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Sample records for lithium 13

  1. Density, vapor pressure, solubility, and viscosity for water + lithium bromide + lithium nitrate + 1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.; Kim, J.S.; Lee, H.; Yu, S.I.

    1997-01-01

    Four physical properties (solubility, vapor pressure, density, and viscosity) of water + lithium bromide + lithium nitrate + 1,3-propanediol (LiBr/LiNO{sub 3} mole ratio = 4, (LiBr + LiNO{sub 3})/HO(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}OH mass ratio = 3.5) were measured. The system, a possible working fluid for an absorption heat pump, mainly consists of absorbent (LiBr + LiNO{sub 3} + HO(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}OH) and refrigerant (H{sub 2}O). Solubilities were measured by the visual polythermal method in the temperature range (285.55 to 346.65) K and in the absorbent concentration range (68.0 to 75.0) mass %. Vapor pressures were measured by the boiling point method in the temperature range (325.35 to 395.15) K and in the absorbent concentration range (46.0 to 69.6) mass %. Densities and viscosities were measured by a set of hydrometers and viscometers, respectively, in the temperature range (283.15 to 343.15) K and in the absorbent concentration range (24.3 to 70.3) mass %. The measured values were correlated.

  2. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1 kt (1,100 st) of contained lithium, a 23-percent decrease from 2009. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium. It remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2010, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 21 kt (22,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 12-percent increase from 2009.

  3. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1.2 kt (1,300 st) of contained lithium, a 40-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium, and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2009, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 18.7 kt (20,600 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds.

  4. Heat capacities of the water + lithium bromide + ethanolamine and water + lithium bromide + 1,3-propanediol systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Park, Y.; Lee, H.; Yu, S.I.

    1997-03-01

    Heat capacities of the water + lithium bromide + ethanolamine (LiBr/H{sub 2}N(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}OH mass ratio = 3.5) and water + lithium bromide + 1,3-propanediol (LiBr/HO(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}OH mass ratio = 3.5) systems were measured by using an isoperibol solution calorimeter at four temperatures (283.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 333.15 K) and absorbent (LiBr + H{sub 2}N(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}OH and LiBr + HO(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}OH) concentration ranges of (29.2 to 70.7)% and (30.7 to 68.3)%, respectively. The measured values were fitted with a simple equation by a least-squares method and the average absolute deviations between experimental and calculated values were 0.21% for the water + lithium bromide + ethanolamine system and 0.15% for the water + lithium bromide + 1,3-propanediol system, respectively.

  5. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 25 kt (25,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 10-percent increase from 2010. U.S. consumption was estimated to have been about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, a 100-percent increase from 2010. The United States was estimated to be the fourth-ranked consumer of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  6. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, lithium consumption in the United States was at 2.5 kt of contained lithium, nearly 32% more than the estimate for 2004. World consumption was 14.1 kt of lithium contained in minerals and compounds in 2003. Exports from the US increased slightly compared with 2004. Due to strong demand for lithium compounds in 2005, both lithium carbonate plants in Chile were operating at or near capacity.

  7. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.

    1998-01-01

    The lithium industry can be divided into two sectors: ore concentrate producers and chemical producers. Ore concentrate producers mine lithium minerals. They beneficiate the ores to produce material for use in ceramics and glass manufacturing.

  9. A study of the incorporation reaction of lithium into V6O13 in a rechargeable lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dequan; Liao, Zhenjiang; Feng, Xikang; Liu, Dangjun

    1989-05-01

    Practical C- and AA-size ambient temperature, rechargeable Li/V6O13 cells have been constructed using pure V6O13, prepared in the laboratory, as cathode active material. X-ray diffraction pattern d values of V6O13 prepared in this study are the same as those given by JCPDS, and cathodes of this material have performed satisfactorily. Cathodic discharge products of test cells have been analyzed by XRD and ESR. New expanded diffraction lines have been discovered in XRD patterns. From XRD and ESR results, it is considered that the incorporation of lithium into V6O13 is the main reduction reaction in the V6O13 cathodic process.

  10. Vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mun, S.Y.; Lee, H.

    1999-12-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems were measured at 60, 160, 300, and 760 mmHg at temperatures ranging from 315 to 488 K. The apparatus used in this work is a modified still especially designed for the measurement of low-pressure VLE, in which both liquid and vapor are continuously recirculated. For the analysis of salt-containing solutions, a method incorporating refractometry and gravimetry was used. From the experimental measurements, the effect of lithium bromide on the VLE behavior of water + 1,3-propanediol was investigated. The experimental data of the salt-free system were successfully correlated using the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC models. In addition, the extended UNIQUAC model of Sander et al. was applied to the VLE calculation of salt-containing mixtures.

  11. Synthesis of high performance LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 from lithium ion battery recovery stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Qina; Gratz, Eric; He, Meinan; Lu, Wenquan; Apelian, Diran; Wang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    Spent lithium ion batteries that contain valuable metal elements such as Co, Ni, Mn, Cu are being landfilled in many countries and raising resources depletion and human toxicity potentials. Low cost and high efficiency recovery process is highly desired. In this work we confirmed that high performance Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3(OH)2 precursor and LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cathode material can be synthesized from leaching solution of a lithium ion battery recovery stream. The precursor was synthesized from a typical co-precipitation process with carefully controlling the reaction parameters. Electrochemical properties including rate capacity and cycle life were tested to evaluate the final product. The results show that the cathode material synthesized from spent lithium ion battery recovery stream is performing a discharge capacity of 158 mAh/g at first cycle of 0.1C and 139 mAh/g at first cycle of 0.5C cycle life test. After 100 and 200 cycles, still over 80% and 65% of capacity is remained, respectively. The materials are also evaluated independently at Argonne National Laboratory.

  12. Lithium Diffusion & Magnetism in Battery Cathode Material LixNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Månsson, M.; Nozaki, H.; Wikberg, J. M.; Prša, K.; Sassa, Y.; Dahbi, M.; Kamazawa, K.; Sedlak, K.; Watanabe, I.; Sugiyama, J.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied low-temperature magnetic properties as well as high-temperature lithium ion diffusion in the battery cathode materials LixNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 by the use of muon spin rotation/relaxation. Our data reveal that the samples enter into a 2D spin-glass state below TSG ≈ 12 K. We further show that lithium diffusion channels become active for T >= Tdiff ~ 125 K where the Li-ion hopping-rate [v(T)] starts to increase exponentially. Further, v(T) is found to fit very well to an Arrhenius type equation and the activation energy for the diffusion process is extracted as Ea ≈ 100 meV.

  13. Determination of lithium and transition metals in Li1 Ni1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 (NCM) cathode material for lithium-ion batteries by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Vortmann-Westhoven, Britta; Lürenbaum, Constantin; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present a novel electrophoretic method that was developed for the determination of lithium and transition metals in LiNi1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 cathode material after microwave digestion. The cations in the digested LiNi1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 material were separated by CE and the element content was determined by UV/Vis detection. To characterize the precision of the measurements, the RSDs and concentrations were calculated and compared to those obtained with ICP-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Furthermore, a certified reference material (BCR 176R-fly ash) was investigated for all techniques. For active material components, the LOD and LOQ were determined. The LODs and LOQs for the metals determined by CE were as follows: lithium (LOD/LOQ): 17.41/62.70 μg/L, cobalt (LOD/LOQ): 348.4/1283 μg/L, manganese (LOD/LOQ): 540.2/2095 μg/L, and nickel (LOD/LOQ): 838.0/2982 μg/L. Recovery rates for lithium were in the range of 95-103%. It could be proven that with the new technique, the results for the determination of the lithium content of active material were comparable with those obtained by ICP-OES and ion chromatography. Furthermore, the recovery rates of the transition metals were determined to be between 96 and 110% by CE and ICP-OES.

  14. Probing the influence of anomeric effects on the lithium ion affinity in 1,3-diaza systems: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Kesharwani, Manoj K; Thiel, Walter; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2010-10-07

    Lithium ion affinities of methanediamine (MDA), N,N,N',N'-tetramethylmethanediamine (TMMDA), 1,3-diazacyclohexane (DAC), trans-3,5-diazabicyclo[4.4.0]decane (trans-3,5-DBD), trans-1,3-diazabicyclo[4.4.0]decane (trans-1,3-DBD), cis-1,3-diazabicyclo[4.4.0]decane (cis-1,3-DBD), 1,5-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (DBN), trans-decahydro-8a,9a-diazaanthracene (trans-DDA), cis-decahydro-8a,9a-diazaanthracene (cis-DDA), 1,3-diazetidine (DAT), 1,3-imidazolidine (IMD), and 1,3-diazepane (DAP) have been studied by using density functional theory (DFT) and correlated ab initio methods. Possible conformers of these compounds were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31+G* level, and relative energies were evaluated at the MP2/6-311+G**//B3LYP/6-31+G* level. The experimental lithium ion affinities for reference molecules (i.e., ammonia and trimethylamine) are well-reproduced at these levels of theory. NBO analysis shows the influence of anomeric effects (n(N) → σ*(C-N) hyperconjugative interactions) on the conformational stability of the title compounds; however, the electrostatic and steric contributions included in the NBO Lewis term also affect the stabilities in some cases. The influence of anomeric effect is apparent in cis-DDA, where the nitrogen involved in n(N) → σ*(C-N) hyperconjugative interaction (cis-DDA-Li2) has a lithium ion affinity 1.7 kcal/mol lower than the nitrogen not involved in n(N) → σ*(C-N) hyperconjugative interaction (cis-DDA-Li1). In general, the computed lithium ion affinities were found to be conformationally dependent. The NBO results showed that the lithium ion affinities are also governed by the interplay of n(N) → σ*(C-N) hyperconjugative interactions and the steric strain caused upon lithiation. Further, the ring size also influences the lithium ion affinities in the 1,3-diaza monocyclic systems. In some complexes multiple coordination of the lithium ion is possible by inversion of one of the nitrogen atoms.

  15. 1-3 connectivity composite material made from lithium niobate and cement for ultrasonic condition monitoring at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, G; Cochran, A; Kirk, K J; McNab, A

    2002-05-01

    We have designed, manufactured and tested a piezoelectric composite material to operate at temperatures above 400 degrees C. The material is a 1-3 connectivity composite with pillars of Z-cut lithium niobate in a matrix of alumina cement. The composite material produced shorter pulses than a monolithic plate of lithium niobate and remained intact upon cooling. Results are presented from room temperature and high temperature testing. This material could be bonded permanently to a test object, making it possible to carry out condition monitoring over an extended period. A new excitation method was also developed to enable remote switching between array elements.

  16. Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties Characterization of SnO2-coated LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 Cathode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis and electrochemical properties characterization of SnO2 -coated LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode material for lithium ion batteries Ping Yang...China Key words: Li-ion battery; cathode materials; LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2; heterogeneous nucleation; SnO2 -coated; electrochemical performance...Abstract LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials have been coated with SnO2 (3% wt) by heterogeneous nucleation process to improve its electrochemical

  17. The impact of calendar aging on the thermal stability of a LiMn2O4-Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2/graphite lithium-ion cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, Patrick; Stiaszny, Barbara; Ziegler, Jörg C.; Baba, Nilüfer; Lagaly, Paul; Wiemhöfer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-12-01

    Aging of lithium-ion cells is an inevitable phenomenon limiting the lifetime. Undesirable side reactions during cycle or calendar aging may affect the performance of all components of the lithium-ion cell. This results in a decreased capacity and an increase in the overall cell impedance. Based on electrochemical and physical characterization methods, the aging behavior during calendar aging of a 18650-cell, containing a blend of LiMn2O4 and Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2 (NMC) as cathode material and graphite as anode material was systematically investigated. To understand how the safety behavior of a lithium-ion cell changes with aging, accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were applied. With these methods the thermal stability behavior of the complete lithium-ion cell and its respective cathode and anode material were investigated. The focus of this work was it to generate first cause-effect relations between the aging under one exemplary aging condition and the thermal stability of a lithium-ion battery both on cell and material level.

  18. Synchrotron radiation-based 61Ni Mössbauer spectroscopic study of Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2 cathode materials of lithium ion rechargeable battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segi, Takashi; Masuda, Ryo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Tsubota, Takayuki; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Seto, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Layered rocksalt type oxides, such as Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2, are widely used as the cathode active materials of lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. Because the nickel ions are associated with the role of the charge compensation at discharge and charge, the 61Ni Mössbauer measurements at 6 K using synchrotron radiation were performed to reveal the role of Ni. The Ni ions of the active materials play two roles for the redox process between the charge and discharge states of lithium-ion batteries. Half of the total Ni ions change to the low-spin Ni3+ with Jahn-Teller distortion from the Ni2+ ions of the discharge state. The remainder exhibit low-spin state divalent Ni ions.

  19. Effect of Co content on performance of LiAl 1/3- xCo xNi 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 compounds for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shao-Kang; Chou, Tse-Chuan; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Ceder, Gerbrand

    Layered LiAl 1/3- xCo xNi 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 (0 ≦ x ≦ 1/3) compounds were studied via the combination of computational and experimental approach. The calculated voltage curve of LiNi 1/3Al 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 compound is presented, indicating it is of great potential for a cathode material of lithium-ion batteries. Unfortunately, it was found that the LiNi 1/3Al 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 compound without impurity phase could not be synthesized via a sol-gel process. To obtain a layered compound without impurity phase, partial of Al is replaced by Co in LiNi 1/3Al 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 compound in this study. Layered LiAl 1/3- xCo xNi 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 (0 ≦ x ≦ 1/3) compounds were synthesized via sol-gel reaction at 900 °C under a oxygen stream. Single phase of the LiAl 1/3- xCo xNi 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 in 1/6 ≦ x ≦ 1/3 region could be prepared successfully. The discharge capacity and conductivity increased with an increase in the Co-substitution content. The enhancement of the conductivity and phase purity by the introduction of Co content shows profound influence on the performance of the LiAl 1/3- xCo xNi 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 compounds.

  20. Temperature-Dependent Lithium-Ion Diffusion and Activation Energy of Li1.2Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54O2 Thin-Film Cathode at Nanoscale by Using Electrochemical Strain Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Yan, Binggong; Wu, Jiaxiong; Lu, Li; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2017-04-26

    This paper presents the in situ mapping of temperature-dependent lithium-ion diffusion at the nanometer level in thin film Li1.2Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54O2 cathode using electrochemical strain microscopy. The thin-film Li1.2Co0.13Ni0.13Mn0.54O2 cathode exhibits higher lithium-ion diffusivities with increasing temperature, which explains the higher capacity observed in the lithium-ion batteries with a Li-rich cathode at elevated temperature. In addition, the activation energy for lithium-ion diffusion can be extracted in an Arrhenius-type plot at the level of grain structure with the assumption that the ionic movement is diffusion controlled. Compared with the grain interiors, the grain boundaries show relatively lower activation energy; hence, it is the preferred diffusion path for lithium ions. This study has bridged the gap between atomistic calculations and traditional macroscopic experiments, showing direct evidence as well as mechanisms for ionic diffusion for Li-rich cathode material.

  1. Binary electrolyte based on tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether and 1,3-dioxolane for lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Duck-Rye; Lee, Suck-Hyun; Kim, Sun-Wook; Kim, Hee-Tak

    An electrolyte based on a mixture of tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME) and 1,3-dioxolane (DOXL) is studied for a use in lithium-sulfur battery. The maximum ionic conductivity is found at the intermediate mixing ratio of TEGDME:DOXL=30:70, because TEGDME readily solvates LiCF 3SO 3 and DOXL effectively reduces the viscosity of the electrolyte medium. The lithium-sulfur battery based on the binary electrolyte shows two discernable voltage plateaux at around 2.4 and 2.1 V, which correspond to the formation of soluble polysulfides and of solid reduction products, respectively. The UV spectral analysis for TEGDME-based and DOXL-based electrolytes suggests that the shorter polysulfide is favourably formed for DOXL-based electrolyte in the upper voltage plateau at around 2.4 V. The lower voltage plateau at around 2.1 V is highly dependent on the TEGDME:DOXL ratio. The sulfur utilization in the lower voltage plateau region can be correlated with the viscosity of the electrolyte, but with the ionic conductivity. The low polysulfide diffusion for the electrolyte with high viscosity causes significant passivation at the surface of the positive electrode and results in low sulfur utilization.

  2. Structural and Electrochemical Study of Hierarchical LiNi(1/3)Co(1/3)Mn(1/3)O2 Cathode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wang, Lecai; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Xie, Man; Wu, Feng; Chen, Renjie

    2015-10-07

    In this study, a facile nanoetching-template route is developed to synthesize porous nanomicrohierarchical LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 microspheres with diameters below 1.5 μm, using porous CoMnO3 binary oxide microspheres as the template. The unique morphology of CoMnO3 template originates from the contraction effect during the oxidative decomposition of Ca0.2Mn0.4Co0.4CO3 precursors and is further improved by selectively removing calcium carbonate with a nanoetching process after calcination. The as-synthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 microsphere, composed of numerous primary particles and pores with size of dozens of nanometers, illustrates a well-assembled porous nanomicrohierarchical structure. When used as the cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, the as-synthesized microspheres exhibit remarkably enhanced electrochemical performances with higher capacity, excellent cycling stability, and better rate capability, compared with the bulk counterpart. Specifically, hierarchical LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 achieves a high discharge capacity of 159.6 mA h g(-1) at 0.2 C with 98.7% capacity retention after 75 cycles and 133.2 mA h g(-1) at 1 C with 90% capacity retention after 100 cycles. A high discharge capacity of 135.5 mA h g(-1) even at a high current of 750 mA g(-1) (5 C) is also achieved. The nanoetching-template method can provide a general approach to improve cycling stability and rate capability of high capacity cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  3. A novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} from the cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xihua; Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin; Nawaz, Faheem; Zhang, Yi

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • A simple process to recycle cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries. • Complete separation of the cathode material from the aluminum foil is achieved. • The recovered aluminum foil is highly pure. • LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} is directly resynthesized from the separated cathode material. - Abstract: To solve the recycling challenge for aqueous binder based lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), a novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} from the cathode scraps generated during manufacturing process is proposed in this study. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is employed to separate the cathode material from the aluminum foil. The effects of TFA concentration, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, reaction temperature and time on the separation efficiencies of the cathode material and aluminum foil are investigated systematically. The cathode material can be separated completely under the optimal experimental condition of 15 vol.% TFA solution, L/S ratio of 8.0 mL g{sup −1}, reacting at 40 °C for 180 min along with appropriate agitation. LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} is successfully resynthesized from the separated cathode material by solid state reaction method. Several kinds of characterizations are performed to verify the typical properties of the resynthesized LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder. Electrochemical tests show that the initial charge and discharge capacities of the resynthesized LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} are 201 mAh g{sup −1} and 155.4 mAh g{sup −1} (2.8–4.5 V, 0.1 C), respectively. The discharge capacity remains at 129 mAh g{sup −1} even after 30 cycles with a capacity retention ratio of 83.01%.

  4. Facile synthesis and electrochemical properties of layered Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2 as cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yingfang; You, Jingwei; Huang, Haifu; Li, Guangxu; Zhou, Wenzheng; Guo, Jin

    2017-06-01

    A layered oxide Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2 was synthesized by an oxalate co-precipitation method. The morphology, structural and composition of the as-papered samples synthesized at different calcination temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that calcination temperature of the sample at 850°C can improve the integrity of structural significantly. The effect of calcination temperature varying from 750°C to 950°C on the electrochemical performance of Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2, cathode material of lithiumion batteries, has been investigated. The results show that Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2 calcined at 850°C possesses a higher capacity retention and better rate capability than other samples. The reversible capacity is up to 178.6 mA•h•g-1, and the discharge capacity still remains 176.3 mA•h•g-1 after 30 cycles. Moreover, our strategy provides a simple and highly versatile route in fabricating cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Solvent-free dry powder coating process for low-cost manufacturing of LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cathodes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shroofy, Mohanad; Zhang, Qinglin; Xu, Jiagang; Chen, Tao; Kaur, Aman Preet; Cheng, Yang-Tse

    2017-06-01

    We report a solvent-free dry powder coating process for making LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC) positive electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. This process eliminates volatile organic compound emission and reduces thermal curing time from hours to minutes. A mixture of NMC, carbon black, and poly(vinylidene difluoride) was electrostatically sprayed onto an aluminum current collector, forming a uniformly distributed electrode with controllable thickness and porosity. Charge/discharge cycling of the dry-powder-coated electrodes in lithium-ion half cells yielded a discharge specific capacity of 155 mAh g-1 and capacity retention of 80% for more than 300 cycles when the electrodes were tested between 3.0 and 4.3 V at a rate of C/5. The long-term cycling performance and durability of dry-powder coated electrodes are similar to those made by the conventional wet slurry-based method. This solvent-free dry powder coating process is a potentially lower-cost, higher-throughput, and more environmentally friendly manufacturing process compared with the conventional wet slurry-based electrode manufacturing method.

  6. First-cycle defect evolution of Li1-xNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 lithium ion battery electrodes investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidlmayer, Stefan; Buchberger, Irmgard; Reiner, Markus; Gigl, Thomas; Gilles, Ralph; Gasteiger, Hubert A.; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    In this study the structure and evolution of vacancy type defects in lithium ion batteries are investigated in respect of crystallographic properties. The relation between positron annihilation and electronic structure is discussed in terms of structural dynamics during the lithiation process. Samples of Li1-xNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC-111) electrodes with decreasing lithium content (x = 0-0.7) covering the whole range of state of charge were electrochemically prepared for the non-destructive analysis using positron coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS). The positron measurements allowed us to observe the evolution of the defect structure caused by the delithiation process in the NMC-111 electrodes. The combination of CDBS with X-ray diffraction for the characterization of the lattice structures enabled the analysis of the well-known kinetic-hindrance-effect in the first charge-discharge cycle and possible implications of vacancy ordering. In particular, CDBS revealed the highest degree of relithiation after discharge to 3.0 V at 55 °C. For the first time, we report on the successful application of CDBS on NMC-111 electrodes yielding new insights in the important role of defects caused by the delithiation process and the kinetic hindrance effect.

  7. Symposium on High Power, Ambient Temperature Lithium Batteries, 180th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, Phoenix, AZ, Oct. 13-17, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. D. K. (Editor); Halpert, Gerald (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented in these proceedings are on the state of the art in high-power lithium batteries, a design analysis of high-power Li-TiS2 battery, the performance and safety features of spiral wound lithium/thionyl chloride cells, the feasibility of a superhigh energy density battery of the Li/BrF3 electrochemical system, and an enhanced redox process of disulfide compounds and their application in high energy storage. Attention is also given to the structure and charge-discharge characteristics of mesophase-pitch based carbons, a study of carbons and graphites as anodes for lithium rechargeable cells, Li metal-free rechargeable Li(1+x)Mn2O4/carbon cells, and rechargeable lithium batteries using V6O13/V5O5 as the positive electrode material. Other papers discuss the electrochemical stability of organic electrolytes in contact with solid inorganic cathode materials, the electrochemical behavior of methyl formate solutions, and the interface between a solid polymer electrolyte and lithium anode.

  8. Symposium on High Power, Ambient Temperature Lithium Batteries, 180th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, Phoenix, AZ, Oct. 13-17, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. D. K. (Editor); Halpert, Gerald (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented in these proceedings are on the state of the art in high-power lithium batteries, a design analysis of high-power Li-TiS2 battery, the performance and safety features of spiral wound lithium/thionyl chloride cells, the feasibility of a superhigh energy density battery of the Li/BrF3 electrochemical system, and an enhanced redox process of disulfide compounds and their application in high energy storage. Attention is also given to the structure and charge-discharge characteristics of mesophase-pitch based carbons, a study of carbons and graphites as anodes for lithium rechargeable cells, Li metal-free rechargeable Li(1+x)Mn2O4/carbon cells, and rechargeable lithium batteries using V6O13/V5O5 as the positive electrode material. Other papers discuss the electrochemical stability of organic electrolytes in contact with solid inorganic cathode materials, the electrochemical behavior of methyl formate solutions, and the interface between a solid polymer electrolyte and lithium anode.

  9. Preparation and Rate Capability of Carbon Coated LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as Cathode Material in Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chaofan; Zhang, Xiaosong; Huang, Mengyi; Huang, Junjie; Fang, Zebo

    2017-04-12

    LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) is regarded as a promising material for next-generation lithium ion batteries due to the high capacity, but its practical applications are limited by the poor electronic conductivity. Here, a one-step method is used to prepare carbon coated LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM/C) by applying active carbon as reaction matrix. TEM shows LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 particles are homogeneously coated by carbon with a thickness about 10 nm. NCM/C delivers the discharge capacity of 191.2 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 C (85 mA g(-1)) with a columbic efficiency of 91.1%. At 40 C (6800 mA g(-1)), the discharge capacity of NCM/C is 54.6 mAh g(-1), whereas NCM prepared through sol-gel route only delivers 13.2 mAh g(-1). After 100 charge and discharge cycles at 1 C (170 mA g(-1)) the capacity retention is 90.3% for NCM/C, whereas it is only 72.4% for NCM. The superior charge/discharge performance of NCM/C owes much to the carbon coating layer, which is not only helpful to increase the electronic conductivity but also contributive to inhibit the side reactions between LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 and the liquid electrolyte.

  10. A novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xihua; Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin; Nawaz, Faheem; Zhang, Yi

    2014-09-01

    To solve the recycling challenge for aqueous binder based lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), a novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps generated during manufacturing process is proposed in this study. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is employed to separate the cathode material from the aluminum foil. The effects of TFA concentration, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, reaction temperature and time on the separation efficiencies of the cathode material and aluminum foil are investigated systematically. The cathode material can be separated completely under the optimal experimental condition of 15vol.% TFA solution, L/S ratio of 8.0 mL g(-1), reacting at 40°C for 180 min along with appropriate agitation. LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 is successfully resynthesized from the separated cathode material by solid state reaction method. Several kinds of characterizations are performed to verify the typical properties of the resynthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 powder. Electrochemical tests show that the initial charge and discharge capacities of the resynthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 are 201 mAh g(-)(1) and 155.4 mAh g(-1) (2.8-4.5 V, 0.1C), respectively. The discharge capacity remains at 129 mAh g(-1) even after 30 cycles with a capacity retention ratio of 83.01%.

  11. PEDOT modified LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 with enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xizheng; Li, Huiqiao; Li, De; Ishida, Masayoshi; Zhou, Haoshen

    2013-12-01

    Layered LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 was modified by poly(3,4-dioxyethylenethiophene) PEDOT via a facile method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). PEDOT modified samples exhibited both improved rate and cycle performance compared with the pristine LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2. At a charge/discharge current of 1500 mA g-1, the discharge capacity was improved from 44.3 to 73.9 mAh g-1. The sample with 2 wt% and heat treated at 300 °C showed the optimized electrochemical performance. Galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) results indicated that the battery polarization of coated samples have been suppressed obviously because the PEDOT layer facilitated the electron transfer at the interface of electrode and electrolyte.

  12. Tanner and Burbank store lithium hydroxide canisters beneath the MDDK during Expedition 13 / STS-115 Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-16

    S115-E-06528 (9-21 Sept. 2006) --- Astronauts Joseph R. Tanner (left) and Daniel C. Burbank, both STS-115 mission specialists, work with the lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters beneath Space Shuttle Atlantis' middeck.

  13. Ultrasonic-assisted co-precipitation to synthesize lithium-rich cathode Li1.3Ni0.21Mn0.64O2+d materials for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Li; Song, Shaotang; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Renjie; Lu, Jun; Wu, Feng; Amine, Khalil

    2014-12-01

    Lithium-rich, composite-layered, transition metal oxides have been intensively investigated recently. However, poor rate capability has severely hindered the commercial development of these materials. We produce nanoscale hydroxide precursors for these cathodes using ultrasonic-assisted co-precipitation. The ultrasonic irradiation of a liquid leads to the generation of a cavitation phenomenon comprised of unique reaction fields, which assists in the synthesis of nanoparticle materials. This is confirmed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement results indicate that the ultrasonic-assisted Li1.3Ni0.21Mn0.64O2+d material has a larger lithium slab space. Electrochemical studies indicate that the ultrasonic-assisted material exhibits a higher initial discharge capacity (251.2 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C) and better cycling performance (200.4 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles) compared with the material synthesized using traditional co-precipitation. Surprisingly, the ultrasonic-assisted material has a stable capacity of 140 mAh g-1 at 5 C and 115 mAh g-1 at 10 C after 50 cycles. First-principles calculations are used to confirm that the specific lattice structure leads to a faster lithium-ion mobility speed.

  14. Impact of morphological changes of LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 on lithium-ion cathode performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabelguen, Pierre-Etienne; Peralta, David; Cugnet, Mikael; Maillet, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Major advances in Li-ion battery technology rely on the nanostructuration of active materials to overcome the severe kinetics limitations of new - cheaper and safer - chemistries. However, opening porosities results in the decrease of volumetric performances, closing the door to significant applications such as portable electronics, electromobility, and grid storage. In this study, we analyze the link between morphologies and performances of model LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 materials. By quantifying exhaustively their microstructures using nitrogen adsorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and helium pycnometry, we can discuss how porosities and surface areas are linked to the electrochemical behavior. There is no geometrical parameters that can predict the performances of all our materials. The shape of agglomeration dictates the electrochemical behavior. A huge drop in volumetric performances is measured when microstructure is considered. We show that gravimetric and volumetric power performances are contrary to each other. Highly dense materials exhibit, by far, the best power performances in terms of volumetric figures, so that opening porosities might not be the best strategy, even in non-nanosized materials, for Li-ion battery technology.

  15. Impact of morphological changes of LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 on lithium-ion cathode performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre-Etienne, Cabelguen; David, Peralta; Mikael, Cugnet; Pascal, Maillet

    2017-04-01

    Major advances in Li-ion battery technology rely on the nanostructuration of active materials to overcome the severe kinetics limitations of new - cheaper and safer - chemistries. However, opening porosities results in the decrease of volumetric performances, closing the door to significant applications such as portable electronics, electromobility, and grid storage. In this study, we analyze the link between morphologies and performances of model LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 materials. By quantifying exhaustively their microstructures using nitrogen adsorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and helium pycnometry, we can discuss how porosities and surface areas are linked to the electrochemical behavior. There is no geometrical parameters that can predict the performances of all our materials. The shape of agglomeration dictates the electrochemical behavior. A huge drop in volumetric performances is measured when microstructure is considered. We show that gravimetric and volumetric power performances are contrary to each other. Highly dense materials exhibit, by far, the best power performances in terms of volumetric figures, so that opening porosities might not be the best strategy, even in non-nanosized materials, for Li-ion battery technology.

  16. Leaching process for recovering valuable metals from the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode of lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Po; Sun, Shu-Ying; Song, Xing-Fu; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-18

    In view of the importance of environmental protection and resource recovery, recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and electrode scraps generated during manufacturing processes is quite necessary. An environmentally sound leaching process for the recovery of Li, Ni, Co, and Mn from spent LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-based LIBs and cathode scraps was investigated in this study. Eh-pH diagrams were used to determine suitable leaching conditions. Operating variables affecting the leaching efficiencies for Li, Ni, Co, and Mn from LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, such as the H2SO4 concentration, temperature, H2O2 concentration, stirring speed, and pulp density, were investigated to determine the most efficient conditions for leaching. The leaching efficiencies for Li, Ni, Co, and Mn reached 99.7% under the optimized conditions of 1M H2SO4, 1vol% H2O2, 400rpm stirring speed, 40g/L pulp density, and 60min leaching time at 40°C. The leaching kinetics of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 were found to be significantly faster than those of LiCoO2. Based on the variation in the weight fraction of the metal in the residue, the "cubic rate law" was revised as follows: θ(1-f)(1/3)=(1-kt/r0ρ), which could characterize the leaching kinetics optimally. The activation energies were determined to be 64.98, 65.16, 66.12, and 66.04kJ/mol for Li, Ni, Co, and Mn, respectively, indicating that the leaching process was controlled by the rate of surface chemical reactions. Finally, a simple process was proposed for the recovery of valuable metals from spent LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-based LIBs and cathode scraps.

  17. Surface Modification of Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2 by Hydrazine Vapor as Cathode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Lei, Zhihong; Wang, Jiulin; NuLi, Yanna; Yang, Jun

    2015-07-29

    An artificial interface is successfully prepared on the surface of the layered lithium-rich cathode material Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.12O2 via treating it with hydrazine vapor, followed by an annealing process. The inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP) results indicate that lithium ions are leached out from the surface of Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.12O2 by the hydrazine vapor. A lithium-deficiency-driven transformation from layered to spinel at the particle surface happens in the annealing process, which is proved by the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). It is also found that the content of the spinel phase increases at higher annealing temperature, and an internal structural evolution from Li1-xM2O4-type spinel to M3O4-type spinel takes place simultaneously. Compared to the pristine Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.12O2, the surface-modified sample annealed at 300 °C delivers a larger initial discharge capacity of 295.6 mA h g(-1) with a Coulombic efficiency of 89.5% and a better rate performance (191.7 mA h g(-1) at 400 mA g(-1)).

