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Sample records for lithium 13

  1. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1.2 kt (1,300 st) of contained lithium, a 40-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium, and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2009, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 18.7 kt (20,600 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds.

  2. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1 kt (1,100 st) of contained lithium, a 23-percent decrease from 2009. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium. It remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2010, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 21 kt (22,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 12-percent increase from 2009.

  3. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 25 kt (25,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 10-percent increase from 2010. U.S. consumption was estimated to have been about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, a 100-percent increase from 2010. The United States was estimated to be the fourth-ranked consumer of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  4. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, lithium consumption in the United States was at 2.5 kt of contained lithium, nearly 32% more than the estimate for 2004. World consumption was 14.1 kt of lithium contained in minerals and compounds in 2003. Exports from the US increased slightly compared with 2004. Due to strong demand for lithium compounds in 2005, both lithium carbonate plants in Chile were operating at or near capacity.

  5. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.

    1998-01-01

    The lithium industry can be divided into two sectors: ore concentrate producers and chemical producers. Ore concentrate producers mine lithium minerals. They beneficiate the ores to produce material for use in ceramics and glass manufacturing.

  7. Vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mun, S.Y.; Lee, H.

    1999-12-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems were measured at 60, 160, 300, and 760 mmHg at temperatures ranging from 315 to 488 K. The apparatus used in this work is a modified still especially designed for the measurement of low-pressure VLE, in which both liquid and vapor are continuously recirculated. For the analysis of salt-containing solutions, a method incorporating refractometry and gravimetry was used. From the experimental measurements, the effect of lithium bromide on the VLE behavior of water + 1,3-propanediol was investigated. The experimental data of the salt-free system were successfully correlated using the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC models. In addition, the extended UNIQUAC model of Sander et al. was applied to the VLE calculation of salt-containing mixtures.

  8. [Lithium].

    PubMed

    Sparsa, A; Bonnetblanc, J-M

    2004-03-01

    The mode of action of the cation lithium is not well known. It is at present used as a topical drug in dermatology. Lithium inhibits many enzymes: Na/K ATPase, adenylcyclase, enzymes of the prostaglandines E1 synthesis, inositol-1-phosphatase. It is active on neutrophils et T lymphocytes, explaining in part its anti-inflammatory activity. It has a dose-dependent action on levures. It has possibly a direct inhibitory activity on DNA synthesis of herpes viruses. Lithium has a good local safety. Percutaneous penetration is weak and plasma concentrations are very much lower than that observed after oral intake. Lithium has been studied in seborrhoeic dermatitis. Its efficacy was primarily observed in psychotic patients. An assay with oral lithium did not confirmed the first observations. Topical lithium was found more efficient. Topical lithium succinate associated with zinc sulfate and lithium gluconate had a greater efficacy than placebo. Comparison with topical ketoconazole showed a non inferiority of lithium gluconate. Oral lithium also showed a reduction of symptoms' duration of herpes simplex. Cutaneous side-effects of oral lithium are frequent and numerous. Some of them may be explained by a lithium pharmacological cell activity (such as psoriasis). Teratogenicity is observed in mice and rats. Drug interactions are not expected after topical application. Irritants side effects are mainly observed after topical application; they are moderate and transitory. Lithium gluconate treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis is a bid application during at least 8 weeks. It may be used in renal insufficiency. It is not recommended in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  9. Synthesis of high performance LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 from lithium ion battery recovery stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Qina; Gratz, Eric; He, Meinan; Lu, Wenquan; Apelian, Diran; Wang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    Spent lithium ion batteries that contain valuable metal elements such as Co, Ni, Mn, Cu are being landfilled in many countries and raising resources depletion and human toxicity potentials. Low cost and high efficiency recovery process is highly desired. In this work we confirmed that high performance Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3(OH)2 precursor and LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cathode material can be synthesized from leaching solution of a lithium ion battery recovery stream. The precursor was synthesized from a typical co-precipitation process with carefully controlling the reaction parameters. Electrochemical properties including rate capacity and cycle life were tested to evaluate the final product. The results show that the cathode material synthesized from spent lithium ion battery recovery stream is performing a discharge capacity of 158 mAh/g at first cycle of 0.1C and 139 mAh/g at first cycle of 0.5C cycle life test. After 100 and 200 cycles, still over 80% and 65% of capacity is remained, respectively. The materials are also evaluated independently at Argonne National Laboratory.

  10. Lithium

    MedlinePlus

    ... depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). Lithium is in a class of medications called antimanic agents. It works by decreasing abnormal activity in the brain.

  11. Al13-pillared anatase TiO2 as a cathode for a lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. D.; Ma, C. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Li, H. D.

    2004-11-01

    Al13-pillared anatase TiO2 is used as a cathode of a lithium battery for the first time. First, a layered titanium dioxide with cationic surfactant ions of cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA+) in the interlayers is synthesized by self-assembly. Then, pillared TiO2 is obtained by exchange of polyoxo cations of aluminium, [Al13O4(OH)24(H2O)12]7+, with CTA+ and subsequent calcination at 300 °C for 1 h in the air. Powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface area (BET) methods are used to characterize the layered and pillared forms of titanium dioxide. A lithium battery with the Al13-pillared TiO2 as the cathode and Li metal foil as the anode is studied within the 1-2.2 V voltage range. The specific capacity of the closed button cell (size 2025) that is delivered on the initial discharge reached 191.4 mA h g-1 at the rate of 25 mA g-1. The cell shows good cycling performance over 50 cycles.

  12. Highly enhanced low temperature discharge capacity of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 with lithium boron oxide glass modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, ShuangYuan; Wang, Lei; Bian, Liang; Xu, JinBao; Ren, Wei; Hu, PengFei; Chang, AiMin

    2015-03-01

    Although lithium ion battery is known to be an excellent renewable energy provider in electronic markets further application of it has been limited by its notoriously poor performance at low temperature, especially below -20 °C. In this paper, the electrochemical performance of the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials coated by lithium boron oxide (LBO) glass was investigated at a temperature range from 20 to -40 °C. The results show that the LBO coating not only helps to improve the discharge capacity of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 at room temperature but also increase the discharge capacity retention of the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from 22.5% to 57.8% at -40 °C. Electrochemical impedance spectra results reveal that the LBO coating plays an important role in reducing the charge-transfer resistance on the electrolyte-electrode interfaces and improving lithium ion diffusion coefficients. The mechanism associated with the change of the structure and electrical properties are discussed in detail.

  13. Preparation and Electrochemical Performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 Cathode Materials for Lithium-ion Batteries from Spent Mixed Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Xi, Guoxi

    2016-01-01

    LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials of lithium-ion batteries were successfully re-synthesized using mixed spent alkaline zinc-manganese batteries and spent lithium-ion batteries as the raw materials. These materials were synthesized by using a combination of dissolution, co-precipitation, calcination, battery preparation, and battery charge-discharge processes. The phase composition, morphology, and electrochemical performance of the products were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, infrared spectra, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and charge-discharge measurements. The results showed that LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials could be successfully re-synthesized at optimal preparation conditions of: co-precipitation, pH value of 8, calcination temperature of 850°C, and calcination time of 10 h. Furthermore, the electrochemical results showed that the re-synthesized sample could deliver an initial discharge capacity of up to 160.2 mAh g-1 and Coulomb efficiency of 99.8%.

  14. A novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} from the cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xihua; Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin; Nawaz, Faheem; Zhang, Yi

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • A simple process to recycle cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries. • Complete separation of the cathode material from the aluminum foil is achieved. • The recovered aluminum foil is highly pure. • LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} is directly resynthesized from the separated cathode material. - Abstract: To solve the recycling challenge for aqueous binder based lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), a novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} from the cathode scraps generated during manufacturing process is proposed in this study. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is employed to separate the cathode material from the aluminum foil. The effects of TFA concentration, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, reaction temperature and time on the separation efficiencies of the cathode material and aluminum foil are investigated systematically. The cathode material can be separated completely under the optimal experimental condition of 15 vol.% TFA solution, L/S ratio of 8.0 mL g{sup −1}, reacting at 40 °C for 180 min along with appropriate agitation. LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} is successfully resynthesized from the separated cathode material by solid state reaction method. Several kinds of characterizations are performed to verify the typical properties of the resynthesized LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder. Electrochemical tests show that the initial charge and discharge capacities of the resynthesized LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} are 201 mAh g{sup −1} and 155.4 mAh g{sup −1} (2.8–4.5 V, 0.1 C), respectively. The discharge capacity remains at 129 mAh g{sup −1} even after 30 cycles with a capacity retention ratio of 83.01%.

  15. Study of the surface modification of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode material for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, A. M. A.; Abdel-Ghany, A. E.; Eid, A. E.; Trottier, J.; Zaghib, K.; Mauger, A.; Julien, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    The surface of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (LNMCO) particles has been studied for material synthesized at 900 °C by a two-step process from a mixture of LiOH·H2O and metal oxalate [(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)C2O4] obtained by co-precipitation. Samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), Raman scattering (RS) spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. We have investigated the effect of the heat treatment of particles at 600 °C with organic substances such as sucrose and starch. HRTEM images and RS spectra indicate that the surface of particles has been modified. The annealing does not lead to any carbon coating but it leads to the crystallization of the thin disordered layer on the surface of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2. The beneficial effect has been tested on the electrochemical properties of the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials. The capacity at 10C-rate is enhanced by 20% for post-treated LNMCO particles at 600 °C for half-an-hour.

  16. Electrochemical performance of zirconium doped lithium rich layered Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 oxide with porous hollow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenjiang; Wang, Zhixing; Chen, Hao; Huang, Zimo; Li, Xinhai; Guo, Huajun; Wang, Renheng

    2015-12-01

    Lithium rich manganese layered oxides (Zr doped Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2) with porous hollow structure are synthesized by co-precipitation followed by calcination. The morphologies of bare materials and electrodes have been studied through scanning electron microscope (SEM), which illustrates that particles with porous hollow structure combine with conductive carbon more efficiency. Additionally, the porous hollow structure provide a three dimensional space for lithium ion diffusion. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been utilized to gain insight to the properties of pristine and Zr doped materials before and after electrode process. Zr doped Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 with porous hollow structure shows better crystal stability and higher diffusion coefficients (D) of the lithium ions diffusing. After 100 cycles at 250 mAg-1, the lattice parameter and crystal structure of Zr doped materials shows smaller changes than pristine's, and the lithium ion diffusion of pristine and Zr doped material decreased from 1.89 × 10-4 and 2.73 × 10-4 mA cm-2 to 3.18 × 10-5 and 1.66 × 10-4 mA cm-2, respectively.

  17. A novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xihua; Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin; Nawaz, Faheem; Zhang, Yi

    2014-09-01

    To solve the recycling challenge for aqueous binder based lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), a novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps generated during manufacturing process is proposed in this study. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is employed to separate the cathode material from the aluminum foil. The effects of TFA concentration, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, reaction temperature and time on the separation efficiencies of the cathode material and aluminum foil are investigated systematically. The cathode material can be separated completely under the optimal experimental condition of 15vol.% TFA solution, L/S ratio of 8.0 mL g(-1), reacting at 40°C for 180 min along with appropriate agitation. LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 is successfully resynthesized from the separated cathode material by solid state reaction method. Several kinds of characterizations are performed to verify the typical properties of the resynthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 powder. Electrochemical tests show that the initial charge and discharge capacities of the resynthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 are 201 mAh g(-)(1) and 155.4 mAh g(-1) (2.8-4.5 V, 0.1C), respectively. The discharge capacity remains at 129 mAh g(-1) even after 30 cycles with a capacity retention ratio of 83.01%.

  18. A novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xihua; Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin; Nawaz, Faheem; Zhang, Yi

    2014-09-01

    To solve the recycling challenge for aqueous binder based lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), a novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps generated during manufacturing process is proposed in this study. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is employed to separate the cathode material from the aluminum foil. The effects of TFA concentration, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, reaction temperature and time on the separation efficiencies of the cathode material and aluminum foil are investigated systematically. The cathode material can be separated completely under the optimal experimental condition of 15vol.% TFA solution, L/S ratio of 8.0 mL g(-1), reacting at 40°C for 180 min along with appropriate agitation. LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 is successfully resynthesized from the separated cathode material by solid state reaction method. Several kinds of characterizations are performed to verify the typical properties of the resynthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 powder. Electrochemical tests show that the initial charge and discharge capacities of the resynthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 are 201 mAh g(-)(1) and 155.4 mAh g(-1) (2.8-4.5 V, 0.1C), respectively. The discharge capacity remains at 129 mAh g(-1) even after 30 cycles with a capacity retention ratio of 83.01%. PMID:24973865

  19. Symposium on High Power, Ambient Temperature Lithium Batteries, 180th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, Phoenix, AZ, Oct. 13-17, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. D. K. (Editor); Halpert, Gerald (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented in these proceedings are on the state of the art in high-power lithium batteries, a design analysis of high-power Li-TiS2 battery, the performance and safety features of spiral wound lithium/thionyl chloride cells, the feasibility of a superhigh energy density battery of the Li/BrF3 electrochemical system, and an enhanced redox process of disulfide compounds and their application in high energy storage. Attention is also given to the structure and charge-discharge characteristics of mesophase-pitch based carbons, a study of carbons and graphites as anodes for lithium rechargeable cells, Li metal-free rechargeable Li(1+x)Mn2O4/carbon cells, and rechargeable lithium batteries using V6O13/V5O5 as the positive electrode material. Other papers discuss the electrochemical stability of organic electrolytes in contact with solid inorganic cathode materials, the electrochemical behavior of methyl formate solutions, and the interface between a solid polymer electrolyte and lithium anode.

  20. Ambident PCN heterocycles: N- and P-phosphanylation of lithium 1,3-benzazaphospholides.

    PubMed

    Aluri, Bhaskar R; Burck, Sebastian; Gudat, Dietrich; Niemeyer, Mark; Holloczki, Oldamur; Nyulaszi, Laszlo; Jones, Peter G; Heinicke, Joachim

    2009-11-16

    Synthetic and structural aspects of the phosphanylation of 1,3-benzazaphospholides 1(Li), ambident benzofused azaphosphacyclopentadienides, are presented. The unusual properties of phospholyl-1,3,2-diazaphospholes inspired us to study the coupling of 1(Li) with chlorodiazaphospholene 2, which led to the N-substituted product 3. Reaction of 1(Li) with chlorodiphenyl- and chlorodicyclohexylphosphane likewise gave N-phosphanylbenzazaphospholes 4 and 5, whereas with the more bulky di-tert-butyl- and di-1-adamantylchlorophosphanes, the diphosphanes 6 and 7 are obtained; in the case of 7 they are isolated as a dimeric LiCl(THF) adduct. Structural information was provided by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy experiments. 2D exchange spectroscopy confirmed the existence of two rotamers of the aminophosphane 5 at room temperature; variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy studies of 6 revealed two dynamic processes, low-temperature inversion at ring phosphorus (DeltaH( not equal)=22 kJ mol(-1), DeltaS( not equal)=2 J K(-1) mol(-1)) and very low-temperature rotation of the tBu(2)P group. Quantum chemical studies give evidence that 2-unsubstituted benzazaphospholides prefer N-phosphanylation, even with bulky chlorophosphanes, and that substituents at the 2-position of the heterocycle are crucial for the occurrence of P-N rotamers and for switching to alternative P-substitution, beyond a threshold steric bulk, by both P- and 2-position substituents.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide assisted synthesis of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as high-performance cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chaohong; Zhang, Yongzhi; Chen, Li; Lei, Ying; Ou, Junke; Guo, Yong; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan

    2015-04-01

    LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) is a promising cathode material for lithium-ion battery. In this research, a facile co-precipitation process is employed, during which the mixed solution of NH3·H2O, H2O2 (30% aqueous solution) and LiOH·H2O is added into the nitrate solution. Notably, H2O2 is introduced as the oxidant and dispersant during the co-precipitation process to oxidize the metal ions and decrease the agglomeration of the precursor by giving out O2, and then improves the specific capacity, stability and energy density of NCM. Additionally, O3 is employed to further oxidize NCM to enhance the stability during the calcination process. The obtained NCM material with single crystal structure exhibits a high initial discharge specific capacity of 208.9 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C (1 C = 280 mA g-1), an excellent cycle stability with high retained capacity of 176.3 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles, and a high initial discharge specific capacities of 150.6 mAh g-1 at 5 C even at a high cutoff potential (4.6 V).

  2. Unraveling transition metal dissolution of Li1.04Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM 111) in lithium ion full cells by using the total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evertz, Marco; Horsthemke, Fabian; Kasnatscheew, Johannes; Börner, Markus; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    In this work we investigated the transition metal dissolution of the layered cathode material Li1.04Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 in dependence on the cycle number and cut-off cell voltage during charge by using the total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique for the elemental analysis of the specific lithium ion battery degradation products. We could show that with ongoing cycling transition metal dissolution from the cathode increased over time. However, it was less pronounced at 4.3 V compared to elevated charge cut-off voltages of 4.6 V. After a maximum of 100 cycles, we detected an overall transition metal loss of 0.2 wt‰ in relation to the whole cathode active material for cells cycled to 4.3 V. At an increased charge cut-off voltage of 4.6 V, 4.5 wt‰ transition metal loss in relation to the whole cathode active material could be detected. The corresponding transition metal dissolution induced capacity loss at the cathode could thus be attributed to 1.2 mAh g-1. Compared to the overall capacity loss of 80 mAh g-1 of the complete cell after 100 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles the value is quite low. Hence, the overall full cell capacity fade cannot be assigned exclusively to the transition metal dissolution induced cathode fading.

  3. Lithium use in batteries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Insight into the channel ion distribution and influence on the lithium insertion properties of hexatitanates A2Ti6O13 (A = Na, Li, H) as candidates for anode materials in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Flores, Juan Carlos; García-Alvarado, Flaviano; Hoelzel, Markus; Sobrados, Isabel; Sanz, Jesús; Kuhn, Alois

    2012-12-28

    Li(2)Ti(6)O(13) and H(2)Ti(6)O(13) were easily synthesized from Na(2)Ti(6)O(13) by successive Na(+)-Li(+)-H(+) ion exchange. The crystal structures of Na(2)Ti(6)O(13), Li(2)Ti(6)O(13) and H(2)Ti(6)O(13) were investigated using neutron powder diffraction. Monovalent A(+) cations (Na, Li and H) have been located using difference Fourier analysis. Although monoclinic lattice parameters (space group C2/m) of the three titanates remain almost unchanged with retention of the basic [Ti(6)O(13)(2-)] network, monovalent Na, Li and H cations occupy different sites in the tunnel space. By comparing the structural details concerning the A(+) oxygen coordination, i.e. NaO(8) square prismatic coordination, LiO(4) square planar coordination and covalently bond H atoms, with results from (23)Na, (7)Li and (1)H NMR spectroscopy we were able to obtain a more detailed insight into the respective local distortions and anharmonic motions. We were able to show that the site that the A(+) cation occupies in the hexatitanate channel structure strongly influences the lithium insertion properties of these compounds and therefore their usefulness as electrode materials for energy storage.

  5. Insight into the channel ion distribution and influence on the lithium insertion properties of hexatitanates A2Ti6O13 (A = Na, Li, H) as candidates for anode materials in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Flores, Juan Carlos; García-Alvarado, Flaviano; Hoelzel, Markus; Sobrados, Isabel; Sanz, Jesús; Kuhn, Alois

    2012-12-28

    Li(2)Ti(6)O(13) and H(2)Ti(6)O(13) were easily synthesized from Na(2)Ti(6)O(13) by successive Na(+)-Li(+)-H(+) ion exchange. The crystal structures of Na(2)Ti(6)O(13), Li(2)Ti(6)O(13) and H(2)Ti(6)O(13) were investigated using neutron powder diffraction. Monovalent A(+) cations (Na, Li and H) have been located using difference Fourier analysis. Although monoclinic lattice parameters (space group C2/m) of the three titanates remain almost unchanged with retention of the basic [Ti(6)O(13)(2-)] network, monovalent Na, Li and H cations occupy different sites in the tunnel space. By comparing the structural details concerning the A(+) oxygen coordination, i.e. NaO(8) square prismatic coordination, LiO(4) square planar coordination and covalently bond H atoms, with results from (23)Na, (7)Li and (1)H NMR spectroscopy we were able to obtain a more detailed insight into the respective local distortions and anharmonic motions. We were able to show that the site that the A(+) cation occupies in the hexatitanate channel structure strongly influences the lithium insertion properties of these compounds and therefore their usefulness as electrode materials for energy storage. PMID:23108296

  6. Layered P3-NaxCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 versus Spinel Li4Ti5O12 as a Positive and a Negative Electrode in a Full Sodium-Lithium Cell.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhecheva, Ekaterina; Kukeva, Rositsa; Nihtianova, Diana; Mihaylov, Lyuben; Atanasova, Genoveva; Stoyanova, Radostina

    2016-07-13

    The development of lithium and sodium ion batteries without using lithium and sodium metal as anodes gives the impetus for elaboration of low-cost and environmentally friendly energy storage devices. In this contribution we demonstrate the design and construction of a new type of hybrid sodium-lithium ion cell by using unique electrode combination (Li4Ti5O12 spinel as a negative electrode and layered Na3/4Co1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 as a positive electrode) and conventional lithium electrolyte (LiPF6 salt dissolved in EC/DMC). The cell operates at an average potential of 2.35 V by delivering a reversible capacity of about 100 mAh/g. The mechanism of the electrochemical reaction in the full sodium-lithium ion cell is studied by means of postmortem analysis, as well as ex situ X-ray diffraction analysis, HR-TEM, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The changes in the surface composition of electrodes are examined by ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). PMID:27315402

  7. Layered P3-NaxCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 versus Spinel Li4Ti5O12 as a Positive and a Negative Electrode in a Full Sodium-Lithium Cell.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhecheva, Ekaterina; Kukeva, Rositsa; Nihtianova, Diana; Mihaylov, Lyuben; Atanasova, Genoveva; Stoyanova, Radostina

    2016-07-13

    The development of lithium and sodium ion batteries without using lithium and sodium metal as anodes gives the impetus for elaboration of low-cost and environmentally friendly energy storage devices. In this contribution we demonstrate the design and construction of a new type of hybrid sodium-lithium ion cell by using unique electrode combination (Li4Ti5O12 spinel as a negative electrode and layered Na3/4Co1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 as a positive electrode) and conventional lithium electrolyte (LiPF6 salt dissolved in EC/DMC). The cell operates at an average potential of 2.35 V by delivering a reversible capacity of about 100 mAh/g. The mechanism of the electrochemical reaction in the full sodium-lithium ion cell is studied by means of postmortem analysis, as well as ex situ X-ray diffraction analysis, HR-TEM, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The changes in the surface composition of electrodes are examined by ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  8. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  9. Enhanced electrochemical performance of Li-rich cathode Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 by surface modification with lithium ion conductor Li3PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Luo, Shaohua; Ren, Jie; Wang, Dan; Qi, Xiwei

    2016-05-01

    Li-rich layered cathode Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 is prepared via a co-precipitation followed with high-temperature calcination, and then successfully modified with nano-Li3PO4 by ball milling and annealing. The TEM and EDS reveal that Li3PO4 is homogeneously coated on the particle surface of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2. And the electrochemical performance of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 is significantly improved by coating with lithium ion conductor Li3PO4. The Li3PO4-coated sample delivers a high initial discharge capacity of 284.7 mAhg-1 at 0.05 C, and retains 192.6 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.5 C, which is higher than that of the pristine sample (244 mAhg-1 at 0.05 C and 168.2 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.5 C). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) demonstrates that the resistance for Li/Li3PO4-coated Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 cell was reduced compared to Li/Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2, which indicates the Li3PO4 coating layer with high ionic conductivity (6.6 × 10-8 S cm-1) facilitates the diffusion of lithium ions through the interface between electrode and electrolyte and accelerates the charge transfer process. What is more, the Li3PO4 coating layer can also act as a protection layer to protect the cathode material from encroachment of electrolyte. The two aspects account for the enhanced electrochemical performance of Li3PO4-coated Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2.

  10. Lithium: for harnessing renewable energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, which has the chemical symbol Li and an atomic number of 3, is the first metal in the periodic table. Lithium has many uses, the most prominent being in batteries for cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid vehicles. Worldwide sources of lithium are broken down by ore-deposit type as follows: closed-basin brines, 58%; pegmatites and related granites, 26%; lithium-enriched clays, 7%; oilfield brines, 3%; geothermal brines, 3%; and lithium-enriched zeolites, 3% (2013 statistics). There are over 39 million tons of lithium resources worldwide. Of this resource, the USGS estimates there to be approximately 13 million tons of current economically recoverable lithium reserves. To help predict where future lithium supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where identified resources are concentrated in the Earth’s crust, and they use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered resources also exist.

  11. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of cathode material Li1.2Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54O2 from spent lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Renjie; Zhao, Taolin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Feng; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-01

    Li-rich layered oxide Li1.2Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54O2 has been successfully re-synthesized using the ascorbic acid leaching solution of spent lithium-ion batteries as the raw materials. A combination of oxalic acid co-precipitation, hydrothermal and calcination processes was applied to synthesize this material. For comparison, a fresh sample with the same composition has been also synthesized from the commercial raw materials using the same method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements are carried out to characterize these samples. XRD results indicate that both samples have the layered α-NaFeO2 structures with a space group of R 3 bar m. No other crystalline phase was detected by XRD. The electrochemical results show that the re-synthesized and fresh-synthesized sample can deliver discharge capacities as high as 258.8 and 264.2 mAh g-1 at the first cycle, respectively. After 50 cycles, discharge capacities of 225.1 and 228 mAh g-1 can be obtained with capacity retention of 87.0 and 86.3%, respectively. This study suggests that the leaching solution from spent lithium ion batteries can be recycled to synthesize Li-rich cathode materials with good electrochemical performance.

  12. The role of prop-1-ene-1,3-sultone as an additive in lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, Julian; Hall, David S.; Madec, Lénaïc; Dahn, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used in conjunction with experimental results to propose decomposition pathways that describe the role and ultimate fate of the PES additive in Li-ion batteries. Oxidation of PES produces carbonyl sulfide gas and ethene at the positive electrode, both experimentally observed byproducts. However, the calculated standard potential for simple PES oxidation, E0ox ∼ 6.7 V vs. Li/Li+, is quite high, suggesting this pathway is unlikely. A "reactive electrode model" is presented, in which the positive electrode material is a reagent in the pseudo-combustion of PES (and other solvents). This spontaneous process produces carbonyl sulfide, carbon dioxide, and a rock salt surface layer, all of which are experimentally observed. At the negative electrode, the reduction of PES occurs via two one-electron steps, where E0red,1 = 0.9 V and E0red,2 = 4.3 V. The reduced species, Li2PES, can react with hydrogen and methyl radicals to produce propene, methylpropene, propane and lithium sulfite. Nucleophilic Li2PES can also react with electrophilic PES, ethylene carbonate, or ethyl methyl carbonate. Eighteen possible organic sulphate 'building blocks' for the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrate that PES reduction indeed results in both lithium sulfite and organic sulphate SEI components.

  13. Magnesium-Doped Li1.2[Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54]O2 for Lithium-Ion Battery Cathode with Enhanced Cycling Stability and Rate Capability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan X; Shang, Ke H; He, Wei; Ai, Xin P; Cao, Yu L; Yang, Han X

    2015-06-17

    Mg-doped Li[Li0.2-2xMgxCo0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54]O2 is synthesized by introducing Mg ions into the transition-metal (TM) layer of this layered compound for substituting Li ions through a simple polymer-pyrolysis method. The structural and morphological characterization reveals that the doped Mg ions are uniformly distributed in the bulk lattice, showing an insignificant impact on the layered structure. Electrochemical experiments reveal that, at a Mg doping of 4%, the Li[Li0.16Mg0.04Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54]O2 electrode can deliver a larger initial reversible capacity of 272 mAh g(-1), an improved rate capability with 114 mAh g(-1) at 8 C, and an excellent cycling stability with 93.3% capacity retention after 300 cycles. The superior electrochemical performances of the Mg-doped material are possibly due to the enhancement of the structural stability by substitution of Li by Mg in the TM layer, which effectively suppresses the cation mixing arrangement, leading to the alleviation of the phase change during lithium-ion insertion and extraction.

  14. Electrochemical properties of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Co0.13Ni0.13]O2 cathode thin film by RF sputtering for all-solid-state lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Haena; Yeon Kong, Woo; Chul Kim, Young; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Choi, Ji-Won

    2012-12-01

    The Li[Li0.2Mn0.56Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 thin films were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrate with target contained a 5% excess of lithium precursor. Thin films were deposited under various deposition conditions such as working pressure, gas ratio of Ar and O2, and the temperature of in-situ annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrochemical property was estimated by a WBC3000 cycler with Li|Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 half-type cell at 1C charge/discharge rate. The (0 0 3) and (1 0 4) diffraction peaks which represent layered α-NaFeO2 type structure (space group R-3m) were observed. Optimal magnetron sputtering conditions were detected. The 500 °C annealed thin film after deposited at 10 m Torr in Ar:O2=3:1 shows a high discharge capacity of around 62 μAh/cm2 μm with a high cyclic retention.

  15. Synthesis and performance of Li[(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)(1-x)Mgx]O2 prepared from spent lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yaqing; Xu, Shengming; Huang, Guoyong; Jiang, Changyin

    2013-02-15

    To reduce cost and secondary pollution of spent lithium ion battery (LIB) recycling caused by complicated separation and purification, a novel simplified recycling process is investigated in this paper. Removal of magnesium is a common issue in hydrometallurgy process. Considering magnesium as an important additive in LIB modification, tolerant level of magnesium in leachate is explored as well. Based on the novel recycling technology, Li[(Ni(1/3)Co(1/3)Mn(1/3))(1-x)Mg(x)]O(2) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.05) cathode materials are achieved from spent LIB. Tests of XRD, SEM, TG-DTA and so on are carried out to evaluate material properties. Electrochemical test shows an initial charge and discharge capacity of the regenerated LiNi(1/3)Co(1/3)Mn(1/3)O(2) to be 175.4 mAh g(-1) and 152.7 mAh g(-1) (2.7-4.3 V, 0.2C), respectively. The capacity remains 94% of the original value after 50 cycles (2.7-4.3 V, 1C). Results indicate that presence of magnesium up to x=0.01 has no significant impact on overall performance of Li[(Ni(1/3)Co(1/3)Mn(1/3))(1-x)Mg(x)]O(2). As a result, magnesium level as high as 360 mg L(-1) in leachate remains tolerable. Compared with conventional limitation of magnesium content, the elimination level of magnesium exceeded general impurity-removal requirement.

  16. Ab initio and kinetic Monte Carlo study of lithium diffusion in LiSi, Li12Si7, Li13Si5 and Li15Si4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Janghyuk; Lee, Byeongchan; Cho, Maenghyo; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2016-10-01

    The kinetics of lithium atoms in various Li-Si binary compounds are investigated using density functional theory calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo calculations. The values of the Li migration energy barriers are identified by NEB calculations with vacancy-mediated, interstitial and exchange migration mechanisms in crystalline LiSi, Li12Si7, Li13Si4, and Li15Si4. A comparison of these NEB results shows that the vacancy-mediated Li migration is identified as the dominant diffusion mechanisms in Li-Si compounds. The diffusion coefficients of Li in Li-Si compounds at room temperature are determined by KMC simulation. From the KMC results, the recalculated migration energy barriers in LiSi, Li12Si7, Li13Si4, and Li15Si4 correspond to 0.306, 0.301, 0.367 and 0.320 eV, respectively. Compared to the Li migration energy barrier of 0.6 eV in crystalline Si, the drastic reduction in the Li migration energy barriers in the lithiated silicon indicates that the initial lithiation of the Si anode is the rate-limiting step. Furthermore, it is also found that Si migration is possible in Li-rich configurations. On the basis of these findings, the underlying mechanisms of kinetics on the atomic scale details are elucidated.

  17. Fabrication of nanoscale patterns in lithium fluoride crystal using a 13.5 nm Schwarzschild objective and a laser produced plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Mu Baozhong; Jiang Li; Zhu Jingtao; Yi Shengzhen; Wang Zhanshan; He Pengfei

    2011-12-15

    Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal is a radiation sensitive material widely used as EUV and soft x-ray detector. The LiF-based detector has high resolution, in principle limited by the point defect size, large field of view, and wide dynamic range. Using LiF crystal as an imaging detector, a resolution of 900 nm was achieved by a projection imaging of test meshes with a Schwarzschild objective operating at 13.5 nm. In addition, by imaging of a pinhole illuminated by the plasma, an EUV spot of 1.5 {mu}m diameter in the image plane of the objective was generated, which accomplished direct writing of color centers with resolution of 800 nm. In order to avoid sample damage and contamination due to the influence of huge debris flux produced by the plasma source, a spherical normal-incidence condenser was used to collect EUV radiation. Together with a description of experimental results, the development of the Schwarzschild objective, the influence of condenser on energy density and the alignment of the imaging system are also reported.

  18. Studies on the translational and rotational motions of ionic liquids composed of N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13) cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Fujii, Kenta; Suenaga, Masahiko; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL, IL) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13, Py13, PYR13, or mppy) is an important cation and produces stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO2CF3)2, TFSA, TFSI, NTf2, or Tf2N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [N(SO2F)2, FSA, or FSI], were investigated. In addition to P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, lithium salt doped samples were prepared (P13-TFSA-Li and P13-FSA-Li). The individual ion diffusion coefficients (D) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured by H1, F19, and L7i NMR. At the same time, the ionic conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and density (ρ) were measured over a wide temperature range. The van der Waals volumes of P13, TFSA, FSA, Li(TFSA)2, and Li(FSA)3 were estimated by molecular orbital calculations. The experimental values obtained in this study were analyzed by the classical Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein (NE), and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations and Walden plots were also made for the neat and binary ILs to clarify physical and mobile properties of individual ions. From the temperature-dependent velocity correlation coefficients for neat P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, the NE parameter 1-ξ was evaluated. The ionicity (electrochemical molar conductivity divided by the NE conductivity from NMR) and the 1-ξ had exactly the same values. The rotational and translational motions of P13 and jump of a lithium ion are also discussed.

  19. Lithium improves cell viability in psychosine-treated MO3.13 human oligodendrocyte cell line via autophagy activation.

    PubMed

    Del Grosso, Ambra; Antonini, Sara; Angella, Lucia; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Signore, Giovanni; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is a rare, rapidly progressing childhood leukodystrophy triggered by deficit of the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC) and characterized by the accumulation of galactosylsphingosine (psychosine; PSY) in the nervous system. PSY is a cytotoxic sphingolipid, which leads to widespread degeneration of oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, causing demyelination. Here we report on autophagy in the human oligodendrocyte cell line MO3.13 treated with PSY and exploitation of Li as an autophagy modulator to rescue cell viability. We demonstrate that PSY causes upregulation of the autophagic flux at the level of autophagosome and autolysosome formation and LC3-II expression. We show that pretreatment with Li, a drug clinically used to treat bipolar disorders, can further stimulate autophagy, improving cell tolerance to PSY. This Li protective effect is found not to be linked to reduction of PSY-induced oxidative stress and might not stem from a reduction of PSY accumulation. These data provide novel information on the intracellular pathways activated during PSY-induced toxicity and suggest the autophagy pathway as a promising novel therapeutic target for ameliorating the GLD phenotype. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638607

  20. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of LiCo1/3Mn1/3Fe1/3PO4/C nanocomposite cathode of lithium batteries with high rate performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Sou; Taniguchi, Izumi

    2013-11-01

    Olivine structured LiCo1/3Mn1/3Fe1/3PO4/C nanocomposites were prepared by a combination of spray pyrolysis at 300 °C and wet ball-milling followed by heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h in a 3%H2 + N2 atmosphere. The formation of a solid solution between LiCoPO4, LiMnPO4, and LiFePO4 at this composition was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with equipped energy dispersive spectroscopy verified that the LiCo1/3Mn1/3Fe1/3PO4/C nanocomposites were agglomerates of LiCo1/3Mn1/3Fe1/3PO4 primary particles with a geometric mean diameter of 107 nm and a uniform chemical composition, and carbon was well distributed on the surface of the agglomerates. The LiCo1/3Mn1/3Fe1/3PO4/C nanocomposite cathode exhibited a high discharge capacity of 159 mAh g-1 at 0.05 C in the potential range of 2.0-5.0 V, corresponding to 94% of theoretical capacity. The capacity retention was 87% after 50 cycles at a charge-discharge rate of 1 C. Furthermore, the rate capability test showed that the high capacity still was retained even at 5 C and 20 C rate with 106 and 72 mAh g-1, respectively.

  2. Lithium toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... dialysis (machine) Medicines to treat symptoms Whole bowel irrigation with a special solution taken by mouth or through a tube through the nose into the stomach (to flush sustained-release lithium quickly through the stomach and intestines)

  3. Fatigue in 0.5Li2MnO3:0.5Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 positive electrodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riekehr, Lars; Liu, Jinlong; Schwarz, Björn; Sigel, Florian; Kerkamm, Ingo; Xia, Yongyao; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    Two different Li-rich nickel-cobalt-manganese-oxide (Li-rich NCM) active materials with the same nominal composition 0.5Li2MnO3:0.5Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 but different pristine nano structure have been analyzed structurally and electrochemically in different cycling states. For structural characterization, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution synchrotron powder diffraction (S-XRD) experiments were conducted. The changes in structure with increasing cycle number are correlated with characteristic features in the corresponding electrochemical dQ/dV-profiles that were obtained by galvanostatically cycling the two different active materials. The presented data demonstrates that structural changes upon cycling, e.g. LiMnO2 and spinel formation, strongly depend on the degree oxygen is involved in the reversible charge compensation for delithiation/lithiation. According to our data, firstly a twin-like environment with nanometer dimensions is formed within the R-3m matrix during the initial cycle, which then gradually transforms into a spinel-like structure with increasing cycle number. As another result, we can show that Li2MnO3 to LiMnO2 transformation is not directly dependent in the irreversible oxygen loss in the first cycle but more importantly on transition metal migration. A model is presented explaining the dependency of LiMnO2 and spinel formation on the ability of Li-rich active materials to include oxygen in the charge compensation process.

  4. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of Li(1.3)Nb(0.3)V(0.4)O2 as a positive electrode material for rechargeable lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Takeuchi, Mitsue; Komaba, Shinichi; Ichikawa, Shinnosuke; Ozaki, Tetsuya; Inamasu, Tokuo

    2016-02-01

    The binary system, xLi3NbO4-(1 - x)LiVO2, was first examined as an electrode material for rechargeable lithium batteries. The sample (x = 0.43) crystallizes into a cation-disordered rocksalt structure and delivers a reversible capacity of ca. 230 mA h g(-1), which originates from V(3+)/V(5+) redox with electrochemically inactive niobium ions. PMID:26686804

  5. A Lithium Superionic Sulfide Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liu, Zengcai; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a facile synthesis approach for core-shell structured Li2S nanoparticles, which have Li2S as the core and Li3PS4 as the shell. This material functions as lithium superionic sulfide (LSS) cathode for long-lasting, energy-efficient lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The LSS has an ionic conductivity of 10-7 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high lithium-ion conductivity of LSS imparts an excellent cycling performance to all-solid Li-S batteries, which also promises safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

  6. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of Li2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2 as a novel 5 V class positive electrode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Kazuki; Shikano, Masahiro; Sakaebe, Hikari

    2016-02-01

    A lithium nickel manganese oxide, O3-Li2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2, is synthesized from the precursor, P3-Na2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2, by a Na+/Li+ ion exchange reaction using molten salt. Post-heating at 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 °C is carried out for 5 h in air. The products are characterized by powder XRD, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), SEM, 6Li-magic-angle-spinning-NMR, and electrochemical measurements. The charge/discharge profiles of O3-Li2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2, thermally treated at 500 °C, show a high-potential plateau region at 4.8 V. Furthermore, sloping voltage profiles are observed at an average voltage of 3.21 V. An initial discharge capacity of 257 mA h g-1 is obtained between 2.0 and 4.8 V with a current density of 15 mA g-1 at 25 °C. This capacity corresponds to 0.90 electron transfers per formula unit. This study shows that Post-heating of O3-Li2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2 is effective to improve its electrochemical properties.

  7. Lithium in 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, estimated world lithium consumption was about 28 kt (31,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, an 8 percent increase from that of 2011. Estimated U.S. consumption was about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, the same as that of 2011. The United States was thought to rank fourth in consumption of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Rockwood Lithium Inc., produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  8. Catalyst engineering for lithium ion batteries: the catalytic role of Ge in enhancing the electrochemical performance of SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G anodes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun Guang; Wang, Ye; Han, Zhao Jun; Shi, Yumeng; Wong, Jen It; Huang, Zhi Xiang; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Yang, Hui Ying

    2014-12-21

    The catalytic role of germanium (Ge) was investigated to improve the electrochemical performance of tin dioxide grown on graphene (SnO(2)/G) nanocomposites as an anode material of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Germanium dioxide (GeO(20) and SnO(2) nanoparticles (<10 nm) were uniformly anchored on the graphene sheets via a simple single-step hydrothermal method. The synthesized SnO(2)(GeO(2))0.13/G nanocomposites can deliver a capacity of 1200 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1), which is much higher than the traditional theoretical specific capacity of such nanocomposites (∼ 702 mA h g(-1)). More importantly, the SnO(2)(GeO(2))0.13/G nanocomposites exhibited an improved rate, large current capability (885 mA h g(-1) at a discharge current of 2000 mA g(-1)) and excellent long cycling stability (almost 100% retention after 600 cycles). The enhanced electrochemical performance was attributed to the catalytic effect of Ge, which enabled the reversible reaction of metals (Sn and Ge) to metals oxide (SnO(2) and GeO(2)) during the charge/discharge processes. Our demonstrated approach towards nanocomposite catalyst engineering opens new avenues for next-generation high-performance rechargeable Li-ion batteries anode materials. PMID:25367289

  9. Lithium-associated hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Siyam, Fadi F; Deshmukh, Sanaa; Garcia-Touza, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Goiters and hypothyroidism are well-known patient complications of the use of lithium for treatment of bipolar disease. However, the occurrence of lithium-induced hyperthyroidism is a more rare event. Many times, the condition can be confused with a flare of mania. Monitoring through serial biochemical measurement of thyroid function is critical in patients taking lithium. Hyperthyroidism induced by lithium is a condition that generally can be controlled medically without the patient having to discontinue lithium therapy, although in some circumstances, discontinuation of lithium therapy may be indicated. We report on a patient case of lithium-associated hyperthyroidism that resolved after discontinuation of the medication. PMID:23948626

  10. Facile synthesis and enhanced electrochemical performances of Li2TiO3-coated lithium-rich layered Li1.13Ni0.30Mn0.57O2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Enyue; Liu, Xiangfeng; Hu, Zhongbo; Sun, Limei; Xiao, Xiaoling

    2015-10-01

    Li2TiO3-coated Li-rich layered Li1.13Ni0.30Mn0.57O2 (0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiNi0.5Mn0.5O2) compound has been successfully synthesized for the first time through a syn-lithiation strategy. In this approach, Ni0.35Mn0.65C2O4·xH2O precursor is first prepared by a co-precipitation method, then it is coated with TiO2 through a reaction between Ni0.35Mn0.65C2O4·xH2O and Ti(OC4H9)4, and finally Ni0.35Mn0.65C2O4rad yH2O@TiO2 is simultaneously lithiated to form Li2TiO3-coated Li-rich layered oxide. Both the cyclability and high-rate capability of Li-rich layered cathode materials have been greatly improved by Li2TiO3 coating. Meanwhile, the Li2TiO3 coating layer also reduces the polarization of the electrode and retards voltage drop during cycling. The reversible capacity of the 3 mol% Li2TiO3-coated Li-rich layered cathode material at the 100th cycle at a large current density of 100 mA/g is significantly enhanced to105 mAh/g from 78 mAh/g of the un-coated sample. The enhancements of the electrochemical performance can be largely attributed to the stabilization of the interface between the cathode and electrolyte, the three-dimensional path for Li+-ion and better conductivity after Li2TiO3 coating. It is also disclosed that the amount of Li2TiO3 coating also has a large influence on the electrochemical performances and it is necessary to optimize the specific capacity, cycling stability and rate capability through tuning the content of Li2TiO3 coating.

