with cracks in magmatically zoned versus regions with disturbed zoning have similar phase proportions. This indicates only minor inclusion replacement away from cracks (i.e., the isolated assemblage is likely primary). This holds true also for inclusions within visually turbid versus clear volumes of zircon. Phase proportions within the inclusion assemblages differ with age indicating a

  9. Habitat relationships with fish assemblages in minimally disturbed Great Plains regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, John R.; Paukert, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of local environmental influences on the structure of fish assemblages were evaluated from 159 sites in two regions of the Great Plains with limited anthropogenic disturbance. These regions offered an opportunity to evaluate the structure and variation of streams and fish assemblages within the Great Plains. We used canonical correspondence analyses to determine the influence of environmental conditions on species abundances, species occurrences and assemblage characteristics. Analysis of regions separately indicated that similar environmental factors structured streams and fish assemblages, despite differences in environmental conditions and species composition between regions. Variance in fish abundance and assemblage characteristics from both regions was best explained by metrics of stream size and associated metrics (width, depth, conductivity and instream cover). Our results provide a framework and reference for conditions and assemblage structure in North American prairie streams.

  10. Temporal changes in taxonomic and functional diversity of fish assemblages downstream from mountaintop mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Chambers, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    Mountaintop mining (MTM) affects chemical, physical, and hydrological properties of receiving streams, but the long-term consequences for fish-assemblage structure and function are poorly understood. We sampled stream fish assemblages using electrofishing techniques in MTM exposure sites and reference sites within the Guyandotte River basin, USA, during 2010–2011. We calculated indices of taxonomic diversity (species richness, abundance, Shannon diversity) and functional diversity (functional richness, functional evenness, functional divergence) to compare exposure and reference assemblages between seasons (spring and autumn) and across years (1999–2011). We based temporal comparisons on 2 sites that were sampled during 1999–2001 by Stauffer and Ferreri (2002). Exposure assemblages had lower taxonomic and functional diversity than reference assemblages or simulated assemblages that accounted for random variation. Differences in taxonomic composition between reference and exposure assemblages were associated with conductivity and aqueous Se concentrations. Exposure assemblages had fewer species, lower abundances, and less biomass than reference assemblages across years and seasons. Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) and Creek Chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) became numerically dominant in exposure assemblages over time because of their persistence and losses of other taxa. In contrast, species richness increased over time in reference assemblages, a result that may indicate recovery from drought. Mean individual biomass increased as fish density decreased and most obligate invertivores were apparently extirpated at MTM exposure sites. Effects of MTM were not related to physical-habitat conditions but were associated with water-quality variables, which may limit quality and availability of benthic macroinvertebrate prey. Simulations revealed effects of MTM that could not be attributed to random variation in fish assemblage structure.

  11. Influential environmental gradients and spatiotemporal patterns of fish assemblages in the unimpounded Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barko, V.A.; Palmer, M.W.; Herzog, D.P.; Ickes, B.S.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated variation of fish assemblages in response to environmental factors using Long Term Resource Monitoring Program data. Data were collected from 1993 to 2000 from five physical habitats in the unimpounded upper Mississippi River. We captured 89 species composing 18 families. Of these, 26% were fluvial specialists, 25% were fluvial dependent and 49% were generalists. The numerically dominant component of the adult fish assemblage (species accounting for >10% of total catch) accounted for 50% of the assemblage and was comprised of only three species: gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum; 25%), common carp (Cyprinus carpio, 15%) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, 10%). The dominant component of the YOY fish assemblage was comprised of only two species, which accounted for 76% of the total catch: freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens; 39%) and gizzard shad (37%). We used a cross-validation multivariate approach to explore how adult and young-of-the-year (YOY) assemblages varied with respect. to physical habitat and environmental gradients. Furthermore, we were interested how the fish assemblages changed over time. Partial canonical correspondence analyses (pCCA) demonstrated significant effects of physical habitats. Such effects differed between young-of-the-year and adult fishes. The four main environmental gradients influencing overall assemblage structure for both age groups were river elevation, water velocity, conductivity, and depth of gear deployment. Morisita's index revealed similar adult assemblage structure over time. However, the YOY assemblage present in 1995 was dissimilar from assemblages present during the other years. We speculate this is a lag effect from the backwater spawning episodes (floodpulse) that occurred with the 500-y flood in 1993. Shannon-Weiner diversity and Camargo's evenness indices were low, but stable across years for the adult assemblage, but varied across years for the YOY assemblage.

  12. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using the nanosecond pulsed laser in 5.8-μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of human carious dentin.

  13. Seasonal dynamics of fish assemblages on breakwaters and natural rocky reefs in a temperate estuary: consistent assemblage differences driven by sub-adults.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Ashley M; Booth, David J

    2013-01-01

    Development of infrastructure around cities is rapidly increasing the amount of artificial substrate (termed artificial reef, 'AR') in coastal marine habitats. However, effects of ARs on marine communities remain unknown, because it is unclear whether ARs can maintain similar communities to natural reefs. We investigated whether well-established (> 30 years old) breakwaters could consistently approximate fish assemblages on interspersed rocky reefs in a temperate estuary over 6 consecutive seasons using regular visual surveys between June 2009 (winter) and November 2010 (spring). We examined whether assemblage differences between reef types were driven by differences in juvenile recruitment, or were related to differences in older life-stages. Assemblages on both reef types were dominated by juveniles (61% of individuals) and sub-adults (34% of individuals). Seasonal fluctuations in assemblage parameters (species richness, diversity, sub-adult abundance) were similar between reef types, and levels of species diversity and assemblage composition were generally comparable. However, abundance and species richness were consistently higher (1.9-7.6 and 1.3-2.6 times, respectively) on breakwaters. These assemblage differences could not be explained by differences in juvenile recruitment, with seasonal patterns of recruitment and juvenile species found to be similar between reef types. In contrast, abundances of sub-adults were consistently higher (1.1-12 times) at breakwaters, and assemblage differences appeared to be driven by this life-stage. Our results indicate that breakwaters in temperate estuaries are capable of supporting abundant and diverse fish assemblages with similar recruitment process to natural reefs. However, breakwaters may not approximate all aspects of natural assemblage structure, with differences maintained by a single-life stage in some cases.

  14. Seasonal dynamics of fish assemblages on breakwaters and natural rocky reefs in a temperate estuary: consistent assemblage differences driven by sub-adults.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Ashley M; Booth, David J

    2013-01-01

    Development of infrastructure around cities is rapidly increasing the amount of artificial substrate (termed artificial reef, 'AR') in coastal marine habitats. However, effects of ARs on marine communities remain unknown, because it is unclear whether ARs can maintain similar communities to natural reefs. We investigated whether well-established (> 30 years old) breakwaters could consistently approximate fish assemblages on interspersed rocky reefs in a temperate estuary over 6 consecutive seasons using regular visual surveys between June 2009 (winter) and November 2010 (spring). We examined whether assemblage differences between reef types were driven by differences in juvenile recruitment, or were related to differences in older life-stages. Assemblages on both reef types were dominated by juveniles (61% of individuals) and sub-adults (34% of individuals). Seasonal fluctuations in assemblage parameters (species richness, diversity, sub-adult abundance) were similar between reef types, and levels of species diversity and assemblage composition were generally comparable. However, abundance and species richness were consistently higher (1.9-7.6 and 1.3-2.6 times, respectively) on breakwaters. These assemblage differences could not be explained by differences in juvenile recruitment, with seasonal patterns of recruitment and juvenile species found to be similar between reef types. In contrast, abundances of sub-adults were consistently higher (1.1-12 times) at breakwaters, and assemblage differences appeared to be driven by this life-stage. Our results indicate that breakwaters in temperate estuaries are capable of supporting abundant and diverse fish assemblages with similar recruitment process to natural reefs. However, breakwaters may not approximate all aspects of natural assemblage structure, with differences maintained by a single-life stage in some cases. PMID:24086634

  15. Seasonal Dynamics of Fish Assemblages on Breakwaters and Natural Rocky Reefs in a Temperate Estuary: Consistent Assemblage Differences Driven by Sub-Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Ashley M.; Booth, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Development of infrastructure around cities is rapidly increasing the amount of artificial substrate (termed artificial reef, ‘AR’) in coastal marine habitats. However, effects of ARs on marine communities remain unknown, because it is unclear whether ARs can maintain similar communities to natural reefs. We investigated whether well-established (> 30 years old) breakwaters could consistently approximate fish assemblages on interspersed rocky reefs in a temperate estuary over 6 consecutive seasons using regular visual surveys between June 2009 (winter) and November 2010 (spring). We examined whether assemblage differences between reef types were driven by differences in juvenile recruitment, or were related to differences in older life-stages. Assemblages on both reef types were dominated by juveniles (61% of individuals) and sub-adults (34% of individuals). Seasonal fluctuations in assemblage parameters (species richness, diversity, sub-adult abundance) were similar between reef types, and levels of species diversity and assemblage composition were generally comparable. However, abundance and species richness were consistently higher (1.9-7.6 and 1.3-2.6 times, respectively) on breakwaters. These assemblage differences could not be explained by differences in juvenile recruitment, with seasonal patterns of recruitment and juvenile species found to be similar between reef types. In contrast, abundances of sub-adults were consistently higher (1.1-12 times) at breakwaters, and assemblage differences appeared to be driven by this life-stage. Our results indicate that breakwaters in temperate estuaries are capable of supporting abundant and diverse fish assemblages with similar recruitment process to natural reefs. However, breakwaters may not approximate all aspects of natural assemblage structure, with differences maintained by a single-life stage in some cases. PMID:24086634

  16. Land use structures fish assemblages in reservoirs of the Tennessee River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Bies, J. M.; Hann, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Inputs of nutrients, sediments and detritus from catchments can promote selected components of reservoir fish assemblages, while hindering others. However, investigations linking these catchment subsidies to fish assemblages have generally focussed on one or a handful of species. Considering this paucity of community-level awareness, we sought to explore the association between land use and fish assemblage composition in reservoirs. To this end, we compared fish assemblages in reservoirs of two sub-basins of the Tennessee River representing differing intensities of agricultural development, and hypothesised that fish assemblage structure indicated by species percentage composition would differ among reservoirs in the two sub-basins. Using multivariate statistical analysis, we documented inter-basin differences in land use, reservoir productivity and fish assemblages, but no differences in reservoir morphometry or water regime. Basins were separated along a gradient of forested and non-forested catchment land cover, which was directly related to total nitrogen, total phosphorous and chlorophyll-a concentrations. Considering the extensive body of knowledge linking land use to aquatic systems, it is reasonable to postulate a hierarchical model in which productivity has direct links to terrestrial inputs, and fish assemblages have direct links to both land use and productivity. We observed a shift from an invertivore-based fish assemblage in forested catchments to a detritivore-based fish assemblage in agricultural catchments that may be a widespread pattern among reservoirs and other aquatic ecosystems.