  18. Lithium use in batteries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  19. Unraveling transition metal dissolution of Li1.04Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM 111) in lithium ion full cells by using the total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evertz, Marco; Horsthemke, Fabian; Kasnatscheew, Johannes; Börner, Markus; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    In this work we investigated the transition metal dissolution of the layered cathode material Li1.04Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 in dependence on the cycle number and cut-off cell voltage during charge by using the total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique for the elemental analysis of the specific lithium ion battery degradation products. We could show that with ongoing cycling transition metal dissolution from the cathode increased over time. However, it was less pronounced at 4.3 V compared to elevated charge cut-off voltages of 4.6 V. After a maximum of 100 cycles, we detected an overall transition metal loss of 0.2 wt‰ in relation to the whole cathode active material for cells cycled to 4.3 V. At an increased charge cut-off voltage of 4.6 V, 4.5 wt‰ transition metal loss in relation to the whole cathode active material could be detected. The corresponding transition metal dissolution induced capacity loss at the cathode could thus be attributed to 1.2 mAh g-1. Compared to the overall capacity loss of 80 mAh g-1 of the complete cell after 100 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles the value is quite low. Hence, the overall full cell capacity fade cannot be assigned exclusively to the transition metal dissolution induced cathode fading.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide assisted synthesis of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as high-performance cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chaohong; Zhang, Yongzhi; Chen, Li; Lei, Ying; Ou, Junke; Guo, Yong; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan

    2015-04-01

    LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) is a promising cathode material for lithium-ion battery. In this research, a facile co-precipitation process is employed, during which the mixed solution of NH3·H2O, H2O2 (30% aqueous solution) and LiOH·H2O is added into the nitrate solution. Notably, H2O2 is introduced as the oxidant and dispersant during the co-precipitation process to oxidize the metal ions and decrease the agglomeration of the precursor by giving out O2, and then improves the specific capacity, stability and energy density of NCM. Additionally, O3 is employed to further oxidize NCM to enhance the stability during the calcination process. The obtained NCM material with single crystal structure exhibits a high initial discharge specific capacity of 208.9 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C (1 C = 280 mA g-1), an excellent cycle stability with high retained capacity of 176.3 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles, and a high initial discharge specific capacities of 150.6 mAh g-1 at 5 C even at a high cutoff potential (4.6 V).

  1. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  2. K(+)-doped Li(1.2)Mn(0.54)Co(0.13)Ni(0.13)O2: a novel cathode material with an enhanced cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Li, Guangshe; Fu, Chaochao; Luo, Dong; Fan, Jianming; Li, Liping

    2014-07-09

    Li-rich layered oxides have attracted much attention for their potential application as cathode materials in lithium ion batteries, but still suffer from inferior cycling stability and fast voltage decay during cycling. How to eliminate the detrimental spinel growth is highly challenging in this regard. Herein, in situ K(+)-doped Li1.20Mn0.54Co0.13Ni0.13O2 was successfully prepared using a potassium containing α-MnO2 as the starting material. A systematic investigation demonstrates for the first time, that the in situ potassium doping stabilizes the host layered structure by prohibiting the formation of spinel structure during cycling. This is likely due to the fact that potassium ions in the lithium layer could weaken the formation of trivacancies in lithium layer and Mn migration to form spinel structure, and that the large ionic radius of potassium could possibly aggravate steric hindrance for spinel growth. Consequently, the obtained oxides exhibited a superior cycling stability with 85% of initial capacity (315 mA h g(-1)) even after 110 cycles. The results reported in this work are fundamentally important, which could provide a vital hint for inhibiting the undesired layered-spinel intergrowth with alkali ion doping and might be extended to other classes of layered oxides for excellent cycling performance.

  3. Insight into the channel ion distribution and influence on the lithium insertion properties of hexatitanates A2Ti6O13 (A = Na, Li, H) as candidates for anode materials in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Flores, Juan Carlos; García-Alvarado, Flaviano; Hoelzel, Markus; Sobrados, Isabel; Sanz, Jesús; Kuhn, Alois

    2012-12-28

    Li(2)Ti(6)O(13) and H(2)Ti(6)O(13) were easily synthesized from Na(2)Ti(6)O(13) by successive Na(+)-Li(+)-H(+) ion exchange. The crystal structures of Na(2)Ti(6)O(13), Li(2)Ti(6)O(13) and H(2)Ti(6)O(13) were investigated using neutron powder diffraction. Monovalent A(+) cations (Na, Li and H) have been located using difference Fourier analysis. Although monoclinic lattice parameters (space group C2/m) of the three titanates remain almost unchanged with retention of the basic [Ti(6)O(13)(2-)] network, monovalent Na, Li and H cations occupy different sites in the tunnel space. By comparing the structural details concerning the A(+) oxygen coordination, i.e. NaO(8) square prismatic coordination, LiO(4) square planar coordination and covalently bond H atoms, with results from (23)Na, (7)Li and (1)H NMR spectroscopy we were able to obtain a more detailed insight into the respective local distortions and anharmonic motions. We were able to show that the site that the A(+) cation occupies in the hexatitanate channel structure strongly influences the lithium insertion properties of these compounds and therefore their usefulness as electrode materials for energy storage.

  4. Layered P3-NaxCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 versus Spinel Li4Ti5O12 as a Positive and a Negative Electrode in a Full Sodium-Lithium Cell.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhecheva, Ekaterina; Kukeva, Rositsa; Nihtianova, Diana; Mihaylov, Lyuben; Atanasova, Genoveva; Stoyanova, Radostina

    2016-07-13

    The development of lithium and sodium ion batteries without using lithium and sodium metal as anodes gives the impetus for elaboration of low-cost and environmentally friendly energy storage devices. In this contribution we demonstrate the design and construction of a new type of hybrid sodium-lithium ion cell by using unique electrode combination (Li4Ti5O12 spinel as a negative electrode and layered Na3/4Co1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 as a positive electrode) and conventional lithium electrolyte (LiPF6 salt dissolved in EC/DMC). The cell operates at an average potential of 2.35 V by delivering a reversible capacity of about 100 mAh/g. The mechanism of the electrochemical reaction in the full sodium-lithium ion cell is studied by means of postmortem analysis, as well as ex situ X-ray diffraction analysis, HR-TEM, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The changes in the surface composition of electrodes are examined by ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  5. Lithium: for harnessing renewable energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, which has the chemical symbol Li and an atomic number of 3, is the first metal in the periodic table. Lithium has many uses, the most prominent being in batteries for cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid vehicles. Worldwide sources of lithium are broken down by ore-deposit type as follows: closed-basin brines, 58%; pegmatites and related granites, 26%; lithium-enriched clays, 7%; oilfield brines, 3%; geothermal brines, 3%; and lithium-enriched zeolites, 3% (2013 statistics). There are over 39 million tons of lithium resources worldwide. Of this resource, the USGS estimates there to be approximately 13 million tons of current economically recoverable lithium reserves. To help predict where future lithium supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where identified resources are concentrated in the Earth’s crust, and they use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered resources also exist.

  6. Enhanced electrochemical performance of Li-rich cathode Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 by surface modification with lithium ion conductor Li3PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Luo, Shaohua; Ren, Jie; Wang, Dan; Qi, Xiwei

    2016-05-01

    Li-rich layered cathode Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 is prepared via a co-precipitation followed with high-temperature calcination, and then successfully modified with nano-Li3PO4 by ball milling and annealing. The TEM and EDS reveal that Li3PO4 is homogeneously coated on the particle surface of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2. And the electrochemical performance of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 is significantly improved by coating with lithium ion conductor Li3PO4. The Li3PO4-coated sample delivers a high initial discharge capacity of 284.7 mAhg-1 at 0.05 C, and retains 192.6 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.5 C, which is higher than that of the pristine sample (244 mAhg-1 at 0.05 C and 168.2 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.5 C). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) demonstrates that the resistance for Li/Li3PO4-coated Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 cell was reduced compared to Li/Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2, which indicates the Li3PO4 coating layer with high ionic conductivity (6.6 × 10-8 S cm-1) facilitates the diffusion of lithium ions through the interface between electrode and electrolyte and accelerates the charge transfer process. What is more, the Li3PO4 coating layer can also act as a protection layer to protect the cathode material from encroachment of electrolyte. The two aspects account for the enhanced electrochemical performance of Li3PO4-coated Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2.

  7. Synthesis of 0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials using 3-D urchin-like MnO2 as precursor for high performance lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenhao; Hu, Zhibiao; Zhou, Yunlong; Fang, Shuzhen; Cai, Shaohan

    2015-02-01

    In the paper, we report synthesis of lithium rich layered oxide 0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 by using an urchin-like MnO2 as precursor. The influences of calcination temperatures on the structures and electrochemical performances of as-prepared materials are systematically studied. The results show that the obtained sample can partially retain the morphology of urchin-like precursor especially at low temperature, and a higher calcination temperature helps to improve the layered structure and particle size. As lithium ion battery cathodes, the 750 °C sample with the size of 100-200 nm reveals an optimal electrochemical performance. The initial discharge capacity of 234.6 mAh g-1 with high Coulombic efficiency of 84.6 % can be reached at 0.1C within 2.0-4.7 V. After 50 cycles, the capacity retention can reach 90.2 % at 0.5C. Even at high current density of 5C, the sample also shows a stable discharge capacity of 120.5 mAh g-1. Anyways, the urchin-like MnO2 directed route is suitable to prepare 0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as lithium ion battery cathode.

  8. Electric field-induced strain behavior in lithium- and copper-added potassium sodium niobate piezoceramics and 1-3 piezocomposites.

    PubMed

    Alkoy, Ebru Mensur; Berksoy, Ayse; Tekdas, A Serkan

    2011-09-01

    Potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-based leadfree materials were prepared and their field-induced strain behaviors were investigated. Ceramic lead-free piezoelectric materials were prepared in bulk and fiber forms with 1 mol% CuO-added potassium sodium niobate K0.5Na0.5NbO3 and x = 7 mol% lithium-modified (K(0.5-x/2)Na(0.5-x/2)Li(x))NbO(3) compositions. Fibers were drawn using a novel alginate gelation technique. Piezocomposites were prepared from these fibers with 1-3 connectivity and an epoxy matrix. A fully recoverable electrostrain of up to approximately 0.11% was observed in the CuO-added sample, whereas the Li-modified sample yielded up to 0.10% at 50 kV/cm electric field. A strain value of up to approximately 0.03% at 50 kV/cm electric field was obtained for piezocomposites prepared from lithium-modified fibers. The high-field converse piezoelectric coefficient was calculated from the strain-electric field (x-E) graph for all samples. Strain characteristics of the bulk and piezocomposite samples were analyzed based on the variation of strain with respect to square of the polarization (x-P2) to determine the electrostrictive contribution to the strain.

  9. The role of prop-1-ene-1,3-sultone as an additive in lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, Julian; Hall, David S.; Madec, Lénaïc; Dahn, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used in conjunction with experimental results to propose decomposition pathways that describe the role and ultimate fate of the PES additive in Li-ion batteries. Oxidation of PES produces carbonyl sulfide gas and ethene at the positive electrode, both experimentally observed byproducts. However, the calculated standard potential for simple PES oxidation, E0ox ∼ 6.7 V vs. Li/Li+, is quite high, suggesting this pathway is unlikely. A "reactive electrode model" is presented, in which the positive electrode material is a reagent in the pseudo-combustion of PES (and other solvents). This spontaneous process produces carbonyl sulfide, carbon dioxide, and a rock salt surface layer, all of which are experimentally observed. At the negative electrode, the reduction of PES occurs via two one-electron steps, where E0red,1 = 0.9 V and E0red,2 = 4.3 V. The reduced species, Li2PES, can react with hydrogen and methyl radicals to produce propene, methylpropene, propane and lithium sulfite. Nucleophilic Li2PES can also react with electrophilic PES, ethylene carbonate, or ethyl methyl carbonate. Eighteen possible organic sulphate 'building blocks' for the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrate that PES reduction indeed results in both lithium sulfite and organic sulphate SEI components.

  10. Oxidation reaction of polyether-based material and its suppression in lithium rechargeable battery using 4 V class cathode, LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yo; Tabuchi, Masato; Shono, Kumi; Ohno, Yasutaka; Mita, Yuichi; Miyashiro, Hajime

    2013-12-11

    The all solid-state lithium battery with polyether-based solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) is regarded as one of next-generation lithium batteries, and has potential for sufficient safety because of the flammable-electrolyte-free system. It has been believed that polyether-based SPE is oxidized at the polymer/electrode interface with 4 V class cathodes. Therefore, it has been used for electric devices such as organic transistor, and lithium battery under 3 V. We estimated decomposition reaction of polyether used as SPE of all solid-state lithium battery. We first identified the decomposed parts of polyether-based SPE and the conservation of most main chain framework, considering the results of SPE analysis after long cycle operations. The oxidation reaction was found to occur slightly at the ether bond in the main chain with the branched side chain. Moreover, we resolved the issue by introducing a self-sacrificing buffer layer at the interface. The introduction of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to the 4 V class cathode surface led to the suppression of SPE decomposition at the interface as a result of the preformation of a buffer layer from CMC, which was confirmed by the irreversible exothermic reaction during the first charge, using electrochemical calorimetry. The attained 1500 cycle operation is 1 order of magnitude longer than those of previously reported polymer systems, and compatible with those of reported commercial liquid systems. The above results indicate to proceed to an intensive research toward the realization of 4 V class "safe" lithium polymer batteries without flammable liquid electrolyte.

  11. Coating effect of LiFePO4 and Al2O3 on Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 cathode surface for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seteni, Bonani; Rapulenyane, Nomasonto; Ngila, Jane Catherine; Mpelane, Siyasanga; Luo, Hongze

    2017-06-01

    Lithium-manganese-rich cathode material Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 is prepared by combustion method, and then coated with nano-sized LiFePO4 and nano-sized Al2O3 particles via a wet chemical process. The as-prepared Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2, LiFePO4-coated Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 and Al2O3-coated Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy shows the agglomeration of the materials and their nanoparticle size ∼100 nm. The transmission electron microscopy confirms that LiFePO4 forms a rough mat-like surface and Al2O3 remain as islandic particles on the surface of the Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 material. The Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 coated with LiFePO4 and Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 coated with Al2O3 exhibits improved electrochemical performance. The initial discharge capacity is enhanced to 267 mAhg-1 after the LiFePO4 coating and 285 mAhg-1 after the Al2O3 coating compared to the as-prepared Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 material that has an initial discharge capacity of 243 mAhg-1. Galvanostatic charge-discharge tests at C/10 display longer activation of Li2MnO3 phase and higher capacity retention of 88% after 20 cycles for Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2-LiFePO4 compared to Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2-Al2O3 of 80% after 20 cycles and LMNC of 80% after 20 cycles. Meanwhile Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2-LiFePO4 also shows higher rate capability compared to Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2-Al2O3.

  12. Synthesis and performance of Li[(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)(1-x)Mgx]O2 prepared from spent lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yaqing; Xu, Shengming; Huang, Guoyong; Jiang, Changyin

    2013-02-15

    To reduce cost and secondary pollution of spent lithium ion battery (LIB) recycling caused by complicated separation and purification, a novel simplified recycling process is investigated in this paper. Removal of magnesium is a common issue in hydrometallurgy process. Considering magnesium as an important additive in LIB modification, tolerant level of magnesium in leachate is explored as well. Based on the novel recycling technology, Li[(Ni(1/3)Co(1/3)Mn(1/3))(1-x)Mg(x)]O(2) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.05) cathode materials are achieved from spent LIB. Tests of XRD, SEM, TG-DTA and so on are carried out to evaluate material properties. Electrochemical test shows an initial charge and discharge capacity of the regenerated LiNi(1/3)Co(1/3)Mn(1/3)O(2) to be 175.4 mAh g(-1) and 152.7 mAh g(-1) (2.7-4.3 V, 0.2C), respectively. The capacity remains 94% of the original value after 50 cycles (2.7-4.3 V, 1C). Results indicate that presence of magnesium up to x=0.01 has no significant impact on overall performance of Li[(Ni(1/3)Co(1/3)Mn(1/3))(1-x)Mg(x)]O(2). As a result, magnesium level as high as 360 mg L(-1) in leachate remains tolerable. Compared with conventional limitation of magnesium content, the elimination level of magnesium exceeded general impurity-removal requirement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced electrochemical performance of Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 by surface modification with the fast lithium-ion conductor Li-La-Ti-O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongzhou; Yang, Tonghuan; Han, Yan; Song, Dawei; Shi, Xixi; Zhang, Lianqi; Bie, Lijian

    2017-10-01

    The drawbacks of Li-rich layered oxides, such as large initial irreversible capacity, phase transformation and electrochemical performance degradation, are closely related to the surface states of the Li-rich layered oxide. To overcome these problems, a new surface modification method to the Li-rich layered oxide is proposed, in which the fast lithium-ion conductor (Li-La-Ti-O composite, LLTO) is coated on the surface of Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 (LRO) particles. SEM, EDS and HRTEM analyses reveal that an entire and homogeneous coating layer is formed. Electrochemical performances display that the LLTO coated samples, especially the LRO-LLTO5 material, exhibit better cycle stability, higher rate capabilities and less voltage decay. To investigate the origins of enhanced electrochemical performances for LLTO coated samples, the electrode processes at various cycles and the structural stability of the samples are studied by EIS and DSC. The protective effect of LLTO coating layer to the bulk crystallographic structure of cathode material is revealed by HRTEM images. Our study shows that the reduced interface impedances and definitely protective effect resulting from the complete and homogeneous LLTO coating layer are responsible for the enhanced electrochemical performances of the LLTO coated samples.

  14. Facile Synthesis of Platelike Hierarchical Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 with Exposed {010} Planes for High-Rate and Long Cycling-Stable Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jiong; Cui, Yanhui; Qu, Deyang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Junwei; Zhu, Xiaomeng; Li, Zuohua; Zhang, Xinhe

    2016-10-05

    Lithium-rich layered oxides are promising cathode candidates for the production of high-energy and high-power electronic devices with high specific capacity and high discharge voltage. However, unstable cycling performance, especially at high charge-recharge rate, is the most challenge issue which needs to be solved to foster the diffusion of these materials. In this paper, hierarchical platelike Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 cathode materials were synthesized by a facile solvothermal method followed by calcination. Calcination time was found to be a key parameter to obtain pure layered oxide phase and tailor its hierarchical morphology. The Li-rich material consists of primary nanoparticles with exposed {010} planes assembled to form platelike layers which exhibit low resistance to Li(+) diffusion. In detail, the product by calcination at 900 °C for 12 h exhibits specific capacity of 228, 218, and 204 mA h g(-1) at 200, 400, and 1000 mA g(-1), respectively, whereas after 100 cycles at 1000 mA g(-1) rate of charge and recharge the specific capacity was retained by about 91%.

  15. Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 with Controllable Morphology and Size for High Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Yi, Liling; Yu, Ruizhi; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Yu; Liu, Zhongshu; Wu, Bing; Liu, Min; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiukang; Xiong, Xunhui; Liu, Meilin

    2017-08-02

    The controllable morphology and size Li-rich Mn-based layered oxide Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 with micro/nano structure is successfully prepared through a simple coprecipitation route followed by subsequent annealing treatment process. By rationally regulating and controlling the volume ratio of ethylene glycol (EG) in hydroalcoholic solution, the morphology and size of the final products can be reasonably designed and tailored from rod-like to olive-like, and further evolved into shuttle-like with the assistance of surfactant. Further, the structures and electrochemical properties of the Li-rich layered oxide with various morphology and size are systematically investigated. The galvanostatic testing demonstrates that the electrochemical performances of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are highly dependent on the morphology and size of Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 cathode materials. In particular, the olive-like morphology cathode material with suitable size exhibits much better electrochemical performances compared with the other two cathode materials in terms of initial reversible capacity (297.0 mAh g(-1)) and cycle performance (95.4% capacity retention after 100 cycles at 0.5 C), as well as rate capacity (142.8 mAh g(-1) at 10 C). The excellent electrochemical performances of the as-prepared materials could be related to the synergistic effect of well-regulated morphology and appropriate size as well as their micro/nano structure.

  16. Fabrication of nanoscale patterns in lithium fluoride crystal using a 13.5 nm Schwarzschild objective and a laser produced plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Mu Baozhong; Jiang Li; Zhu Jingtao; Yi Shengzhen; Wang Zhanshan; He Pengfei

    2011-12-15

    Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal is a radiation sensitive material widely used as EUV and soft x-ray detector. The LiF-based detector has high resolution, in principle limited by the point defect size, large field of view, and wide dynamic range. Using LiF crystal as an imaging detector, a resolution of 900 nm was achieved by a projection imaging of test meshes with a Schwarzschild objective operating at 13.5 nm. In addition, by imaging of a pinhole illuminated by the plasma, an EUV spot of 1.5 {mu}m diameter in the image plane of the objective was generated, which accomplished direct writing of color centers with resolution of 800 nm. In order to avoid sample damage and contamination due to the influence of huge debris flux produced by the plasma source, a spherical normal-incidence condenser was used to collect EUV radiation. Together with a description of experimental results, the development of the Schwarzschild objective, the influence of condenser on energy density and the alignment of the imaging system are also reported.

  17. Fabrication of nanoscale patterns in lithium fluoride crystal using a 13.5 nm Schwarzschild objective and a laser produced plasma source.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Mu, Baozhong; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Jingtao; Yi, Shengzhen; Wang, Zhanshan; He, Pengfei

    2011-12-01

    Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal is a radiation sensitive material widely used as EUV and soft x-ray detector. The LiF-based detector has high resolution, in principle limited by the point defect size, large field of view, and wide dynamic range. Using LiF crystal as an imaging detector, a resolution of 900 nm was achieved by a projection imaging of test meshes with a Schwarzschild objective operating at 13.5 nm. In addition, by imaging of a pinhole illuminated by the plasma, an EUV spot of 1.5 μm diameter in the image plane of the objective was generated, which accomplished direct writing of color centers with resolution of 800 nm. In order to avoid sample damage and contamination due to the influence of huge debris flux produced by the plasma source, a spherical normal-incidence condenser was used to collect EUV radiation. Together with a description of experimental results, the development of the Schwarzschild objective, the influence of condenser on energy density and the alignment of the imaging system are also reported.

  18. Lithium battery technology

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasetty, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the use of lithium in electric batteries. Topics considered include solvents for lithium battery technology, transport properties and structure of nonaqueous electrolyte solutions, primary lithium batteries, lithium sulfur dioxide batteries, lithium oxyhalide batteries, medical batteries, ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium cells, high-temperature lithium batteries, and lithium ion-conducting solid electrolytes.

  19. High rate performance of LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} cathode material synthesized by a carbon gel–combustion process for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Zhao, Na; Li, Guo-Dong; Guo, Fei-Fan; Zhao, Junwei; Zhao, Yinggang; Jia, Tiekun; Fu, Fang; Li, Jili

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The cycling stability of the LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrode was investigated at different discharge rates from 5 C to 50 C. - Highlights: • The LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} was prepared via a carbon gel–combustion process. • The sample showed high purity and nanosized particles. • The LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrode shows excellent rate capability and cyclic performance. - Abstract: The LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrode material was prepared via a carbon gel–combustion process using resorcinol–formaldehyde gel as fuel and nitrate as an oxidizer. The carbon gel process ensures the molecular-level homogeneity of the chemical product. The gas derived from carbon gel separates the raw material particles and restrains the growth of the grains to some extent, and well-crystallized nanosized powders are obtained with calcination at 700 °C for 6 h. As the cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, the discharge capacity of LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} was as high as 175.6 mA h g{sup −1} in the first cycle at 0.5 C, and it could remain 163.0 mA h g{sup −1} within the voltage range of 2.5–4.4 V after 50 cycles. The electrode also showed outstanding rate capacities at high discharge rates such as 30 C and 50 C, suggesting the applications of the material in high power lithium-ion batteries.

  20. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  1. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  2. Studies on the translational and rotational motions of ionic liquids composed of N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13) cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts.

    PubMed

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Fujii, Kenta; Suenaga, Masahiko; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2010-11-21

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL, IL) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P(13), Py(13), PYR(13), or mppy) is an important cation and produces stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO(2)CF(3))(2), TFSA, TFSI, NTf(2), or Tf(2)N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [N(SO(2)F)(2), FSA, or FSI], were investigated. In addition to P(13)-TFSA and P(13)-FSA, lithium salt doped samples were prepared (P(13)-TFSA-Li and P(13)-FSA-Li). The individual ion diffusion coefficients (D) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) were measured by (1)H, (19)F, and (7)Li NMR. At the same time, the ionic conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and density (ρ) were measured over a wide temperature range. The van der Waals volumes of P(13), TFSA, FSA, Li(TFSA)(2), and Li(FSA)(3) were estimated by molecular orbital calculations. The experimental values obtained in this study were analyzed by the classical Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein (NE), and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations and Walden plots were also made for the neat and binary ILs to clarify physical and mobile properties of individual ions. From the temperature-dependent velocity correlation coefficients for neat P(13)-TFSA and P(13)-FSA, the NE parameter 1-ξ was evaluated. The ionicity (electrochemical molar conductivity divided by the NE conductivity from NMR) and the 1-ξ had exactly the same values. The rotational and translational motions of P(13) and jump of a lithium ion are also discussed.

  3. Studies on the translational and rotational motions of ionic liquids composed of N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13) cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Fujii, Kenta; Suenaga, Masahiko; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL, IL) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13, Py13, PYR13, or mppy) is an important cation and produces stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO2CF3)2, TFSA, TFSI, NTf2, or Tf2N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [N(SO2F)2, FSA, or FSI], were investigated. In addition to P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, lithium salt doped samples were prepared (P13-TFSA-Li and P13-FSA-Li). The individual ion diffusion coefficients (D) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured by H1, F19, and L7i NMR. At the same time, the ionic conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and density (ρ) were measured over a wide temperature range. The van der Waals volumes of P13, TFSA, FSA, Li(TFSA)2, and Li(FSA)3 were estimated by molecular orbital calculations. The experimental values obtained in this study were analyzed by the classical Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein (NE), and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations and Walden plots were also made for the neat and binary ILs to clarify physical and mobile properties of individual ions. From the temperature-dependent velocity correlation coefficients for neat P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, the NE parameter 1-ξ was evaluated. The ionicity (electrochemical molar conductivity divided by the NE conductivity from NMR) and the 1-ξ had exactly the same values. The rotational and translational motions of P13 and jump of a lithium ion are also discussed.

  4. Synthesis and electrochemical performances of core-shell structured Li[(Ni 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3) 0.8(Ni 1/2Mn 1/2) 0.2]O 2 cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Soo; Myung, Seung-Taek; Sun, Yang-Kook

    Micro-scale core-shell structured Li[(Ni 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3) 0.8(Ni 1/2Mn 1/2) 0.2]O 2 powders for use as cathode material are synthesized by a co-precipitation method. To protect the core material Li[Ni 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3]O 2 from structural instability at high voltage, a Li[Ni 1/2Mn 1/2]O 2 shell, which provides structural and thermal stability, is used to encapsulate the core. A mixture of the prepared core-shell precursor and lithium hydroxide is calcined at 770 °C for 12 h in air. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the prepared material has a typical layered structure with an R 3 bar m space group. Spherical morphologies with mono-dispersed powders are observed in the cross-sectional images obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The core-shell Li[(Ni 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3) 0.8(Ni 1/2Mn 1/2) 0.2]O 2 electrode has an excellent capacity retention at 30 °C, maintaining 99% of its initial discharge capacity after 100 cycles in the voltage range of 3-4.5 V. Furthermore, the thermal stability of the core-shell material in the highly delithiated state is improved compared to that of the core material. The resulting exothermic onset temperature appear at approximately 272 °C, which is higher than that of the highly delithiated Li[Ni 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3]O 2 (261 °C).

  5. Lithium nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jobson Lopes de; Silva Júnior, Geraldo Bezerra da; Abreu, Krasnalhia Lívia Soares de; Rocha, Natália de Albuquerque; Franco, Luiz Fernando Leonavicius G; Araújo, Sônia Maria Holanda Almeida; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Lithium has been widely used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Its renal toxicity includes impaired urinary concentrating ability and natriuresis, renal tubular acidosis, tubulointerstitial nephritis progressing to chronic kidney disease and hypercalcemia. The most common adverse effect is nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which affects 20-40% of patients within weeks of lithium initiation. Chronic nephropathy correlates with duration of lithium therapy. Early detection of renal dysfunction should be achieved by rigorous monitoring of patients and close collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists. Recent experimental and clinical studies begin to clarify the mechanisms by which lithium induces changes in renal function. The aim of this study was to review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, histopathological aspects and treatment of lithium-induced nephrotoxicity.

  6. Lithium Diffusion Pathway in Li(1.3)Al(0.3)Ti(1.7)(PO4)3 (LATP) Superionic Conductor.

    PubMed

    Monchak, Mykhailo; Hupfer, Thomas; Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Boysen, Hans; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Hansen, Thomas; Schell, Karl G; Bucharsky, Ethel C; Hoffmann, Michael J; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-03-21

    The Al-substituted LiTi2(PO4)3 powders Li(1+x)Al(x)Ti(2-x)(PO4)3 (LATP) were successfully prepared by a water-based sol-gel process with subsequent calcination and sintering. The crystal structure of obtained samples was characterized at different temperatures using high-resolution synchrotron-based X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Possible lithium diffusion pathways were initially evaluated using the difference bond-valence approach. Experimental 3D lithium diffusion pathway in LATP was extracted from the negative nuclear density maps reconstructed by the maximum entropy method. Evaluation of the energy landscape determining the lithium diffusion process in NASICON-type superionic conductor is shown for the first time.

  7. Adiponitrile-Lithium Bis(trimethylsulfonyl)imide Solutions as Alkyl Carbonate-free Electrolytes for Li4 Ti5 O12 (LTO)/LiNi1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 (NMC) Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Douaa; Ghamouss, Fouad; Maibach, Julia; Edström, Kristina; Lemordant, Daniel

    2017-02-23

    Recently, dinitriles (NC(CH2 )n CN) and especially adiponitrile (ADN, n=4) have attracted attention as safe electrolyte solvents owing to their chemical stability, high boiling points, high flash points, and low vapor pressure. The good solvation properties of ADN toward lithium salts and its high electrochemical stability (≈6 V vs. Li/Li(+) ) make it suitable for safer Li-ions cells without performance loss. In this study, ADN is used as a single electrolyte solvent with lithium bis(trimethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI). This electrolyte allows the use of aluminium collectors as almost no corrosion occurs at voltages up to 4.2 V. The physicochemical properties of the ADN-LiTFSI electrolyte, such as salt dissolution, conductivity, and viscosity, were determined. The cycling performances of batteries using Li4 Ti5 O12 (LTO) as the anode and LiNi1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 (NMC) as the cathode were determined. The results indicate that LTO/NMC batteries exhibit excellent rate capabilities with a columbic efficiency close to 100 %. As an example, cells were able to reach a capacity of 165 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 C and a capacity retention of more than 98 % after 200 cycles at 0.5 C. In addition, electrodes analyses by SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy after cycling confirming minimal surface changes of the electrodes in the studied battery system.

  8. [Lithium nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Ireneusz; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    Lithium salts are the first-line drug therapy in the treatment of uni- and bipolar disorder since the sixties of the twentieth century. In the mid-70s, the first information about their nephrotoxicity appeared. Lithium salts have a narrow therapeutic index. Side effects during treatment are polyuria, polydipsia and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Accidental intoxication can cause acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy while receiving long-term lithium salt can lead to the development of chronic kidney disease. The renal biopsy changes revealed a type of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy. The imaging studies revealed the presence of numerous symmetric microcysts. Care of the patient receiving lithium should include regular determination of serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and monitoring of urine volume. In case of deterioration of renal function reducing the dose should be considered.

  9. Lithium toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lithonate Note: Lithium is also commonly found in batteries, lubricants, high performance metal alloys, and soldering supplies. ... Kidney failure Memory problems Movement disorders Problems ... your body Psychosis (disturbed thought processes, unpredictable ...