  11. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  12. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  13. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  14. Catalyst engineering for lithium ion batteries: the catalytic role of Ge in enhancing the electrochemical performance of SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yun Guang; Wang, Ye; Han, Zhao Jun; Shi, Yumeng; Wong, Jen It; Huang, Zhi Xiang; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Yang, Hui Ying

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic role of germanium (Ge) was investigated to improve the electrochemical performance of tin dioxide grown on graphene (SnO2/G) nanocomposites as an anode material of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Germanium dioxide (GeO2) and SnO2 nanoparticles (<10 nm) were uniformly anchored on the graphene sheets via a simple single-step hydrothermal method. The synthesized SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G nanocomposites can deliver a capacity of 1200 mA h g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1, which is much higher than the traditional theoretical specific capacity of such nanocomposites (~702 mA h g-1). More importantly, the SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G nanocomposites exhibited an improved rate, large current capability (885 mA h g-1 at a discharge current of 2000 mA g-1) and excellent long cycling stability (almost 100% retention after 600 cycles). The enhanced electrochemical performance was attributed to the catalytic effect of Ge, which enabled the reversible reaction of metals (Sn and Ge) to metals oxide (SnO2 and GeO2) during the charge/discharge processes. Our demonstrated approach towards nanocomposite catalyst engineering opens new avenues for next-generation high-performance rechargeable Li-ion batteries anode materials.The catalytic role of germanium (Ge) was investigated to improve the electrochemical performance of tin dioxide grown on graphene (SnO2/G) nanocomposites as an anode material of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Germanium dioxide (GeO2) and SnO2 nanoparticles (<10 nm) were uniformly anchored on the graphene sheets via a simple single-step hydrothermal method. The synthesized SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G nanocomposites can deliver a capacity of 1200 mA h g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1, which is much higher than the traditional theoretical specific capacity of such nanocomposites (~702 mA h g-1). More importantly, the SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G nanocomposites exhibited an improved rate, large current capability (885 mA h g-1 at a discharge current of 2000 mA g-1) and excellent long

  15. A comparative study on electrochemical cycling stability of lithium rich layered cathode materials Li1.2Ni0.13M0.13Mn0.54O2 where M = Fe or Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laisa, C. P.; Nanda Kumar, A. K.; Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P.; Lakshminarasimhan, N.; Govindaraj, R.; Ramesha, K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we compare electrochemical cycling stability of Fe containing Li rich phase Li1.2Ni0.13Fe0.13Mn0.54O2 (Fe-Li rich) with the well-known Co containing Li rich composition Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 (Co-Li rich). During the first charge, the activation plateau corresponding to removal of Li2O from the structure is smaller (removal of 0.6 Li) in the case of Fe-Li rich compared to Co-Li rich composition (0.8 Li removal). Consequently, the Fe compound shows better capacity retention; for example, after 100 cycles Fe-Li rich compound exhibits 20% capacity degradation where as it is about 40% in the case of Co-Li rich phase. The electrochemical and microscopy studies support the fact that compared to Co-Li rich compound, the Fe-Li rich composition display smaller voltage decay and reduced spinel conversion. XPS studies on charged/discharged Fe-Li rich samples show participation of Fe+3/Fe+4 redox during electrochemical cycling which is further supported by our first principles calculations. Also the temperature dependent magnetic studies on charge-discharged samples of Fe-Li rich compound point out that magnetic behavior is sensitive to cation oxidation states and Ni/Li disorder.

  16. A comparative study on electrochemical cycling stability of lithium rich layered cathode materials Li1.2Ni0.13M0.13Mn0.54O2 where M = Fe or Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laisa, C. P.; Nanda Kumar, A. K.; Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P.; Lakshminarasimhan, N.; Govindaraj, R.; Ramesha, K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we compare electrochemical cycling stability of Fe containing Li rich phase Li1.2Ni0.13Fe0.13Mn0.54O2 (Fe-Li rich) with the well-known Co containing Li rich composition Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 (Co-Li rich). During the first charge, the activation plateau corresponding to removal of Li2O from the structure is smaller (removal of 0.6 Li) in the case of Fe-Li rich compared to Co-Li rich composition (0.8 Li removal). Consequently, the Fe compound shows better capacity retention; for example, after 100 cycles Fe-Li rich compound exhibits 20% capacity degradation where as it is about 40% in the case of Co-Li rich phase. The electrochemical and microscopy studies support the fact that compared to Co-Li rich compound, the Fe-Li rich composition display smaller voltage decay and reduced spinel conversion. XPS studies on charged/discharged Fe-Li rich samples show participation of Fe+3/Fe+4 redox during electrochemical cycling which is further supported by our first principles calculations. Also the temperature dependent magnetic studies on charge-discharged samples of Fe-Li rich compound point out that magnetic behavior is sensitive to cation oxidation states and Ni/Li disorder.

  17. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  18. Aluminum-lithium alloys in helicopters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.F.

    1997-10-01

    Aluminium-lithium alloys are widely applied on the EH101 helicopter, designed and built jointly by GKN Westland Helicopters of England and Agusta S.p.A. of Italy. With the exception of the powder metallurgy alloy AA 5091, all the current commercially available aluminum-lithium alloys are produced by direct-chill casting, and require a precipitation-aging heat treatment to achieve the required properties. In aluminum-lithium alloys containing greater than 1.3% (by weight) of lithium, the intermetallic phase {delta}{prime}-Al{sub 3}Li precipitates upon natural or artificial aging, but the associated strengthening effect is insufficient to meet the medium or high strength levels usually required (the damage tolerant temper in AA 8090 is an exception).

  19. Tailoring Surface Properties of Polymeric Separators for Lithium-Ion Batteries by 13.56 MHz Radio-Frequency Plasma Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chia-Han; Juang, Ruey-Shin; Tsai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Chun

    2013-11-01

    The hydrophilic surface modification of the polymeric separator is achieved by low-pressure 13.56 MHz radio-frequency Ar and He gas plasma treatments. The changes in surface hydrophilicity and surface free energy were examined by static contact angle analysis. The static water contact angle of the plasma-modified polymeric separator particularly decreased with the increase in treatment time. An obvious increase in the surface energy of polymeric separators owing to the crosslinking by activated species of inert gases effect of monatomic-gas-plasma treatments was also observed. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to analyze the chemical species generated after Ar and He gas plasma treatments. The variations in the surface morphology and chemical structure of the polymeric separators were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. XPS analysis showed significantly higher surface concentrations of oxygen functional groups for monatomic-gas-plasma-modified polymeric separator surfaces than for the unmodified polymeric separator surface. The experimental results show the important role of chemical species in the interaction between Ar and He gas plasmas and the polymeric separator surface, which can be controlled by surface modification to tailor the hydrophilicity of the polymeric separator.

  20. Rechargeable lithium cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, M.; Plichta, E. J.

    1984-09-01

    The general object of this invention is to provide an improved rechargeable lithium cell. A more specific object of the invention is to provide a rechargeable lithium cell having an improved low temperature performance and rate capability. It has now been found that the aformentioned objects can be attained using lithium as the anode, a solution of a lithium salt such as LiF6 or LiAlC14 in a mixed organic solvent as the electrolyte and a lithium intercalating cathode.

  1. Lithium1.3Aluminum0.3Titanium1.7Phosphate as a solid state Li-ion conductor: Issues with microcracking and stability in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, Spencer D.

    Lithium aluminum titanium phosphate (LATP) with formula Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO4)3 was analyzed and tested to better understand its applicability as a solid state ion conducting ceramic material for electrochemical applications. Sintered samples were obtained from Ceramatec, Inc. in Salt Lake City and characterized in terms of density, phase-purity, fracture toughness, Young's modulus, thermal expansion behavior, mechanical strength, a.c. and d.c. ionic conductivity, and susceptibility to static and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous Li salt solutions. It was shown that LATP is prone to microcrack generation because of high thermal expansion anisotropy. A.c. impedance spectra of high-purity LATP of varying grain sizes showed that microcracking had a negative impact on the ionic conduction of Li along grain boundaries, with fine-grained (1.7±0.7 µm) LATP having twice the ionic conductivity of the same purity of coarse-grained (4.8±1.9 µm) LATP at 50°C. LATP with detectible secondary phases had lower ionic conductivity for similar grain sizes, as would be expected. The Young's modulus of fine-grained LATP was measured to be 115 GPa, and the highest biaxial strength was 191±11 MPa when tested in mineral oil, 144±13 MPa as measured in air, and 26±7 MPa after exposure to deionized water, suggesting that LATP undergoes stress-corrosion cracking. After exposure to LiOH, the strength was 76±19 MPa. This decrease in strength was observed despite there being no measureable change in a.c. impedance spectra, X-ray diffraction, or sample mass, suggesting phosphate glasses at grain boundaries. The chemical and electrochemical stability of high-purity LATP in aqueous electrochemical cells was evaluated using LiOH, LiCl, LiNO3, and LiCOOCH3 salts as the Li source. LATP was found to be most stable between pH 8-9, with the longest cell operating continuously at 25 mA cm-2 for 625 hours at 40°C in LiCOOCH3. At pH values outside of the 7-10 range, eventual membrane degradation

  2. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-01

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes.

  3. Kidney function and lithium concentrations of rats given an injection of lithium orotate or lithium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F; Schou, M

    1979-03-01

    A recent study by Kling et al (1978) noted the finding of higher lithium concentrations in serum and brain of rats after an intraperitoneal injection (2 mmol lithium kg-1) of lithium orotate as a slurry than of lithium carbonate in solution. The authors suggested that lithium orotate might offer advantages in the treatment of patients. We repeated the experiments of Kling et al but in addition examined the kidney function of the rats. Glomerular filtration rate and urine flow were markedly lower in rats given lithium orotate than in rats given lithium carbonate, sodium chloride or a sham injection. The renal lithium clearance was significantly lower, the kidney weight and the lithium concentrations in serum, kidney and heart significantly higher after injection of lithium orotate than after injection of lithium carbonate. The higher lithium concentrations could be accounted for by the lower kidney function. It seems inadvisable to use lithium orotate for the treatment of patients. PMID:34690

  4. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes. PMID:26081242

  5. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-17

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes.

  6. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  7. Lithium Redistribution in Lithium-Metal Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrese, A; Albertus, P; Christensen, J; Newman, J

    2012-01-01

    A model of a lithium-metal battery with a CoO2 positive electrode has been modeled in order to predict the movement of lithium in the negative electrode along the negative electrode/separator interface during cell cycling. A finite-element approach was used to incorporate an intercalation positive electrode using superposition, electrode tabbing, transport using concentrated solution theory, as well as the net movement of the lithium electrode during cycling. From this model, it has been found that movement of lithium along the negative electrode/separator interface does occur during cycling and is affected by three factors: the cell geometry, the slope of the open-circuit-potential function of the positive electrode, and concentration gradients in both the solid and liquid phases in the cell. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.027210jes] All rights reserved.

  8. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, R.F.; Meadows, G.E.

    1984-01-10

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  9. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, Robert F.; Meadows, George E.

    1985-01-01

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  10. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltash, Abdolreza; Petrov, Andrei Y; Linkous, Randall Lee; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2007-01-01

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient

  11. Lithium batteries: Application of neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Esaka, Takao; Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Kanda, Keiji

    Several kinds of primary and secondary commercial lithium batteries, such as CR1/3 · 1H (Fujitsu), CR1220 and BR435 (Panasonic), ML1220 (Sanyo Excel) were investigated using neutron radiography; the variation of the lithium distribution inside these batteries upon discharging (and charging) were clarified by analyzing their visualized images. It was demonstrated that neutron radiography is a potential and useful method, especially in evaluating the reversibility of rechargeable batteries, which have been used under different discharging/charging conditions.

  12. NASA lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juvinall, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages of lithium systems are described and a general summary of their application in present and future NASA programs is presented. Benefits of the lithium systems include an increased payload weight and an increased cost effectiveness to the customer. This also allows for more flexibility in the design of future space transportation systems.

  13. Metastable structure of Li13Si4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Thomas; Bahmann, Silvia; Kortus, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The Li13Si4 phase is one out of several crystalline lithium silicide phases, which is a potential electrode material for lithium ion batteries and contains a high theoretical specific capacity. By means of ab initio methods like density functional theory (DFT) many properties such as heat capacity or heat of formation can be calculated. These properties are based on the calculation of phonon frequencies, which contain information about the thermodynamical stability. The current unit cell of "Li13Si4" given in the ICSD database is unstable with respect to DFT calculations. We propose a modified unit cell that is stable in the calculations. The evolutionary algorithm EVO found a structure very similar to the ICSD one with both of them containing metastable lithium positions. Molecular dynamic simulations show a phase transition between both structures where these metastable lithium atoms move. This phase transition is achieved by a very fast one-dimensional lithium diffusion and stabilizes this phase.

  14. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  15. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  16. Lithium and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Motoi, Yumiko; Shimada, Kohei; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-06-18

    Lithium, a drug used to treat bipolar disorders, has a variety of neuroprotective mechanisms, including autophagy regulation, in various neuropsychiatric conditions. In neurodegenerative diseases, lithium enhances degradation of aggregate-prone proteins, including mutated huntingtin, phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein, and causes damaged mitochondria to degrade, while in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer's disease autophagy downregulation by lithium is observed. The signaling pathway of lithium as an autophagy enhancer might be associated with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent pathway, which is involved in myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the mTOR-dependent pathway might be involved in inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in other diseases. Lithium's autophagy-enhancing property may contribute to the therapeutic benefit of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders.

  17. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kim, Jeom-Soo; Johnson, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  18. Lithium cell test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

  19. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  20. Lithium reduces apoptosis and autophagy after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Li, H; Roughton, K; Wang, X; Kroemer, G; Blomgren, K; Zhu, C

    2010-07-15

    Lithium is used in the treatment of bipolar mood disorder. Reportedly, lithium can be neuroprotective in models of adult brain ischemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of lithium in a model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Nine-day-old male rats were subjected to unilateral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and 2 mmol/kg lithium chloride was injected i.p. immediately after the insult. Additional lithium injections, 1 mmol/kg, were administered at 24-h intervals. Pups were killed 6, 24 or 72 h after HI. Lithium reduced the infarct volume from 24.7±2.9 to 13.8±3.3 mm(3) (44.1%) and total tissue loss (degeneration + lack of growth) from 67.4±4.4 to 38.4±5.9 mm(3) (43.1%) compared with vehicle at 72 h after HI. Injury was reduced in the cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and striatum. Lithium reduced the ischemia-induced dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, the activation of calpain and caspase-3, the mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as autophagy. We conclude that lithium could mitigate the brain injury after HI by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis. The lithium doses used were in the same range as those used in bipolar patients, suggesting that lithium might be safely used for the avoidance of neonatal brain injury.

  1. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  2. Inverse temperature dependence of electrical conductivity of solutions of lithium salts in aprotic media

    SciTech Connect

    Plakhotnik, V.N.; Tovmash, N.F.; Kovtum, Yu.V.

    1987-08-01

    Solutions of lithium salts in aprotic dipolar solvents are studied in this paper for their use as electrolytes in lithium batteries. The temperature dependence and isotherms of the electric conductivity of molten salts of lithium fluorides with arsenic and boron are assessed against a range of solvents including tetrahydrofuran, propylene carbonate, 1,3-dioxolane, gamma-butyrolactone, water, hydrogen, and dimethoxyethane. Ionization potentials are given and molar ratios for the salts and solvents are tabulated.

  3. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  4. Microstructure of Li(Mn{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} cathode material for lithium ion battery: Dependence of crystal structure on calcination and heat-treatment temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kabi, S.; Ghosh, A.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: TEM micrograph of Li(Mn{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} compound calcined at 900 °C. - Highlights: • Synthesis condition of Li(Mn{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} compound was optimized. • Effect of calcination and heat treatment on the structure was investigated. • Controlled heat-treatment reduced cation mixing and improved structural ordering. • Calcination and heat-treatment condition affected distribution of particle size. - Abstract: Cathode compounds of composition Li(Mn{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} have been prepared by calcination of the precursor materials at 700, 800, 900 and 1000 °C for 24 h and by subsequent heat-treatments at 1100 °C for 4–6 h. It has been observed that the structural ordering and particle size increase with increasing calcination temperature. The compounds calcined at 700 °C and 800 °C are not well-crystallized, but the distribution of particles is uniform. However, the compounds calcined at 900 °C and 1000 °C are well-crystallized with a non-uniform distribution of particles. The compounds calcined at 900 °C are well-crystallized with a well-ordered hexagonal structure. The samples calcined at 800 °C and heat treated at 1100 °C for 4 h also show same structure. They have smooth surface morphology with uniform distribution of particles in the sub-micron (0.15–0.40 μm) range and less amount of cation mixing.

  5. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  6. Lithium counterdoped silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I. (Inventor); Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The resistance to radiation damage of an n(+)p boron doped silicon solar cell is improved by lithium counterdoping. Even though lithium is an n-dopant in silicon, the lithium is introduced in small enough quantities so that the cell base remains p-type. The lithium is introduced into the solar cell wafer by implantation of lithium ions whose energy is about 50 keV. After this lithium implantation, the wafer is annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere at 375 C for two hours.

  7. Aluminum-lithium for aerospace

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.S.; Wolf, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys were developed primarily to reduce the weight of aircraft and aerospace structures. Lithium is the lightest metallic element, and each 1% of lithium added to aluminum reduces alloy density by about 3% and increases modulus by about 5%. Though lithium has a solubility limit of 4.2% in aluminum, the amount of lithium ranges between 1 and 3% in commercial alloys. Aluminum-lithium alloys are most often selected for aerospace components because of their low density, high strength, and high specific modulus. However, other applications now exploit their excellent fatigue resistance and cryogenic toughness.

  8. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J.

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  9. Lithium to the Rescue.

    PubMed

    Jope, Richard S; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    Lithium, an element that Mother Nature has put in some drinking water sources, has been used for its curative powers for centuries. Today, it's given in capsule form as a mood stabilizer for bipolar disorder and depression. New research, however, reveals its role as a neuroprotector, and suggests that a better understanding of the role enzymes modulated by lithium play could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27408673

  10. Lithium Polysulfidophosphates: A Family of Lithium-Conducting Sulfur-Rich Compounds for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wujun; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-01-01

    Given the great potential for improving the energy density of state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries by a factor of 5, a breakthrough in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries will have a dramatic impact in a broad scope of energy related fields. Conventional Li-S batteries that use liquid electrolytes are intrinsically short-lived with low energy efficiency. The challenges stem from the poor electronic and ionic conductivities of elemental sulfur and its discharge products. We report herein lithium polysulfidophosphates (LPSP), a family of sulfur-rich compounds, as the enabler of long-lasting and energy-efficient Li-S batteries. LPSP have ionic conductivities of 3.0 10-5 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 8 orders of magnitude higher than that of Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high Li-ion conductivity of LPSP is the salient characteristic of these compounds that impart the excellent cycling performance to Li-S batteries. In addition, the batteries are configured in an all-solid state that promises the safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

  11. [Neuroprotective actions of lithium].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Jeong, Mi Ra; Senatorov, Vladimir V; Christ, Lori; Leeds, Peter; Chuang, De-Maw; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has long been one of the primary drugs used to treat bipolar mood disorder. However, neither the etiology of this disease nor the therapeutic mechanism(s) of this drug is well understood. Several lines of clinical evidence suggest that lithium has neurotrophic actions. For example chronic lithium treatment increases the volume of gray matter and the content of N-acetyl-aspartate, a cell survival marker, in bipolar mood disorder patients (Moore et al., 2000). Moreover, treatment with this mood-stabilizer suppresses the decrease in the volume of the subgenual pre-frontal cortex found in bipolar patients (Drevets, 2001). To elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions of lithium, we employed a preparation of cultured cortical neurons prepared form embryonic rats. We found that treatment with therapeutic doses (0.2-1.2 mM) of lithium robustly protects cortical neurons from multiple insults, notably glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. The neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity is time-dependent, requiring treatment for 5-6 days for maximal effect, and is associated with a reduction in NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx. The latter is correlated with a decrease in Tyrosine 1472 phosphorylation levels in the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors and a loss of Src kinase activity which is involved in NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation. Neither the activity of total tyrosine protein kinase nor that of tyrosine protein phosphatase is affected by this drug, indicating the selectivity of the modulation. Lithium neuroprotection against excitotoxicity is inhibited by a BDNF-neutralizing antibody and K252a, a Trk antagonist. Lithium treatment time-dependently increases the intracellular level of BDNF in cortical neurons and activates its receptor, TrkB. The neuroprotection can be completely blocked by either heterozygous or homozygous knockout of the BDNF gene. These results suggest a central role of BDNF and TrkB in mediating the

  12. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-01

    In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H(2)O(2) (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75°C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H(2)O(2) in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1-(1-X)(1/3)=k(c)t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model 'ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles' i.e. 1-3(1-X)(2/3)+2(1-X)=k(c)t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  13. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  14. Nonflammable perfluoropolyether-based electrolytes for lithium batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Dominica H. C.; Thelen, Jacob L.; Fu, Yanbao; Devaux, Didier; Pandya, Ashish A.; Battaglia, Vincent S.; Balsara, Nitash P.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The flammability of conventional alkyl carbonate electrolytes hinders the integration of large-scale lithium-ion batteries in transportation and grid storage applications. In this study, we have prepared a unique nonflammable electrolyte composed of low molecular weight perfluoropolyethers and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide lithium salt. These electrolytes exhibit thermal stability beyond 200 °C and a remarkably high transference number of at least 0.91 (more than double that of conventional electrolytes). Li/LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cells made with this electrolyte show good performance in galvanostatic cycling, confirming their potential as rechargeable lithium batteries with enhanced safety and longevity. PMID:24516123

  15. Rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    The cycling performance of a secondary lithium cell with a 2-methyl THF lithium hectofluorarsenate electrolyte is discussed. Stripping efficiency, dendritization, passivation on standing, and discharge efficiency are considered.

  16. US Navy lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of lithium systems that are already in the fleet are discussed. The approach that the Navy is taking in the control of the introduction of lithium batteries into the fleet is also discussed.

  17. Lithium question for nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, P.S.S.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the lithium reserve (the economically recoverable lithium) for the tritium breeding in D-T fusion reactors and other uses. Similar development patterns for fusion energy and fission energy are assumed to estimate the future lithium requirements. These requirements are grouped into three categories; the commercial uses, the lithium batteries for electric cars, and the fusion reactor uses. 5 refs.

  18. Effects of maintenance lithium treatment on serum parathyroid hormone and calcium levels: a retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Umberto; De Cori, David; Aguglia, Andrea; Barbaro, Francesca; Lanfranco, Fabio; Bogetto, Filippo; Maina, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study was to evaluate the effects of maintenance lithium treatment on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium levels. Methods A retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study design was used. Data were collected from the database of a tertiary psychiatric center covering the years 2010–2014. Included were bipolar patients who had never been exposed to lithium and had lithium started, and who had PTH, and total and ionized calcium levels available before and during lithium treatment. Paired t-tests were used to analyze changes in PTH and calcium levels. Linear regressions were performed, with mean lithium level and duration of lithium exposure as independent variables and change in PTH levels as dependent variable. Results A total 31 patients were included. The mean duration of lithium treatment was 18.6±11.4 months. PTH levels significantly increased during lithium treatment (+13.55±14.20 pg/mL); the rate of hyperparathyroidism was 12.9%. Neither total nor ionized calcium increased from baseline to follow-up; none of our patients developed hypercalcemia. Linear regressions analyses did not show an effect of duration of lithium exposure or mean lithium level on PTH levels. Conclusion Lithium-associated stimulation of parathyroid function is more common than assumed to date. Among parameters to be evaluated prior to lithium implementation, calcium and PTH should be added. PMID:26229473

  19. A review of lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Huang, Jun; Yann Liaw, Bor; Metzler, Viktor; Zhang, Jianbo

    2014-05-01

    Major aspects related to lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries are reviewed. For lithium-ion batteries with carbonaceous anode, lithium deposition may occur under harsh charging conditions such as overcharging or charging at low temperatures. The major technical solutions include: (1) applying electrochemical models to predict the critical conditions for deposition initiation; (2) preventions by improved battery design and material modification; (3) applying adequate charging protocols to inhibit lithium deposition. For lithium metal secondary batteries, the lithium deposition is the inherent reaction during charging. The major technical solutions include: (1) the use of mechanistic models to elucidate and control dendrite initiation and growth; (2) engineering surface morphology of the lithium deposition to avoid dendrite formation via adjusting the composition and concentration of the electrolyte; (3) controlling battery working conditions. From a survey of the literature, the areas that require further study are proposed; e.g., refining the lithium deposition criteria, developing an effective AC self pre-heating method for low-temperature charging of lithium-ion batteries, and clarifying the role the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays in determining the deposition morphology; to facilitate a refined control of the lithium deposition.

  20. Lithium overdosage and related tests.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, Paolo D; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Guzzi, Gianpaolo

    2016-12-01

    Lithium acts biochemically through the inositol depletion in brain cortex. At low doses, however, it is partly effective and/or ineffective, whereas in high concentrations is toxic. We would like to make one point about this review. In fact, in our view, the patient should be given a support to correct hypernatremia and even sodium levels should be tested serially-along with serum lithium concentrations-because high sodium levels reduce the rate of elimination of lithium. Lithium is mainly a neurotoxicant. Lithium-related central nervous system toxicity as well as the cardiovascular and thyroid changes are most likely due to the cations (Na2 (+) and K(+)) competition. PMID:26753697

  1. Lithium Dinitramide as an Additive in Lithium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkovenko, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    Lithium dinitramide, LiN(NO2)2 has shown promise as an additive to nonaqueous electrolytes in rechargeable and non-rechargeable lithium-ion-based electrochemical power cells. Such non-aqueous electrolytes consist of lithium salts dissolved in mixtures of organic ethers, esters, carbonates, or acetals. The benefits of adding lithium dinitramide (which is also a lithium salt) include lower irreversible loss of capacity on the first charge/discharge cycle, higher cycle life, lower self-discharge, greater flexibility in selection of electrolyte solvents, and greater charge capacity. The need for a suitable electrolyte additive arises as follows: The metallic lithium in the anode of a lithium-ion-based power cell is so highly reactive that in addition to the desired main electrochemical reaction, it engages in side reactions that cause formation of resistive films and dendrites, which degrade performance as quantified in terms of charge capacity, cycle life, shelf life, first-cycle irreversible capacity loss, specific power, and specific energy. The incidence of side reactions can be reduced through the formation of a solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) a thin film that prevents direct contact between the lithium anode material and the electrolyte. Ideally, an SEI should chemically protect the anode and the electrolyte from each other while exhibiting high conductivity for lithium ions and little or no conductivity for electrons. A suitable additive can act as an SEI promoter. Heretofore, most SEI promotion was thought to derive from organic molecules in electrolyte solutions. In contrast, lithium dinitramide is inorganic. Dinitramide compounds are known as oxidizers in rocket-fuel chemistry and until now, were not known as SEI promoters in battery chemistry. Although the exact reason for the improvement afforded by the addition of lithium dinitramide is not clear, it has been hypothesized that lithium dinitramide competes with other electrolyte constituents to react with

  2. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  3. 77 FR 28259 - Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... for mailpieces containing lithium metal or lithium-ion cells or batteries and applies regardless of...'' instead of ``lithium content'' for secondary lithium-ion batteries when describing maximum quantity limits...-ion (Rechargeable) Cells and Batteries Small consumer-type lithium-ion cells and batteries like...

  4. Advances in ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Deligiannis, F.; Huang, C.-K.; Halpert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the NASA/OAST sponsored program on the development of ambient-temperature secondary lithium cells for future space applications is to develop cells with a 100 W h/kg specific energy and capable of 1000 cycles at 50-percent depth of discharge. This paper examines the performance potentials of Li-TiS2, Li-MoS3, Li-V6O13, and Li-NbSe3 electrochemical systems at ambient temperature, together with cycle life and safety characteristics. Of these four, the Li-TiS2 system was found to be the most promising in terms of achievable specific energy and cycle life. Major advances made on the development of secondary lithium cells, which are in the areas of cathode processing technology, mixed solvent electrolytes, and cell assembly, are summarized.

  5. Diagnostics for liquid lithium experiments in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Efthimion, P.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Kugel, H.; Majeski, R.; Munsat, T.; Raftopoulos, S.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.

    2001-01-01

    A flowing liquid lithium first wall or divertor target could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls in fusion reactors. To investigate the interaction of a spherical torus plasma with liquid lithium limiters, large area divertor targets, and walls, discharges will be established in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) where the plasma--wall interactions are dominated by liquid lithium surfaces. Among the unique CDX-U lithium diagnostics is a multilayer mirror (MLM) array, which will monitor the 13.5 nm LiIII line for core lithium concentrations. Additional spectroscopic diagnostics include a grazing incidence extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectrometer (STRS) and a filterscope system to monitor D{sub {alpha}} and various impurity lines local to the lithium limiter. Profile data will be obtained with a multichannel tangential bolometer and a multipoint Thomson scattering system configured to give enhanced edge resolution. Coupons on the inner wall of the CDX-U vacuum vessel will be used for surface analysis. A 10000 frame per second fast visible camera and an IR camera will also be available.

  6. Lithium disulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1988-01-01

    A negative electrode limited secondary electrochemical cell having dense FeS.sub.2 positive electrode operating exclusively on the upper plateau, a Li alloy negative electrode and a suitable lithium-containing electrolyte. The electrolyte preferably is 25 mole percent LiCl, 38 mole percent LiBr and 37 mole percent KBr. The cell may be operated isothermally.

  7. Lithium battery discharge tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The long term discharge of a variety of lithium cells was characterized and the susceptibility of the cells to chemical variation during the slow discharge was tested. A shunt resistor was set across the terminals to monitor the voltage as a function of time. Failures were identified by premature voltage drops.

  8. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  9. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  10. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Manis Kumar Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: • Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. • Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. • The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. • Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. • After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 °C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 − (1 − X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ‘ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles’ i.e. 1 − 3(1 − X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 − X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  11. Increased risk of solid renal tumors in lithium-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, Mohamad; Stucker, Fabien; Stengel, Bénédicte; Vasiliu, Viorel; Hummel, Aurélie; Landais, Paul; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Ronco, Pierre; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Servais, Aude

    2014-07-01

    Cystic kidney diseases and toxic interstitial nephritis may be complicated by renal tumors. Long-term lithium intake is associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis and renal cysts but to date such an association with tumors has not been determined. We evaluated this in a retrospective study to determine whether lithium-treated patients were at higher risk of renal tumors compared with lithium-free patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and to the general population. Over a 16-year period, 14 of 170 lithium-treated patients had renal tumors, including seven malignant and seven benign tumors. The mean duration of lithium exposure at diagnosis was 21.4 years. The renal cancers included three clear-cell and two papillary renal cell carcinomas, one hybrid tumor with chromophobe and oncocytoma characteristics, and one clear-cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma. The benign tumors included four oncocytomas, one mixed epithelial and stromal tumor, and two angiomyolipomas. The percentage of renal tumors, particularly cancers and oncocytomas, was significantly higher in lithium-treated patients compared with 340 gender-, age-, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-matched lithium-free patients. Additionally, the Standardized Incidence Ratio of renal cancer was significantly higher in lithium-treated patients compared with the general population: 7.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) (1.51-21.95)) and 13.69 (95% CI (3.68-35.06)) in men and women, respectively. Thus, there is an increased risk of renal tumors in lithium-treated patients.

  12. Lithium-methomyl induced seizures in rats: A new model of status epilepticus?

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Rafal M. . E-mail: kaminskr@mail.nih.gov; Blaszczak, Piotr; Dekundy, Andrzej; Parada-Turska, Jolanta; Calderazzo, Lineu; Cavalheiro, Esper A.; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2007-03-15

    Behavioral, electroencephalographic (EEG) and neuropathological effects of methomyl, a carbamate insecticide reversibly inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity, were studied in naive or lithium chloride (24 h, 3 mEq/kg, s.c.) pretreated male Wistar rats. In naive animals, methomyl with equal potency produced motor limbic seizures and fatal status epilepticus. Thus, the CD50 values (50% convulsant dose) for these seizure endpoints were almost equal to the LD50 (50% lethal dose) of methomyl (13 mg/kg). Lithium pretreated rats were much more susceptible to convulsant, but not lethal effect of methomyl. CD50 values of methomyl for motor limbic seizures and status epilepticus were reduced by lithium pretreatment to 3.7 mg/kg (a 3.5-fold decrease) and 5.2 mg/kg (a 2.5-fold decrease), respectively. In contrast, lithium pretreatment resulted in only 1.3-fold decrease of LD50 value of methomyl (9.9 mg/kg). Moreover, lithium-methomyl treated animals developed a long-lasting status epilepticus, which was not associated with imminent lethality observed in methomyl-only treated rats. Scopolamine (10 mg/kg) or diazepam (10 mg/kg) protected all lithium-methomyl treated rats from convulsions and lethality. Cortical and hippocampal EEG recordings revealed typical epileptic discharges that were consistent with behavioral seizures observed in lithium-methomyl treated rats. In addition, convulsions induced by lithium-methomyl treatment were associated with widespread neurodegeneration of limbic structures. Our observations indicate that lithium pretreatment results in separation between convulsant and lethal effects of methomyl in rats. As such, seizures induced by lithium-methomyl administration may be an alternative to lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus, which is associated with high lethality.

  13. Predictors of excellent response to lithium: results from a nationwide register-based study.

    PubMed

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hellmund, Gunnar; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify sociodemographic and clinical predictors of excellent response, that is, 'cure' of future affective episodes, to lithium in monotherapy. We used nationwide registers to identify all patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in psychiatric hospital settings who were prescribed lithium from 1995 to 2006 in Denmark (N=3762). Excellent lithium responders were defined as patients who after a stabilization lithium start-up period of 6 months, continued lithium in monotherapy without getting hospitalized. The rate of excellent response to lithium in monotherapy was 8.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.9-9.9] at 5-year follow-up and 5.4% (95% CI: 4.4-6.3) at 10-year follow-up. The rate of nonresponse to lithium monotherapy was significantly increased for female patients [hazards ratio (HR)=1.12, 95% CI: 1.04-1.21) and for patients with a depressive index episode compared with patients in remission or with a diagnosis of other or unspecified bipolar disorder before first lithium purchase (HR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.03-1.25). The rate of nonresponse increased by 3% (95% CI: 2-5%) for every psychiatric hospitalization before first purchase of lithium. Patients with somatic comorbidity had increased rates of non-response to lithium compared with patients without somatic comorbidity (HR=1.23, 95% CI: 1.00-1.52).It is concluded that the prevalence of excellent response to lithium monotherapy is low and such patients are characterized by few earlier psychiatric hospitalizations, a manic index episode before lithium and reduced somatic comorbidity.

  14. Sputter deposition of lithium silicate - lithium phosphate amorphous electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N.J.; Bates, J.B.; Luck, C.F. ); Robertson, J.D. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of an amorphous lithium-conducting electrolyte were deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of ceramic targets containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The lithium content of the films was found to depend more strongly on the nature and composition of the targets than on many other sputtering parameters. For targets containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, most of the lithium was found to segregate away from the sputtered area of the target. Codeposition using two sputter sources achieves a high lithium content in a controlled and reproducible film growth. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  16. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Hou, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed. PMID:24958286

  17. Effect of Cu substitution on structures and electrochemical properties of Li[NiCo1-xCuxMn]1/3O2 as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhao-Jin; Wang, Dong; Gao, Zhi-Fang; Yue, Hai-Feng; Liu, Wei-Ming

    2015-11-14

    Copper ions are one of the major associated metal ions present in the precursors of the synthesis of Li[NiCoMn]1/3O2 from the recovery of spent Li-ion batteries by wet chemical processes. To evaluate the feasibility of reusing Cu(2+) as a favourable dopant in Li[NiCoMn]1/3O2 instead of as usual removing it as an undesirable impurity, the effect of Cu-doping on the electrochemical behaviour of Li[NiCoMn]1/3O2 is investigated in this work. Li[NiCo1-xCuxMn]1/3O2 (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08) is synthesized through two steps, roasting the precursors obtained from carbonate co-precipitation, and their structures and electrochemical performances are systemically investigated. The results indicate that substitution of Co with Cu was successfully achieved without any detectable second phases. The initial discharge capacity of Li[NiCo1-xCuxMn]1/3O2 gradually dropped with an increase of x but the rate property and capacity retention were remarkably enhanced. In particular, the capacity retention of the Li[NiCo0.94Cu0.06Mn]1/3O2 sample reached 95.87% within 50 cycles at a current density of 160 mA g(-1). CV and EIS revealed that such improvements are ascribed to a higher Li(+) diffusion coefficient and lower charge-transfer resistance derived from Cu(2+) doping. The results suggest that Cu can be used as a beneficial dopant to partially substitute Co in synthesizing Li[NiCoMn]1/3O2 from spent LIBs instead of having to remove it as an impurity. PMID:26448326

  18. Rat brain and serum lithium concentrations after acute injections of lithium carbonate and orotate.

    PubMed

    Kling, M A; Manowitz, P; Pollack, I W

    1978-06-01

    Eight hours after intraperitoneal injections of 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0m equiv Li kg-1, the serum and brain lithium concentrations of rats were significantly greater after lithium orotate than after lithium carbonate. While little serum lithium remained at 24 h after injection of 2.0 m equiv kg-1 lithium carbonate, two-thirds of the 2 h serum lithium concentration was present 24h after lithium orotate. Furthermore, the 24 h brain concentration of lithium after lithium orotate was approximately three times greater than that after lithium carbonate. These data suggest the possibility that lower doses of lithium orotate than lithium carbonate may achieve therapeutic brain lithium concentrations and relatively stable serum concentrations. PMID:26768

  19. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomic analysis of lithium effects on glial-neuronal metabolism and interactions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Yuan, Peixiong; Lane, Andrew N; Higashi, Richard M; Wang, Yun; Hamidi, Anahita B; Zhou, Rulun; Guitart, Xavier; Chen, Guang; Manji, Husseini K; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2010-06-01

    Despite the long-established therapeutic efficacy of lithium in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BPD), its molecular mechanism of action remains elusive. Newly developed stable isotope-resolved metabolomics (SIRM) is a powerful approach that can be used to elucidate systematically how lithium impacts glial and neuronal metabolic pathways and activities, leading ultimately to deciphering its molecular mechanism of action. The effect of lithium on the metabolism of three different (13)C-labeled precursors ([U-(13)C]-glucose, (13)C-3-lactate or (13)C-2,3-alanine) was analyzed in cultured rat astrocytes and neurons by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using [U-(13)C]-glucose, lithium was shown to enhance glycolytic activity and part of the Krebs cycle activity in both astrocytes and neurons, particularly the anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation (PC). The PC pathway was previously thought to be active in astrocytes but absent in neurons. Lithium also stimulated the extracellular release of (13)C labeled-lactate, -alanine (Ala), -citrate, and -glutamine (Gln) by astrocytes. Interrogation of neuronal pathways using (13)C-3-lactate or (13)C-2,3-Ala as tracers indicated a high capacity of neurons to utilize lactate and Ala in the Krebs cycle, particularly in the production of labeled Asp and Glu via PC and normal cycle activity. Prolonged lithium treatment enhanced lactate metabolism via PC but inhibited lactate oxidation via the normal Krebs cycle in neurons. Such lithium modulation of glycolytic, PC and Krebs cycle activity in astrocytes and neurons as well as release of fuel substrates by astrocytes should help replenish Krebs cycle substrates for Glu synthesis while meeting neuronal demands for energy. Further investigations into the molecular regulation of these metabolic traits should provide new insights into the pathophysiology of mood disorders and early diagnostic markers, as well as new target(s) for

  20. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1998-02-10

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li{sub 2}O--CeO{sub 2}--SiO{sub 2} system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications. 12 figs.

  1. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li.sub.2 O--CeO.sub.2 --SiO.sub.2 system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications.

  2. A high performance ceramic-polymer separator for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Kichambare, Padmakar; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Rodrigues, Stanley; Subramanyam, Guru

    2016-01-01

    A three-layered (ceramic-polymer-ceramic) hybrid separator was prepared by coating ceramic electrolyte [lithium aluminum germanium phosphate (LAGP)] over both sides of polyethylene (PE) polymer membrane using electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technique. Ionic conductivities of membranes were evaluated after soaking PE and LAGP/PE/LAGP membranes in a 1 Molar (1M) lithium hexafluroarsenate (LiAsF6) electrolyte in ethylene carbonate (EC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) in volume ratio (1:1:1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were employed to evaluate morphology and structure of the separators before and after cycling performance tests to better understand structure-property correlation. As compared to regular PE separator, LAGP/PE/LAGP hybrid separator showed: (i) higher liquid electrolyte uptake, (ii) higher ionic conductivity, (iii) lower interfacial resistance with lithium and (iv) lower cell voltage polarization during lithium cycling at high current density of 1.3 mA cm-2 at room temperature. The enhanced performance is attributed to higher liquid uptake, LAGP-assisted faster ion conduction and dendrite prevention. Optimization of density and thickness of LAGP layer on PE or other membranes through manipulation of PVD deposition parameters will enable practical applications of this novel hybrid separator in rechargeable lithium batteries with high energy, high power, longer cycle life, and higher safety level.

  3. Lithium/bromine cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.G.; Skarstad, P.M.; Hayes, T.G.; Owens, B.B.

    1980-01-01

    Bromine is attractive as a cathode material because cells with a high energy density and high cell voltage are theoretically possible. The addition of small amounts of certain salts or organic compounds results in bromine solutions of sufficient conductivity for cathode applications. However, given these highly conductive bromine cathodes, lithium/bromine cells are limited in rate and practical available capacity by the high resistivity of the discharge product. The rate of resistance increase for the best bromine cells in this study is more than one order of magnitude greater than that observed for corresponding lithium/iodine cells. Lithium/bromine cells can function at pacemaker rates and they may be superior to cells used in early pacemakers. However, the authors have not found the lithium/bromine cells described to be superior to existing lithium/iodine cells available for cardiac pacemakers. 17 refs.

  4. HOW RELIABLE IS 24 HOUR SERUM LITHIUM LEVEL AFTER A TEST DOSE OF LITHIUM IN PREDICTING OPTIMAL LITHIUM DOSE?

    PubMed Central

    Kuruvilla, K.; Shaji, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY 57% of a group of 35 patients treated with Lithium Carbonate at dosages predicted by the nomogram suggested by Cooper et al (1973) failed to reach therapeutic levels of serum lithium. This finding casts serious doubts on the usefulness of the claim by Cooper et al (1973 & 1976) that 24 hour serum lithium level after a test dose of 600 mg. lithium can predict the daily lithium dose. PMID:21927360

  5. Lithium orotate, carbonate and chloride: pharmacokinetics, polyuria in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D F

    1976-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion administered as lithium orotate were studied in rats. Parallel studies were carried out with lithium carbonate and lithium chloride. 2 No differences in the uptake, distribution and excretion of the lithium ion were observed between lithium orotate, lithium carbonate and lithium chloride after single intraperitoneal, subcutaneous or intragastric injections (0.5-1.0 mEq lithium/kg) or after administration of the lithium salts for 20 days in the food. 3 The findings oppose the notion that the pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion given as lithium orotate differ from lithium chloride or lithium carbonate. 4 Polyuria and polydipsia developed more slowly in rats given lithium orotate than in those given lithium carbonate or lithium chloride, perhaps due to an effect of the orotate anion. PMID:1260219

  6. Lithium orotate, carbonate and chloride: pharmacokinetics, polyuria in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F

    1976-04-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion administered as lithium orotate were studied in rats. Parallel studies were carried out with lithium carbonate and lithium chloride. 2 No differences in the uptake, distribution and excretion of the lithium ion were observed between lithium orotate, lithium carbonate and lithium chloride after single intraperitoneal, subcutaneous or intragastric injections (0.5-1.0 mEq lithium/kg) or after administration of the lithium salts for 20 days in the food. 3 The findings oppose the notion that the pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion given as lithium orotate differ from lithium chloride or lithium carbonate. 4 Polyuria and polydipsia developed more slowly in rats given lithium orotate than in those given lithium carbonate or lithium chloride, perhaps due to an effect of the orotate anion. PMID:1260219

  7. Lithium tetrafluoro oxalato phosphate as electrolyte additive for lithium-ion cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Y.; Chen, Z.; Liu, J.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-01

    Lithium tetrafluoro oxalato phosphate (LTFOP) was investigated as an electrolyte additive to improve the life of mesocarbon microbead (MCMB)/Li{sub 1.1}[Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}]{sub 0.9}O{sub 2} (NCM) cells for high power applications. With the addition of 1-3 wt % LTFOP to MCMB/NCM cells, the capacity retention after 200 cycles at 55 C significantly improved. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the LTFOP addition in the electrolyte increased the initial impedance but lowered the impedance growth rate during cycling. Aging tests at 55 C indicated that the capacity retention of the negative electrode significantly benefited as a result of the LTFOP addition. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the safety of the lithiated MCMB is significantly improved with the LTFOP addition.