  17. Fish assemblage structure in an Oklahoma Ozark stream before and after rainbow trout introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, M.G.; Winkelman, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have been widely stocked throughout the United States as a popular sport fish. Our study was initiated to evaluate potential effects of rainbow trout introduction on native fishes to inform future decisions about trout stocking in northeastern Oklahoma streams. We sampled fish assemblages in pools, glides, and riffles in Brush Creek, Delaware County, Oklahoma, from February 2000 to September 2002, and experimentally stocked rainbow trout into the stream from November 2000 to March 2001 and November 2001 to March 2002. We used a combination of multivariate analyses to evaluate seasonal and habitat effects on native fish assemblages and to compare assemblage structure between prestocking, the first year of stocking, and the second year of stocking. Mesohabitat type significantly affected assemblage structure among years, whereas we did not detect an effect of season. We did not detect differences in assemblage structure among years in glide or riffle habitats. Native fish assemblage structure in pool habitats before rainbow trout introduction differed from assemblage structure in both the first and second year of stocking. Declines in seven species, including two native game fish (smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and bluegill Lepomis machrochirus), contributed to assemblage dissimilarity in pool habitats between prestocking conditions and the second year of stocking. Our results indicate that stocking rainbow trout may cause local disruption in assemblage structure in pool habitats. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

  18. Effects of reef proximity on the structure of fish assemblages of unconsolidated substrata.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Arthur L; Malcolm, Hamish A; Bucher, Daniel J; Smith, Stephen D A

    2012-01-01

    Fish assemblages of unconsolidated sedimentary habitats on continental shelves are poorly described when compared to those of hard substrata. This lack of data restricts the objective management of these extensive benthic habitats. In the context of protecting representative areas of all community types, one important question is the nature of the transition from reefal to sedimentary fish assemblages. We addressed this question using Baited Remote Underwater Videos (BRUVs) to assess fish assemblages of sedimentary habitats at six distances from rocky reefs (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 m) at four sites in subtropical eastern Australia. Distance from reef was important in determining fish assemblage structure, and there was no overlap between reef sites and sedimentary sites 400 m from reef. While there was a gradient in assemblage structure at intermediate distances, this was not consistent across sites. All sites, however, supported a mixed 'halo' assemblage comprising both reef and sediment species at sampling stations close to reef. BRUVs used in conjunction with high-resolution bathymetric and backscatter spatial data can resolve differences in assemblage structure at small spatial scales (10s to 100s of metres), and has further application in unconsolidated habitats. Unless a 'reef halo' assemblage is being examined, a minimum of 200 m but preferably 400 m distance from any hard substrate is recommended when designing broader-scale assessments of fish assemblages of sedimentary habitats. PMID:23189145

  19. Autumn ichthyoplankton assemblage in the Yangtze Estuary shaped by environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shude

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the response of the ichthyoplankton community to environmental changes in the Yangtze Estuary using canonical correspondence analysis. Ichthyoplankton community and environmental data were recorded during the autumns of 1998, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2009. Among the ichthyoplankton, the dominant larval and juvenile families were the Engraulidae, Gobiidae and Salangidae, and the most common eggs were from Trichiurus lepturus. The ichthyoplankton was identified via canonical correspondence analysis to three assemblages: an estuary assemblage dominated by Chaeturichthys stigmatias, a coastal assemblage dominated by Engraulis japonicus and Stolephorus commersonii, and an offshore assemblage dominated by Trichiurus lepturus. Regarding environmental factors in the Yangtze Estuary, suspended matter and surface seawater salinity were the main factors influencing the distributions of the different assemblages, while sediment from the Yangtze River during the rainy season and chlorophyll a were the principle drivers of the annual variances in the distribution of ichthyoplankton assemblages. Our aims in this study were to provide detailed characterizations of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in the autumns of seven years, examine the long-term dynamics of autumn ichthyoplankton assemblages, and evaluate the influence of environmental factors on the spatial distribution and inter-annual variations of ichthyoplankton assemblages associated with the Yangtze Estuary. PMID:27114877

  20. Biological structure and dynamics of littoral fish assemblages in the eastern Finger Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Fish assemblages from three of the New York Finger Lakes were examined for structure within and between lakes and over time. Species-area relationships indicated that local fish assemblages are the result of recent, lake-specific events that altered the regional species pool. Fish assemblages varied among seasons and those occupying eutrophic waters had different characteristics from those in oligotrophic waters. Bluntnose minnows (Pimephales notatus) were a persistent and important component of most assemblages, but abundance of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) was the most distinguishing feature. Species associations indicated that interactions among the fishes had little influence on assemblage structure. Correlations between community structure and abiotic factors were identified. Ten abiotic variables were strongly associated with the species assemblages, but could not fully explain differences between assemblages. Results indicate that the abundance and diversity of water column feeders was related to productivity of lake habitat. In general, fish populations were smaller in oligotrophic waters and water column feeders were poorly represented in those assemblages. Productivity at various trophic levels was implicated as a major factor determining lake fish assemblage structure.

  1. Effects of hydrologic connectivity on aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages in different marsh types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kang, Sung-Ryong; King, Sammy L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrologic connectivity can be an important driver of aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Its effects on aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages in coastal marshes, however, are relatively poorly studied. We evaluated the effects of lateral hydrologic connectivity (permanently connected ponds: PCPs; temporary connected ponds: TCPs), and other environmental variables on aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages and functional feeding groups (FFGs) in freshwater, brackish, and saline marshes in Louisiana, USA. We hypothesized that (1) aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages in PCPs would have higher assemblage metric values (density, biomass, Shannon-Wiener diversity) than TCPs and (2) the density and proportional abundance of certain FFGs (i.e. scrapers, shredders, and collectors) would be greater in freshwater marsh than brackish and saline marshes. The data in our study only partially supported our first hypothesis: while freshwater marsh PCPs had higher density and biomass than TCPs, assemblage metric values in saline TCPs were greater than saline PCPs. In freshwater TCPs, long duration of isolation limited access of macroinvertebrates from adjacent water bodies, which may have reduced assemblage metric values. However, the relatively short duration of isolation in saline TCPs provided more stable or similar habitat conditions, facilitating higher assemblage metric values. As predicted by our second hypothesis, freshwater PCPs and TCPs supported a greater density of scrapers, shredders, and collectors than brackish and saline ponds. Aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages seem to be structured by individual taxa responses to salinity as well as pond habitat attributes.

  2. Patterns in species richness and assemblage structure of native mussels in the Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zigler, Steven J.; Newton, Teresa J.; Davis, Mike; Rogala, James T.

    2012-01-01

    1. To evaluate patterns in mussel assemblages in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR), data from systematic surveys of mussels conducted in three large reaches (Navigation Pools 5, 6, and 18) from 2005–2007 were analysed. 2. Nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling analyses and permutation tests indicated that assemblages differed among reaches. The mussel assemblage in Pool 18 was substantially different from the assemblage in Pool 5 and moderately different from the assemblage in Pool 6, whereas assemblages in Pools 5 and 6 were similar. Assemblages in broadly defined, flowing aquatic habitats did not substantially differ. 3. The dissimilarity of Pool 18 was primarily the result of Pool 18 having higher abundances of three Quadrula species (Q. quadrula, Q. pustulosa, and Q. nodulata), and lower abundances of Amblema plicata and Fusconaia flava. 4. Rarefaction analyses showed that species richness and species density were higher in Pool 18 compared with the other two pools. 5. Large-scale patterns in mussel assemblages may be related to other longitudinal trends in the system including geomorphology, water quality, and abundances of fish species that serve as hosts for glochidial larvae. 6. The results suggest that management goals and actions in the UMR may need to account for important differences in mussel assemblages that occur among reaches.

  3. Macroalgal assemblages of disturbed coastal detritic bottoms subject to invasive species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Judith C.; Verlaque, Marc

    2009-04-01

    Characteristic flora and fauna that are highly sensitive to disturbances colonize coastal detritic bottoms in the Mediterranean Sea. In the present study, a comparison of the assemblage composition and colonization by invasive macroalgae was made between two coastal detritic macrophyte assemblages, one dominated by rhodoliths (free-living non-geniculate Corallinales) and the other dominated by fleshy algae, in an area that has been exposed to important levels of anthropogenic disturbance, mainly pollution (including changed sedimentation regimes) in the recent past (bay of Marseilles, France). In comparison with less strongly impacted Mediterranean regions, the macrophyte assemblages in the bay of Marseilles were characteristic in terms of species identity and richness of coastal detritic macrophyte assemblages. However, extremely low species abundance (cover) was observed. As far as invasive species were concerned, Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea was only abundant in the rhodolith assemblage whereas the two invasive Rhodophyta Asparagopsis armata and Womersleyella setacea were mainly found in the fleshy algae assemblage. The seasonality observed in the Rhodolith assemblage seemed to be related to the development of C. racemosa var. cylindracea and did not follow the typical pattern of other Mediterranean assemblages. This study represents the first study of coastal detritic assemblages invaded by C. racemosa var. cylindracea.

  4. Effects of Reef Proximity on the Structure of Fish Assemblages of Unconsolidated Substrata

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Arthur L.; Malcolm, Hamish A.; Bucher, Daniel J.; Smith, Stephen D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Fish assemblages of unconsolidated sedimentary habitats on continental shelves are poorly described when compared to those of hard substrata. This lack of data restricts the objective management of these extensive benthic habitats. In the context of protecting representative areas of all community types, one important question is the nature of the transition from reefal to sedimentary fish assemblages. We addressed this question using Baited Remote Underwater Videos (BRUVs) to assess fish assemblages of sedimentary habitats at six distances from rocky reefs (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 m) at four sites in subtropical eastern Australia. Distance from reef was important in determining fish assemblage structure, and there was no overlap between reef sites and sedimentary sites 400 m from reef. While there was a gradient in assemblage structure at intermediate distances, this was not consistent across sites. All sites, however, supported a mixed ‘halo’ assemblage comprising both reef and sediment species at sampling stations close to reef. BRUVs used in conjunction with high-resolution bathymetric and backscatter spatial data can resolve differences in assemblage structure at small spatial scales (10s to 100s of metres), and has further application in unconsolidated habitats. Unless a ‘reef halo’ assemblage is being examined, a minimum of 200 m but preferably 400 m distance from any hard substrate is recommended when designing broader-scale assessments of fish assemblages of sedimentary habitats. PMID:23189145

  5. Middle Ordovician organic matter assemblages and their effect on Ordovician-derived oils

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, S.R.; Hatch, J.R.; Teerman, S.C.; Askin, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Two distinct Middle Ordovician oil-prone organic-matter assemblages occur in thermally immature to marginally mature petroleum source rocks from Iowa. The substantially more oil-prone Assemblage A generates the unique Ordovician Oil fingerprint, which has been associated with the organic-walled microfossil Gloeocapsamorpha prisca. The second, Assemblage B, generates a more ordinary signature. The two assemblages, which are mixed or interbedded in many Ordovician sediments of North America, explain the variations in oils derived from Ordovician source rocks. These mixtures also aid in interpretation of the chemistry of G. prisca. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Current concepts and techniques for caries excavation and adhesion to residual dentin.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Neves, Aline; Coutinho, Eduardo; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Lambrechts, Paul; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2011-02-01

    The advent of "Adhesive Dentistry" has simplified the guidelines for cavity preparation enormously. The design and extent of the current preparations are basically defined by the extent and shape of the caries lesion, potentially slightly extended by bevelling the cavity margins in order to meet the modern concept of minimally invasive dentistry. New caries excavation techniques have been introduced, such as the use of plastic and ceramic burs, improved caries-disclosing dyes, enzymatic caries-dissolving agents, caries-selective sono/air abrasion and laser ablation. They all aim to remove or help remove caries-infected tissue as selectively as possible, while being minimally invasive through maximum preservation of caries-affected tissue. Each technique entails a specific caries-removal endpoint and produces residual dentin substrates of different natures and thus different receptiveness for adhesive procedures. This paper reviews the newest developments in caries excavation techniques and their effect on the remaining dentin tissue with regard to its bonding receptiveness.