  10. A Lithium Superionic Sulfide Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liu, Zengcai; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a facile synthesis approach for core-shell structured Li2S nanoparticles, which have Li2S as the core and Li3PS4 as the shell. This material functions as lithium superionic sulfide (LSS) cathode for long-lasting, energy-efficient lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The LSS has an ionic conductivity of 10-7 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high lithium-ion conductivity of LSS imparts an excellent cycling performance to all-solid Li-S batteries, which also promises safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

  11. Three-volt lithium-ion battery with Li[Ni 1/2Mn 3/2]O 4 and the zero-strain insertion material of Li[Li 1/3Ti 5/3]O 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyoshi, Kingo; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ohzuku, Tsutomu

    A 3 V lithium-ion cell with Li[Ni 1/2Mn 3/2]O 4 ( Fd 3¯m ; a=8.17 Å) and the zero-strain insertion material of Li[Li 1/3Ti 5/3]O 4 ( Fd 3¯m ; a=8.36 Å) was examined with an emphasis on rate-capability and cycle life. This cell showed a quite flat operating voltage of 3.2 V with excellent cycleability. Accelerated cycle tests indicated that 83% of the initial capacity was delivered and stored even after 1100 cycles. Although the calculated energy density of a Li[Li 1/3Ti 5/3]O 4/Li[Ni 1/2Mn 3/2]O 4 cell was about 250 Wh kg -1 or 1000 Wh dm -3 based on the active material weight or volume, the 3 V lithium-ion battery exhibited positive characteristic features, such as flatness in operating voltage, high rate capability, and cycle life.

  12. Fatigue in 0.5Li2MnO3:0.5Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 positive electrodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riekehr, Lars; Liu, Jinlong; Schwarz, Björn; Sigel, Florian; Kerkamm, Ingo; Xia, Yongyao; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    Two different Li-rich nickel-cobalt-manganese-oxide (Li-rich NCM) active materials with the same nominal composition 0.5Li2MnO3:0.5Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 but different pristine nano structure have been analyzed structurally and electrochemically in different cycling states. For structural characterization, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution synchrotron powder diffraction (S-XRD) experiments were conducted. The changes in structure with increasing cycle number are correlated with characteristic features in the corresponding electrochemical dQ/dV-profiles that were obtained by galvanostatically cycling the two different active materials. The presented data demonstrates that structural changes upon cycling, e.g. LiMnO2 and spinel formation, strongly depend on the degree oxygen is involved in the reversible charge compensation for delithiation/lithiation. According to our data, firstly a twin-like environment with nanometer dimensions is formed within the R-3m matrix during the initial cycle, which then gradually transforms into a spinel-like structure with increasing cycle number. As another result, we can show that Li2MnO3 to LiMnO2 transformation is not directly dependent in the irreversible oxygen loss in the first cycle but more importantly on transition metal migration. A model is presented explaining the dependency of LiMnO2 and spinel formation on the ability of Li-rich active materials to include oxygen in the charge compensation process.

  13. Li2ZrO3-coated 0.4Li2MnO3·0.6LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for high performance cathode material in lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiaowei; Ni, Huan; Zhang, Han; Wang, Chunguang; Fang, Jianhui; Yang, Gang

    2014-10-01

    To improve the high-rate capacity and cycle ability, minor Li2ZrO3 successfully coat the nanoparticles of 0.4Li2MnO3·0.6LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (LMO) via sol-gel method. The crystal structure and electrochemical properties of the bare and coated material are studied by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT), and charge-discharge tests. The lithium diffusion coefficient of LMO increases one to two orders of magnitude after Li2ZrO3 coating. Li2ZrO3 coating improves the rate capability and cycling stability of LMO. Within the cut-off voltage of 2.5-4.8 V, the initial discharge capacity of Li2ZrO3-coated 0.4Li2MnO3·0.6LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (LZO-LMO) reaches to 264 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C rate, and the capacity remains 235 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. At the current rates of 1, 2, 5 and 10 C, the maximum discharge capacities of LZO-LMO are 205.6, 161, 153.8 and 106 mAh g-1, respectively. Minor Li2ZrO3 modification plays an important role to enhance the high-rate capability and cycle ability of LMO.

  14. Surface Heterostructure Induced by PrPO4 Modification in Li1.2[Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 Cathode Material for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries with Mitigating Voltage Decay.

    PubMed

    Ding, Feixiang; Li, Jianling; Deng, Fuhai; Xu, Guofeng; Liu, Yanying; Yang, Kai; Kang, Feiyu

    2017-08-23

    Lithium-rich layered oxides (LLOs) have been attractive cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries because of their high reversible capacity. However, they suffer from low initial Coulombic efficiency and capacity/voltage decay upon cycling. Herein, facile surface modification of Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 cathode material is designed to overcome these defects by the protective effect of a surface heterostructure composed of an induced spinel layer and a PrPO4 modification layer. As anticipated, a sample modified with 3 wt % PrPO4 (PrP3) shows an enhanced initial Coulombic efficiency of 90% compared to 81.8% for the pristine one, more excellent cycling stability with a capacity retention of 89.3% after 100 cycles compared to only 71.7% for the pristine one, and less average discharge voltage fading from 0.6353 to 0.2881 V. These results can be attributed to the fact that the modification nanolayers have moved amounts of oxygen and lithium from the lattice in the bulk crystal structure, leading to a chemical activation of the Li2MnO3 component previously and forming a spinel interphase with a 3D fast Li(+) diffusion channel and stable structure. Moreover, the elaborate surface heterostructure on a lithium-rich cathode material can effectively curb the undesired side reactions with the electrolyte and may also extend to other layered oxides to improve their cycling stability at high voltage.

  15. Navy Lithium Battery Safety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-14

    lithium -sulfur dioxide (Li-SO2), lithium - thionyl chloride (Li- SOCL2), and lithium -sulfuryl chloride (Li-S02CL2...and 1980’s with active primary cells: Lithium -sulfur dioxide (Li-SO2) Lithium - thionyl chloride (Li-SOCL2) Lithium -sulfuryl chloride (Li-S0 CL ) 2 2...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. NAVY LITHIUM BATTERY SAFETY John Dow1 and Chris Batchelor2 Naval

  16. Synthesis, dielectric, conductivity and magnetic studies of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn(1/3)-xAlxO2 (x = 0.0, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06) for cathode materials of lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, N.; Margarette, S. J.; Veeraiah, V.

    Layered structure cathode materials LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn(1/3)-xAlxO2 (x = 0.0, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06) are prepared by the sol-gel method by adding citric acid as chelating agent. The physical, electrical and magnetic properties of the synthesized materials are systematically discussed using the structural (XRD, FESEM with EDS and FT-IR), impedance (LCR) and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the synthesized samples possessed the α-NaFeO2 structure of the space group, R 3 bar m , with no evidence of any impurities. The peak intensity ratio I(104)/I(003) increased with Al concentration, which indicated the cation mixing between transition metal layer and lithium layer. The field effect scanning electron microscopy showed the particle size distribution in the range of 230-250 nm and EDS has been analysed for elemental mapping. The local structure is investigated by vibrational spectroscopy in FT-IR study. The impedance studies are characterized by complex impedance spectroscopy (CIS) in the frequency range from 42 Hz to 1 MHz at room temperature (30 °C). The dielectric properties are analyzed in the framework of complex dielectric permittivity and formalism of the complex electric modulus. For these samples, the ESR analysis of magnetic measurements, the degree of cation mixing, is estimated to be Ni2+(3b) = 2.75%.

  17. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of Li2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2 as a novel 5 V class positive electrode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Kazuki; Shikano, Masahiro; Sakaebe, Hikari

    2016-02-01

    A lithium nickel manganese oxide, O3-Li2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2, is synthesized from the precursor, P3-Na2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2, by a Na+/Li+ ion exchange reaction using molten salt. Post-heating at 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 °C is carried out for 5 h in air. The products are characterized by powder XRD, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), SEM, 6Li-magic-angle-spinning-NMR, and electrochemical measurements. The charge/discharge profiles of O3-Li2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2, thermally treated at 500 °C, show a high-potential plateau region at 4.8 V. Furthermore, sloping voltage profiles are observed at an average voltage of 3.21 V. An initial discharge capacity of 257 mA h g-1 is obtained between 2.0 and 4.8 V with a current density of 15 mA g-1 at 25 °C. This capacity corresponds to 0.90 electron transfers per formula unit. This study shows that Post-heating of O3-Li2/3Ni1/3Mn2/3O2 is effective to improve its electrochemical properties.

  18. Lithium in 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, estimated world lithium consumption was about 28 kt (31,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, an 8 percent increase from that of 2011. Estimated U.S. consumption was about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, the same as that of 2011. The United States was thought to rank fourth in consumption of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Rockwood Lithium Inc., produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  19. EADS-Astrium Lithium Technology Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattesco, P.

    2008-09-01

    The Lithium-ion battery has been perceived ten years ago by EADS Astrium as a very promising technology in terms of technical, industrial and cost aspects for satellite platforms with respect to NiCd and NiH2 technologies. In 2008, lithium technology is the baseline for all new spacecrafts, whatever the missions.For telecommunication satellite, since 2003, more than 18 Lithium batteries for Eurostar E3000 platform have been fully tested and integrated (with SAFT VES140S Lithium cells) up to now. 6 E3000 satellites are in orbit equipped with Lithium batteries with more than 4 years in orbit for the first E3000 satellite equipped with Lithium-ion batteries. 7 others E3000 satellites with lithium batteries are currently at various stage of production.For LEO missions (THEOS, PLEIADES…), ABSL batteries with Sony 18650 HC lithium cells will replace, on the latest LEO platform the NiCd technology. The same technology change has been also successfully done previously for scientific missions: since June 2003 for Mars Express and November 2005 for Venus Express.Associated expected system improvements (weight reduction of the battery system, easiest on ground and launch pad management, highest available energy during launch, ….) driven by specific lithium-ion technology features are today demonstrated and in orbit behaviours are as expected [1], [13].The paper will give an overview of experience of EADS-Astrium on lithium battery technology with the description (design, management, architecture) of lithium batteries used on board LEO and GEO satellites. It will give also a picture of the effort done the last ten years to reach this level of experience (test characterisation, simulation…).

  20. Lithium-associated hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Siyam, Fadi F; Deshmukh, Sanaa; Garcia-Touza, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Goiters and hypothyroidism are well-known patient complications of the use of lithium for treatment of bipolar disease. However, the occurrence of lithium-induced hyperthyroidism is a more rare event. Many times, the condition can be confused with a flare of mania. Monitoring through serial biochemical measurement of thyroid function is critical in patients taking lithium. Hyperthyroidism induced by lithium is a condition that generally can be controlled medically without the patient having to discontinue lithium therapy, although in some circumstances, discontinuation of lithium therapy may be indicated. We report on a patient case of lithium-associated hyperthyroidism that resolved after discontinuation of the medication.

  1. Catalyst engineering for lithium ion batteries: the catalytic role of Ge in enhancing the electrochemical performance of SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G anodes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun Guang; Wang, Ye; Han, Zhao Jun; Shi, Yumeng; Wong, Jen It; Huang, Zhi Xiang; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Yang, Hui Ying

    2014-12-21

    The catalytic role of germanium (Ge) was investigated to improve the electrochemical performance of tin dioxide grown on graphene (SnO(2)/G) nanocomposites as an anode material of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Germanium dioxide (GeO(20) and SnO(2) nanoparticles (<10 nm) were uniformly anchored on the graphene sheets via a simple single-step hydrothermal method. The synthesized SnO(2)(GeO(2))0.13/G nanocomposites can deliver a capacity of 1200 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1), which is much higher than the traditional theoretical specific capacity of such nanocomposites (∼ 702 mA h g(-1)). More importantly, the SnO(2)(GeO(2))0.13/G nanocomposites exhibited an improved rate, large current capability (885 mA h g(-1) at a discharge current of 2000 mA g(-1)) and excellent long cycling stability (almost 100% retention after 600 cycles). The enhanced electrochemical performance was attributed to the catalytic effect of Ge, which enabled the reversible reaction of metals (Sn and Ge) to metals oxide (SnO(2) and GeO(2)) during the charge/discharge processes. Our demonstrated approach towards nanocomposite catalyst engineering opens new avenues for next-generation high-performance rechargeable Li-ion batteries anode materials.

  2. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  3. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  4. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  5. Facile synthesis and enhanced electrochemical performances of Li2TiO3-coated lithium-rich layered Li1.13Ni0.30Mn0.57O2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Enyue; Liu, Xiangfeng; Hu, Zhongbo; Sun, Limei; Xiao, Xiaoling

    2015-10-01

    Li2TiO3-coated Li-rich layered Li1.13Ni0.30Mn0.57O2 (0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiNi0.5Mn0.5O2) compound has been successfully synthesized for the first time through a syn-lithiation strategy. In this approach, Ni0.35Mn0.65C2O4·xH2O precursor is first prepared by a co-precipitation method, then it is coated with TiO2 through a reaction between Ni0.35Mn0.65C2O4·xH2O and Ti(OC4H9)4, and finally Ni0.35Mn0.65C2O4rad yH2O@TiO2 is simultaneously lithiated to form Li2TiO3-coated Li-rich layered oxide. Both the cyclability and high-rate capability of Li-rich layered cathode materials have been greatly improved by Li2TiO3 coating. Meanwhile, the Li2TiO3 coating layer also reduces the polarization of the electrode and retards voltage drop during cycling. The reversible capacity of the 3 mol% Li2TiO3-coated Li-rich layered cathode material at the 100th cycle at a large current density of 100 mA/g is significantly enhanced to105 mAh/g from 78 mAh/g of the un-coated sample. The enhancements of the electrochemical performance can be largely attributed to the stabilization of the interface between the cathode and electrolyte, the three-dimensional path for Li+-ion and better conductivity after Li2TiO3 coating. It is also disclosed that the amount of Li2TiO3 coating also has a large influence on the electrochemical performances and it is necessary to optimize the specific capacity, cycling stability and rate capability through tuning the content of Li2TiO3 coating.

  6. Specular Lithium Deposits from Lithium Hexafluoroarsenate/Diethyl Ether Electrolytes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    81 4 13 035 $ UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS PAGE fWhen Dala Entered) OPAGE READ INSTRUCTIONS REPORT DOCUMENTATION BEFORE COMPLETING...NAME &II AODOSSQIi different lrom Conmlling Office) t5. SECURITY CLASS. (of thl reparl) UNCLASSIFIED 15s. DECLASSIFICATION/ OOWNGRADING" SCHEDULE 15...be due to the formation of a protective lithium ethoxide film. ID JAN 73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV SS IS OBSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED _k/6. SECURITY

  7. Overview and In-Orbit Behaviour of the First Lithium-Ion Batteries Used Onboard Eutelsat 7A and Eutelsat Hot Bird 13B GEO Telecommunication Satellite- Update after Ten Years in Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, Fabien; Leconte, Vincent; Borthomieu, Yannick; Bauchais, Frederic

    2014-08-01

    The Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery has been perceived several years ago by Astrium as a very promising technology in terms of technical, industrial and cost aspects for its Eurostar 3000 platform dedicated to telecommunications satellite for payload power from 5 up to 15 kW and for Alphabus Platform from 10 up to 22 kW. One of the main advantages of such energy storage technology is the capacity to deliver very high power and energy density with quite low dissipation when compared to the other qualified technologies. On March 15, 2004, a Proton Launcher placed successfully into orbit the EUTELSAT 7A spacecraft called "W3A" for Eutelsat (first commercial satellite equipped with Li- ion batteries). This was the achievement of the work, initiated with the support of ESA and CNES in 1996 with Stentor program. In 2014, 45 Li-ion batteries are in orbit on 24 Eurostar 3000 satellites and one battery on Alphabus platformThis paper is an update of the one presented at the Nineth European Space Power Conference in 2011 [1]. First part is a recall of the battery development, battery design, and battery management during system tests and pre-launch phases. In the second part, the ten years behaviour in orbit for the two W3A batteries and the seven years behaviour for the two EUTELSAT HOT BIRD 13B called "HB8" batteries is provided.

  8. Lithium and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Lithium and Pregnancy Saturday, 20 September 2014 In every ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to lithium may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  9. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  10. Catalyst engineering for lithium ion batteries: the catalytic role of Ge in enhancing the electrochemical performance of SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yun Guang; Wang, Ye; Han, Zhao Jun; Shi, Yumeng; Wong, Jen It; Huang, Zhi Xiang; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Yang, Hui Ying

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic role of germanium (Ge) was investigated to improve the electrochemical performance of tin dioxide grown on graphene (SnO2/G) nanocomposites as an anode material of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Germanium dioxide (GeO2) and SnO2 nanoparticles (<10 nm) were uniformly anchored on the graphene sheets via a simple single-step hydrothermal method. The synthesized SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G nanocomposites can deliver a capacity of 1200 mA h g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1, which is much higher than the traditional theoretical specific capacity of such nanocomposites (~702 mA h g-1). More importantly, the SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G nanocomposites exhibited an improved rate, large current capability (885 mA h g-1 at a discharge current of 2000 mA g-1) and excellent long cycling stability (almost 100% retention after 600 cycles). The enhanced electrochemical performance was attributed to the catalytic effect of Ge, which enabled the reversible reaction of metals (Sn and Ge) to metals oxide (SnO2 and GeO2) during the charge/discharge processes. Our demonstrated approach towards nanocomposite catalyst engineering opens new avenues for next-generation high-performance rechargeable Li-ion batteries anode materials.The catalytic role of germanium (Ge) was investigated to improve the electrochemical performance of tin dioxide grown on graphene (SnO2/G) nanocomposites as an anode material of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Germanium dioxide (GeO2) and SnO2 nanoparticles (<10 nm) were uniformly anchored on the graphene sheets via a simple single-step hydrothermal method. The synthesized SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G nanocomposites can deliver a capacity of 1200 mA h g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1, which is much higher than the traditional theoretical specific capacity of such nanocomposites (~702 mA h g-1). More importantly, the SnO2(GeO2)0.13/G nanocomposites exhibited an improved rate, large current capability (885 mA h g-1 at a discharge current of 2000 mA g-1) and excellent long

  11. How to Calculate Spin-Spin Coupling and Spin-Rotation Coupling Strengths and Their Uncertainties from Spectroscopic Data: Application to the c(1^3Σ_g^+) State of Diatomic Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.; Li, Xuan

    2013-06-01

    Recent high-resolution (± 0.00002 cm^{-1}) photo-association spectroscopy (PAS) data of seven previously unexplored vibrational levels of the 1^3Σ_g^+ state of Li_2 have allowed for the first ever experimental determination of the spin-spin (λ_v) and spin-rotation (γ_v) coupling constants in a diatomic lithium system. For triplet states of diatomic molecules such as the 1^3Σ_g^+ state of Li_2, the three spin-spin/spin-rotation resolved energies associated with a ro-vibrational state |v,N> were expressed explicity in terms of B_v, λ_v, and γ_v in 1929 by Kramer's first-order formulas and then in 1937 by Schlapp's more refined formulas. Given spectroscopic data, while it has never been difficult to extract λ_v and γ_v from Schlapp's formulas, it has been a challenge to reliably predict how accurate these extracted values are. This is for two reasons: (1) the lack of a rigorous method to estimate the uncertainty in B_v, (2) the non-linearity of Schlapp's coupled equations has meant that traditionally they have had to be solved numerically by Newton iterations which makes error propagation difficult. The former challenge has been this year solved by Le Roy with a modification of Hutson's perturbation theory of, and the latter problem has now been solved by symbolic computing software that solves Schlapp's coupled non-linear equations analytically for the first time since their introduction in 1937. M. Semczuk, X. Li, W. Gunton, M. Haw, N. Dattani, J. Witz, A. Mills, D. Jones, K. Madison, Physical Review A {87}, XX (2013) H. Kramers, Zeitschrift fur Physik {53}, 422 (1929) R. Schlapp, Physical Review {51}, 342 (1937) J. Hutson, J. Phys. B, {14}, 851 (1981)

  12. Direct determination of motional spectral densities for lithium dodecyl sulfate micellar dynamics from analysis of 13C 2H scalar relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilbs, Peter; Söderman, Olle; Walderhaug, harald

    The motional spectral densities, J( ω0) and J(2 ω0) are extracted directly from a bandshape analysis of the 13C signal of a deuterated methylene group of a surfactant, Li dodecyl sulfate, residing in a micelle. The extracted spectral densities are then compared with spectral densities calculated using a motional model, the so-called "two-step model," for methylene segments of aggregated surfactants. The two sets of spectral densities agree within the experimental uncertainty. Thus, the two-step model is a reasonable description of NMR relaxation in micellar systems.

  13. Lithium Cell Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Page 1. INVESTIGATION OF CHEMICAL, ELECTROCHEMICAL AND PARASITIC REACTIONS IN LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLS ....... ................. 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION...OF LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLS. ................ 56 1.4.1 Carbon Limited Overdischarge...............56 1.4.1.1 Background... LITHIUM THIONYL - CHLORIDE CELLS. .. ............ ...... 101 1.5.1 Background. ....... ............ .... 101 1.5.2 Microphotography

  14. A comparative study on electrochemical cycling stability of lithium rich layered cathode materials Li1.2Ni0.13M0.13Mn0.54O2 where M = Fe or Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laisa, C. P.; Nanda Kumar, A. K.; Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P.; Lakshminarasimhan, N.; Govindaraj, R.; Ramesha, K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we compare electrochemical cycling stability of Fe containing Li rich phase Li1.2Ni0.13Fe0.13Mn0.54O2 (Fe-Li rich) with the well-known Co containing Li rich composition Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 (Co-Li rich). During the first charge, the activation plateau corresponding to removal of Li2O from the structure is smaller (removal of 0.6 Li) in the case of Fe-Li rich compared to Co-Li rich composition (0.8 Li removal). Consequently, the Fe compound shows better capacity retention; for example, after 100 cycles Fe-Li rich compound exhibits 20% capacity degradation where as it is about 40% in the case of Co-Li rich phase. The electrochemical and microscopy studies support the fact that compared to Co-Li rich compound, the Fe-Li rich composition display smaller voltage decay and reduced spinel conversion. XPS studies on charged/discharged Fe-Li rich samples show participation of Fe+3/Fe+4 redox during electrochemical cycling which is further supported by our first principles calculations. Also the temperature dependent magnetic studies on charge-discharged samples of Fe-Li rich compound point out that magnetic behavior is sensitive to cation oxidation states and Ni/Li disorder.

  15. Crystal structure of di-μ-iodido-bis-{[1,3-bis-(2,6-diiso-propyl-phen-yl)imidazol-2-yl-idene]lithium}.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hui-Da; Hong, Jian-Quan

    2015-06-01

    In the title binuclear complex, [Li2(C27H36N2)2I2], the unique Li(I) cation is coordinated by two iodide anions and one yl-idene C atom from a 1,3-bis-(2,6-diiso-propyl-phen-yl)imidazol-2-yl-idene ligand in a distorted trigonal-planar geometry. The two symmetry-related iodide anions bridge two Li(I) cations, forming an inversion dimer in which the Li2I2 plane is nearly perpendicular to the imidazol-2-yl-idene ring, with a dihedral angle of 85.5 (3)°. No hydrogen bonding is observed in the crystal.

  16. Fabrication and electrochemical properties of hemisphere structured 3D Li(Li0.2Mn0.54Co0.13Ni0.13)O2 cathode thin film for all-solid-state lithium battery.

    PubMed

    Yim, H; Kong, W Y; Yoon, S J; Kim, Y C; Choi, J W

    2013-05-01

    The Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 cathode thin films were deposited on planar, hemisphere, linked hemisphere, and isolated hemisphere structured Pt current collector thin films to investigate the effect of 3-dimensional (3-D) structure for the electrochemical properties of active cathode thin films. The films of linked hemisphere structure shows the highest initial discharge capacity of 140 microA h/cm2-microm which is better than those of planar (62 microA h/cm2-microm), hemisphere (94.6 microA h/cm2-microm), and isolated hemisphere (135 microA h/cm2-microm) films due to increase of surface area for cathode thin films. Linked hemisphere shows the biggest capacity and the best retention rate because 6 nanobridges of each hemisphere bring strong connection.

  17. Tailoring Surface Properties of Polymeric Separators for Lithium-Ion Batteries by 13.56 MHz Radio-Frequency Plasma Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chia-Han; Juang, Ruey-Shin; Tsai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Chun

    2013-11-01

    The hydrophilic surface modification of the polymeric separator is achieved by low-pressure 13.56 MHz radio-frequency Ar and He gas plasma treatments. The changes in surface hydrophilicity and surface free energy were examined by static contact angle analysis. The static water contact angle of the plasma-modified polymeric separator particularly decreased with the increase in treatment time. An obvious increase in the surface energy of polymeric separators owing to the crosslinking by activated species of inert gases effect of monatomic-gas-plasma treatments was also observed. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to analyze the chemical species generated after Ar and He gas plasma treatments. The variations in the surface morphology and chemical structure of the polymeric separators were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. XPS analysis showed significantly higher surface concentrations of oxygen functional groups for monatomic-gas-plasma-modified polymeric separator surfaces than for the unmodified polymeric separator surface. The experimental results show the important role of chemical species in the interaction between Ar and He gas plasmas and the polymeric separator surface, which can be controlled by surface modification to tailor the hydrophilicity of the polymeric separator.

  18. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-01

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes.

  19. Positron confinement in embedded lithium nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Kuriplach, J.

    2002-02-01

    Quantum confinement of positrons in nanoclusters offers the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the electronic structure of nanoclusters by application of positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques. In this work, positron confinement is investigated in lithium nanoclusters embedded in monocrystalline MgO. These nanoclusters were created by means of ion implantation and subsequent annealing. It was found from the results of Doppler broadening positron beam analysis that approximately 92% of the implanted positrons annihilate in lithium nanoclusters rather than in the embedding MgO, while the local fraction of lithium at the implantation depth is only 1.3 at. %. The results of two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation confirm the presence of crystalline bulk lithium. The confinement of positrons is ascribed to the difference in positron affinity between lithium and MgO. The nanocluster acts as a potential well for positrons, where the depth of the potential well is equal to the difference in the positron affinities of lithium and MgO. These affinities were calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method. This yields a positronic potential step at the MgO||Li interface of 1.8 eV using the generalized gradient approximation and 2.8 eV using the insulator model.

  20. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  1. Transparent lithium loaded plastic scintillators for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breukers, R. D.; Bartle, C. M.; Edgar, A.

    2013-02-01

    The fabrication of a series of novel, optically transparent, bulk plastic scintillators loaded with lithium methacrylate, and incorporating 2,5-diphenyloxazole and 5-phenyl-2-[4-(5-phenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl)phenyl]-1,3-oxazole fluorescent centres, is described. The attenuation length, photoluminescence, and both gamma ray and thermal neutron scintillation responses were compared over a range of lithium methacrylate concentrations. The maximum concentration corresponded to a weight percentage of lithium-6 of 0.63%. The photoluminescence shows a composite 2,5-diphenyloxazole and 5-phenyl-2-[4-(5-phenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl)phenyl]-1,3-oxazole broad band with vibronic features in the range 350-500 nm, and lifetimes in the range 0.9-2.7 ns. An increasing luminescence in a thermal neutron beam with increasing lithium-6 content is demonstrated.

  2. Lithium1.3Aluminum0.3Titanium1.7Phosphate as a solid state Li-ion conductor: Issues with microcracking and stability in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, Spencer D.

    Lithium aluminum titanium phosphate (LATP) with formula Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO4)3 was analyzed and tested to better understand its applicability as a solid state ion conducting ceramic material for electrochemical applications. Sintered samples were obtained from Ceramatec, Inc. in Salt Lake City and characterized in terms of density, phase-purity, fracture toughness, Young's modulus, thermal expansion behavior, mechanical strength, a.c. and d.c. ionic conductivity, and susceptibility to static and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous Li salt solutions. It was shown that LATP is prone to microcrack generation because of high thermal expansion anisotropy. A.c. impedance spectra of high-purity LATP of varying grain sizes showed that microcracking had a negative impact on the ionic conduction of Li along grain boundaries, with fine-grained (1.7±0.7 µm) LATP having twice the ionic conductivity of the same purity of coarse-grained (4.8±1.9 µm) LATP at 50°C. LATP with detectible secondary phases had lower ionic conductivity for similar grain sizes, as would be expected. The Young's modulus of fine-grained LATP was measured to be 115 GPa, and the highest biaxial strength was 191±11 MPa when tested in mineral oil, 144±13 MPa as measured in air, and 26±7 MPa after exposure to deionized water, suggesting that LATP undergoes stress-corrosion cracking. After exposure to LiOH, the strength was 76±19 MPa. This decrease in strength was observed despite there being no measureable change in a.c. impedance spectra, X-ray diffraction, or sample mass, suggesting phosphate glasses at grain boundaries. The chemical and electrochemical stability of high-purity LATP in aqueous electrochemical cells was evaluated using LiOH, LiCl, LiNO3, and LiCOOCH3 salts as the Li source. LATP was found to be most stable between pH 8-9, with the longest cell operating continuously at 25 mA cm-2 for 625 hours at 40°C in LiCOOCH3. At pH values outside of the 7-10 range, eventual membrane degradation

  3. Lithium-Rich Nanoscale Li 1.2 Mn 0.54 Ni 0.13 Co 0.13 O 2 Cathode Material Prepared by Co-Precipitation Combined Freeze Drying (CP-FD) for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Ying; Li, Yu; Wu, Chuan; Lu, Jun; Li, Hui; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhong, Yunxia; Chen, Shi; Zhang, Cunzhong; Amine, Khalil; Wu, Feng

    2015-07-14

    Nanoscale Li-rich Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 material is synthesized by a co-precipitation combined freeze drying (CP-FD) method, and compared with a conventional co-precipitation method combined vacuum drying (CP-VD). With the combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), it is found that the sample from CP-FD method consists of a pure phase with good crystallinity and small, homogenous particles (100-300 nm) with uniform particle size distribution. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) shows that the sample has a stoichiometric ratio of n((Li)): n((Mn)): n((Ni)): n((Co))=9: 4: 1: 1; and its Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area is 5.749 m(2)g(-1). This sample achieves excellent electrochemical properties: its initial discharge capacities are 298.9 mAhg(-1) at 0.1C (20 mAg(-1)), 246.1 mAhg(-1) at 0.5C, 215.8 mAhg(-1) at 1C, and 154.2 mAhg(-1) at 5C (5C charge and 5C discharge), as well as good cycling performance. In addition, the Li+ chemical diffusion coefficient of Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 material prepared by the CP-FD method is 4.59 x 10(-11) cm(2) s(-1), which is higher than that of the Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 material prepared by CP-VD. This phenomenon illustrates the potential for Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 with good rate performance synthesized by CP-FD method.

  4. Prediction Model of Serum Lithium Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazunari; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takefumi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Yoshino, Nariyasu; Houchi, Hitoshi; Mimura, Masaru; Fukuoka, Noriyasu

    2017-08-02

    Introduction Therapeutic drug monitoring is necessary for lithium, but clinical application of several prediction strategies is still limited because of insufficient predictive accuracy. We herein proposed a suitable model, using creatinine clearance (CLcr)-based lithium clearance (Li-CL). Methods Patients receiving lithium provided the following information: serum lithium and creatinine concentrations, time of blood draw, dosing regimen, concomitant medications, and demographics. Li-CL was calculated as a daily dose per trough concentration for each subject, and the mean of Li-CL/CLcr was used to estimate Li-CL for another 30 subjects. Serum lithium concentrations at the time of sampling were estimated by 1-compartment model with Li-CL, fixed distribution volume (0.79 L/kg), and absorption rate (1.5/hour) in the 30 subjects. Results One hundred thirty-one samples from 82 subjects (44 men; mean±standard deviation age: 51.4±16.0 years; body weight: 64.6±13.8 kg; serum creatinine: 0.78±0.20 mg/dL; dose of lithium: 680.2±289.1 mg/day) were used to develop the pharmacokinetic model. The mean±standard deviation (95% confidence interval) of absolute error was 0.13±0.09 (0.10-0.16) mEq/L. Discussion Serum concentrations of lithium can be predicted from oral dosage with high precision, using our prediction model. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Microencapsulation of Lithium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    SPILLED With dry rubber gloves. Rick up t.- lithium ingot and return to steel container and store under oil : label or tag , Keep away from moisture or...was in a 30% solids dispersion of mineral oil . Thus, the dispersion was purchased and the lithium metal was cleaned by extracting the mineral oil with... oil could be eliminated. Unfortunately, the manufacturer was unable to meet product specifications. Of the micronized lithium metal supplied to SwRI

  6. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, Robert F.; Meadows, George E.

    1985-01-01

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  7. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, R.F.; Meadows, G.E.

    1984-01-10

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  8. [Parkinsonism during lithium use].

    PubMed

    Walrave, T R W M; Bulens, C

    2009-01-01

    Two patients with bipolar disorder had been treated for years with lithium without any complications but began to develop symptoms of rigidity and an altered gait, namely symptoms compatible with a diagnosis of Parkinsonism with an action tremor. In both patients lithium levels were within the therapeutic range. Medication-induced Parkinsonism occurs frequently in patients using antipsychotic medication, but is a rare complication in patients receiving long term treatment with lithium. The lithium dosage was reduced gradually and within a few months all neurological symptoms subsided completely.