  8. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, Charles H.; Graham, Robert A.; Kuehn, Stephen F.; Precit, Richard R.; Rogers, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  9. Glycine lithium nitrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Valenzuela, R.; Hernández-Paredes, J.; Medrano-Pesqueira, T.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Jesús-Castillo, S.; Rodriguez-Mijangos, R.; Terpugov, V. S.; Alvarez-Ramos, M. E.; Duarte-Möller, A.

    Crystals of glycine lithium nitrate with non-linear optical properties have been grown in a solution by slow evaporation at room temperature. The crystal shows a good thermal stability from room temperature to 175 °C where the crystal begins to degrade. This property is desirable for future technological applications. Also, a good performance on the second harmonic generation was found, characterizing the emitted dominant wavelength by a customized indirect procedure using luminance and chromaticity measured data based on the CIE-1931 standard. Additionally, the 532 nm signal was detected by using a variant to the Kurtz and Perry method.

  10. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  11. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  12. Lithium electric dipole polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Puchalski, M.; KePdziera, D.; Pachucki, K.

    2011-11-15

    The electric dipole polarizability of the lithium atom in the ground state is calculated including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections. The obtained result {alpha}{sub E}=164.0740(5) a.u. is in good agreement with the less accurate experimental value of 164.19(1.08) a.u. The small uncertainty of about 3 parts per 10{sup 6} comes from the approximate treatment of quantum electrodynamics corrections. Our theoretical result can be considered as a benchmark for more general atomic structure methods and may serve as a reference value for the relative measurement of polarizabilities of the other alkali-metal atoms.

  13. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  14. Electrochemical stability of lithium bis(oxatlato) borate containing solid polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ding; Yan, Hui; Zhu, Zhi; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Jian; Qi, Lu

    The electrochemical stability of lithium bis(oxatlato) borate (LiBOB) containing solid polymer electrolyte has been evaluated both by inert electrode and real cathodes. Enhanced intrinsic anodic stability and decreased interface impedance, are obtained by addition of nano-sized MgO to PEO 20-LiBOB. It is also found that the LiBOB-containing SPEs exhibit prominent kinetic stability between 3.0 and 4.5 V. For cells using SPEs as the separators, good cycling performance is obtained for real 4 V class cathodes material LiNi 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 and LiCoO 2. The Li|PEO 20-LiBOB|LiNi 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 cell takes an initial capacity of 156.8 mAh g -1, with retention of 142.5 mAh g -1 after 20 cycles at 0.2 C-rate. The cell also works well up to 1 C-rate. The addition of nano-sized MgO into PEO 20-LiBOB readily reduces the irreversible capacity per cycle, both for LiNi 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 and LiCoO 2 cathodes. In addition, the critical role of LiBOB in obtaining kinetic stability and passivating ability towards cathodes are specially discussed.

  15. A lithium superionic conductor.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-09-01

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10(-2) S cm(-1)) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li(10)GeP(2)S(12) that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window). PMID:21804556

  16. A lithium superionic conductor.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-09-01

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10(-2) S cm(-1)) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li(10)GeP(2)S(12) that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window).

  17. Anodes for rechargeable lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kepler, Keith D.; Vaughey, John T.

    2003-01-01

    A negative electrode (12) for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell (10) with an intermetallic host structure containing two or more elements selected from the metal elements and silicon, capable of accommodating lithium within its crystallographic host structure such that when the host structure is lithiated it transforms to a lithiated zinc-blende-type structure. Both active elements (alloying with lithium) and inactive elements (non-alloying with lithium) are disclosed. Electrochemical cells and batteries as well as methods of making the negative electrode are disclosed.

  18. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  19. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  20. Teaching Chemistry Using the Movie "Apollo 13."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goll, James G.; Woods, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers suggestions for incorporating topics that relate to the Apollo 13 space mission into a chemistry course. Discusses connections between the study of chemistry and space exploration, including fuels and oxidants used, reasons for an oxygen tank rupture, and lithium hydroxide-containing carbon dioxide filters. Contains 11 references. (WRM)

  1. Cyanoethylated Compounds as Additives in Lithium/Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    1998-05-08

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  2. Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    1999-01-01

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  3. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  4. Comparative analysis of ex-situ and operando X-ray diffraction experiments for lithium insertion materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brant, William R.; Li, Dan; Gu, Qinfen; Schmid, Siegbert

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of ex-situ and operando X-ray diffraction techniques using the fast lithium ion conductor Li0.18Sr0.66Ti0.5Nb0.5O3 is presented. Ex-situ analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction data suggests that a single phase material exists for all discharges to as low as 0.422 V. For samples discharged to 1 V or lower, i.e. with higher lithium content, it is possible to determine the lithium position from the X-ray data. However, operando X-ray diffraction from a coin cell reveals that a kinetically driven two phase region occurs during battery cycling below 1 V. Through monitoring the change in unit cell dimension during electrochemical cycling the dynamics of lithium insertion are explored. A reduction in the rate of unit cell expansion of 22(2)% part way through the first discharge and 13(1)% during the second discharge is observed. This reduction may be caused by a drop in lithium diffusion into the bulk material for higher lithium contents. A more significant change is a jump in the unit cell expansion by 60(2)% once the lithium content exceeds one lithium ion per vacant site. It is suggested that this jump is caused by damping of octahedral rotations, thus establishing a link between lithium content and octahedral rotations.

  5. Mixed solvent electrolytes for ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Deligiannis, Fotios (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention comprises an improved electrolyte for secondary lithium-based cells as well as batteries fabricated using this electrolyte. The electrolyte is a lithium containing salt dissolved in a non-aqueous solvent, which is made from a mixture of ethylene carbonate, ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, 2-methylfuran, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. This improved, mixed solvent electrolyte is more conductive than prior electrolytes and much less corrosive to lithium anodes. Batteries constructed with this improved electrolyte utilize lithium or lithium alloy anodes and cathodes made of metal chalcogenides or oxides, such as TiS.sub.2, NbSe.sub.3, V.sub.6 O.sub.13, V.sub.2 O.sub.5, MoS.sub.2, MoS.sub.3, CoO.sub.2, or CrO.sub.2, dissolved in a supporting polymer matrix, like EPDM. The preferred non-aqueous solvent mixture comprises approximately 5 to 30 volume percent ethylene carbonate, approximately 0.01 to 0.1 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and approximately 0.2 to 2 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The most preferred solvent comprises approximately 10 to 20 volume percent ethylene carbonate, about 0.05 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and about 1.0 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The concentration of lithium arsenic hexafluoride can range from about 1.0 to 1.8 M; a concentration 1.5 M is most preferred. Secondary batteries made with the improved electrolyte of this invention have lower internal impedance, longer cycle life, higher energy density, low self-discharge, and longer shelf life.

  6. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  7. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  8. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  9. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  10. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  11. Silica Precipitation and Lithium Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Renew

    2015-09-20

    This file contains silica precipitation and lithium sorption data from the project. The silica removal data is corrected from the previous submission. The previous submission did not take into account the limit of detection of the ICP-MS procedure.

  12. Galileo lithium/SO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagdon, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the Galileo lithium SO2 battery is described. The following general requirements of the battery are discussed: (1) electrical characteristics, (2) storage, (3) reliability, and (4) performance.

  13. Operando Lithium Dynamics in the Li-Rich Layered Oxide Cathode Material via Neutron Diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Haodong; An, Ke; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Qian, Danna; Zhang, Minghao; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-04-06

    Neutron diffraction under operando battery cycling is used to study the lithium and oxygen dynamics of high Li-rich Li(Lix/3Ni(3/8-3x/8)Co(1/4-x/4)Mn(3/8+7x/24)O2 (x = 0.6, HLR) and low Li-rich Li(Lix/3Ni(1/3-x/3)Co(1/3-x/3)Mn(1/3+x/3)O2 (x = 0.24, LLR) compounds that exhibit different degrees of oxygen activation at high voltage. The measured lattice parameter changes and oxygen position show largely contrasting changes for the two cathodes where the LLR exhibits larger movement of oxygen and lattice contractions in comparison to the HLR that maintains relatively constant lattice parameters and oxygen position during the high voltage plateau until the end of charge. Density functional theory calculations show the presencemore » of oxygen vacancy during the high voltage plateau; changes in the lattice parameters and oxygen position are consistent with experimental observations. Lithium migration kinetics for the Li-rich material is observed under operando conditions for the first time to reveal the rate of lithium extraction from the lithium layer, and transition metal layer is related to the different charge and discharge characteristics. At the beginning of charging, the lithium extraction predominately occurs within the lithium layer. The lithium extraction from the lithium layer slows down and extraction from the transition metal layer evolves at a faster rate once the high voltage plateau is reached.« less

  14. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  15. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  16. Lithium compensation for full cell operation

    DOEpatents

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Chen, Xilin; Lu, Dongping; Liu, Jun; Jiguang, Jiguang

    2016-05-17

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of a lithium-ion battery system comprising an anode, an anode current collector, and a layer of lithium metal in contact with the current collector, but not in contact with the anode. The lithium compensation layer dissolves into the electrolyte to compensate for the loss of lithium ions during usage of the full cell. The specific placement of the lithium compensation layer, such that there is no direct physical contact between the lithium compensation layer and the anode, provides certain advantages.

  17. Secondary lithium batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, B.; Khanna, S. K.; Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary lithium cells which use a LiAsF6-2-Me-THF electrolyte and a TiS2 intercalatable cathode exhibit encouraging cycle life at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and surface analytical studies indicate that the electrolyte is unstable in the presence of metallic lithium, leading to the formation of a lithium passivating film composed of lithium arsenic oxyfluorides and lithium fluorsilicates. The lithium cyclability remains as the most important problem to solve. Different electrolyte solvents, such as sulfolane, exhibit promising characteristics but lead to new compatibility problems with the other cell component materials.

  18. Modeling the Lithium Ion Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The lithium ion battery will be a reliable electrical resource for many years to come. A simple model of the lithium ions motion due to changes in concentration and voltage is presented. The battery chosen has LiCoO[subscript 2] as the cathode, LiPF[subscript 6] as the electrolyte, and LiC[subscript 6] as the anode. The concentration gradient and…

  19. Lithium-iodine pacemaker cell

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.A.; Snyder, S.E.; DeVan, T.; Harney, M.J.; Harney, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The lithium-iodine pacemaker cell is described as supplied by several manufacturers. The features of each design are discussed along with their effect on energy density, self-discharge and shape of the discharge curve. Differences in performance characteristics are related to morphology of the lithium iodine electrolyte and to the form of the cathode. A new, high-drain cell is mentioned which can supply 60 /mu/a/cm/sup 2/. 10 refs.

  20. Air breathing lithium power cells

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15

    A cell suitable for use in a battery according to one embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; a stabilized zirconia electrolyte for selective oxygen anion transport; a molten salt electrolyte; and a lithium-based anode. A cell suitable for use in a battery according to another embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; an electrolyte; a membrane selective to molecular oxygen; and a lithium-based anode.

  1. Lithium intoxication: Incidence, clinical course and renal function – a population-based retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Michael; Stegmayr, Bernd; Salander Renberg, Ellinor; Werneke, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    When prescribing lithium, the risk of toxicity remains a concern. In this study, we examined a cohort of patients exposed to lithium between 1997 and 2013. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of lithium intoxication and to evaluate the clinical course and changes in renal function. Of 1340 patients, 96 had experienced at least one episode of lithium levels ⩾1.5 mmol/L, yielding an incidence of 0.01 per patient-year. Seventy-seven patients available for review had experienced 91 episodes, of whom 34% required intensive care and 13% were treated with haemodialysis. There were no fatalities. Acute kidney injury occurred, but renal function at baseline was not different to renal function after the episode. Renal impairment was often associated with co-morbidities and other factors. Both intermittent and continuous-venovenous haemodialysis were used, but the clearance of continuous-venovenous haemodialysis can be too low in cases where large amounts of lithium have been ingested. Saline and forced diuresis have been used and are safe. Lithium intoxication seems rare and can be safely managed in most cases. Physicians should not withhold lithium for fear of intoxication in patients who benefit from it. Yet, physicians should have a low threshold to screen for toxicity. PMID:27307388

  2. Lithium peroxide primary element

    SciTech Connect

    Winsel, A.

    1985-03-12

    In a galvanic primary element of the system Li/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the aqueous cathode depolarizer H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is fixated as a polyurethane gel. It can thereby be controlled and caused to react with anode metal in accordance with the current drain requirements. This is accomplished using a ram to press the gel toward a conductor which covers the lithium anode, which may take the form of a metal grid and/or a gas diffusion electrode. The oxygen which forms in the working layer through catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide creates a gas bubble when the current is interrupted or the ram is stopped, thereby interrupting the further supply of hydrogen peroxide to the catalyst.

  3. Lithium peroxide primary element

    SciTech Connect

    Winsel, A.

    1982-05-04

    In a galvanic primary element of the system Li/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the aqueous cathode depolarizer H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is fixated as a polyurethane gel. It can thereby be controlled and caused to react with the anode metal in accordance with the current drain requirements. This is accomplished using a ram to press the gel toward a conductor which covers the lithium anode, which may take the form of a metal grid and/or a gas diffusion electrode. The oxygen which forms in the working layer through catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide creates a gas bubble when the current is interrupted or the ram is stopped, thereby interrupting the further supply of hydrogen peroxide to the catalyst.

  4. Chemical Shuttle Additives in Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Mary

    2013-03-31

    The goals of this program were to discover and implement a redox shuttle that is compatible with large format lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} (NMC) cathode material and to understand the mechanism of redox shuttle action. Many redox shuttles, both commercially available and experimental, were tested and much fundamental information regarding the mechanism of redox shuttle action was discovered. In particular, studies surrounding the mechanism of the reduction of the oxidized redox shuttle at the carbon anode surface were particularly revealing. The initial redox shuttle candidate, namely 2-(pentafluorophenyl)-tetrafluoro-1,3,2-benzodioxaborole (BDB) supplied by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL, Lemont, Illinois), did not effectively protect cells containing NMC cathodes from overcharge. The ANL-RS2 redox shuttle molecule, namely 1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)-2,5-di-tert-butyl-benzene, which is a derivative of the commercially successful redox shuttle 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DDB, 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota), is an effective redox shuttle for cells employing LiFePO{sub 4} (LFP) cathode material. The main advantage of ANL-RS2 over DDB is its larger solubility in electrolyte; however, ANL-RS2 is not as stable as DDB. This shuttle also may be effectively used to rebalance cells in strings that utilize LFP cathodes. The shuttle is compatible with both LTO and graphite anode materials although the cell with graphite degrades faster than the cell with LTO, possibly because of a reaction with the SEI layer. The degradation products of redox shuttle ANL-RS2 were positively identified. Commercially available redox shuttles Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} (Air Products, Allentown, Pennsylvania and Showa Denko, Japan) and DDB were evaluated and were found to be stable and effective redox shuttles at low C-rates. The Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} is suitable for lithium ion cells utilizing a high voltage cathode (potential that is higher

  5. A new lithium salt with dihydroxybenzene and lithium tetrafluoroborate for lithium battery electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhao-Ming; Sun, Bin-Bin; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Chun-Hua

    2011-10-01

    A new unsymmetrical lithium salt containing F-, C6H4O22- [dianion of 1,2-benzenediol], lithium difluoro(1,2-benzene-diolato(2-)-o,o‧)borate (LDFBDB) is synthesized and characterized. Its thermal decomposition in nitrogen begins at 170 °C. The cyclic voltammetry study shows that the LDFBDB solution in propylene carbonate (PC) is stable up to 3.7 V versus Li+/Li. It is soluble in common organic solvents. The ionic dissociation properties of LDFBDB are examined by conductivity measurements in PC, PC+ ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), PC + dimethyl ether (DME), PC + ethylene carbonate (EC) + EMC solutions. The conductivity values of the 0.564 mol dm-3 LDFBDB electrolyte in PC + DME solution is 3.90 mS cm-1. All these properties of the new lithium salt including the thermal characteristics, electrochemical stabilities, solubilities, ionic dissociation properties are studied and compared with those of its derivatives, lithium difluoro(3-fluoro-1,2-benzene-diolato(2-)-o,o‧)borate (FLDFBDB), lithium [3-fluoro-1,2-benzenediolato(2-)-o,o‧ oxalato]borate (FLBDOB), and lithium bis(oxalate)borate (LBOB).

  6. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium wallsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.; Tritz, K.

    2015-05-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  7. Protective lithium ion conducting ceramic coating for lithium metal anodes and associate method

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A battery structure including a cathode, a lithium metal anode and an electrolyte disposed between the lithium anode and the cathode utilizes a thin-film layer of lithium phosphorus oxynitride overlying so as to coat the lithium anode and thereby separate the lithium anode from the electrolyte. If desired, a preliminary layer of lithium nitride may be coated upon the lithium anode before the lithium phosphorous oxynitride is, in turn, coated upon the lithium anode so that the separation of the anode and the electrolyte is further enhanced. By coating the lithium anode with this material lay-up, the life of the battery is lengthened and the performance of the battery is enhanced.

  8. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; and others

    2015-05-15

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  9. Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil Amine

    2009-09-14

    Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Khalil Amine

    2016-07-12

    Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Michael Thackeray on Lithium-air Batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Thackeray, Michael

    2016-07-12

    Michael Thackeray, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  12. Sixty years of lithium responders.

    PubMed

    Grof, Paul

    2010-01-01

    It has been 60 years since Cade first described patients who responded to antimanic lithium treatment. Two decades later, responders to lithium stabilization emerged in larger numbers. The responses of many severely ill bipolar patients to lithium were striking and called for an explanation. Remarkable reactions to a simple ion generated hope for an uncomplicated laboratory test of response and an extensive search for suitable biological markers ensued. But despite promising reports, particularly from molecular genetics, we are still waiting for a biological elucidation of the stabilizing effects of lithium. The most useful predictor of lithium stabilization has to date been the patient's clinical profile, based on a comprehensive clinical assessment: complete remissions and other characteristics of episodic clinical course, bipolar family history, low psychiatric comorbidity and a characteristic presenting psychopathology. In brief, the responders approximate the classical Kraepelinian description of a manic-depressive patient. But the most intriguing findings have recently emerged from prospective observations of the next generation: the children of lithium responders, their counterparts coming from parents who did not respond to lithium and controls. Overall, they indicate that parents and offspring suffer from a comparable brain dysfunction that manifests clinically in distinct stages. If the child's predicament starts early in childhood, it presents with varied, nonaffective or subclinical manifestations that are usually nonresponsive to standard treatments prescribed according to the symptoms. The next stage then unfolds in adolescence, first with depressive and later with activated episodes. The observations have a potential to markedly enrich the prevailing understanding and management of mood disorders. PMID:20453530

  13. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  14. Novel Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, Brett L.

    2014-12-12

    We have been investigating three primary areas related to lithium ion battery electrolytes. First, we have been investigating the thermal stability of novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, in particular borate based salts. Second, we have been investigating novel additives to improve the calendar life of lithium ion batteries. Third, we have been investigating the thermal decomposition reactions of electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

  15. Rechargeable lithium battery technology - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Surampudi, Subbarao

    1990-01-01

    The technology of the rechargeable lithium battery is discussed with special attention given to the types of rechargeable lithium cells and to their expected performance and advantages. Consideration is also given to the organic-electrolyte and polymeric-electrolyte cells and to molten salt lithium cells, as well as to technical issues, such as the cycle life, charge control, rate capability, cell size, and safety. The role of the rechargeable lithium cell in future NASA applications is discussed.

  16. Primary lithium batteries, some consumer considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bro, P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine whether larger size lithium batteries would be commercially marketable, the performance of several D size lithium batteries was compared with that of an equivalent alkaline manganese battery, and the relative costs of the different systems were compared. It is concluded that opportunities exist in the consumer market for the larger sizes of the low rate and moderate rate lithium batteries, and that the high rate lithium batteries need further improvements before they can be recommended for consumer applications.

  17. Lithium in Medicine: Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Mota de Freitas, Duarte; Leverson, Brian D; Goossens, Jesse L

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the mechanism of action of lithium salts from a chemical perspective. A description on how lithium salts are used to treat mental illnesses, in particular bipolar disorder, and other disease states is provided. Emphasis is not placed on the genetics and the psychopharmacology of the ailments for which lithium salts have proven to be beneficial. Rather we highlight the application of chemical methodologies for the characterization of the cellular targets of lithium salts and their distribution in tissues.

  18. The role of plasma volume, plasma renin and the sympathetic nervous system in the posture-induced decline in renal lithium clearance in man.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F; Shimizu, M

    1978-01-01

    Excretion of lithium in urine was studied in 2 healthy males while recumbent and while upright, either walking or standing quietly. An oral dose of 24.3 mmol of Lit was taken as three lithium carbonate tablets 13 h before clearance tests. Renal lithium clearance decreased and lithium fractional reabsorption increased while upright. Standing immersed to the neck in water, which prevents the fall in plasma volume upon changing posture from recumbent to upright, prevented the fall in renal lithium clearance as well as the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption while upright. Oral doses of guanethidine (total dose of 200 mg) or oxprenolol (total dose of 140 mg) taken to prevent high levels of sympathetic nervous system activity and plasma renin, respectively, failed to prevent the fall in renal lithium clearance or the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption upon changing posture from recumbent to upright. The findings indicate that the fall in renal lithium clearance and the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption upon changing posture from recumbent to upright is related to the fall in plasma volume but not to high levels of sympathetic nervous system activity or plasma renin activity. PMID:692834

  19. The role of plasma volume, plasma renin and the sympathetic nervous system in the posture-induced decline in renal lithium clearance in man.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F; Shimizu, M

    1978-01-01

    Excretion of lithium in urine was studied in 2 healthy males while recumbent and while upright, either walking or standing quietly. An oral dose of 24.3 mmol of Lit was taken as three lithium carbonate tablets 13 h before clearance tests. Renal lithium clearance decreased and lithium fractional reabsorption increased while upright. Standing immersed to the neck in water, which prevents the fall in plasma volume upon changing posture from recumbent to upright, prevented the fall in renal lithium clearance as well as the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption while upright. Oral doses of guanethidine (total dose of 200 mg) or oxprenolol (total dose of 140 mg) taken to prevent high levels of sympathetic nervous system activity and plasma renin, respectively, failed to prevent the fall in renal lithium clearance or the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption upon changing posture from recumbent to upright. The findings indicate that the fall in renal lithium clearance and the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption upon changing posture from recumbent to upright is related to the fall in plasma volume but not to high levels of sympathetic nervous system activity or plasma renin activity.

  20. Towards Stable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with a Low Self-Discharge Rate: Ion Diffusion Modulation and Anode Protection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Tao; Peng, Hong-Jie; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Chen-Zi; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    The self-discharge of a lithium-sulfur cell decreases the shelf-life of the battery and is one of the bottlenecks that hinders its practical applications. New insights into both the internal chemical reactions in a lithium-sulfur system and effective routes to retard self-discharge for highly stable batteries are crucial for the design of lithium-sulfur cells. Herein, a lithium-sulfur cell with a carbon nanotube/sulfur cathode and lithium-metal anode in lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide/1,3-dioxolane/dimethyl ether electrolyte was selected as the model system to investigate the self-discharge behavior. Both lithium anode passivation and polysulfide anion diffusion suppression strategies are applied to reduce self-discharge of the lithium-sulfur cell. When the lithium-metal anode is protected by a high density passivation layer induced by LiNO3 , a very low shuttle constant of 0.017 h(-1) is achieved. The diffusion of the polysulfides is retarded by an ion-selective separator, and the shuttle constants decreased. The cell with LiNO3 additive maintained a discharge capacity of 97 % (961 mAh g(-1) ) of the initial capacity after 120 days at open circuit, which was around three times higher than the routine cell (32 % of initial capacity, corresponding to 320 mAh g(-1) ). It is expected that lithium-sulfur batteries with ultralow self-discharge rates may be fabricated through a combination of anode passivation and polysulfide shuttle control, as well as optimization of the lithium-sulfur cell configuration.

  1. NASA/Marshall's lithium battery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschal, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    A general lithium battery is described and a summary of lithium battery applications is presented. Four aspects of a particular lithium battery, the inducement environmental contamination monitoring battery, are discussed-design and construction details, thermal vacuum tests, projection tests, and acceptance tests.

  2. Army position on lithium battery safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, E.

    1982-01-01

    User requirements for lithium sulfur batteries are presented. They include careful analysis of design and quality control, along with certain equipment specifications. Some of the specifications include: hermetically sealed cells; lithium limited cells with stoichiometry of lithium to sulfur dioxide as a ratio of one; low moisture content in the cells; and battery capacity.

  3. Aplastic anemia associated with lithium therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Z.; Khan, A. G.; Chaudhry, Z. A.

    1973-01-01

    A case is reported of fatal aplastic anemia developing in a 50-year-old woman who received lithium carbonate in the generally accepted dosage for a manic-depressive disorder. The serum lithium had been determined at regular intervals and never exceeded what is considered a safe level. Patients for whom lithium is prescribed should have periodic hematologic examinations. PMID:4691107

  4. Magnetism in lithium-oxygen discharge product.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Jung, Hun-Ji; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Schlueter, John A; Du, Peng; Assary, Rajeev S; Greeley, Jeffrey; Ferguson, Glen A; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Hassoun, Jusef; Iddir, Hakim; Zhou, Jigang; Zuin, Lucia; Hu, Yongfeng; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Kahlil

    2013-07-01

    Nonaqueous lithium-oxygen batteries have a much superior theoretical gravimetric energy density compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, and thus could render long-range electric vehicles a reality. A molecular-level understanding of the reversible formation of lithium peroxide in these batteries, the properties of major/minor discharge products, and the stability of the nonaqueous electrolytes is required to achieve successful lithium-oxygen batteries. We demonstrate that the major discharge product formed in the lithium-oxygen cell, lithium peroxide, exhibits a magnetic moment. These results are based on dc-magnetization measurements and a lithium-oxygen cell containing an ether-based electrolyte. The results are unexpected because bulk lithium peroxide has a significant band gap. Density functional calculations predict that superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with unpaired electrons exist on stoichiometric lithium peroxide crystalline surfaces and on nanoparticle surfaces; these computational results are consistent with the magnetic measurement of the discharged lithium peroxide product as well as EPR measurements on commercial lithium peroxide. The presence of superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with spin can play a role in the reversible formation and decomposition of lithium peroxide as well as the reversible formation and decomposition of electrolyte molecules. PMID:23670967

  5. Electrochemical isotope effect and lithium isotope separation.

    PubMed

    Black, Jay R; Umeda, Grant; Dunn, Bruce; McDonough, William F; Kavner, Abby

    2009-07-29

    A large electrochemical isotopic effect is observed upon the electrodeposition of lithium from solutions of propylene carbonate producing isotopically light metal deposits. The magnitude of fractionation is controlled by the applied overpotential and is largest close to equilibrium. Calculated partition function ratios for tetrahedrally coordinated lithium complexes and metallic lithium predict an equilibrium fractionation close to that measured experimentally.

  6. [Lithium induced dysfunction of the parathyroid hormone].

    PubMed

    Valeur, Nana; Andersen, Rikke Steen

    2002-01-28

    The prevalence of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in patients treated with lithium is higher than that in controls. Lithium seems to affect calcium metabolism, by acting directly parathyroid hormone cells, and distal tubuli in the kidneys. Because hypercalcaemic HPT can cause psychiatric symptoms mistakenly attributed to the lithium treatment, ionised calcium should be a standard control.

  7. Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

    2014-12-30

    An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

  8. Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Binod; Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G.

    2000-01-01

    Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a ceramic-ceramic composite electrolyte is provided containing lithium nitride and lithium phosphate. The ceramic-ceramic composite is also preferably annealed and exhibits an activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

  9. Magnetism in lithium-oxygen discharge product.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Jung, Hun-Ji; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Schlueter, John A; Du, Peng; Assary, Rajeev S; Greeley, Jeffrey; Ferguson, Glen A; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Hassoun, Jusef; Iddir, Hakim; Zhou, Jigang; Zuin, Lucia; Hu, Yongfeng; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Kahlil

    2013-07-01

    Nonaqueous lithium-oxygen batteries have a much superior theoretical gravimetric energy density compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, and thus could render long-range electric vehicles a reality. A molecular-level understanding of the reversible formation of lithium peroxide in these batteries, the properties of major/minor discharge products, and the stability of the nonaqueous electrolytes is required to achieve successful lithium-oxygen batteries. We demonstrate that the major discharge product formed in the lithium-oxygen cell, lithium peroxide, exhibits a magnetic moment. These results are based on dc-magnetization measurements and a lithium-oxygen cell containing an ether-based electrolyte. The results are unexpected because bulk lithium peroxide has a significant band gap. Density functional calculations predict that superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with unpaired electrons exist on stoichiometric lithium peroxide crystalline surfaces and on nanoparticle surfaces; these computational results are consistent with the magnetic measurement of the discharged lithium peroxide product as well as EPR measurements on commercial lithium peroxide. The presence of superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with spin can play a role in the reversible formation and decomposition of lithium peroxide as well as the reversible formation and decomposition of electrolyte molecules.

  10. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T.; Andersson, Anna M.

    2012-04-03

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  11. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T.; Andersson, Anna M.

    2008-03-18

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  12. Strengthened lithium for x-ray blast windows

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Imam, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    Lithium's high x-ray transparency makes it an attractive material for windows intended to protect soft x-ray diagnostics in high energy density experiments. Pure lithium is soft and weak, but lithium mixed with lithium hydride powder becomes harder and stronger, in principle without any additional x-ray absorption. A comparison with the standard material for x-ray windows, beryllium, suggests that lithium or lithium strengthened by lithium hydride may well be an excellent option for such windows.

  13. Strengthened lithium for x-ray blast windows.

    PubMed

    Pereira, N R; Imam, M A

    2008-05-01

    Lithium's high x-ray transparency makes it an attractive material for windows intended to protect soft x-ray diagnostics in high energy density experiments. Pure lithium is soft and weak, but lithium mixed with lithium hydride powder becomes harder and stronger, in principle without any additional x-ray absorption. A comparison with the standard material for x-ray windows, beryllium, suggests that lithium or lithium strengthened by lithium hydride may well be an excellent option for such windows.

  14. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  15. Advances in ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Deligiannis, F.; Huang, C-K.; Halpert, G.

    1989-01-01

    The goal is to develop secondary lithium cells with a 100 Wh/kg specific energy capable of 1000 cycles at 50 percent DOD. The approach towards meeting this goal initially focused on several basic issues related to the cell chemistry, selection of cathode materials and electrolytes and component development. The performance potential of Li-TiS2, Li-MoS3, Li-V6O13 and Li-NbSe3 electrochemical systems was examined. Among these four, the Li-TiS2 system was found to be the most promising system in terms of achievable specific energy and cycle life. Major advancements to date in the development of Li-TiS2 cells are in the areas of cathode processing technology, mixed solvent electrolytes, and cell assembly. A summary is given of these advances.

  16. Lithium and Valproate Levels Do Not Correlate with Ketamine's Antidepressant Efficacy in Treatment-Resistant Bipolar Depression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Annie J; Niciu, Mark J; Lundin, Nancy B; Luckenbaugh, David A; Ionescu, Dawn F; Richards, Erica M; Vande Voort, Jennifer L; Ballard, Elizabeth D; Brutsche, Nancy E; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine and lithium both inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, lithium and ketamine have synergistic antidepressant-like effects at individually subeffective doses in rodents. We hypothesized that ketamine's antidepressant effects would be improved by therapeutic doses of lithium versus valproate and that serum lithium levels would positively correlate with ketamine's antidepressant efficacy. Thirty-six patients with treatment-resistant bipolar depression maintained on therapeutic-dose lithium (n = 23, 0.79 ± 0.15 mEq/L) or valproate (n = 13, 79.6 ± 12.4 mg/mL) received 0.5 mg/kg ketamine infusion in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. The primary depression outcome measure-the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)-was assessed before infusion and at numerous postinfusion time points. Both lithium (F 1,118 = 152.08, p < 0.001, and d = 2.27) and valproate (F 1,128 = 20.12, p < 0.001, and d = 0.79) significantly improved depressive symptoms, but no statistically significant difference was observed between mood stabilizer groups (F 1,28 = 2.51, p = 0.12, and d = 0.60). Serum lithium and valproate levels did not correlate with ketamine's antidepressant efficacy. Although the study was potentially underpowered, our results suggest that lithium may not potentiate ketamine's antidepressant efficacy in treatment-resistant bipolar depression.

  17. Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiations: Lithium Chloride Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Lekha; Hoepker, Alexander C.; Singh, Kanwal J.

    2009-01-01

    Ortholithiations of a range of arenes mediated by lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) in THF at -78 °C reveal substantial accelerations by as little as 0.5 mol % LiCl (relative to LDA). Substrate dependencies suggest a specific range of reactivity within which the LiCl catalysis is optimal. Standard protocols using unpurified commercial samples of n-butyllithium to prepare LDA or commercially available LDA show marked batch-dependent rates--up to 100-fold--that could prove significant to the unwary practitioner. Other lithium salts elicit more modest accelerations. The mechanism is not discussed. PMID:19191711

  18. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-13

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  19. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  20. Estimation of lithium clearance from routine clinical data in Egyptian bipolar patients. A population pharmacokinetic approach.

    PubMed

    ElDesoky, E S; Kumar, V; Alorainy, M S; Hamdi, M M; Derendorf, H

    2008-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetics (PK) of lithium as a mood stabilizer was investigated in Egyptian patients with bipolar affective disorders (n = 50) of whom 31 were suffering from lithium toxicity. The mean (+/- SD) age and body weight of patients were 33 +/- 10 years and 67 +/- 3.6 kg, respectively. Patients selected were maintained on lithium carbonate controlled release tablets at doses of 400 mg/12 hours (n = 43) or 200 mg/12 hours (n = 7) respectively. In 19 patients who continued lithium therapy, 1 blood sample/patient was withdrawn for lithium level determination before the morning dose of the drug was given while for 31 patients who suffered from lithium-related toxicity and cessation of drug intake was therapeutically decided, a single blood was drawn at variable time (36, 48 or 72 h) following the last administered dose of the drug. The data was subjected to population PK analysis using NONMEM and a two-compartment model was used. Due to single point sparse data, not all parameters and their between subject variability (BSV) could be determined. Therefore, lithium clearance (CL) and BSV were estimated while other PK parameters were fixed using available literature information. First order (FO) estimation method was used in the analysis. Covariates were evaluated by univariate analysis using likelihood ratio test. The most significant covariate on lithium CL was found to be creatinine clearance (CrCL). The population CL of lithium in the final model was expressed as CLpop = 0.51 x (CrCL/105.3)0.44. The final population PK parameters estimates of lithium were: CL = 0.51 l/h with 12.7% BSV, V1 (Fixed) = 15.2 l, Q (Fixed) = 7.44 l/h, and V2 (Fixed) = 6.7 l. The mean value of lithium concentration at 12 hours as predicted by the final model in the patients with drug toxicity was 1.3 +/- 0.1 mmol/l versus 0.8 +/- 0.14 mmol/l in patients without toxic signs. External validation of the final model on another group of adult bipolar patients (n = 12) maintained on

  1. Characterization of lithium coordination sites with magic-angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimovich, A.; Goldbourt, A.

    2015-05-01

    Lithium, in the form of lithium carbonate, is one of the most common drugs for bipolar disorder. Lithium is also considered to have an effect on many other cellular processes hence it possesses additional therapeutic as well as side effects. In order to quantitatively characterize the binding mode of lithium, it is required to identify the interacting species and measure their distances from the metal center. Here we use magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to study the binding site of lithium in complex with glycine and water (LiGlyW). Such a compound is a good enzyme mimetic since lithium is four-coordinated to one water molecule and three carboxylic groups. Distance measurements to carbons are performed using a 2D transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR) MAS solid-state NMR experiment, and water binding is probed by heteronuclear high-resolution proton-lithium and proton-carbon correlation (wPMLG-HETCOR) experiments. Both HETCOR experiments separate the main complex from impurities and non-specifically bound lithium species, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method to probe the species in the binding site. Optimizations of the TEDOR pulse scheme in the case of a quadrupolar nucleus with a small quadrupole coupling constant show that it is most efficient when pulses are positioned on the spin-1/2 (carbon-13) nucleus. Since the intensity of the TEDOR signal is not normalized, careful data analysis that considers both intensity and dipolar oscillations has to be performed. Nevertheless we show that accurate distances can be extracted for both carbons of the bound glycine and that these distances are consistent with the X-ray data and with lithium in a tetrahedral environment. The lithium environment in the complex is very similar to the binding site in inositol monophosphatase, an enzyme associated with bipolar disorder and the putative target for lithium therapy. A 2D TEDOR experiment applied to the bacterial SuhB gene product of this enzyme was designed

  2. Characterization of lithium coordination sites with magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Haimovich, A; Goldbourt, A

    2015-05-01

    Lithium, in the form of lithium carbonate, is one of the most common drugs for bipolar disorder. Lithium is also considered to have an effect on many other cellular processes hence it possesses additional therapeutic as well as side effects. In order to quantitatively characterize the binding mode of lithium, it is required to identify the interacting species and measure their distances from the metal center. Here we use magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to study the binding site of lithium in complex with glycine and water (LiGlyW). Such a compound is a good enzyme mimetic since lithium is four-coordinated to one water molecule and three carboxylic groups. Distance measurements to carbons are performed using a 2D transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR) MAS solid-state NMR experiment, and water binding is probed by heteronuclear high-resolution proton-lithium and proton-carbon correlation (wPMLG-HETCOR) experiments. Both HETCOR experiments separate the main complex from impurities and non-specifically bound lithium species, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method to probe the species in the binding site. Optimizations of the TEDOR pulse scheme in the case of a quadrupolar nucleus with a small quadrupole coupling constant show that it is most efficient when pulses are positioned on the spin-1/2 (carbon-13) nucleus. Since the intensity of the TEDOR signal is not normalized, careful data analysis that considers both intensity and dipolar oscillations has to be performed. Nevertheless we show that accurate distances can be extracted for both carbons of the bound glycine and that these distances are consistent with the X-ray data and with lithium in a tetrahedral environment. The lithium environment in the complex is very similar to the binding site in inositol monophosphatase, an enzyme associated with bipolar disorder and the putative target for lithium therapy. A 2D TEDOR experiment applied to the bacterial SuhB gene product of this enzyme was designed

  3. Lithium ion rechargeable systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.C.; Lasasse, R.R.; Cygan, R.T.; Voigt, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    Lithium ion systems, although relatively new, have attracted much interest worldwide. Their high energy density, long cycle life and relative safety, compared with metallic lithium rechargeable systems, make them prime candidates for powering portable electronic equipment. Although lithium ion cells are presently used in a few consumer devices, e.g., portable phones, camcorders, and laptop computers, there is room for considerable improvement in their performance. Specific areas that need to be addressed include: (1) carbon anode--increase reversible capacity, and minimize passivation; (2) cathode--extend cycle life, improve rate capability, and increase capacity. There are several programs ongoing at Sandia National Laboratories which are investigating means of achieving the stated objectives in these specific areas. This paper will review these programs.

  4. Phthalocyanine cathode materials for secondary lithium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, J.; Yamaji, A.

    1982-01-01

    Discharge and charge characteristics of various phthalocyanine cathodes coupled with lithium metal are studied. The best capacity based only on cathode active material weight is 1440 A-hr/kg in the lithium/iron phthalocyanine system, and the cycle life of the lithium/Cu phthalocyanine system is more than 100 times at the discharge depth of 157 A-hr/kg. The cathode reaction mechanism is supposed to be lithium intercalation between phthalocyanine molecules. The results indicate that these phthalocyanines are promising cathode active materials for lithium secondary batteries.

  5. Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dudney, N. J.; Bates, J. B.; Lubben, D.

    1995-06-01

    Thin film rechargeable lithium batteries using ceramic electrolyte and cathode materials have been fabricated by physical deposition techniques. The lithium phosphorous oxynitride electrolyte has exceptional electrochemical stability and a good lithium conductivity. The lithium insertion reaction of several different intercalation materials, amorphous V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, amorphous LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and crystalline LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} films, have been investigated using the completed cathode/electrolyte/lithium thin film battery.

  6. Lithium-cupric sulfide cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, A.J.; Bump, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Lithium cells have become the primary power source for cardiac pacemakers due to their reliability and longevity at low current drain rates. A lithium-cupric sulfide cell was developed which makes maximum use of the shape of a pacemaker's battery compartment. The cell has a stable voltage throughout 90% of its lifetime. It then drops to a second stable voltage before depletion. The voltage drop creates a small decrease in pacemaker rate, which alerts the physician to replace the pacemaker. No loss of capacity due to self-discharge as been seen to date, and cells have proven to be safe under extreme conditions. 2 refs.

  7. US Army lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legath, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The how, why and where the Army is applying lithium batteries are addressed. The Army is committing its efforts to the utilization of lithium batteries in new equipment that will be going into the field possibly from FY-80 and thereafter. The Army's philosophy is to guide their users and the equipment designers, to use battery packs are opposed to singel cells. After a detailed description of the battery types that are being considered, a discussion is presented in which questions and comments are exchanged among the Workshop participants.

  8. Lithium synthesis in microquasar accretion.

    PubMed

    Iocco, Fabio; Pato, Miguel

    2012-07-13

    We study the synthesis of lithium isotopes in the hot tori formed around stellar mass black holes by accretion of the companion star. We find that sizable amounts of both stable isotopes 6Li and 7Li can be produced, the exact figures varying with the characteristics of the torus and reaching as much as 10(-2) M⊙ for each isotope. This mass output is enough to contaminate the entire Galaxy at a level comparable with the original, pregalactic amount of lithium and to overcome other sources such as cosmic-ray spallation or stellar nucleosynthesis. PMID:23030150

  9. Spatial periphery of lithium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Galanina, L. I. Zelenskaja, N. S.

    2013-12-15

    The spatial structure of lithium isotopes is studied with the aid of the charge-exchange and (t, p) reactions on lithium nuclei. It is shown that an excited isobaric-analog state of {sup 6}Li (0{sup +}, 3.56MeV) has a halo structure formed by a proton and a neutron, that, in the {sup 9}Li nucleus, there is virtually no neutron halo, and that {sup 11}Li is a Borromean nucleus formed by a {sup 9}Li core and a two-neutron halo manifesting itself in cigar-like and dineutron configurations.

  10. Lithium synthesis in microquasar accretion.

    PubMed

    Iocco, Fabio; Pato, Miguel

    2012-07-13

    We study the synthesis of lithium isotopes in the hot tori formed around stellar mass black holes by accretion of the companion star. We find that sizable amounts of both stable isotopes 6Li and 7Li can be produced, the exact figures varying with the characteristics of the torus and reaching as much as 10(-2) M⊙ for each isotope. This mass output is enough to contaminate the entire Galaxy at a level comparable with the original, pregalactic amount of lithium and to overcome other sources such as cosmic-ray spallation or stellar nucleosynthesis.

  11. Solid solution lithium alloy cermet anodes

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2013-07-09

    A metal-ceramic composite ("cermet") has been produced by a chemical reaction between a lithium compound and another metal. The cermet has advantageous physical properties, high surface area relative to lithium metal or its alloys, and is easily formed into a desired shape. An example is the formation of a lithium-magnesium nitride cermet by reaction of lithium nitride with magnesium. The reaction results in magnesium nitride grains coated with a layer of lithium. The nitride is inert when used in a battery. It supports the metal in a high surface area form, while stabilizing the electrode with respect to dendrite formation. By using an excess of magnesium metal in the reaction process, a cermet of magnesium nitride is produced, coated with a lithium-magnesium alloy of any desired composition. This alloy inhibits dendrite formation by causing lithium deposited on its surface to diffuse under a chemical potential into the bulk of the alloy.