  7. Measurement of carbon storage in landfills from the biogenic carbon content of excavated waste samples.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Barlaz, Morton A

    2013-10-01

    Landfills are an anaerobic ecosystem and represent the major disposal alternative for municipal solid waste (MSW) in the U.S. While some fraction of the biogenic carbon, primarily cellulose (Cel) and hemicellulose (H), is converted to carbon dioxide and methane, lignin (L) is essentially recalcitrant. The biogenic carbon that is not mineralized is stored within the landfill. This carbon storage represents a significant component of a landfill carbon balance. The fraction of biogenic carbon that is not reactive in the landfill environment and therefore stored was derived for samples of excavated waste by measurement of the total organic carbon, its biogenic fraction, and the remaining methane potential. The average biogenic carbon content of the excavated samples was 64.6±18.0% (average±standard deviation), while the average carbon storage factor was 0.09±0.06g biogenic-C stored per g dry sample or 0.66±0.16g biogenic-C stored per g biogenic C.

  8. The effects of a dredge excavation pit on benthic macrofauna in offshore Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Terence A; Montagna, Paul A; Nairn, Robert B

    2008-04-01

    Over two years after the original creation of a sand excavation pit 8 km off the Louisiana coast, benthic macrofauna communities and sedimentary characteristics are still effected. Macrofaunal communities inside the pit had lower abundance, biomass, and diversity than communities outside the pit. This difference, however, was only significant with some of the stations outside the pit. Results from multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis showed that macrofaunal communities were less than 32% similar inside the pit to communities outside the pit. The polychaete Mediomastus ambiseta was the most abundant species outside the excavation pit, but the species was only counted once inside the pit. The most dominant species, which made up over 90% of organisms inside the pit, was the pioneer polychaete Paraprionospio pinnata. Only three species were found at each station inside the pit as opposed to 9-27 species at stations outside the pit. All species inside the pit were also found outside the pit; thus, change was due to a loss of species rather than replacement by different species. Sediment inside the pit contained more silt and clay; however, no difference in water quality was detected compared with outside the pit. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed near the dredge pit in 2005 and could have effected sediment transport in the region. Because the macrofaunal community inside the pit has not recovered within 38 months, it is likely that it will require more time before it resembles the surrounding conditions.

  9. Mechanical Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Sharad M.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Robinson, Bruce Alan

    2015-01-09

    This report is being prepared under the FY14 activity FT-14LA0818069, Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-Field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations, and fulfills the Los Alamos National Laboratory deliverable M4FT-14LA08180610, which in PICS:NE is titled “Draft report, Test Plan for Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations.” Since the report is an intermediate deliverable intended as input to the eventual test plan for this test, rather than being an actual test plan, the activity title is used as the title of this document to avoid confusion as to the contents in the report. This report summarizes efforts to simulate mechanical processes occurring within a hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt. The report summarizes work completed since the last project deliverable, “Coupled model for heat and water transport in a high level waste repository in salt “, a Level 2 milestone submitted to DOE in September 2013 (Stauffer et al., 2013).

  10. Comparative clinical evaluation of the efficacy of a new method for caries diagnosis and excavation

    PubMed Central

    Peskersoy, Cem; Turkun, Murat; Onal, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency of fluorescence-aided caries excavation (FACE) to remove carious dentin primary teeth with that of conventional methods. Methods and Materials: After caries excavation was carried out, dentin surfaces were conventionally inspected using visual tactile criteria and 415 cavities which were classified as caries-free, re-inspected with Face-Light and caries detector dye (CDD) methods. Orange-red fluorescing areas classified as carious dentin, as well as stained carious dentin. All the data were recorded according to localization of the caries and determination efficiency of the methods. X2 test was used to compare the mean values of both Face-Light and dye applications, while Wilcoxon test performed to evaluate the effectiveness for each diagnostic method. Results: A total of 273 patients with 415 Class II (OM/OD) cavities (1.65 ± 0.52 teeth per patient) with carious lesions in molar and premolar teeth, were examined. Out of 415 teeth, in 149 teeth (35.9%) no caries findings had been illustrated. While FACE detected remaining carious or partially removed areas in 237 teeth (57.2%), CDD stained only 29 teeth by itself (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, FACE has a higher detectability compared to visual inspection and caries detector dye in diagnosis and removal of carious dentin. PMID:26430298

  11. Effect of tunnel excavation on source and mixing of groundwater in a coastal granitoidic fracture network.

    PubMed

    Mathurin, Frédéric A; Åström, Mats E; Laaksoharju, Marcus; Kalinowski, Birgitta E; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how the excavation of the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory tunnel has impacted on sources and mixing of groundwater in fractured crystalline (granitoidic) bedrock. The tunnel is 3600 m long and extends to a depth of 460 m at a coastal site in Boreal Europe. The study builds on a unique data set consisting of 1117 observations on chloride and δ(18)O of groundwater collected from a total of 356 packed-off fractures between 1987 and 2011. On the basis of the values of these two variables in selected source waters, a classification system was developed to relate the groundwater observations to source and postinfiltration mixing phenomena. The results show that the groundwater has multiple sources and a complex history of transport and mixing, and is composed of at least glacial water, marine water, recent meteoric water, and an old saline water. The tunnel excavation has had a large impact on flow, sources, and mixing of the groundwater. Important phenomena include upflow of deep-lying saline water, extensive intrusion of current Baltic Sea water, and substantial temporal variability of chloride and δ(18)O in many fractures.

  12. Mammoth (Mammuthus sp.) excavation on a college campus in Western Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Treworgy, J.D.; Saunders, J.J.; Grimley, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of the remains of a mammoth, Mammuthus sp., on the Principia College campus in Elsah, Illinois, has allowed for careful excavation by students over several years. The mammoth is relatively well preserved in late Wisconsin Peoria Silt on the top of the bluffs of the Mississippi River. The mammoth was buried by loess, perhaps as a result of persistent dust storms, approximately 17 500 14C years ago. This age estimate is based on the mammoth's stratigraphic position within the Peoria Silt and is loosely supported by an AMS radiocarbon age on poorly preserved collagen from tooth dentine (???17 810??4300 14C years [CAMS #104172]). Over one hundred bones or bone pieces have been excavated to-date. The skull, containing the tusks and maxillary teeth, is complete and in close proximity to associated postcranial remains, indicating that the mammoth died where it was found. The size and characteristics of skeletal elements have allowed us to determine that this was a mature male of about 41 years of age. Taxonomic attribution-either to Mammuthus primigenius or Mammuthus jeffersonii-is pending, based on the outcome of thorough analysis once the skull with dentition has been prepared from enclosing matrix. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  13. The Effects of a Dredge Excavation Pit on Benthic Macrofauna in Offshore Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Terence A.; Montagna, Paul A.; Nairn, Robert B.

    2008-04-01

    Over two years after the original creation of a sand excavation pit 8 km off the Louisiana coast, benthic macrofauna communities and sedimentary characteristics are still effected. Macrofaunal communities inside the pit had lower abundance, biomass, and diversity than communities outside the pit. This difference, however, was only significant with some of the stations outside the pit. Results from multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis showed that macrofaunal communities were less than 32% similar inside the pit to communities outside the pit. The polychaete Mediomastus ambiseta was the most abundant species outside the excavation pit, but the species was only counted once inside the pit. The most dominant species, which made up over 90% of organisms inside the pit, was the pioneer polychaete Paraprionospio pinnata. Only three species were found at each station inside the pit as opposed to 9-27 species at stations outside the pit. All species inside the pit were also found outside the pit; thus, change was due to a loss of species rather than replacement by different species. Sediment inside the pit contained more silt and clay; however, no difference in water quality was detected compared with outside the pit. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed near the dredge pit in 2005 and could have effected sediment transport in the region. Because the macrofaunal community inside the pit has not recovered within 38 months, it is likely that it will require more time before it resembles the surrounding conditions.

  14. Excavation on the Moon: Regolith Collection for Oxygen Production and Outpost Site Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, John J.; Spina, Dan C.; Greer, Lawrence C.; John, Wentworth T.; Michele, Clem; Krasowski, Mike J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a robust regolith moving system for lunar and planetary processing and construction is critical to the NASA mission to the Moon and Mars. Oxygen production may require up to 200 metric tons of regolith collection per year; outpost site development may require several times this amount. This paper describes progress in the small vehicle implement development and small excavation system development. Cratos was developed as a platform for the ISRU project to evaluate the performance characteristics of a low center of gravity, small (0.75m x 0.75m x 0.3m), low-power, tracked vehicle performing excavation, load, haul, and dump operations required for lunar ISRU. It was tested on loose sand in a facility capable of producing level and inclined surfaces, and demonstrated the capability to pick up, carry, and dump sand, allowing it to accomplish the delivery of material to a site. Cratos has demonstrated the capability to pick up and deliver simulant to a bury an inflatable habitat, to supply an oxygen production plant, and to build a ramp.

  15. The Tissint Martian meteorite as evidence for the largest impact excavation.

    PubMed

    Baziotis, Ioannis P; Liu, Yang; DeCarli, Paul S; Melosh, H Jay; McSween, Harry Y; Bodnar, Robert J; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure minerals in meteorites provide clues for the impact processes that excavated, launched and delivered these samples to Earth. Most Martian meteorites are suggested to have been excavated from 3 to 7 km diameter impact craters. Here we show that the Tissint meteorite, a 2011 meteorite fall, contains virtually all the high-pressure phases (seven minerals and two mineral glasses) that have been reported in isolated occurrences in other Martian meteorites. Particularly, one ringwoodite (75 × 140 μm(2)) represents the largest grain observed in all Martian samples. Collectively, the ubiquitous high-pressure minerals of unusually large sizes in Tissint indicate that shock metamorphism was widely dispersed in this sample (~25 GPa and ~2,000 °C). Using the size and growth kinetics of the ringwoodite grains, we infer an initial impact crater with ~90 km diameter, with a factor of 2 uncertainty. These energetic conditions imply alteration of any possible low-T minerals in Tissint.

  16. Results of Hazardous and Mixed Waste Excavation from the Chemical Waste Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S. G.; Schofield, D. P.; Kwiecinski, D.; Edgmon, C. L.; Methvin, R.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the results of the excavation of a 1.9-acre hazardous and mixed waste landfill operated for 23 years at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Excavation of the landfill was completed in 2 1/2 years without a single serious accident or injury. Approximately 50,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organics, metals, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and radioactive constituents was removed. In addition, over 400 cubic yards of buried debris was removed, including bulk debris, unknown chemicals, compressed gas cylinders, thermal and chemical batteries, explosive and ordnance debris, pyrophoric materials and biohazardous waste. Removal of these wastes included negotiation of multiple regulations and guidances encompassed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and risk assessment methodology. RCRA concepts that were addressed include the area of contamination, permit modification, emergency treatment provision, and listed waste designation. These regulatory decisions enabled the project to overcome logistical and programmatic needs such as increased operational area, the ability to implement process improvements while maintaining a record of decisions and approvals.