  9. Lithium and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, R. D.; Galbraith, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Some of lithium's effects on blood cell formation suggest that the element may be of value in treating hematologic disorders. Lithium enhances granulopoiesis and thereby induces neutrophilia. Two possible mechanisms of action are suggested: a direct action on the pluripotent stem cells, or an inhibition of the suppressor cells (thymus-dependent lymphocytes) that limit hematopoiesis. Lithium also inhibits erythropoiesis. Although most studies use concentrations at or above pharmacologic levels there is evidence that lithium plays a role in normal cell metabolism. PMID:6336655

  10. Lithium nephrotoxicity revisited.

    PubMed

    Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Rossier, Bernard C

    2009-05-01

    Lithium is widely used to treat bipolar disorder. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is the most common adverse effect of lithium and occurs in up to 40% of patients. Renal lithium toxicity is characterized by increased water and sodium diuresis, which can result in mild dehydration, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and renal tubular acidosis. The concentrating defect and natriuretic effect develop within weeks of lithium initiation. After years of lithium exposure, full-blown nephropathy can develop, which is characterized by decreased glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease. Here, we review the clinical and experimental evidence that the principal cell of the collecting duct is the primary target for the nephrotoxic effects of lithium, and that these effects are characterized by dysregulation of aquaporin 2. This dysregulation is believed to occur as a result of the accumulation of cytotoxic concentrations of lithium, which enters via the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) on the apical membrane and leads to the inhibition of signaling pathways that involve glycogen synthase kinase type 3beta. Experimental and clinical evidence demonstrates the efficacy of the ENaC inhibitor amiloride for the treatment of lithium-induced NDI; however, whether this agent can prevent the long-term adverse effects of lithium is not yet known.

  11. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltash, Abdolreza; Petrov, Andrei Y; Linkous, Randall Lee; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2007-01-01

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient

  12. Advanced Rechargeable Lithium Sulfur Dioxide Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    electrolyte. Surface treatments were carried out at 2406C using water (Cell 15) and thionyl chloride (Cell 16). 3 Cathodes were placed in a Parr Bomb...Pawcatuck, CT 06379 94-02298 1425 Best Available Copy I ADVANCED RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM SULFUR DIOXIDE CELL I R.C. McDonald, P. Harris, F. Goebel, S. Hossain...Test Group 3 13 Test Group 4 22 Test Group 5 22 Test Group 6 24 Test Group 7 46 Test Group 8 52 Test Group 9 65 I CHEMICAL ANALYSIS 65 LITHIUM CYCLING

  13. Polymeric electrolytes for ambient temperature lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, G.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-07-01

    A new type of highly conductive Li{sup +} polymer electrolyte, referred to as the Innovision polymer electrolyte, is completely amorphous at room temperature and has an ionic conductivity in the range of 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm. This report discusses the electrochemical characteristics (lithium oxidation and reduction), conductivity, and physical properties of Innovision electrolytes containing various dissolved salts. These electrolytes are particularly interesting since they appear to have some of the highest room-temperature lithium ion conductivities yet observed among polymer electrolytes. 13 refs. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Modelling of lithium erosion and transport in FTU lithium experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, R.; Maddaluno, G.; Apicella, M. L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Kirschner, A.; Chen, J. L.; Li, J. G.; Luo, G.-N.

    2013-07-01

    The ERO code has been used to simulate lithium erosion, transport and re-deposition from liquid lithium limiter experiments in FTU. Two different operational cases from LLL experiments with different plasma parameters and surface temperature are modelled. According to the effective lithium sputtering yields, for both cases the lithium erosion is mainly due to physical sputtering rather than evaporation. Furthermore, the modelled re-deposition fraction of evaporated lithium is much higher than that of sputtered lithium, which is due to the shorter ionisation mean free path of thermal lithium atoms. Therefore, the evaporation erosion effect can be neglected compared to physical sputtering when the surface temperature is below 450 °C. According to the simulations, most of the lithium impurities exist in the form of Li+, and the main plasma contamination by lithium ions is low because most of eroded lithium particles are not transported into the core plasma and stay outside of the LCFS.

  15. LITHIUM AND RENAL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, N.; Trivedi, J.K.; Sethi, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty patients of affective disorder who were on lithium for a year and thirty patients on antidepressant were studied in detail for renal functions. Our observation is that lithium therapy does not lead to any deterioration in kidney functions. The results are discussed. PMID:21927211

  16. Facile hydrothermal method synthesis of coralline-like Li{sub 1.2}Mn{sub 0.54}Ni{sub 0.13}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} hierarchical architectures as superior cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Xianhua; Huang, Yanling; Ma, Shaomeng; Zou, Xiaoli; Hu, Shejun; Wu, Yuping

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • A coralline-like Li{sub 1.20}Mn{sub 0.54}Ni{sub 0.13}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} cathode was synthesized by hydrothermal method. • Initial discharge capacity of 250.2 mAh g{sup −1} for the cathode was obtained at 0.1 C. • A high reversible specific capacity of 210.2 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles was acquired. • The high capacity retention of 84.5% was obtained even after 200 cycles at 10 C. - Abstract: A coralline-like lithium-rich layered cathode material with homogeneous composition of Li{sub 1.20}Mn{sub 0.54}Ni{sub 0.13}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} has been successfully synthesized via a facile ethanolamine (EA)-mediated hydrothermal method route, with subsequent calcination at 850 °C. An initial specific discharge capacity of 250.2 mAh g{sup −1} and a reversible specific capacity of 210.2 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles at a constant density of 25 mA g{sup −1} (1 C = 250 mA g{sup −1}) are acquired. Even at 10 C, it still delivers a discharge capacity of approximately 100 mA h g{sup −1}, thereby indicating its excellent high power performance. The sample also shows enhanced cycling performance with 88.5%, 79.9% and 90.5% of capacity retention after 100 cycles at 0.5, 5 and 10 C rates, respectively. Besides, 84.5% of initial capacity is retained even after 200 cycles at 10 C. Consequently, the fascinating electrochemical performance may facilitate the coralline-like LMNCO composite to be a promising alternative cathode for LIBs with a high application potential.

  17. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  18. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  19. [Intoxication with lithium].

    PubMed

    Fiegler, K; Liechti, M E; Bodmer, M; Bruggisser, M

    2009-06-24

    We report a case of a 75-year-old male patient who presented to the emergency room with arterial hypotension and impaired vigilance. The patient was on lithium therapy due to mood disorder. One month earlier medication with a betablocker, a loop-diuretic and an ACE-inhibitor had been started due to heart failure. Findings at admission included renal insufficiency, pneumonia and a slightly increased serum level of lithium. Three days later his Glasgow Coma Scale Score was 7, he showed gaze deviation, increased muscle tonus and cloni. The patient fully recovered after volume substitution and normalization of his renal function. Diagnosis of chronic intoxication with lithium was made due to the clinical picture and after exclusion of neurological pathologies. The pharmacokinetic characteristics of lithium is described and the risk factors leading to lithium intoxication and treatment of intoxication are discussed.

  20. Neuropsychologic effects of lithium discontinuation.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, J H; Shaw, E D; Stokes, P E; Wilner, P; Elliot, A S; Sikes, C; Myers, B; Manevitz, A; Parides, M

    1993-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of blind lithium discontinuation and resumption on measures of cognition, creativity, and fine motor performance in 46 lithium-maintained euthymic outpatients. Scores on memory measures, tests of tapping speed, and associative productivity all improved significantly during the time off of lithium. In an effort to further explain these results, analyses were undertaken with six possible intervening variables: age, sex, lithium concentration in plasma, thyroid function, duration of lithium maintenance, and depressive symptoms. Significant group and interactive effects are reported and discussed. A multiple regression analysis suggested that lithium has a greater neuropsychologic effect in younger, less-depressed patients having higher lithium concentrations in plasma.

  1. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kim, Jeom-Soo; Johnson, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  2. Metastable structure of Li13Si4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Thomas; Bahmann, Silvia; Kortus, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The Li13Si4 phase is one out of several crystalline lithium silicide phases, which is a potential electrode material for lithium ion batteries and contains a high theoretical specific capacity. By means of ab initio methods like density functional theory (DFT) many properties such as heat capacity or heat of formation can be calculated. These properties are based on the calculation of phonon frequencies, which contain information about the thermodynamical stability. The current unit cell of "Li13Si4" given in the ICSD database is unstable with respect to DFT calculations. We propose a modified unit cell that is stable in the calculations. The evolutionary algorithm EVO found a structure very similar to the ICSD one with both of them containing metastable lithium positions. Molecular dynamic simulations show a phase transition between both structures where these metastable lithium atoms move. This phase transition is achieved by a very fast one-dimensional lithium diffusion and stabilizes this phase.

  3. Lithium in drinking water and thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Karin; Concha, Gabriela; Engström, Karin; Lindvall, Magnus; Grandér, Margareta; Vahter, Marie

    2011-06-01

    High concentrations of lithium in drinking water were previously discovered in the Argentinean Andes Mountains. Lithium is used worldwide for treatment of bipolar disorder and treatment-resistant depression. One known side effect is altered thyroid function. We assessed associations between exposure to lithium from drinking water and other environmental sources and thyroid function. Women (n=202) were recruited in four Andean villages in northern Argentina. Lithium exposure was assessed based on concentrations in spot urine samples, measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Thyroid function was evaluated by plasma free thyroxine (T4) and pituitary gland thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), analyzed by routine immunometric methods. The median urinary lithium concentration was 3,910 μg/L (5th, 95th percentiles, 270 μg/L, 10,400 μg/L). Median plasma concentrations (5th, 95th percentiles) of T4 and TSH were 17 pmol/L (13 pmol/L, 21 pmol/L) and 1.9 mIU/L, (0.68 mIU/L, 4.9 mIU/L), respectively. Urine lithium was inversely associated with T4 [β for a 1,000-μg/L increase=-0.19; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.31 to -0.068; p=0.002] and positively associated with TSH (β=0.096; 95% CI, 0.033 to 0.16; p=0.003). Both associations persisted after adjustment (for T4, β=-0.17; 95% CI, -0.32 to -0.015; p=0.032; for TSH: β=0.089; 95% CI, 0.024 to 0.15; p=0.007). Urine selenium was positively associated with T4 (adjusted T4 for a 1 μg/L increase: β=0.041; 95% CI, 0.012 to 0.071; p=0.006). Exposure to lithium via drinking water and other environmental sources may affect thyroid function, consistent with known side effects of medical treatment with lithium. This stresses the need to screen for lithium in all drinking water sources.

  4. Electrochemical analysis of lithium polymer batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong-Bong

    electrochemists. In order to solve this problem, we have developed a method to measure the kinetic parameters such as symmetry factor and exchange current density by AC impedance measurement based on porous electrode theory. One significant conclusion predicted from porous electrode theory is that the distribution of local reaction rate at the active particles is not uniform in the cathode during charge and discharge. In order to verify porous electrode theory experimentally, we have measured the lithium metal anode potential versus a lithium reference electrode during the discharge of Li/V 6O13 cells and then analyzed the data by using a mathematical model based on porous electrode theory. The results were explained by the nonuniform distribution of local reaction rate at the active particles and were consistent with porous electrode theory.

  5. Sealed Lithium Inorganic Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    MuWrn , 1,ad iw..am m4 IdM.D to We"L406W) Inorganic Electrolyte lattery Carbon Cathode Evaluation Thionyl Chloride Gas Generation Lithium C ell sign...hardware surface to carry the reductIon of thionyl chloride when in contact with lithium (self discharge) and the corro,’ion of hardware materials... Lithium - Aluminum Chloride 10) AOSTSAC? (Cmawl/e o ade H .m.eewr W MWO, AV 600 nwe w) Stdies were continued of the effects of hardware materials on the

  6. Lithium Combustion: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    lithium vapors generated with air formed an intense white flame that produced branched- chain condensation aerosol particles, of concentrations 򓆄 mg/im3...generated chain -aggregate lithium combustion aerosols in dry, COg-free air prior to reaction with 0, 0.10, 0.50, 1.0, 1.75, or 5.0% CO in air at a...In order to burn in gaseous chlorine or in bromine or iodine vapor, lithium needs to be heated. With iodine vapor, the reaction is accompanied by

  7. Lithium and Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed

    Sípek, A

    1989-01-01

    The article deals with Ebstein's anomaly, lithium and their relationship. Some studies suggest that lithium might be involved as a teratogen increasing the incidence of Ebstein's anomaly in the offspring of female patients with manio-depressive psychosis and lithium-administered during pregnancy. The second part of the article contains data on the incidence of Ebstein's anomaly in the Czech Socialist Republic between 1960 and 1985. The results indicate a steady rise in the incidence of this congenital malformation over the above period of time.

  8. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  9. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  10. Lithium causes G2 arrest of renal principal cells.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Theun; Alsady, Mohammad; Jaklofsky, Marcel; Otte-Höller, Irene; Baumgarten, Ruben; Giles, Rachel H; Deen, Peter M T

    2014-03-01

    Vasopressin-regulated expression and insertion of aquaporin-2 channels in the luminal membrane of renal principal cells is essential for urine concentration. Lithium affects urine concentrating ability, and approximately 20% of patients treated with lithium develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disorder characterized by polyuria and polydipsia. Lithium-induced NDI is caused by aquaporin-2 downregulation and a reduced ratio of principal/intercalated cells, yet lithium induces principal cell proliferation. Here, we studied how lithium-induced principal cell proliferation can lead to a reduced ratio of principal/intercalated cells using two-dimensional and three-dimensional polarized cultures of mouse renal collecting duct cells and mice treated with clinically relevant lithium concentrations. DNA image cytometry and immunoblotting revealed that lithium initiated proliferation of mouse renal collecting duct cells but also increased the G2/S ratio, indicating G2/M phase arrest. In mice, treatment with lithium for 4, 7, 10, or 13 days led to features of NDI and an increase in the number of principal cells expressing PCNA in the papilla. Remarkably, 30%-40% of the PCNA-positive principal cells also expressed pHistone-H3, a late G2/M phase marker detected in approximately 20% of cells during undisturbed proliferation. Our data reveal that lithium treatment initiates proliferation of renal principal cells but that a significant percentage of these cells are arrested in the late G2 phase, which explains the reduced principal/intercalated cell ratio and may identify the molecular pathway underlying the development of lithium-induced renal fibrosis.

  11. Lithium Causes G2 Arrest of Renal Principal Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Theun; Alsady, Mohammad; Jaklofsky, Marcel; Otte-Höller, Irene; Baumgarten, Ruben; Giles, Rachel H.

    2014-01-01

    Vasopressin-regulated expression and insertion of aquaporin-2 channels in the luminal membrane of renal principal cells is essential for urine concentration. Lithium affects urine concentrating ability, and approximately 20% of patients treated with lithium develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disorder characterized by polyuria and polydipsia. Lithium-induced NDI is caused by aquaporin-2 downregulation and a reduced ratio of principal/intercalated cells, yet lithium induces principal cell proliferation. Here, we studied how lithium-induced principal cell proliferation can lead to a reduced ratio of principal/intercalated cells using two-dimensional and three-dimensional polarized cultures of mouse renal collecting duct cells and mice treated with clinically relevant lithium concentrations. DNA image cytometry and immunoblotting revealed that lithium initiated proliferation of mouse renal collecting duct cells but also increased the G2/S ratio, indicating G2/M phase arrest. In mice, treatment with lithium for 4, 7, 10, or 13 days led to features of NDI and an increase in the number of principal cells expressing PCNA in the papilla. Remarkably, 30%–40% of the PCNA-positive principal cells also expressed pHistone-H3, a late G2/M phase marker detected in approximately 20% of cells during undisturbed proliferation. Our data reveal that lithium treatment initiates proliferation of renal principal cells but that a significant percentage of these cells are arrested in the late G2 phase, which explains the reduced principal/intercalated cell ratio and may identify the molecular pathway underlying the development of lithium-induced renal fibrosis. PMID:24408872

  12. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  13. Performance of SONY 18650-HC Lithium-Ion Cells for Various Cycling Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-15

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-2010(8550)-5 Performance of SONY 18650 -HC Lithium-Ion Cells for Various Cycling Rates 15 January 2010 Albert H...SONY 18650 -HC Lithium-Ion Cells for Various Cycling Rates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-09-C-0001 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 20100310195 14. ABSTRACT Five different life tests of SONY 18650 -HC lithium

  14. Lithium Sulfuryl Chloride Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Primary batteries , Electrochemistry, Ionic current, Electrolytes, Cathodes(Electrolytic cell), Anodes(Electrolytic cell), Thionyl chloride ...Phosphorus compounds, Electrical conductivity, Calibration, Solutions(Mixtures), Electrical resistance, Performance tests, Solvents, Lithium compounds

  15. Lithium Mining, Nevada

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the once-abandoned mining town of Silver Peak, Nevada, which began to thrive again when Foote Mineral Company began extracting lithium from brine below the floor of Clayton Valley in 1966.

  16. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  17. Lithium and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, a drug used to treat bipolar disorders, has a variety of neuroprotective mechanisms, including autophagy regulation, in various neuropsychiatric conditions. In neurodegenerative diseases, lithium enhances degradation of aggregate-prone proteins, including mutated huntingtin, phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein, and causes damaged mitochondria to degrade, while in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer’s disease autophagy downregulation by lithium is observed. The signaling pathway of lithium as an autophagy enhancer might be associated with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent pathway, which is involved in myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in Huntington’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. However, the mTOR-dependent pathway might be involved in inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in other diseases. Lithium’s autophagy-enhancing property may contribute to the therapeutic benefit of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24738557

  18. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  19. Superior lithium adsorption and required magnetic separation behavior of iron-doped lithium ion-sieves

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shulei; Zheng, Shili; Wang, Zheming; ...

    2018-09-09

    The recent research on adsorption-based lithium recovery from lithium-containing solutions has been centred on adsorption capacity and separation of lithium ion-sieves powder from solutions. Herein, an effective iron-doped lithium titanium oxide (Fe-doped Li2TiO3) was synthesized by Fe-doping via solid state reactions followed by acid treatment to form iron-doped lithium ion-sieves (Fe/Ti-x(H)). The resulting solid powder displays both superior adsorption capacity of lithium and high separation efficiency of the adsorbent from the solutions. SEM imaging and BET surface area measurement results showed that at Fe doping levels x ≤ 0.15, Fe-doping led to grain shrinkage as compared to Li2TiO3 and atmore » the same time the BET surface area increased. The Fe/Ti-0.15(H) exhibited saturated magnetization values of 13.76 emu g-1, allowing effective separation of the material from solid suspensions through the use of a magnet. Consecutive magnetic separation results suggested that the Fe/Ti-0.15(H) powders could be applied at large-scale and continuously removed from LiOH solutions with separation efficiency of 96% or better. Lithium adsorption studies indicated that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of Fe/Ti-0.15(H) in LiOH solutions (1.8 g L-1 Li, pH 12) reached 53.3 mg g-1 within 24 h, which was higher than that of pristine Li2TiO3 (50.5 mg g-1) without Fe doping. Competitive adsorption and regeneration results indicated that the Fe/Ti-0.15(H) possessed a high selectivity for Li with facile regeneration. Therefore, it could be expected that the iron-doped lithium ion-sieves have practical applicability potential for large scale lithium extraction and recovery from lithium-bearing solutions.« less

  20. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  1. Atmospheric corrosion of lithium electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.

    1981-10-01

    Atmospheric corrosion of lithium during lithium-cell assembly and the dry storage of cells prior to electrolyte fill has been found to initiate lithium corrosion pits and to form corrosion products. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate lithium pitting and the white floccullent corrosion products. Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and Auger spectroscopy in combination with X-ray diffraction were used to characterize lithium surfaces. Lithium surfaces with corrosion products were found to be high in carbonate content indicating the presence of lithium carbonate. Lithium electrodes dry stored in unfilled batteries were found to contain high concentration of lithium flouride a possible corrosion product from gaseous materials from the carbon monofluoride cathode. Future investigations of the corrosion phenomena will emphasize the effect of the corrosion products on the electrolyte and ultimate battery performance. The need to protect lithium electrodes from atmospheric exposure is commonly recognized to minimize corrosion induced by reaction with water, oxygen, carbon dioxide or nitrogen (1). Manufacturing facilities customarily limit the relative humidity to less than two percent. Electrodes that have been manufactured for use in lithium cells are typically stored in dry-argon containers. In spite of these precautions, lithium has been found to corrode over a long time period due to residual gases or slow diffusion of the same into storage containers. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the nature of the lithium corrosion.

  2. Lithium in staurolite and its petrologic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrow, Barbara L.; Holdaway, M. J.; Hinton, R. W.

    1986-12-01

    Natural metapelitic staurolites contain appreciable amounts of lithium. Lithium contents were determined by ion microprobe with concentrations of representative samples independently analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry for calibration. Seventy-one percent of the analyzed staurolites contain >0.1 wt.% Li2O, although the distribution is skewed to values less than 0.3 wt.%. High Li contents observed in staurolite are attributed to one or more of several factors: initiation of staurolite breakdown, lack of additional host phases for lithium (e.g. biotite), pre-metamorphic Li-rich bulk rock composition, and/or interaction of the rock with Li-rich fluids. Li content is generally not correlated with the modal amount of staurolite in the rock, rather Li values tend to reflect variable host rock Li. Lithium most likely resides in the R2+ tetrahedral site. Its incorporation into the structure is probably related to a coupled substitution with Al: ivLi viA1/3 ivR{-1/2+} vi□-1/3 When staurolite analyses yield low R2+ and high Al values, the possibility of high Li should be considered after accounting for variable H. Lithium partitions into common pelitic metamorphic minerals in the order staurolite>cordierite>biotite>muscovite> garnet, tourmaline, and chloritoid. Partitioning is non-ideal in staurolite and a function of Fe content. Li in staurolite expands its stability field to a higher T relative to garnet and sillimanite, and to a lower T relative to chloritoid and Al-silicate. Analysis of staurolites for Li may provide further insight into this enigmatic mineral.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of lithium silicate/vanadium pentoxide interfacial lithium ion diffusion in thin film lithium ion-conducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqun

    The lithium ion diffusion behavior and mechanism in the glassy electrolyte and the electrolyte/cathode interface during the initial stage of lithium ion diffusing from electrolyte into cathode were investigated using Molecular Dynamics simulation technique. Lithium aluminosilicate glass electrolytes with different R (ratio of the concentration of Al to Li) were simulated. The structural features of the simulated glasses are analyzed using Radial Distribution Function (RDF) and Pair Distribution Function (PDF). The diffusion coefficient and activation energy of lithium ion diffusion in simulated lithium aluminosilicate glasses were calculated and the values are consistent with those in experimental glasses. The behavior of lithium ion diffusion from the glassy electrolyte into a polycrystalline layered intercalation cathode has been studied. The solid electrolyte was a model lithium silicate glass while the cathode was a nanocrystalline vanadia with amorphous V2O5 intergranular films (IGF) between the V2O5 crystals. Two different orientations between the V2O5 crystal planes are presented for lithium ion intercalation via the amorphous vanadia IGF. A series of polycrystalline vanadia cathodes with 1.3, 1.9, 2.9 and 4.4 nm thickness IGFs were simulated to examine the effects of the IGF thickness on lithium ion transport in the polycrystalline vanadia cathodes. The simulated results showed that the lithium ions diffused from the glassy electrolyte into the IGF of the polycrystalline vanadia cathode and then part of those lithium ions diffused into the crystalline V2O5 from the IGF. The simulated results also showed an ordering of the vanadium ion structure in the IGF near the IGF/V2 O5 interface. The ordering structure still existed with glass former silica additive in IGF. Additionally, 2.9 run is suggested to be the optimal thickness of the IGF, which is neither too thick to decrease the capacity of the cathode nor too thin to impede the transport of lithium from

  4. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-01

    In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H(2)O(2) (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75°C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H(2)O(2) in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1-(1-X)(1/3)=k(c)t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model 'ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles' i.e. 1-3(1-X)(2/3)+2(1-X)=k(c)t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. US Navy lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of lithium systems that are already in the fleet are discussed. The approach that the Navy is taking in the control of the introduction of lithium batteries into the fleet is also discussed.

  6. Rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    The cycling performance of a secondary lithium cell with a 2-methyl THF lithium hectofluorarsenate electrolyte is discussed. Stripping efficiency, dendritization, passivation on standing, and discharge efficiency are considered.

  7. Composition and growth behavior of the surface and electrolyte decomposition layer of/on a commercial lithium ion battery LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cathode determined by sputter depth profile X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Philip; Winter, Martin

    2013-12-23

    A detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of the surface and electrolyte decomposition layer of a LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC) cathode from commercial NMC/graphite cells by intense sputter depth profiling (SDP) using a polyatomic ion gun is provided. Cathodes of a cell after electrochemical formation and a cell at a state of initial capacity (SOIC) of 80%, which was reached after 2500 full cycles at 30 °C, are investigated.

  8. The Hyades lithium problem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Fritz J.; Faulkner, John; Rogers, Forrest J.; Iglesias, Carlos A.

    1994-04-01

    We now explore the self-consistent consequences of more complete opacity tables and several other physical improvements in both solar and Hyades models. We examine their impact on pre-main-sequence (PMS) lithium depletion, the depth of the solar convective zone, and the deduced helium abundances for the Sun and Hyades (the latter involving an appeal to the observed Hyades mass-luminosity relationship). Adopted improvements are (1) OPAL interior opacities (with solar photospheric or meteoritic iron abundances), (2) new surfaces opacities (Alexander 1992), (3) calibrated parameters (from Proffitt & Michaud 1991a) for the pressure ionization prescription of the EFF (Eggleton, Faulkner, & Flannery 1973) equation of state, and (4) electrostatic corrections to the equation of state. (1) and (3) significantly increase depletion while (2) significantly decreases the depletion. While the 'best' models deplete substantially more lithium than our early models, they do not deplete quite enough to fit the observed pattern. (A notable 'peculiarity' of the 'best' self-consistent models so produced is that the deduced Hyades helium mass fraction falls short of the solar model value by approximately 0.02.) Finally, we explore a number of separate, additional possible changes that could produce an excellent self-consistent fit to both the Hyades lithium depletion pattern and the observed mass-luminosity relationship. Three such changes are: (1) an increase in opacity of approximately 14% in the 1-4 million degree range (which also produces a solar model with the correct convective depth as determined from oscillations); (2) an increase in (Fe/H)Hyades from 0.13 to approximately 0.27 (which also increases the deduced helium content of the Hyades to slightly more than the solar value); (3) a modest amount of convective overshooting, by approximately 0.08 of a pressure scale height, Hp. Since some earlier, studies required overshooting by approximately 0.7Hp to roughly fit the observed

  9. Lithium Inorganic Electrolyte Battery Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-01-01

    rjp 3.2 PRISMATIC CELLS This subsection presents the results of the investigations conducted on large prismatic lithium thionyl chloride cells, both...91 5.0 PASSIVATION 5.1 INTRODUCTION Passivation in Li/SOC12 cells consists of the surface reaction of lithium directly with thionyl chloride to...produce a film of lithium chloride (LiCI). This film prevents the complete and rapid reaction of lithium and thionyl chloride at moderate temperatures. On

  10. Lithium plasma emitter for collisionless magnetized plasma experiment.

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Huang, Yi-Jue; Syugu, Wun-Jheng; Song, Sung-Xuang; Hsieh, Tung-Yuan; Cheng, C Z

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a newly developed lithium plasma emitter, which can provide quiescent and low-temperature collisionless conditions for magnetized plasma experiments. This plasma emitter generates thermal emissions of lithium ions and electrons to produce a lithium plasma. Lithium type beta-eucryptite and lanthanum-hexaboride (LaB(6)) powders were mixed and directly heated with a tungsten heater to synthesize ion and electron emissions. As a result, a plasma with a diameter of ~15 cm was obtained in a magnetic mirror configuration. The typical range of electron density was 10(12)-10(13) m(-3) and that of electron temperature was 0.1-0.8 eV with the emitter operation temperature of about 1500 K. The amplitude fluctuations for the plasma density were lower than 1%. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  11. Anisotropic Tuning of Graphite Thermal Conductivity by Lithium Intercalation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Gu, Xiaokun; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Yang, Ronggui

    2016-11-17

    Understanding thermal transport in lithium intercalated layered materials is not only important for managing heat generation and dissipation in lithium ion batteries but also the understanding potentially provides a novel way to design materials with reversibly tunable thermal conductivity. In this work, the thermal conductivity of lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (LixC6) is calculated using molecular dynamics simulations as a function of the amount of lithium intercalated. We found that intercalation of lithium has an anisotropic effect on tuning the thermal conductivity: the thermal conductivity in the basal plane decreases monotonically from 1232 W/m·K of pristine graphite to 444 W/m·K of the fully lithiated LiC6, while the thermal conductivity along the c-axis decreases first from 6.5 W/m·K for graphite to 1.3 W/m·K for LiC18 and then increases to 5.0 W/m·K for LiC6 as the lithium composition increases. More importantly, we provide the very first atomic-scale insight into the effect of lithium intercalation on the spectral phonon properties of graphite. The intercalated lithium ions are found to suppress the phonon lifetime and to reduce the group velocity of phonons parallel to the basal plane but significantly to increase the phonon group velocity along the c-axis, which anisotropically tunes the thermal conductivity of lithiated graphite compounds. This work could shed some light on the search for tunable thermal conductivity materials and might have strong impacts on the thermal management of lithium ion batteries.

  12. Effects of maintenance lithium treatment on serum parathyroid hormone and calcium levels: a retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Umberto; De Cori, David; Aguglia, Andrea; Barbaro, Francesca; Lanfranco, Fabio; Bogetto, Filippo; Maina, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study was to evaluate the effects of maintenance lithium treatment on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium levels. Methods A retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study design was used. Data were collected from the database of a tertiary psychiatric center covering the years 2010–2014. Included were bipolar patients who had never been exposed to lithium and had lithium started, and who had PTH, and total and ionized calcium levels available before and during lithium treatment. Paired t-tests were used to analyze changes in PTH and calcium levels. Linear regressions were performed, with mean lithium level and duration of lithium exposure as independent variables and change in PTH levels as dependent variable. Results A total 31 patients were included. The mean duration of lithium treatment was 18.6±11.4 months. PTH levels significantly increased during lithium treatment (+13.55±14.20 pg/mL); the rate of hyperparathyroidism was 12.9%. Neither total nor ionized calcium increased from baseline to follow-up; none of our patients developed hypercalcemia. Linear regressions analyses did not show an effect of duration of lithium exposure or mean lithium level on PTH levels. Conclusion Lithium-associated stimulation of parathyroid function is more common than assumed to date. Among parameters to be evaluated prior to lithium implementation, calcium and PTH should be added. PMID:26229473

  13. Nonflammable perfluoropolyether-based electrolytes for lithium batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Dominica H. C.; Thelen, Jacob L.; Fu, Yanbao; Devaux, Didier; Pandya, Ashish A.; Battaglia, Vincent S.; Balsara, Nitash P.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The flammability of conventional alkyl carbonate electrolytes hinders the integration of large-scale lithium-ion batteries in transportation and grid storage applications. In this study, we have prepared a unique nonflammable electrolyte composed of low molecular weight perfluoropolyethers and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide lithium salt. These electrolytes exhibit thermal stability beyond 200 °C and a remarkably high transference number of at least 0.91 (more than double that of conventional electrolytes). Li/LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cells made with this electrolyte show good performance in galvanostatic cycling, confirming their potential as rechargeable lithium batteries with enhanced safety and longevity. PMID:24516123

  14. Nonflammable perfluoropolyether-based electrolytes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dominica H C; Thelen, Jacob L; Fu, Yanbao; Devaux, Didier; Pandya, Ashish A; Battaglia, Vincent S; Balsara, Nitash P; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2014-03-04

    The flammability of conventional alkyl carbonate electrolytes hinders the integration of large-scale lithium-ion batteries in transportation and grid storage applications. In this study, we have prepared a unique nonflammable electrolyte composed of low molecular weight perfluoropolyethers and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide lithium salt. These electrolytes exhibit thermal stability beyond 200 °C and a remarkably high transference number of at least 0.91 (more than double that of conventional electrolytes). Li/LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cells made with this electrolyte show good performance in galvanostatic cycling, confirming their potential as rechargeable lithium batteries with enhanced safety and longevity.

  15. Lithium insertion in graphite from ternary ionic liquid-lithium salt electrolytes. I. Electrochemical characterization of the electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appetecchi, Giovanni B.; Montanino, Maria; Balducci, Andrea; Lux, Simon F.; Winterb, Martin; Passerini, Stefano

    In this paper we report the results of chemical-physical investigation performed on ternary room temperature ionic liquid-lithium salt mixtures as electrolytes for lithium-ion battery systems. The ternary electrolytes were made by mixing N-methyl- N-propyl pyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl) imide (PYR 13FSI) and N-butyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (PYR 14TFSI) ionic liquids with lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF 6) or lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI). The mixtures were developed based on preliminary results on the cyclability of graphite electrodes in the IL-LiX binary electrolytes. The results clearly show the beneficial synergic effect of the two ionic liquids on the electrochemical properties of the mixtures.