  12. Lithium Abundance in Planet Search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Justin; Yale Exoplanets

    2016-01-01

    Since most lithium in the universe is primordial and is destroyed in stars, lithium abundance can be used as a stellar age indicator. Some research seems to show that planet formation may also affect lithium abundance in exoplanet host stars (EHS). However, small and heterogenous samples have made both of these phenomena unclear. Further study of lithium abundance in EHS is needed to better understand possible physical roles of lithium in planet formation theory. We use a large homogenous sample with accurate stellar parameters on which we will use equivalent width analysis to determine precise lithium abundances. From these abundance values we determine an age vs. abundance relation. Additionally, we aim to explore correlation between lithium abundance and planet formation.

  13. Liquid lithium experiments in CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeski, R.; Efthimion, P.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Raftopoulos, S.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Soukhanovski, V.; Stutman, D.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Whyte, D.; Maingi, R.; Causey, R.; Buchanauer, D.

    2000-10-01

    The research goal of the Current Drive eXperiment - Upgrade (CDX-U) is to investigate the use of liquid lithium as a plasma-facing component in an operating spherical torus. A liquid lithium rail limiter system has been constructed at UCSD and will be installed in CDX-U in late July 2000. A liquid lithium toroidal belt limiter is to follow in October 2000. Modifications to CDX-U to accommodate in-vessel inventories of approximately 1 liter of liquid lithium, techniques for loading lithium onto the limiters, and other preparations will be described. Results of CDX-U experiments with lithium limiter systems on lithium influx, core and edge plasma modifications associated with very low recycling edges, and the effect of forced disruptions and halo currents on the liquid metal will be presented as available.

  14. Liquid Lithium Experiments in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski; R. Doerner; R. Kaita; G. Antar; J. Timberlake; et al

    2000-11-15

    The initial results of experiments involving the use of liquid lithium as a plasma facing component in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) are reported. Studies of the interaction of a steady-state plasma with liquid lithium in the Plasma Interaction with Surface and Components Experimental Simulator (PISCES-B) are also summarized. In CDX-U a solid or liquid lithium covered rail limiter was introduced as the primary limiting surface for spherical torus discharges. Deuterium recycling was observed to be reduced, but so far not eliminated, for glow discharge-cleaned lithium surfaces. Some lithium influx was observed during tokamak operation. The PISCES-B results indicate that the rates of plasma erosion of lithium can exceed predictions by an order of magnitude at elevated temperatures. Plans to extend the CDX-U experiments to large area liquid lithium toroidal belt limiters are also described.

  15. Surface protected lithium-metal-oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2016-04-05

    A lithium-metal-oxide positive electrode having a layered or spinel structure for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell and battery is disclosed comprising electrode particles that are protected at the surface from undesirable effects, such as electrolyte oxidation, oxygen loss or dissolution by one or more lithium-metal-polyanionic compounds, such as a lithium-metal-phosphate or a lithium-metal-silicate material that can act as a solid electrolyte at or above the operating potential of the lithium-metal-oxide electrode. The surface protection significantly enhances the surface stability, rate capability and cycling stability of the lithium-metal-oxide electrodes, particularly when charged to high potentials.

  16. 77 FR 68069 - Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ...-ion (Rechargeable) Cells and Batteries Small consumer-type lithium-ion cells and batteries like those... maximum of only four lithium-ion cells or two lithium-ion batteries. c. The lithium content must not... 20 Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION:......

  17. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  18. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  19. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  20. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  1. Lithium-Induced Motor Neuropathy: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Satyakam; Sahoo, Manas Ranjan; Rath, Neelmadhav

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy secondary to lithium is under-recognized. Most cases of polyneuropathy were reported with lithium intoxication. However, very few cases were reported without lithium toxicity. We present a case of motor neuropathy due to the use of lithium in a 26-year-old male with a therapeutic lithium level. PMID:27335523

  2. Identification of a new lithium oxide, Li3O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium oxide (Li3O2) was prepared by decomposing anhydrous lithium hydroxide at 360 C in 48 hours and between 640 and 730 C in times up to 1.3 hours and pressures of about 0.00001 torr. Decompositions were done in nickel, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, and the T-111 tantalum alloy (Ta - 8-wt.% W - 2 wt.% Hf) containers. This oxide probably belongs to the simple orthorhombic system with the following lattice parameters: a = 108.4 + or - 0.4 nm (10.84 + or - 0.04 A), b = 128.4 + or - 0.5 nm (12.84 + or - 0.05 A), and c = 103.6 + or - 0.4 nm (10.36 + or - 0.04 A).

  3. Main-sequence mass loss and the lithium dip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary; Dearborn, David S. P.

    1990-01-01

    The significant dip in observed lithium abundances for Population I stars near M about 1.3 solar mass is discussed. It is noted that this dip occurs near where the instability strip crosses the main sequence on the lower edge of the Delta Scuti stars and that stellar pulsations are expected to give rise to mass loss. A total mass loss of 0.05 solar mass over the main-sequence lifetime of these stars would be sufficient to explain the observations of lithium depletion. The absence of a dip in the Pleiades and of significant depletion of beryllium in the Hyades places tight constraints on the rate of mass loss. These constraints make unlikely the high main-sequence mass-loss rates which would significantly affect globular cluster ages.

  4. Photodisintegration of Lithium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurtz, Ward Andrew

    We have performed a measurement of the photodisintegration of the lithium isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, using a monochromatic, polarised photon beam and a segmented neutron detector array which covers approximately ¼ of 4pi srad. Using time-of-flight and scintillator light-output spectra we separate the data into individual reaction channels. This work is motivated by the need to compare with recent theoretical predictions and to provide data for future theoretical work. For the photodisintegration of 6Li we took data at 12 photon energies between 8 and 35 MeV. We describe the data using a model consisting of two-body reaction channels and obtain angular distributions and absolute cross sections for many of these reaction channels. We compare our results with a recent Lorentz integral transform calculation (Bacca et al. Phys. Rev. C 69, 057001 (2004)). Our results are in reasonable agreement with the calculation, in contradiction with previous experimental results. For the photodisintegration of 7Li, we took data at 9 photon energies between 10 and 35 MeV. We obtain cross sections for the reaction channel 7Li + gamma → n + 6 Li(g.s.) at all photon energies with angular distributions at all but the highest energy. We obtain angular distributions and total cross sections for reaction channels involving excited states of the daughter nucleus, 6Li, at select energies. We hope that these measurements will provide incentive for new theoretical calculations. We observe neutrons that can only be described by the reaction channel 7Li + gamma → n + 6Li(10.0) which necessitates an excited state of 6Li with excitation energy Ex = 10.0 +/- 0.5 MeV that is not in the standard tables of excited states. ii

  5. An experimental study on burning behaviors of 18650 lithium ion batteries using a cone calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yangyang; Lu, Song; Li, Kaiyuan; Liu, Changchen; Cheng, Xudong; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Numerous of lithium ion battery fires and explosions enhance the need of precise risk assessments on batteries. In the current study, 18650 lithium ion batteries at different states of charge are tested using a cone calorimeter to study the burning behaviors under an incident heat flux of 50 kW m-2. Several parameters are measured, including mass loss rate, time to ignition, time to explosion, heat release rate (HRR), the surface temperature and concentration of toxic gases. Although small quantities of oxygen are released from the lithium ion battery during burning, it is estimated that the energy, consuming oxygen released from the lithium ion battery, accounts for less than 13% of total energy released by a fully charged lithium ion battery. The experimental results show that the peak HRR and concentration of toxic gases rise with the increasing the states of charge, whereas the time to ignition and time to explosion decrease. The test results of the fully charged lithium ion batteries at three different incident heat fluxes show that the peak HRR increases from 6.2 to 9.1 kW and the maximum surface temperature increases from 662 to 934 °C as the incident heat flux increases from 30 to 60 kW m-2.

  6. Measured and calculated fast neutron spectra in a depleted uranium and lithium hydride shielded reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.; Mueller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of MeV neutron were made at the surface of a lithium hydride and depleted uranium shielded reactor. Four shield configurations were considered: these were assembled progressively with cylindrical shells of 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, and 3-centimeter-thick depleted uranium. Measurements were made with a NE-218 scintillation spectrometer; proton pulse height distributions were differentiated to obtain neutron spectra. Calculations were made using the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT and ENDF/B (version 3) cross sections. Good agreement between measured and calculated spectral shape was observed. Absolute measured and calculated fluxes were within 50 percent of one another; observed discrepancies in absolute flux may be due to cross section errors.

  7. Long-Term Lithium Use and Risk of Renal and Upper Urinary Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper; Jensen, Boye L; Madsen, Kirsten; Friis, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Lithium induces proliferation in the epithelium of renal collecting ducts. A recent small-scale cohort study reported a strong association between use of lithium and increased risk of renal neoplasia. We therefore conducted a large-scale pharmacoepidemiologic study of the association between long-term use of lithium and risk of upper urinary tract cancer, including renal cell cancer and cancers of the renal pelvis or ureter. We identified all histologically verified upper urinary tract cancer cases in Denmark between 2000 and 2012 from the Danish Cancer Registry. A total of 6477 cases were matched by age and sex to 259,080 cancer-free controls. Data on lithium use from 1995 to 2012 were obtained from the Danish Prescription Registry. We estimated the association between long-term use of lithium (≥5 years) and risk of upper urinary tract cancer using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Long-term use of lithium was observed among 0.22% of cases and 0.17% of controls. This yielded an overall nonsignificant adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.3 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.8-2.2) for upper urinary tract cancer associated with long-term use of lithium. Analyses stratified by stage and subtype of upper urinary tract cancer revealed slight but nonsignificant increases in the ORs for localized disease (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8-3.0) and for renal pelvis/ureter cancers (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.5-5.4). In conclusion, in our nationwide case-control study, use of lithium was not associated with an increased risk of upper urinary tract cancer.

  8. Mass effect on the lithium abundance evolution of open clusters: Hyades, NGC 752, and M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M.; Duarte, T.; Pace, G.; do Nascimento, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Lithium abundances in open clusters provide an effective way of probing mixing processes in the interior of solar-type stars and convection is not the only mixing mechanism at work. To understand which mixing mechanisms are occurring in low-mass stars, we test non-standard models, which were calibrated using the Sun, with observations of three open clusters of different ages, the Hyades, NGC 752, and M 67. We collected all available data, and for the open cluster NGC 752, we redetermine the equivalent widths and the lithium abundances. Two sets of evolutionary models were computed, one grid of only standard models with microscopic diffusion and one grid with rotation-induced mixing, at metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.13, 0.0, and 0.01 dex, respectively, using the Toulouse-Geneva evolution code. We compare observations with models in a color-magnitude diagram for each cluster to infer a cluster age and a stellar mass for each cluster member. Then, for each cluster we analyze the lithium abundance of each star as a function of mass. The data for the open clusters Hyades, NGC 752, and M 67, are compatible with lithium abundance being a function of both age and mass for stars in these clusters. Our models with meridional circulation qualitatively reproduce the general trend of lithium abundance evolution as a function of stellar mass in all three clusters. This study points out the importance of mass dependence in the evolution of lithium abundance as a function of age. Comparison between models with and without rotation-induced mixing shows that the inclusion of meridional circulation is essential to account for lithium depletion in low-mass stars. However, our results suggest that other mechanisms should be included to explain the Li-dip and the lithium dispersion in low-mass stars.

  9. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  10. Tradeoff analysis with lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C.

    1978-01-01

    Characteristic data, primarily on high rate lithium sulfur dioxide design (basically in the D and DD cell configuration), both before and after much exposure to environmental conditions are discussed. The environmental as opposed to signle cells. Discussion was generated among the Workshop participants and comments and questions are reported. Graphical representations of the test data are presented.

  11. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2011-04-05

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  12. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2012-01-31

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  13. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2008-06-24

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell system. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plastized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  14. Primary lithium cell life studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capulli, John; Donley, Sam; Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, David

    1990-01-01

    One solution for providing a truly independent power source is to package, within the critical subsystem element, a primary battery that can remain dormant for time periods as long as the mission life, which can be 10-15 years, maximum. When primary power from the spacecraft solar array/battery system is interrupted, the backup battery system, which is connected through a diode to the power input line, would automatically support the load to avoid a power interruption to the critical load for a time period long enough to ensure that ground control could access the satellite and correct the anomaly by sending appropriate commands to the spacecraft. Critical subsystems identified for the application are telemetry and command circuits, volatile computer memory, attitude control circuits, and some critical payloads. Due to volume packaging and weight restrictions that exist on most spacecraft, coupled with the long storage periods required, lithium cell technology was selected for the backup power source. Because of the high energy density (200-400 Wh/kg), long shelf life, and load capability, soluble cathode primary lithium technology was chosen. The most important lithium cell properties that require detail characterization for this application are capacity loss, shelf life, and the voltage delay mechanism. These are functions of storage time and temperature. During storage, a passive film builds up on the lithium electrode. The film protects the lithium electrode from progressive capacity decay but requires time to break down when a load is applied. This phenomenon results in a depressed voltage during the period of film breakdown which can last from fractions of a second to minutes.

  15. Biologically enhanced cathode design for improved capacity and cycle life for lithium-oxygen batteries

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dahyun; Qi, Jifa; Lu, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Yong; Shao-Horn, Yang; Belcher, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-oxygen batteries have a great potential to enhance the gravimetric energy density of fully packaged batteries by 2–3 times that of lithium-ion cells. Recent studies have focused on finding stable electrolytes to address poor cycling capability and improve practical limitations of current lithium-oxygen batteries. In this study, the catalyst electrode, where discharge products are deposited and decomposed, was investigated since it plays a critical role in the operation of rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries. Here we report the electrode design principle to improve specific capacity and cycling performance of lithium-oxygen batteries by utilizing high efficiency nanocatalysts assembled by M13 virus with earth abundant elements, such as manganese oxides. By incorporating only 3–5 wt % of palladium nanoparticles in the electrode, this hybrid nanocatalyst achieves 13,350 mAh g−1c (7,340 mAh g−1c+catalyst) of specific capacity at 0.4 A g−1c and a stable cycle life up to 50 cycles (4,000 mAh g−1c, 400 mAh g−1c+catalyst) at 1 A g−1c. PMID:24220635

  16. Lithium cell technology and safety report of the Tri-Service Lithium Safety Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, E.

    1980-01-01

    The organization of the Tri-Service Lithium Safety Committee is described. The following areas concerning lithium batteries are discussed: transportation--DOT Exemption 7052, FAA; disposal; storage; individual testing/test results; and battery design and usage.

  17. 78 FR 55773 - Fourteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 225, Rechargeable Lithium Battery and Battery Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Battery and Battery Systems--Small and Medium Size AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S... Lithium Battery and Battery Systems--Small and Medium Size. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to... Battery and Battery Systems--Small and Medium Size DATES: The meeting will be held October 1-3, 2013,...

  18. Lithium: Sources, Production, Uses, and Recovery Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talens Peiró, Laura; Villalba Méndez, Gara; Ayres, Robert U.

    2013-08-01

    The demand for lithium has increased significantly during the last decade as it has become key for the development of industrial products, especially batteries for electronic devices and electric vehicles. This article reviews sources, extraction and production, uses, and recovery and recycling, all of which are important aspects when evaluating lithium as a key resource. First, it describes the estimated reserves and lithium production from brine and pegmatites, including the material and energy requirements. Then, it continues with a description about the current uses of lithium focusing on its application in batteries and concludes with a description of the opportunities for recovery and recycling and the future demand forecast. The article concludes that the demand of lithium for electronic vehicles will increase from 30% to almost 60% by 2020. Thus, in the next years, the recovery and recycling of lithium from batteries is decisive to ensure the long-term viability of the metal.

  19. Persistent nephrogenic diabetes insipidus following lithium therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C J; France, A J; Baylis, P H

    1997-02-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed severe hypernatraemic dehydration following a head injury. Ten years previously he had been diagnosed to have lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and lithium therapy had been discontinued. He remained thirsty and polyuric despite cessation of lithium and investigations on admission showed him to have normal osmoregulated thirst and vasopressin secretion, with clear evidence of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Lithium induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is considered to be reversible on cessation of therapy but polyuria persisted in this patient for ten years after lithium was stopped. We discuss the possible renal mechanisms and the implications for management of patients with lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

  20. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  1. Stabilized Lithium-Metal Surface in a Polysulfide-Rich Environment of Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zu, Chenxi; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2014-08-01

    Lithium-metal anode degradation is one of the major challenges of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, hindering their practical utility as next-generation rechargeable battery chemistry. The polysulfide migration and shuttling associated with Li-S batteries can induce heterogeneities of the lithium-metal surface because it causes passivation by bulk insulating Li2S particles/electrolyte decomposition products on a lithium-metal surface. This promotes lithium dendrite formation and leads to poor lithium cycling efficiency with complicated lithium surface chemistry. Here, we show copper acetate as a surface stabilizer for lithium metal in a polysulfide-rich environment of Li-S batteries. The lithium surface is protected from parasitic reactions with the organic electrolyte and the migrating polysulfides by an in situ chemical formation of a passivation film consisting of mainly Li2S/Li2S2/CuS/Cu2S and electrolyte decomposition products. This passivation film also suppresses lithium dendrite formation by controlling the lithium deposition sites, leading to a stabilized lithium surface characterized by a dendrite-free morphology and improved surface chemistry. PMID:26277939

  2. Lithium Metal Oxide Electrodes For Lithium Cells And Batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-20

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  3. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil

    2008-12-23

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  4. A study of electrolytes for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Gerald; Desnoyers, J. E.; Rheault, F.; Gagnon, R.; Quirion, F.; Camire, C.; Ledoux, J.

    1989-05-01

    The main objective of the work described here was to develop a fast and efficient method to optimize the electrolytic medium in primary and secondary high density Li/SO2 batteries over a wide range of temperatures. Mixed aprotic solvents are frequently used in batteries to optimize their performance. In the work described here, combinations of five solvents (acetonitrile, gamma butyrolacetone, 1,3- dimethoxyethane, 1,3- dioxolane and sulfolane), three electrolytes (LiBr, LiClO4, and LiAsF6), and SO2 were studied. The liquid-solid phase diagrams at 25 C were correlated with the viscosity, conductivity, density, and in some cases heat capacity of the mixture. Five types of material combinations were analyzed. These combinations included: (1) aprotic solvents + aprotic solvents, (2) electrolytes + aprotic solvents, (3) electrolytes + mixtures of aprotic solvents, (4) aprotic solvents + SO2, and (5) electrolytes + solvents + SO2. Mixed solvent plus electrolyte conductivities were up to 50 percent greater than the best conductivity observed when a single solvent was combined with an electrolyte. In addition the conductivity of the lithium salts in mixtures of aprotic solvents with SO2 at minus 15 C were measured. In this case, the specific conductivity maximized in the region corresponding to the SO2 rich eutectic for all mixtures studied. The study showed a correlation between the liquid solids equilibrium properties for the mixtures and their physico-chemical properties in solution, even at temperatures far above the solid liquid equilibrium point.

  5. Lithium's effect in forced-swim test is blood level dependent but not dependent on weight loss.

    PubMed

    Bersudsky, Yuly; Shaldubina, Alona; Belmaker, R H

    2007-02-01

    The effects of lithium in models of depression are often inconsistent. We aimed to replicate a regimen that induces robust antidepressant effects in the forced-swim test. Mice were treated with three different doses of lithium chloride (LiCl) 0.25, 0.4 or 0.5% in food and the forced-swim test or open field test was performed on day 15. We yoked control mice to food deprivation to test whether lithium-induced food deprivation could cause the lithium effects in the forced-swim test. Treatment with LiCl doses leading to blood levels of 1.3 and 1.4 mmol/l led to highly significant reduction in immobility time in the forced-swim test, but the dose leading to a blood level of 0.8 mmol/l was not different from controls in immobility time. Mice yoked to lithium-induced food deprivation showed no difference in the forced-swim test compared with controls. In conclusion these results suggest that lithium effects in mice in the forced-swim test are dose dependent but not owing to lithium-induced weight loss.

  6. Lithium-Ion Cell Storage Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Leonine; Rao, Gopalkrishna M.

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the issues concerning storage of lithium ion batteries. The presentation outlines tests used to establish a best long term storage for the lithium ion cells. Another objective of the study was to determine the preferred solstice condition for the lithium ion chemistry (polymer and liquid electrolyte). It also compared voltage clamped with trickle charge storage. The tests and results are reviewed

  7. Electrode materials and lithium battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Belharouak, Ilias; Liu, Jun

    2011-06-28

    A material comprising a lithium titanate comprising a plurality of primary particles and secondary particles, wherein the average primary particle size is about 1 nm to about 500 nm and the average secondary particle size is about 1 .mu.m to about 4 .mu.m. In some embodiments the lithium titanate is carbon-coated. Also provided are methods of preparing lithium titanates, and devices using such materials.

  8. Minerals yearbook, 1993: Lithium. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The two companies that produced lithium in the United States in 1993 did so from two different types of deposits. Both firms mined spodumene (a ltihium-aluminum-silicate mineral) from large hard-rock deposits in North Carolina using open pit methods. Lithium was recovered from geothermal brine deposits in Nevada. During 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) offered for sale approximately 14 million kilograms of its 36-million-kilogram stock of lithium hydroxide monohydrate.

  9. Lithium anode for lithium-air secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Zhang, Tao; Hirano, Atushi; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Osamu

    The lithium ion conducting solid lithium phosphorous nitride (LiPON) has been sputtered on the water-stable NASICON-type lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte Li 1+ x+ yAl xTi 2- xP 3- ySi yO 12 (LATP). The stability and the interface resistance of the Li-Al/LiPON/LATP/LiPON/Li-Al cell have been examined. It is shown that the LiPON film protects LATP from reacting with the Li-Al alloy. The impedance of the Li-Al/LiPON/LATP/LiPON/Li-Al cell has been measured in the temperature range 25-80 °C. The total cell resistance is about 8600 Ω cm 2 at room temperature and 360 Ω cm 2 at 80 °C. The analysis of the impedance profiles suggests that the Li-Al/LiPON interface resistance is dominant at lower temperatures. The LATP plate immersed in water for 1 month shows only a slight degradation in the conductivity.

  10. Spectral emission measurements of lithium on the lithium tokamak experiment.

    PubMed

    Gray, T K; Biewer, T M; Boyle, D P; Granstedt, E M; Kaita, R; Maingi, R; Majeski, R P

    2012-10-01

    There has been a long-standing collaboration between ORNL and PPPL on edge and boundary layer physics. As part of this collaboration, ORNL has a large role in the instrumentation and interpretation of edge physics in the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). In particular, a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) diagnostic is being designed and undergoing staged testing on LTX. Here we present results of passively measured lithium emission at 5166.89 A in LTX in anticipation of active spectroscopy measurements, which will be enabled by the installation of a neutral beam in 2013. Preliminary measurements are made in transient LTX plasmas with plasma current, I(p) < 70 kA, ohmic heating power, P(oh) ∼ 0.3 MW and discharge lifetimes of 10-15 ms. Measurements are made with a short focal length spectrometer and optics similar to the CHERS diagnostics on NSTX [R. E. Bell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68(2), 1273-1280 (1997)]. These preliminary measurements suggest that even without the neutral beam for active spectroscopy, there is sufficient passive lithium emission to allow for line-of-sight profile measurements of ion temperature, T(i); toroidal velocity and v(t). Results show peak T(i) = 70 eV and peak v(t) = 45 km/s were reached 10 ms into the discharge.

  11. Spectral emission measurements of lithium on the lithium tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, T. K.; Biewer, T. M.; Maingi, R.; Boyle, D. P.; Granstedt, E. M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. P.

    2012-10-15

    There has been a long-standing collaboration between ORNL and PPPL on edge and boundary layer physics. As part of this collaboration, ORNL has a large role in the instrumentation and interpretation of edge physics in the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). In particular, a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) diagnostic is being designed and undergoing staged testing on LTX. Here we present results of passively measured lithium emission at 5166.89 A in LTX in anticipation of active spectroscopy measurements, which will be enabled by the installation of a neutral beam in 2013. Preliminary measurements are made in transient LTX plasmas with plasma current, I{sub p} < 70 kA, ohmic heating power, P{sub oh}{approx} 0.3 MW and discharge lifetimes of 10-15 ms. Measurements are made with a short focal length spectrometer and optics similar to the CHERS diagnostics on NSTX [R. E. Bell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68(2), 1273-1280 (1997)]. These preliminary measurements suggest that even without the neutral beam for active spectroscopy, there is sufficient passive lithium emission to allow for line-of-sight profile measurements of ion temperature, T{sub i}; toroidal velocity and v{sub t}. Results show peak T{sub i} = 70 eV and peak v{sub t} = 45 km/s were reached 10 ms into the discharge.

  12. Spectral emission measurements of lithium on the lithium tokamak experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, T. K.; Biewer, T. M.; Boyle, D. P.; Granstedt, E. M.; Kaita, R.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R. P.

    2012-10-01

    There has been a long-standing collaboration between ORNL and PPPL on edge and boundary layer physics. As part of this collaboration, ORNL has a large role in the instrumentation and interpretation of edge physics in the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). In particular, a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) diagnostic is being designed and undergoing staged testing on LTX. Here we present results of passively measured lithium emission at 5166.89 Å in LTX in anticipation of active spectroscopy measurements, which will be enabled by the installation of a neutral beam in 2013. Preliminary measurements are made in transient LTX plasmas with plasma current, Ip < 70 kA, ohmic heating power, Poh ˜ 0.3 MW and discharge lifetimes of 10-15 ms. Measurements are made with a short focal length spectrometer and optics similar to the CHERS diagnostics on NSTX [R. E. Bell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68(2), 1273-1280 (1997), 10.1063/1.1147885]. These preliminary measurements suggest that even without the neutral beam for active spectroscopy, there is sufficient passive lithium emission to allow for line-of-sight profile measurements of ion temperature, Ti; toroidal velocity and vt. Results show peak Ti = 70 eV and peak vt = 45 km/s were reached 10 ms into the discharge.

  13. Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wu; Wang, Jiulin; Ding, Fei; Chen, Xilin; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-10-29

    Rechargeable lithium metal batteries have much higher energy density than those of lithium ion batteries using graphite anode. Unfortunately, uncontrollable dendritic lithium growth inherent in these batteries (upon repeated charge/discharge cycling) and limited Coulombic efficiency during lithium deposition/striping has prevented their practical application over the past 40 years. With the emerging of post Li-ion batteries, safe and efficient operation of lithium metal anode has become an enabling technology which may determine the fate of several promising candidates for the next generation of energy storage systems, including rechargeable Li-air battery, Li-S battery, and Li metal battery which utilize lithium intercalation compounds as cathode. In this work, various factors which affect the morphology and Coulombic efficiency of lithium anode will be analyzed. Technologies used to characterize the morphology of lithium deposition and the results obtained by modeling of lithium dendrite growth will also be reviewed. At last, recent development in this filed and urgent need in this field will also be discussed.

  14. Lithium in Medicine: Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Mota de Freitas, Duarte; Leverson, Brian D; Goossens, Jesse L

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the mechanism of action of lithium salts from a chemical perspective. A description on how lithium salts are used to treat mental illnesses, in particular bipolar disorder, and other disease states is provided. Emphasis is not placed on the genetics and the psychopharmacology of the ailments for which lithium salts have proven to be beneficial. Rather we highlight the application of chemical methodologies for the characterization of the cellular targets of lithium salts and their distribution in tissues. PMID:26860311

  15. Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-30

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

  16. Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Godshall, Ned A.; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

  17. Recovery and recycling of lithium value from spent lithium titanate (Li2TiO3) pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, D.

    2013-09-01

    Hydrochloric acid was used. The reasons to use hydrochloric acid are discussed below. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) analytical grade, procured form Merck Chemicals, Mumbai, India. To precipitate lithium as lithium carbonate from lithium hydroxide solution sodium carbonate was used. Distilled water. Distilled was used in the experiments, primarily to dilute hydrochloric acid to the desired molar solution. Leaching agent. Concentration of the leaching agent. Temperature. Speed of agitation. Solid to liquid ratio, and Particle Size. In the experimental work spherical Li2TiO3 pebbles of size 1.0 was used as mentioned above. To study the effect of particle size on the recovery of lithium from fine Li2TiO3 particles of size range 100-200 μm were used. These fines were obtained by pulverizing 1.0 mm Li2TiO3 pebbles in a planetary ball mill and classified standard sieves.It is reported that both HNO3 and HCl give relatively more recovery of lithium compared to H2SO4[11-13]. Though the handling of HCl is difficulties due to the chloride corrosion, it is preferred to HNO3 because the deposal of nitrate waste which will generate due to the latter's use viz. sodium nitrate is a problem as per the norms of pollution control standard [11,12].The leaching of Li2TiO3 pebbles were carried out in a 1000 ml three necked and flat bottom glass reactor. The flux was fitted with a reflux condenser to reduce the loss of solution by evaporation and a thermometer. The solid was suspended in the solution by stirring the solution using a magnetic stirrer. The flux was kept on a hot plate with a temperature controller to heat the slurry at constant temperature. The temperature of the solution was controlled within ±3 °C and the temperature of the slurry was noted at an interval of 5 min and the average temperature of each run is determined by time average of the noted readings.A known of volume of HCl solution with known concentration was added to the flux. After the desired stirring speed and reaction

  18. Mixed organic compound-ionic liquid electrolytes for lithium battery electrolyte systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanino, M.; Moreno, M.; Carewska, M.; Maresca, G.; Simonetti, E.; Lo Presti, R.; Alessandrini, F.; Appetecchi, G. B.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal, transport, rheological and flammability properties of electrolyte mixtures, proposed for safer lithium-ion battery systems, were investigated as a function of the mole composition. The blends were composed of a lithium salt (LiTFSI), organic solvents (namely EC, DEC) and an ionic liquid (PYR13TFSI). The main goal is to combine the fast ion transport properties of the organic compounds with the safe issues of the non-flammable and non-volatile ionic liquids. Preliminary tests in batteries have evidenced cycling performance approaching that observed in commercial organic electrolytes.

  19. Lithium in population I subgiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randich, S.; Gratton, R.; Pallavicini, R.; Pasquini, L.; Carretta, E.

    1999-08-01

    We present a lithium survey for a sample of 91 Pop. I stars. JHKL photometry was also obtained for 61 stars in the sample. Besides Li abundances, [Fe/H] values were derived. Thanks to Hipparcos parallaxes, we could infer absolute V magnitudes for our sample stars and were able to place them on the color-magnitude diagram, which allowed us to constrain their evolutionary status. Masses and ages were derived for most of the stars by comparison with evolutionary tracks. The sample was originally selected so to include class IV stars later than spectral-type F0, but, based on the location on the color-magnitude diagram, we found a posteriori that a fraction of the stars (about 20%) are either main sequence stars or evolved giants. As it is the case for dwarfs and giants, a large spread in lithium abundance is present among the subgiants in our sample. As expected, the average lithium decreases as the stars evolve along the subgiant branch; however, there is not a one-to-one relationship between the position on the color-magnitude diagram and lithium abundance, and the observed dispersion is only partially explainable as due to a dispersion in mass, metallicity, and age. In particular, a dispersion in lithium is seen among slightly evolved subgiants with masses close to solar but in the same evolutionary stage as the G2 IV star beta Hyi. The comparison of the beta Hyi-like sample with a sample of non evolved solar-like stars indeed suggests that beta Hyi has most likely evolved from a main sequence Li-rich star, rather than from a Li-poor star (like the Sun) that has dredged-up previously stored lithium. Our sample includes several stars that have completed the first-dredge up lithium dilution, but that have not yet evolved to the evolutionary point where extra-mixing in the giant phase is thought to occur. A large number of them have Li abundances considerably below the theoretical predictions of first dredge-up dilution. We confirm that this is due to the fact that

  20. Lithium-Air Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Dobley, Arthur; Seymour, Frasier W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-air (Li-air) primary batteries have a theoretical specific capacity of 11,400 Wh/kg, the highest of any common metal-air system. NASA is developing Li-air technology for a Mobile Oxygen Concentrator for Spacecraft Emergencies, an application which requires an extremely lightweight primary battery that can discharge over 24 hours continuously. Several vendors were funded through the NASA SBIR program to develop Li-air technology to fulfill the requirements of this application. New catalysts and carbon cathode structures were developed to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction and increase surface area to improve cell performance. Techniques to stabilize the lithium metal anode surface were explored. Experimental results for prototype laboratory cells are given. Projections are made for the performance of hypothetical cells constructed from the materials that were developed.

  1. Growth energizes lithium ion interest

    SciTech Connect

    D`Amico, E.

    1996-03-20

    The prospects for big growth in the US for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) has sparked the interest of potential domestic suppliers. {open_quotes}The money that can be made in this market is staggering,{close_quotes} says one industry expert. {open_quotes}Everybody who is remotely related to this industry is interested.{close_quotes} The size of the market, still in its infancy, is difficult to gauge, say consultants, who estimate that leading Japanese producers are each making millions of lithium ion cells/month. {open_quotes}The market is not too measurable right now because the only production is really limited to prototypes being sampled,{close_quotes} says Ward Seitz, a consultant with SRI International (Menlo Park, CA), {open_quotes}but there is phenomenal interest.{close_quotes}

  2. The NASA Lithium Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, G.; Frank, H.

    1984-01-01

    NASA is sponsoring research to develop advanced primary and secondary lithium cells. Lithium cells are conducive to aerospace use because they have high specific energy, volumetric energy density, and long storage capability. The primary cell research is centered on the Li/SOCl2 system. It is in the late development stage and all effort is being placed on resolving safety problems. The secondary cell, which is in the development stage, is the Li/TiS2 system. The objective is to produce a 100 wh/kg cell capable of operating in a geosynchronous orbit for 10 years. The development of improved conductivity polymeric films for electrochemical use is also being investigated. The lightweight batteries will have many applications in space and are already being prepared for the 1986 Galileo mission to Jupiter.

  3. Lithium orotate in the treatment of alcoholism and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, H E

    1986-01-01

    The subjects were 42 alcoholic patients (33 males and 9 females) who were treated with lithium orotate during an alcohol rehabilitation program in a private clinical setting for at least six months. They derive from a total number of 105 patients who received this treatment initially, while the remainder discontinued the treatment within six months. The data were collected from a private practice record and the follow-up varied between six months and 10 years. The 42 patients studied displayed a multitude of complaints in addition to chronic alcoholism. These included liver dysfunction, seizure disorders, headaches, hyperthyroidism, affective disorders. Meniere's syndrome, liver and lung cancers. Thirty-six of the 42 patients studied had been hospitalized at least once for the management of their alcoholism. Lithium orotate was given, 150 mg daily, with a diet low in simple carbohydrates and containing moderate amounts of protein and fat. In addition, calcium orotate (for hepatic involvement), magnesium orotate, bromelaine, and essential phospholipids (for cardiac problems), and supportive measures were instituted, if required. Lithium orotate proved useful as the main pharmacologic agent for the treatment of alcoholism. Ten of the patients had no relapse for over three and up to 10 years, 13 patients remained without relapse for 1 to 3 years, and the remaining 12 had relapses between 6 to 12 months. Lithium orotate therapy was safe and the adverse side effects noted were minor, i.e., eight patients developed muscle weakness, loss of appetite or mild apathy. For these patients, the symptoms subsided when the daily dose was given 4 to 5 times weekly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3718672

  4. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Alamgir, Mohamed; Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.

    1993-01-01

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  5. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

    1993-10-12

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

  6. Lithium battery safety and reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Samuel C.

    Lithium batteries have been used in a variety of applications for a number of years. As their use continues to grow, particularly in the consumer market, a greater emphasis needs to be placed on safety and reliability. There is a useful technique which can help to design cells and batteries having a greater degree of safety and higher reliability. This technique, known as fault tree analysis, can also be useful in determining the cause of unsafe behavior and poor reliability in existing designs.

  7. NASA's lithium cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juvinall, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Briefly outlined are the activities of the various research centers involved in the NASA program. Graphs are presented for: (1) the initial results on SOCl2 decomposition rate; (2) effect of rate on output of Li-SOCl2 cells; (3) comparison of high and low rate Li-SOCl2 cells; and (4) effect of temperature on output of Li-SOCl2 cells. Abusive test results and a description of secondary lithium cells are also presented.

  8. Safety testing of lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bene, J.

    1981-01-01

    The testing consisted of a forced discharge to zero volts constant current under isothermal conditions. The temperature range was -40 to 65 C. Short circuit tests, drop tests, and puncture tests were run to determine how a cell might behave if it developed a leak. Once the sulfur dioxide is exhausted, a lithium acetontirile reaction occurs. An excess of sulfur dioxide must be maintained in order to avoid chemical explosions.

  9. Crystallization of lithium borate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goktas, A. A.; Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of lithium borate compositions, in the diborate-to-metaborate-range, were studied. In particular, the nature and sequence of formation of crystalline phases and the tendency toward devitrification were investigated as functions of temperature, thermal history and batch composition. It was found that the sequence of crystalline phase formation was sensitive to all of the three latter factors, and it was observed that under certain conditions metastable defect structures of the metaborate can appear.

  10. Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2014-08-05

    A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

  11. Lithium batteries for pulse power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redey, Laszlo

    New designs of lithium batteries having bipolar construction and thin cell components possess the very low impedance that is necessary to deliver high-intensity current pulses. The research and development and understanding of the fundamental properties of these pulse batteries have reached an advanced level. Ranges of 50 to 300 kW/kg specific power and 80 to 130 Wh/kg specific energy have been demonstrated with experimental high-temperature lithium alloy/transition-metal disulfide rechargeable bipolar batteries in repeated 1- to 100-ms long pulses. Other versions are designed for repetitive power bursts that may last up to 20 or 30 s and yet may attain high specific power (1 to 10 kW/kg). Primary high-temperature Li-alloy/FeS2 pulse batteries (thermal batteries) are already commercially available. Other high-temperature lithium systems may use chlorine or metal-oxide positive electrodes. Also under development are low-temperature pulse batteries: a 50-kW Li/SOCl2 primary batter and an all solid-state, polymer-electrolyte secondary battery. Such pulse batteries could find use in commercial and military applications in the near future.

  12. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Clinical uses of lithium salts.

    PubMed

    Frost, R E; Messiha, F S

    1983-08-01

    A comprehensive overview of the clinical aspects of lithium therapy is presented. Emphasis is placed on recent developments regarding the clinical uses of Li2CO3 in non-psychiatric conditions. The established efficacy of the drug in the treatment and prophylaxis of mania and bipolar affective disorders is noted, and the evidence supporting the use of lithium salts as a prophylactic agent in unipolar depression, aggressive behavior, schizophrenic disorders and organic brain dysfunction is discussed. The use of lithium carbonate in various disorders of movement and in certain extrapyramidal diseases is summarized, as are the results of its trials in alcoholism and drug abuse. In addition, uses of Li2CO3 in asthma, thyroid diseases, granulocytopenia, headache, bowel disease, anesthesiology, cardiology, and sleep disorders are summarized. The data suggests the potential effectiveness of Li2CO3 in a variety of clinical conditions other than those for which it is classically indicated, provided more detailed double-blind studies are performed.

  14. Lithium batteries for pulse power

    SciTech Connect

    Redey, L.

    1990-01-01

    New designs of lithium batteries having bipolar construction and thin cell components possess the very low impedance that is necessary to deliver high-intensity current pulses. The R D and understanding of the fundamental properties of these pulse batteries have reached an advanced level. Ranges of 50--300 kW/kg specific power and 80--130 Wh/kg specific energy have been demonstrated with experimental high-temperature lithium alloy/transition-metal disulfide rechargeable bipolar batteries in repeated 1- to 100-ms long pulses. Other versions are designed for repetitive power bursts that may last up to 20 or 30 s and yet may attain high specific power (1--10 kW/kg). Primary high-temperature Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} pulse batteries (thermal batteries) are already commercially available. Other high-temperature lithium systems may use chlorine or metal-oxide positive electrodes. Also under development are low-temperature pulse batteries: a 50-kW Li/SOCl{sub 2} primary batter and an all solid-state, polymer-electrolyte secondary battery. Such pulse batteries could find use in commercial and military applications in the near future. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Lithium/water battery with lithium ion conducting glass-ceramics electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Takashi; Inda, Yasushi; Nakajima, Kousuke; Ye, Rongbin; Baba, Mamoru

    Lithium/water batteries have attracted considerable attention as high power supply devices because they use high energy density lithium metal as an anode and water as a cathode. In this study, we investigate the use of lithium/water batteries that use a glass-ceramics plate as an electrolyte. A lithium ion conducting glass-ceramics plate has no through-holes and does not exhibit moisture permeation. Such a plate has stable ionic conductivity in water. Lithium/water batteries that used a glass-ceramics plate as an electrolyte had a long and stable discharge for 50 days at room temperature when the lithium metal was prevented from coming into contact with water. Lithium/seawater batteries using a glass-ceramics plate as an electrolyte also operated well in the 10-70 °C temperature range.

  16. Ether-functionalized ionic liquid electrolytes for lithium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Yushi; Shiotsuki, Taishi; Mizuno, Fuminori; Higashi, Shougo; Takechi, Kensuke; Asaoka, Takahiko; Nishikoori, Hidetaka; Iba, Hideki

    2013-12-01

    Ionic liquids composed of N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium (DEME), N-methyl-N-methoxyethylpiperidinium (PP1.1o2) cations functionalized with ethers, N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium (PP13), and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium (P14) cations and the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (TFSA) anion are investigated for application as electrolytes in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. The PP13-TFSA, P14-TFSA and DEME-TFSA ionic liquids have high oxygen radical stability. A comparison of the lithium supply capacity measured using pulse-gradient spin-echo NMR for 7Li nuclei and the oxygen supply capacity measured using electrochemical methods indicates that the oxygen supply is the rate-limiting step for the generation of lithium-oxygen compounds (LiOx) in these ionic liquids with supporting electrolytes. The DEME-TFSA system has the highest LiOx generation activity among the ionic liquid systems examined. We demonstrate the improved performance (output power, discharge-charge capacity and coulombic efficiency) of a Li-O2 battery using the DEME-TFSA system compared with that using the PP13-TFSA system. The improvements observed for the DEME-TFSA system are attributed to the high LiOx generation properties and lithium ion supply.

  17. A Lithium-Ion Battery with Enhanced Safety Prepared using an Environmentally Friendly Process.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Franziska; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, R Jürgen; Passerini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    A new lithium-ion battery chemistry is presented based on a conversion-alloying anode material, a carbon-coated Fe-doped ZnO (TMO-C), and a LiNi1/3 Mn1/3 Co1/3 O2 (NMC) cathode. Both electrodes were fabricated using an environmentally friendly cellulose-based binding agent. The performance of the new lithium-ion battery was evaluated with a conventional, carbonate-based electrolyte (ethylene carbonate:diethyl carbonate-1 m lithium hexafluorophosphate, EC:DEC 1 m LiPF6 ) and an ionic liquid (IL)-based electrolyte (N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-0.2 m lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, Pyr14 TFSI 0.2 m LiTFSI), respectively. Galvanostatic charge/discharge tests revealed a reduced rate capability of the TMO-C/Pyr14 TFSI 0.2 m LiTFSI/NMC full-cell compared to the organic electrolyte, but the coulombic efficiency was significantly enhanced. Moreover, the IL-based electrolyte substantially improves the safety of the system due to a higher thermal stability of the formed anodic solid electrolyte interphase and the IL electrolyte itself. While the carbonate-based electrolyte shows sudden degradation reactions, the IL exhibits a slowly increasing heat flow, which does not constitute a serious safety risk.

  18. Equivalent circuit model analysis on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of lithium metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Zhang, Cuifen; Wen, Guangwu

    2015-10-01

    Lithium metal electrode is pretreated with 1,3-dioxolane or 1,4-dioxane to improve its properties. The components and morphology of the surface films formed in the above two pretreatment liquids are studied using FTIR and SEM respectively. Li-LiCoO2 coin cells are then fabricated and their cycle and discharge performance are tested. It is found that the battery performance is greatly improved by such pretreatment. Interestingly, the 1,4-dioxane pretreatment is more effective than 1,3-dioxolane in improving the lithium metal electrode performance. To explore the mechanism(s) behind, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is employed and an equivalent circuit model is designed for EIS analysis. The fitting curves are aligned well with the experimental curves, suggesting that the proposed equivalent circuit model is an ideal model for lithium battery. Next, the corresponding relationship between the impedance components and every individual semicircle in the Nyquist curves is inferred theoretically and the result is satisfying. Based on the analysis using this model, we conclude that the structural stability of SEI film is increased and the interfacial compatibility between the lithium substrate and the SEI film is improved by 1,3-dioxolane or 1,4-dioxane pretreatment.