  17. A Basic Robotic Excavator (the Glenn Digger): Description, Design, and Initial Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steve; Newman, Paul; Izadnegahdar, Alain; Johnson, Kyle; Abel, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, commercial part selections, fabrication, assembly, installation, and initial operation of a two degree of freedom robotic excavator. Colloquially referred to as "the NASA Glenn Digger," it was designed specifically to be mounted onto, and to operate with, the then newly developed Centaur 2 robotic mobility base. The excavator, when mounted to Centaur 2, is designed to scoop loose regolith from the terrain, raise its loaded bucket up and dump the load into a hopper of at least a 1-m-height. The hopper represents the input to a machine that would process the raw material, such as to produce oxygen from lunar regolith as would be required for long-term lunar habitation. This equipment debuted at the annual Research and Technology Studies ("Desert RATS", Ref. 1) event held north of Flagstaff, Arizona, in September of 2010, when the Digger was successfully joined to Centaur 2 and the shoveling articulation was demonstrated. During 2011, the hardware was modified for added strength, strain gauges were added to measure loads, and the controls were improved in preparation for the 2011 Desert RATS event, where additional "field operations" experience was gained.

  18. The Tissint Martian meteorite as evidence for the largest impact excavation.

    PubMed

    Baziotis, Ioannis P; Liu, Yang; DeCarli, Paul S; Melosh, H Jay; McSween, Harry Y; Bodnar, Robert J; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure minerals in meteorites provide clues for the impact processes that excavated, launched and delivered these samples to Earth. Most Martian meteorites are suggested to have been excavated from 3 to 7 km diameter impact craters. Here we show that the Tissint meteorite, a 2011 meteorite fall, contains virtually all the high-pressure phases (seven minerals and two mineral glasses) that have been reported in isolated occurrences in other Martian meteorites. Particularly, one ringwoodite (75 × 140 μm(2)) represents the largest grain observed in all Martian samples. Collectively, the ubiquitous high-pressure minerals of unusually large sizes in Tissint indicate that shock metamorphism was widely dispersed in this sample (~25 GPa and ~2,000 °C). Using the size and growth kinetics of the ringwoodite grains, we infer an initial impact crater with ~90 km diameter, with a factor of 2 uncertainty. These energetic conditions imply alteration of any possible low-T minerals in Tissint. PMID:23360995

  19. Reactive-power compensation of coal mining excavators by using a new-generation STATCOM

    SciTech Connect

    Bilgin, H.F.; Ermis, M.; Kose, K.N.; Cadirci, I.; Acik, A.; Demirci, T.; Terciyanli, A.; Kocak, C.; Yorukoglu, M.

    2007-01-15

    This paper deals with the development and implementation of a current-source-converter-based static synchronous compensator (CSC-STATCOM) applied to the volt-ampere-reactive (VAR) compensation problem of coal mining excavators. It is composed of a +/- 750-kVAR full-bridge CSC with selective harmonic elimination, a low-pass input filter tuned to 200 Hz, and a Delta/Y-connected coupling transformer for connection to medium-voltage load bus. Each power semiconductor switch is composed of an asymmetrical integrated gate commutated thyristor (IGCT) connected in series with a reverse-blocking diode and switched at 500 Hz to eliminate 5th, 7th, 11th, and 13th current harmonics produced by the CSC. Operating principles, power stage, design of dc link, and input filter are also described in this paper. It has been verified by field tests that the developed STATCOM follows rapid fluctuations in nearly symmetrical lagging and leading VAR consumption of electric excavators, resulting in nearly unity power factor on monthly basis, and the harmonic current spectra in the lines of CSC-STATCOM at the point of common coupling comply with the IEEE Standard 519-1992.

  20. Brittle Rock Modeling Approach and its Validation Using Excavation-Induced Micro-Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Chi; Li, Tian-Bin; Xing, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Hang; Wang, Min-Jie; Liu, Tian-Yi; Chen, Guo-Qing; Chen, Zi-Quan

    2016-08-01

    With improvements to the bonded-particle model, a custom indicator of crack intensity is introduced to grade rock fractures accurately. Brittle fracturing of rock mass is studied using the bonded-particle model; here, "brittle" refers to the process where more energy is released towards making particles collide and disperse, and hence results in the quick emergence of "chain cracks". Certain principles concerning how to construct brittle rock are then proposed. Furthermore, a modeling approach for brittle rocks based on the adaptive continuum/discontinuum (AC/DC) method is proposed to aid the construction of large-scale models of tunnel excavations. To connect with actual tunneling conditions, fundamental mechanical properties, the mechanism for brittle fracturing, the joint distribution, and the initial stress field are considered in the modeling approach. Results from micro-seismic monitoring of a tunnel excavation confirmed the suitability of this modeling approach to simulate crack behavior, and results show that simulated cracking exhibit similar trends (evolution, location, and intensity) with micro-seismic cracking.

  1. Rhizosphere microbiome assemblage is affected by plant development

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro, Jacqueline M; Badri, Dayakar V; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2014-01-01

    There is a concerted understanding of the ability of root exudates to influence the structure of rhizosphere microbial communities. However, our knowledge of the connection between plant development, root exudation and microbiome assemblage is limited. Here, we analyzed the structure of the rhizospheric bacterial community associated with Arabidopsis at four time points corresponding to distinct stages of plant development: seedling, vegetative, bolting and flowering. Overall, there were no significant differences in bacterial community structure, but we observed that the microbial community at the seedling stage was distinct from the other developmental time points. At a closer level, phylum such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria and specific genera within those phyla followed distinct patterns associated with plant development and root exudation. These results suggested that the plant can select a subset of microbes at different stages of development, presumably for specific functions. Accordingly, metatranscriptomics analysis of the rhizosphere microbiome revealed that 81 unique transcripts were significantly (P<0.05) expressed at different stages of plant development. For instance, genes involved in streptomycin synthesis were significantly induced at bolting and flowering stages, presumably for disease suppression. We surmise that plants secrete blends of compounds and specific phytochemicals in the root exudates that are differentially produced at distinct stages of development to help orchestrate rhizosphere microbiome assemblage. PMID:24196324

  2. Pollen assemblages as paleoenvironmental proxies in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Weimer, L.M.; Riegel, W.L.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of 170 pollen assemblages from surface samples in eight vegetation types in the Florida Everglades indicates that these wetland sub-environments are distinguishable from the pollen record and that they are useful proxies for hydrologic and edaphic parameters. Vegetation types sampled include sawgrass marshes, cattail marshes, sloughs with floating aquatics, wet prairies, brackish marshes, tree islands, cypress swamps, and mangrove forests. The distribution of these vegetation types is controlled by specific environmental parameters, such as hydrologic regime, nutrient availability, disturbance level, substrate type, and salinity; ecotones between vegetation types may be sharp. Using R-mode cluster analysis of pollen data, we identified diagnostic species groupings; Q-mode cluster analysis was used to differentiate pollen signatures of each vegetation type. Cluster analysis and the modern analog technique were applied to interpret vegetational and environmental trends over the last two millennia at a site in Water Conservation Area 3A. The results show that close modern analogs exist for assemblages in the core and indicate past hydrologic changes at the site, correlated with both climatic and land-use changes. The ability to differentiate marshes with different hydrologic and edaphic requirements using the pollen record facilitates assessment of relative impacts of climatic and anthropogenic changes on this wetland ecosystem on smaller spatial and temporal scales than previously were possible. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Coastal Upwelling Drives Intertidal Assemblage Structure and Trophic Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Reddin, Carl J.; Docmac, Felipe; O’Connor, Nessa E.; Bothwell, John H.; Harrod, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Similar environmental driving forces can produce similarity among geographically distant ecosystems. Coastal oceanic upwelling, for example, has been associated with elevated biomass and abundance patterns of certain functional groups, e.g., corticated macroalgae. In the upwelling system of Northern Chile, we examined measures of intertidal macrobenthic composition, structure and trophic ecology across eighteen shores varying in their proximity to two coastal upwelling centres, in a hierarchical sampling design (spatial scales of >1 and >10 km). The influence of coastal upwelling on intertidal communities was confirmed by the stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) of consumers, including a dominant suspension feeder, grazers, and their putative resources of POM, epilithic biofilm, and macroalgae. We highlight the utility of muscle δ15N from the suspension feeding mussel, Perumytilus purpuratus, as a proxy for upwelling, supported by satellite data and previous studies. Where possible, we used corrections for broader-scale trends, spatial autocorrelation, ontogenetic dietary shifts and spatial baseline isotopic variation prior to analysis. Our results showed macroalgal assemblage composition, and benthic consumer assemblage structure, varied significantly with the intertidal influence of coastal upwelling, especially contrasting bays and coastal headlands. Coastal topography also separated differences in consumer resource use. This suggested that coastal upwelling, itself driven by coastline topography, influences intertidal communities by advecting nearshore phytoplankton populations offshore and cooling coastal water temperatures. We recommend the isotopic values of benthic organisms, specifically long-lived suspension feeders, as in situ alternatives to offshore measurements of upwelling influence. PMID:26214806

  4. An assemblage of lava flow features on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Paul K.; Klimczak, Christian; Williams, David A.; Hurwitz, Debra M.; Solomon, Sean C.; Head, James W.; Preusker, Frank; Oberst, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    contrast to other terrestrial planets, Mercury does not possess a great variety of volcanic features, its history of volcanism instead largely manifest by expansive smooth plains. However, a set of landforms at high northern latitudes on Mercury resembles surface flow features documented on Earth, the Moon, Mars, and Venus. The most striking of such landforms are broad channels that host streamlined islands and that cut through the surrounding intercrater plains. Together with narrower, more sinuous channels, coalesced depressions, evidence for local flooding of intercrater plains by lavas, and a first-order analysis of lava flow rates, the broad channels define an assemblage of flow features formed by the overland flow of, and erosion by, voluminous, high-temperature, low-viscosity lavas. This interpretation is consistent with compositional data suggesting that substantial portions of Mercury's crust are composed of magnesian, iron-poor lithologies. Moreover, the proximity of this partially flooded assemblage to extensive volcanic plains raises the possibility that the formation of these flow features may preface total inundation of an area by lavas emplaced in a flood mode and that they escaped complete burial only due to a waning magmatic supply. Finally, that these broad channels on Mercury are volcanic in nature yet resemble outflow channels on Mars, which are commonly attributed to catastrophic water floods, implies that aqueous activity is not a prerequisite for the formation of such distinctive landforms on any planetary body.

  5. Spatial scaling of functional structure in bird and mammal assemblages.

    PubMed

    Belmaker, Jonathan; Jetz, Walter

    2013-04-01

    Differences in trait composition, or functional structure, of assemblages across spatial scales may stem from the ability to tolerate local conditions (environmental filters) and from assembly rules (biological filters). However, disentangling their respective roles has proven difficult, and limited generalities have emerged from research on the spatial scaling of functional structure. Here we quantify differences in trait composition among 679 spatially nested (i.e., paired regional pool and local community) bird and mammal assemblages worldwide. Among the regional pool, we identify species with trait combinations within the range observed locally as the ecological species pool. The ecological species pool has a trait structure that is generally different from that of the regional pool, consistent with the operation of environmental filters. In contrast, local species trait structure generally shows little difference from that of the ecological pool. We find notable deviations from expectations based on equiprobable draws from the ecological pool. However, these deviations vary little across scales and broad environmental gradients. For mammals, but not birds, this is consistent with assembly rules. Thus, by conceptualizing ecological pools, we demonstrate that functional structure is jointly determined by processes causing both low and high functional differences between scales and are able to quantify their relative importance.