  16. Reversibility of anodic lithium in rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jiang-Lan; Okasinski, John S; Kenesei, Peter; Dobbs, Howard A; Zhao, Dan; Almer, Jonathan D; Liu, Di-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Non-aqueous lithium-air batteries represent the next-generation energy storage devices with very high theoretical capacity. The benefit of lithium-air batteries is based on the assumption that the anodic lithium is completely reversible during the discharge-charge process. Here we report our investigation on the reversibility of the anodic lithium inside of an operating lithium-air battery using spatially and temporally resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction and three-dimensional micro-tomography technique. A combined electrochemical process is found, consisting of a partial recovery of lithium metal during the charging cycle and a constant accumulation of lithium hydroxide under both charging and discharging conditions. A lithium hydroxide layer forms on the anode separating the lithium metal from the separator. However, numerous microscopic 'tunnels' are also found within the hydroxide layer that provide a pathway to connect the metallic lithium with the electrolyte, enabling sustained ion-transport and battery operation until the total consumption of lithium.

  17. Lithium Dinitramide as an Additive in Lithium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkovenko, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    Lithium dinitramide, LiN(NO2)2 has shown promise as an additive to nonaqueous electrolytes in rechargeable and non-rechargeable lithium-ion-based electrochemical power cells. Such non-aqueous electrolytes consist of lithium salts dissolved in mixtures of organic ethers, esters, carbonates, or acetals. The benefits of adding lithium dinitramide (which is also a lithium salt) include lower irreversible loss of capacity on the first charge/discharge cycle, higher cycle life, lower self-discharge, greater flexibility in selection of electrolyte solvents, and greater charge capacity. The need for a suitable electrolyte additive arises as follows: The metallic lithium in the anode of a lithium-ion-based power cell is so highly reactive that in addition to the desired main electrochemical reaction, it engages in side reactions that cause formation of resistive films and dendrites, which degrade performance as quantified in terms of charge capacity, cycle life, shelf life, first-cycle irreversible capacity loss, specific power, and specific energy. The incidence of side reactions can be reduced through the formation of a solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) a thin film that prevents direct contact between the lithium anode material and the electrolyte. Ideally, an SEI should chemically protect the anode and the electrolyte from each other while exhibiting high conductivity for lithium ions and little or no conductivity for electrons. A suitable additive can act as an SEI promoter. Heretofore, most SEI promotion was thought to derive from organic molecules in electrolyte solutions. In contrast, lithium dinitramide is inorganic. Dinitramide compounds are known as oxidizers in rocket-fuel chemistry and until now, were not known as SEI promoters in battery chemistry. Although the exact reason for the improvement afforded by the addition of lithium dinitramide is not clear, it has been hypothesized that lithium dinitramide competes with other electrolyte constituents to react with

  18. LITHIUM PROPHYLAXIS IN AFFECTIVE DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Rao, A. Venkoba; Hariharasubramanian, N.; Devi, S. Parvathi; Sugumar, A.; Srinivasan, V.

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY Out of 108 patients on the rolls in the Lithium clinic, Madurai Medical College and Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, India, 47 patients suffering from affective disorders receiving lithium continuously for more than three years were analysed with a view to study the recurrences. Thirteen suffered no relapses while on lithium while nineteen experienced them while on lithium. Four were free from recurrences after lithium was withdrawn- Seven defaulted but suffered recurrences while in four the drug was withdrawn and in both the groups remission was achieved with re-administration of lithium. The study reveals that lithium besides averting the recurrences can reduce the frequency, number, duration, intensity of episodes and improve the amenability to drugs. Among the symptoms, suicidal ideas and behaviour and insight were found to be influenced favourably by lithium. Among the factors that help favourable response to lithium were a positive family history of affective disorder, in the first degree relatives and lesser frequency and number of episodes in the pre-lithium period. A reappraisal of the natural history of the illness is called for in the light of lithium prophylaxis of manic depressive psychosis. PMID:21965880

  19. Lithium tetraborate transducer cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosinski, John; Ballato, Arthur; Lukaszek, Theodore

    1990-03-01

    Lithium tetraborate is a tetragonal material of considerable promise for frequency control and signal processing applications. It exhibits piezoelectric coupling values that fall between those of lithium niobate and quartz, but possesses orientations for which the temperature coefficient of frequency and delay time is zero for bulk and surface acoustic waves. In this report, we discuss the properties of two doubly rotated bulk wave resonator orientations having both first- and second-order temperature coefficients equal to zero. These are suitable for shear and compressional wave transducers in applications where very low temperature sensitivity is required simultaneously with moderately strong piezocoupling coefficients.

  20. Lithium tetraborate transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballato, Arthur; Kosinski, John A.; Lukaszek, Ted J.

    1991-01-01

    Lithium tetraborate is a tetragonal material of considerable promise for frequency control and signal processing applications. It exhibits piezoelectric coupling values that fall between those of lithium niobate and quartz, but possesses orientations for which the temperature coefficient of frequency and delay time is zero for bulk and surface acoustic waves. The properties of two doubly rotated bulk wave resonator orientations having first- and second-order temperature coefficients equal to zero are discussed. These are suitable for shear and compressional wave transducers in applications where very low temperature sensitivity is required simultaneously with moderately strong piezocoupling coefficients.

  1. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  2. Large lithium loop experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Owen, T.J.; Berg, J.D.; Atwood, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    An engineering design and operating experience of a large, isothermal, lithium-coolant test loop are presented. This liquid metal coolant loop is called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) and has operated safely and reliably for over 6500 hours through September 1981. The loop is used for full-scale testing of components for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Main system parameters include coolant temperatures to 430/sup 0/C and flow to 0.038 m/sup 3//s (600 gal/min). Performance of the main pump, vacuum system, and control system is discussed. Unique test capabilities of the ELS are also discussed.

  3. Investigation of Lithium Ion Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Leonine; Rao, Gopalkrishna M.

    1999-01-01

    NASA/GSFC is interested in flying lithium ion cells for geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) satellites. To determine the preferred solstice storage conditions for the lithium ion chemistry, we have been studying either a constant current storage with a maximum voltage clamp or storage with only a voltage clamp. The cells used for this study are two 4Ah SAFT cylindrical lithium ion cells, two 1.5Ah Wilson Great Batch lithium ion cells, and one 8Ah Lithium Technology lithium polymer cell. In each pair, one cell is clamped at 4V, and the other is trickle charged at C/500 with a 4.lV clamp. The Lithium Technology cell is only undergoing voltage clamped storage testing. After each storage period the cells are subjected to a capacity test (C/2 discharge, C/10 charge) and a charge retention test at room temperature. Results after 4 weeks and 8 weeks of storage testing will be presented here.

  4. Lithium-induced renal insufficiency: a longitudinal study of creatinine increases in intellectually disabled adults.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, David S; Buneviciute, Juste; Hu, Qiaoyan; Davis, John M

    2011-12-01

    Lithium has been shown to increase serum creatinine levels in a subgroup of patients. However, lithium-induced increases in serum creatinine have not been well studied with regard to timing, trajectory, or predictability. The medical records of 16 intellectually disabled individuals treated with lithium between 1980 and 2010 in whom serum creatinine levels peaked at 1.5 mg/100 mL or higher (ie, who developed renal insufficiency) were reviewed. These individuals were compared with a group of 36 similar lithium-treated individuals in whom serum creatinine did not reach 1.5 mg/100 mL. The 16 lithium-treated individuals who developed renal insufficiency had a mean peak serum creatinine level of 1.8 ± 0.3 mg/100 mL while on lithium. The mean time from institution of lithium until the 1.5 mg/100 mL serum creatinine level was first reached was 7.9 years. After lithium was discontinued, overall mean serum creatinine levels did not significantly change. Reaching a serum creatinine level of 1.3 or 1.4 mg/100 mL predicted reaching a 1.5 mg/100 mL level or higher. No significant differences in the age lithium was started, baseline serum creatinine levels, years receiving lithium, sex, or race differentiated those who developed renal insufficiency. Prescribing lithium led to elevated serum creatinine levels in some individuals. A serum creatinine level of 1.3 and/or 1.4 mg/100 mL predicted renal insufficiency. Clinical implications of this study are that if 1 serum creatinine result reaches 1.3 mg/100 mL or more, intensive monitoring for further increases is indicated.

  5. Lithium stimulates the release of human parathyroid hormone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J; Klandorf, H; Giuliano, A; Van Herle, A

    1988-06-01

    The effect of lithium on PTH release from human parathyroid tissue was studied using a perifusion system and an immunoradiometric assay for intact human PTH. Tissue was obtained from three patients undergoing surgery for thyroid disease, three patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism due to chronic renal insufficiency, and four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism due to a parathyroid adenoma. Addition of lithium in concentrations equivalent to the therapeutic serum levels normally attained in man (1.3 mmol/L) resulted in a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in PTH release under normocalcemic (1.15 mmol/L) conditions from normal and hyperplastic tissues. The magnitude of the lithium-induced response of PTH release ranged from a 1.4- to 5.3-fold increase above basal levels (perifusion with 1.15 mmol/L calcium alone) and was comparable to the response during a low calcium (0.42 mmol/L) perifusion. Although the response to lithium was delayed compared to that of hypocalcemia, PTH returned to basal levels immediately after removal of either stimulator. In contrast, parathyroid adenomas did not respond to either lithium or hypocalcemia in a characteristic manner, but, rather, functioned in an autonomous fashion with repeated pulsatile bursts of PTH release that were not suppressible even under hypercalcemic (1.70 mmol/L) conditions. These in vitro studies suggest that lithium therapy may elevate serum PTH levels in some patients and could, thus, be responsible for hypercalcemia in them.

  6. Lithium Abundance in M3 Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givens, Rashad; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the abundance of lithium in the red giant star vZ 1050 (SK 291) in the globular cluster M3. A previous survey of giants in the cluster showed that like IV-101, vZ 1050 displays a prominent Li I 6707 Å feature. vZ 1050 lies on the blue side of the red giant branch about 1.3 magnitudes above the level of the horizontal branch, and may be an asymptotic giant branch star. A high resolution spectrum of M3 vZ1050 was obtained with the ARC 3.5m telescope and the ARC Echelle Spectrograph (ARCES). Atmospheric parameters were determined using Fe I and Fe II lines from the spectrum using the MOOG spectral analysis program, and the lithium abundance was determined using spectrum synthesis.

  7. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  8. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  9. Lithium disulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1988-01-01

    A negative electrode limited secondary electrochemical cell having dense FeS.sub.2 positive electrode operating exclusively on the upper plateau, a Li alloy negative electrode and a suitable lithium-containing electrolyte. The electrolyte preferably is 25 mole percent LiCl, 38 mole percent LiBr and 37 mole percent KBr. The cell may be operated isothermally.

  10. Lithium battery discharge tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The long term discharge of a variety of lithium cells was characterized and the susceptibility of the cells to chemical variation during the slow discharge was tested. A shunt resistor was set across the terminals to monitor the voltage as a function of time. Failures were identified by premature voltage drops.

  11. Lithium Polymer Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    formation of the galvanic cell , lithium foil approximately 150 µm thick and with an area of 0.785 cm2 was placed on top of the pressed electrolyte/cathode...pellet. The entire galvanic cell fabricated in this configuration was hermetically sealed and under pressure. A Tenney environmental chamber was

  12. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Manis Kumar Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: • Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. • Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. • The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. • Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. • After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 °C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 − (1 − X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ‘ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles’ i.e. 1 − 3(1 − X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 − X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  13. The Classical Hyades Lithium Problem Revisited II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, F. J.; Faulkner, J.; Rogers, F. J.; Iglesias, C. A.

    1992-05-01

    Swenson, Stringfellow, and Faulkner (1990) suggested that deficiencies in interior opacities could be responsible for stellar models underestimating pre-main sequence (PMS) lithium depletion. They showed that models with increased interior opacities can produce excellent theoretical agreement with the pattern of depletion observed in the Hyades G-dwarfs. The first abstract in this series (1990, BAAS, 22, 1223) showed, as anticipated, that models using OPAL interior opacities instead of Cox-Tabor opacities experience considerably more PMS depletion. We now explore the consequences of a variety of physical improvements in both solar and Hyades models. We examine their impact on PMS lithium depletion, the depth of the solar convective zone, and the deduced helium abundance for the Sun and Hyades. (The deduction of the Hyades helium abundance is accomplished by making a detailed comparison between models and the observed Hyades Mass-Luminosity relationship.) Improvements are (1) the adoption of OPAL interior opacities (with photospheric or meteoritic iron abundances), (2) adoption of new surface opacities (Alexander 1992), (3) calibrated parameters for the pressure ionization prescription of the EFF equation of state (Proffitt & Michaud 1991), and (4) full inclusion of electrostatic corrections to the EFF EOS. (1) and (3) significantly increase depletion while (2) significantly decreases the depletion. While our ``best'' models deplete more lithium than our early models, they do not deplete enough to fit the observed pattern. We do, however, consider a number of changes that can produce an excellent fit to both the Hyades lithium depletion pattern and the Mass-Luminosity diagram. Two of which are: (i) an increase in opacity of ~ 13\\ 1 to 4 million degree range (this also produces a solar model with the correct convective depth as determined from oscillations), and (ii) an increase in [Fe/H]_Hyades from 0.13 to ~ 0.26 (this also increases the deduced helium content of

  14. Lithium-cation conductivity and crystal structure of lithium diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, V.I.; Sherstobitova, E.A.; Blatov, V.A.; Shekhtman, G.Sh.

    2014-03-15

    The electrical conductivity of lithium diphosphate Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been measured and jump-like increasing of ionic conductivity at 913 K has been found. The crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction at 300–1050 K. At 913 K low temperature triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.8261(4) Å, b=5.2028(4) Å, c=13.3119(2) Å, β=104.372(6)°. The migration maps of Li{sup +} cations based on experimental data implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. It was found that lithium cations in both low- and high temperature forms of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} migrate in three dimensions. Cross sections of the migrations channels extend as the temperature rises, but at the phase transition point have a sharp growth showing a strong “crystal structure – ion conductivity” correlation. -- Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} at 950 K. Red balls represent oxygen atoms; black lines show Li{sup +} ion migration channels in the layers perpendicular to [001] direction. Highlights: • Structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction. • At 913 K triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one. • The migration maps of Li{sup +} implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. • Cross sections of the migrations channels at the phase transition have a sharp growth.

  15. Lithium in rocks from the Lincoln, Helena, and Townsend areas, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner-Tourtelot, Elizabeth F.; Meier, Allen L.; Curtis, Craig A.

    1978-01-01

    In anticipation of increased demand for lithium for energy-related uses, the U.S. Geological Survey has been appraising the lithium resources of the United States and investigating occurrences of lithium. Analyses of samples of chiefly lacustrine rocks of Oligocene age collected by M. R. Mudge near Lincoln, Mont. showed as much as 1,500 ppm lithium. Since then we have sampled the area in greater detail, and have sampled rocks of similar ages in the Helena and Townsend valleys. The lithium-rich beds crop out in a band about 1.3 km long by 0.3 km wide near the head of Beaver Creek, about 14 km northwest of Lincoln, Mont. These beds consist of laminated marlstone, oil shale, carbonaceous shale, limestone, conglomerate, and tuff. Some parts of this sequence average almost 0.1 percent lithium. The lithium-bearing rocks are too low in grade and volume to be economic. Samples of sedimentary rocks of Oligocene age from the Helena and Townsend valleys in the vicinity of Helena, Mont. were generally low in lithium (3-40 ppm). However, samples of rhyolites from the western side of the Helena valley and from the Lava Mountain area were slightly above average in lithium content (6-200 ppm).

  16. Increased risk of solid renal tumors in lithium-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, Mohamad; Stucker, Fabien; Stengel, Bénédicte; Vasiliu, Viorel; Hummel, Aurélie; Landais, Paul; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Ronco, Pierre; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Servais, Aude

    2014-07-01

    Cystic kidney diseases and toxic interstitial nephritis may be complicated by renal tumors. Long-term lithium intake is associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis and renal cysts but to date such an association with tumors has not been determined. We evaluated this in a retrospective study to determine whether lithium-treated patients were at higher risk of renal tumors compared with lithium-free patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and to the general population. Over a 16-year period, 14 of 170 lithium-treated patients had renal tumors, including seven malignant and seven benign tumors. The mean duration of lithium exposure at diagnosis was 21.4 years. The renal cancers included three clear-cell and two papillary renal cell carcinomas, one hybrid tumor with chromophobe and oncocytoma characteristics, and one clear-cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma. The benign tumors included four oncocytomas, one mixed epithelial and stromal tumor, and two angiomyolipomas. The percentage of renal tumors, particularly cancers and oncocytomas, was significantly higher in lithium-treated patients compared with 340 gender-, age-, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-matched lithium-free patients. Additionally, the Standardized Incidence Ratio of renal cancer was significantly higher in lithium-treated patients compared with the general population: 7.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) (1.51-21.95)) and 13.69 (95% CI (3.68-35.06)) in men and women, respectively. Thus, there is an increased risk of renal tumors in lithium-treated patients.

  17. Lithium-methomyl induced seizures in rats: A new model of status epilepticus?

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Rafal M. . E-mail: kaminskr@mail.nih.gov; Blaszczak, Piotr; Dekundy, Andrzej; Parada-Turska, Jolanta; Calderazzo, Lineu; Cavalheiro, Esper A.; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2007-03-15

    Behavioral, electroencephalographic (EEG) and neuropathological effects of methomyl, a carbamate insecticide reversibly inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity, were studied in naive or lithium chloride (24 h, 3 mEq/kg, s.c.) pretreated male Wistar rats. In naive animals, methomyl with equal potency produced motor limbic seizures and fatal status epilepticus. Thus, the CD50 values (50% convulsant dose) for these seizure endpoints were almost equal to the LD50 (50% lethal dose) of methomyl (13 mg/kg). Lithium pretreated rats were much more susceptible to convulsant, but not lethal effect of methomyl. CD50 values of methomyl for motor limbic seizures and status epilepticus were reduced by lithium pretreatment to 3.7 mg/kg (a 3.5-fold decrease) and 5.2 mg/kg (a 2.5-fold decrease), respectively. In contrast, lithium pretreatment resulted in only 1.3-fold decrease of LD50 value of methomyl (9.9 mg/kg). Moreover, lithium-methomyl treated animals developed a long-lasting status epilepticus, which was not associated with imminent lethality observed in methomyl-only treated rats. Scopolamine (10 mg/kg) or diazepam (10 mg/kg) protected all lithium-methomyl treated rats from convulsions and lethality. Cortical and hippocampal EEG recordings revealed typical epileptic discharges that were consistent with behavioral seizures observed in lithium-methomyl treated rats. In addition, convulsions induced by lithium-methomyl treatment were associated with widespread neurodegeneration of limbic structures. Our observations indicate that lithium pretreatment results in separation between convulsant and lethal effects of methomyl in rats. As such, seizures induced by lithium-methomyl administration may be an alternative to lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus, which is associated with high lethality.

  18. Lithium-methomyl induced seizures in rats: a new model of status epilepticus?

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Rafal M; Blaszczak, Piotr; Dekundy, Andrzej; Parada-Turska, Jolanta; Calderazzo, Lineu; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Turski, Waldemar A

    2007-03-01

    Behavioral, electroencephalographic (EEG) and neuropathological effects of methomyl, a carbamate insecticide reversibly inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity, were studied in naive or lithium chloride (24 h, 3 mEq/kg, s.c.) pretreated male Wistar rats. In naive animals, methomyl with equal potency produced motor limbic seizures and fatal status epilepticus. Thus, the CD50 values (50% convulsant dose) for these seizure endpoints were almost equal to the LD50 (50% lethal dose) of methomyl (13 mg/kg). Lithium pretreated rats were much more susceptible to convulsant, but not lethal effect of methomyl. CD50 values of methomyl for motor limbic seizures and status epilepticus were reduced by lithium pretreatment to 3.7 mg/kg (a 3.5-fold decrease) and 5.2 mg/kg (a 2.5-fold decrease), respectively. In contrast, lithium pretreatment resulted in only 1.3-fold decrease of LD50 value of methomyl (9.9 mg/kg). Moreover, lithium-methomyl treated animals developed a long-lasting status epilepticus, which was not associated with imminent lethality observed in methomyl-only treated rats. Scopolamine (10 mg/kg) or diazepam (10 mg/kg) protected all lithium-methomyl treated rats from convulsions and lethality. Cortical and hippocampal EEG recordings revealed typical epileptic discharges that were consistent with behavioral seizures observed in lithium-methomyl treated rats. In addition, convulsions induced by lithium-methomyl treatment were associated with widespread neurodegeneration of limbic structures. Our observations indicate that lithium pretreatment results in separation between convulsant and lethal effects of methomyl in rats. As such, seizures induced by lithium-methomyl administration may be an alternative to lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus, which is associated with high lethality.

  19. Sputter deposition of lithium silicate - lithium phosphate amorphous electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N.J.; Bates, J.B.; Luck, C.F. ); Robertson, J.D. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of an amorphous lithium-conducting electrolyte were deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of ceramic targets containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The lithium content of the films was found to depend more strongly on the nature and composition of the targets than on many other sputtering parameters. For targets containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, most of the lithium was found to segregate away from the sputtered area of the target. Codeposition using two sputter sources achieves a high lithium content in a controlled and reproducible film growth. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C; Popescu, L; Constantinescu, S; Cernescu, S

    1988-01-01

    Studies in human embryo fibroblasts infected with measles or herpes simplex virus showed a reduction in virus yield when cultures were pretreated with 1-10 mM lithium chloride doses. Maximum effect was obtained by a 1 h treatment with 10 mM lithium chloride, preceding viral infection by 19-24 hours. A specific antiviral effect against measles virus was manifest immediately after culture pretreatment. Intermittent treatment with 10 mM lithium chloride of cultures persistently infected with measles or herpes virus obtained from human myeloid K-562 cell line shows a reduction in the extracellular virus yield. In the K-562/herpes virus system, the culture treatment with lithium chloride and acyclovir (10 microM) has an additive inhibitory effect on virus production. The paper is focused on the mechanism of lithium chloride antiviral action and the expediency of lithium therapy in SSPE (subacute sclerosing panencephalitis).

  1. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  2. Sealed Lithium Inorganic Electrolyte Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    revere side it necoeery and idM,1117 "~ bfoh numiber) Inorganic Electrolyte Battery Carbon Cathode Evaluation Thionyl Chloride Gas Generation Lithium ...hardware corrosion in cold rolled steel cans, due to cathodic protection of the cans by the lithium . Recent data 4 showed that thionyl chloride is reduced...very slowly on the surface of nickel and stainless steel, when these materials were in contact with a lithium anode in the thionyl chloride

  3. Membranes in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Hou, Junbo

    2012-07-04

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed.

  4. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Hou, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed. PMID:24958286

  5. Lithium-Inorganic Electrolyte Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PRIMARY BATTERIES , TEMPERATURE, LITHIUM , CATHODES, ELECTRODES, PROTECTIVE COATINGS, PLATINUM, NICKEL, SULFUR, STORAGE, GOLD, RELIABILITY(ELECTRONICS...CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, CARBON BLACK, GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY, THIONYL CHLORIDE , REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY).

  6. Advanced lithium ion battery charger

    SciTech Connect

    Teofilo, V.L.; Merritt, L.V.; Hollandsworth, R.P.

    1997-12-01

    A lithium ion battery charger has been developed for four and eight cell batteries or multiples thereof. This charger has the advantage over those using commercial lithium ion charging chips in that the individual cells are allowed to be taper charged at their upper charging voltage rather than be cutoff when all cells of the string have reached the upper charging voltage limit. Since 30--60% of the capacity of lithium ion cells maybe restored during the taper charge, this charger has a distinct benefit of fully charging lithium ion batteries by restoring all of the available capacity to all of its cells.

  7. Optimized lithium oxyhalide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilroy, W. P.; Schlaikjer, C.; Polsonetti, P.; Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    Lithium thionyl chloride cells were optimized with respect to electrolyte and carbon cathode composition. Wound 'C-size' cells with various mixtures of Chevron acetylene black with Ketjenblack EC-300J and containing various concentrations of LiAlCl4 and derivatives, LiGaCl4, and mixtures of SOCl2 and SO2Cl2 were evaluated as a function of discharge rate, temperature, and storage condition.

  8. Lithium ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, Dave P.; Kwan, Joe W.; Lidia, Steven M.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.

    2014-01-01

    A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion source has been chosen as a source of ˜100mA lithium ion current for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at LBNL. Research and development was carried out on lithium alumino-silicate ion sources prior to NDCX-II source fabrication. Space-charge-limited emission with the current density exceeding 1 mA/cm2 was measured with 0.64 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at 1275 °C. The beam current density is less for the first 10.9 cm diameter NDCX-II source, and it may be due to an issue of surface coverage. The lifetime of a thin coated (on a tungsten substrate) source is varied, roughly 40-50 h, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of 6μs each, i.e., a duty factor of 3×10-7, at an operating temperature of 1250-1275 °C. The 10.9 cm diameter source lifetime is likely the same as of a 0.64 cm source, but the lifetime of a source with a 2 mm diameter (without a tungsten substrate) is 10-15 h with a duty factor of 1 (DC extraction). The lifetime variation is dependent on the amount of deposition of β-eucryptite mass, and the surface temperature. The amount of mass deposition does not significantly alter the current density. More ion source work is needed to improve the large source performance.

  9. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1998-02-10

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li{sub 2}O--CeO{sub 2}--SiO{sub 2} system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications. 12 figs.

  10. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li.sub.2 O--CeO.sub.2 --SiO.sub.2 system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications.

  11. [Profile of lithium carbonate use in patients with bipolar disorder in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique; Alzate-Carvajal, Catalina; Zapata-Castañeda, Kevin; Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique

    2017-04-01

    Lithium is the drug of choice for the treatment of bipolar affective disorder. To define lithium therapeutic profile and adverse reactions to its use in patients with bipolar affective disorder in Colombia. We conducted an observational retrospective cohort study between January 1 and December 31, 2013, which included patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder treated with lithium carbonate in 25 Colombian cities; we evaluated socio-demographic variables, lithium dose, co-medication, drug interactions and adverse reactions. A multivariate analysis was done using SPSS 22.0. The 331 patients had an average age of 44.5 ± 13.9 years; 59.2% were women. The mean dose of lithium was 898 ± 294 mg/day; 22% received doses lower than recommended, and patients had received lithium for 38.0 ± 39.5 months (range: 12-159 months). Lithium levels in blood had been measured only in 13.5% of patients; 71.3% of them had received adjuvant therapy for bipolar disorder with other drugs, especially clozapine (16.6%) and valproic acid (16.6%). The main comorbidities were hypothyroidism (18.1%) and hypertension (12.7%); 390 potentially toxic drug interactions were found, and adverse reactions were reported in 1.2% of patients. A statistically significant association was found between a lower risk of combination therapy and receiving treatment in the cities of Bogotá (OR=0.4, p=0.025), Cartagena (OR=0.3, p=0.015) and Ibagué (OR=0.3, p=0.025). Lithium was generally used at recommended doses and intervals, but a significant percentage of patients received lower doses than those recommended, and it was not possible to compare with lithium levels in blood. Adverse reactions and blood lithium levels reporting should be improved in patients with bipolar disorder in Colombia.

  12. Lithium/bromine cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.G.; Skarstad, P.M.; Hayes, T.G.; Owens, B.B.

    1980-01-01

    Bromine is attractive as a cathode material because cells with a high energy density and high cell voltage are theoretically possible. The addition of small amounts of certain salts or organic compounds results in bromine solutions of sufficient conductivity for cathode applications. However, given these highly conductive bromine cathodes, lithium/bromine cells are limited in rate and practical available capacity by the high resistivity of the discharge product. The rate of resistance increase for the best bromine cells in this study is more than one order of magnitude greater than that observed for corresponding lithium/iodine cells. Lithium/bromine cells can function at pacemaker rates and they may be superior to cells used in early pacemakers. However, the authors have not found the lithium/bromine cells described to be superior to existing lithium/iodine cells available for cardiac pacemakers. 17 refs.

  13. Lithium Treatment for Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Maletzky, Barry M.; Shore, James H.

    1978-01-01

    Although used around the world since 1949, lithium has come into extensive use in psychiatry in the United States only within the past decade. Before initiating treatment with this drug, physicians must be familiar with the diagnostic scheme of the major affective disorders, the indications and contraindications to lithium's use, and its principles of treatment, including evaluation before lithium therapy, criteria for monitoring blood levels and signs of impending toxicity. Despite earlier reports about the toxicity of lithium when it was promoted as a salt substitute, lithium is a safe drug. Its use not only has revolutionized the treatment of the major affective disorders, but has opened up new and broad avenues of research into the regulation of man's emotions. PMID:664651

  14. A high performance ceramic-polymer separator for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Kichambare, Padmakar; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Rodrigues, Stanley; Subramanyam, Guru

    2016-01-01

    A three-layered (ceramic-polymer-ceramic) hybrid separator was prepared by coating ceramic electrolyte [lithium aluminum germanium phosphate (LAGP)] over both sides of polyethylene (PE) polymer membrane using electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technique. Ionic conductivities of membranes were evaluated after soaking PE and LAGP/PE/LAGP membranes in a 1 Molar (1M) lithium hexafluroarsenate (LiAsF6) electrolyte in ethylene carbonate (EC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) in volume ratio (1:1:1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were employed to evaluate morphology and structure of the separators before and after cycling performance tests to better understand structure-property correlation. As compared to regular PE separator, LAGP/PE/LAGP hybrid separator showed: (i) higher liquid electrolyte uptake, (ii) higher ionic conductivity, (iii) lower interfacial resistance with lithium and (iv) lower cell voltage polarization during lithium cycling at high current density of 1.3 mA cm-2 at room temperature. The enhanced performance is attributed to higher liquid uptake, LAGP-assisted faster ion conduction and dendrite prevention. Optimization of density and thickness of LAGP layer on PE or other membranes through manipulation of PVD deposition parameters will enable practical applications of this novel hybrid separator in rechargeable lithium batteries with high energy, high power, longer cycle life, and higher safety level.

  15. Positive electrode for a lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-04-07

    A method for producing a lithium alkali transition metal oxide for use as a positive electrode material for lithium secondary batteries by a precipitation method. The positive electrode material is a lithium alkali transition metal composite oxide and is prepared by mixing a solid state mixed with alkali and transition metal carbonate and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain a small amount of alkali metal residual in the lithium transition metal composite oxide cathode material.

  16. Lithium/nutrition interaction in the brain: a single lithium administration impairs spreading depression in malnourished, but not in well-nourished rats.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Márlison José Lima; de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2011-07-01

    Lithium salts exert electrophysiological and behavioral effects in animals and humans and have been used clinically in the treatment of bipolar disorders. Little is known about the lithium/nutrition interaction in the developing brain. This work aimed to determine, in adult rats, whether treatment with a single dose of lithium chloride (LiCl) would influence the propagation of the brain excitability-related phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression (CSD). Male well-nourished (W; fed a lab chow diet with 22% protein; n=22) and previously protein-malnourished rats (M; fed a low-quality 8% protein diet; proteins mostly from vegetable source; n=20) were treated at 75-80 days of age with a single intraperitoneal injection of either 50 mg/kg LiCl (n=9 W and 10 M rats) or saline (n=13 W and 10 M rats). When the pups were 90-110 days, CSD was elicited at the frontal cortex and recorded during 4 hours at two cortical parietal points. In malnourished, but not in well-nourished rats, lithium treatment lowered CSD velocities (P < 0.05), in comparison with saline-injected animals. In a third group (n=23), in which the low-protein diet was quantitatively corrected to 22%, the lithium effect disappeared (n=12), compared to saline (n=11). Our results demonstrate a facilitating effect of malnutrition on the CSD-impairing action of a single lithium administration, suggesting a lithium/nutrition interaction.

  17. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  18. Lithium electric dipole polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Puchalski, M.; KePdziera, D.; Pachucki, K.

    2011-11-15

    The electric dipole polarizability of the lithium atom in the ground state is calculated including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections. The obtained result {alpha}{sub E}=164.0740(5) a.u. is in good agreement with the less accurate experimental value of 164.19(1.08) a.u. The small uncertainty of about 3 parts per 10{sup 6} comes from the approximate treatment of quantum electrodynamics corrections. Our theoretical result can be considered as a benchmark for more general atomic structure methods and may serve as a reference value for the relative measurement of polarizabilities of the other alkali-metal atoms.

  19. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, Charles H.; Graham, Robert A.; Kuehn, Stephen F.; Precit, Richard R.; Rogers, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  20. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  1. Lithium Reserve Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the high temperature stability of 2M LiAsF6/MF electrolyte solutions. It was found that the addition of small amounts of LiBF4 to these solutions...greatly increased their high temperature storage capabilities. It was determined that the LiBF4 was effective only when lithium metal was also present in...the solution. LiBF4 was able to stabilize solutions prepared with grades of LiAsF6 obtained from other vendors but to a much lesser degree.