  19. A Lithium-Ion Battery with Enhanced Safety Prepared using an Environmentally Friendly Process.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Franziska; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, R Jürgen; Passerini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    A new lithium-ion battery chemistry is presented based on a conversion-alloying anode material, a carbon-coated Fe-doped ZnO (TMO-C), and a LiNi1/3 Mn1/3 Co1/3 O2 (NMC) cathode. Both electrodes were fabricated using an environmentally friendly cellulose-based binding agent. The performance of the new lithium-ion battery was evaluated with a conventional, carbonate-based electrolyte (ethylene carbonate:diethyl carbonate-1 m lithium hexafluorophosphate, EC:DEC 1 m LiPF6 ) and an ionic liquid (IL)-based electrolyte (N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-0.2 m lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, Pyr14 TFSI 0.2 m LiTFSI), respectively. Galvanostatic charge/discharge tests revealed a reduced rate capability of the TMO-C/Pyr14 TFSI 0.2 m LiTFSI/NMC full-cell compared to the organic electrolyte, but the coulombic efficiency was significantly enhanced. Moreover, the IL-based electrolyte substantially improves the safety of the system due to a higher thermal stability of the formed anodic solid electrolyte interphase and the IL electrolyte itself. While the carbonate-based electrolyte shows sudden degradation reactions, the IL exhibits a slowly increasing heat flow, which does not constitute a serious safety risk. PMID:27159254

  20. Mechanical properties of low activation Cr-Mn austenitic steels changes in liquid lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertkov, A. V.; Evtikhin, V. A.; Lyublinski, I. E.; Syichev, A. A.; Demina, E. V.; Prusakova, M. D.

    1993-08-01

    The mechanical properties of Fe0.06C12Cr14Mn4NiAlMo, Fe0.10C12Cr20Mn W, Fe0.25C12Cr20Mn2W, Fe0.06C17Cr19Mn3NiNbN, Fe0.0713Cr20MnN steels attacked by liquid lithium were studied. Preexposure of steels was performed in static isothermal lithium at 723 and 873 K; in the hot leg of a convection loop at 723 K, and in inert atmosphere at 723 and 873 K for 2600 h. Lithium contained up to 400 ppm nitrogen and up to 1% hydrogen. The mechanical properties were determined by tensile test in lithium and in vacuum at a strain rate of 1×10 -5-1×10 -3 s -1. It was shown that mechanical properties of tested steels after exposure in the lithium changed more than for CrNi steels. The strong embrittlement of steels containing nitrogen is associated with intergranular penetration of lithium. The character of other steels mechanical properties changes is difficult to explain and may be associated with nometallic impurities redistribution and steel phase composition changes. The main mechanical properties change took place continually for the first 1000 h at 723 K exposure. Noticeable change in the mechanical properties of the steels exposed to lithium at 873 K occuredeven until 2600 h of exposure. The effect of strength and ductility reduction through absorption did not occur.

  1. Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water & Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J

    2015-11-30

    The global demand for rechargeable batteries is large and growing rapidly. Assuming the adoption of electric vehicles continues to increase, the need for smaller, lighter, and less expensive batteries will become even more pressing. In this vein, PolyPlus Battery Company has developed ultra-light high performance batteries based on its proprietary protected lithium electrode (PLE) technology. The Company’s Lithium-Air and Lithium-Seawater batteries have already demonstrated world record performance (verified by third party testing), and we are developing advanced lithium-sulfur batteries which have the potential deliver high performance at low cost. In this program PolyPlus Battery Company teamed with Corning Incorporated to transition the PLE technology from bench top fabrication using manual tooling to a pre- commercial semi-automated pilot line. At the inception of this program PolyPlus worked with a Tier 1 battery manufacturing engineering firm to design and build the first-of-its-kind pilot line for PLE production. The pilot line was shipped and installed in Berkeley, California several months after the start of the program. PolyPlus spent the next two years working with and optimizing the pilot line and now produces all of its PLEs on this line. The optimization process successfully increased the yield, throughput, and quality of PLEs produced on the pilot line. The Corning team focused on fabrication and scale-up of the ceramic membranes that are key to the PLE technology. PolyPlus next demonstrated that it could take Corning membranes through the pilot line process to produce state-of-the-art protected lithium electrodes. In the latter part of the program the Corning team developed alternative membranes targeted for the large rechargeable battery market. PolyPlus is now in discussions with several potential customers for its advanced PLE-enabled batteries, and is building relationships and infrastructure for the transition into manufacturing. It is likely

  2. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  3. The observation of damage regions produced by neutron irradiation in lithium-doped silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Sargent, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study regions of lattice disorder produced in lithium-doped float-zone melted n/p-type silicon solar cells by irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at doses between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 13th per cu cm. The defect regions were revealed by chemically etching the surface of the solar cells and by observing carbon replicas in an electron microscope. It was found that the defect density increased with increasing irradiation dose and increased lithium content, whereas the average defect diameter was found to decrease. From thermal annealing experiments it was found that in the lithium-doped material the defect structure was stable at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. This was found to be in contrast to the undoped material where at the lowest doses considerable annealing was observed to occur. These results are discussed in terms of the theoretical predictions and models of defect clusters proposed by Gossick (1959) and Crawford and Cleland (1959).

  4. Jeff Chamberlain on Lithium-air batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Chamberlain, Jeff

    2016-07-12

    Jeff Chamberlain, technology transfer expert at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries. More information at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/batteries090915.html

  5. Characterization of prototype secondary lithium battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R.

    1980-01-01

    The performance characteristics of ambient temperature secondary lithium batteries were determined through continuous cycle tests with periodic current and voltage measurements. Cycle life of the lithium anode was found to be an important problem area as was the formation of dentrite breakage and subsequent shorting. Energy density was increased by using more efficient cathode structures.

  6. Lithium Ion Battery Design and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Au, George; Locke, Laura

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation makes several recommendations to ensure the safe and effective design of Lithium ion cell batteries. Large lithium ion cells require pressure switches and small cells require pressure disconnects and other safety devices with the ability to instantly interrupt flow. Other suggestions include specifications for batteries and battery chargers.

  7. Anode for rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ambient room temperature, high density, rechargeable lithium battery includes a Li(x)Mg2Si negative anode which intercalates lithium to form a single crystalline phase when x is up to 1.0 and an amorphous phase when x is from 1 to 2.0. The electrode has good reversibility and mechanical strength after cycling.

  8. Characterization of reactive tracers for C-wells field experiments 1: Electrostatic sorption mechanism, lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.; Newman, B.D.

    1989-11-01

    Lithium (Li{sup +}) was introduced as lithium bromide (LiBr), as a retarded tracer for experiments in the C-wells complex at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The objective was to evaluate the potential of lithium to sorb predominately by physical forces. lithium was selected as a candidate tracer on the basis of high solubility, good chemical and biological stability, and relatively low sorptivity; lack of bioaccumulation and exclusion as a priority pollutant in pertinent federal environmental regulations; good analytical detectability and low natural background concentrations; and a low cost Laboratory experiments were performed with suspensions of Prow Pass cuttings from drill hole UE-25p{number_sign}1 at depths between 549 and 594 m in J-13 water at a pH of approximately 8 and in the temperature range of 25{degree}C to 45{degree}C. Batch equilibrium and kinetics experiments were performed; estimated thermodynamic constants, relative behavior between adsorption and desorption, and potentiometric studies provided information to infer the physical nature of lithium sorption.

  9. 77 FR 21714 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Safety Administration, telephone (202) 366-1074. Background On January 11, 2010 (75 FR 1302), PHMSA, in... Assessment of Bulk-Packed, Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Cells in Transport Category Aircraft; April 2006 (DOT/FAA... configurations of lithium batteries: 1. Lithium ion batteries (PI 965). 2. Lithium ion batteries packed...

  10. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. As used in this section, lithium cell(s) or battery(ies... the lithium cells or batteries will provide electrical power for its operation. (a) Classification....

  11. Recent developments and likely advances in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Andrew; Howard, Wilmont

    Advances in lithium-ion battery technology since the last International Power Sources Symposium in Amsterdam in September 2003 are reviewed. Cost and safety are still seen as important factors limiting further expansion of application of lithium-ion batteries. Lithium bis-oxalato borate electolyte salt and lithium iron phosphate cathode material are being actively investigated.

  12. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Jung Lee, Yun; Luo, Xiangyi; Chun Lau, Kah; Asadi, Mohammad; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Brombosz, Scott; Wen, Jianguo; Zhai, Dengyun; Chen, Zonghai; Miller, Dean J.; Sub Jeong, Yo; Park, Jin-Bum; Zak Fang, Zhigang; Kumar, Bijandra; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported. However, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime. These studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery. However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). Here we show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage.

  13. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Lee, Yun Jung; Luo, Xiangyi; Lau, Kah Chun; Asadi, Mohammad; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Brombosz, Scott; Wen, Jianguo; Zhai, Dengyun; Chen, Zonghai; Miller, Dean J; Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Kumar, Bijandra; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-21

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported. However, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime. These studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery. However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). Here we show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage.

  14. A preliminary deposit model for lithium brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Munk, LeeAnn; Jochens, Hillary; Hynek, Scott; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    This report is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to update existing mineral deposit models and to develop new ones. The global transition away from hydrocarbons toward energy alternatives increases demand for many scarce metals. Among these is lithium, a key component of lithium-ion batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Lithium brine deposits account for about three-fourths of the world’s lithium production. Updating an earlier deposit model, we emphasize geologic information that might directly or indirectly help in exploration for lithium brine deposits, or for assessing regions for mineral resource potential. Special attention is given to the best-known deposit in the world—Clayton Valley, Nevada, and to the giant Salar de Atacama, Chile.

  15. Lithium ion batteries based on nanoporous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Sarah H.; Nemanick, Eric J.; Kang, Chris Byung-Hwa

    2015-09-22

    A lithium ion battery that incorporates an anode formed from a Group IV semiconductor material such as porous silicon is disclosed. The battery includes a cathode, and an anode comprising porous silicon. In some embodiments, the anode is present in the form of a nanowire, a film, or a powder, the porous silicon having a pore diameters within the range between 2 nm and 100 nm and an average wall thickness of within the range between 1 nm and 100 nm. The lithium ion battery further includes, in some embodiments, a non-aqueous lithium containing electrolyte. Lithium ion batteries incorporating a porous silicon anode demonstrate have high, stable lithium alloying capacity over many cycles.

  16. Chemical feasibility of lithium as a matrix for structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swann, R. T.; Esterling, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical compatibility of lithium with tows of carbon and aramid fibers and silicon carbide and boron monofilaments was investigated by encapsulating the fibers in liquid lithium and also by sintering. The lithium did not readily wet the various fibers. In particular, very little lithium infiltration into the carbon and aramid tows was achieved and the strength of the tows was seriously degraded. The strength of the boron and silicon carbide monofilaments, however, was not affected by the liquid lithium. Therefore lithium is not feasible as a matrix for carbon and aramid fibers, but a composite containing boron or silicon carbide fibers in a lithium matrix may be feasible for specialized applications.

  17. Stable Lithium Deposition Generated from Ceramic-Cross-Linked Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Anode.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chih-Hao; Hsiao, Yang-Hung; Hsu, Chun-Han; Kuo, Ping-Lin

    2016-06-22

    In this work, a composite gel electrolyte comprising ceramic cross-linker and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) matrix is shown to have superior resistance to lithium dendrite growth and be applicable to gel polymer lithium batteries. In contrast to pristine gel electrolyte, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes show good compatibility with liquid electrolytes, wider electrochemical window, and a superior rate and cycling performance. These silica cross-linkers allow the PEO to form the lithium ion pathway and reduce anion mobility. Therefore, the gel not only features lower polarization and interfacial resistance, but also suppresses electrolyte decomposition and lithium corrosion. Further, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes increase the lithium transference number to 0.5, and exhibit superior electrochemical stability up to 5.0 V. Moreover, the lithium cells feature long-term stability and a Coulombic efficiency that can reach 97% after 100 cycles. The SEM image of the lithium metal surface after the cycling test shows that the composite gel electrolyte with 20% silica cross-linker forms a uniform passivation layer on the lithium surface. Accordingly, these features allow this gel polymer electrolyte with ceramic cross-linker to function as a high-performance lithium-ionic conductor and reliable separator for lithium metal batteries.

  18. Stable Lithium Deposition Generated from Ceramic-Cross-Linked Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Anode.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chih-Hao; Hsiao, Yang-Hung; Hsu, Chun-Han; Kuo, Ping-Lin

    2016-06-22

    In this work, a composite gel electrolyte comprising ceramic cross-linker and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) matrix is shown to have superior resistance to lithium dendrite growth and be applicable to gel polymer lithium batteries. In contrast to pristine gel electrolyte, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes show good compatibility with liquid electrolytes, wider electrochemical window, and a superior rate and cycling performance. These silica cross-linkers allow the PEO to form the lithium ion pathway and reduce anion mobility. Therefore, the gel not only features lower polarization and interfacial resistance, but also suppresses electrolyte decomposition and lithium corrosion. Further, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes increase the lithium transference number to 0.5, and exhibit superior electrochemical stability up to 5.0 V. Moreover, the lithium cells feature long-term stability and a Coulombic efficiency that can reach 97% after 100 cycles. The SEM image of the lithium metal surface after the cycling test shows that the composite gel electrolyte with 20% silica cross-linker forms a uniform passivation layer on the lithium surface. Accordingly, these features allow this gel polymer electrolyte with ceramic cross-linker to function as a high-performance lithium-ionic conductor and reliable separator for lithium metal batteries. PMID:27247991

  19. Impact of tripropyl borate on life and impedance of lithium-ion cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Liu, J.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2008-03-10

    Tripropyl borate was investigated as a low cost anion receptor to improve the performance of lithium-ion cells. The impact of tripropyl borate was examined using lithium-ion cells comprising a negative electrode of mesocarbon microbeads, a positive electrode of Li{sub 1.1}[Mn{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}]{sub 0.9}O{sub 2} and an LiPF{sub 6}-based electrolyte. It was found that the performance of the cells was improved by adding a proper amount of tripropyl borate ({le} 0.1 wt%) to the LiPF{sub 6}-based electrolyte. However, a small amount of gas was observed from cells with high contents of tripropyl borate when cycled at 55 C, and as a result, the performance of the cells deteriorated.

  20. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2007-02-02

    Lithium insertion into various iron vanadates has been investigated. Fe{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 13} and Fe{sub 4}(V{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O have discharge capacities approaching 200 mAh/g above 2.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li. Although the potential profiles change significantly between the first and subsequent discharges, capacity retention is unexpectedly good. Other phases, structurally related to FeVO{sub 4}, containing copper and/or sodium ions were also studied. One of these, {beta}-Cu{sub 3}Fe{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 6}, reversibly consumes almost 10 moles of electrons per formula unit (ca. 240 mAh g{sup -1}) between 3.6 and 2.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li, in a non-classical insertion process. It is proposed that both copper and vanadium are electrochemically active, whereas iron(III) reacts to form LiFe{sup III}O{sub 2}. The capacity of the Cu{sub 3}Fe{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 6}/Li system is nearly independent of cycling rate, stabilizing after a few cycles at 120-140 mAh g{sup -1}. Iron vanadates exhibit better capacities than their phosphate analogues, whereas the latter display more constant discharge potentials.

  1. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  2. Lithium batteries. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, D. M.

    1980-07-01

    Federally funded research on design, development, components, testing corrosion, electrolytes, sealing, hazards of lithium cells are presented. Batteries studied include lithium organic cells, lithium sulfur cells, lithium water air cells, and lithium nickel fluoride cells. Applications cover use in spacecraft, electric vehicles, off peak energy storage, and forklift trucks. This updated bibliography contains 151 citations, 57 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  3. Structural diversity in lithium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangzheng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Cohen, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium-carbon binary system possesses a broad range of chemical compounds, which exhibit fascinating chemical bonding characteristics, which give rise to diverse and technologically important properties. While lithium carbides with various compositions have been studied or suggested previously, the crystal structures of these compounds are far from well understood. In this work, we present the first comprehensive survey of all ground state (GS) structures of lithium carbides over a broad range of thermodynamic conditions, using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) crystal structure searching methods. Thorough searches were performed for 29 stoichiometries ranging from Li12C to LiC12 at 0 and 40 GPa. Based on formation enthalpies from optimized van der Waals density functional calculations, three thermodynamically stable phases (Li4C3 , Li2C2 , and LiC12) were identified at 0 GPa, and seven thermodynamically stable phases (Li8C , Li6C , Li4C , Li8C3 , Li2C , Li3C4 , and Li2C3 ) were predicted at 40 GPa. A rich diversity of carbon bonding, including monomers, dimers, trimers, nanoribbons, sheets, and frameworks, was found within these structures, and the dimensionality of carbon connectivity existing within each phase increases with increasing carbon concentration. We find that the well-known composition LiC6 is actually a metastable one. We also find a unique coexistence of carbon monomers and dimers within the predicted thermodynamically stable phase Li8C3 , and different widths of carbon nanoribbons coexist in a metastable phase of Li2C2 (Imm2). Interesting mixed sp2-sp3 carbon frameworks are predicted in metastable phases with composition LiC6.

  4. Investigating the First-Cycle Irreversibility of Lithium Metal Oxide Cathodes for Li Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kang,S.; Yoon , W.; Nam, K.; Yang, X.; Abraham, D.

    2008-01-01

    Layered lithium metal oxide cathodes typically exhibit irreversibility during the first cycle in lithium cells when cycled in conventional voltage ranges (e.g., 3-4.3 V vs. Li+/Li). In this work, we have studied the first-cycle irreversibility of lithium cells containing various layered cathode materials using galvanostatic cycling and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. When cycled between 3.0 and 4.3 V vs. Li+/Li, the cells containing LiCoO2, LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2, and Li1.048(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)0.952O2 as cathodes showed initial coulombic efficiencies of 98.0, 87.0, and 88.6%, respectively, at relatively slow current (8 mA/g). However, the 'lost capacity' could be completely recovered by discharging the cells to low voltages (<2 V vs Li+/Li). During this deep discharge, the same cells exhibited voltage plateaus at 1.17, 1.81, and 1.47 V, respectively, which is believed to be associated with formation of a Li2MO2-like phase (M = Ni, Co, Mn) on the oxide particle surface due to very sluggish lithium diffusion in LieMO2 with {var_epsilon}{yields} 1 (i.e., near the end of discharge). The voltage relaxation curve and in situ X-ray diffraction patterns, obtained from a Li/Li1.048(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)0.952O2 cell, showed that the oxide cathode reversibly returned to its original state [i.e., Li1.048(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)0.952O2] during relaxation following the deep discharge to achieve 100% cycle efficiency.

  5. A lithium oxygen secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semkow, Krystyna W.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1987-01-01

    Some recent work on a lithium-oxygen secondary battery is reported in which stabilized zirconia oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolytes were used for the effective separation of respective half-cell reactions. The electroactive material consisted of alloys possessing the general composition Li(x)FeSi2 immersed in a ternary molten salt comprising LiF, LiCl, and Li2O. The manufacture of the cell is described, and discharge-current voltage curves for partially charged cells are shown and discussed. A galvanostatic IR free-changing curve and an IR-free charge-discharge curve are also shown.

  6. Lithium Depletion in Solar Type stars: Lithium and Planet Presence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Israelian, G.; Delgado Mena, E.; Fernandes, J.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.; Domínguez Cerdeña, C.; Rebolo, R.; Randich, S.

    2011-12-01

    The lithium (Li) abundance measured in the solar atmosphere is 140 times smaller than expected considering the proto-solar value. Furthermore, measurements of Li abundance made for many stars similar to the Sun reveal a large dispersion. These observations have defied the models of light element depletion for decades. We present a strong evidence for a correlation between Li depletion and the presence of planets. This result comes from the analysis of an unbiased sample of solar-analogue stars with and without planets detected, and for which precise spectroscopic stellar parameters were derived in an uniform way. Planet host stars are found to have typically only 1% of the primordial Li abundance while about 50% of the solar analogues without detected planets have on average ten times more Li. In addition, stellar evolutionary models were used to show that differences in stellar mass and age cannot be responsible for the observed correlation. These results suggest that the observed lithium difference is likely linked to some process related to the formation and evolution of planetary systems.

  7. Lithium chloride modulates chondrocyte primary cilia and inhibits Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Clare L; Wiles, Anna; Poole, C Anthony; Knight, Martin M

    2016-02-01

    Lithium chloride (LiCl) exhibits significant therapeutic potential as a treatment for osteoarthritis. Hedgehog signaling is activated in osteoarthritis, where it promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage matrix catabolism. Hedgehog signaling requires the primary cilium such that maintenance of this compartment is essential for pathway activity. Here we report that LiCl (50 mM) inhibits Hedgehog signaling in bovine articular chondrocytes such that the induction of GLI1 and PTCH1 expression is reduced ​ by 71 and 55%, respectively. Pathway inhibition is associated with a 97% increase in primary cilia length from 2.09 ± 0.7 μm in untreated cells to 4.06 ± 0.9 μm in LiCl-treated cells. We show that cilia elongation disrupts trafficking within the axoneme with a 38% reduction in Arl13b ciliary localization at the distal region of the cilium, consistent with the role of Arl13b in modulating Hedgehog signaling. In addition, we demonstrate similar increases in cilia length in human chondrocytes in vitro and after administration of dietary lithium to Wistar rats in vivo. Our data provide new insights into the effects of LiCl on chondrocyte primary cilia and Hedgehog signaling and shows for the first time that pharmaceutical targeting of the primary cilium may have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26499268

  8. Influence of corannulene's curved carbon lattice (C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) on lithium intercalation.

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, L. G.

    1998-06-08

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been used to investigate the influence of corannulene's curved carbon lattice (C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) on lithium intercalation. This has been approximated by investigating the reaction of lithium atoms with either the corannulene molecule directly or with a sandwich structure formed from two corannulene molecules. In the first case, one corannulene molecule, three, six and seven lithiums have been used to form Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}), Li{sub 6}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) and Li{sub 7}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}). The last complex has a lithium to carbon ratio of 1:2.86 indicative of a high capacity lithium carbon anode versus the 1:6 ratio found in stage 1 lithium intercalated graphite. The change in Gibbs energy for formation of Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) with a multiplicity of 4 (3 unpaired electrons) is -4.75 kcal/mole. However, when a multiplicity of 2 is used (1 unpaired electron), the change in Gibbs energy is -8.49 kcal/mole. The change in Gibbs energy for formation of Li{sub 6}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) and Li{sub 7}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) (multiplicity of 2) are -26.48 and -26.47 kcal/mole, respectively. In all the lithium corannulene complexes described, each complex has a molecular orbital composed only of lithium orbitals, indicative of lithium cluster formation. However, in the formation of Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) with three lithium atoms intercalated between two corannulene carbon lattices, there are no molecular orbitals indicative of lithium cluster formation. The multiplicity for this chemical system is 4 and the corannulene lattices are stacked one over the other like saucers. The corannulene carbon lattices are separated by approximately 4.5 {angstrom}. The separations between lithiums are 3.13, 3.60 and 3.79 {angstrom}. These results are in contrast to those found in the Li{sub 3}C{sub 60} endohedral complex with a multiplicity of 4. In this complex there is a molecular orbital composed only of lithium orbitals

  9. [Chronic renal function disorders during lithium use].

    PubMed

    van Gerven, H A J M; Boer, W H

    2006-08-01

    Lithium is used for the treatment and prevention of bipolar disease and unipolar depression. A well-recognized adverse effect is renal diabetes insipidus resulting in polyuria and polydipsia. A debate has been going on for decades as to whether the long-term use of lithium may also cause slowly progressive renal failure. According to the literature, some decrease in renal function occurs in approximately 20% of the patients on long-term lithium treatment. Progressive renal failure probably develops in only a minority of them, but there is an increasing number of reports on patients that have become dependent upon dialysis due to the long-term use of lithium. In patients developing progressive renal failure, discontinuation of the use of lithium will have to be considered at some point in time. Limited data in the literature suggest that discontinuation of lithium may be advisable at a serum-creatinine concentration of approximately 200 micromol/l or a creatinine clearance of about 40 ml/min. The relatively large group of patients that develop less severe, nonprogressive renal failure and that continue to use lithium also deserves attention. According to the recent literature, chronic renal failure is a separate risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Adequate detection and management of hypertension, dyslipidaemia and perhaps also proteinuria may be of great importance for this group ofpatients.

  10. Lithium protects ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Jin . E-mail: jizhong@iupui.edu; Yang Xianlin; Yao Weiguo; Lee Weihua

    2006-12-01

    Lithium is widely used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Recent studies have demonstrated its neuroprotective effect. Ethanol is a potent neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to the developing nervous system. In this study, we evaluated lithium's neuroprotection against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Transient exposure of infant mice to ethanol caused apoptotic cell death in brain, which was prevented significantly by administering a low dose of lithium 15 min later. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons, ethanol-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3/9, both of which were prevented by lithium. However, lithium's protection is not mediated by its commonly known inhibition of glycogen synthase3{beta}, because neither ethanol nor lithium has significant effects on the phosphorylation of Akt (ser473) or GSK3{beta} (ser9). In addition, the selective GSK-3{beta} inhibitor SB-415286 was unable to prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis. These data suggest lithium may be used as a potential preventive measure for ethanol-induced neurological deficits.

  11. JPL lithium doped solar cell development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    One of the most significant problems encountered in the use of silicon solar cells in space is the sensitivity of the device to electron and proton radiation exposure. The p-diffused-into-n-base solar cells were replaced with the more radiation tolerant n-diffused-into-p-base solar cells. Another advancement in achieving greater radiation tolerance was the discovery that the addition of lithium to n-base silicon resulted in what appeared to be annealing of radiation-induced defects. This phenomenon is being exploited to develop a high efficiency radiation resistant lithium-doped solar cell. Lithium-doped solar cells fabricated from oxygen-lean and oxygen-rich silicon were obtained with average initial efficiencies of 11.9% at air mass zero and 28 C, as compared to state-of-the-art n-p cells fabricated from 10 ohm cm silicon with average efficiencies of 11.3% under similar conditions. Lithium-doped cells demonstrated the ability to withstand three to five times the fluence of 1-MeV electrons before degrading to a power equivalent to state-of-the-art solar cells. The principal investigations are discussed with respect to fabrication of high efficiency radiation resistant lithium-doped cells, including starting material, p-n junction diffusion, lithium source introduction, and lithium diffusion.

  12. High Performance Discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) with Liquid Lithium Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, John

    2014-10-01

    The possibility of a liquid metal first wall for a fusion reactor has been extensively discussed. Small-area liquid lithium limiters and divertor targets have been installed in tokamaks, but no confinement device has ever operated with a large-area liquid lithium wall. Here we report the first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (2 m2, or 40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the hot (300 C) wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10 × compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic confinement times exceeded ITER98P(y,2) scaling by up to a factor of four. LTX lacks auxiliary heating, so these confinement improvements represent changes in electron confinement. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges using the John Hopkins University transmission grating extreme ultraviolet spectrometer indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges run against liquid walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges operated against solid lithium walls. This differs strongly from earlier trials of molten lithium walls in LTX, which showed evidence for strong oxygen influx from walls operated at similar temperatures. At present, the Thomson scattering system is undergoing upgrades and realignment, after which confinement times obtained with magnetic diagnostics will be compared with kinetic measurements. A second electron beam will be installed to extend liquid lithium wall operation to 4 m2 coverage, or >80% of the total plasma surface area. Results with expanded liquid lithium wall area will be presented. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Thermodynamics of electrochemical lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Maier, Joachim

    2013-05-01

    The thermodynamics of electrochemical lithium storage are examined by taking into account that it is the point defects that enable storage. While the Li defects are mobile, most of the other point defects have to be considered as frozen owing to the performance temperature being low compared to the melting point of the electrode materials. The defect chemistry needs to be considered to fully understand equilibrium charge/discharge curves. On this basis, single phase and multiphase storage mechanisms can be discussed in terms of theoretical storage capacity and theoretical voltage. Of paramount interest in the field of Li batteries are metastable materials, in particular nanocrystalline and amorphous materials. The thermodynamics of storage and voltage, also at interfaces, thus deserve a special treatment. The relationship between reversible cell voltage and lithium content is derived for the novel job-sharing mechanism. With respect to the classic storage modes, thermodynamic differences for cathodes and anodes are elaborated with a special attention being paid to the search for new materials. As this contribution concentrates on the equilibrium state, current-related phenomena (irreversible thermodynamics) are only briefly touched upon. PMID:23630067

  14. The Lithium Vapor Box Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert; Hakim, Ammar; Hammett, Gregory; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Schwartz, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Projections of scrape-off layer width to a demonstration power plant suggest an immense parallel heat flux, of order 12 GW/m2, which will necessitate nearly fully detached operation. Building on earlier work by Nagayama et al. and by Ono et al., we propose to use a series of differentially pumped boxes filled with lithium vapor to isolate the buffering vapor from the main plasma chamber, allowing stable detachment. This powerful differential pumping is only available for condensable vapors, not conventional gases. We demonstrate the properties of such a system through conservation laws for vapor mass and enthalpy, and then include plasma entrainment and ultimately an estimate of radiated power. We find that full detachment should be achievable with little leakage of lithium to the main plasma chamber. We also present progress towards solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically for the chain of vapor boxes, including self-consistent wall boundary conditions and fully-developed shocks, as well as concepts for an initial experimental demonstration-of-concept. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Thermodynamics of electrochemical lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Maier, Joachim

    2013-05-01

    The thermodynamics of electrochemical lithium storage are examined by taking into account that it is the point defects that enable storage. While the Li defects are mobile, most of the other point defects have to be considered as frozen owing to the performance temperature being low compared to the melting point of the electrode materials. The defect chemistry needs to be considered to fully understand equilibrium charge/discharge curves. On this basis, single phase and multiphase storage mechanisms can be discussed in terms of theoretical storage capacity and theoretical voltage. Of paramount interest in the field of Li batteries are metastable materials, in particular nanocrystalline and amorphous materials. The thermodynamics of storage and voltage, also at interfaces, thus deserve a special treatment. The relationship between reversible cell voltage and lithium content is derived for the novel job-sharing mechanism. With respect to the classic storage modes, thermodynamic differences for cathodes and anodes are elaborated with a special attention being paid to the search for new materials. As this contribution concentrates on the equilibrium state, current-related phenomena (irreversible thermodynamics) are only briefly touched upon.

  16. Lithium D-cell study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Size, P.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this contract is to evaluate parametrically the effects of various factors including the electrolyte type, electrolyte concentration, depolarizer type, and cell configuration on lithium cell electrical performance and safety. This effort shall allow for the selection and optimization of cell design for future NASA applications while maintaining close ties with WGL's continuous improvements in manufacturing processes and lithium cell design. Taguchi experimental design techniques are employed in this task, and allow for a maximum amount of information to be obtained while requiring significantly less cells than if a full factorial design were employed. Acceptance testing for this task is modeled after the NASA Document EP5-83-025, Revision C, for cell weights, OCV's and load voltages. The performance attributes that are studied in this effort are fresh capacity and start-up characteristics evaluated at two rates and two temperatures, shelf-life characteristics including start-up and capacity retention, and iterative microcalorimetry measurements. Abuse testing includes forced over discharge at two rates with and without diode protection, temperature tolerance testing, and shorting tests at three rates with the measurement of heat generated during shorting conditions.

  17. Lithium in Stellar Atmospheres: Observations and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, L. S.

    2016-09-01

    Of all the light elements, lithium is the most sensitive indicator of stellar evolution. This review discusses current data on the abundance of lithium in the atmospheres of A-, F-, G-, and K-stars of different types, as well as the consistency of these data with theoretical predictions. The variety of observed Li abundances is illustrated by the following objects in different stages of evolution: (1) Old stars in the galactic halo, which have a lithium abundance logɛ(Li)=2.2 (the "lithium plateau") that appears to be 0.5 dex lower than the primordial abundance predicted by cosmological models. (2) Young stars in the galactic disk, which have been used to estimate the contemporary initial lithium abundance logɛ(Li)=3.2±0.1 for stars in the Main sequence. Possible sources of lithium enrichment in the interstellar medium during evolution of the galaxy are discussed. (3) Evolving FGK dwarfs in the galactic disk, which have lower logɛ(Li) for lower effective temperature T eff and mass M. The "lithium dip" near T eff ~6600 K in the distribution of logɛ(Li) with respect to T eff in old clusters is discussed. (4) FGK giants and supergiants, of which most have no lithium at all. This phenomenon is consistent with rotating star model calculations. (5) Lithium rich cold giants with logɛ(Li) ≥ 2.0, which form a small, enigmatic group. Theoretical models with rotation can explain the existence of these stars only in the case of low initial rotation velocities V 0 <50 km/s. In all other cases it is necessary to assume recent synthesis of lithium (capture of a giant planet is an alternative). (6) Magnetic Ap-stars, where lithium is concentrated in spots located at the magnetic poles. There the lithium abundance reaches logɛ(Li)=6. Discrepancies between observations and theory are noted for almost all the stars discussed in this review.

  18. Possible nephotoxic interaction of lithium and metronidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Teicher, M.H.; Altesman, R.I.; Cole, J.O.; Schatzberg, A.F.

    1987-06-26

    Several classes of drugs can promote renal retention of lithium and, occasionally, can induce lithium intoxication. The antimicrobial agent metronidazole hydrochloride (Flagyl I.V.) was also implicated in producing such a reaction in one woman. The authors describe two patients who experienced toxic reactions to lithium following brief use of metronidazole. However, in these two patients, in contrast to the previous case, the degree of acute intoxication was less severe and treatment with metronidazole was completed without apparent suspicion, but persistent signs of renal damage later emerged.

  19. Lithium electronic environments in rechargeable battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hightower, Adrian

    This work investigates the electronic environments of lithium in the electrodes of rechargeable batteries. The use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a novel approach, which when coupled with conventional electrochemical experiments, yield a thorough picture of the electrode interior. Relatively few EELS experiments have been preformed on lithium compounds owing to their reactivity. Experimental techniques were established to minimize sample contamination and control electron beam damage to studied compounds. Lithium hydroxide was found to be the most common product of beam damaged lithium alloys. Under an intense electron beam, halogen atoms desorbed by radiolysis in lithium halides. EELS spectra from a number of standard lithium compounds were obtained in order to identify the variety of spectra encountered in lithium rechargeable battery electrodes. Lithium alloys all displayed characteristically broad Li K-edge spectra, consistent with transitions to continuum states. Transitions to bound states were observed in the Li K and oxygen K-edge spectra of lithium oxides. Lithium halides were distinguished by their systematic chemical shift proportional to the anion electronegativity. Good agreement was found with measured lithium halide spectra and electron structure calculations using a self-consistant multiscattering code. The specific electrode environments of LiC6, LiCoO2, and Li-SnO were investigated. Contrary to published XPS predictions, lithium in intercalated graphite was determined to be in more metallic than ionic. We present the first experimental evidence of charge compensation by oxygen ions in deintercalated LiCoO2. Mossbauer studies on cycled Li-SnO reveal severely defective structures on an atomic scale. Metal hydride systems are presented in the appendices of this thesis. The mechanical alloying of immiscible Fe and Mg powders resulted in single-phase bcc alloys of less than 20

  20. Alternate seal configuration for lithium primary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of glass degradation in the glass-to-metal seals in lithium/sulfur dioxide cells is discussed. The glass degradation mechanism is attributed to lithium reacting with glass which is a result of deposition of lithium at the glass/metal/electrolyte interface. The worst degradation was observed when cells were stored in the inverted position. Alternate sealing methods were examined and a modified Ziegler seal is considered to be one of the best possible methods. The seal consists of a crimp type soft seal using a plastic annulus and a metal tube. Results of degradation tests are presented.

  1. Preventing Overcharge And Overdischarge Of Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo; Surampudi, Subbarao; Shen, David H.; Deligiannis, Fotios; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Secondary lithium cells operating at ambient temperature protected against overcharge and overdischarge by use of cathode additives acting as sources and sinks of electroactive chemical species, which is lithium. Additive in cathode limits excursion of voltage of cell during both overcharge and overdischarge. In addition to protecting cell, also serves as part of state-of-charge indicator: attainment of greater or lesser limiting voltage indicates end of charge or end of discharge, respectively. Concept applied to Li/TiS2 system, and also applicable to such other lithium systems as Li/MoS2, Li/NbSe3, and Li/V2O5.

  2. Lithium iodide cardiac pacemakers: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A new long-life cardiac pacemaker pulse generator powered by a lithium iodide fuel cell was introduced in Canada in 1973. The compact, hermetically sealed unit is easily implanted and reliable, has excellent patient acceptance and has an anticipated battery life of almost 14 years. Among 105 patients who received a lithium iodide pacemaker, complications occurred in 18. The lithium iodide pacemaker represents a significant advance in pacemaker generator technology and is recommended for long-term cardiac pacing; the manufacturer guarantees the pulse generator for 6 years. Images FIG. 1 PMID:974965

  3. Improved Separators For Rechargeable Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David; Surampudi, Subbarao; Huang, Chen-Kuo; Halpert, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Improved pairs of separators proposed for use in rechargeable lithium cells operating at ambient temperature. Block growth of lithium dendrites and help prevent short circuits. Each cell contains one separator made of microporous polypropylene placed next to anode, and one separator made of microporous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) next to cathode. Separators increase cycle lives of secondary lithium cells. Cells to which concept applicable those of Li/TiS(2), Li/NbSe(3), Li/CoO(2), Li/MoS(2), Li/VO(x), and Li/MnO(2) chemical systems. Advantageous in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high energy density and rechargeability needed.

  4. Modeling Lithium Movement over Multiple Cycles in a Lithium-Metal Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrese, A; Newman, J

    2014-04-11

    This paper builds on the work by Ferrese et al. [J. Electrochem., 159, A1615 (2012)], where a model of a lithium-metal battery with a LiyCoO2 positive electrode was created in order to predict the movement of lithium in the negative electrode along the negative electrode/separator interface during cell cycling. In this paper, the model is expanded to study the movement of lithium along the lithium-metal anode over multiple cycles. From this model, it is found that when a low percentage of lithium at the negative electrode is utilized, the movement of lithium along the negative electrode/separator interface reaches a quasi steady state after multiple cycles. This steady state is affected by the slope of the open-circuit-potential function in the positive electrode, the rate of charge and discharge, the depth of discharge, and the length of the rest periods. However, when a high percent of the lithium at the negative electrode is utilized during cycling, the movement does not reach a steady state and pinching can occur, where the lithium nearest the negative tab becomes progressively thinner after cycling. This is another nonlinearity that leads to a progression of the movement of lithium over multiple cycles. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society.

  5. Lithium in drinking water and suicide mortality: interplay with lithium prescriptions

    PubMed Central

    Helbich, Marco; Leitner, Michael; Kapusta, Nestor D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of lithium intake through drinking water on suicide. This intake originates either from natural rock and soil elution and/or accumulation of lithium-based pharmaceuticals in ground water. Aims To examine the interplay between natural lithium in drinking water, prescribed lithium-based pharmaceuticals and suicide in Austria. Method Spatial Bayesian regressions for males, females and pooled suicide mortality rates were estimated. Results Although the expected inverse association between lithium levels in drinking water and suicide mortality was confirmed for males and for total suicide rates, the relationship for females was not significant. The models do not indicate that lithium from prescriptions, assumed to accumulate in drinking water, is related to suicide risk patterns either as an individual effect or as a moderator of lithium levels in drinking water. Gender-specific differences in risk factors and local risk hot spots are confirmed. Conclusions The findings do not support the hypotheses that lithium prescriptions have measureable protective effects on suicide or that they interact with lithium in drinking water. PMID:25953888

  6. Electrolytic method for the production of lithium using a lithium-amalgam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Krikorian, Oscar H.; Homsy, Robert V.

    1979-01-01

    A method for recovering lithium from its molten amalgam by electrolysis of the amalgam in an electrolytic cell containing as a molten electrolyte a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of two or more alkali metal halides, preferably alkali metal halides selected from lithium iodide, lithium chloride, potassium iodide and potassium chloride. A particularly suitable molten electrolyte is a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of at least three components obtained by modifying an eutectic mixture of LiI-KI by the addition of a minor amount of one or more alkali metal halides. The lithium-amalgam fused-salt cell may be used in an electrolytic system for recovering lithium from an aqueous solution of a lithium compound, wherein electrolysis of the aqueous solution in an aqueous cell in the presence of a mercury cathode produces a lithium amalgam. The present method is particularly useful for the regeneration of lithium from the aqueous reaction products of a lithium-water-air battery.

  7. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  8. A rapid method for the determination of lithium transference numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Dai, H.; Sanderson, S.; Davey, J.; Uribe, F.

    1997-05-01

    Lithium ion-conducting polymer electrolytes are of increasing interest for use in lithium-polymer batteries. Lithium transference numbers, the net fraction of current carried by lithium in a cell, are key figures of merit for potential lithium battery electrolytes. The authors describe the Electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) method for the determination of lithium ion transference numbers (T{sub Li}). The work presented is a proof-of-concept of the application of the ENMR method to lithium ion transference measurements for several different lithium salts in gelled electrolytes. The NMR method allows accurate determination of T{sub Li} values, as indicated by the similarity of T{sub Li} in the gelled electrolytes to those in aqueous electrolyte solutions at low salt concentration. Based on calculated tradeoffs of various experimental parameters, they also discuss some conclusions concerning the range of applicability of the method to other electrolytes with lower lithium mobility.

  9. A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

    2005-08-29

    Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

  10. Apollo 13 LiOH canister breakthrough test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    The Apollo 13 lithium hydroxide canister test was conducted to evaluate emergency measures designed to enable the Apollo 13 crew to use command module lithium hydroxide canisters in the lunar module. The test verified the effectiveness of the emergency system and established that the canisters in the command module would provide ample carbon dioxide removal for the return of the Apollo 13 crew. The time interval between canister changes on the flight was also determined in the test. This reduced power demand on the lunar module by eliminating the need for telemetry in determining canister replacement times. Details of the canister modifications were relayed to the flight crew and a replica of the test system was assembled in the flight vehicle. Graphs of the parameters which were measured during the simulation are presented.

  11. A Polymer Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report the characteristics of a lithium-oxygen battery using a solid polymer membrane as the electrolyte separator. The polymer electrolyte, fully characterized in terms of electrochemical properties, shows suitable conductivity at room temperature allowing the reversible cycling of the Li-O2 battery with a specific capacity as high as 25,000 mAh gC(-1) reflected in a surface capacity of 12.5 mAh cm(-2). The electrochemical formation and dissolution of the lithium peroxide during Li-O2 polymer cell operation is investigated by electrochemical techniques combined with X-ray diffraction study, demonstrating the process reversibility. The excellent cell performances in terms of delivered capacity, in addition to its solid configuration allowing the safe use of lithium metal as high capacity anode, demonstrate the suitability of the polymer lithium-oxygen as high-energy storage system.

  12. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper will discuss the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  13. Regenerable hydrogen storage in lithium amidoborane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ziwei; Tan, Yingbin; Chen, Xiaowei; Yu, Xuebin

    2012-09-25

    Regenerable hydrogen storage of lithium amidoborane is firstly achieved through the routes of direct thermal dehydrogenation and subsequent chemical hydrogenation of its dehydrogenated products by treatment with hydrazine in liquid ammonia. PMID:22875287

  14. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  15. Layered electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Christopher S.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Kahaian, Arthur J.; Kim, Jeom-Soo

    2008-04-15

    Lithium metal oxide compounds of nominal formula Li.sub.2MO.sub.2, in which M represents two or more positively charged metal ions, selected predominantly and preferably from the first row of transition metals are disclosed herein. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds have a layered-type structure, which can be used as positive electrodes for lithium electrochemical cells, or as a precursor for the in-situ electrochemical fabrication of LiMO.sub.2 electrodes. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds of the invention may have additional functions in lithium cells, for example, as end-of-discharge indicators, or as negative electrodes for lithium cells.

  16. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  17. Catastrophic event modeling. [lithium thionyl chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the catastrophic failures (venting or explosion of the cell) in lithium thionyl chloride batteries is presented. The phenomenology of the various processes leading to cell failure is reviewed.

  18. Lithium thionyl chloride high rate discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinedinst, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements in high rate lithium thionyl chloride power technology achieved by varying the electrolyte composition, operating temperature, cathode design, and cathode composition are discussed. Discharge capacities are plotted as a function of current density, cell voltage, and temperature.