  6. Influence of landscape structure on reef fish assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grober-Dunsmore, R.; Frazer, T.K.; Beets, J.P.; Lindberg, W.J.; Zwick, P.; Funicelli, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Management of tropical marine environments calls for interdisciplinary studies and innovative methodologies that consider processes occurring over broad spatial scales. We investigated relationships between landscape structure and reef fish assemblage structure in the US Virgin Islands. Measures of landscape structure were transformed into a reduced set of composite indices using principal component analyses (PCA) to synthesize data on the spatial patterning of the landscape structure of the study reefs. However, composite indices (e.g., habitat diversity) were not particularly informative for predicting reef fish assemblage structure. Rather, relationships were interpreted more easily when functional groups of fishes were related to individual habitat features. In particular, multiple reef fish parameters were strongly associated with reef context. Fishes responded to benthic habitat structure at multiple spatial scales, with various groups of fishes each correlated to a unique suite of variables. Accordingly, future experiments should be designed to test functional relationships based on the ecology of the organisms of interest. Our study demonstrates that landscape-scale habitat features influence reef fish communities, illustrating promise in applying a landscape ecology approach to better understand factors that structure coral reef ecosystems. Furthermore, our findings may prove useful in design of spatially-based conservation approaches such as marine protected areas (MPAs), because landscape-scale metrics may serve as proxies for areas with high species diversity and abundance within the coral reef landscape. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Effects of acidification on algal assemblages in temporary ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Glackin, M.E.; Pratt, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Atmospheric deposition monitoring in Pennsylvania has characterized a steep gradient of acidic ion depositions across the north-central portion of the state. This study evaluated acidification effects on the composition of algal assemblages in temporary ponds in two forested areas exposed to atmospheric deposition that varied in degree of acidity. Artificial substrates were used to sample and compare the algal assemblages in the two areas. Colonized communities were also transplanted to lower pH ponds to observe changes in species composition. A laboratory microcosm experiment manipulating pH was conducted to reduce the variables that differed between the two areas. Fewer algal taxa were present in lower pH ponds, on colonized substrates after transplant to lower pH ponds, and in lower pH laboratory treatments. Species composition was altered in the lower pH conditions. Most taxa that were excluded from the lower pH ponds naturally also did not survive when experimentally introduced to those conditions. These results suggest that acidification of temporary ponds can alter the structure of algal communities. There is interest in a possible link between acid deposition and reports of worldwide declines in amphibian populations. Algae are an important food source for larval amphibians, such as the wood frog, which require temporary ponds to breed. Changes in algal species composition could potentially impact the temporary pond and forest ecosystem.

  8. Phytoplankton assemblage of a small, shallow, tropical African reservoir.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Moshood K

    2009-12-01

    I measured physico-chemical properties and phytoplankton in the small, shallow tropical reservoir of Oyun (Offa, Nigeria) between January 2002 and December 2003. I identified 25 phytoplankton genera in three sampling stations. Bacillariophyceae dominated (75.3%), followed by Chlorophyceae (12.2%), Cyanobacteria (11.1%) and Desmidiaceae (0.73%). The high amount of nutrients (e.g. nitrate, phosphate, sulphate and silica) explain phytoplankton heterogeneity (p<0.05). Phytoplankton was abundant during the rainy season, but the transition period had the richest assemblage and abundance. Fluctuations in phytoplankton density were a result of seasonal changes in concentration of nutrients, grazing pressure and reservoir hydrology. The reservoir is eutrophic with excellent water quality and a diverse phytoplankton assemblage: fish production would be high. These conditions resulted from strategies such as watershed best management practices (BMPs) to control eutrophication and sedimentation, and priorities for water usage established through legislation. Additional measures are recommended to prevent oligotrophy, hypereutrophy, excessive phytoplankton bloom, toxic cyanobacteria, and run-off of organic waste and salts. PMID:20073331

  9. Sampling effort affects multivariate comparisons of stream assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, Y.; Larsen, D.P.; Hughes, R.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Patton, T.M.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate analyses are used widely for determining patterns of assemblage structure, inferring species-environment relationships and assessing human impacts on ecosystems. The estimation of ecological patterns often depends on sampling effort, so the degree to which sampling effort affects the outcome of multivariate analyses is a concern. We examined the effect of sampling effort on site and group separation, which was measured using a mean similarity method. Two similarity measures, the Jaccard Coefficient and Bray-Curtis Index were investigated with 1 benthic macroinvertebrate and 2 fish data sets. Site separation was significantly improved with increased sampling effort because the similarity between replicate samples of a site increased more rapidly than between sites. Similarly, the faster increase in similarity between sites of the same group than between sites of different groups caused clearer separation between groups. The strength of site and group separation completely stabilized only when the mean similarity between replicates reached 1. These results are applicable to commonly used multivariate techniques such as cluster analysis and ordination because these multivariate techniques start with a similarity matrix. Completely stable outcomes of multivariate analyses are not feasible. Instead, we suggest 2 criteria for estimating the stability of multivariate analyses of assemblage data: 1) mean within-site similarity across all sites compared, indicating sample representativeness, and 2) the SD of within-site similarity across sites, measuring sample comparability.

  10. The effects of seasonally variable dragonfly predation on butterfly assemblages.

    PubMed

    Tiitsaar, Anu; Kaasik, Ants; Teder, Tiit

    2013-01-01

    Where predation is seasonally variable, the potential impact of a predator on individual prey species will critically depend on phenological synchrony of the predator with the prey. Here we explored the effects of seasonally variable predation in multispecies assemblages of short-lived prey. The study was conducted in a landscape in which we had previously demonstrated generally high, but spatially and seasonally variable dragonfly-induced mortality in adult butterflies. In this system, we show that patterns of patch occupancy in butterfly species flying during periods of peak dragonfly abundance are more strongly associated with spatial variation in dragonfly abundance than patch occupancy of species flying when dragonfly density was low. We provide evidence indicating that this differential sensitivity of different butterfly species to between-habitat differences in dragonfly abundance is causally tied to seasonal variation in the intensity of dragonfly predation. The effect of dragonfly predation could also be measured at the level of whole local butterfly assemblages. With dragonfly density increasing, butterfly species richness decreased, and butterfly species composition tended to show a shift toward a greater proportion of species flying during periods of off-peak dragonfly abundance.

  11. "Controlling ourselves, by ourselves": risk assemblages on Malaysia's assembly lines.

    PubMed

    Root, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, the Malaysian government has identified factories as high risk for HIV and AIDS. Signaling epidemiological concerns over the rising rates of HIV among factory workers, a significant proportion of whom are women, the label also appeared to reconstitute stereotypes of factory women as dangerously sexual and of factories as immoral spaces. Drawing on ethnographic research in the export processing zones of Penang, Malaysia in the mid-1990s, I examine the meanings and experiences of HIV risk among factory women themselves. Data were analyzed using discourse and grounded theory methods, the former to identify women's multiple modes of rationalizing HIV risks, and the latter to theorize the sources and significance of women's HIV risk assemblages. The heuristic of assemblages as localized knowledge spaces helped to show that biomedical and socioreligious risk lexica operated not as fixed epistemological categories but as situational resources in women's risk scripts. Overall, women desired multiple risk knowledges to help them "control themselves by themselves," a project of reflexive self-shaping mediated by the diverse and discordant discourses of gender, ethnicity, and modernity in Malaysia that shaped how HIV risks were engendered and experienced.

  12. The 'Goldilocks' effect: preservation bias in vertebrate track assemblages.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, P L; Bates, K T; Margetts, L; Manning, P L

    2011-08-01

    Finite-element analysis was used to investigate the extent of bias in the ichnological fossil record attributable to body mass. Virtual tracks were simulated for four dinosaur taxa of different sizes (Struthiomimus, Tyrannosaurus, Brachiosaurus and Edmontosaurus), in a range of substrate conditions. Outlines of autopodia were generated based upon osteology and published soft-tissue reconstructions. Loads were applied vertically to the feet equivalent to the weight of the animal, and distributed accordingly to fore- and hindlimbs where relevant. Ideal, semi-infinite elastic-plastic substrates displayed a 'Goldilocks' quality where only a narrow range of loads could produce tracks, given that small animals failed to indent the substrate, and larger animals would be unable to traverse the area without becoming mired. If a firm subsurface layer is assumed, a more complete assemblage is possible, though there is a strong bias towards larger, heavier animals. The depths of fossil tracks within an assemblage may indicate thicknesses of mechanically distinct substrate layers at the time of track formation, even when the lithified strata appear compositionally homogeneous. This work increases the effectiveness of using vertebrate tracks as palaeoenvironmental indicators in terms of inferring substrate conditions at the time of track formation. Additionally, simulated undertracks are examined, and it is shown that complex deformation beneath the foot may not be indicative of limb kinematics as has been previously interpreted, but instead ridges and undulations at the base of a track may be a function of sediment displacement vectors and pedal morphology.

  13. Long-term dynamics of a fragmented rainforest mammal assemblage.

    PubMed

    Laurance, William F; Laurance, Susan G; Hilbert, David W

    2008-10-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a severe threat to tropical biotas, but its long-term effects are poorly understood. We evaluated longer-term changes in the abundance of larger (>1 kg) mammals in fragmented and intact rainforest and in riparian "corridors" in tropical Queensland, with data from 190 spotlighting surveys conducted in 1986-1987 and 2006-2007. In 1986-1987 when most fragments were already 20-50 years old, mammal assemblages differed markedly between fragmented and intact forest. Most vulnerable were lemuroid ringtail possums (Hemibelideus lemuroides), followed by Lumholtz's tree-kangaroos (Dendrolagus lumholtzi) and Herbert River ringtail possums (Pseudocheirus herbertensis). Further changes were evident 20 years later. Mammal species richness fell significantly in fragments, and the abundances of 4 species, coppery brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula johnstoni), green ringtail possums (Pseudochirops archeri), red-legged pademelons (Thylogale stigmatica), and tree-kangaroos, declined significantly. The most surprising finding was that the lemuroid ringtail, a strict rainforest specialist, apparently recolonized one fragment, despite a 99.98% decrease in abundance in fragments and corridors. A combination of factors, including long-term fragmentation effects, shifts in the surrounding matrix vegetation, and recurring cyclone disturbances, appear to underlie these dynamic changes in mammal assemblages.

  14. Rock encrusting assemblages: Structure and distribution along the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Monika; Grzelak, Katarzyna; Kukliński, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Aquatic community structure and dynamics are generally controlled by a variety of biological and physical factors. Among these factors in marine ecosystems, salinity is known to have a significant effect on species occurrence and composition. In this study, we investigated the large-scale distribution and abundance of encrusting fauna along a salinity gradient on the shallow Baltic Sea rocky coast. Rock samples collected from 14 locations distributed between the Gulf of Bothnia (salinity 0.6) and Skagerrak (salinity 28) supported a total number of 24 encrusting species. The faunas were composed mostly of marine species with opportunistic life histories; however, some brackish water specialists were also present. The number of species and abundance counts is strongly positively correlated with increases in salinity. No encrusting faunas were recorded below salinity level 4. Multivariate analysis (nMDS) revealed three major groups based on species composition that differed in terms of abundance and number of species. Each group was associated with specific salinity conditions. The first assemblage type occurred within salinity 4-7, the second within salinity between 22 and 27, and the third type was a mixture between the two observed at a salinity of approximately 17. This study indicates that to determine the assemblage structure of the Baltic Sea encrusting fauna, analyses at the family level were found to be a reliable surrogate for species composition.