  2. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  3. A lithium superionic conductor.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-07-31

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10(-2) S cm(-1)) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li(10)GeP(2)S(12) that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window).

  4. A lithium superionic conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-09-01

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10-2 S cm-1) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li10GeP2S12 that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm-1 at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window).

  5. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  6. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  7. Ambient Temperature Rechargeable Lithium Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    AD-AI O297 EIC LA BS INC NEWTON MA F/6 10/3 AMB IENT TEMPERATURE RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERAU AG(MARHMU)L TI ARI AK IC07 UNCLASSIFIED C-655DEE TB6...036FL -T Research and Development Technical Report -N DELET-TR-81-0378-F AMBIENT TEMPERATURE RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERY K. M. Abraham D. L. Natwig...WORDS (Cenimne an revee filf Of ~"#amp Pu l41"lfr bg’ 61WA amober) Rechargeable lithium battery, CrO.5VO.5S2 positive electrode, 2Me-THF/LiAsF6, cell

  8. Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    EEEElhIhEEEEEE 1111 1 - MI(CRO( fy Hl ff1Sf UIIIUN Ift I IA I~t Research and Development Technical Report DELET - TR - 78 - 0563 - F Cq LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE ...2b(1110) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Lithium - Thionyl Chloride Battery -10/1/78 - 11/30/80 6. PNING ORG. REPORT NUMBER Z %A a.~as B.,OWRACT OR...block number) Inorganic Electrolyte battery, Thionyl Chloride , lithium , high rate D cell, high rate flat cylindrical cell, laser designator battery. C//i

  9. Anodes for rechargeable lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kepler, Keith D.; Vaughey, John T.

    2003-01-01

    A negative electrode (12) for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell (10) with an intermetallic host structure containing two or more elements selected from the metal elements and silicon, capable of accommodating lithium within its crystallographic host structure such that when the host structure is lithiated it transforms to a lithiated zinc-blende-type structure. Both active elements (alloying with lithium) and inactive elements (non-alloying with lithium) are disclosed. Electrochemical cells and batteries as well as methods of making the negative electrode are disclosed.

  10. Lithium insertion in graphite from ternary ionic liquid-lithium salt electrolytes: II. Evaluation of specific capacity and cycling efficiency and stability at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lux, Simon F.; Schmuck, Martin; Appetecchi, Giovanni B.; Passerini, Stefano; Winter, Martin; Balducci, Andrea

    In this paper we report the results about the use of ternary room temperature ionic liquid-lithium salt mixtures as electrolytes for lithium-ion battery systems. Mixtures of N-methyl- N-propyl pyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl) imide, PYR 13FSI, and N-butyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl) imide, PYR 14TFSI, with lithium hexafluorophosphate, LiPF 6 and lithium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl) imide, LiTFSI, containing 5 wt.% of vinylene carbonate (VC) as additive, have been used in combination with a commercial graphite, KS6 TIMCAL. The performance of the graphite electrodes has been considered in term of specific capacity, cycling efficiency and cycling stability. The results clearly show the advantage of the use of ternary mixtures on the performance of the graphite electrode.

  11. Electrochemical properties and lithium ion solvation behavior of sulfone-ester mixed electrolytes for high-voltage rechargeable lithium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuu; Kinoshita, Shin-ichi; Wada, Satoshi; Hoshino, Keiji; Morimoto, Hideyuki; Tobishima, Shin-ichi

    2008-05-01

    Sulfone-ester mixed solvent electrolytes were examined for 5 V-class high-voltage rechargeable lithium cells. As the base-electrolyte, sulfolane (SL)-ethyl acetate (EA) (1:1 mixing volume ratio) containing 1 M LiBF4 solute was investigated. Electrolyte conductivity, electrochemical stability, Li+ ion solvation behavior and cycleability of lithium electrode were evaluated. 13C NMR measurement results suggest that Li+ ions are solvated with both SL and EA. Charge-discharge cycling efficiency of lithium anode in SL-EA electrolytes was poor, being due to its poor tolerance for reduction. To improve lithium charge-discharge cycling efficiency in SL-EA electrolytes, following three trials were carried out: (i) improvement of the cathodic stability of electrolyte solutions by change in polarization through modification of solvent structure; isopropyl methyl sulfone and methyl isobutyrate were investigated as alternative SL and EA, respectively, (ii) suppression of the reaction between lithium and electrolyte solutions by addition of low reactivity surfactants of cycloalkanes (decalin and adamantane) or triethylene glycol derivatives (triglyme, 1,8-bis(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)-3,6-dioxaoctane and triethylene glycol di(methanesulfonate)) into SL-EA electrolytes, and (iii) change in surface film by addition of surface film formation agent of vinylene carbonate (VC) into SL-EA electrolytes. These trials made lithium cycling behavior better. Lithium cycling efficiency tended to increase with a decrease in overpotential. VC addition was most effective for improvement of lithium cycling efficiency among these additives. Stable surface film is formed on lithium anode by adding VC and the resistance between anode/electrolyte interfaces showed a constant value with an increase in cycle number. When the electrolyte solutions without VC, the interfacial resistance increased with an increase in cycle number. VC addition to SL-EA was effective not only for Li/LiCoO2 cell with charge

  12. Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    1999-01-01

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  13. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  14. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  19. Mixed solvent electrolytes for ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Deligiannis, Fotios (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention comprises an improved electrolyte for secondary lithium-based cells as well as batteries fabricated using this electrolyte. The electrolyte is a lithium containing salt dissolved in a non-aqueous solvent, which is made from a mixture of ethylene carbonate, ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, 2-methylfuran, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. This improved, mixed solvent electrolyte is more conductive than prior electrolytes and much less corrosive to lithium anodes. Batteries constructed with this improved electrolyte utilize lithium or lithium alloy anodes and cathodes made of metal chalcogenides or oxides, such as TiS.sub.2, NbSe.sub.3, V.sub.6 O.sub.13, V.sub.2 O.sub.5, MoS.sub.2, MoS.sub.3, CoO.sub.2, or CrO.sub.2, dissolved in a supporting polymer matrix, like EPDM. The preferred non-aqueous solvent mixture comprises approximately 5 to 30 volume percent ethylene carbonate, approximately 0.01 to 0.1 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and approximately 0.2 to 2 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The most preferred solvent comprises approximately 10 to 20 volume percent ethylene carbonate, about 0.05 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and about 1.0 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The concentration of lithium arsenic hexafluoride can range from about 1.0 to 1.8 M; a concentration 1.5 M is most preferred. Secondary batteries made with the improved electrolyte of this invention have lower internal impedance, longer cycle life, higher energy density, low self-discharge, and longer shelf life.

  20. Silica Precipitation and Lithium Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Renew

    2015-09-20

    This file contains silica precipitation and lithium sorption data from the project. The silica removal data is corrected from the previous submission. The previous submission did not take into account the limit of detection of the ICP-MS procedure.

  1. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  2. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  3. Lithium compensation for full cell operation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Chen, Xilin; Lu, Dongping; Liu, Jun; Jiguang, Jiguang

    2016-05-17

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of a lithium-ion battery system comprising an anode, an anode current collector, and a layer of lithium metal in contact with the current collector, but not in contact with the anode. The lithium compensation layer dissolves into the electrolyte to compensate for the loss of lithium ions during usage of the full cell. The specific placement of the lithium compensation layer, such that there is no direct physical contact between the lithium compensation layer and the anode, provides certain advantages.

  4. Secondary lithium batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, B.; Khanna, S. K.; Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary lithium cells which use a LiAsF6-2-Me-THF electrolyte and a TiS2 intercalatable cathode exhibit encouraging cycle life at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and surface analytical studies indicate that the electrolyte is unstable in the presence of metallic lithium, leading to the formation of a lithium passivating film composed of lithium arsenic oxyfluorides and lithium fluorsilicates. The lithium cyclability remains as the most important problem to solve. Different electrolyte solvents, such as sulfolane, exhibit promising characteristics but lead to new compatibility problems with the other cell component materials.

  5. Secondary lithium batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, B.; Khanna, S. K.; Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary lithium cells which use a LiAsF6-2-Me-THF electrolyte and a TiS2 intercalatable cathode exhibit encouraging cycle life at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and surface analytical studies indicate that the electrolyte is unstable in the presence of metallic lithium, leading to the formation of a lithium passivating film composed of lithium arsenic oxyfluorides and lithium fluorsilicates. The lithium cyclability remains as the most important problem to solve. Different electrolyte solvents, such as sulfolane, exhibit promising characteristics but lead to new compatibility problems with the other cell component materials.

  6. Erosive effects in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Down, M.G.; Bagnall, C.; Keeton, A.R.; Tsu, T.C.

    1982-09-01

    Results are reported of experimental testing to investigate the potential erosive effect of liquid lithium at 270/sup 0/C and velocities up to 24 ms/sup -1/, on type 304 stainless steel. Two experiments were performed in order to compare data from a conventional flow-through isothermal test leg with those from specimens attached to the circumference of a rotating disc in static lithium.

  7. Lithium-iodine pacemaker cell

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.A.; Snyder, S.E.; DeVan, T.; Harney, M.J.; Harney, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The lithium-iodine pacemaker cell is described as supplied by several manufacturers. The features of each design are discussed along with their effect on energy density, self-discharge and shape of the discharge curve. Differences in performance characteristics are related to morphology of the lithium iodine electrolyte and to the form of the cathode. A new, high-drain cell is mentioned which can supply 60 /mu/a/cm/sup 2/. 10 refs.

  8. Military applications of lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Richard A.

    1989-05-01

    Practically every weapon system requires a battery to provide electrical power for various functions. The lithium battery is becoming the 'power source of choice' for a large number of these military systems. Lithium technology offers unique solutions to the combination of requirements imposed by military systems - low weight, low volume, long storage life, low life cycle cost, and immediate readiness over the full military environmental condition spectrum.

  9. Modeling the Lithium Ion Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The lithium ion battery will be a reliable electrical resource for many years to come. A simple model of the lithium ions motion due to changes in concentration and voltage is presented. The battery chosen has LiCoO[subscript 2] as the cathode, LiPF[subscript 6] as the electrolyte, and LiC[subscript 6] as the anode. The concentration gradient and…

  10. Air breathing lithium power cells

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15

    A cell suitable for use in a battery according to one embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; a stabilized zirconia electrolyte for selective oxygen anion transport; a molten salt electrolyte; and a lithium-based anode. A cell suitable for use in a battery according to another embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; an electrolyte; a membrane selective to molecular oxygen; and a lithium-based anode.

  11. Modeling the Lithium Ion Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The lithium ion battery will be a reliable electrical resource for many years to come. A simple model of the lithium ions motion due to changes in concentration and voltage is presented. The battery chosen has LiCoO[subscript 2] as the cathode, LiPF[subscript 6] as the electrolyte, and LiC[subscript 6] as the anode. The concentration gradient and…

  12. International Meeting on Lithium Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-07

    nk(k 1) interconnected MO6 octahedra, e.g., titanium dioxide (TiO2); and rhenium To overcome the problems of cor- trioxide (ReO3 )-related structures...discharge reactions for the with a conductive foil, and the assembly lithium/manganese dioxide, lithium/iron is pressed and sealed. Hampartzumian disulfide ...films as electrode matrials. G.L. sulfide (NbS) shows trigenal pris- Farrington (Univ. of Pennsylvania) matic, and tantalum disulfide (TaS,) reported

  13. Aqueous lithium air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Petrov, Alexei; Goncharenko, Nikolay

    2017-05-23

    Aqueous Li/Air secondary battery cells are configurable to achieve high energy density and prolonged cycle life. The cells include a protected a lithium metal or alloy anode and an aqueous catholyte in a cathode compartment. The aqueous catholyte comprises an evaporative-loss resistant and/or polyprotic active compound or active agent that partakes in the discharge reaction and effectuates cathode capacity for discharge in the acidic region. This leads to improved performance including one or more of increased specific energy, improved stability on open circuit, and prolonged cycle life, as well as various methods, including a method of operating an aqueous Li/Air cell to simultaneously achieve improved energy density and prolonged cycle life.

  14. Lithium peroxide primary element

    SciTech Connect

    Winsel, A.

    1982-05-04

    In a galvanic primary element of the system Li/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the aqueous cathode depolarizer H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is fixated as a polyurethane gel. It can thereby be controlled and caused to react with the anode metal in accordance with the current drain requirements. This is accomplished using a ram to press the gel toward a conductor which covers the lithium anode, which may take the form of a metal grid and/or a gas diffusion electrode. The oxygen which forms in the working layer through catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide creates a gas bubble when the current is interrupted or the ram is stopped, thereby interrupting the further supply of hydrogen peroxide to the catalyst.

  15. Operando Lithium Dynamics in the Li-Rich Layered Oxide Cathode Material via Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haodong; An, Ke; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Qian, Danna; Zhang, Minghao; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-04-06

    Neutron diffraction under operando battery cycling is used to study the lithium and oxygen dynamics of high Li-rich Li(Lix/3Ni(3/8-3x/8)Co(1/4-x/4)Mn(3/8+7x/24)O2 (x = 0.6, HLR) and low Li-rich Li(Lix/3Ni(1/3-x/3)Co(1/3-x/3)Mn(1/3+x/3)O2 (x = 0.24, LLR) compounds that exhibit different degrees of oxygen activation at high voltage. The measured lattice parameter changes and oxygen position show largely contrasting changes for the two cathodes where the LLR exhibits larger movement of oxygen and lattice contractions in comparison to the HLR that maintains relatively constant lattice parameters and oxygen position during the high voltage plateau until the end of charge. Density functional theory calculations show the presence of oxygen vacancy during the high voltage plateau; changes in the lattice parameters and oxygen position are consistent with experimental observations. Lithium migration kinetics for the Li-rich material is observed under operando conditions for the first time to reveal the rate of lithium extraction from the lithium layer, and transition metal layer is related to the different charge and discharge characteristics. At the beginning of charging, the lithium extraction predominately occurs within the lithium layer. The lithium extraction from the lithium layer slows down and extraction from the transition metal layer evolves at a faster rate once the high voltage plateau is reached.

  16. Operando Lithium Dynamics in the Li-Rich Layered Oxide Cathode Material via Neutron Diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Haodong; An, Ke; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; ...

    2016-04-06

    Neutron diffraction under operando battery cycling is used to study the lithium and oxygen dynamics of high Li-rich Li(Lix/3Ni(3/8-3x/8)Co(1/4-x/4)Mn(3/8+7x/24)O2 (x = 0.6, HLR) and low Li-rich Li(Lix/3Ni(1/3-x/3)Co(1/3-x/3)Mn(1/3+x/3)O2 (x = 0.24, LLR) compounds that exhibit different degrees of oxygen activation at high voltage. The measured lattice parameter changes and oxygen position show largely contrasting changes for the two cathodes where the LLR exhibits larger movement of oxygen and lattice contractions in comparison to the HLR that maintains relatively constant lattice parameters and oxygen position during the high voltage plateau until the end of charge. Density functional theory calculations show the presencemore » of oxygen vacancy during the high voltage plateau; changes in the lattice parameters and oxygen position are consistent with experimental observations. Lithium migration kinetics for the Li-rich material is observed under operando conditions for the first time to reveal the rate of lithium extraction from the lithium layer, and transition metal layer is related to the different charge and discharge characteristics. At the beginning of charging, the lithium extraction predominately occurs within the lithium layer. The lithium extraction from the lithium layer slows down and extraction from the transition metal layer evolves at a faster rate once the high voltage plateau is reached.« less

  17. Teaching Chemistry Using the Movie "Apollo 13."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goll, James G.; Woods, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers suggestions for incorporating topics that relate to the Apollo 13 space mission into a chemistry course. Discusses connections between the study of chemistry and space exploration, including fuels and oxidants used, reasons for an oxygen tank rupture, and lithium hydroxide-containing carbon dioxide filters. Contains 11 references. (WRM)

  18. Teaching Chemistry Using the Movie "Apollo 13."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goll, James G.; Woods, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers suggestions for incorporating topics that relate to the Apollo 13 space mission into a chemistry course. Discusses connections between the study of chemistry and space exploration, including fuels and oxidants used, reasons for an oxygen tank rupture, and lithium hydroxide-containing carbon dioxide filters. Contains 11 references. (WRM)

  19. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; and others

    2015-05-15

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  20. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium wallsa)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.; Tritz, K.

    2015-05-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasm surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  1. Protective lithium ion conducting ceramic coating for lithium metal anodes and associate method

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A battery structure including a cathode, a lithium metal anode and an electrolyte disposed between the lithium anode and the cathode utilizes a thin-film layer of lithium phosphorus oxynitride overlying so as to coat the lithium anode and thereby separate the lithium anode from the electrolyte. If desired, a preliminary layer of lithium nitride may be coated upon the lithium anode before the lithium phosphorous oxynitride is, in turn, coated upon the lithium anode so that the separation of the anode and the electrolyte is further enhanced. By coating the lithium anode with this material lay-up, the life of the battery is lengthened and the performance of the battery is enhanced.

  2. Recent advances in lithium ion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    Lithium ion technology is based on the use of lithium intercalating electrodes. Carbon is the most commonly used anode material, while the cathode materials of choice have been layered lithium metal chalcogenides (LiMX{sub 2}) and lithium spinel-type compounds. Electrolytes may be either organic liquids or polymers. Although the first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds as battery anodes was reported in 1981 for molten salt cells (1) and in 1983 for ambient temperature systems (2) it was not until Sony Energytech announced a new lithium ion rechargeable cell containing a lithium ion intercalating carbon anode in 1990, that interest peaked. The reason for this heightened interest is that these cells have the high energy density, high voltage and fight weight of metallic lithium systems plus a very long cycle life, but without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge and the safety considerations associated with metallic lithium.

  3. Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil Amine

    2009-09-14

    Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Michael Thackeray on Lithium-air Batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Thackeray, Michael

    2016-07-12

    Michael Thackeray, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Khalil Amine

    2016-07-12

    Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  6. Chemical Shuttle Additives in Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Mary

    2013-03-31

    The goals of this program were to discover and implement a redox shuttle that is compatible with large format lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} (NMC) cathode material and to understand the mechanism of redox shuttle action. Many redox shuttles, both commercially available and experimental, were tested and much fundamental information regarding the mechanism of redox shuttle action was discovered. In particular, studies surrounding the mechanism of the reduction of the oxidized redox shuttle at the carbon anode surface were particularly revealing. The initial redox shuttle candidate, namely 2-(pentafluorophenyl)-tetrafluoro-1,3,2-benzodioxaborole (BDB) supplied by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL, Lemont, Illinois), did not effectively protect cells containing NMC cathodes from overcharge. The ANL-RS2 redox shuttle molecule, namely 1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)-2,5-di-tert-butyl-benzene, which is a derivative of the commercially successful redox shuttle 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DDB, 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota), is an effective redox shuttle for cells employing LiFePO{sub 4} (LFP) cathode material. The main advantage of ANL-RS2 over DDB is its larger solubility in electrolyte; however, ANL-RS2 is not as stable as DDB. This shuttle also may be effectively used to rebalance cells in strings that utilize LFP cathodes. The shuttle is compatible with both LTO and graphite anode materials although the cell with graphite degrades faster than the cell with LTO, possibly because of a reaction with the SEI layer. The degradation products of redox shuttle ANL-RS2 were positively identified. Commercially available redox shuttles Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} (Air Products, Allentown, Pennsylvania and Showa Denko, Japan) and DDB were evaluated and were found to be stable and effective redox shuttles at low C-rates. The Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} is suitable for lithium ion cells utilizing a high voltage cathode (potential that is higher

  7. Characteristics and Behavior of Cycled Aged Lithium Ion Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    service cycle and provide the cornerstone for safety analysis. 18650 Cells with representative chemistry of cells contained in current Army procured...their relevance to this effort warrants inclusion. 1-3 EXPERIMENTAL Representative 18650 cells were cycled at different rates and environmental...conditions. The 18650 chemistry used in this effort is a LiCoO2 lithium ion electrochemical cell. The bulk of this effort was conducted with 1.5 Amp-hr

  8. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  9. Sealed Primary Lithium-Inorganic Electrolyte Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    Battery , Thionyl Chloride , Lithium , Lithium Aluminum Chloride , Hermetic Lithium Battery , D Cell, Voltage-Delay, Shelf Life, High Energy Density Battery ... lithium - thionyl chloride , inorganic electrclyte system is one of the highest energy density systems known to date (1-4). The cells contain an Li anoae, a...However, this is not tne case with te thionyl chloride system. A completely discharged battery , while sitting on

  10. Lithium in Medicine: Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Mota de Freitas, Duarte; Leverson, Brian D; Goossens, Jesse L

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the mechanism of action of lithium salts from a chemical perspective. A description on how lithium salts are used to treat mental illnesses, in particular bipolar disorder, and other disease states is provided. Emphasis is not placed on the genetics and the psychopharmacology of the ailments for which lithium salts have proven to be beneficial. Rather we highlight the application of chemical methodologies for the characterization of the cellular targets of lithium salts and their distribution in tissues.

  11. Novel Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, Brett L.

    2014-12-12

    We have been investigating three primary areas related to lithium ion battery electrolytes. First, we have been investigating the thermal stability of novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, in particular borate based salts. Second, we have been investigating novel additives to improve the calendar life of lithium ion batteries. Third, we have been investigating the thermal decomposition reactions of electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

  12. Primary lithium batteries, some consumer considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bro, P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine whether larger size lithium batteries would be commercially marketable, the performance of several D size lithium batteries was compared with that of an equivalent alkaline manganese battery, and the relative costs of the different systems were compared. It is concluded that opportunities exist in the consumer market for the larger sizes of the low rate and moderate rate lithium batteries, and that the high rate lithium batteries need further improvements before they can be recommended for consumer applications.

  13. Rechargeable lithium battery technology - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Surampudi, Subbarao

    1990-01-01

    The technology of the rechargeable lithium battery is discussed with special attention given to the types of rechargeable lithium cells and to their expected performance and advantages. Consideration is also given to the organic-electrolyte and polymeric-electrolyte cells and to molten salt lithium cells, as well as to technical issues, such as the cycle life, charge control, rate capability, cell size, and safety. The role of the rechargeable lithium cell in future NASA applications is discussed.

  14. Rechargeable lithium battery technology - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Surampudi, Subbarao

    1990-01-01

    The technology of the rechargeable lithium battery is discussed with special attention given to the types of rechargeable lithium cells and to their expected performance and advantages. Consideration is also given to the organic-electrolyte and polymeric-electrolyte cells and to molten salt lithium cells, as well as to technical issues, such as the cycle life, charge control, rate capability, cell size, and safety. The role of the rechargeable lithium cell in future NASA applications is discussed.

  15. Lithium Ion Battery Anode Aging Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Agubra, Victor; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms such as lithium plating, growth of the passivated surface film layer on the electrodes and loss of both recyclable lithium ions and electrode material adversely affect the longevity of the lithium ion battery. The anode electrode is very vulnerable to these degradation mechanisms. In this paper, the most common aging mechanisms occurring at the anode during the operation of the lithium battery, as well as some approaches for minimizing the degradation are reviewed. PMID:28809211

  16. Primary lithium batteries, some consumer considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bro, P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine whether larger size lithium batteries would be commercially marketable, the performance of several D size lithium batteries was compared with that of an equivalent alkaline manganese battery, and the relative costs of the different systems were compared. It is concluded that opportunities exist in the consumer market for the larger sizes of the low rate and moderate rate lithium batteries, and that the high rate lithium batteries need further improvements before they can be recommended for consumer applications.

  17. Decreased responsiveness following lithium discontinuation in bipolar disorder: A naturalistic observation study.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Sibel; Yazıcı, Olcay; Post, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Lithium is a cornerstone in treatment of bipolar disorder. Findings are conflicting as to whether acquired unresponsiveness occurs following the discontinuation. Retrospective life chart data were evaluated to investigate the incidence of loss of response. Sixty-five patients chosen from a larger cohort, followed with prospective life charts, who discontinued lithium and had a second lithium treatment. Patients who had at least 2 mood episodes when they were drug naïve to describe the natural frequency of illness and 3 mood episodes before the discontinuation were included. The type of response was defined as excellent, partial, or poor according to mirror design method. Eighteen of 65 patients (27.6%) had a decreased response to lithium following its discontinuation. Nine of these patients (13.8%) were unresponsive and nine patients (13.8%) had attenuated response to second lithium treatment. The mean time of discontinuation was longer in the patients who show decreased response (245.8+268.2 vs. 117.9+149.8 days, p=.01). Those who had episode recurrences during the discontinuation were more likely to show reduced responsiveness upon re-treatment. After discontinuation of lithium treatment, more than a quarter of the patients showed an attenuated response or unresponsiveness, and initial partial responders more likely to show unresponsiveness than excellent responders.

  18. Lithium insertion in carbonaceous materials containing silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alfred Macdonald

    Three different series of silicon-containing carbonaceous materials were synthesized for use as anodes in lithium ion cells. Disordered (or pregraphitic) carbons containing nanodispersed silicon were prepared by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of various chlorosilanes (SiClsb4, (CHsb3)sb2Clsb2Si, and (CHsb3)sb3ClSi) with benzene in two different apparatuses. Silicon oxycarbide glasses were synthesized by the pyrolysis of over 50 silicon-containing polymers at various temperatures, although the principal materials in the study were prepared at 1000sp°C. Finally, materials which we believe to be similar to disordered carbons containing nanodispersed silicon were prepared by the pyrolysis of various blends of pitches with polysilanes. Powder X-ray diffraction was used to learn about the structure of all the materials made. Thermal gravimetric analysis was used to determine the silicon content in the CVD materials and, when coupled to a residual gas analyzer, to study the decomposition process of the polymers. Near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of the silicon L- and K-edges of CVD materials and the silicon K-edges of silicon oxycarbides were used to learn about local chemical environments of the silicon atoms. Lithium metal electrochemical test cells of the silicon-containing CVD materials showed larger capacities (up to 500 mAh/g) than pure carbons prepared in the same way (˜300 mAh/g). The additional capacity was observed to be centered near 0.4 V on charge, the average voltage observed for the removal of lithium from a silicon-lithium alloy. Chemical analysis showed that the stoichiometries of materials made by polymer pyrolysis were distributed over a well-defined region in the Si-O-C Gibbs phase diagram. An interesting series of materials is found near the line in the Si-O-C Gibbs triangle connecting carbon to SiOsb{1.3}. Lithium metal electrochemical test cells made using all the silicon oxycarbides synthesized showed that a stoichiometry

  19. NASA/Marshall's lithium battery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschal, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    A general lithium battery is described and a summary of lithium battery applications is presented. Four aspects of a particular lithium battery, the inducement environmental contamination monitoring battery, are discussed-design and construction details, thermal vacuum tests, projection tests, and acceptance tests.

  20. Magnetism in lithium-oxygen discharge product.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Jung, Hun-Ji; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Schlueter, John A; Du, Peng; Assary, Rajeev S; Greeley, Jeffrey; Ferguson, Glen A; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Hassoun, Jusef; Iddir, Hakim; Zhou, Jigang; Zuin, Lucia; Hu, Yongfeng; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Kahlil

    2013-07-01

    Nonaqueous lithium-oxygen batteries have a much superior theoretical gravimetric energy density compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, and thus could render long-range electric vehicles a reality. A molecular-level understanding of the reversible formation of lithium peroxide in these batteries, the properties of major/minor discharge products, and the stability of the nonaqueous electrolytes is required to achieve successful lithium-oxygen batteries. We demonstrate that the major discharge product formed in the lithium-oxygen cell, lithium peroxide, exhibits a magnetic moment. These results are based on dc-magnetization measurements and a lithium-oxygen cell containing an ether-based electrolyte. The results are unexpected because bulk lithium peroxide has a significant band gap. Density functional calculations predict that superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with unpaired electrons exist on stoichiometric lithium peroxide crystalline surfaces and on nanoparticle surfaces; these computational results are consistent with the magnetic measurement of the discharged lithium peroxide product as well as EPR measurements on commercial lithium peroxide. The presence of superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with spin can play a role in the reversible formation and decomposition of lithium peroxide as well as the reversible formation and decomposition of electrolyte molecules.

  1. Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

    2014-12-30

    An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

  2. 77 FR 28259 - Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... quantity, size, watt hours, and whether the cells or batteries are packed in equipment, with equipment, or... 111 Mailings of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Postal... batteries and devices containing lithium batteries. This prohibition also extends to the mailing of lithium...

  3. Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Binod; Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G.

    2000-01-01

    Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a ceramic-ceramic composite electrolyte is provided containing lithium nitride and lithium phosphate. The ceramic-ceramic composite is also preferably annealed and exhibits an activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

  4. Lithium toxicity: the importance of clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Francis J

    2010-04-01

    Although there appears to be a decline in its use, lithium is still used extensively in the UK to treat bipolar disorder. However, lithium can be quite toxic and lead to long-term problems, rarely death. Therefore, doctors need to carefully monitor patients taking lithium and seek appropriate advice whenever concerns are raised.

  5. Aplastic anemia associated with lithium therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Z.; Khan, A. G.; Chaudhry, Z. A.

    1973-01-01

    A case is reported of fatal aplastic anemia developing in a 50-year-old woman who received lithium carbonate in the generally accepted dosage for a manic-depressive disorder. The serum lithium had been determined at regular intervals and never exceeded what is considered a safe level. Patients for whom lithium is prescribed should have periodic hematologic examinations. PMID:4691107

  6. Research, Development and Fabrication of Lithium Solar Cells, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development and fabrication of lithium solar cells are discussed. Several single-step, lithium diffusion schedules using lower temperatures and times are described. A comparison was made using evaporated lithium metal as the lithium source, and greatly improved consistency in lithium concentrations was obtained. It was possible to combine all processing steps to obtain lithium doped cells of high output which also contained adequate lithium to ensure good recoverability.

  7. Space-charge at the lithium-lithium chloride interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamnik, J.; Gaberscek, M.; Meden, A.; Pejovnik, S.

    1991-06-01

    The electrical properties of the passive layer formed on lithium as the product of the corrosion reaction in thionyl chloride are discussed. The passive layer is regarded as a thin layer of an ionic crystal placed between two party blocking electrodes (i.e., lithium and liquid electrolyte). After a short review of thermodynamic properties of the system, a model for description of the electric properties of the static space-charge regions is presented. On this basis, a comment on and partial reinterpretation of impedance measurements of the passive layer is given. The suggested approach leads to the conclusion that the quality of Li/SOCl2 batteries decisively depends on the properties of the lithium passive layer interface. Finally, experiments to confirm the model are suggested.

  8. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming [Framingham, MA; Chung, Sung-Yoon [Incheon, KR; Bloking, Jason T [Mountain View, CA; Andersson, Anna M [Vasteras, SE

    2012-04-03

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  9. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming [Framingham, MA; Chung, Sung-Yoon [Seoul, KR; Bloking, Jason T [Cambridge, MA; Andersson, Anna M [Uppsala, SE

    2008-03-18

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  10. Towards Stable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with a Low Self-Discharge Rate: Ion Diffusion Modulation and Anode Protection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Tao; Peng, Hong-Jie; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Chen-Zi; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-09-07

    The self-discharge of a lithium-sulfur cell decreases the shelf-life of the battery and is one of the bottlenecks that hinders its practical applications. New insights into both the internal chemical reactions in a lithium-sulfur system and effective routes to retard self-discharge for highly stable batteries are crucial for the design of lithium-sulfur cells. Herein, a lithium-sulfur cell with a carbon nanotube/sulfur cathode and lithium-metal anode in lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide/1,3-dioxolane/dimethyl ether electrolyte was selected as the model system to investigate the self-discharge behavior. Both lithium anode passivation and polysulfide anion diffusion suppression strategies are applied to reduce self-discharge of the lithium-sulfur cell. When the lithium-metal anode is protected by a high density passivation layer induced by LiNO3 , a very low shuttle constant of 0.017 h(-1) is achieved. The diffusion of the polysulfides is retarded by an ion-selective separator, and the shuttle constants decreased. The cell with LiNO3 additive maintained a discharge capacity of 97 % (961 mAh g(-1) ) of the initial capacity after 120 days at open circuit, which was around three times higher than the routine cell (32 % of initial capacity, corresponding to 320 mAh g(-1) ). It is expected that lithium-sulfur batteries with ultralow self-discharge rates may be fabricated through a combination of anode passivation and polysulfide shuttle control, as well as optimization of the lithium-sulfur cell configuration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Lithium-associated kidney microcysts.