  19. A Polymer Lithium-Oxygen Battery

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report the characteristics of a lithium-oxygen battery using a solid polymer membrane as the electrolyte separator. The polymer electrolyte, fully characterized in terms of electrochemical properties, shows suitable conductivity at room temperature allowing the reversible cycling of the Li-O2 battery with a specific capacity as high as 25,000 mAh gC−1 reflected in a surface capacity of 12.5 mAh cm−2. The electrochemical formation and dissolution of the lithium peroxide during Li-O2 polymer cell operation is investigated by electrochemical techniques combined with X-ray diffraction study, demonstrating the process reversibility. The excellent cell performances in terms of delivered capacity, in addition to its solid configuration allowing the safe use of lithium metal as high capacity anode, demonstrate the suitability of the polymer lithium-oxygen as high-energy storage system. PMID:26238552

  20. First experiments with lithium limiter on FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, M. L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Lazarev, V.; Alekseyev, A.; Vertkov, A.; Zagórski, R.; FTU Team

    2007-06-01

    A liquid lithium limiter (LLL) with capillary porous system has been tested for the first time on the high field medium size tokamak, FTU. Lithium acts as a first wall material in the liquid phase and as a conditioning technique by depositing a lithium film on the walls (lithization). Thermal loads exceeding 5 MW/m2 have been so far applied to the LLL surface during plasma discharges: no anomalous Li influx, like 'lithium bloom', occurs and no surface damage is observed, even after plasma disruptions. Radiation losses, plasma contamination and working gas recycling are reduced after Li coating of the wall as for boronization but with better results. A large electron temperature increase (∼50%) in the scrape-off layer occurs that is well reproduced by the simulation of 2D code TECXY. The Greenwald density limit is easily reached and even exceeded in the explored plasma current ranges (Ip = 0.50-0.9 MA).

  1. Lithium ion battery with improved safety

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chun-hua; Hyung, Yoo Eup; Vissers, Donald R.; Amine, Khalil

    2006-04-11

    A lithium battery with improved safety that utilizes one or more additives in the battery electrolyte solution wherein a lithium salt is dissolved in an organic solvent, which may contain propylene, carbonate. For example, a blend of 2 wt % triphenyl phosphate (TPP), 1 wt % diphenyl monobutyl phosphate (DMP) and 2 wt % vinyl ethylene carbonate additives has been found to significantly enhance the safety and performance of Li-ion batteries using a LiPF6 salt in EC/DEC electrolyte solvent. The invention relates to both the use of individual additives and to blends of additives such as that shown in the above example at concentrations of 1 to 4-wt % in the lithium battery electrolyte. This invention relates to additives that suppress gas evolution in the cell, passivate graphite electrode and protect it from exfoliating in the presence of propylene carbonate solvents in the electrolyte, and retard flames in the lithium batteries.

  2. Shock Induced Birefringence in Lithium Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N C

    2001-06-01

    We have used an ellipsometer to measure the birefringence of lithium fluoride in shock compression experiments. In previous x-ray diffraction experiments, single crystal [100] LiF has been reported to remain cubic at moderate pressures.

  3. Lithium transport through nanosized amorphous silicon layers.

    PubMed

    Hüger, Erwin; Dörrer, Lars; Rahn, Johanna; Panzner, Tobias; Stahn, Jochen; Lilienkamp, Gerhard; Schmidt, Harald

    2013-03-13

    Lithium migration in nanostructured electrode materials is important for an understanding and improvement of high energy density lithium batteries. An approach to measure lithium transport through nanometer thin layers of relevant electrochemical materials is presented using amorphous silicon as a model system. A multilayer consisting of a repetition of five [(6)LiNbO3(15 nm)/Si (10 nm)/(nat)LiNbO3 (15 nm)/Si (10 nm)] units is used for analysis, where LiNbO3 is a Li tracer reservoir. It is shown that the change of the relative (6)Li/(7)Li isotope fraction in the LiNbO3 layers by lithium diffusion through the nanosized silicon layers can be monitored nondestructively by neutron reflectometry. The results can be used to calculate transport parameters.

  4. Dosimetric properties of activated lithium tetraborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrowski, Andrzej; Malecki, M.; Zmija, Jozef; Warkocki, Stanislaw; Warkocki, Wodzislaw

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes preliminary investigations of Li2B4O7 thermoluminescent phosphors as candidates for gamma radiation dosimetry materials. Single crystals, glasses, and polycrystals of lithium tetraborate activated with different dopants have been investigated.

  5. Protection of lithium metal surfaces using chlorosilanes.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Filippo; Star, Kurt; Menke, Erik; Buffeteau, Thierry; Servant, Laurent; Dunn, Bruce; Wudl, Fred

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for protecting metallic lithium surfaces based on a reaction between the thin native layer of lithium hydroxide present on the surface and various chlorosilane derivatives. The chemical composition of the resulting layer and the chemistry involved in layer formation were analyzed by polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Spectroscopy shows the disappearance of surface hydroxide groups and the appearance of silicon and chloride on the lithium surface. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) show that this surface treatment protects the lithium from certain gas-phase reactions and is ionically conductive.

  6. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-20

    The Early Flight Fission -- Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  7. Design and simulation of lithium rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, C.M.

    1995-08-01

    Lithium -based rechargeable batteries that utilize insertion electrodes are being considered for electric-vehicle applications because of their high energy density and inherent reversibility. General mathematical models are developed that apply to a wide range of lithium-based systems, including the recently commercialized lithium-ion cell. The modeling approach is macroscopic, using porous electrode theory to treat the composite insertion electrodes and concentrated solution theory to describe the transport processes in the solution phase. The insertion process itself is treated with a charge-transfer process at the surface obeying Butler-Volmer kinetics, followed by diffusion of the lithium ion into the host structure. These models are used to explore the phenomena that occur inside of lithium cells under conditions of discharge, charge, and during periods of relaxation. Also, in order to understand the phenomena that limit the high-rate discharge of these systems, we focus on the modeling of a particular system with well-characterized material properties and system parameters. The system chosen is a lithium-ion cell produced by Bellcore in Red Bank, NJ, consisting of a lithium-carbon negative electrode, a plasticized polymer electrolyte, and a lithium-manganese-oxide spinel positive electrode. This battery is being marketed for consumer electronic applications. The system is characterized experimentally in terms of its transport and thermodynamic properties, followed by detailed comparisons of simulation results with experimental discharge curves. Next, the optimization of this system for particular applications is explored based on Ragone plots of the specific energy versus average specific power provided by various designs.

  8. Mangalith: a new lithium pacemaker battery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbier, G.; Lehmann, G.

    1980-01-01

    An original lithium battery system is being developed for pacemaker application. The material used, lithium-manganese dioxide, industrially available at the present time for a variety of electronic applications, has been modified and adapted for pacemaker power requirements. The utilization of a different modification of manganese dioxide offers performance advantages. The cell technology is described and performance comparisons between this new cathode material and the industrial counterpart are reported. 7 refs.

  9. A Cable-Shaped Lithium Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-01-20

    A carbon nanostructured hybrid fiber is developed by integrating mesoporous carbon and graphene oxide into aligned carbon nanotubes. This hybrid fiber is used as a 1D cathode to fabricate a new cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery. The fiber cathode exhibits a decent specific capacity and lifespan, which makes the cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery rank far ahead of other fiber-shaped batteries.

  10. Aggregation studies of complexes containing a chiral lithium amide and n-Butyllithium.

    PubMed

    Li, Deyu; Sun, Chengzao; Liu, Jia; Hopson, Russell; Li, Weibin; Williard, Paul G

    2008-03-21

    A system consisting of a chiral lithium amide and n-BuLi in tol-d(8) solution was investigated with (1)H and (13)C INEPT DOSY, (6)Li and (15)N NMR, and other 2D NMR techniques. A mixed 2:1 trimeric complex was identified as the major species as the stoichiometry approached 1.5 equiv of n-BuLi to 1 equiv of amine compound. (1)H and (13)C INEPT DOSY spectra confirmed this lithium aggregate in the solution. The formula weight of the aggregate, correlated with diffusion coefficients of internal references, indicated the aggregation number of this complex. Plots of log D(rel) vs log FW are linear (r > 0.9900). (6)Li and (15)N NMR titration experiments also corroborated these results. These NMR experiments indicate that this mixed aggregate is the species that is responsible for asymmetric addition of n-BuLi to aldehydes.

  11. Lithium brines: A global perspective: Chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munk, LeeAnn; Hynek, Scott; Bradley, Dwight C.; Boutt, David; Labay, Keith A.; Jochens, Hillary; Verplanck, Philip L.; Hitzman, Murray W.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium is a critical and technologically important element that has widespread use, particularly in batteries for hybrid cars and portable electronic devices. Global demand for lithium has been on the rise since the mid-1900s and is projected to continue to increase. Lithium is found in three main deposit types: (1) pegmatites, (2) continental brines, and (3) hydrothermally altered clays. Continental brines provide approximately three-fourths of the world’s Li production due to their relatively low production cost. The Li-rich brine systems addressed here share six common characteristics that provide clues to deposit genesis while also serving as exploration guidelines. These are as follows: (1) arid climate; (2) closed basin containing a salar (salt crust), a salt lake, or both; (3) associated igneous and/or geothermal activity; (4) tectonically driven subsidence; (5) suitable lithium sources; and (6) sufficient time to concentrate brine. Two detailed case studies of Li-rich brines are presented; one on the longest produced lithium brine at Clayton Valley, Nevada, and the other on the world’s largest producing lithium brine at the Salar de Atacama, Chile.

  12. Rechargeable Thin-film Lithium Batteries

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bates, J. B.; Gruzalski, G. R.; Dudney, N. J.; Luck, C. F.; Yu, Xiaohua

    1993-08-01

    Rechargeable thin film batteries consisting of lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have recently been developed. The batteries, which are typically less than 6 {mu}m thick, can be fabricated to any specified size, large or small, onto a variety of substrates including ceramics, semiconductors, and plastics. The cells that have been investigated include Li TiS{sub 2}, Li V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Li Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5, 3.6, and 4.2, respectively. The development of these batteries would not have been possible without the discovery of a new thin film lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride, that is stable in contact with metallic lithium at these potentials. Deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in N{sub 2}, this material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46} and a conductivity at 25{degrees}C of 2 {mu}S/cm. The maximum practical current density obtained from the thin film cells is limited to about 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} due to a low diffusivity of Li{sup +} ions in the cathodes. In this work, the authors present a short review of their work on rechargeable thin film lithium batteries.

  13. Predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Vangerow, J. von; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.; Bogomolov, A. S.; Baklanov, A. V.; Reich, D. M.; Skomorowski, W.; Koch, C. P.

    2015-01-28

    The predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide (LiI) in the first excited A-state is investigated for molecules in the gas phase and embedded in helium nanodroplets, using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. In the gas phase, the transient Li{sup +} and LiI{sup +} ion signals feature damped oscillations due to the excitation and decay of a vibrational wave packet. Based on high-level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of LiI and simulations of the wave packet dynamics, the exponential signal decay is found to result from predissociation predominantly at the lowest avoided X-A potential curve crossing, for which we infer a coupling constant V{sub XA} = 650(20) cm{sup −1}. The lack of a pump-probe delay dependence for the case of LiI embedded in helium nanodroplets indicates fast droplet-induced relaxation of the vibrational excitation.

  14. Rechargeable lithium-ion cell

    DOEpatents

    Bechtold, Dieter; Bartke, Dietrich; Kramer, Peter; Kretzschmar, Reiner; Vollbert, Jurgen

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a rechargeable lithium-ion cell, a method for its manufacture, and its application. The cell is distinguished by the fact that it has a metallic housing (21) which is electrically insulated internally by two half shells (15), which cover electrode plates (8) and main output tabs (7) and are composed of a non-conductive material, where the metallic housing is electrically insulated externally by means of an insulation coating. The cell also has a bursting membrane (4) which, in its normal position, is located above the electrolyte level of the cell (1). In addition, the cell has a twisting protection (6) which extends over the entire surface of the cover (2) and provides centering and assembly functions for the electrode package, which comprises the electrode plates (8).

  15. The cosmological lithium problem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Shubhchintak

    2016-07-01

    After a brief review of the cosmological lithium problem, we report a few recent attempts to find theoretical solutions by our group at Texas A&M University (Commerce & College Station). We will discuss our studies on the theoretical description of electron screening, the possible existence of parallel universes of dark matter, and the use of non-extensive statistics during the Big Bang nucleosynthesis epoch. Last but not least, we discuss possible solutions within nuclear physics realm. The impact of recent measurements of relevant nuclear reaction cross sections for the Big Bang nucleosynthesis based on indirect methods is also assessed. Although our attempts may not able to explain the observed discrepancies between theory and observations, they suggest theoretical developments that can be useful also for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  16. Electrode for a lithium cell

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2008-10-14

    This invention relates to a positive electrode for an electrochemical cell or battery, and to an electrochemical cell or battery; the invention relates more specifically to a positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell or battery when the electrode is used therein. The positive electrode includes a composite metal oxide containing AgV.sub.3O.sub.8 as one component and one or more other components consisting of LiV.sub.3O.sub.8, Ag.sub.2V.sub.4O.sub.11, MnO.sub.2, CF.sub.x, AgF or Ag.sub.2O to increase the energy density of the cell, optionally in the presence of silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrode and to improve the power capability of the cell or battery.

  17. Glass for sealing lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Leedecke, C.J.

    1981-08-28

    Glass compositions resistant to corrosion by lithium cell electrolyte and having an expansion coefficient of 45 to 85 x 10/sup -70/C/sup -1/ have been made with SiO/sub 2/, 25 to 55% by weight; B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 5 to 12%; Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 12 to 35%; CaO, 5 to 15%; MgO, 5 to 15%; SrO, 0 to 10%; and La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0 to 5%. Preferred compositions within that range contain 3 to 8% SrO and 0.5 to 2.5% La/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  18. Solute-solvent interactions in micellar electrokinetic chromatography. Selectivity of lithium dodecyl sulfate-lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate mixed-micellar buffers.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, E; Ràfols, C; Bosch, E; Rosés, M; Abraham, M H

    2001-01-12

    The solvation parameter model has been applied to the characterization of micellar electrokinetic chromatographic (MEKC) systems with mixtures of lithium dodecyl sulfate and lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate as surfactant. The variation in MEKC surfactant composition results in changes in the coefficients of the correlation equation, which in turns leads to information on solute-solvent and solute-micelle interactions. Lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate is more dipolar and hydrogen bond acidic but less polarizable and hydrogen bond basic than lithium dodecyl sulfate. Therefore mixtures of lithium dodecyl sulfate and lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate cover a very wide range of polarity and hydrogen bond properties, which in turn results in important selectivity changes for analytes with different solute properties.

  19. Magnesium oxide doping reduces acoustic wave attenuation in lithium metatantalate and lithium metaniobate crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, W.; Damon, R.; Kedzie, R.; Kestigian, M.; Smith, A.; Worley, J.

    1970-01-01

    Single crystals of lithium metatantalate and lithium metaniobate, grown from melts having different stoichiometries and different amounts of magnesium oxide, show that doping lowers temperature-independent portion of attenuation of acoustic waves. Doped crystals possess optical properties well suited for electro-optical and photoelastic applications.

  20. Selective Recovery of Lithium from Cathode Materials of Spent Lithium Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Akitoshi; Ankei, Naoki; Nishihama, Syouhei; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu

    2016-10-01

    Selective recovery of lithium from four kinds of cathode materials, manganese-type, cobalt-type, nickel-type, and ternary-type, of spent lithium ion battery was investigated. In all cathode materials, leaching of lithium was improved by adding sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) as an oxidant in the leaching solution, while the leaching of other metal ions (manganese, cobalt, and nickel) was significantly suppressed. Optimum leaching conditions, such as pH, temperature, amount of Na2S2O8, and solid/liquid ratio, for the selective leaching of lithium were determined for all cathode materials. Recovery of lithium from the leachate as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) was then successfully achieved by adding sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) to the leachate. Optimum recovery conditions, such as pH, temperature, and amount of Na2CO3, for the recovery of lithium as Li2CO3 were determined for all cases. Purification of Li2CO3 was achieved by lixiviation in all systems, with purities of the Li2CO3 higher than 99.4%, which is almost satisfactory for the battery-grade purity of lithium.

  1. Study of the microdynamics of liquid lithium and lithium-hydrogen melt by inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Blagoveshchenskii, N. M.; Morozov, V. A.; Novikov, A. G.; Pashnev, M. A. Savostin, V. V.; Shimkevich, A. L.

    2007-05-15

    The frequency spectra of vibrations of Li atoms at temperatures of 22, 227, 397, and 557 deg. C and the lithium-hydrogen melt (98 at % {sup 7}Li, 2 at % H) at 557 deg. C have been obtained from the experimental neutron inelastic scattering data. On the basis of the frequency spectra, the temperature dependences of the mean-square displacement of Li atoms, the mean-square amplitudes of atomic vibrations, and the velocity autocorrelation function of atoms have been calculated. The speed of sound in liquid lithium has been estimated within the Debye model. The frequency spectra of lithium-hydrogen melt and solid lithium hydride are compared. A generalized frequency spectrum of vibrations of hydrogen atoms in lithium-hydrogen melt is obtained.

  2. Criteria for the safe storage of lithium metal and lithium compounds at the Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, S.O.

    1995-07-01

    Considerable quantities of lithium-based materials are being generated as a result of the nuclear weapons disassembly process. The lithium from these materials, in the form of lithium hydride (LiH) and lithium deuteride (LiD), is enriched in the lithium-6 ({sup 6}Li) isotope and is considered to be an accountable nuclear material. These materials are neither radioactive nor fissile, but they are integral components of nuclear weapons. The LiD functions as a fuel for thermonuclear fusion and the LiH functions as a neutron moderator. Current plans are to store such materials in a suitable chemical form until they are needed for building future weapons or for other undefined uses. Because no domestic capability exists for producing enriched {sup 6}Li and because {sup 6}Li is an integral component of nuclear weapons, it must be stored safely, securely, and in an environmentally compliant form.

  3. Mixed Aggregates of 1-Methoxyallenyllithium with Lithium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Lawrence M; Dixon, Darryl D; Tius, Marcus A

    2014-01-01

    A combined computational and 13C NMR study was used to investigate the formation of mixed aggregates of 1-methoxyallenyllithium and lithium chloride in tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution. The observed and calculated chemical shifts, as well as the calculated free energies of mixed aggregate formation (MP2/6-31+G(d)), are consistent with the formation of a mixed dimer as the major species in solution. Free energies of mixed dimer, trimer, and tetramer formation were calculated by using the B3LYP and MP2 methods and the 6-31+G(d) basis set. The two methods generated different predictions of which mixed aggregates will be formed, with B3LYP/6-31+G(d) favoring mixed trimers and tetramers in THF solution, and MP2/6-31+G(d) favoring mixed dimers. Formation of the sterically unhindered mixed dimers is also consistent with the enhanced reactivity of these compounds in the presence of lithium chloride. The spectra are also consistent with some residual 1-methoxyallenyllithium tetramer, as well as small amounts of higher mixed aggregates. Although neither computational method is perfect, for this particular system, the calculated free energies derived using the MP2 method are in better agreement with experimental data than those derived using the B3LYP method. PMID:25558443

  4. Response of NSTX Liquid Lithium divertor to High Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Tyler; Kallman, J; Kaitaa, R; Foley, E L; Grayd, T K; Kugel, H; Levinton, F; McLean, A G; Skinner, C H

    2012-07-18

    Samples of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) with and without an evaporative Li coating were directly exposed to a neutral beam ex-situ at a power of ~1.5 MW/m2 for 1-3 seconds. Measurements of front face and bulk sample temperature were obtained. Predictions of temperature evolution were derived from a 1D heat flux model. No macroscopic damage occurred when the "bare" sample was exposed to the beam but microscopic changes to the surface were observed. The Li-coated sample developed a lithium hydroxide (LiOH) coating, which did not change even when the front face temperature exceeded the pure Li melting point. These results are consistent with the lack of damage to the LLD surface and imply that heating alone may not expose pure liquid Li if the melting point of surface impurities is not exceeded. This suggests that flow and heat are needed for future PFCs requiring a liquid Li surface. __________________________________________________

  5. Heat transfer and thermal management studies of lithium polymer batteries for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li

    The thermal conductivities of the polymer electrolyte and composite cathode are important parameters characterizing heat transport in lithium polymer batteries. The thermal conductivities of lithium polymer electrolytes, including poly-ethylene oxide (PEO), PEO-LiClO4, PEO-LiCF3SO 3, PEO-LiN(CF3SO2)2, PEO-LiC(CF 3SO2)3, and the thermal conductivities of TiS 2 and V6O13 composite cathodes, were measured over the temperature range from 25°C to 150°C by a guarded heat flow meter. The thermal conductivities of the electrolytes were found to be relatively constant for the temperature and for electrolytes with various concentrations of the lithium salt. The thermal conductivities of the composite cathodes were found to increase with the temperature below the melting temperature of the polymer electrolyte and only slightly increase above the melting temperature. Three different lithium polymer cells, including Li/PEO-LiCF3 S O3/TiS2, Li/PEO-LiC(CF3 S O2)3/V6 O13, and Li/PEO-LiN(CF3 S O2)2/ Li1+x Mn2 O4 were prepared and their discharge curves, along with heat generation rates, were measured at various galvanostatic discharge current densities, and at different temperature (70°C, 80°C and 90°C), by a potentiostat/galvanostat and an isothermal microcalorimeter. The thermal stability of a lithium polymer battery was examined by a linear perturbation analysis. In contrast to the thermal conductivity, the ionic conductivity of polymer electrolytes for lithium-polymer cell increases greatly with increasing temperature, an instability could arise from this temperature dependence. The numerical calculations, using a two dimensional thermal model, were carried out for constant potential drop across the electrolyte, for constant mean current density and for constant mean cell output power. The numerical calculations were approximately in agreement with the linear perturbation analysis. A coupled mathematical model, including electrochemical and thermal components, was

  6. Lithium-end-capped polylactide thin films influence osteoblast progenitor cell differentiation and mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gomillion, Cheryl T.; Lakhman, Rubinder Kaur; Kasi, Rajeswari M.; Weiss, R. A.; Kuhn, Liisa T.; Goldberg, A. Jon

    2015-01-01

    End-capping by covalently binding functional groups to the ends of polymer chains offers potential advantages for tissue engineering scaffolds, but the ability of such polymers to influence cell behavior has not been studied. As a demonstration, polylactide (PLA) was end-capped with lithium carboxylate ionic groups (hPLA13kLi) and evaluated. Thin films of the hPLA13kLi and PLA homopolymer were prepared with and without surface texturing. Murine osteoblast progenitor cells from collagen 1α1 transgenic reporter mice were used to assess cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. Measurement of green fluorescent protein expressed by these cells and xylenol orange staining for mineral allowed quantitative analysis. The hPLA13kLi was biologically active, increasing initial cell attachment and enhancing differentiation, while reducing proliferation and strongly suppressing mineralization, relative to PLA. These effects of bound lithium ions (Li+) had not been previously reported, and were generally consistent with the literature on soluble additions of lithium. The surface texturing generated here did not influence cell behavior. These results demonstrate that end-capping could be a useful approach in scaffold design, where a wide range of biologically active groups could be employed, while likely retaining the desirable characteristics associated with the unaltered homopolymer backbone. PMID:24733780

  7. An all-solid-state lithium-sulfur battery using two solid electrolytes having different functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Hiroshi; Chikusa, Yasuo

    2016-10-01

    All-solid-state lithium-sulfur batteries are expected to be valuable next generation batteries. To improve the performance of all-solid-state lithium-sulfur batteries, it is essential to raise both the reactivity of sulfur and the ionic conductivity of the positive composite electrode. For achieving this, we investigate a positive composite electrode prepared using P2S5 and a solid electrolyte with a high ionic conductivity. As a result, we have found that the lithium-sulfur cell exhibits a relatively low activation energy together with high ionic conductivity. The positive composite electrode exhibits an extremely high capacity of 1550 mA h g-1 (sulfur) at 1.3 mA cm-2 and 25 °C. Moreover, when using the positive electrode, the energy densities at the cell level (18650) are 540 W h kg-1 and 990 W h L-1, estimated from the equivalent structure of a current lithium-ion battery.

  8. Dependence of structure and temperature for lithium-rich layered-spinel microspheres cathode material of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Yu, Ruizhi; Wang, Xianyou; Ge, Long; Yang, Xiukang

    2015-02-12

    Homogeneous lithium-rich layered-spinel 0.5Li2MnO3·0.5LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 microspheres (~1 μm) are successfully prepared by a solvothermal method and subsequent high-temperature calcinations process. The effects of temperature on the structure and performance of the as-prepared cathode material are systemically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), galvanostatical charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectra. The results show that a spinel Li4Mn5O12 component can be controllably introduced into the lithium-rich layered material at 750°C. Besides, it has been found that the obtained layered-spinel cathode material represents excellent electrochemical characteristics. For example, it can deliver a high initial discharge capacity of 289.6 mAh g(-1) between 2.0 V and 4.6 V at a rate of 0.1 C at room temperature, and a discharge capacity of 144.9 mAh g(-1) at 5 C and 122.8 mAh g(-1) even at 10 C. In addition, the retention of the capacity is still as high as 88% after 200 cycles, while only 79.9% for the single-phase layered material. The excellent electrochemical performance of the as-prepared cathode material can probably be attributed to the hybrid structures combining a fast Li-ion diffusion rate of 3D spinel Li4Mn5O12 phase and a high capacity of the layered Li-Mn-Ni-Co-O component.

  9. Dependence of structure and temperature for lithium-rich layered-spinel microspheres cathode material of lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Di; Yu, Ruizhi; Wang, Xianyou; Ge, Long; Yang, Xiukang

    2015-01-01

    Homogeneous lithium-rich layered-spinel 0.5Li2MnO3·0.5LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 microspheres (~1 μm) are successfully prepared by a solvothermal method and subsequent high-temperature calcinations process. The effects of temperature on the structure and performance of the as-prepared cathode material are systemically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), galvanostatical charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectra. The results show that a spinel Li4Mn5O12 component can be controllably introduced into the lithium-rich layered material at 750°C. Besides, it has been found that the obtained layered-spinel cathode material represents excellent electrochemical characteristics. For example, it can deliver a high initial discharge capacity of 289.6 mAh g−1 between 2.0 V and 4.6 V at a rate of 0.1 C at room temperature, and a discharge capacity of 144.9 mAh g−1 at 5 C and 122.8 mAh g−1 even at 10 C. In addition, the retention of the capacity is still as high as 88% after 200 cycles, while only 79.9% for the single-phase layered material. The excellent electrochemical performance of the as-prepared cathode material can probably be attributed to the hybrid structures combining a fast Li-ion diffusion rate of 3D spinel Li4Mn5O12 phase and a high capacity of the layered Li-Mn-Ni-Co-O component. PMID:25672573

  10. Aftereffects of Lithium-Conditioned Stimuli on Consummatory Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domjan, Michael; Gillan, Douglas J.

    1977-01-01

    To complement investigations of the direct effects of lithium toxicosis on consummatory behavior, these experiments were designed to determine the aftereffects on drinking of exposure to a conditioned stimulus previously paired with lithium. (Author/RK)

  11. Lithium-ion batteries having conformal solid electrolyte layers

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Gi-Heon; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2014-05-27

    Hybrid solid-liquid electrolyte lithium-ion battery devices are disclosed. Certain devices comprise anodes and cathodes conformally coated with an electron insulating and lithium ion conductive solid electrolyte layer.

  12. Chemical and morphological characteristics of lithium electrode surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D.; Vasquez, R. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Somoano, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Lithium electrode surfaces were analyzed for chemical and morphological characteristics, using electron spectroscopy chemical analysis (ESCA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Samples included lithium metal and lithium electrodes which were cycled in a 1.5 M lithium arsenic hexafluoride/two-methyl tetrahydrofuran electrolyte. Results show that the surface of the as-received lithium metal was already covered by a film composed of LiO2 and an Li2O/CO2 adduct with a thickness of approximately 100-200 A. No evidence of Ni3 was found. Upon exposure of the lithium electrode to a 1.5 M LiAsF6/2-Me-THF electrochemical environment, a second film was observed to form on the surface, consisting primarily of As, Si, and F, possibly in the form of lithium arsenic oxyfluorides or lithium fluorosilicates. It is suggested that the film formation may be attributed to salt degradation.

  13. Lithium Resources for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, S.; Gruber, P.; Medina, P.; Keolian, G.; Everson, M. P.; Wallington, T.

    2011-12-01

    Lithium is an important industrial compound and the principal component of high energy-density batteries. Because it is the lightest solid element, these batteries are widely used in consumer electronics and are expected to be the basis for battery electric vehicles (BEVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) for the 21st century. In view of the large incremental demand for lithium that will result from expanded use of various types of EVs, long-term estimates of lithium demand and supply are advisable. For GDP growth rates of 2 to 3% and battery recycling rates of 90 to 100%, total demand for lithium for all markets is expected to be a maximum of 19.6 million tonnes through 2100. This includes 3.2 million tonnes for industrial compounds, 3.6 million tonnes for consumer electronics, and 12.8 million tonnes for EVs. Lithium-bearing mineral deposits that might supply this demand contain an estimated resource of approximately 39 million tonnes, although many of these deposits have not been adequately evaluated. These lithium-bearing mineral deposits are of two main types, non-marine playa-brine deposits and igneous deposits. Playa-brine deposits have the greatest immediate resource potential (estimated at 66% of global resources) and include the Salar de Atacama (Chile), the source of almost half of current world lithium production, as well as Zabuye (China/Tibet) and Hombre Muerto (Argentina). Additional important playa-brine lithium resources include Rincon (Argentina), Qaidam (China), Silver Peak (USA) and Uyuni (Bolivia), which together account for about 35% of the estimated global lithium resource. Information on the size and continuity of brine-bearing aquifers in many of these deposits is limited, and differences in chemical composition of brines from deposit to deposit require different extraction processes and yield different product mixes of lithium, boron, potassium and other elements. Numerous other brines in playas

  14. Preparation, characterization of LiNi{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} film cathode.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S. H.; Abraham, D. P.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-01-01

    Positive electrodes based on the LiNi{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} material are being evaluated in high-power lithium-ion cells for hybrid-electric vehicle applications. To determine performance degradation mechanisms that are associated with the active material, we prepared carbon- and binder-free LiNi{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} film cathode on a Pt substrate using a sol-gel spin coating technique. The material was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Initial data from cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements conducted on the electrodes are reported.

  15. Lithium isotope fractionation during uptake by gibbsite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimpenny, Josh; Colla, Christopher A.; Yu, Ping; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2015-11-01

    The intercalation of lithium from solution into the six-membered μ2-oxo rings on the basal planes of gibbsite is well-constrained chemically. The product is a lithiated layered-double hydroxide solid that forms via in situ phase change. The reaction has well established kinetics and is associated with a distinct swelling of the gibbsite as counter ions enter the interlayer to balance the charge of lithiation. Lithium reacts to fill a fixed and well identifiable crystallographic site and has no solvation waters. Our lithium-isotope data shows that 6Li is favored during this intercalation and that the solid-solution fractionation depends on temperature, electrolyte concentration and counter ion identity (whether Cl-, NO3- or ClO4-). We find that the amount of isotopic fractionation between solid and solution (ΔLisolid-solution) varies with the amount of lithium taken up into the gibbsite structure, which itself depends upon the extent of conversion and also varies with electrolyte concentration and in the counter ion in the order: ClO4- < NO3- < Cl-. Higher electrolyte concentrations cause more rapid expansion of the gibbsite interlayer and some counter ions, such as Cl-, are more easily taken up than others, probably because they ease diffusion. The relationship between lithium loading and ΔLisolid-solution indicates two stages: (1) uptake into the crystallographic sites that favors light lithium, in parallel with adsorption of solvated cations, and (2) continued uptake of solvated cations after all available octahedral vacancies are filled; this second stage has no isotopic preference. The two-step reaction progress is supported by solid-state NMR spectra that clearly resolve a second reservoir of lithium in addition to the expected layered double-hydroxide phase.

  16. Antiproliferative Potential of Officinal Forms and Nanoparticles of Lithium Salts.

    PubMed

    Lykov, A P; Poveshchenko, O V; Bondarenko, N A; Bogatova, N P; Makarova, O P; Konenkov, V I

    2016-04-01

    We studied the effect of officinal forms and nanoparticles of lithium carbonate and lithium citrate on proliferative activity of hepatoma-29 cells. Lithium carbonate nanoparticles suppressed proliferation of hepatoma-29 cells in lower concentrations than officinal form of this salt. The antiproliferative effect of lithium salts i activation of apoptosis and arrest of hepatoma-29 cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. PMID:27165073

  17. Methods for making lithium vanadium oxide electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Schutts, Scott M.; Kinney, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    A method of making vanadium oxide formulations is presented. In one method of preparing lithium vanadium oxide for use as an electrode material, the method involves: admixing a particulate form of a lithium compound and a particulate form of a vanadium compound; jet milling the particulate admixture of the lithium and vanadium compounds; and heating the jet milled particulate admixture at a temperature below the melting temperature of the admixture to form lithium vanadium oxide.

  18. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  19. Results from the CDX-U Lithium Wall and NSTX Lithium Pallet Injection and Evaporation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R; Kugel, H; Bell, M; Bell, R; Beiersdorfer, P; Bush, C; Doerner, R; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Sabbagh, S; Souskhanovskii, V; Spaleta, J; Stevenson, T; Timberlake, J; Zakharov, L

    2006-10-05

    CDX-U has been operated with the vacuum vessel wall and limiter surfaces nearly completely coated with lithium, producing dramatic improvements to plasma performance. Discharges achieved global energy confinement times up to 6 ms, exceeding previous CDX-U results by a factor of 5, and ITER98P(y,1) scaling by 2-3. Lithium wall coatings up to 1000 {angstrom} thick were applied between discharges by electron-beam-induced evaporation of a lithium-filled limiter and vapor deposition from a resistively heated oven. The e-beam power was modest (1.6 kW) but it produced up to 60 MW/m2 power density in a 0.3 cm{sup 2} spot; the duration was up to 300 s. Convective transport of heat away from the beam spot was so effective that the entire lithium inventory (140 g) was heated to evaporation (400-500 C) and there was no observable hot spot on the lithium surface within the beam footprint. These results are promising for use of lithium plasma-facing components in reactor scale devices. Lithium coating has also been applied to NSTX carbon plasma-facing surfaces, to control the density rise during long-duration H-modes for non-inductive current sustainment. First, lithium pellets were injected into sequences of Ohmically heated helium plasmas in both center stack limiter (CSL) and lower single-null divertor (LSND) configurations to deposit a total of 25-30 mg of lithium on the respective plasma contact areas. In both cases, the first subsequent L mode, deuterium discharge with NBI showed a reduction in the volume-average density by a factor {approx}3 compared to similar discharges before the lithium coating. Recently, a lithium evaporator was installed aimed toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. Twelve depositions, ranging from about 10 mg to 5 g of lithium, were performed. The effects on LSND L-mode, double-null divertor (DND) H-mode, and DND reversed-shear plasmas were variable but, immediately after coating, there were decreases in the density and

  20. Nanostructured lithium sulfide materials for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Yun Jung; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2016-08-01

    Upon the maturation and saturation of Li-ion battery technologies, the demand for the development of energy storage systems with higher energy densities has surged to meet the needs of key markets such as electric vehicles. Among the many next generation high-energy storage options, the Lisbnd S battery system is considered particularly close to mass commercialization because of its low cost and the natural abundance of sulfur. In this review, we focus on nanostructured Li2S materials for Lisbnd S batteries. Due to a lithium source in its molecular structure, Li2S can be coupled with various Li-free anode materials, thereby giving it the potential to surmount many of the problems related with a Li-metal anode. The hurdles that impede the full utilization of Li2S materials include its high activation barrier and the low electrical conductivity of bulk Li2S particles. Various strategies that can be used to assist the activation process and facilitate electrical transport are analyzed. To provide insight into the opportunities specific to Li2S materials, we highlight some major advances and results that have been achieved in the development of metal Li-free full cells and all-solid-state cells based on Li2S cathodes.

  1. Doping-Enhanced Lithium Diffusion in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang; Wu, Shunnian; Wu, Ping

    2011-09-01

    We disclose a distortion-assisted diffusion mechanism in Li3N and Li2.5Co0.5N by first-principles simulations. A B2g soft mode at the Γ point is found in α-Li3N, and a more stable α'-Li3N (P3¯m1) structure, which is 0.71 meV lower in energy, is further derived. The same soft mode is inherited into Li2.5Co0.5N and is enhanced due to Co doping. Consequently, unlike the usual Peierls spin instability along Co-N chains, large lithium-ion displacements on the Li-N plane are induced by a set of soft modes. Such a distortion is expected to offer Li atoms a route to bypass the high diffusion barrier and promote Li-ion conductivity. In addition, we further illustrate abnormal Born effective charges along Co-N chains which result from the competition between the motions of electrons and ion cores. Our results provide future opportunities in both fundamental understanding and structural modifications of Li-ion battery materials.

  2. Secondary electron emission from lithium and lithium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capece, A. M.; Patino, M. I.; Raitses, Y.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, measurements of electron-induced secondary electron emission (SEE) yields of lithium as a function of composition are presented. The results are particularly relevant for magnetic fusion devices such as tokamaks, field-reversed configurations, and stellarators that consider Li as a plasma-facing material for improved plasma confinement. SEE can reduce the sheath potential at the wall and cool electrons at the plasma edge, resulting in large power losses. These effects become significant as the SEE coefficient, γe, approaches one, making it imperative to maintain a low yield surface. This work demonstrates that the yield from Li strongly depends on chemical composition and substantially increases after exposure to oxygen and water vapor. The total yield was measured using a retarding field analyzer in ultrahigh vacuum for primary electron energies of 20-600 eV. The effect of Li composition was determined by introducing controlled amounts of O2 and H2O vapor while monitoring film composition with Auger electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption. The results show that the energy at which γe = 1 decreases with oxygen content and is 145 eV for a Li film that is 17% oxidized and drops to less than 25 eV for a fully oxidized film. This work has important implications for laboratory plasmas operating under realistic vacuum conditions in which oxidation significantly alters the electron emission properties of Li walls.

  3. Crystal structure of advanced lithium titanate with lithium oxide additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Kazuya; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Hayashi, Kimio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Takuya; Terai, Takayuki

    2009-04-01

    Li 2TiO 3 is one of the most promising candidates among solid breeder materials proposed for fusion reactors. However, the mass of Li 2TiO 3 was found to decrease with time in the sweep gas mixed with hydrogen. This mass change indicates that the oxygen content of the sample decreased, suggesting the change from Ti 4+ to Ti 3+. In the present paper, the crystal structure and the non-stoichiometry of Li 2TiO 3 added with Li 2O have been extensively investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry. In the case of the Li 2TiO 3 samples used in the present study, LiO-C 2H 5 or LiO-i-C 3H 7 and Ti(O-i-C 3H 7) 4 were mixed in the proportion corresponding to the molar ratio Li 2O/TiO 2 of either 2.00 or 1.00. In thermogravimetry, the mass of this sample decreased with time due to lithium deficiency, where no presence of oxygen deficiency was indicated.

  4. Secondary electron emission from lithium and lithium compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Capece, A. M.; Patino, M. I.; Raitses, Y.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-07-06

    In this work, measurements of electron-induced secondary electron emission ( SEE) yields of lithium as a function of composition are presented. The results are particularly relevant for magnetic fusion devices such as tokamaks, field-reversed configurations, and stellarators that consider Li as a plasma-facing material for improved plasma confinement. SEE can reduce the sheath potential at the wall and cool electrons at the plasma edge, resulting in large power losses. These effects become significant as the SEE coefficient, γe, approaches one, making it imperative to maintain a low yield surface. This work demonstrates that the yield from Li strongly depends onmore » chemical composition and substantially increases after exposure to oxygen and water vapor. The total yield was measured using a retarding field analyzer in ultrahigh vacuum for primary electron energies of 20-600 eV. The effect of Li composition was determined by introducing controlled amounts of O2 and H2O vapor while monitoring film composition with Auger electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption. The results show that the energy at which γe = 1 decreases with oxygen content and is 145 eV for a Li film that is 17% oxidized and drops to less than 25 eV for a fully oxidized film. This work has important implications for laboratory plasmas operating under realistic vacuum conditions in which oxidation significantly alters the electron emission properties of Li walls. Published by AIP Publishing.« less

  5. Lithium-induced sinus node dysfunction at therapeutic levels.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjan K; Vivek, G; Parida, Amrita; Chetty, Shashikanth

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is used as an antimanic and mood-stabilising drug. It can cause various adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting, polyuria, fine tremors, myocarditis and arrhythmias. We are describing a case of lithium induced sinus-node dysfunction in a patient with serum lithium levels in therapeutic range.

  6. 40 CFR 721.9668 - Organotin lithium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organotin lithium compound. 721.9668... Substances § 721.9668 Organotin lithium compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as an organotin lithium compound (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9668 - Organotin lithium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organotin lithium compound. 721.9668... Substances § 721.9668 Organotin lithium compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as an organotin lithium compound (PMN...

  8. 78 FR 19024 - Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... SAFETY BOARD Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum On Thursday and Friday, April 11-12, 2013, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a forum titled, ``Lithium Ion... Inquiry. The forum is organized into three topic areas: Lithium ion battery design, development, and...

  9. Electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries. Research and development technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, H.F.

    1981-09-01

    Theoretical considerations predict increased stability of cyclic ethers and diethers against reductive cleavage by lithium if the ethers have 2 methyl substitution. Diethers are solvents with low viscosity which are desirable for high rate rechargeable lithium batteries. Synergistic, mixed solvent effects increase electrolyte conductance and rate capability of lithium intercalating cathodes.

  10. Lithium air batteries having ether-based electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Curtiss, Larry A.; Lu, Jun; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2016-10-25

    A lithium-air battery includes a cathode including a porous active carbon material, a separator, an anode including lithium, and an electrolyte including a lithium salt and polyalkylene glycol ether, where the porous active carbon material is free of a metal-based catalyst.

  11. 75 FR 9147 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... associated with the air transport of lithium cells and batteries. PHMSA and FAA will hold a public meeting on... air transportation, eliminate regulatory exceptions for lithium cells and batteries, other than...-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous...

  12. 76 FR 53056 - Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... 20 Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final... for the outbound mailing of lithium batteries. This is consistent with recent amendments to the... a subject line of ``International Lithium Batteries.'' Faxed comments are not accepted. FOR...

  13. 76 FR 55799 - Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... 20 Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final... maximum limits for the outbound mailing of lithium batteries to international, or APO, FPO or DPO... metal or lithium-ion batteries that were to be effective October 3, 2011. These revisions...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10332 - Lithium metal phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lithium metal phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10332 Lithium metal phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as lithium metal phosphate (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10332 - Lithium metal phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lithium metal phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10332 Lithium metal phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as lithium metal phosphate (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10332 - Lithium metal phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lithium metal phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10332 Lithium metal phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as lithium metal phosphate (PMN...

  17. Plasma and Brain Pharmacokinetics of Previously Unexplored Lithium Salts

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam J.; Kim, Seol-Hee; Tan, Jun; Sneed, Kevin B.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Shytle, R. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Despite its narrow therapeutic window, lithium is still regarded as the gold standard comparator and benchmark treatment for mania. Recent attempts to find new drugs with similar therapeutic activities have yielded new chemical entities. However, these potential new drugs have yet to match the many bioactivities attributable to lithium's efficacy for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. Consequently, an intense effort for re-engineering lithium therapeutics using crystal engineering is currently underway. We sought to improve the likelihood of success of these endeavors by evaluating the pharmacokinetics of previously unexplored lithium salts with organic anions (lithium salicylate and lithium lactate). We report that these lithium salts exhibit profoundly different pharmacokinetics compared to the more common FDA approved salt, lithium carbonate, in rats. Remarkably, lithium salicylate produced elevated plasma and brain levels of lithium beyond 48 hours post-dose without the sharp peak that contributes to the toxicity problems of current lithium therapeutics. These findings could be important for the development of the next generation of lithium therapeutics. PMID:25045517

  18. 40 CFR 721.9668 - Organotin lithium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organotin lithium compound. 721.9668... Substances § 721.9668 Organotin lithium compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as an organotin lithium compound (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9668 - Organotin lithium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organotin lithium compound. 721.9668... Substances § 721.9668 Organotin lithium compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as an organotin lithium compound (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9668 - Organotin lithium compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organotin lithium compound. 721.9668... Substances § 721.9668 Organotin lithium compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as an organotin lithium compound (PMN...