  15. Niche partitioning and species coexistence in a Neotropical felid assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bitetti, Mario S.; De Angelo, Carlos D.; Di Blanco, Yamil E.; Paviolo, Agustín

    2010-07-01

    Carnivores have been used as a model to understand the effects of competition in community structure. Behavioral mechanisms that facilitate species coexistence have been poorly explored and may explain the lack of community-wide morphological character displacement in some carnivore assemblages. We use the results of large-scale and intensive camera-trap surveys conducted in the Atlantic Forest of NE Argentina between 2003 and 2008 to describe the spatial patterns of detection and the daily pattern of records of the six wild cat species present in the region (jaguar Panthera onca, puma Puma concolor, ocelot Leopardus pardalis, jaguarundi Puma yagouaroundi, margay Leopardus wiedii, and oncilla Leopardus tigrinus). We use these patterns to generate hypotheses about behavioral differences that may facilitate species coexistence. The larger species were more frequently recorded in the better-protected areas, probably as a result of anthropogenic effects (poaching of cats and their prey). Competitive release from ocelots and jaguarundis may explain why the oncilla and the margay showed the opposite pattern. Morphologically similar species had the most contrasting activity patterns: the margay was exclusively nocturnal and the jaguarundi diurnal. The other species were cathemeral, but alternated their peaks of activity in relation to the relative order of their body weights. The contrasting temporal patterns observed and the ability of pumas and oncillas to adjust their activity patterns to local conditions may facilitate the coexistence of these cat species and explain the lack of character displacement in this assemblage.

  16. Holocene Environmental Signals from Mollusk Assemblages in Burgundy (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis-Didier; Limondin, Nicole; Puissegur, Jean-Jacques

    1993-09-01

    The malacofaunas of Burgundy, France, reflect changes in climate and the activities of man during the Holocene. Statistical analyses based on the Shannon diversity index and correspondence analysis are used to describe the mollusk assemblages in a composite sequence based on three well-dated sites. The variation demonstrated by the mollusks suggests that a two-step warming took place between 10,000 and 9000 and 8000 and 6000 yr B.P. in relative agreement with the timing of the deglaciation in the tropical Atlantic Ocean proposed by Mix and Ruddiman (1985, Quaternary Science Reviews 4, 59-108). High humidity, partly associated with widespread inundations of the valleys between 10,000 and 8000 yr B.P., may be related to estimated variations in the rate of freshwater discharge to the Atlantic Ocean reported by Fairbanks (1989, Nature 342, 637-642). The increasing impact of human activities on the environment during the past 2000 yr is indicated by the low diversity of the mollusk assemblages, demonstrating the need for careful interpretation of the youngest Holocene sediments in this region.

  17. Avian assemblages in the lower Missouri river floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thogmartin, W.E.; Gallagher, M.; Young, N.; Rohweder, J.J.; Durbian, F.; Knutson, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Floodplain habitat provides important migration and breeding habitat for birds in the midwestern United States. However, few studies have examined how the avian assemblage changes with different stages of floodplain forest succession in the midwestern United States. In spring and summer from 2002 to 2004, we conducted 839 point counts in wet prairie/forbs fields, 547 point counts in early successional forests, and 434 point counts in mature forests to describe the migrating and breeding bird assemblage in the lower Missouri River floodplain. We recorded 131, 121, and 141 species in the three respective habitats, a number higher than most locations in the midwestern United States and comprising > 15% of all avian species in North America. Avian species diversity generally increased from west to east along the river, differed among land cover classes, but overlapped between seasons (migration and breeding) and years. Wet prairies were particularly important for conservation as there were 20 species of high conservation concern observed, including Dickcissels (Spiza americana). Important species for monitoring biotic integrity included the Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) and Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in wet prairie, Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii) in early successional forest, and Northern Parula (Parula americana) and Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) in mature forest. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  18. Silica Under- and Oversaturated Mineral Assemblages in Chondrule Mesostases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J. C.; Hutchison, R.

    1995-09-01

    In chondrules of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOC's), mesostases sometimes have compositions that are not in equilibrium with the co-existing minerals. Examples include highly silica-oversaturated mesostases in porphyritic olivine chondrules and feldspathoid-bearing mesostases in radiating pyroxene (enstatite) chondrules [1]. As part of a larger study of chondrules and clasts in UOC's, we report the results of a survey of the mineral assemblages in mesostases. Silica enrichment can manifest itself in mesostasis glass, with SiO2 contents up to 73wt%, or as silica polymorphs. Neither of these assemblages are in equilibrium with the olivine phenocrysts which comprise the bulk of the chondrules. Chondrule CC35 (type IIA [2]) separated from Chainpur (LL3.4) is an example of the latter. Mesostasis comprising 10% of CC35 contains An(sub)69-83, Ca-px (En(sub)44-52, Fs(sub)17-18, Wo(sub)31-39) and a silica polymorph. Silica oversaturation in chondrules can readily be attributed to abundant metastable olivine crystallisation, which drives residua towards quartz-, diopside- and feldspar-rich normative compositions. This could occur in chondrules crystallising as closed systems, so sampling of a larger, chemically fractionated reservoir need not necessarily be invoked, although silica-rich clasts provide evidence that an analogous process occurred in larger, open igneous systems [3]. Some silica undersaturated mineral assemblages in mesostases may also be explained by closed system crystallisation within chondrules. A radiating pyroxene chondrule in Chainpur (Chr1) contains interstitial nepheline and scapolite. Metastable crystallisation of enstatite from an initially chondritic melt composition, at low pressure, can create silica undersaturated residua. The LREE-enriched abundances of the Chr1 mesostasis minerals are consistent with this, having up to 19 x OC La and Eu/Eu* = 10 [4]. Similarly nepheline-bearing mesostasis identified in two Parnallee (LL3.6) chondrules

  19. Multilocus Genotyping of Human Giardia Isolates Suggests Limited Zoonotic Transmission and Association between Assemblage B and Flatulence in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lebbad, Marianne; Petersson, Ingvor; Karlsson, Lillemor; Botero-Kleiven, Silvia; Andersson, Jan O.; Svenungsson, Bo; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Giardia intestinalis is one of the most common diarrhea-related parasites in humans, where infection ranges from asymptomatic to acute or chronic disease. G. intestinalis consists of eight genetically distinct genotypes or assemblages, designated A–H, and assemblages A and B can infect humans. Giardiasis has been classified as a possible zoonotic disease but the role of animals in human disease transmission still needs to be proven. We tried to link different assemblages and sub-assemblages of G. intestinalis isolates from Swedish human patients to clinical symptoms and zoonotic transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings Multilocus sequence-based genotyping of 207 human Giardia isolates using three gene loci: ß-giardin, glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), and triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) was combined with assemblage-specific tpi PCRs. This analysis identified 73 patients infected with assemblage A, 128 with assemblage B, and six with mixed assemblages A+B. Multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were easily determined for the assemblage A isolates, and most patients with this genotype had apparently been infected through anthroponotic transmission. However, we also found evidence of limited zoonotic transmission of Giardia in Sweden, since a few domestic human infections involved the same assemblage A MLGs previously reported in Swedish cats and ruminants. Assemblage B was detected more frequently than assemblage A and it was also more common in patients with suspected treatment failure. However, a large genetic variability made determination of assemblage B MLGs problematic. Correlation between symptoms and assemblages was found only for flatulence, which was significantly more common in children less than six years of age infected with assemblage B. Conclusions/Significance This study shows that certain assemblage A subtypes are potentially zoonotic and that flatulence is connected to assemblage B infections in young children. Determination of MLGs from

  20. Historical Photogrammetry: Bird's Paluxy River Dinosaur Chase Sequence Digitally Reconstructed as It Was prior to Excavation 70 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Falkingham, Peter L.; Bates, Karl T.; Farlow, James O.

    2014-01-01

    It is inevitable that some important specimens will become lost or damaged over time, conservation is therefore of vital importance. The Paluxy River dinosaur tracksite is among the most famous in the world. In 1940, Roland T. Bird described and excavated a portion of the site containing associated theropod and sauropod trackways. This excavated trackway was split up and housed in different institutions, and during the process a portion was lost or destroyed. We applied photogrammetric techniques to photographs taken by Bird over 70 years ago, before the trackway was removed, to digitally reconstruct the site as it was prior to excavation. The 3D digital model offers the opportunity to corroborate maps drawn by R.T. Bird when the tracksite was first described. More broadly, this work demonstrates the exciting potential for digitally recreating palaeontological, geological, or archaeological specimens that have been lost to science, but for which photographic documentation exists. PMID:24695537

  1. Sequential Subterranean Transport of Excavated Sand and Foraged Seeds in Nests of the Harvester Ant, Pogonomyrmex badius.

    PubMed

    Tschinkel, Walter R; Rink, William J; Kwapich, Christina L

    2015-01-01

    During their approximately annual nest relocations, Florida harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex badius) excavate large and architecturally-distinct subterranean nests. Aspects of this process were studied by planting a harvester ant colony in the field in a soil column composed of layers of 12 different colors of sand. Quantifying the colors of excavated sand dumped on the surface by the ants revealed the progress of nest deepening to 2 m and enlargement to 8 L in volume. Most of the excavation was completed within about 2 weeks, but the nest was doubled in volume after a winter lull. After 7 months, we excavated the nest and mapped its structure, revealing colored sand deposited in non-host colored layers, especially in the upper 30 to 40 cm of the nest. In all, about 2.5% of the excavated sediment was deposited below ground, a fact of importance to sediment dating by optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL). Upward transport of excavated sand is carried out in stages, probably by different groups of ants, through deposition, re-transport, incorporation into the nest walls and floors and remobilization from these. This results in considerable mixing of sand from different depths, as indicated in the multiple sand colors even within single sand pellets brought to the surface. Just as sand is transported upward by stages, incoming seeds are transported downward to seed chambers. Foragers collect seeds and deposit them only in the topmost nest chambers from which a separate group of workers rapidly transports them downward in increments detectable as a "wave" of seeds that eventually ends in the seed chambers, 20 to 80 cm below the surface. The upward and downward transport is an example of task-partitioning in a series-parallel organization of work carried out by a highly redundant work force in which each worker usually completes only part of a multi-step process. PMID:26509900

  2. Numerical Simulation of Rock Mass Damage Evolution During Deep-Buried Tunnel Excavation by Drill and Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Hu, Yingguo; Chen, Ming; Yan, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Presence of an excavation damage zone (EDZ) around a tunnel perimeter is of significant concern with regard to safety, stability, costs and overall performance of the tunnel. For deep-buried tunnel excavation by drill and blast, it is generally accepted that a combination of effects of stress redistribution and blasting is mainly responsible for development of the EDZ. However, few open literatures can be found to use numerical methods to investigate the behavior of rock damage induced by the combined effects, and it is still far from full understanding how, when and to what degree the blasting affects the behavior of the EDZ during excavation. By implementing a statistical damage evolution law based on stress criterion into the commercial software LS-DYNA through its user-subroutines, this paper presents a 3D numerical simulation of the rock damage evolution of a deep-buried tunnel excavation, with a special emphasis on the combined effects of the stress redistribution of surrounding rock masses and the blasting-induced damage. Influence of repeated blast loadings on the damage extension for practical millisecond delay blasting is investigated in the present analysis. Accompanying explosive detonation and secession of rock fragments from their initial locations, in situ stress in the immediate vicinity of the excavation face is suddenly released. The transient characteristics of the in situ stress release and induced dynamic responses in the surrounding rock masses are also highlighted. From the simulation results, some instructive conclusions are drawn with respect to the rock damage mechanism and evolution during deep-buried tunnel excavation by drill and blast.