    PubMed

    Tuazon, Jennifer; Casalino, David; Syed, Ehteshamuddin; Batlle, Daniel

    2008-08-31

    Long-term lithium therapy is associated with impairment in concentrating ability and, occasionally, progression to advanced chronic kidney disease from tubulointerstitial nephropathy. Biopsy findings in patients with lithium-induced chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy include tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis interspersed with tubular cysts and dilatations. Recent studies have shown that cysts are seen in 33-62.5% of the patients undergoing lithium therapy. MR imaging is highly capable of defining renal morphological features and has been demonstrated to be superior to US and CT scan for the visualization of small renal cysts. The microcysts are found in both cortex and medulla, particularly in the regions with extensive atrophy and fibrosis, and can be multiple and bilateral. They tend to be sparse and do not normally exceed 1-2 mm in diameter. The renal microcysts in the image here reported are subtle, but consistent with lithium-induced chronic nephropathy. An MRI of the kidneys provides noninvasive evidence that strengthens the diagnosis of lithium-induced nephropathy.

  12. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  13. Long-term lithium treatment in bipolar disorder is associated with longer leukocyte telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Martinsson, L; Wei, Y; Xu, D; Melas, P A; Mathé, A A; Schalling, M; Lavebratt, C; Backlund, L

    2013-01-01

    Telomere shortening is a hallmark of aging and has been associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and chronic somatic, as well as psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and depression. Additionally, antidepressants have been found to protect against telomere shortening. However, pharmacological telomere studies are lacking in bipolar disorder (BD). Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore telomere length (TL) in patients with BD in the context of lithium treatment. We determined TL by quantitative real-time PCR using peripheral blood leukocytes. Participants were outpatients diagnosed with BD type 1 or 2 (n=256) and healthy controls (n=139). Retrospective case–control and case–case study designs were applied. Lithium response (LiR) was scored using the Alda-Scale. Lithium-treated BD patients overall, as well as those on lithium monotherapy, had 35% longer telomeres compared with controls (P<0.0005, partial η2=0.13). TL correlated positively with lithium treatment duration of >30 months (P=0.031, R2=0.13) and was negatively associated with increasing number of depressive episodes (P<0.007). BD patients responding well to lithium treatment had longer telomeres than those not responding well. This is the first study to report a positive effect of long-term lithium treatment on TL. Importantly, longer TL was also associated with a better LiR in BD patients. These data suggest that lithium exerts a protective effect against telomere shortening especially when therapeutically efficacious. We hypothesize that induction of telomerase activity may be involved in LiR in BD. PMID:23695236

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of lithium ion using a water-soluble octabromoporphyrin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Tabata, M; Nishimoto, J; Kusano, T

    1998-08-01

    A water-soluble porphyrin, (2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octabromo-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin; H(2)obtpps(4-)) was synthesized and developed for the determination of lithium ion in aqueous solution. The octabromo groups lower the basicity of the porphyrin by their electron-withdrawing effect, and enable the porphyrin to react with the lithium ion in alkaline solution to form the lithium complex along with a shift of absorption maximum: lambda max/nm (logepsilon/mol(-1) dm(3) cm(-1)) of the lithium porphyrin are 490.5 nm (5.31) and 734 nm (4.36). Sodium and potassium ions did not react with the porphyrin. The equilibrium constant for the reaction Li(+)+Hobtpps(5-)right harpoon over left harpoon[Li(obtpps)](5-)+H(+) was found to be 10(-8.80) and the conditional formation constant of the [Li(obtpps)](5-) at pH 13 is 10(4.21). The above results were applied to the determination of lithium ion in aqueous solution. The interference from transition and heavy metal ions was masked by using N,N'-1,2-ethanediylbis[N(carboxylmethy)glycinato]magnesium(II) ([Mg(edta)](2-)) solution. Absorbance at 490 nm was measured against a blank solution. A calibration graph was linear over the range of 0.007-0.7 mug cm(-3) (1x10(-6)-1x10(-4) mol dm(-3)) of lithium(I) with a correlation factor of 0.967. Lithium ion less than ppm level was determined spectrophtometrically in aqueous solution. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lithium in human serum and sea water samples.

  15. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-13

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  16. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  17. Polyimide encapsulated lithium-rich cathode material for high voltage lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Qingwen; Fang, Jianhua; Wang, Jiulin; Yang, Jun; NuLi, Yanna

    2014-10-22

    Lithium-rich materials represented by xLi2MnO3·(1 - x)LiMO2 (M = Mn, Co, Ni) are attractive cathode materials for lithium-ion battery due to their high specific energy and low cost. However, some drawbacks of these materials such as poor cycle and rate capability remain to be addressed before applications. In this study, a thin polyimide (PI) layer is coated on the surface of Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2 (LNMCO) by a polyamic acid (PAA) precursor with subsequently thermal imidization process. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) results confirm the successful formation of a PI layer (∼3 nm) on the surface of LNMCO without destruction of its main structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra show a slight shift of the Mn valence state from Mn(IV) to Mn(III) in the PI-LNMCO treated at 450 °C, elucidating that charge transfer takes place between the PI layer and LNMCO surface. Electrochemical performances of LNMCO including cyclic stability and rate capability are evidently improved by coating a PI nanolayer, which effectively separates the cathode material from the electrolyte and stabilizes their interface at high voltage.

  18. Research on lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, I. R.; Goledzinowski, M.; Dore, R.

    1993-12-01

    Research was conducted on two types of lithium batteries. The first is a rechargeable Li-SO2 system using an all-inorganic electrolyte. A Li/liquid cathode system was chosen to obtain a relatively high discharge rate capability over the +20 to -30 C range. The fabrication and cycling performance of research cells are described, including the preparation and physical properties of porous polytetra fluoroethylene bonded carbon electrodes. Since the low temperature performance of the standard electrolyte was unsatisfactory, studies of electrolytes containing mixed salts were made. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the species present in these electrolytes and to identify discharge products. Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure electrolyte impurities. Film growth on the LiCl was also monitored. The second battery is a Li-thionyl chloride nonrechargeable system. Research cells were fabricated containing cobalt phthalo cyanine in the carbon cathode. The cathode was heat treated at different temperatures and the effect on cell discharge rate and capacity evaluated. Commercially obtained cells were used in an investigation of a way to identify substandard cells. The study also involved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cell discharging at various rates. The results are discussed in terms of LiCl passivation.

  19. Lithium and Valproate Levels Do Not Correlate with Ketamine's Antidepressant Efficacy in Treatment-Resistant Bipolar Depression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Annie J; Niciu, Mark J; Lundin, Nancy B; Luckenbaugh, David A; Ionescu, Dawn F; Richards, Erica M; Vande Voort, Jennifer L; Ballard, Elizabeth D; Brutsche, Nancy E; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine and lithium both inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, lithium and ketamine have synergistic antidepressant-like effects at individually subeffective doses in rodents. We hypothesized that ketamine's antidepressant effects would be improved by therapeutic doses of lithium versus valproate and that serum lithium levels would positively correlate with ketamine's antidepressant efficacy. Thirty-six patients with treatment-resistant bipolar depression maintained on therapeutic-dose lithium (n = 23, 0.79 ± 0.15 mEq/L) or valproate (n = 13, 79.6 ± 12.4 mg/mL) received 0.5 mg/kg ketamine infusion in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. The primary depression outcome measure-the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)-was assessed before infusion and at numerous postinfusion time points. Both lithium (F 1,118 = 152.08, p < 0.001, and d = 2.27) and valproate (F 1,128 = 20.12, p < 0.001, and d = 0.79) significantly improved depressive symptoms, but no statistically significant difference was observed between mood stabilizer groups (F 1,28 = 2.51, p = 0.12, and d = 0.60). Serum lithium and valproate levels did not correlate with ketamine's antidepressant efficacy. Although the study was potentially underpowered, our results suggest that lithium may not potentiate ketamine's antidepressant efficacy in treatment-resistant bipolar depression.

  20. Lithium and Valproate Levels Do Not Correlate with Ketamine's Antidepressant Efficacy in Treatment-Resistant Bipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Annie J.; Niciu, Mark J.; Lundin, Nancy B.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Ionescu, Dawn F.; Richards, Erica M.; Vande Voort, Jennifer L.; Ballard, Elizabeth D.; Brutsche, Nancy E.; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine and lithium both inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, lithium and ketamine have synergistic antidepressant-like effects at individually subeffective doses in rodents. We hypothesized that ketamine's antidepressant effects would be improved by therapeutic doses of lithium versus valproate and that serum lithium levels would positively correlate with ketamine's antidepressant efficacy. Thirty-six patients with treatment-resistant bipolar depression maintained on therapeutic-dose lithium (n = 23, 0.79 ± 0.15 mEq/L) or valproate (n = 13, 79.6 ± 12.4 mg/mL) received 0.5 mg/kg ketamine infusion in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. The primary depression outcome measure—the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)—was assessed before infusion and at numerous postinfusion time points. Both lithium (F 1,118 = 152.08, p < 0.001, and d = 2.27) and valproate (F 1,128 = 20.12, p < 0.001, and d = 0.79) significantly improved depressive symptoms, but no statistically significant difference was observed between mood stabilizer groups (F 1,28 = 2.51, p = 0.12, and d = 0.60). Serum lithium and valproate levels did not correlate with ketamine's antidepressant efficacy. Although the study was potentially underpowered, our results suggest that lithium may not potentiate ketamine's antidepressant efficacy in treatment-resistant bipolar depression. PMID:26137324

  1. Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dudney, N. J.; Bates, J. B.; Lubben, D.

    1995-06-01

    Thin film rechargeable lithium batteries using ceramic electrolyte and cathode materials have been fabricated by physical deposition techniques. The lithium phosphorous oxynitride electrolyte has exceptional electrochemical stability and a good lithium conductivity. The lithium insertion reaction of several different intercalation materials, amorphous V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, amorphous LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and crystalline LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} films, have been investigated using the completed cathode/electrolyte/lithium thin film battery.

  2. Thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N.J.; Bates, J.B.; Lubben, D.

    1995-06-01

    Thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries using ceramic electrolyte and cathode materials have been fabricated by physical deposition techniques. The lithium phosphorous oxynitride electrolyte has exceptional electrochemical stability and a good lithium conductivity. The lithium insertion reaction of several different intercalation materials, amorphous V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, amorphous LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and crystalline LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} films, have been investigated using the completed cathode/electrolyte/lithium thin-film battery.

  3. Advances in ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Deligiannis, F.; Huang, C-K.; Halpert, G.

    1989-01-01

    The goal is to develop secondary lithium cells with a 100 Wh/kg specific energy capable of 1000 cycles at 50 percent DOD. The approach towards meeting this goal initially focused on several basic issues related to the cell chemistry, selection of cathode materials and electrolytes and component development. The performance potential of Li-TiS2, Li-MoS3, Li-V6O13 and Li-NbSe3 electrochemical systems was examined. Among these four, the Li-TiS2 system was found to be the most promising system in terms of achievable specific energy and cycle life. Major advancements to date in the development of Li-TiS2 cells are in the areas of cathode processing technology, mixed solvent electrolytes, and cell assembly. A summary is given of these advances.

  4. Lithium nitrate and lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate ammoniates for electrolytes in lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahys, B.; Herlem, M.

    1991-03-01

    The liquid ammonia solutions of lithium nitrate and lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate) have been found to be highly conductive inorganic electrolytes with low vapor pressures. The important phases of the LiNO3-xNH3 solutions (x between values of 1.5 and 3.1) those of the LiSO3CF3-yNH3 solutions (y between values of 1.5 and 3.5) are documented. In addition, the temperature dependence of their conductivities, their electrical stability windows, and their NH3 vapor pressures were determined. In summary, the lithium triflate ammoniate (LiCF3SO3-2NH3) pressures were determined. In summary, the lithium triflate ammoniate (LiCF3SO3-2NH3) remains a liquid down to -10 C. It has an electroactivity range of 3.8 V and a conductivity of 0.0006/ohm per cm at -10 C. The NH3 vapor pressure is less than 1 bar at 60 C. The lithium nitrate ammoniate (LiNO3-2NH3) has an electroactivity range of 3.5 V and a conductivity of 0.025/ohm per cm at 20 C. The freezing point of the nitrate ammoniate is between 3 C and -10 C depending on the stoichiometry. Its NH3 vapor pressure remains below 1 bar up to 40 C. Li/MnO2 batteries were constructed and tested using the above mentioned electrolytes.

  5. Lithium iron phosphates as cathode materials in lithium ion batteries for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaojun; Chen, Linfeng; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    Olivine-structured lithium iron phosphates are promising cathode materials in the development of high power lithium ion batteries for electric vehicles. However, the low electronic conductivity and ionic conductivity of lithium iron phosphates hinder their commercialization pace. This work aims to verify the approaches for improving the electrochemical properties of lithium iron phosphates. In this work, sol-gel method was used to synthesize carbon coated lithium iron phosphates and nickel doped lithium iron phosphates, and their particle sizes were controlled in the nanometer to sub-micrometer range. The crystalline structures of the synthesized lithium iron phosphates were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and their morphologies were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. To study their electrochemical properties, prototype lithium ion batteries were assembled with the synthesized lithium iron phosphates as cathode active materials, and with lithium metal discs as the anodes, and the discharge / charge properties and cycling behaviors of the prototype batteries were tested at different rates. The synthesized lithium iron phosphate materials exhibited high capacity and high cycling stability. It was confirmed that particle size reduction, carbon coating and metal doping are three effective approaches for increasing the conductivity of lithium iron phosphates, and thus improving their electrochemical properties. Experimental results show that by combing the three approaches for improving the electrochemical properties, lithium iron phosphate composites with characteristics favorable for their applications in lithium ion batteries for electric vehicles can be developed, including high specific capacity, high rate capacity, flat discharge voltage plateau and high retention ratio.

  6. Characterization of lithium coordination sites with magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Haimovich, A; Goldbourt, A

    2015-05-01

    Lithium, in the form of lithium carbonate, is one of the most common drugs for bipolar disorder. Lithium is also considered to have an effect on many other cellular processes hence it possesses additional therapeutic as well as side effects. In order to quantitatively characterize the binding mode of lithium, it is required to identify the interacting species and measure their distances from the metal center. Here we use magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to study the binding site of lithium in complex with glycine and water (LiGlyW). Such a compound is a good enzyme mimetic since lithium is four-coordinated to one water molecule and three carboxylic groups. Distance measurements to carbons are performed using a 2D transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR) MAS solid-state NMR experiment, and water binding is probed by heteronuclear high-resolution proton-lithium and proton-carbon correlation (wPMLG-HETCOR) experiments. Both HETCOR experiments separate the main complex from impurities and non-specifically bound lithium species, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method to probe the species in the binding site. Optimizations of the TEDOR pulse scheme in the case of a quadrupolar nucleus with a small quadrupole coupling constant show that it is most efficient when pulses are positioned on the spin-1/2 (carbon-13) nucleus. Since the intensity of the TEDOR signal is not normalized, careful data analysis that considers both intensity and dipolar oscillations has to be performed. Nevertheless we show that accurate distances can be extracted for both carbons of the bound glycine and that these distances are consistent with the X-ray data and with lithium in a tetrahedral environment. The lithium environment in the complex is very similar to the binding site in inositol monophosphatase, an enzyme associated with bipolar disorder and the putative target for lithium therapy. A 2D TEDOR experiment applied to the bacterial SuhB gene product of this enzyme was designed

  7. Characterization of lithium coordination sites with magic-angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimovich, A.; Goldbourt, A.

    2015-05-01

    Lithium, in the form of lithium carbonate, is one of the most common drugs for bipolar disorder. Lithium is also considered to have an effect on many other cellular processes hence it possesses additional therapeutic as well as side effects. In order to quantitatively characterize the binding mode of lithium, it is required to identify the interacting species and measure their distances from the metal center. Here we use magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to study the binding site of lithium in complex with glycine and water (LiGlyW). Such a compound is a good enzyme mimetic since lithium is four-coordinated to one water molecule and three carboxylic groups. Distance measurements to carbons are performed using a 2D transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR) MAS solid-state NMR experiment, and water binding is probed by heteronuclear high-resolution proton-lithium and proton-carbon correlation (wPMLG-HETCOR) experiments. Both HETCOR experiments separate the main complex from impurities and non-specifically bound lithium species, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method to probe the species in the binding site. Optimizations of the TEDOR pulse scheme in the case of a quadrupolar nucleus with a small quadrupole coupling constant show that it is most efficient when pulses are positioned on the spin-1/2 (carbon-13) nucleus. Since the intensity of the TEDOR signal is not normalized, careful data analysis that considers both intensity and dipolar oscillations has to be performed. Nevertheless we show that accurate distances can be extracted for both carbons of the bound glycine and that these distances are consistent with the X-ray data and with lithium in a tetrahedral environment. The lithium environment in the complex is very similar to the binding site in inositol monophosphatase, an enzyme associated with bipolar disorder and the putative target for lithium therapy. A 2D TEDOR experiment applied to the bacterial SuhB gene product of this enzyme was designed

  8. Lithium: thyroid effects and altered renal handling.

    PubMed

    Oakley, P W; Dawson, A H; Whyte, I M

    2000-01-01

    Lithium is frequently used in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder, and is widely known to affect thyroid function, most commonly resulting in hypothyroidism and goiter. Less well-known is the association between lithium therapy and hyperthyroidism and the potential for lithium to moderate the effects of thyroxine at a cellular level. Lithium excretion relates principally to glomerular filtration rate and proximal tubule function. Thyroxine, through its effects on tubular function, alters lithium clearance such that thyroid disease may cause retention of lithium and subsequent toxicity. We report 2 cases with lithium toxicity, both of whom were later found to be hyperthyroid. One patient developed thyroid storm following dialysis to remove lithium. The other received antithyroid medication early. Both suffered a protracted multifactorial delirium requiring intensive inpatient care. In addition to altering thyroid function, lithium therapy may mask the signs of hyperthyroidism by inducing cellular unresponsiveness. In some lithium-treated patients with biochemical hyperthyroidism, early antithyroid treatment may be appropriate. Altered renal tubular function induced by hyperthyroidism may result in retention of lithium and systemic toxicity. We propose induction of the proximal tubule sodium hydrogen antiporter as the relevant mechanism.

  9. Lithium-cupric sulfide cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, A.J.; Bump, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Lithium cells have become the primary power source for cardiac pacemakers due to their reliability and longevity at low current drain rates. A lithium-cupric sulfide cell was developed which makes maximum use of the shape of a pacemaker's battery compartment. The cell has a stable voltage throughout 90% of its lifetime. It then drops to a second stable voltage before depletion. The voltage drop creates a small decrease in pacemaker rate, which alerts the physician to replace the pacemaker. No loss of capacity due to self-discharge as been seen to date, and cells have proven to be safe under extreme conditions. 2 refs.

  10. Lithium synthesis in microquasar accretion.

    PubMed

    Iocco, Fabio; Pato, Miguel

    2012-07-13

    We study the synthesis of lithium isotopes in the hot tori formed around stellar mass black holes by accretion of the companion star. We find that sizable amounts of both stable isotopes 6Li and 7Li can be produced, the exact figures varying with the characteristics of the torus and reaching as much as 10(-2) M⊙ for each isotope. This mass output is enough to contaminate the entire Galaxy at a level comparable with the original, pregalactic amount of lithium and to overcome other sources such as cosmic-ray spallation or stellar nucleosynthesis.

  11. Lithium nephropathy: unique sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Donald N; Park, Joseph; Laing, Faye C

    2012-04-01

    This case series describes a unique sonographic appearance consisting of numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci seen on renal sonograms of 10 adult patients receiving chronic lithium therapy. Clinically, chronic renal insufficiency was present in 6 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2. Sonography showed numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci. Computed tomography in 5 patients confirmed microcysts and microcalcifications, which were fewer in number than on sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging in 2 patients confirmed microcysts in each case. Renal biopsy in 1 patient showed chronic interstitial nephritis, microcysts, and tubular dilatation. The diagnosis of lithium nephropathy should be considered when sonography shows these findings.

  12. Solid solution lithium alloy cermet anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2013-07-09

    A metal-ceramic composite ("cermet") has been produced by a chemical reaction between a lithium compound and another metal. The cermet has advantageous physical properties, high surface area relative to lithium metal or its alloys, and is easily formed into a desired shape. An example is the formation of a lithium-magnesium nitride cermet by reaction of lithium nitride with magnesium. The reaction results in magnesium nitride grains coated with a layer of lithium. The nitride is inert when used in a battery. It supports the metal in a high surface area form, while stabilizing the electrode with respect to dendrite formation. By using an excess of magnesium metal in the reaction process, a cermet of magnesium nitride is produced, coated with a lithium-magnesium alloy of any desired composition. This alloy inhibits dendrite formation by causing lithium deposited on its surface to diffuse under a chemical potential into the bulk of the alloy.

  13. Surface protected lithium-metal-oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2016-04-05

    A lithium-metal-oxide positive electrode having a layered or spinel structure for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell and battery is disclosed comprising electrode particles that are protected at the surface from undesirable effects, such as electrolyte oxidation, oxygen loss or dissolution by one or more lithium-metal-polyanionic compounds, such as a lithium-metal-phosphate or a lithium-metal-silicate material that can act as a solid electrolyte at or above the operating potential of the lithium-metal-oxide electrode. The surface protection significantly enhances the surface stability, rate capability and cycling stability of the lithium-metal-oxide electrodes, particularly when charged to high potentials.

  14. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  15. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  16. Development of lithium powder based anode with conductive carbon materials for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Man Su

    Current lithium ion battery with a graphite anode shows stable cycle performance and safety. However, the lithium ion battery still has the limitation of having a low energy density caused by the application of lithium intercalated cathode and anode with low energy density. The combination of high capacity non-lithiated cathode such as sulfur and carbon and lithium metal anode has been researched for a long time to maximize battery's energy density. However, this cell design also has a lot of technical challenges to be solved. Among the challenges, lithium anode's problem related to lithium dendrite growth causing internal short and low cycling efficiency is very serious. Thus, extensive research on lithium metal anode has been performed to solve the lithium dendrite problem and a major part of the research has been focused on the control of the interface between lithium and electrolyte. However, research on lithium anode design itself has not been much conducted. In this research, innovative lithium anode design for less dendrite growth and higher cycling efficiency was suggested. Literature review for the lithium dendrite growth mechanism was conducted in Chapter 2 to develop electrode design concept and the importance of the current density on lithium dendrite growth was also found in the literatures. The preliminary test was conducted to verify the developed electrode concept by using lithium powder based anode (LIP) with conductive carbon materials and the results showed that lithium dendrite growth could be suppressed in this electrode design due to its increased electrochemical surface area and lithium deposition sites during lithium deposition. The electrode design suggested in Chapter 2 was extensively studied in Chapter 3 in terms of lithium dendrite growth morphology, lithium cycling efficiency and full cell cycling performance. This electrode concept was further developed to maximize the electrode's performance and safety in Chapter 4. In this new

  17. A stable organic-inorganic hybrid layer protected lithium metal anode for long-cycle lithium-oxygen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinhui; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Jingjing; Zhang, Tao; Li, Lei; Wang, Jiulin; Nuli, Yanna

    2017-10-01

    A stable organic-inorganic hybrid layer (OIHL) is direct fabricated on lithium metal surface by the interfacial reaction of lithium metal foil with 1-chlorodecane and oxygen/carbon dioxide mixed gas. This favorable OIHL is approximately 30 μm thick and consists of lithium alkyl carbonate and lithium chloride. The lithium-oxygen batteries with OIHL protected lithium metal anode exhibit longer cycle life (340 cycles) than those with bare lithium metal anode (50 cycles). This desirable performance can be ascribed to the robust OIHL which prevents the growth of lithium dendrites and the corrosion of lithium metal.

  18. Photodisintegration of Lithium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurtz, Ward Andrew

    We have performed a measurement of the photodisintegration of the lithium isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, using a monochromatic, polarised photon beam and a segmented neutron detector array which covers approximately ¼ of 4pi srad. Using time-of-flight and scintillator light-output spectra we separate the data into individual reaction channels. This work is motivated by the need to compare with recent theoretical predictions and to provide data for future theoretical work. For the photodisintegration of 6Li we took data at 12 photon energies between 8 and 35 MeV. We describe the data using a model consisting of two-body reaction channels and obtain angular distributions and absolute cross sections for many of these reaction channels. We compare our results with a recent Lorentz integral transform calculation (Bacca et al. Phys. Rev. C 69, 057001 (2004)). Our results are in reasonable agreement with the calculation, in contradiction with previous experimental results. For the photodisintegration of 7Li, we took data at 9 photon energies between 10 and 35 MeV. We obtain cross sections for the reaction channel 7Li + gamma → n + 6 Li(g.s.) at all photon energies with angular distributions at all but the highest energy. We obtain angular distributions and total cross sections for reaction channels involving excited states of the daughter nucleus, 6Li, at select energies. We hope that these measurements will provide incentive for new theoretical calculations. We observe neutrons that can only be described by the reaction channel 7Li + gamma → n + 6Li(10.0) which necessitates an excited state of 6Li with excitation energy Ex = 10.0 +/- 0.5 MeV that is not in the standard tables of excited states. ii

  19. An experimental study on burning behaviors of 18650 lithium ion batteries using a cone calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yangyang; Lu, Song; Li, Kaiyuan; Liu, Changchen; Cheng, Xudong; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Numerous of lithium ion battery fires and explosions enhance the need of precise risk assessments on batteries. In the current study, 18650 lithium ion batteries at different states of charge are tested using a cone calorimeter to study the burning behaviors under an incident heat flux of 50 kW m-2. Several parameters are measured, including mass loss rate, time to ignition, time to explosion, heat release rate (HRR), the surface temperature and concentration of toxic gases. Although small quantities of oxygen are released from the lithium ion battery during burning, it is estimated that the energy, consuming oxygen released from the lithium ion battery, accounts for less than 13% of total energy released by a fully charged lithium ion battery. The experimental results show that the peak HRR and concentration of toxic gases rise with the increasing the states of charge, whereas the time to ignition and time to explosion decrease. The test results of the fully charged lithium ion batteries at three different incident heat fluxes show that the peak HRR increases from 6.2 to 9.1 kW and the maximum surface temperature increases from 662 to 934 °C as the incident heat flux increases from 30 to 60 kW m-2.

  20. Study to determine and improve design for lithium-doped solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, G.; Faith, T. J.; Holmes-Siedle, A.

    1971-01-01

    Solar cell experiments show that a single lithium density parameter, the lithium density gradient, calculated from nondestructive capacitance measurements, provides the basis for accurate predictions of lithium cell behavior in a 1-MeV electron environment for fluences ranging between 3 X 10 to the 13th power e/sq cm and 3 X 10 to the 15th power/e sq cm. The oxygen-rich (quartz crucible) lithium cell with phosphorous starting dopant and lithium gradient between approximately 5 X 10 to the 18th power and 1.5 x 10 to the 19th power/cm to the 4th power was found superior in performance to the commercial 10 ohm-cm n/p control cells. Post-recovery stability of oxygen-rich cells was satisfactory. An average post-recovery current drop of approximately 1 mA was observed for 70 crucible cells after 1 year-equivalent storage time at 80 C. In contrast the oxygen-poor (float zone and Lopex) lithium cells displayed spotty initial performance and stability problems at room temperature.

  1. Identification of a new lithium oxide, Li3O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium oxide (Li3O2) was prepared by decomposing anhydrous lithium hydroxide at 360 C in 48 hours and between 640 and 730 C in times up to 1.3 hours and pressures of about 0.00001 torr. Decompositions were done in nickel, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, and the T-111 tantalum alloy (Ta - 8-wt.% W - 2 wt.% Hf) containers. This oxide probably belongs to the simple orthorhombic system with the following lattice parameters: a = 108.4 + or - 0.4 nm (10.84 + or - 0.04 A), b = 128.4 + or - 0.5 nm (12.84 + or - 0.05 A), and c = 103.6 + or - 0.4 nm (10.36 + or - 0.04 A).

  2. Lithium-free transition metal monoxides for positive electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Hyunchul; Cho, Min Gee; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Lee, Byungju; Kim, Hyungsub; Park, Young-Uk; Hong, Jihyun; Park, Kyu-Young; Yoon, Gabin; Seong, Won Mo; Cho, Yongbeom; Oh, Myoung Hwan; Kim, Haegyeom; Gwon, Hyeokjo; Hwang, Insang; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Yoon, Won-Sub; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries based on intercalation compounds have dominated the advanced portable energy storage market. The positive electrode materials in these batteries belong to a material group of lithium-conducting crystals that contain redox-active transition metal and lithium. Materials without lithium-conducting paths or lithium-free compounds could be rarely used as positive electrodes due to the incapability of reversible lithium intercalation or the necessity of using metallic lithium as negative electrodes. These constraints have significantly limited the choice of materials and retarded the development of new positive electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. Here, we demonstrate that lithium-free transition metal monoxides that do not contain lithium-conducting paths in their crystal structure can be converted into high-capacity positive electrodes in the electrochemical cell by initially decorating the monoxide surface with nanosized lithium fluoride. This unusual electrochemical behaviour is attributed to a surface conversion reaction mechanism in contrast with the classic lithium intercalation reaction. Our findings will offer a potential new path in the design of positive electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias [Westmont, IL; Amine, Khalil [Downers Grove, IL

    2012-01-31

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  4. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2008-06-24

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell system. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plastized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  5. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias [Bolingbrook, IL; Amine, Khalil [Oak Brook, IL

    2011-04-05

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  6. Gelled Electrolytes For Lithium Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Attia, Alan; Halpert, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Gelled polymer electrolyte consists of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), LiBF4, and propylene carbonate (PC). Thin films of electrolyte found to exhibit stable bulk conductivities of order of 10 to the negative 3rd power S/cm at room temperature. Used in thinfilm rechargeable lithium batteries having energy densities near 150 W h/kg.

  7. Lithium equation-of-state

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, J.A.

    1983-09-01

    In 1977, Dave Young published an equation-of-state (EOS) for lithium. This EOS was used by Lew Glenn in his AFTON calculations of the HYLIFE inertial-fusion-reactor hydrodynamics. In this paper, I summarize Young's development of the EOS and demonstrate a computer program (MATHSY) that plots isotherms, isentropes and constant energy lines on a P-V diagram.

  8. Interfacial reactions in lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Rachid; Ma, Zi-Feng; Amine, Khalil

    2017-08-01

    The lithium-ion battery was first commercially introduced by Sony Corporation in 1991 using LiCoO2 as the cathode material and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs) as the anode material. After continuous research and development for 25 years, lithium-ion batteries have been the dominant energy storage device for modern portable electronics, as well as for emerging applications for electric vehicles and smart grids. It is clear that the success of lithium-ion technologies is rooted to the existence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that kinetically suppresses parasitic reactions between the lithiated graphitic anodes and the carbonate-based non-aqueous electrolytes. Recently, major attention has been paid to the importance of a similar passivation/protection layer on the surface of cathode materials, aiming for a rational design of high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries with extended cycle/calendar life. In this article, the physical model of the SEI, as well as recent research efforts to understand the nature and role of the SEI are summarized, and future perspectives on this important research field will also be presented.

  9. Reversible Lithium Neurotoxicity: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Sources: A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. Study Selection: A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Extraction: The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Data Synthesis: Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P < .001) and presented mainly with acute organic brain syndrome. In most cases, the therapeutic serum lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P < .001), and dosage regimens were less than 2,000 mg/day. Specific drug combinations with lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The

  10. Enhancing the Lithium Ion Conductivity in Lithium Superionic Conductor (LISICON) Solid Electrolytes through a Mixed Polyanion Effect.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yue; Eames, Christopher; Fleutot, Benoit; David, Rénald; Chotard, Jean-Noël; Suard, Emmanuelle; Masquelier, Christian; Islam, M Saiful

    2017-03-01

    Lithium superionic conductor (LISICON)-related compositions Li4±xSi1-xXxO4 (X = P, Al, or Ge) are important materials that have been identified as potential solid electrolytes for all solid state batteries. Here, we show that the room temperature lithium ion conductivity can be improved by several orders of magnitude through substitution on Si sites. We apply a combined computer simulation and experimental approach to a wide range of compositions (Li4SiO4, Li3.75Si0.75P0.25O4, Li4.25Si0.75Al0.25O4, Li4Al0.33Si0.33P0.33O4, and Li4Al1/3Si1/6Ge1/6P1/3O4) which include new doped materials. Depending on the temperature, three different Li(+) ion diffusion mechanisms are observed. The polyanion mixing introduced by substitution lowers the temperature at which the transition to a superionic state with high Li(+) ion conductivity occurs. These insights help to rationalize the mechanism of the lithium ion conductivity enhancement and provide strategies for designing materials with promising transport properties.

  11. Investigation of micro-structured Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2 cathodes by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrek, P.; Zheng, Y.; Rakebrandt, J.-H.; Seifert, H. J.; Pfleging, W.