  1. RECOVERY AND SEPARATION OF LITHIUM VALUES FROM SALVAGE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Hansford, D.L.; Raabe, E.W.

    1963-08-20

    Lithium values can be recovered from an aqueous basic solution by reacting the values with a phosphate salt soluble in the solution, forming an aqueous slurry of the resultant aqueous insoluble lithium phosphate, contacting the slurry with an organic cation exchange resin in the acid form until the slurry has been clarified, and thereafter recovering lithium values from the resin. (AEC)

  2. Superacid-Based Lithium Salts For Polymer Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Prakash, Surya; Shen, David H.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Olah, George

    1995-01-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes exhibiting high lithium-ion conductivities made by incorporating salts of superacids into thin films of polyethylene oxide (PEO). These and other solid-polymer electrolytes candidates for use in rechargeable lithium-based electrochemical cells. Increases in room-temperature lithium-ion conductivities of solid electrolytes desirable because they increase achievable power and energy densities.

  3. Lithium-tellurium bimetallic cell has increased voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Rogers, G. L.; Shimotake, H.

    1968-01-01

    Lithium-tellurium secondary cell with a fused lithium halide electrolyte, tested in the temperature range 467 degrees to 500 degrees C, showed improvement over the sodium bismuth cell. The voltage of this bimetallic cell was increased by using the more electropositive anode material, lithium, and the more electronegative cathode material, tellurium.

  4. Diffusive Fractionation of Lithium Isotopes in Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homolova, V.; Richter, F. M.; Watson, E. B.; Chaussidon, M.

    2014-12-01

    Systematic lithium isotope variations along concentration gradients found in olivine and pyroxene grains from terrestrial, lunar and martian rocks have been attributed to diffusive isotopic fractionation [Beck et al., 2006; Tang et al., 2007]. In some cases, these isotopic excursions are so large that a single grain may display isotopic variability that spans almost the entire range of documented terrestrial values [Jeffcoate et al., 2007]. In this study, we present the results of experiments to examine diffusive isotopic fractionation of lithium in olivine. The experiments comprised crystallographically oriented slabs of San Carlos olivine juxtaposed with either spodumene powder or a lithium rich pyroxene crystal. Experiments were conducted at 1 GPa and 0.1MPa over a temperature range of 1000 to 1125⁰C. Oxygen fugacity in the 0.1MPa experiments was controlled using the wustite-magnetite and nickel-nickel oxide solid buffer assemblages. Lithium concentrations generally decrease smoothly away from the edges of the grains; however, experiments involving diffusion parallel to the a-axis consistently show peculiar wavy or segmented concentration profiles. Lithium diffusivity parallel to the c-axis is on the order of 1E-14m2/s at 1100⁰C. The diffusivity parallel to the c-axis is more than an order of magnitude faster than diffusion parallel to the b-axis and correlates positively with oxygen fugacity. The lithium isotopic composition, δ7Li = 1000‰ * ((δ7Lisample- δ7Ligrain center)/ δ7Ligrain center), shows a decrease away from the edge of the grain to a minimum value (up to 70‰ lighter) and then an abrupt increase back to the initial isotopic composition of the olivine grain. This isotopic profile is similar to those found in natural grains and an experimental study on diffusive fractionation of lithium isotopes in pyroxene [Richter et al., 2014]. Results from the present study are modeled using the approach of Dohmen et al. [2010], which assumes lithium

  5. Size effects in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu-Rong, Yao; Ya-Xia, Yin; Yu-Gao, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Size-related properties of novel lithium battery materials, arising from kinetics, thermodynamics, and newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms, are reviewed. Complementary experimental and computational investigations of the use of the size effects to modify electrodes and electrolytes for lithium ion batteries are enumerated and discussed together. Size differences in the materials in lithium ion batteries lead to a variety of exciting phenomena. Smaller-particle materials with highly connective interfaces and reduced diffusion paths exhibit higher rate performance than the corresponding bulk materials. The thermodynamics is also changed by the higher surface energy of smaller particles, affecting, for example, secondary surface reactions, lattice parameter, voltage, and the phase transformation mechanism. Newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms that result in superior storage capacity are also briefly highlighted. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51225204 and 21303222), the Shandong Taishan Scholarship, China, the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2012CB932900), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010000).

  6. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha; Button, Robert; Manzo, Michelle; McKissock, Barbara; Miller, Thomas; Gemeiner, Russel; Bennett, William; Hand, Evan

    2006-01-01

    Life-test data of Lithium-Ion battery cells is critical in order to establish their performance capabilities for NASA missions and Exploration goals. Lithium-ion cells have the potential to replace rechargeable alkaline cells in aerospace applications, but they require a more complex charging scheme than is typically required for alkaline cells. To address these requirements in our Lithium-Ion Cell Test Verification Program, a Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit was developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This unit gives researchers the ability to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and results in a substantial reduction in test costs as compared to individual cell testing. The Naval Surface Warfare Center at Crane, Indiana developed a power reduction scheme that works in conjunction with the Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit. This scheme minimizes the power dissipation required by the circuitry to prolong circuit life and improve its reliability.

  7. Mechanochemistry of lithium nitride under hydrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhang, J; Wang, S; Jiang, L; Latroche, M; Du, J; Cuevas, F

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen uptake during the mechanochemistry of lithium nitride under 9 MPa hydrogen pressure has been analyzed by means of in situ solid-gas absorption and ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. In situ hydrogenation curves show two H-sorption steps leading to an overall hydrogen uptake of 9.8 wt% H after 3 hours of milling. The milled end-products consist of nanocrystalline (∼10 nm) LiNH2 and LiH phases. The first reaction step comprises the transformation of the polymorph α-Li3N (S.G. P6/mmm) into the β-Li3N (S.G. P63/mmc) metastable phase and the reaction of the latter with hydrogen to form lithium imide: β-Li3N + H2→ Li2NH + LiH. Reaction kinetics of the first step is zero-order. Its rate-limiting control is assigned to the collision frequency between milling balls and Li3N powder. In the second absorption step, lithium imide converts to lithium amide following the reaction scheme Li2NH + H2→ LiNH2 + LiH. Reaction kinetics is here limited by one-dimensional nucleation and the growth mechanism, which, in light of structural data, is assigned to the occurrence of lithium vacancies in the imide compound. This study provides new insights into the reaction paths and chemical kinetics of light hydrogen storage materials during their mechanochemical synthesis.

  8. Role of Constituent Hard Polymer in Enhancing Lithium Transference Number of Lithium Salt-Polymer Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Gyuha; Park, Moon Jeong

    2015-03-01

    Lithium polymer batteries have been projected as promising energy storage systems, owing to their unique advantages such as long cycle life, high specific capacity, and high cell potential. While the polymer electrolytes such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) employed in lithium polymer batteries have high ionic conductivity and low volatility, the PEO-lithium salt complexes indicated immense shortcomings of concentration polarization, ascribed to the motion of free anions within PEO. This has limited charge/discharge rate of lithium batteries. In this study, we present a new methodology for improving the ionic conductivity and lithium transference number of PEO, by block copolymerization with a hard polymer, namely poly(dithiooxamide) (PDTOA). Compared to a simple PEO/PDTOA blend, lithium-salt doped PEO-b-PDTOA block copolymers exhibited significantly improved ionic conductivity values. Further, lithium transference numbers as high as 0.66 were observed, which are much higher than the corresponding values for conventional PEO-salt electrolytes (~ 0 . 25).

  9. Self-discharge rate of lithium thionyl-chloride cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, W.R.

    1993-12-31

    Our low-rate lithium/thionyl-chloride ``D`` cell is required to provide power continuously for up to 10 years. The cell was designed at Sandia National Laboratories and manufactured at Eagle-Picher Industries, Joplin, Missouri. We have conducted accelerated aging studies at elevated temperatures to predict long-term performance of cells fabricated in 1992. Cells using 1.0M LiAlCl{sub 4} electrolyte follow Arrhenius kinetics with an activation energy of 14.6 Kcal/mol. This results in an annual capacity loss to self-discharge of 0.13 Ah at 25 C. Cells using a 1.0M LiAlCl{sub 4}{sm_bullet}SO{sub 2} electrolyte do not follow Arrhenius behavior. The performance of aged cells from an earlier fabrication lot is variable.

  10. Direct Synthesis of Phospholyl Lithium from White Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Chi, Yue; Du, Shanshan; Zhang, Wen-Xiong; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2016-08-01

    The selective construction of P-C bonds directly from P4 and nucleophiles is an ideal and step-economical approach to utilizing elemental P4 for the straightforward synthesis of organophosphorus compounds. In this work, a highly efficient one-pot reaction between P4 and 1,4-dilithio-1,3-butadienes was realized, which quantitatively affords phospholyl lithium derivatives. DFT calculations indicate that the mechanism is significantly different from that of the well-known stepwise cleavage of P-P bond in P4 activation. Instead, a cooperative nucleophilic attack of two Csp2 Li bonds on P4 , leading to simultaneous cleavage of two P-P bonds, is favorable. This mechanistic information offers a new view on the mechanism of P4 activation, as well as a reasonable explanation for the excellent yields and selectivity. This method could prove to be a useful route to P4 activation and the subsequent production of organophosphorus compounds.

  11. Elaboration and characterization of a free standing LiSICON membrane for aqueous lithium-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, Laurent; Cantau, Christophe; Vinatier, Philippe; Toussaint, Gwenaëlle; Stevens, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    In order to develop a LISICON separator for an aqueous lithium-air battery, a thin membrane was prepared by a tape-casting of a Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7 (PO4)3-AlPO4 based slip followed by a sintering step. By optimizing the grain sizes, the slip composition and the sintering treatment, the mechanical properties were improved and the membrane was reduced to a thickness of down to 40 μm. As a result, the ionic resistance is relatively low, around 38 Ω for a 55 μm membrane of 1 cm2. One side of the membrane was coated with a lithium oxynitrured phosphorous (LiPON) thin film to prevent lithium metal attack. Lithium metal was electrochemically deposited on the LiPON surface from a saturated aqueous solution of LiOH. However, the ionic resistance of the LiPON film, around 67 Ω for a 1.2 μm film of 1 cm2, still causes an important ohmic loss contribution which limits the power performance of a lithium-air battery.

  12. Lithium-vanadium advanced blanket development. ITER final report on U.S. contribution: Task T219/T220

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.F.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this task is to develop the required data base and demonstrate the performance of a liquid lithium-vanadium advanced blanket design. The task has two main activities related to vanadium structural material and liquid lithium system developments. The vanadium alloy development activity included four subtasks: (1.1) baseline mechanical properties of non irradiated base metal and weld metal joints; (1.2) compatibility with liquid lithium; (1.3) material irradiation tests; and (1.4) development of material manufacturing and joining methods. The lithium blanket technology activity included four subtasks: (2.1) electrical insulation development and testing for liquid metal systems; (2.2) MHD pressure drop and heat transfer study for self-cooled liquid metal systems; (2.3) chemistry of liquid lithium; and (2.4) design, fabrication and testing of ITER relevant size blanket mockups. A summary of the progress and results obtained during the period 1995 and 1996 in each of the subtask areas is presented in this report.

  13. Lithium: effect on (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding, ionic content, and amino acid levels in the brain of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Banay-Schwartz, M.; Wajda, I.J.; Manigault, I.; DeGuzman, T.; Lajtha, A.

    1982-02-01

    After prolonged treatment of rats with lithium (pellets, 0.21% lithium carbonate, or 0.5 mg/ml lithium chloride in drinking water) for three months, the level of lithium in plasma was 0.87 meq/liter; in several brain regions, between 1.06-1.39 mueq/g wet weight. The content of sodium and potassium in the plasma was normal. The level of potassium in the brain regions tested increased by 13-30% and that of sodium by about 10%. Glycine levels increased significantly in all the regions (cerebral cortex, midbrain, cerebellum, and spinal cord). In the cerebellum GABA was also increased, while glutamine was decreased. In midbrain, apart from increases in glycine levels, alanine, valine, GABA and lysine were also increased. In the spinal cord, glutamic acid was also increased. Changes were largely in the putative neurotransmitters. Long-term treatment with lithium also influenced the high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H) spiperone in the cerebral cortex and corpus striatum. Two specific binding sites were found in both brain regions; the main change was the reduction in the lower affinity binding site (B max 2).

  14. Single-Ion Block Copoly(ionic liquid)s as Electrolytes for All-Solid State Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Porcarelli, Luca; Shaplov, Alexander S; Salsamendi, Maitane; Nair, Jijeesh R; Vygodskii, Yakov S; Mecerreyes, David; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2016-04-27

    Polymer electrolytes have been proposed as replacement for conventional liquid electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to their intrinsic enhanced safety. Nevertheless, the power delivery of these materials is limited by the concentration gradient of the lithium salt. Single-ion conducting polyelectrolytes represent the ideal solution since their nature prevents polarization phenomena. Herein, the preparation of a new family of single-ion conducting block copolymer polyelectrolytes via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization technique is reported. These copolymers comprise poly(lithium 1-[3-(methacryloyloxy)propylsulfonyl]-1-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate blocks. The obtained polyelectrolytes show low Tg values in the range of -61 to 0.6 °C, comparatively high ionic conductivity (up to 2.3 × 10(-6) and 1.2 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 25 and 55 °C, respectively), wide electrochemical stability (up to 4.5 V versus Li(+)/Li), and a lithium-ion transference number close to unity (0.83). Owing to the combination of all mentioned properties, the prepared polymer materials were used as solid polyelectrolytes and as binders in the elaboration of lithium-metal battery prototypes with high charge/discharge efficiency and excellent specific capacity (up to 130 mAh g(-1)) at C/15 rate.

  15. Lithium toxicity in a neonate owing to false elevation of blood lithium levels caused by contamination in a lithium heparin container: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zainab; Athiraman, Naveen K; Clark, Simon J

    2016-08-01

    Lithium toxicity in a neonate can occur owing to antenatal exposure as a result of maternal treatment for psychiatric illnesses. False elevation of lithium levels has been reported in the paediatric population when the sample was mistakenly collected in a lithium heparin container. A term, male infant was born to a mother who was on lithium treatment for a psychiatric illness. On day 1, the infant was jittery, had a poor suck with difficulties in establishing feeds. Blood taken from the infant approximately 8 hours after birth demonstrated a lithium level of 4.9 mmol/L (adult toxic level w1.5 mmol/L). However, the sample for lithium levels was sent in a lithium heparin container and the probability of false elevation was considered. He was closely monitored in the neonatal intensive care unit and his hydration was optimised with intravenous fluids. Clinically, he remained well and commenced feeding, and his jitteriness had decreased the following day. A repeat blood lithium level, collected in a gel container, was only 0.4 mmol/L. The initially raised lithium level was owing to contamination from the lithium heparin container.

  16. Lithium-rich giants in the Galactic thick disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, L.; Villanova, S.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Geisler, D.; Bonifacio, P.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Zoccali, M.; Jilkova, L.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Lithium is a fragile element, which is easily destroyed in the stellar interior. The existence of lithium-rich giants still represents a challenge for stellar evolution models. Aims: We have collected a large database of high-resolution stellar spectra of 824 candidate thick-disk giants having 2 MASS photometry and proper motions measured by the Southern Proper-Motion Program (SPM). In order to investigate the nature of Li-rich giants, we searched this database for giants presenting a strong Li I resonance line. Methods: We performed a chemical abundance analysis on the selected stars with the MOOG code along with proper ATLAS-9 model atmospheres. The iron content and atmospheric parameters were fixed by using the equivalent width of a sample of Fe lines. We also derive abundances for C, N, and O and measure or derive lower limits on the 12C/13C isotopic ratios, which is a sensible diagnostic of the stars evolutionary status. Results: We detected five stars with a lithium abundance higher than 1.5, i.e. Li-rich according to the current definition. One of them (SPM-313132) has A(Li) > 3.3 and, because of this, belongs to the group of the rare super Li-rich giants. Its kinematics makes it a likely thin-disk member and its atmospheric parameters are compatible with it being a 4 M⊙ star either on the red giant branch (RGB) or the early asymptotic giant branch. This object is the first super Li-rich giant detected at this phase. The other four are likely low-mass thick-disk stars evolved past the RGB luminosity bump, as determined from their metallicities and atmospheric parameters. The most evolved of them lies close to the RGB-tip. It has A(Li) > 2.7 and a low 12C/13C isotopic ratio, close to the cool bottom processing predictions. Based on observations taken at the Las Campanas and La Silla/ Paranal observatory (ESO proposal ID: 077.B-0348).

  17. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms and molecules on helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Florian; Poms, Johannes; Krois, Günter; Pototschnig, Johann V; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2013-11-21

    We report on the spectroscopic investigation of lithium atoms and lithium dimers in their triplet manifold on the surface of helium nanodroplets (He(N)). We present the excitation spectrum of the 3p ← 2s and 3d ← 2s two-photon transitions for single Li atoms on He(N). The atoms are excited from the 2S(Σ) ground state into Δ, Π, and Σ pseudodiatomic molecular substates. Excitation spectra are recorded by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight (REMPI-TOF) mass spectroscopy, which allows an investigation of the exciplex (Li*–He(m), m = 1–3) formation process in the Li–He(N) system. Electronic states are shifted and broadened with respect to free atom states, which is explained within the pseudodiatomic model. The assignment is assisted by theoretical calculations, which are based on the Orsay–Trento density functional where the interaction between the helium droplet and the lithium atom is introduced by a pairwise additive approach. When a droplet is doped with more than one alkali atom, the fragility of the alkali–He(N) systems leads preferably to the formation of high-spin molecules on the droplets. We use this property of helium nanodroplets for the preparation of Li dimers in their triplet ground state (13Σu(+)). The excitation spectrum of the 23Πg(ν′ = 0–11) ← 13Σu(+)(ν″ = 0) transition is presented. The interaction between the molecule and the droplet manifests in a broadening of the transitions with a characteristic asymmetric form. The broadening extends to the blue side of each vibronic level, which is caused by the simultaneous excitation of the molecule and vibrations of the droplet (phonons). The two isotopes of Li form 6Li2 and 7Li2 as well as isotope mixed 6Li7Li molecules on the droplet surface. By using REMPI-TOF mass spectroscopy, isotope-dependent effects could be studied.

  18. A Stable Fluorinated and Alkylated Lithium Malonatoborate Salt for Lithium Ion Battery Application

    DOE PAGES

    Wan, Shun; Jiang, Xueguang; Guo, Bingkun; Dai, Sheng; Goodenough, John B.; Sun, Xiao-Guang

    2015-04-27

    A new fluorinated and alkylated lithium malonatoborate salt, lithium bis(2-methyl-2-fluoromalonato)borate (LiBMFMB), has been synthesized for lithium ion battery application. A 0.8 M LiBMFMB solution is obtained in a mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (1:2 by wt.). The new LiBMFMB based electrolyte exhibits good cycling stability and rate capability in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and graphite based half-cells.

  19. Lithium Ion Electrolytes and Lithium Ion Cells With Good Low Temperature Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    There is provided in one embodiment of the invention an electrolyte for use in a lithium ion electrochemical cell. The electrolyte comprises a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), an ester cosolvent, and a lithium salt. The ester cosolvent comprises methyl propionate (MP), ethyl propionate (EP), methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate (EB), propyl butyrate (PB), or butyl butyrate (BB). The electrochemical cell operates in a temperature range of from about -60 C to about 60 C. In another embodiment there is provided a lithium ion electrochemical cell using the electrolyte of the invention.

  20. Long cycle life lithium ion battery with lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide (NCM) cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Xiong, L.; He, C.

    2014-09-01

    Lithium ion batteries with lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide (NCM) cathode were characterized by extensive cycling (>2000 cycles), discharge rate test, hybrid pulse power characterization test (HPPC), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The crystal structure, morphology and particle size of cathode materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was demonstrated that the rate performance and cycle life of battery are closely related to the cathode material composition and electrode design. With proper selection of cathode composition and electrode design, the lithium ion battery cell achieved close to 3500 cycles with 85% capacity retention at 1C current.

  1. A stable fluorinated and alkylated lithium malonatoborate salt for lithium ion battery application.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shun; Jiang, Xueguang; Guo, Bingkun; Dai, Sheng; Goodenough, John B; Sun, Xiao-Guang

    2015-06-18

    A new fluorinated and alkylated lithium malonatoborate salt, lithium bis(2-methyl-2-fluoromalonato)borate (LiBMFMB), has been synthesized for lithium ion battery application. A 0.8 M LiBMFMB solution is obtained in a mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (1 : 2 by wt). The new LiBMFMB based electrolyte exhibits good cycling stability and rate capability in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and graphite based half-cells.

  2. Oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized disiloxanes as electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengcheng; Dong, Jian; West, Robert; Amine, Khalil

    Functionalized disiloxane compounds were synthesized by attaching oligo(ethylene glycol) chains, -(CH 2CH 2O)- n, n = 2-7, via hydrosilation, dehydrocoupling, and nucleophilic substitution reactions and were examined as non-aqueous electrolyte solvents in lithium-ion cells. The compounds were fully characterized by 1H, 13C, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Upon doping with lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) or LiPF 6, the disiloxane electrolytes showed conductivities up to 6.2 × 10 -4 S cm -1 at room temperature. The thermal behavior of the electrolytes was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, which revealed very low glass transition temperatures before and after LiBOB doping and much higher thermal stability compared to organic carbonate electrolytes. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that disiloxane-based electrolytes with 0.8 M LiBOB salt concentration are stable to 4.7 V. The LiBOB/disiloxane combinations were found to be good electrolytes for lithium-ion cells; unlike LiPF 6, LiBOB can provide a good passivation film on the graphite anode. The LiPF 6/disiloxane electrolyte was enabled in lithium-ion cells by adding 1 wt% vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC). Full cell performance tests with LiNi 0.80Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2 as the cathode and mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) graphite as the anode show stable cyclability. The results demonstrate that disiloxane-based electrolytes have considerable potential as electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Enabling LiTFSI-based electrolytes for safer lithium-ion batteries by using linear fluorinated carbonates as (Co)solvent.

    PubMed

    Kalhoff, Julian; Bresser, Dominic; Bolloli, Marco; Alloin, Fannie; Sanchez, Jean-Yves; Passerini, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    In this Full Paper we show that the use of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) as conducting salt in commercial lithium-ion batteries is made possible by introducing fluorinated linear carbonates as electrolyte (co)solvents. Electrolyte compositions based on LiTFSI and fluorinated carbonates were characterized regarding their ionic conductivity and electrochemical stability towards oxidation and with respect to their ability to form a protective film of aluminum fluoride on the aluminum surface. Moreover, the investigation of the electrochemical performance of standard lithium-ion anodes (graphite) and cathodes (Li[Ni1/3 Mn1/3 Co1/3 ]O2 , NMC) in half-cell configuration showed stable cycle life and good rate capability. Finally, an NMC/graphite full-cell confirmed the suitability of such electrolyte compositions for practical lithium-ion cells, thus enabling the complete replacement of LiPF6 and allowing the realization of substantially safer lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, M.M.; Kostecki, R.; Marcinek, M.; Wilcoc, J.D.

    2008-12-10

    In this paper, we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin film conductive carbon coatings on LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} cathode active material powders for lithium-ion batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon were produced from a solid organic precursor, anthracene, by a one-step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. The structure and morphology of the carbon coatings were examined using SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half coin cells. The composite cathodes made of the carbon-coated LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder showed superior electrochemical performance and increased capacity compared to standard composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes.

  5. Enhanced lithium ion storage in nanoimprinted carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Li, Jiangyu; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2015-07-27

    Disordered carbons processed from polymers have much higher theoretical capacity as lithium ion battery anode than graphite, but they suffer from large irreversible capacity loss and have poor cyclic performance. Here, a simple process to obtain patterned carbon structure from polyvinylpyrrolidone was demonstrated, combining nanoimprint lithography for patterning and three-step heat treatment process for carbonization. The patterned carbon, without any additional binders or conductive fillers, shows remarkably improved cycling performance as Li-ion battery anode, twice as high as the theoretical value of graphite at 98 cycles. Localized electrochemical strain microscopy reveals the enhanced lithium ion activity at the nanoscale, and the control experiments suggest that the enhancement largely originates from the patterned structure, which improves surface reaction while it helps relieving the internal stress during lithium insertion and extraction. This study provides insight on fabricating patterned carbon architecture by rational design for enhanced electrochemical performance.

  6. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  7. Deuterium Retention in NSTX with Lithium Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner, J.P. Allain, W. Blanchard, H.W. Kugel, R. Maingi, L. Roquemore, V. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor

    2010-06-02

    High (≈ 90%) deuterium retention was observed in NSTX gas balance measurements both withand without lithiumization of the carbon plasma facing components. The gas retained in ohmic discharges was measured by comparing the vessel pressure rise after a discharge to that of a gasonly pulse with the pumping valves closed. For neutral beam heated discharges the gas input and gas pumped by the NB cryopanels were tracked. The discharges were followed by outgassing of deuterium that reduced the retention. The relationship between retention and surface chemistry was explored with a new plasma-material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface science station that exposed four material samples to the plasma. XPS and TDS analysis showed that the binding of D atoms is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular atoms are weakly bonded in regions near lithium atoms bound to either oxygen or the carbon matrix.

  8. Safety considerations for fabricating lithium battery packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium cell safety is a major issue with both manufacturers and end users. Most manufacturers have taken great strides to develop the safest cells possible while still maintaining performance characteristics. The combining of lithium cells for higher voltages, currents, and capacities requires the fabricator of lithium battery packs to be knowledgable about the specific electrochemical system being used. Relatively high rate, spirally wound (large surface area) sulfur oxychloride cells systems, such as Li/Thionyl or Sulfuryl chloride are considered. Prior to the start of a design of a battery pack, a review of the characterization studies for the cells should be conducted. The approach for fabricating a battery pack might vary with cell size.

  9. Reactivity of nonaqueous organic electrolytes towards lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Huang, C.-K.; Halpert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The successful operation of an ambient temperature secondary lithium cell is primarily dependent on the stability of the electrolyte towards lithium. The lithium electrode on open circuit must be inert towards the electrolyte to achieve a long shelf life. The reactivity of tetrahydrofuran and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran based electrolytes with additives such as 2-methylfuran, ethylene carbonate, propylene carbonate, and 3-methylsulfolane was investigated by microcalorimetry and ac impedance spectroscopy techniques. Also the stability of electrolytes by open circuit stand tests was studied. Addition of ethylene carbonate and 2-methylfuran additives was found to improve the stability of tetrahydrofuran and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran based electrolytes. Long term microcalorimetry and ac impedance data clearly confirmed the higher stability of ethylene carbonate/2-methyltetrahydrofuran electrolyte compared to the 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and propylene carbonate/2-methyltetrahydrofuran electrolytes.

  10. Electrochemical Lithium Ion Battery Performance Model

    2007-03-29

    The Electrochemical Lithium Ion Battery Performance Model allows for the computer prediction of the basic thermal, electrical, and electrochemical performance of a lithium ion cell with simplified geometry. The model solves governing equations describing the movement of lithium ions within and between the negative and positive electrodes. The governing equations were first formulated by Fuller, Doyle, and Newman and published in J. Electrochemical Society in 1994. The present model solves the partial differential equations governingmore » charge transfer kinetics and charge, species, heat transports in a computationally-efficient manner using the finite volume method, with special consideration given for solving the model under conditions of applied current, voltage, power, and load resistance.« less

  11. Enhanced lithium ion storage in nanoimprinted carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jiangyu

    2015-07-01

    Disordered carbons processed from polymers have much higher theoretical capacity as lithium ion battery anode than graphite, but they suffer from large irreversible capacity loss and have poor cyclic performance. Here, a simple process to obtain patterned carbon structure from polyvinylpyrrolidone was demonstrated, combining nanoimprint lithography for patterning and three-step heat treatment process for carbonization. The patterned carbon, without any additional binders or conductive fillers, shows remarkably improved cycling performance as Li-ion battery anode, twice as high as the theoretical value of graphite at 98 cycles. Localized electrochemical strain microscopy reveals the enhanced lithium ion activity at the nanoscale, and the control experiments suggest that the enhancement largely originates from the patterned structure, which improves surface reaction while it helps relieving the internal stress during lithium insertion and extraction. This study provides insight on fabricating patterned carbon architecture by rational design for enhanced electrochemical performance.

  12. Thermal Aspects of Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H.; Shakkottai, P.; Bugga, R.; Smart, M.; Huang, C. K.; Timmerman, P.; Surampudi, S.

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation outlines the development of a thermal model of Li-ion cells in terms of heat generation, thermal mass, and thermal resistance. Intended for incorporation into battery model. The approach was to estimate heat generation: with semi-theoretical model, and then to check accuracy with efficiency measurements. Another objective was to compute thermal mass from component weights and specific heats, and to compute the thermal resistance from component dimensions and conductivities. Two lithium batteries are compared, the Cylindrical lithium battery, and the prismatic lithium cell. It reviews methodology for estimating the heat generation rate. Graphs of the Open-circuit curves of the cells and the heat evolution during discharge are given.

  13. Determination of lithium in rocks by distillation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, M.H.

    1949-01-01

    A method for the quantitative extraction and recovery of lithium from rocks is based on a high temperature volatilization procedure. The sample is sintered with a calcium carbonate-calcium chloride mixture at 1200?? C. for 30 minutes in a platinum ignition tube, and the volatilization product is collected in a plug of Pyrex glass wool in a connecting Pyrex tube. The distillate, which consists of the alkali chlorides with a maximum of 5 to 20 mg. of calcium oxide and traces of a few other elements, is removed from the apparatus by dissolving in dilute hydrochloric acid and subjected to standard analytiaal procedures. The sinter residues contained less than 0.0005% lithium oxide. Lithium oxide was recovered from synthetic samples with an average error of 1.1%.

  14. Lithium intoxication: a coordinated treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Minden, S L; Bassuk, E L; Nadler, S P

    1993-01-01

    This case illustrates the clinical features of lithium intoxication and the problems in treating it that may arise as a result of lithium's effects on the kidney. It also demonstrates the difficulties that can develop when a delicate physiologic balance is inadvertently disrupted by nonpharmacologic interventions such as seclusion and consequent restriction of access to food and water. Patients with lithium-induced urine-concentrating defects are especially at risk for dehydration, and care must be taken to ensure adequate fluid and salt intake. This case also shows how intense negative feelings evoked by chronically mentally ill patients can adversely affect their psychiatric and medical care. While such feelings are inevitable, their impact may be lessened by improved communication and coordination between the medical and psychiatric systems of care and by the presence of psychiatrists in the general medical hospital. PMID:8419561

  15. Lithium Toxicity Following Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Abdulkader; Raouf, Sherief; Recio, Fernando O.

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting the first documented case of lithium toxicity after vertical sleeve gastrectomy surgery in an 18 year-old female with psychiatric history of bipolar disorder who was treated with lithium. This case illustrates the need for closer monitoring of lithium levels following bariatric surgery. Both psychiatrists and surgeons should be aware of the potential risk of lithium toxicity following bariatric surgery, as well as the need to judiciously monitor lithium level and possibly adjust the dose of some medications. PMID:27489390

  16. [Downbeat nystagmus - a rare side-effect of lithium carbonate].

    PubMed

    Monden, M A H; Nederkoorn, P J; Tijsma, M

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman who had been treated with lithium carbonate for 10 years developed a downbeat nystagmus. The literature describes downbeat nystagmus as a rare side-effect of lithium carbonate. In this patient other causes of downbeat nystagmus were ruled out. In most cases stopping lithium carbonate does not alleviate the symptoms, which are often debilitating. At the moment there is no adequate treatment for the condition. In some cases, however, the symptoms subside after the patient stops taking lithium. Therefore, we consider that early recognition of downbeat nystagmus in patients being treated with lithium carbonate is vitally important.

  17. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOEpatents

    Coops, Melvin S.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  18. Extraction of lithium from spodumene by bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Rezza, I; Salinas, E; Calvente, V; Benuzzi, D; Sanz de Tosetti, M I

    1997-09-01

    The recovery of lithium from spodumene (6.9% Li2O) by bioleaching was investigated. This process was carried out using heterotrophic micro-organisms previously isolated from the mineral. Penicillium purpurogenum, Aspergillus niger and Rhodotorula rubra were assayed separately. Two different media were used for bioleaching; one of them (M2 medium) was highly limited in Mg2+, Fe2+ and K+. The assays were carried out in 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks with 1 g of ground mineral at 50-80 mesh and 150 ml of leaching medium. Lithium extracted and accumulated in biomass during 30 d of bioleaching with P. purpurogenum was 6.35 mg % dry weight (d.w.) in M1 medium and 10.8 mg % d.w. in M2 medium, while in the leach liquor, Li concentration was 1.06 ppm (M1 medium) and 1.26 ppm (M2 medium). Results of leaching on day 30 with R. rubra were 5.87 mg % d.w. and 16.7 mg % d.w. of lithium accumulated in biomass in M1 medium and M2 medium, respectively. In leach liquor, lithium was 0.5 ppm (M1 medium) and 1.53 ppm (M2 medium). Aspergillus niger was able to accumulate 1.60 mg % d.w. (M1 medium) and 5.1 mg % d.w. of lithium (M2 medium) in biomass. Lithium in leach liquor was 0.37 ppm (M1 medium) and 0.75 ppm (M2 medium). Chemical analysis of the leach liquor showed gluconic and citric acids. It was possible to detect capsular exopolymers in the yeast. These metabolic products seem to be related to leaching but a more important factor for enhancing this process may be microbial adaptation to a low nutrient environment.

  19. Lithium debris removal by sputtering and evaporation for EUV optics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Martin John

    2007-12-01

    The selection of EUV as the next generation lithography light source has been a natural progression of the development in the semiconductor industry. These sources of EUV light convert about 1-4% of net deposited plasma energy into photons between 13-14 nm and the remaining energy generates out of band radiation and the production of energetic ions and neutrals in the dense hot plasma. A fraction of these ions strike electrode surfaces, injection nozzles, and the vacuum chamber producing low-energy sputtered atoms termed debris. As such, the mechanism and ability of Li removal from the collector like optics needs to be studied and modeled to be able to provide a predictive value for lifetime of the optics. This removal can be accomplished with the presence of a secondary helium plasma which can selectively sputter lithium from the collector optic surface while providing high EUV photon transmission and have the advantage of being a nondestructive in situ cleaning method for the collector optics. A lithium magnetron source was developed to provide low energy lithium debris like that which is present in EUV sources. This magnetron plasma was characterized through the use of Langmuir probe analysis to yield a mapping of the temperature and density of the plasma, in addition to the ionization fraction. From here, a secondary helium plasma source was developed, employed, and studied in the same manner to also provide information on the electron density, temperature, and ionization fraction so as to accurately model and measure the deposition flux of lithium and sputter flux of helium on the sample surface. The model correlated well to experimental observations. The development of a model of simultaneous lithium deposition and evaporation in the presence of a secondary plasma held below the lithium sputtering threshold was well correlated to experimental observations. The simultaneous process of deposition, evaporation, and sputtering of lithium was modeled and

  20. Brain Lithium Levels and Effects on Cognition and Mood in Geriatric Bipolar Disorder: A Lithium-7 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Forester, Brent P.; Streeter, Chris C.; Berlow, Yosef A.; Tian, Hua; Wardrop, Megan; Finn, Chelsea T.; Harper, David; Renshaw, Perry F.; Moore, Constance M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The authors investigated the relationship between brain lithium, serum lithium and age in adult subjects treated with lithium. In addition, the authors investigated the association between brain lithium and serum lithium with frontal lobe functioning and mood in a subgroup of older subjects. Design Cross-sectional assessment. Setting McLean Hospital’s Geriatric Psychiatry Research Program and Brain Imaging Center; The Division of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine. Participants Twenty-six subjects, 20 to 85 years, with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition–TR bipolar disorder (BD), currently treated with lithium. Measurements All subjects had measurements of mood (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS] and Young Mania Rating Scale) and serum and brain lithium levels. Brain lithium levels were assessed using lithium Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Ten subjects older than 50 years also had assessments of frontal lobe functioning (Stroop, Trails A and B, Wis. Card Sorting Task). Results Brain lithium levels correlated with serum lithium levels for the group as a whole. However, this relationship was not present for the group of subjects older than 50. For these older subjects elevations in brain (but not serum) lithium levels were associated with frontal lobe dysfunction and higher HDRS scores. The higher HDRS were associated with increased somatic symptoms. Conclusion Frontal lobe dysfunction and elevated depression symptoms correlating with higher brain lithium levels supports conservative dosing recommendations in bipolar older adults. The absence of a predictable relationship between serum and brain lithium makes specific individual predictions about the “ideal” lithium serum level in an older adult with BD difficult. PMID:18626002

  1. Brain oscillations in bipolar disorder and lithium-induced changes

    PubMed Central

    Atagün, Murat İlhan

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) studies in patients with bipolar disorder have revealed lower amplitudes in brain oscillations. The aim of this review is to describe lithium-induced EEG changes in bipolar disorder and to discuss potential underlying factors. A literature survey about lithium-induced EEG changes in bipolar disorder was performed. Lithium consistently enhances magnitudes of brain oscillations in slow frequencies (delta and theta) in both resting-state EEG studies as well as event-related oscillations studies. Enhancement of magnitudes of beta oscillations is specific to event-related oscillations. Correlation between serum lithium levels and brain oscillations has been reported. Lithium-induced changes in brain oscillations might correspond to lithium-induced alterations in neurotransmitters, signaling cascades, plasticity, brain structure, or biophysical properties of lithium. Therefore, lithium-induced changes in brain oscillations could be promising biomarkers to assess the molecular mechanisms leading to variability in efficacy. Since the variability of lithium response in bipolar disorder is due to the genetic differences in the mechanisms involving lithium, it would be highly promising to assess the lithium-induced EEG changes as biomarkers in genetic studies. PMID:27022264

  2. Cosmis Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Cassé, M.

    Light element nucleosynthesis is an important chapter of nuclear astrophysics. Specifically, the rare and fragile light nuclei Lithium, Beryllium and Boron (LiBeB) are not generated in the normal course of stellar nucleosynthesis (except Lithium-7) and are, in fact, destroyed in stellar interiors. This characteristic is reflected in the low abundance of these simple species. Up to recently, the most plausible interpretation was that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) interact with interstellar CNO to form LiBeB. Other origins have been also identified, primordial and stellar (Lithium-7) and supernova neutrino spallation (Lithium-7 and Boron-11). In contrast, Beryllium-9, Boron-10 and Lithium-6 are pure spallative products. This last isotope presents a special interest since the Lithium-7/Lithium-6 ratio has been measured in a few halo stars offering a new constraint on the early galactic evolution. However, in the nineties, new observations prompted astrophysicists to reassess the question. Optical measurements of the beryllium and boron abundances in halo stars have been achieved by the 10 meters KECK telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. These observations indicate a quasi linear correlation between Be and B vs Fe, at least at low metallicity, unexpected on the basis of GCR scenario, predicting a quadratic relationship. As a consequence, the origin and the evolution of the LiBeB nuclei has been revisited. This linearity implies the acceleration of C and O nuclei freshly synthesized and their fragmentation on the the interstellar Hydrogen and Helium. Wolf-Rayet stars and supernovae via the shock waves induced, are the best candidates to the acceleration of their own material enriched into C and O; so LiBeB is produced independently of the Interstellar Medium chemical composition. Moreover, neutrinos emitted by the newly born neutron stars interacting with the C layer of the supernova could produce specifically Lithium-7 and Boron-11. This process is supported by the

  3. Polarization Labeling Spectroscopy of Hollow Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.-T.; Wehlitz, R.; Cherepkov, N. A.; Azuma, Y.; Depaola, B. D.; Nagata, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Levin, J. C.; Sellin, I. A.

    1998-05-01

    Utilization of polarized or aligned targets can provide valuable information on atomic photoionization and excitation processes. (M. Meyer et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2963 (1987) We measured numerous even-parity doubly core excited ``hollow lithium'' resonances using monchromatized synchrotron radiation derived from an undulator, and laser excited lithium targets. The excited 1s^22p ^2Po targets, were aligned or polarized by laser pumping, and measurements were made with various combinations with the polarization of synchrotron radiation. The intensity pattern of the photoion spectrum shows clear polarization dependence and provides useful clues to the analysis.

  4. Model potential calculations of lithium transitions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, T. C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1972-01-01

    Semi-empirical potentials are constructed that have eigenvalues close in magnitude to the binding energies of the valence electron in lithium. The potentials include the long range polarization force between the electron and the core. The corresponding eigenfunctions are used to calculate dynamic polarizabilities, discrete oscillator strengths, photoionization cross sections and radiative recombination coefficients. A consistent application of the theory imposes a modification on the transition operator, but its effects are small for lithium. The method presented can be regarded as a numerical generalization of the widely used Coulomb approximation.

  5. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen [Mesa, AZ; Xu, Wu [Tempe, AZ

    2009-05-05

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  6. Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Binod; Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G.

    2001-01-01

    Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a polymer-ceramic composite electrolyte containing poly(ethylene oxide), lithium tetrafluoroborate and titanium dioxide is provided in the form of an annealed film having a room temperature conductivity of from 10.sup.-5 S cm.sup.-1 to 10.sup.-3 S cm.sup.-1 and an activation energy of about 0.5 eV.

  7. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Xu, Wu

    2008-01-01

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  8. Structure Stabilization by Mixed Anions in Oxyfluoride Cathodes for High-Energy Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Pereira, Nathalie; Chernova, Natasha A; Omenya, Fredrick; Gao, Peng; Whittingham, M Stanley; Amatucci, Glenn G; Su, Dong; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-27

    Mixed-anion oxyfluorides (i.e., FeOxF2-x) are an appealing alternative to pure fluorides as high-capacity cathodes in lithium batteries, with enhanced cyclability via oxygen substitution. However, it is still unclear how the mixed anions impact the local phase transformation and structural stability of oxyfluorides during cycling due to the complexity of electrochemical reactions, involving both lithium intercalation and conversion. Herein, we investigated the local chemical and structural ordering in FeO0.7F1.3 at length scales spanning from single particles to the bulk electrode, via a combination of electron spectrum-imaging, magnetization, electrochemistry, and synchrotron X-ray measurements. The FeO0.7F1.3 nanoparticles retain a FeF2-like rutile structure but chemically heterogeneous, with an F-rich core covered by thin O-rich shell. Upon lithiation the O-rich rutile phase is transformed into Li-Fe-O(-F) rocksalt that has high lattice coherency with converted metallic Fe, a feature that may facilitate the local electronic and ionic transport. The O-rich rocksalt is highly stable over lithiation/delithiation and thus advantageous to maintain the integrity of the particle, and due to its predominant distribution on the surface, it is expected to prevent the catalytic interaction of Fe with electrolyte. Our findings of the structural origin of cycling stability in oxyfluorides may provide insights into developing viable high-energy electrodes for lithium batteries.

  9. Nanoscale Surface Modification of Lithium-Rich Layered-Oxide Composite Cathodes for Suppressing Voltage Fade.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fenghua; Yang, Chenghao; Xiong, Xunhui; Xiong, Jiawen; Hu, Renzong; Chen, Yu; Liu, Meilin

    2015-10-26

    Lithium-rich layered oxides are promising cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries and exhibit a high reversible capacity exceeding 250 mAh g(-1) . However, voltage fade is the major problem that needs to be overcome before they can find practical applications. Here, Li1.2 Mn0.54 Ni0.13 Co0.13 O2 (LLMO) oxides are subjected to nanoscale LiFePO4 (LFP) surface modification. The resulting materials combine the advantages of both bulk doping and surface coating as the LLMO crystal structure is stabilized through cationic doping, and the LLMO cathode materials are protected from corrosion induced by organic electrolytes. An LLMO cathode modified with 5 wt % LFP (LLMO-LFP5) demonstrated suppressed voltage fade and a discharge capacity of 282.8 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 C with a capacity retention of 98.1 % after 120 cycles. Moreover, the nanoscale LFP layers incorporated into the LLMO surfaces can effectively maintain the lithium-ion and charge transport channels, and the LLMO-LFP5 cathode demonstrated an excellent rate capacity.