  3. Sequential Subterranean Transport of Excavated Sand and Foraged Seeds in Nests of the Harvester Ant, Pogonomyrmex badius

    PubMed Central

    Tschinkel, Walter R.; Rink, William J.; Kwapich, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    During their approximately annual nest relocations, Florida harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex badius) excavate large and architecturally-distinct subterranean nests. Aspects of this process were studied by planting a harvester ant colony in the field in a soil column composed of layers of 12 different colors of sand. Quantifying the colors of excavated sand dumped on the surface by the ants revealed the progress of nest deepening to 2 m and enlargement to 8 L in volume. Most of the excavation was completed within about 2 weeks, but the nest was doubled in volume after a winter lull. After 7 months, we excavated the nest and mapped its structure, revealing colored sand deposited in non-host colored layers, especially in the upper 30 to 40 cm of the nest. In all, about 2.5% of the excavated sediment was deposited below ground, a fact of importance to sediment dating by optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL). Upward transport of excavated sand is carried out in stages, probably by different groups of ants, through deposition, re-transport, incorporation into the nest walls and floors and remobilization from these. This results in considerable mixing of sand from different depths, as indicated in the multiple sand colors even within single sand pellets brought to the surface. Just as sand is transported upward by stages, incoming seeds are transported downward to seed chambers. Foragers collect seeds and deposit them only in the topmost nest chambers from which a separate group of workers rapidly transports them downward in increments detectable as a "wave" of seeds that eventually ends in the seed chambers, 20 to 80 cm below the surface. The upward and downward transport is an example of task-partitioning in a series-parallel organization of work carried out by a highly redundant work force in which each worker usually completes only part of a multi-step process. PMID:26509900

  4. Geohydromechanical Processes in the Excavation Damaged Zone in Crystalline Rock, Rock Salt, and Indurated and Plastic Clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Bernier, Frederic; Davies, Christophe

    2004-06-20

    The creation of an excavation disturbed zone or excavation damaged zone is expected around all man-made openings in geologic formations. Macro- and micro-fracturing, and in general a redistribution of in situ stresses and rearrangement of rock structures, will occur in this zone, resulting in drastic changes of permeability to flow, mainly through the fractures and cracks induced by excavation. Such an EDZ may have significant implications for the operation and long-term performance of an underground nuclear waste repository. Various issues of concern need to be evaluated, such as processes creating fractures in the excavation damaged zone, the degree of permeability increase, and the potential for sealing or healing (with permeability reduction) in the zone. In recent years, efforts along these lines have been made for a potential repository in four rock types-crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay-and these efforts have involved field, laboratory, and theoretical studies. The present work involves a synthesis of the ideas and issues that emerged from presentations and discussions on EDZ in these four rock types at a CLUSTER Conference and Workshop held in Luxembourg in November, 2003. First, definitions of excavation disturbed and excavation damaged zones are proposed. Then, an approach is suggested for the synthesis and intercomparison of geohydromechanical processes in the EDZ for the four rock types (crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay). Comparison tables of relevant processes, associated factors, and modeling and testing techniques are developed. A discussion of the general state-of-the-art and outstanding issues are also presented. A substantial bibliography of relevant papers on the subject is supplied at the end of the paper.

  5. Sequential Subterranean Transport of Excavated Sand and Foraged Seeds in Nests of the Harvester Ant, Pogonomyrmex badius.

    PubMed

    Tschinkel, Walter R; Rink, William J; Kwapich, Christina L

    2015-01-01

    During their approximately annual nest relocations, Florida harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex badius) excavate large and architecturally-distinct subterranean nests. Aspects of this process were studied by planting a harvester ant colony in the field in a soil column composed of layers of 12 different colors of sand. Quantifying the colors of excavated sand dumped on the surface by the ants revealed the progress of nest deepening to 2 m and enlargement to 8 L in volume. Most of the excavation was completed within about 2 weeks, but the nest was doubled in volume after a winter lull. After 7 months, we excavated the nest and mapped its structure, revealing colored sand deposited in non-host colored layers, especially in the upper 30 to 40 cm of the nest. In all, about 2.5% of the excavated sediment was deposited below ground, a fact of importance to sediment dating by optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL). Upward transport of excavated sand is carried out in stages, probably by different groups of ants, through deposition, re-transport, incorporation into the nest walls and floors and remobilization from these. This results in considerable mixing of sand from different depths, as indicated in the multiple sand colors even within single sand pellets brought to the surface. Just as sand is transported upward by stages, incoming seeds are transported downward to seed chambers. Foragers collect seeds and deposit them only in the topmost nest chambers from which a separate group of workers rapidly transports them downward in increments detectable as a "wave" of seeds that eventually ends in the seed chambers, 20 to 80 cm below the surface. The upward and downward transport is an example of task-partitioning in a series-parallel organization of work carried out by a highly redundant work force in which each worker usually completes only part of a multi-step process.

  6. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages in Osaka Bay, southwestern Japan: Faunal changes over the last 50 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsujimoto, Akira; Nomura, Ritsuo; Yasuhara, Moriaki; Yoshikawa, Shusaku

    2006-01-01

    Live benthic foraminiferal assemblages from surface sediment in Osaka Bay collected in 1999 were analyzed to characterize the distribution of the modern foraminiferal assemblages. Foraminiferal assemblages were compared with those of previous studies to document environmental changes in Osaka Bay over the past 50 years. Sixty-one species of foraminifera belonging to 37 genera were recognized from the 1999 surface sediment samples. An agglutinated assemblage containing Trochammina hadai and Eggerella advena is dominant in the inner part of the bay and is related to eutrophication. The foraminiferal assemblage in areas deeper than about 20 m is composed of Eggerella advena, Ammonia beccarii forma A, and Pseudorotalia gaimardii. This assemblage may be influenced by the large clockwise Okinose Circulation Current which extends throughout the western bay. Foraminiferal assemblages in Osaka Bay have changed dramatically during the last 50 years. The Trochammina hadai-Eggerella advena assemblage became established in the inner part of the bay, reflecting eutrophication that progressed from the 1960s through the 1970s. This assemblage became dominant in 1983, and typically dominated the inner part of the bay. From 1983 to 1999, however, the abundance of taxa belonging to this assemblage decreased greatly following implementation of 1973 Osaka City bylaws that restricted wastewater discharge. Changes in benthic assemblages such as the decrease of Ammonia beccarii forma A and increase of Eggerella advena have occurred in response to decreased incidence of red tides, and floral change in the species that cause these tides. The results of this study demonstrate that the abundance and distribution of benthic foraminifers in Osaka Bay are intimately related to environmental changes related to the urbanization of coastal areas. ?? by the Palaeontological Society of Japan.

  7. Archaeogeophysical Studies in the Ruins of Kars-Ani (Turkey) in the 2009 Excavation Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskan, Nihan; Ahmet Yuksel, Fethi; Gorucu, Ziya; Coruhlu, Yasar

    2010-05-01

    The Ani ancient city, which is at 48 km distance to Kars (Turkey), is founded at the banks of the Arpacay River flowing in the vicinity of Turkey - Armenia border and is in the borders of Mevcut Ocakli Village. Recent studies show that the first settlement in Ani ancient city could be in the 5th millenium B.C.(Chalcolithic Period) and moreover, there were some buildings built in the Iron and Bronze Period. In the early 9th century, Ashot Msaker, who was Bagratuni dynasty (806-827), declared their first capital city at Bagaran, some 40 km south of Ani, and then transferred it to Kars in the year 929. In 961, King Ashot III (953-977) transferred the capital city from Kars to Ani. Ani expanded during the reign of King Smbat II (977-989). Recent research shows that by the early 11th century the population of Ani was over 100,000. After capture of Ashot, Ani surrendered to Byzantine controlled in 1045. A Greek governor was installed in the city. In 1064 a Seljuk Turkish army, headed by Sultan Alparslan, attacked and captured Ani. Then the Georgians captured Ani in 1124, 1161 and 1174. By the 14th century Ani was ruled by the Turkish dynasties, namely Jalayrids and the Kara Koyunlu. After the Persian Safavids ruled Ani, it became part of the Turkish Ottoman Empire in 1579. A small town remained within its walls until 1650 A.C. and it was completely abandoned by the middle of the 18th century. Examples of Sasani, Arabic, Armenian, and Seljuk architecture can be found among the Ani ruins. Ani is home to the first Turkish mosque built in Anatolia, namely Ebul Menucehr. The mosque was erected by the members of the Seljuk Dynasty in 1072. The first archaeological excavations were conducted at Ani in 1892. Since then, several archaeological excavations have been done in Ani. In the 2009 excavation season, magnetic methods were applied in Ani ruins to find the exact locations of the ruins. Magnetic Gradient Measurements were taken in front of Ebul Menucehr Mosque. After

  8. Middle Pleistocene ostracod assemblages from Lake Trasimeno, Perugia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchegiano, Marta; Gliozzi, Elsa; Buratti, Nicoletta; Ariztegui, Daniel; Cirilli, Simonetta

    2014-05-01

    Lake Trasimeno is a meso-eutrophic, shallow (<6 m deep) and large lake (~120km2) located in central Italy, at 259 m above sea level. A preliminary age model based on pollen data for a core retrieved along the present southern shore of the lake (north of the Panicarola town) suggests that the record may be as old as Middle Pleistocene. An ongoing multidisciplinary study of a 175 m long sedimentary core includes magnetic properties, sedimentary microfacies, paleontology, palynology and bulk elemental geochemistry. This contribution focus on the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the topmost 30 m of the core using ostracods. A total of 245 samples have been taken at a 13 cm sampling interval. On the whole, 13 species referable to 10 genera were collected (Ilyocypris gibba, Candona neglecta, Candona angulata, Cypridopsis vidua, Heterocypris salina, Limnocythere sp.1, Limnocythere stationis, Darwinula stevensoni, Cyprideis sp., Leptocythere spp., Fabaeformiscandona fabaeformis, Cyclocypris ovum). Abrupt changes in the abundance of the assemblages were found along the studied core alternating sections with very abundant ostracod remains with others with scant (or even null) individuals. Moreover, the changes observed in the composition of the ostracod assemblages are interpreted as recording environmental variations. In particular, two intervals are significant for the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of this sedimentary succession: 1) the section from 25.60 m to 23.50 m is characterized by a rich ostracod fauna (dominated by Cyprideis sp., Candona angulata and Leptocythere spp.). These assemblages possibly indicate an increase in salinity or alkalinity of the water body; 2) the interval from 21.05 m to 17.60 m contains Ilyocypris gibba, Candona neglecta, Cypridopsis vidua, Heterocypris salina, Limnocythere sp. 1, Limnocythere stationis and Darwinula stevensoni. Limnocythere stationis is a central European species, until now in Italy only described in the Holocene of

  9. Isotopic characteristics of canopies in simulated leaf assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Heather V.; Patzkowsky, Mark E.; Wing, Scott L.; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2014-11-01

    The geologic history of closed-canopy forests is of great interest to paleoecologists and paleoclimatologists alike. Closed canopies have pronounced effects on local, continental and global rainfall and temperature patterns. Although evidence for canopy closure is difficult to reconstruct from the fossil record, the characteristic isotope gradients of the "canopy effect" could be preserved in leaves and proxy biomarkers. To assess this, we employed new carbon isotopic data for leaves collected in diverse light environments within a deciduous, temperate forest (Maryland, USA) and for leaves from a perennially closed canopy, moist tropical forest (Bosque Protector San Lorenzo, Panamá). In the tropical forest, leaf carbon isotope values range 10‰, with higher δ13Cleaf values occurring both in upper reaches of the canopy, and with higher light exposure and lower humidity. Leaf fractionation (Δleaf) varied negatively with height and light and positively with humidity. Vertical 13C enrichment in leaves largely reflects changes in Δleaf, and does not trend with δ13C of CO2 within the canopy. At the site in Maryland, leaves express a more modest δ13C range (∼6‰), with a clear trend that follows both light and leaf height. Using a model we simulate leaf assemblage isotope patterns from canopy data binned by elevation. The re-sampling (bootstrap) model determined both the mean and range of carbon isotope values for simulated leaf assemblages ranging in size from 10 to over 1000 leaves. For the tropical forest data, the canopy's isotope range is captured with 50 or more randomly sampled leaves. Thus, with a sufficient number of fossil leaves it is possible to distinguish isotopic gradients in an ancient closed canopy forest from those in an open forest. For very large leaf assemblages, mean isotopic values approximate the δ13C of carbon contributed by leaves to soil and are similar to observed δ13Clitter values at forested sites within Panamá, including the

  10. Assessing the response of estuarine intertidal assemblages to urbanised catchment discharge.

    PubMed

    Courtenay, Glenn Christopher; Gladstone, William; Schreider, Maria

    2005-08-01

    Measurement of intertidal rock assemblages was investigated as a potential biological indicator to provide a quantitative estimate of the impact of urbanised catchment discharge on the estuaries of Sydney, Australia, from 1995 to 1999. Based on the presence and characteristics of adjacent human activities, sampling locations were categorised as: Bush; Urban; Urban with Sewer Overflows; and Industry with Sewer Overflows. In Sydney Harbour, variation in assemblage structure was measured between most impact categories, however differences between impact categories were not consistent for each year. Nevertheless, in years of above average rainfall (1998-1999), reference assemblages adjacent to national parks and distant from urbanisation were different to all other putatively impacted assemblages. Variability within assemblages was least at reference locations in each year and greatest at locations adjacent to stormwater canals and sewer overflows, particularly in 1998-1999. Variation in assemblage structure in Sydney estuaries was most strongly correlated with chlorophyll--a concentrations. Univariate analysis also identified highly significant differences for a number of factors, however, interactions between year, impact categories and location for numerous analyses, confounded the differentiation between impact categories. The results suggest that intertidal rock assemblages in Sydney Harbour and surrounding estuaries appear to be responding to the quality and quantity of discharge from urbanised catchments and, furthermore, that assemblages are more suitable than individual taxa to indicate the difference between Bush and anthropogenically disturbed estuarine locations.

  11. Lunch Time at the Child Care Centre: Neoliberal Assemblages in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nxumalo, Fikile; Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica; Rowan, Mary Caroline

    2011-01-01

    In this article we interrogate neoliberal assemblages within the context of eating and feeding practices in early childhood education. We consider how neoliberal assemblages are enacted and created through multiple linkages between micro and macro regulations and policies, and everyday food routines. We attend to the embodied intensities, desires…

  12. Surface water connectivity drives richness and composition of Arctic lake fish assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laske, Sarah M.; Haynes, Trevor B.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Koch, Joshua C.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Whitman, Matthew; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides useful baseline information on the processes that drive the relations between patch connectivity and fish species richness and assemblage composition. The environmental processes that organise fish assemblages in Arctic lakes are likely to change in a warming climate.

  13. BIRD SPECIES ASSEMBLAGES AS INDICATORS OF BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY IN GREAT BASIN RANGELAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluates the potential for bird species assemblages to serve as indicators of biological integrity of rangelands in the Great Basin in much the same way that fish and invertebrate assemblages have been used as indicators in aquatic environments. Our approach was to ide...

  14. Changes in dominance patterns in upper Carboniferous plant-fossil assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferkorn, Hermann W.; Thomson, Margaret C.

    1982-12-01

    Upper Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) terrestrial clastic rocks from North America and Europe contain compression-impression plant-fossil assemblages that represent the remains of plant communities that grew on floodplains, levees, and other clastic facies of fluvial and deltaic lowlands. Quantitative analysis of 66 plant-fossil assemblages spanning the entire late Carboniferous demonstrates that before the middle of the Westphalian D Stage the majority of plant-fossil assemblages are dominated by pteridosperms and sphenopsids. Lycopods and cordaites dominate only a few assemblages counted. Ferns do not dominate any assemblages. These findings contrast sharply with the dominance of lycopods reported by others from coal swamps of the same time interval. Above the middle of the Westphalian D, however, one-third of the compression-impression assemblages counted are dominated by ferns. The change in dominance pattern in compression-impression plant-fossil assemblages occurs half a stage earlier than the previously reported change from lycopod-dominated to fern-dominated assemblages at the Westphalian-Stephanian boundary in coal swamps. A trend toward dryer climate during Westphalian D apparently influenced plants growing on better-drained alluvial soils earlier than those growing on water-logged soils of contemporaneous coal swamps. *Present address: Room 108 Math.-Geology Building, University of Minnesota, Duluth, Minnesota 55812

  15. Social Equity and the Assemblage of Values in Australian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Fazal; Lingard, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The paper argues that the policy concept of social equity cannot be adequately understood in a generalised abstract manner, but is better viewed as an assemblage that brings together a number of contrasting, and sometimes competing, values. Our use of assemblage is somewhat eclectic and is designed to underscore the performative character of…

  16. High phylogenetic diversity is preserved in species-poor high-elevation temperate moth assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yi; Sang, Weiguo; Hausmann, Axel; Axmacher, Jan Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the diversity and composition of species assemblages and identifying underlying biotic and abiotic determinants represent great ecological challenges. Addressing some of these issues, we investigated the α-diversity and phylogenetic composition of species-rich geometrid moth (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) assemblages in the mature temperate forest on Changbai Mountain. A total of 9285 geometrid moths representing 131 species were collected, with many species displaying wide elevational distribution ranges. Moth α-diversity decreased monotonously, while the standardized effect size of mean pairwise phylogenetic distances (MPD) and phylogenetic diversity (PD) increased significantly with increasing elevation. At high elevations, the insect assemblages consisted largely of habitat generalists that were individually more phylogenetically distinct from co-occurring species than species in assemblages at lower altitudes. This could hint at higher speciation rates in more favourable low-elevation environments generating a species-rich geometrid assemblage, while exclusion of phylogenetically closely related species becomes increasingly important in shaping moth assemblages at higher elevations. Overall, it appears likely that high-elevation temperate moth assemblages are strongly resilient to environmental change, and that they contain a much larger proportion of the genetic diversity encountered at low-elevation assemblages in comparison to tropical geometrid communities. PMID:26979402

  17. Introduction to historical changes in large river fish assemblages of the Americas

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book’s objective is to document historical changes in the fish assemblages of large American rivers, and to determine patterns in and rationale for those changes. In this chapter, we review pertinent literature on large rivers and fish assemblages worldwide and briefly intr...

  18. Lions as Bone Accumulators? Paleontological and Ecological Implications of a Modern Bone Assemblage from Olduvai Gorge

    PubMed Central

    Arriaza, Mari Carmen; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Yravedra, José; Baquedano, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Analytic models have been developed to reconstruct early hominin behaviour, especially their subsistence patterns, revealed mainly through taphonomic analyses of archaeofaunal assemblages. Taphonomic research is used to discern which agents (carnivores, humans or both) generate the bone assemblages recovered at archaeological sites. Taphonomic frameworks developed during the last decades show that the only large-sized carnivores in African biomes able to create bone assemblages are leopards and hyenas. A carnivore-made bone assemblage located in the short-grassland ecological unit of the Serengeti (within Olduvai Gorge) was studied. Taphonomic analyses of this assemblage including skeletal part representation, bone density, breakage patterns and anatomical distribution of tooth marks, along with an ecological approach to the prey selection made by large carnivores of the Serengeti, were carried out. The results show that this bone assemblage may be the first lion-accumulated assemblage documented, although other carnivores (namely spotted hyenas) may have also intervened through postdepositional ravaging. This first faunal assemblage potentially created by lions constitutes a new framework for neotaphonomic studies. Since lions may accumulate carcasses under exceptional circumstances, such as those documented at the site reported here, this finding may have important consequences for interpretations of early archaeological and paleontological sites, which provide key information about human evolution. PMID:27144649

  19. Lions as Bone Accumulators? Paleontological and Ecological Implications of a Modern Bone Assemblage from Olduvai Gorge.

    PubMed

    Arriaza, Mari Carmen; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Yravedra, José; Baquedano, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Analytic models have been developed to reconstruct early hominin behaviour, especially their subsistence patterns, revealed mainly through taphonomic analyses of archaeofaunal assemblages. Taphonomic research is used to discern which agents (carnivores, humans or both) generate the bone assemblages recovered at archaeological sites. Taphonomic frameworks developed during the last decades show that the only large-sized carnivores in African biomes able to create bone assemblages are leopards and hyenas. A carnivore-made bone assemblage located in the short-grassland ecological unit of the Serengeti (within Olduvai Gorge) was studied. Taphonomic analyses of this assemblage including skeletal part representation, bone density, breakage patterns and anatomical distribution of tooth marks, along with an ecological approach to the prey selection made by large carnivores of the Serengeti, were carried out. The results show that this bone assemblage may be the first lion-accumulated assemblage documented, although other carnivores (namely spotted hyenas) may have also intervened through postdepositional ravaging. This first faunal assemblage potentially created by lions constitutes a new framework for neotaphonomic studies. Since lions may accumulate carcasses under exceptional circumstances, such as those documented at the site reported here, this finding may have important consequences for interpretations of early archaeological and paleontological sites, which provide key information about human evolution. PMID:27144649

  20. High phylogenetic diversity is preserved in species-poor high-elevation temperate moth assemblages.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Sang, Weiguo; Hausmann, Axel; Axmacher, Jan Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the diversity and composition of species assemblages and identifying underlying biotic and abiotic determinants represent great ecological challenges. Addressing some of these issues, we investigated the α-diversity and phylogenetic composition of species-rich geometrid moth (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) assemblages in the mature temperate forest on Changbai Mountain. A total of 9285 geometrid moths representing 131 species were collected, with many species displaying wide elevational distribution ranges. Moth α-diversity decreased monotonously, while the standardized effect size of mean pairwise phylogenetic distances (MPD) and phylogenetic diversity (PD) increased significantly with increasing elevation. At high elevations, the insect assemblages consisted largely of habitat generalists that were individually more phylogenetically distinct from co-occurring species than species in assemblages at lower altitudes. This could hint at higher speciation rates in more favourable low-elevation environments generating a species-rich geometrid assemblage, while exclusion of phylogenetically closely related species becomes increasingly important in shaping moth assemblages at higher elevations. Overall, it appears likely that high-elevation temperate moth assemblages are strongly resilient to environmental change, and that they contain a much larger proportion of the genetic diversity encountered at low-elevation assemblages in comparison to tropical geometrid communities. PMID:26979402