  10. Reactivity of lithium intercalated into petroleum coke in carbonate electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Jean, M.; Tranchant, A.; Messina, R.

    1996-02-01

    There have been considerable efforts to develop lithium rocking chair batteries where the lithium metal anode is replaced by a nonmetal material capable of storing and exchanging large quantities of lithium ions. The results of a study of the reactivity of lithium intercalated into petroleum coke (Conoco) in a PC/EC/DMC (1/1/3 volume) mixture and LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} as the lithium salt are presented here. The authors show the loss of intercalated lithium is due to its reactivity with the electrolyte and increases quasi-linearly during 1,000 h of storage, and thereafter becomes less important as the storage time increases. The storage of passivated petroleum coke electrodes without any lithium content allowed the authors to determine the rates of the precipitation and dissolution reactions involving the passivating layer.

  11. In vivo imaging of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of lithium.

    PubMed

    Kilts, C D

    2000-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of lithium for the long-term management of bipolar disorder is well recognized, along with the risk of lithium-induced toxicity. The author describes the current findings of in vivo functional neuroimaging techniques with respect to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lithium and their future potential to elucidate the drug distribution and neural mechanisms that produce its therapeutic effects. Brain Li nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings have disassociated postdose brain and blood lithium concentrations and suggest a pharmacokinetic basis for lithium response and nonresponse. The application of in vivo synaptic activity and neurochemical imaging is providing new knowledge related to the distributed neural activity associated with lithium response and is contributing to the critical human testing of neuroprotective and signal transduction models of lithium's therapeutic effects.

  12. Determination of the lithium binding site in inositol monophosphatase, the putative target for lithium therapy, by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Haimovich, Anat; Eliav, Uzi; Goldbourt, Amir

    2012-03-28

    Inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of inositol monophosphate to inorganic phosphate and inositol. For this catalytic process to occur, Mg(2+) cations must exist in the active site. According to the inositol depletion hypothesis, IMPase activity is assumed to be higher than normal in patients suffering from bipolar disorder. Treatment with Li(+), an inhibitor of IMPase, reduces its activity, but the mechanism by which lithium exerts its therapeutic effects is still at a stage of conjecture. The Escherichia coli SuhB gene product possesses IMPase activity, which is also strongly inhibited by Li(+). It has significant sequence similarity to human IMPase and has most of its key active-site residues. Here we show that by using (7)Li magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including {(13)C}(7)Li dipolar recoupling experiments, the bound form of lithium in the active site of wild-type E. coli SuhB can be unambiguously detected, and on the basis of our data and other biochemical data, lithium binds to site II, coupled to aspartate residues 84, 87, and 212.

  13. Stable nanostructured cathode with polycrystalline Li-deficient Li0.28Co0.29Ni0.30Mn0.20O2 for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Tan, Guoqiang; Lu, Jun; Chen, Renjie; Li, Li; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-12

    The lithium-ion battery, a major renewable power source, has been widely applied in portable electronic devices and extended to hybrid electric vehicles and all-electric vehicles. One of the main issues for the transportation application is the need to develop high-performance cathode materials. Here we report a novel nanostructured cathode material based on air-stable polycrystalline Li0.28Co0.29Ni0.30Mn0.20O2 thin film with lithium deficiency for high-energy density lithium-ion batteries. This film is prepared via a method combining radio frequency magnetron sputtering and annealing using a crystalline and stoichiometric LiCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 target. This lithium-deficient Li0.28Co0.29Ni0.30Mn0.20O2 thin film has a polycrystalline nanostructure, high tap density, and higher energy and power density compared to the initial stoichiometric LiCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2. Such a material is a promising cathode candidate for high-energy lithium-ion batteries, especially thin-film batteries.

  14. Nanostructured lithium-aluminum alloy electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Hudak, Nicholas S.; Huber, Dale L.

    2010-12-01

    Electrodeposited aluminum films and template-synthesized aluminum nanorods are examined as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. The lithium-aluminum alloying reaction is observed electrochemically with cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cycling in lithium half-cells. The electrodeposition reaction is shown to have high faradaic efficiency, and electrodeposited aluminum films reach theoretical capacity for the formation of LiAl (1 Ah/g). The performance of electrodeposited aluminum films is dependent on film thickness, with thicker films exhibiting better cycling behavior. The same trend is shown for electron-beam deposited aluminum films, suggesting that aluminum film thickness is the major determinant in electrochemical performance regardless of deposition technique. Synthesis of aluminum nanorod arrays on stainless steel substrates is demonstrated using electrodeposition into anodic aluminum oxide templates followed by template dissolution. Unlike nanostructures of other lithium-alloying materials, the electrochemical performance of these aluminum nanorod arrays is worse than that of bulk aluminum.

  15. Lithium storage mechanisms in purpurin based organic lithium ion battery electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Arava Leela Mohana; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Chumyim, Porramate; Gowda, Sanketh R.; Pradhan, Padmanava; Jadhav, Swapnil R.; Dubey, Madan; John, George; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    Current lithium batteries operate on inorganic insertion compounds to power a diverse range of applications, but recently there is a surging demand to develop environmentally friendly green electrode materials. To develop sustainable and eco-friendly lithium ion batteries, we report reversible lithium ion storage properties of a naturally occurring and abundant organic compound purpurin, which is non-toxic and derived from the plant madder. The carbonyl/hydroxyl groups present in purpurin molecules act as redox centers and reacts electrochemically with Li-ions during the charge/discharge process. The mechanism of lithiation of purpurin is fully elucidated using NMR, UV and FTIR spectral studies. The formation of the most favored six membered binding core of lithium ion with carbonyl groups of purpurin and hydroxyl groups at C-1 and C-4 positions respectively facilitated lithiation process, whereas hydroxyl group at C-2 position remains unaltered. PMID:23233879

  16. Lithium pellet production (LiPP): A device for the production of small spheres of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, P.; Andrucyzk, D.; Roquemore, A. L.; McGuire, M.; Curreli, D.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2013-06-01

    With lithium as a fusion material gaining popularity, a method for producing lithium pellets relatively quickly has been developed for NSTX. The Lithium Pellet Production device is based on an injector with a sub-millimeter diameter orifice and relies on a jet of liquid lithium breaking apart into small spheres via the Plateau-Rayleigh instability. A prototype device is presented in this paper and for a pressure difference of ΔP = 5 Torr, spheres with diameters between 0.91 < D < 1.37 mm have been produced with an average diameter of D = 1.14 mm, which agrees with the developed theory. Successive tests performed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory with Wood's metal have confirmed the dependence of sphere diameter on pressure difference as predicted.

  17. First principles modeling of interfaces of lithium (thio) phosphate solid electrolytes and lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzwarth, N. A. W.; Lepley, N. D.; Al-Qawasmeh, A. N. M.; Kates, C. M.

    2014-03-01

    Computer modeling studies show that while lithium phosphate electrolytes form stable interfaces with lithium metal anodes, lithium thiophosphate electrolytes are typically structurally and chemically altered by the presence of lithium metal. On the other hand, experiments have shown that an electrochemical cell of Li/Li3PS4/Li can be cycled many times. One possible explanation of the apparent experimental stability of the Li/Li3PS4/Li system is that a stabilizing buffer layer is formed at the interface during the first few electrochemical cycles. In order to computationally explore this possibility, we examined the influence of ``thin film'' buffer layers of Li2S on the surface of the electrolyte. Using first principles techniques, stable electrolyte-buffer layer configurations were constructed and the resulting Li3PS4/Li2S and Li2S/Li interfaces were found to be structurally and chemically stable. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1105485.

  18. 78 FR 69516 - In The Matter of: Sovereign Lithium, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... COMMISSION In The Matter of: Sovereign Lithium, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading November 15, 2013. It... require a suspension of trading in the securities of Sovereign Lithium, Inc. (``Sovereign Lithium... manipulative transactions in Sovereign Lithium's common stock. Sovereign Lithium is a Delaware...

  19. Factors associated with lithium efficacy in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2014-01-01

    About one-third of lithium-treated, bipolar patients are excellent lithium responders; that is, lithium monotherapy totally prevents further episodes of bipolar disorder for ten years and more. These patients are clinically characterized by an episodic clinical course with complete remission, a bipolar family history, low psychiatric comorbidity, mania-depression episode sequences, a moderate number of episodes, and a low number of hospitalizations in the pre-lithium period. Recently, it has been found that temperamental features of hypomania (a hyperthymic temperament) and a lack of cognitive disorganization predict the best results of lithium prophylaxis. Lithium exerts a neuroprotective effect, in which increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) play an important role. The response to lithium has been connected with the genotype of the BDNF gene and serum BDNF levels. A better response to lithium is connected with the Met allele of the BDNF Val/Met polymorphism, as is a hyperthymic temperament. Excellent lithium responders have normal cognitive functions and serum BDNF levels, even after long-term duration of the illness. The preservation of cognitive functions in long-term lithium-treated patients may be connected with the stimulation of the BDNF system, with the resulting prevention of affective episodes exerting deleterious cognitive effects, and possibly also with lithium's antiviral effects. A number of candidate genes that are related to neurotransmitters, intracellular signaling, neuroprotection, circadian rhythms, and other pathogenic mechanisms of bipolar disorder were found to be associated with the lithium prophylactic response. The Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) has recently performed the first genome-wide association study on the lithium response in bipolar disorder.

  20. Review of lithium effects on brain and blood.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2009-01-01

    Clinicians have long used lithium to treat manic depression. They have also observed that lithium causes granulocytosis and lymphopenia while it enhances immunological activities of monocytes and lymphocytes. In fact, clinicians have long used lithium to treat granulocytopenia resulting from radiation and chemotherapy, to boost immunoglobulins after vaccination, and to enhance natural killer activity. Recent studies revealed a mechanism that ties together these disparate effects of lithium. Lithium acts through multiple pathways to inhibit glycogen synthetase kinase-3beta (GSK3 beta). This enzyme phosphorylates and inhibits nuclear factors that turn on cell growth and protection programs, including the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and WNT/beta-catenin. In animals, lithium upregulates neurotrophins, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 (NT3), as well as receptors to these growth factors in brain. Lithium also stimulates proliferation of stem cells, including bone marrow and neural stem cells in the subventricular zone, striatum, and forebrain. The stimulation of endogenous neural stem cells may explain why lithium increases brain cell density and volume in patients with bipolar disorders. Lithium also increases brain concentrations of the neuronal markers n-acetyl-aspartate and myoinositol. Lithium also remarkably protects neurons against glutamate, seizures, and apoptosis due to a wide variety of neurotoxins. The effective dose range for lithium is 0.6-1.0 mM in serum and >1.5 mM may be toxic. Serum lithium levels of 1.5-2.0 mM may have mild and reversible toxic effects on kidney, liver, heart, and glands. Serum levels of >2 mM may be associated with neurological symptoms, including cerebellar dysfunction. Prolonged lithium intoxication >2 mM can cause permanent brain damage. Lithium has low mutagenic and carcinogenic risk. Lithium is still the most effective therapy for depression. It "cures" a third

  1. Heterogeneous microring and Mach-Zehnder modulators based on lithium niobate and chalcogenide glasses on silicon.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ashutosh; Patil, Aniket; Chiles, Jeff; Malinowski, Marcin; Novak, Spencer; Richardson, Kathleen; Rabiei, Payam; Fathpour, Sasan

    2015-08-24

    Thin films of lithium niobate are wafer bonded onto silicon substrates and rib-loaded with a chalcogenide glass, Ge(23)Sb(7)S(70), to demonstrate strongly confined single-mode submicron waveguides, microring modulators, and Mach-Zehnder modulators in the telecom C band. The 200 μm radii microring modulators present 1.2 dB/cm waveguide propagation loss, 1.2 × 10(5) quality factor, 0.4 GHz/V tuning rate, and 13 dB extinction ratio. The 6 mm long Mach-Zehnder modulators have a half-wave voltage-length product of 3.8 V.cm and an extinction ratio of 15 dB. The demonstrated work is a key step towards enabling wafer scale dense on-chip integration of high performance lithium niobate electro-optical devices on silicon for short reach optical interconnects and higher order advanced modulation schemes. PMID:26368243

  2. Heterogeneous microring and Mach-Zehnder modulators based on lithium niobate and chalcogenide glasses on silicon.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ashutosh; Patil, Aniket; Chiles, Jeff; Malinowski, Marcin; Novak, Spencer; Richardson, Kathleen; Rabiei, Payam; Fathpour, Sasan

    2015-08-24

    Thin films of lithium niobate are wafer bonded onto silicon substrates and rib-loaded with a chalcogenide glass, Ge(23)Sb(7)S(70), to demonstrate strongly confined single-mode submicron waveguides, microring modulators, and Mach-Zehnder modulators in the telecom C band. The 200 μm radii microring modulators present 1.2 dB/cm waveguide propagation loss, 1.2 × 10(5) quality factor, 0.4 GHz/V tuning rate, and 13 dB extinction ratio. The 6 mm long Mach-Zehnder modulators have a half-wave voltage-length product of 3.8 V.cm and an extinction ratio of 15 dB. The demonstrated work is a key step towards enabling wafer scale dense on-chip integration of high performance lithium niobate electro-optical devices on silicon for short reach optical interconnects and higher order advanced modulation schemes.

  3. Lithium inclusion in indium metal-organic frameworks showing increased surface area and hydrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Mathieu; Zhang, Muwei; Feng, Dawei; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Xuan; Chen, Ying-Pin; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of counterion exchange in two anionic In-Metal-Organic Frameworks (In-MOFs) showed that partial replacement of disordered ammonium cations was achieved through the pre-synthetic addition of LiOH to the reaction mixture. This resulted in a surface area increase of over 1600% in (Li [In(1,3 − BDC){sub 2}]){sub n} and enhancement of the H{sub 2} uptake of approximately 275% at 80 000 Pa at 77 K. This method resulted in frameworks with permanent lithium content after repeated solvent exchange as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lithium counterion replacement appears to increase porosity after activation through replacement of bulkier, softer counterions and demonstrates tuning of pore size and properties in MOFs.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of the 3d 2D → nf 2F transitions in lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzada, S.; Shah, M.; Haq, S. U.; Nawaz, M.; Ahmed, M.; Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We report term energies and effective quantum numbers of the odd parity 3d 2D → nf 2F series of lithium using multi-step and multi-photon laser excitation schemes. The experiments were performed using three dye lasers simultaneously pumped by the second harmonic (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in conjunction with an atomic beam apparatus and thermionic diode ion detector. The first ionization potential of lithium has been determined as 43,487.13 ± 0.02 cm- 1 from the much extended 3d 2D → nf 2F (17 ≤ n ≤ 70) series. In addition, the oscillator strengths of the 3d 2D → nf 2F (15 ≤ n ≤ 48) transitions have been determined, showing a decreasing trend with the increase in principal quantum number n.

  5. What's the matter with lithium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollett, Kenneth

    2007-04-01

    Big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) has long provided a boundary between the possible and the impossible in particle physics and cosmology. Now that there are often stronger constraints from the laboratory and from the cosmic microwave background, BBN provides an important cross-check, a window into times long before recombination, and a set of initial conditions for the nuclear history of universe. However, some nagging issues remain for BBN, and probably none are as vexing as the Li/H ratios in low-metallicity turnoff stars of the Galactic halo. Since the early 1980's, the remarkably consistent Li/H ratios among these stars have been seen as evidence of the primordial Li/H, and the lack of star-to-star scatter has been matched by a lack of publication-to-publication scatter over time. The problem with this very consistent picture is that the measured Li/H is lower than the prediction of BBN by about a factor of 3, presenting us with a quandary: depletion of lithium after BBN by such a large factor without introducing scatter seems possible but not certain; stellar model atmospheres do not seem uncertain enough to provide a factor of 3; the uncertainties on the nuclear cross sections involved in BBN cannot accommodate a factor of 3; a few solutions with ``exotic'' early-universe physics beyond the standard model exist, but have weak motivation beyond BBN. An additional puzzle has cropped up in the last few years, as previous hints of a relatively constant ^6Li/H ratio in halo stars have developed into a substantial data set. This is not predicted at all by standard BBN. I will review these developments, the several ways one might try to explain them, and the difficulties involved in establishing these explanations without contradicting known facts. Work supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Reaction between Lithium Anode and Polysulfide Ions in a Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2016-09-01

    The reaction between polysulfides and a lithium anode in a Li-S battery was examined using HPLC. The results demonstrated that the polysulfide species with six sulfur atoms or more were reactive with regard to lithium metal. Although the reaction can be greatly inhibited by the addition of LiNO3 in the electrolyte, LiNO3 cannot form a stable protection layer on the Li anode to prevent the reaction during storage. PMID:27535337

  7. Reaction between Lithium Anode and Polysulfide Ions in a Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2016-09-01

    The reaction between polysulfides and a lithium anode in a Li-S battery was examined using HPLC. The results demonstrated that the polysulfide species with six sulfur atoms or more were reactive with regard to lithium metal. Although the reaction can be greatly inhibited by the addition of LiNO3 in the electrolyte, LiNO3 cannot form a stable protection layer on the Li anode to prevent the reaction during storage.

  8. Lithium-Ion Performance and Abuse Evaluation Using Lithium Technologies 9Ah cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Albert Daniel; Jeevarajan, Judith A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries in a pouch form offer high energy density and safety in their designs and more recently they are offering performance at higher rates. Lithium Technologies 9Ah high-power pouch cells were studied at different rates, thermal environments, under vacuum and several different conditions of abuse including overcharge, over-discharge and external short circuit. Results of this study will be presented.

  9. Lanthanum Nitrate As Electrolyte Additive To Stabilize the Surface Morphology of Lithium Anode for Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Li, Guo-Ran; Gao, Xue-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is regarded as one of the most promising candidates beyond conventional lithium ion batteries. However, the instability of the metallic lithium anode during lithium electrochemical dissolution/deposition is still a major barrier for the practical application of Li-S battery. In this work, lanthanum nitrate, as electrolyte additive, is introduced into Li-S battery to stabilize the surface of lithium anode. By introducing lanthanum nitrate into electrolyte, a composite passivation film of lanthanum/lithium sulfides can be formed on metallic lithium anode, which is beneficial to decrease the reducibility of metallic lithium and slow down the electrochemical dissolution/deposition reaction on lithium anode for stabilizing the surface morphology of metallic Li anode in lithium-sulfur battery. Meanwhile, the cycle stability of the fabricated Li-S cell is improved by introducing lanthanum nitrate into electrolyte. Apparently, lanthanum nitrate is an effective additive for the protection of lithium anode and the cycling stability of Li-S battery. PMID:26981849

  10. Lanthanum Nitrate As Electrolyte Additive To Stabilize the Surface Morphology of Lithium Anode for Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Li, Guo-Ran; Gao, Xue-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is regarded as one of the most promising candidates beyond conventional lithium ion batteries. However, the instability of the metallic lithium anode during lithium electrochemical dissolution/deposition is still a major barrier for the practical application of Li-S battery. In this work, lanthanum nitrate, as electrolyte additive, is introduced into Li-S battery to stabilize the surface of lithium anode. By introducing lanthanum nitrate into electrolyte, a composite passivation film of lanthanum/lithium sulfides can be formed on metallic lithium anode, which is beneficial to decrease the reducibility of metallic lithium and slow down the electrochemical dissolution/deposition reaction on lithium anode for stabilizing the surface morphology of metallic Li anode in lithium-sulfur battery. Meanwhile, the cycle stability of the fabricated Li-S cell is improved by introducing lanthanum nitrate into electrolyte. Apparently, lanthanum nitrate is an effective additive for the protection of lithium anode and the cycling stability of Li-S battery.

  11. Countering the Segregation of Transition-Metal Ions in LiMn1/3 Co1/3 Ni1/3 O2 Cathode for Ultralong Life and High-Energy Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dong; Fang, Shaohua; Tamiya, Yu; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    High-voltage layered lithium transition-metal oxides are very promising cathodes for high-energy Li-ion batteries. However, these materials often suffer from a fast degradation of cycling stability due to structural evolutions. It seriously impedes the large-scale application of layered lithium transition-metal oxides. In this work, an ultralong life LiMn1/3 Co1/3 Ni1/3 O2 microspherical cathode is prepared by constructing an Mn-rich surface. Its capacity retention ratio at 700 mA g(-1) is as large as 92.9% after 600 cycles. The energy dispersive X-ray maps of electrodes after numerous cycles demonstrate that the ultralong life of the as-prepared cathode is attributed to the mitigation of TM-ions segregation. Additionally, it is discovered that layered lithium transition-metal oxide cathodes with an Mn-rich surface can mitigate the segregation of TM ions and the corrosion of active materials. This study provides a new strategy to counter the segregation of TM ions in layered lithium transition-metal oxides and will help to the design and development of high-energy cathodes with ultralong life. PMID:27389965

  12. Hybrid Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with a Solid Electrolyte Membrane and Lithium Polysulfide Catholyte.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xingwen; Bi, Zhonghe; Zhao, Feng; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-08-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are receiving great attention as the most promising next-generation power source with significantly high charge-storage capacity. However, the implementation of Li-S batteries is hampered by a critical challenge because of the soluble nature of the intermediate polysulfide species in the liquid electrolyte. The use of traditional porous separators unavoidably allows the migration of the dissolved polysulfide species from the cathode to the lithium-metal anode and results in continuous loss of capacity. In this study, a LiSICON (lithium super ionic conductor) solid membrane is used as a cation-selective electrolyte for lithium-polysulfide (Li-PS) batteries to suppress the polysulfide diffusion. Ionic conductivity issue at the lithium metal/solid electrolyte interface is successfully addressed by insertion of a "soft", liquid-electrolyte integrated polypropylene interlayer. The solid LiSICON lithium-ion conductor maintains stable ionic conductivity during the electrochemical cycling of the cells. The Li-PS battery system with a hybrid solid/liquid electrolyte exhibits significantly enhanced cyclability relative to the cells with the traditional liquid-electrolyte integrated porous separator. PMID:26161547

  13. A review of lithium and non-lithium based solid state batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Gon; Son, Byungrak; Mukherjee, Santanu; Schuppert, Nicholas; Bates, Alex; Kwon, Osung; Choi, Moon Jong; Chung, Hyun Yeol; Park, Sam

    2015-05-01

    Conventional lithium-ion liquid-electrolyte batteries are widely used in portable electronic equipment such as laptop computers, cell phones, and electric vehicles; however, they have several drawbacks, including expensive sealing agents and inherent hazards of fire and leakages. All solid state batteries utilize solid state electrolytes to overcome the safety issues of liquid electrolytes. Drawbacks for all-solid state lithium-ion batteries include high resistance at ambient temperatures and design intricacies. This paper is a comprehensive review of all aspects of solid state batteries: their design, the materials used, and a detailed literature review of various important advances made in research. The paper exhaustively studies lithium based solid state batteries, as they are the most prevalent, but also considers non-lithium based systems. Non-lithium based solid state batteries are attaining widespread commercial applications, as are also lithium based polymeric solid state electrolytes. Tabular representations and schematic diagrams are provided to underscore the unique characteristics of solid state batteries and their capacity to occupy a niche in the alternative energy sector.

  14. Phase II screening trial of lithium carbonate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, D.H.; Forshew, D.A.; Katz, J.S.; Barohn, R.J.; Valan, M.; Bromberg, M.B.; Goslin, K.L.; Graves, M.C.; McCluskey, L.F.; McVey, A.L.; Mozaffar, T.; Florence, J.M.; Pestronk, A.; Ross, M.; Simpson, E.P.; Appel, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To use a historical placebo control design to determine whether lithium carbonate slows progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: A phase II trial was conducted at 10 sites in the Western ALS Study Group using similar dosages (300–450 mg/day), target blood levels (0.3–0.8 mEq/L), outcome measures, and trial duration (13 months) as the positive trial. However, taking riluzole was not a requirement for study entry. Placebo outcomes in patients matched for baseline features from a large database of recent clinical trials, showing stable rates of decline over the past 9 years, were used as historical controls. Results: The mean rate of decline of the ALS Functional Rating Scale–Revised was greater in 107 patients taking lithium carbonate (−1.20/month, 95% confidence interval [CI] −1.41 to −0.98) than that in 249 control patients (−1.01/month, 95% CI −1.11 to −0.92, p = 0.04). There were no differences in secondary outcome measures (forced vital capacity, time to failure, and quality of life), but there were more adverse events in the treated group. Conclusions: The lack of therapeutic benefit and safety concerns, taken together with similar results from 2 other recent trials, weighs against the use of lithium carbonate in patients with ALS. The absence of drift over time and the availability of a large database of patients for selecting a matched historical control group suggest that use of historical controls may result in more efficient phase II trials for screening putative ALS therapeutic agents. Classification of evidence: This study provided Class IV evidence that lithium carbonate does not slow the rate of decline of function in patients with ALS over 13 months. Neurology® 2011;77:973–979 PMID:21813790

  15. Lithium Ion Secondary Cell Prepared by a Printing Procedure, and Its Application to All-Solid-State Inorganic Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Ryohei

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a straightforward printing method for preparation of a lithium secondary cell. LiCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 and Li4Ti5O12 viscous printable pastes were used for the cathode and anode, respectively. Electrochemical measurement was used to characterize the capacitance of each cell, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy and particle size measurements were used to characterize particle size and morphology. These film electrodes functioned stably both in a standard liquid electrolyte and in an Li2SiO3 solid electrolyte, although the capacitance of the all-solid-state cell was significantly lower than that of the cell containing liquid electrolyte. When liquid electrolyte was used, the capacity decreased by 36% after 50 cycles. However, the capacity of 0.2 mA h/g remained almost the same even after 50 charge-discharge cycles, demonstrating the stability and strength of the all-solid-state lithium ion cell. It was also found that the cell resistance mostly arose from the electrode/electrolyte interface and not from the bulk electrolyte. Addition of a sol-gel to the solid electrolyte printable paste improved cell performance.

  16. Stabilizing the surface of lithium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughey, J. T.; Liu, Gao; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2014-05-01

    Lithium metal is an ideal anode for the next generation of high capacity rechargeable batteries, including Li-air, Li-S, and other Li-based batteries using intercalation compounds. To enable the broad applications for lithium anodes, more fundamental studies need to be conducted to simultaneously address the two barriers discussed above. One of the key breakthroughs in this field may come from the development of new electrolytes (and additives) which can form a stable SEI layer with enough mechanical strength and flexibility. The ideal electrolyte may consist of only two components; one component inhibits dendrite growth, while another component forms a stable SEI layer to improve Coulombic efficiency. In this review, the status of three approaches at manipulating and controlling the lithium metal – electrolyte interface were discussed. While previous studies concentrated on coatings with minimal surface connectivity, the approaches discussed, namely a coating that forms and dissipates into the electrolyte based on charge density, a coating bonded to the termination layer of lithium, and a conformal carbonate coating formed at the interface, all highlight new research directions. Although there are still many obstacles to be overcome, we are optimistic that Li metal can be used as an anode in rechargeable batteries in the foreseeable future. This will enable wide

  17. Mineral resource of the month: lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithium, the lightest metallic element, is silvery, white and soft, and highly reactive. It is used most frequently in chemical compounds or traded as mineral concentrates. Its thermal properties make it an ideal component in thermal shock-resistant ceramics, and its electrochemical properties make it an ideal material for several types of batteries.

  18. EFFECT OF LITHIUM ON SERUM ELECTROLYTES

    PubMed Central

    Geetha, P.R.; Channabasavanna, S.M.; Rama Rao, B.S. Sridhara

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY 26 patients diagnosed as manic depressive psychosis were treated with lithium for three months and serum levels of calcium, magnesium, phosphates and proteins were estimated repeatedly. There were no significant changes in the levels of these electrolytes and proteins during the three months of study period. PMID:21847255

  19. Toxic effect of lithium in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, P.K.; Smithberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of lithium ion on glucose oxidation in the cerebrum and cerebellum of mice was measured in vitro by the conversion of isotopic glucose into /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg wet weight. Glucose utilization is unaffected by lowest lithium dosage but is inhibited by high lithium concentrations (197-295 mM). Chronic administration of lithium to adult mice decreased the DNA content of the cerebrum and cerebellum at concentrations of 80 and 108 mM. The DNA content of selected postnatal stages of cerebrum and cerebellum was measured starting on Day 1 or 2. This served as another parameter to evaluate glucose oxidation studies at these ages. On the basis of wet weight, both brain parts of neonates of ages 1 and 10 days were approximately one-half that of the adult counterparts. On the basis of DNA content, the cerebrum enhanced its glucose utilization twofold from Day 1 to Day 10 and tripled its utilization from Day 10 to Day 20. The glucose utilization by cerebrum at Day 20 is similar to adult values. In contrast, glucose oxidation in the cerebellum remained relatively constant throughout the postnatal growth. The relative susceptibility of the two brain parts is discussed.

  20. Lithium depletion and the star age connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Marília Gabriela C. C.

    2015-12-01

    It is known that lithium is destroyed in the inner layers of a star via proton capture ( 7Li(p, α)α) at temperatures near to 2.5 ∗ 106 K. Due to the fact that Li burning happens when the element is transported to the innermost and hotter regions through convective motions of the star, Li abundance studies offers an excellent opportunity to understand the extent of the mixing processes within and below the stellar convective zone. Thus, for a better understanding of the inner stars regions, this study aims to observe correlations between lithium abundances, stellar age, masses and planets occurrence for various solar twins aged between 0.7 and 8.8 Gyr.The sample consists of 21 solar twins measured in the HARPS spectrograph with spectral resolution R≈115.000 and signal to noise ratio from 400 to 2400. The lithium abundance were obtained by spectral synthesis of the line 6707.75 Å with the aid of MOOG code.The results indicate a strong correlation between age and Li abundances in the stars of this sample and a non-connection between lithium abundances and the presence of planets.

  1. Electrostatic spray deposition based lithium ion capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Richa; Chen, Chunhui; Wang, Chunlei

    2016-05-01

    Conventional Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) are well suited as power devices that can provide large bursts of energy in short time periods. However, their relatively inferior energy densities as compared to their secondary battery counterparts limit their application in devices that require simultaneous supply of both high energy and high power. In the wake of addressing this shortcoming of EDLCs, the concept of hybridization of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and EDLCs has attracted significant scientific interest in recent years. Such a device, generally referred to as the "lithium-ion capacitor" typically utilizes a lithium intercalating electrode along with a fast charging capacitor electrode. Herein we have constructed a lithium hybrid electrochemical capacitor comprising a Li4Ti5O12-TiO2 (LTO-TiO2) anode and a reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotube (rGO-CNT) composite cathode using electrostatic spray deposition (ESD). The electrodes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements were carried out to evaluate the electrochemical performance of the individual electrodes and the full hybrid cells.

  2. Newly synthesized lithium in the interstellar medium

    PubMed

    Knauth; Federman; Lambert; Crane

    2000-06-01

    Astronomical observations of elemental and isotopic abundances provide the means to determine the source of elements and to reveal their evolutionary pathways since the formation of the Galaxy some 15 billion years ago. The abundance of lithium is particularly interesting because, although some of it is thought to be primordial, most results from spallation reactions (in which Galactic cosmic rays break apart larger nuclei in the interstellar medium). Spallation reactions are crucial for the production of other light elements, such as beryllium and boron, so observations of lithium isotopic abundances can be used to test model predictions for light-element synthesis in general. Here we report observations of 7Li and 6Li abundances in several interstellar clouds lying in the direction of the star o Persei. We find the abundance ratio 7Li/6Li to be about 2, which is significantly lower than the average Solar System value of 12.3 (refs 6, 7). An abundance ratio of 2 is clear evidence that the observed lithium must have resulted entirely from spallation, confirming a basic tenet of light-element synthesis. The total lithium abundance, however, is not enhanced as expected.

  3. Surface analysis of lithium coatings in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberlake, J.; Kugel, H. W.; Skinner, C. H.; Yao, N.

    2007-11-01

    Lithium coatings have been applied to NSTX plasma facing surfaces as part of a long term program to explore the potential for lithium to improve plasma and PFC performance. A LIThium EvaporatoR (LITER) directed a collimated stream of lithium vapor from an upper vacuum vessel port toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor either before, or continuously between and during, discharges. Silicon witness coupons and other samples were retrieved from the vacuum vessel after the campaign and the surface morphology and elemental compostion examined with a XL30 FEG-SEM microscope equipped with an energy dispersed X-rays system sensitive to elements with atomic number greater than 4. The surfaces showed a complex morphology with nucleation sites apparent. Carbon and oxygen were the dominant impurities. Trace metals (Fe and Cr) were detected in the coating on the Si coupon, but not in a flake of bulk Li. We will present results of the surface analysis of samples exposed to Li evaporation in NSTX.

  4. Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz,John; Newman, John

    2005-09-29

    We have investigated possible anticipated advantages of ionic-liquid electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries. Thermal stabilities and phase behavior were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazoliumTFSI systems, pyrrolidiniumTFSI, BMIMPF{sub 6}, BMIMBF{sub 4}, and BMIMTf. Thermal stabilities were measured for neat ionic liquids and for BMIMBF{sub 4}-LiBF{sub 4}, BMIMTf-LiTf, BMIMTFSI-LiTFSI mixtures. Conductivities have been measured for various ionic-liquid lithium-salt systems. We show the development of interfacial impedance in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell and we report results from cycling experiments for a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + 1 mol/kg LIBF{sub 4}|C cell. The interfacial resistance increases with time and the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode. As expected, imidazolium-based ionic liquids react with lithium electrodes. We seek new ionic liquids that have better chemical stabilities.

  5. Hazardous behavior of lithium batteries. Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marincic, N.

    1983-01-01

    Case histories were described of hazardous behavior for three different cell sizes ranging in nominal capacity from 300 mAh to 12,000 Ah. Design characteristics and other facts believed to have been responsible for the cell explosions, are presented. Obvious facts are discussed as causes for hazardous behavior of lithium batteries in general and oxyhalide batteries in particular.

  6. Design considerations for rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Huang, C.-K.; Davies, E.; Perrone, D.; Surampudi, S.; Halpert, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of a discussion of design considerations for rechargable lithium batteries. The objective is to determine the influence of cell design parameters on the performance of Li-TiS2 cells. Topics covered include cell baseline design and testing, cell design and testing, cell design parameters studies, and cell cycling performance.

  7. Determination of lithium in rocks: Fluorometric method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, C.E.; Fletcher, M.H.; Parks, J.

    1951-01-01

    The gravimetric method in general use for the determination of lithium is tedious, and the final weighed product often contains other alkali metals. A fluorometric method was developed to shorten the time required for the analysis and to assure that the final determination is for lithium alone. This procedure is based on the complex formed between lithium and 8-hydroxyquinoline. The fluorescence is developed in a slightly alkaline solution of 95% alcohol and measurement is made on a photoelectric fluorometer. Separation from the ore is carried out by the wet method or by the distillation procedure. Sodium and potassium are removed by alcohol and ether, but complete separation is not necessary. Comparison of analyzed samples shows excellent agreement with spectrographic and gravimetric methods. The fluorometric method is more rapid than the gravimetric and produces more conclusive results. Another useful application is in the preparation of standard lithium solutions from reagent quality salts when a known standard is available. In this case no separations are necessary.

  8. High-Cycle-Life Lithium Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Carter, B.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R.

    1985-01-01

    Lithium-anode electrochemical cell offers increased number of charge/ discharge cycles. Cell uses components selected for compatibility with electrolyte solvent: These materials are wettable and chemically stable. Low vapor pressure and high electrochemical stability of solvent improve cell packaging, handling, and safety. Cell operates at modest temperatures - less than 100 degrees C - and is well suited to automotive, communications, and other applications.

  9. Performance and Safety of Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Smart, M. C.; Whitcanack, L.; Surampudi, S.; Marsh, R.

    2001-01-01

    This report evaluates the performance and safety of Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) cells when used in batteries. Issues discussed include the cycle life, energy efficiency, tolerance to higher charge voltage, tolerance to extended tapered charge voltage, charge on cycling, specific energy, low temperature discharge, low temperature charge, various charge characteristics, storage characteristics, and more of Li-Ion cells.

  10. Electrothermal Analysis of Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Vlahinos, A.; Bharathan, D.; Duong, T.

    2006-03-01

    This report presents the electrothermal analysis and testing of lithium ion battery performance. The objectives of this report are to: (1) develop an electrothermal process/model for predicting thermal performance of real battery cells and modules; and (2) use the electrothermal model to evaluate various designs to improve battery thermal performance.

  11. Overview of ENEA's Projects on lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandrini, F.; Conte, M.; Passerini, S.; Prosini, P. P.

    The increasing need of high performance batteries in various small-scale and large-scale applications (portable electronics, notebooks, palmtops, cellular phones, electric vehicles, UPS, load levelling) in Italy is motivating the R&D efforts of various public and private organizations. Research of lithium batteries in Italy goes back to the beginning of the technological development of primary and secondary lithium systems with national know-how spread in various academic and public institutions with a few private stakeholders. In the field of lithium polymer batteries, ENEA has been dedicating significant efforts in almost two decades to promote and carry out basic R&D and pre-industrial development projects. In recent years, three major national projects have been performed and coordinated by ENEA in co-operation with some universities, governmental research organizations and industry. In these projects novel polymer electrolytes with ceramic additives, low cost manganese oxide-based composite cathodes, environmentally friendly process for polymer electrolyte, fabrication processes of components and cells have been investigated and developed in order to fulfill long-term needs of cost-effective and highly performant lithium polymer batteries.

  12. Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bates, J. B.; Gruzalski, G. R.; Dudney, N. J.; Luck, C. F.; Yu, X.

    1993-11-01

    Rechargeable thin films batteries with lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have been fabricated and characterized. The cathodes include TiS{sub 2}, the {omega} phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and the cubic spinel Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V, respectively. The development of these robust cells, which can be cycled thousands of times, was possible because of the stability of the amorphous lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride. This material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46} and a conductivity at 25 C of 2 {mu}S/cm. Thin film cells have been cycled at 100% depth of discharge using current densities of 2 to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. The polarization resistance of the cells is due to the slow insertion rate of Li{sup +} ions into the cathode. Chemical diffusion coefficients for Li{sup +} ions in the three types of cathodes have been estimated from the analysis of ac impedance measurements.

  13. Stabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2000-08-07

    The stabilization theory of free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks by liquid lithium streams driven by magnetic propulsion is formulated. While the conventional, wall-locked, resistive wall mode can be well suppressed by the flow, a new, stream-locked mode determines the limits of the flow stabilization.

  14. Polymer electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Meyer, W H

    1998-04-01

    The motivation for lithium battery development and a discussion of ion conducting polymers as separators begin this review, which includes a short history of polymer electrolyte research, a summary of the major parameters that determine lithium ion transport in polymer matrices, and consequences for solid polymer electrolyte development. Two major strategies for the application of ion conducting polymers as separators in lithium batteries are identified: One is the development of highly conductive materials via the crosslinking of mobile chains to form networks, which are then swollen by lithium salt solutions ("gel electrolytes"). The other is the construction of solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) with supramolecular architectures, which intrinsically give rise to much enhanced mechanical strength. These materials as yet exhibit relatively common conductivity levels but may be applied as very thin films. Molecular composites based on poly(p-phenylene)- (PPP)-reinforced SPEs are a striking example of this direction. Neither strategy has as yet led to a "breakthrough" with respect to technical application, at least not for electrically powered vehicles. Before being used as separators, the gel electrolytes must be strengthened, while the molecularly reinforced solid polymer electrolytes must demonstrate improved conductivity.

  15. Metallic function of lithium phosphate glass electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kochetova, T.I.; Bobrov, V.S.

    1995-05-20

    Specificity of metallic functions of lithium phosphate glasses toward univalent cations over a wide concentration range and their correlation with cation size have been studied. In the present work, the authors extended the spectrum of phosphate glass compositions: a study has been made how additions of gallium, titanium, and vanadium oxides influence electrode properties.

  16. Improvements in safety testing of lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinebring, R. C.; Krehl, P.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic approach was developed for evaluating the basic safety parameters of high power lithium soluble cathode cells. This approach consists of performing a series of tests on each cell model during the design, prototype and production phases. Abusive testing is performed in a facility where maximum protection is given to test personnel.

  17. Interconnected hollow carbon nanospheres for stable lithium metal anodes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guangyuan; Lee, Seok Woo; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Yan, Kai; Yao, Hongbin; Wang, Haotian; Li, Weiyang; Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi

    2014-08-01

    For future applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid storage, batteries with higher energy storage density than existing lithium ion batteries need to be developed. Recent efforts in this direction have focused on high-capacity electrode materials such as lithium metal, silicon and tin as anodes, and sulphur and oxygen as cathodes. Lithium metal would be the optimal choice as an anode material, because it has the highest specific capacity (3,860 mAh g(-1)) and the lowest anode potential of all. However, the lithium anode forms dendritic and mossy metal deposits, leading to serious safety concerns and low Coulombic efficiency during charge/discharge cycles. Although advanced characterization techniques have helped shed light on the lithium growth process, effective strategies to improve lithium metal anode cycling remain elusive. Here, we show that coating the lithium metal anode with a monolayer of interconnected amorphous hollow carbon nanospheres helps isolate the lithium metal depositions and facilitates the formation of a stable solid electrolyte interphase. We show that lithium dendrites do not form up to a practical current density of 1 mA cm(-2). The Coulombic efficiency improves to ∼ 99% for more than 150 cycles. This is significantly better than the bare unmodified samples, which usually show rapid Coulombic efficiency decay in fewer than 100 cycles. Our results indicate that nanoscale interfacial engineering could be a promising strategy to tackle the intrinsic problems of lithium metal anodes.

  18. Lithium-Induced Minimal Change Disease and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Parul; Wong, Natalie; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lithium carbonate is a psychiatric medication commonly used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been implicated in inducing nephrogenic diabetes inspidus, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and acute tubular necrosis. We describe a case of lithium-induced minimal change disease (MCD) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Case Report: A 32-year-old female with a medical history of bipolar disorder treated with chronic lithium therapy presented with anasarca, fatigue, and tremors. Work-up revealed supra-therapeutic lithium levels, hypoalbuminemia, and significant proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively with fluids and discontinuation of lithium therapy. Subsequently, she developed significant AKI and persistent proteinuria. She underwent a renal biopsy that demonstrated effacement of podocyte foot processes consistent with lithium-induced MCD. This was treated with corticosteroids, which decreased the proteinuria and resolved all the patient's symptoms. Conclusion: Lithium-induced MCD is a rare disease that affects patients of all ages. It is often associated with therapeutic lithium and is typically resolved with discontinuation of lithium. In some cases, concurrent AKI may result due to vascular obstruction from hyperalbuminuria and associated renal interstitial edema. Corticosteroids may be needed to reduce the proteinuria and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. As such, patients on lithium therapy may benefit from monitoring of glomerular function via urinalysis to prevent the onset of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26258081

  19. Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-14

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  20. A chemically stable PVD multilayer encapsulation for lithium microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. F.; Sousa, R.; Cunha, D. J.; Vieira, E. M. F.; Silva, M. M.; Dupont, L.; Goncalves, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    A multilayer physical vapour deposition (PVD) thin-film encapsulation method for lithium microbatteries is presented. Lithium microbatteries with a lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) cathode, a lithium phosphorous oxynitride (LiPON) electrolyte and a metallic lithium anode are under development, using PVD deposition techniques. Metallic lithium film is still the most common anode on this battery technology; however, it presents a huge challenge in terms of material encapsulation (lithium reacts with almost any materials deposited on top and almost instantly begins oxidizing in contact with atmosphere). To prove the encapsulation concept and perform all the experiments, lithium films were deposited by thermal evaporation technique on top of a glass substrate, with previously patterned Al/Ti contacts. Three distinct materials, in a multilayer combination, were tested to prevent lithium from reacting with protection materials and atmosphere. These multilayer films were deposited by RF sputtering and were composed of lithium phosphorous oxide (LiPO), LiPON and silicon nitride (Si3N4). To complete the long-term encapsulation after breaking the vacuum, an epoxy was applied on top of the PVD multilayer. In order to evaluate oxidation state of lithium films, the lithium resistance was measured in a four probe setup (cancelling wires/contact resistances) and resistivity calculated, considering physical dimensions. A lithium resistivity of 0.16 Ω μm was maintained for more than a week. This PVD multilayer exonerates the use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD), glove-box chambers and sample manipulation between them, significantly reducing the fabrication cost, since battery and its encapsulation are fabricated in the same PVD chamber.