    2017-02-01

    Lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2, NMC) thick film electrodes were manufactured by using the doctor-blade technique (tape-casting). Ultrafast laser-structuring was performed in order to improve the electrochemical performance. For this purpose, three-dimensional (3D) micro-structures such as free standing micropillars were generated in NMC cathodes by using femtosecond laser ablation. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used for post-mortem investigation of the lithium distribution of unstructured and femtosecond laser-structured NMC electrodes. For achieving a variable State-of-Health (SoH), both types of electrodes were electrochemically cycled. LIBS calibration was performed based on NMC electrodes with defined lithium amount. Those samples were produced by titration technique in a voltage window of 3.0 V - 5.0 V. Elemental mapping and elemental depth-profiling of lithium with a lateral resolution of 100 μm were applied in order to characterize the whole electrode surface. The main goal is to develop an optimized 3D cell design with improved electrochemical properties which can be correlated to a characteristic lithium distribution along 3D micro-structures at different SoH.

  12. Measured and calculated fast neutron spectra in a depleted uranium and lithium hydride shielded reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.; Mueller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of MeV neutron were made at the surface of a lithium hydride and depleted uranium shielded reactor. Four shield configurations were considered: these were assembled progressively with cylindrical shells of 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, and 3-centimeter-thick depleted uranium. Measurements were made with a NE-218 scintillation spectrometer; proton pulse height distributions were differentiated to obtain neutron spectra. Calculations were made using the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT and ENDF/B (version 3) cross sections. Good agreement between measured and calculated spectral shape was observed. Absolute measured and calculated fluxes were within 50 percent of one another; observed discrepancies in absolute flux may be due to cross section errors.

  13. Lithium and the kidney: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, M

    1999-03-01

    Despite the availability of alternative agents, lithium continues to be the standard against which all mood stabilisers, prescribed for acute and maintenance treatment of bipolar (and, to a lesser extent, unipolar) mood disorders, are compared. As a medication often used on a maintenance basis for a lifelong disorder, the potential for lithium to cause long term organ toxicity has generated appropriate concern. Foremost among these concerns are its renal effects. Lithium adversely affects renal tubular function, causing polyuria secondary to a deficit in urine concentrating ability. This effect is probably progressive for the first decade of lithium therapy, i.e. it correlates with duration of lithium therapy. Although this effect of lithium is probably functional and reversible early in treatment, it may become structural and irreversible over time. In contrast, the effect of lithium on glomerular function is not progressive. Conclusions in this area are hampered by the evidence that patients with psychiatric disorders who are not receiving lithium also show defects in certain aspects of renal function. Despite the generally sanguine data on glomerular function, a very small group of patients may develop renal insufficiency due to lithium (possibly in conjunction with other somatic factors) in the form of interstitial nephritis. However, for the vast majority of patients, the renal effects of lithium are benign. Current strategies for minimising the renal effects of lithium include: (i) assiduously avoiding episodes of renal toxicity; (ii) monitoring serum lithium concentrations in order to achieve optimal efficacy at the lowest possible concentration; (iii) monitoring serum creatinine levels on a yearly basis, getting further medical evaluation when the serum creatinine level consistently rises above 140 mmol/L (1.6 mg/dl); and (iv) possibly administering lithium once a day.

  14. The lithium vapor box divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-01-13

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Our recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. Furthermore, at the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required in order to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  15. The lithium vapor box divertor

    DOE PAGES

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-01-13

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Our recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al asmore » well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. Furthermore, at the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required in order to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.« less

  16. Primary lithium cell life studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capulli, John; Donley, Sam; Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, David

    1990-01-01

    One solution for providing a truly independent power source is to package, within the critical subsystem element, a primary battery that can remain dormant for time periods as long as the mission life, which can be 10-15 years, maximum. When primary power from the spacecraft solar array/battery system is interrupted, the backup battery system, which is connected through a diode to the power input line, would automatically support the load to avoid a power interruption to the critical load for a time period long enough to ensure that ground control could access the satellite and correct the anomaly by sending appropriate commands to the spacecraft. Critical subsystems identified for the application are telemetry and command circuits, volatile computer memory, attitude control circuits, and some critical payloads. Due to volume packaging and weight restrictions that exist on most spacecraft, coupled with the long storage periods required, lithium cell technology was selected for the backup power source. Because of the high energy density (200-400 Wh/kg), long shelf life, and load capability, soluble cathode primary lithium technology was chosen. The most important lithium cell properties that require detail characterization for this application are capacity loss, shelf life, and the voltage delay mechanism. These are functions of storage time and temperature. During storage, a passive film builds up on the lithium electrode. The film protects the lithium electrode from progressive capacity decay but requires time to break down when a load is applied. This phenomenon results in a depressed voltage during the period of film breakdown which can last from fractions of a second to minutes.

  17. Effect of lithium therapy on glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Decina, P; Oliver, J A; Sciacca, R R; Colt, E; Fieve, R R

    1983-08-01

    Patients taking lithium had a slightly higher serum creatinine concentration than controls. Creatinine concentration was independent of lithium level or therapy length, suggesting that lithium decreases glomerular filtration but that this effect is small, noncumulative, and of marginal clinical significance.

  18. Lithium cell technology and safety report of the Tri-Service Lithium Safety Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, E.

    1980-01-01

    The organization of the Tri-Service Lithium Safety Committee is described. The following areas concerning lithium batteries are discussed: transportation--DOT Exemption 7052, FAA; disposal; storage; individual testing/test results; and battery design and usage.

  19. Light-assisted delithiation of lithium iron phosphate nanocrystals towards photo-rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Paolella, Andrea; Faure, Cyril; Bertoni, Giovanni; Marras, Sergio; Guerfi, Abdelbast; Darwiche, Ali; Hovington, Pierre; Commarieu, Basile; Wang, Zhuoran; Prato, Mirko; Colombo, Massimo; Monaco, Simone; Zhu, Wen; Feng, Zimin; Vijh, Ashok; George, Chandramohan; Demopoulos, George P.; Armand, Michel; Zaghib, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Recently, intensive efforts are dedicated to convert and store the solar energy in a single device. Herein, dye-synthesized solar cell technology is combined with lithium-ion materials to investigate light-assisted battery charging. In particular we report the direct photo-oxidation of lithium iron phosphate nanocrystals in the presence of a dye as a hybrid photo-cathode in a two-electrode system, with lithium metal as anode and lithium hexafluorophosphate in carbonate-based electrolyte; a configuration corresponding to lithium ion battery charging. Dye-sensitization generates electron–hole pairs with the holes aiding the delithiation of lithium iron phosphate at the cathode and electrons utilized in the formation of a solid electrolyte interface at the anode via oxygen reduction. Lithium iron phosphate acts effectively as a reversible redox agent for the regeneration of the dye. Our findings provide possibilities in advancing the design principles for photo-rechargeable lithium ion batteries. PMID:28393912

  20. Light-assisted delithiation of lithium iron phosphate nanocrystals towards photo-rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolella, Andrea; Faure, Cyril; Bertoni, Giovanni; Marras, Sergio; Guerfi, Abdelbast; Darwiche, Ali; Hovington, Pierre; Commarieu, Basile; Wang, Zhuoran; Prato, Mirko; Colombo, Massimo; Monaco, Simone; Zhu, Wen; Feng, Zimin; Vijh, Ashok; George, Chandramohan; Demopoulos, George P.; Armand, Michel; Zaghib, Karim

    2017-04-01

    Recently, intensive efforts are dedicated to convert and store the solar energy in a single device. Herein, dye-synthesized solar cell technology is combined with lithium-ion materials to investigate light-assisted battery charging. In particular we report the direct photo-oxidation of lithium iron phosphate nanocrystals in the presence of a dye as a hybrid photo-cathode in a two-electrode system, with lithium metal as anode and lithium hexafluorophosphate in carbonate-based electrolyte; a configuration corresponding to lithium ion battery charging. Dye-sensitization generates electron-hole pairs with the holes aiding the delithiation of lithium iron phosphate at the cathode and electrons utilized in the formation of a solid electrolyte interface at the anode via oxygen reduction. Lithium iron phosphate acts effectively as a reversible redox agent for the regeneration of the dye. Our findings provide possibilities in advancing the design principles for photo-rechargeable lithium ion batteries.

  1. Repression of a lithium pump as a consequence of lithium ingestion by manic-depressive subjects.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, H L; Kassir, S; Dunner, D L; Fieve, R R

    1977-10-20

    The lithium pump in human erythrocyte membranes, which is responsible for extrusion of lithium against a concentration gradient, has been found to be reversibly repressed during periods of lithium carbonate administration. The pump activity of patients prior to lithium therapy is not different from controls. The onset of repression may require several days to several weeks and occurs at specific individual threshold levels of lithium carbonate dosage. Reactivation of the lithium pump occurs sometime after the dosage is discontinued. We postulate that repression of the lithium pump results from systemically available factors which alter membrane structure, and suggest that is such changes also occur in the central nervous system, they may provide insight into one means by which lithium produces its psychotropic affects.

  2. Light-assisted delithiation of lithium iron phosphate nanocrystals towards photo-rechargeable lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Paolella, Andrea; Faure, Cyril; Bertoni, Giovanni; Marras, Sergio; Guerfi, Abdelbast; Darwiche, Ali; Hovington, Pierre; Commarieu, Basile; Wang, Zhuoran; Prato, Mirko; Colombo, Massimo; Monaco, Simone; Zhu, Wen; Feng, Zimin; Vijh, Ashok; George, Chandramohan; Demopoulos, George P; Armand, Michel; Zaghib, Karim

    2017-04-10

    Recently, intensive efforts are dedicated to convert and store the solar energy in a single device. Herein, dye-synthesized solar cell technology is combined with lithium-ion materials to investigate light-assisted battery charging. In particular we report the direct photo-oxidation of lithium iron phosphate nanocrystals in the presence of a dye as a hybrid photo-cathode in a two-electrode system, with lithium metal as anode and lithium hexafluorophosphate in carbonate-based electrolyte; a configuration corresponding to lithium ion battery charging. Dye-sensitization generates electron-hole pairs with the holes aiding the delithiation of lithium iron phosphate at the cathode and electrons utilized in the formation of a solid electrolyte interface at the anode via oxygen reduction. Lithium iron phosphate acts effectively as a reversible redox agent for the regeneration of the dye. Our findings provide possibilities in advancing the design principles for photo-rechargeable lithium ion batteries.

  3. What do patients in a lithium outpatient clinic know about lithium therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Rainer T.; Berghoefer, Anne; Müller-Oerlinghausen, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine how much patients know about lithium therapy and to examine factors that might influence this knowledge. Setting Lithium outpatient clinic. Patients Patients (n = 123) affiliated with a lithium outpatient clinic (mean treatment duration of 12 years). Diagnoses, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition, revised, included bipolar disorder, recurrent unipolar depression and schizoaffective disorder. Outcome measures Quantitative assessment of lithium-related knowledge, obtained by responses to a questionnaire adapted from the Lithium Knowledge Test, and factors affecting this knowledge. Results Age was negatively correlated with lithium therapy knowledge scores, whereas duration of treatment, sex, education and diagnosis appeared to be unrelated to knowledge. Conclusion Patient education about lithium treatment should be intensified, especially for older patients taking lithium because adverse drug reactions pose a greater risk to the elderly. PMID:11590971

  4. Repression and reactivation of lithium efflux from erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Goodnick, P J; Meltzer, H L; Dunner, D L; Fieve, R R

    1979-10-01

    Efflux of lithium from human erythrocytes was studied in patients before, during, and after discontinuation of administration of lithium carbonate. Onset of lithium-induced repression of efflux took approximately 10 days and was significantly shorter in patients who had had lithium therapy previously. Reactivation took a longer period of time--approximately 2 week--and was found to be related to duration of lithium therapy. Theoretical pathways of lithium flow through membranes are discussed.

  5. [Lithium can be given to patients on haemodialysis treatment].

    PubMed

    Kancir, Anne Sophie Pinholt; Viftrup, Jens Emil; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2015-01-26

    Lithium-induced nephropathy is a known complication of lithium treatment in bipolar disorder. Treatment with lithium should be discontinued, if there is evidence of lithium-induced nephropathy. However, lithium can be given to patients with end-stage-renal-disease on haemodialysis treatment, if there is no other way to control the bipolar disorder. We report one patient who was successfully treated with lithium in parallel with haemodialysis.

  6. Identification of electron and hole traps in lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) crystals: Oxygen vacancies and lithium vacancies

    SciTech Connect

    Swinney, M. W.; McClory, J. W.; Petrosky, J. C.; Yang Shan; Brant, A. T.; Halliburton, L. E.; Adamiv, V. T.; Burak, Ya. V.; Dowben, P. A.

    2010-06-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) are used to identify and characterize electrons trapped by oxygen vacancies and holes trapped by lithium vacancies in lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) crystals. Our study includes a crystal with the natural abundances of {sup 10}B and {sup 11}B and a crystal highly enriched with {sup 10}B. The as-grown crystals contain isolated oxygen vacancies, lithium vacancies, and copper impurities, all in nonparamagnetic charge states. During an irradiation at 77 K with 60 kV x-rays, doubly ionized oxygen vacancies trap electrons while singly ionized lithium vacancies and monovalent copper impurities trap holes. The vacancies return to their preirradiation charge states when the temperature of the sample is increased to approximately 90 K. Hyperfine interactions with {sup 10}B and {sup 11}B nuclei, observed between 13 and 40 K in the radiation-induced EPR and ENDOR spectra, provide models for the two vacancy-related defects. The electron trapped by an oxygen vacancy is localized primarily on only one of the two neighboring boron ions while the hole stabilized by a lithium vacancy is localized on a neighboring oxygen ion with nearly equal interactions with the two boron ions adjacent to the oxygen ion.

  7. Biologically enhanced cathode design for improved capacity and cycle life for lithium-oxygen batteries

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dahyun; Qi, Jifa; Lu, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Yong; Shao-Horn, Yang; Belcher, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-oxygen batteries have a great potential to enhance the gravimetric energy density of fully packaged batteries by 2–3 times that of lithium-ion cells. Recent studies have focused on finding stable electrolytes to address poor cycling capability and improve practical limitations of current lithium-oxygen batteries. In this study, the catalyst electrode, where discharge products are deposited and decomposed, was investigated since it plays a critical role in the operation of rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries. Here we report the electrode design principle to improve specific capacity and cycling performance of lithium-oxygen batteries by utilizing high efficiency nanocatalysts assembled by M13 virus with earth abundant elements, such as manganese oxides. By incorporating only 3–5 wt % of palladium nanoparticles in the electrode, this hybrid nanocatalyst achieves 13,350 mAh g−1c (7,340 mAh g−1c+catalyst) of specific capacity at 0.4 A g−1c and a stable cycle life up to 50 cycles (4,000 mAh g−1c, 400 mAh g−1c+catalyst) at 1 A g−1c. PMID:24220635

  8. Biologically enhanced cathode design for improved capacity and cycle life for lithium-oxygen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dahyun; Qi, Jifa; Lu, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Yong; Shao-Horn, Yang; Belcher, Angela M.

    2013-11-01

    Lithium-oxygen batteries have a great potential to enhance the gravimetric energy density of fully packaged batteries by two to three times that of lithium ion cells. Recent studies have focused on finding stable electrolytes to address poor cycling capability and improve practical limitations of current lithium-oxygen batteries. In this study, the catalyst electrode, where discharge products are deposited and decomposed, was investigated as it has a critical role in the operation of rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries. Here we report the electrode design principle to improve specific capacity and cycling performance of lithium-oxygen batteries by utilizing high-efficiency nanocatalysts assembled by M13 virus with earth-abundant elements such as manganese oxides. By incorporating only 3-5 wt% of palladium nanoparticles in the electrode, this hybrid nanocatalyst achieves 13,350 mAh g-1c (7,340 mAh g-1c+catalyst) of specific capacity at 0.4 A g-1c and a stable cycle life up to 50 cycles (4,000 mAh g-1c, 400 mAh g-1c+catalyst) at 1 A g-1c.

  9. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  10. Study of lithium absorption by users of spas treated with lithium ion.

    PubMed

    McCarty, J D; Carter, S P; Fletcher, M J; Reape, M J

    1994-05-01

    This study examines the possible dermal absorption of lithium ion into the blood serum of spa/hot tub bathers. Fifty-three participants (28 males and 25 females) spent 20 minutes per day, 4 days per week for 2 consecutive weeks in one of two assigned spas. The participants were randomly assigned to one of the two spas after matching based on sex, age, and use of oral contraceptives. The test spa contained 40 +/- 5 ppm lithium ion, while the control spa contained no additional lithium ion above the background levels of approximately 0.02 ppm. The exposure in the spa treated with lithium ion (from lithium chloride) simulated the maximum exposure that would be expected in a spa sanitized with lithium hypochlorite. The two spas were maintained at 101 +/- 2 degrees F. Serum lithium ion levels before and after spa use were determined using graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy with a minimum detectable level of lithium ion in serum of 2 micrograms l-1 (ppb). There was no statistically significant difference in serum lithium levels between the control and treatment group at any stage. We conclude that dermal exposure to lithium ion (as would be present after treatment of a spa with lithium hypochlorite) did not result in a detectable increase in the serum lithium ion level.

  11. Prismatic cell lithium-ion battery using lithium manganese oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, G.M.; Hellen, R.M.; Reddy, T.B.

    1997-12-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries have demonstrated the ability to fulfill the energy storage needs of many new technologies. The most significant drawbacks of currently available technologies, such as LiCoO{sub 2} based Li-ion cells, is their high cost and significant environmental hazards. Li-ion cells which use a lithium manganese oxide (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel based cathode material should be much less costly and safer than LiCoO{sub 2} based cells. Performance data from prismatic design cells which use a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} based cathode material is presented and shown to meet many military performance criteria. The most significant drawback of this technology, at the present time, is the short cycle life.

  12. Lithium Metal Oxide Electrodes For Lithium Cells And Batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-20

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  13. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil

    2008-12-23

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  14. The role of SEI in lithium and lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Peled, E.; Golodnitsky, D.; Ardel, G.; Menachem, C.; Bar-Tow, D.; Eshkenazy, V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents and discusses fundamental processes taking place at the lithium and Li{sub x}C{sub 6} electrode/electrolyte interphases and models for these interphases. The authors deal with both nonaqueous and polymer (dry and gel) electrolytes, graphitized and nongraphitized carbonaceous materials as anodes for Li-ion batteries. Each electrode/electrolyte combination has its own unique features and problems but there are some general phenomena common to all of them. Issues to be reviewed include SEI composition, morphology and formation reactions, graphite surface modifications including chemical bonded SEI and micro channels formation, electrode degradation processes, lithium deposition-dissolution and intercalation-deintercalation mechanisms, rate-determining steps (RDS), electrolyte and electrode parameters and conditions affecting the above mentioned processes. Technology-related issues are emphasized.

  15. High Efficiency Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    AD-Al14 672 HONEYWELL POWER SOURCES CENTER HORSHAM PA F/S 10/3 HIGH EFFICIENCY LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLo(U) APR 82 N DODDAPANEN! OAAK20-81-C...CHART NATIONAl BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963 A Research and Development Technical Report DELET-TR-81-0381-3 HIGH EFFICIENCY LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELL...reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) Thionyl chloride , lithium , high discharge rates, low temperatures, catalysis, cyclic

  16. Electrode materials and lithium battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil [Downers Grove, IL; Belharouak, Ilias [Westmont, IL; Liu, Jun [Naperville, IL

    2011-06-28

    A material comprising a lithium titanate comprising a plurality of primary particles and secondary particles, wherein the average primary particle size is about 1 nm to about 500 nm and the average secondary particle size is about 1 .mu.m to about 4 .mu.m. In some embodiments the lithium titanate is carbon-coated. Also provided are methods of preparing lithium titanates, and devices using such materials.

  17. Lithium toxicity induced by triamterene-hydrochlorothiazide.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, B. R.; Robinson, B. H.

    1980-01-01

    Two patients on long-term lithium therapy for manic-depressive psychosis developed serious toxicity within days of being prescribed a combination of triamterene (50 mg) and hydrochlorothiazide (25 mg) for mild symptomless hypertension. Reduced clearance of lithium has been reported to follow its concurrent administration with diuretics that deplete both sodium and potassium. A combination of triamterene with thiazide has not been shown previously to precipitate lithium toxicity. PMID:7267481

  18. Sealed Primary Lithium-Inorganic Electrolyte Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    Thionyl Chloride , Lithium , Lithium Aluminum Chloride , Hermetic Lithium Battery, D Cell I Voltage-Delay 1 Shelf Life 1 High_ Energy Density...and the propagation of the thermal runaway en- countered in the thionyl cells. For our initial studies we restricted ourselves to the stable...types of sulfur e.g. rhombic (^) and monoclinic (A ). 3. Thionyl Chloride (SOCI2) The thermogram of SOCI2 (0.161 gm) at 50C/min heating rate is

  19. Liquid electrolytes for lithium and lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, George E.

    A number of advances in electrolytes have occurred in the past 4 years, which have contributed to increased safety, wider temperature range of operation, better cycling and other enhancements to lithium-ion batteries. The changes to basic electrolyte solutions that have occurred to accomplish these advances are discussed in detail. The solvent components that have led to better low-temperature operation are also considered. Also, additives that have resulted in better structure of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) are presented as well as proposed methods of operation of these additives. Other additives that have lessened the flammability of the electrolyte when exposed to air and also caused lowering of the heat of reaction with the oxidized positive electrode are discussed. Finally, additives that act to open current-interrupter devices by releasing a gas under overcharge conditions and those that act to cycle between electrodes to alleviate overcharging are presented. As a class, these new electrolytes are often called "functional electrolytes". Possibilities for further progress in this most important area are presented. Another area of active work in the recent past has been the reemergence of ambient-temperature molten salt electrolytes applied to alkali metal and lithium-ion batteries. This revival of an older field is due to the discovery of new salt types that have a higher voltage window (particularly to positive potentials) and also have greatly increased hydrolytic stability compared to previous ionic liquids. While practical batteries have not yet emerged from these studies, the increase in the number of active researchers and publications in the area demonstrates the interest and potentialities of the field. Progress in the field is briefly reviewed. Finally, recent results on the mechanisms for capacity loss on shelf and cycling in lithium-ion cells are reviewed. Progress towards further market penetration by lithium-ion cells hinges on improved

  20. Improving electrolytes for lithium-ion and lithium oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalasani, Dinesh

    There is an ever increasing demand for fossil fuels. Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) can effectively reduce the production of greenhouse gases and lessen the need for fossil fuels. LIBs also have great potential in electric vehicle applications as an alternative to petroleum modes of transportation. Understanding the chemical reactions between the electrolyte and electrodes in LIBs is very crucial in developing batteries which can work over a wide temperature range and also give a wide potential window. The Solid Electrolyte Interface (SEI), formed by the reduction of solvent molecules on the surface of electrodes, is an important component of LIBs. The SEI is very essential to the performance of LIBs. One electron reduction pathway products of solvent molecules was investigated using lithium-naphthalenide. Methylene ethylene carbonate, a high temperature additive has been synthesized and its performance has been tested at 60°C. Lithium-Oxygen batteries have an energy density ten times greater than that of LIBs. However, lithium-oxygen batteries have rechargability problems associated with them. The most common electrolyte used in this type of batteries is LiPF6 in carbonate or ether based solvents. LiPF6 inherently decreases electrolyte stability, since LiPF 6 can undergo thermal dissociation into PF5 and LiF. PF 5 being a strong Lewis acid, can react with electron rich species. The thermal decomposition reactions of LiPF6 based electrolytes are studied in detail with regard to LIBs. The comprehensive study has been conducted on the thermal degradation of several electrolyte systems in the presence of Li2O2.

  1. Lithium's effect in forced-swim test is blood level dependent but not dependent on weight loss.

    PubMed

    Bersudsky, Yuly; Shaldubina, Alona; Belmaker, R H

    2007-02-01

    The effects of lithium in models of depression are often inconsistent. We aimed to replicate a regimen that induces robust antidepressant effects in the forced-swim test. Mice were treated with three different doses of lithium chloride (LiCl) 0.25, 0.4 or 0.5% in food and the forced-swim test or open field test was performed on day 15. We yoked control mice to food deprivation to test whether lithium-induced food deprivation could cause the lithium effects in the forced-swim test. Treatment with LiCl doses leading to blood levels of 1.3 and 1.4 mmol/l led to highly significant reduction in immobility time in the forced-swim test, but the dose leading to a blood level of 0.8 mmol/l was not different from controls in immobility time. Mice yoked to lithium-induced food deprivation showed no difference in the forced-swim test compared with controls. In conclusion these results suggest that lithium effects in mice in the forced-swim test are dose dependent but not owing to lithium-induced weight loss.

  2. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jun; Lee, Yun Jung; Luo, Xiangyi; Lau, Kah Chun; Wen, Jianguo; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Zhai, Dengyun; Miller, Dean; Jeong, Yo-Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-11

    Although the superoxide of lithium (LiO2) is believed to be a key intermediate in Li-O2 batteries leading to the formation of lithium peroxide, LiO2 has never been observed in its pure state. In this work, we provide evidence that use of a cathode based on a reduced graphene oxide with Ir nanoparticles in a Li-O2 battery results in a LiO2 discharge product formed by single electron transfer without further electron transfer or disproportionation to form Li2O2. High energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) patterns indicates the presence of crystalline LiO2 with no evidence of Li2O2 or Li2O. The HEXRD studies as a function of time also show that LiO2 can be stable in its crystalline form after one week of aging in the presence of electrolyte. The results provide evidence that LiO2 is stable enough that it can be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (~3.2 V) and may open the avenue for a lithium superoxide-based battery.

  3. Sealed Primary Lithium-Inorganic Electrolyte Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Primary batteries , Reliability(Electronics), Lithium compounds, Aluminum compounds, Chlorides , Thionyl chloride , Battery components, Storage, Life tests, Explosions, Hazards, Temperature, Ventilation

  4. Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-30

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

  5. Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Godshall, Ned A.; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

  6. Lithium Based Anodes for Solid State Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-30

    AFOSR- 77- 3460 LITHIUM BASED ANODES FOR SOLID STATE BATTERIES R.A.H. Edwards, J.R. Owen and B.C.H. Steele I!Tolfson Unit for Solid State Ionics, D...use in secondary lithium batteries . Three main problems associated with the use of pure lithium as the negative plate are as follows: (a) Formation of...Proceedings of the Workshop on Lithium Non aque ous Battery Electrochemistry. Case Western Reserve Univ. June 4-6 1980, pp.130-142, The Electrochemical Soc

  7. 78 FR 55773 - Fourteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 225, Rechargeable Lithium Battery and Battery Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Battery and Battery Systems--Small and Medium Size AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S... Lithium Battery and Battery Systems--Small and Medium Size. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to... Battery and Battery Systems--Small and Medium Size DATES: The meeting will be held October 1-3, 2013, from...

  8. Recovery and recycling of lithium value from spent lithium titanate (Li2TiO3) pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, D.

    2013-09-01

    Hydrochloric acid was used. The reasons to use hydrochloric acid are discussed below. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) analytical grade, procured form Merck Chemicals, Mumbai, India. To precipitate lithium as lithium carbonate from lithium hydroxide solution sodium carbonate was used. Distilled water. Distilled was used in the experiments, primarily to dilute hydrochloric acid to the desired molar solution. Leaching agent. Concentration of the leaching agent. Temperature. Speed of agitation. Solid to liquid ratio, and Particle Size. In the experimental work spherical Li2TiO3 pebbles of size 1.0 was used as mentioned above. To study the effect of particle size on the recovery of lithium from fine Li2TiO3 particles of size range 100-200 μm were used. These fines were obtained by pulverizing 1.0 mm Li2TiO3 pebbles in a planetary ball mill and classified standard sieves.It is reported that both HNO3 and HCl give relatively more recovery of lithium compared to H2SO4[11-13]. Though the handling of HCl is difficulties due to the chloride corrosion, it is preferred to HNO3 because the deposal of nitrate waste which will generate due to the latter's use viz. sodium nitrate is a problem as per the norms of pollution control standard [11,12].The leaching of Li2TiO3 pebbles were carried out in a 1000 ml three necked and flat bottom glass reactor. The flux was fitted with a reflux condenser to reduce the loss of solution by evaporation and a thermometer. The solid was suspended in the solution by stirring the solution using a magnetic stirrer. The flux was kept on a hot plate with a temperature controller to heat the slurry at constant temperature. The temperature of the solution was controlled within ±3 °C and the temperature of the slurry was noted at an interval of 5 min and the average temperature of each run is determined by time average of the noted readings.A known of volume of HCl solution with known concentration was added to the flux. After the desired stirring speed and reaction

  9. A Study Of Lithium And Iron Abundances In NGC 3680

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Deliyannis, C. P.; Twarog, B. A.; Croxall, K. V.; Cummings, J.; Henderson, K. J.; Callen, E. F.; Sanders, K.

    2007-12-01

    We have obtained spectra using the 4-meter telescope at Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory and the Hydra multi-object echelle spectrograph in July of 2005 for stars in the intermediate-age open cluster NGC 3680. The targeted wavelength range, 6550 to 6800 Angstroms, was chosen to probe the lithium abundances of 72 stars including giants, turnoff stars and main sequence stars as faint as four magnitudes below the cluster turnoff; signal to noise ratios for the spectra vary from a few dozen to over 300 within the sample. Utilizing membership information from Kozhurina-Platais et al. (1995), we find the mean radial velocity for 24 cluster stars with membership probabilities > 50% and no indication of binarity to be 1.82 km/sec, similar to the value of 1.3 km/sec found by Nordstrom, Andersen & Andersen (1996). Our results confirm the dip in Lithium near the main sequence turnoff noted by Pasquini et al. (2001) and sketch out a declining lithium abundance for cooler main sequence stars. Further analyses appear to confirm a slightly subsolar iron abundance for the cluster.

  10. Lithium-Air Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Dobley, Arthur; Seymour, Frasier W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-air (Li-air) primary batteries have a theoretical specific capacity of 11,400 Wh/kg, the highest of any common metal-air system. NASA is developing Li-air technology for a Mobile Oxygen Concentrator for Spacecraft Emergencies, an application which requires an extremely lightweight primary battery that can discharge over 24 hours continuously. Several vendors were funded through the NASA SBIR program to develop Li-air technology to fulfill the requirements of this application. New catalysts and carbon cathode structures were developed to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction and increase surface area to improve cell performance. Techniques to stabilize the lithium metal anode surface were explored. Experimental results for prototype laboratory cells are given. Projections are made for the performance of hypothetical cells constructed from the materials that were developed.

  11. Growth energizes lithium ion interest

    SciTech Connect

    D`Amico, E.

    1996-03-20

    The prospects for big growth in the US for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) has sparked the interest of potential domestic suppliers. {open_quotes}The money that can be made in this market is staggering,{close_quotes} says one industry expert. {open_quotes}Everybody who is remotely related to this industry is interested.{close_quotes} The size of the market, still in its infancy, is difficult to gauge, say consultants, who estimate that leading Japanese producers are each making millions of lithium ion cells/month. {open_quotes}The market is not too measurable right now because the only production is really limited to prototypes being sampled,{close_quotes} says Ward Seitz, a consultant with SRI International (Menlo Park, CA), {open_quotes}but there is phenomenal interest.{close_quotes}

  12. Solid-State Lithium Conductors for Lithium Metal Batteries Based on Electrospun Nanofiber/Plastic Crystal Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yundong; Wang, Xiaoen; Zhu, Haijin; Yoshizawa-Fujita, Masahiro; Miyachi, Yukari; Armand, Michel; Forsyth, Maria; Greene, George W; Pringle, Jennifer M; Howlett, Patrick C

    2017-08-10

    Organic ionic plastic crystals (OIPCs) are a class of solid-state electrolytes with good thermal stability, non-flammability, non-volatility, and good electrochemical stability. When prepared in a composite with electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) nanofibers, a 1:1 mixture of the OIPC N-ethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide ([C2 mpyr][FSI]) and lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) produced a free-standing, robust solid-state electrolyte. These high-concentration Li-containing electrolyte membranes had a transference number of 0.37(±0.02) and supported stable lithium symmetric-cell cycling at a current density of 0.13 mA cm(-2) . The effect of incorporating PVdF in the Li-containing plastic crystal was investigated for different ratios of PVdF and [Li][FSI]/[C2 mpyr][FSI]. In addition, Li|LiNi1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 cells were prepared and cycled at ambient temperature and displayed a good rate performance and stability. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Crystallization of lithium borate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goktas, A. A.; Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of lithium borate compositions, in the diborate-to-metaborate-range, were studied. In particular, the nature and sequence of formation of crystalline phases and the tendency toward devitrification were investigated as functions of temperature, thermal history and batch composition. It was found that the sequence of crystalline phase formation was sensitive to all of the three latter factors, and it was observed that under certain conditions metastable defect structures of the metaborate can appear.

  14. Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2014-08-05

    A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

  15. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

    1993-10-12

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

  16. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Alamgir, Mohamed; Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.

    1993-01-01

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  17. Electroencephalographic characteristics of lithium hydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Saratikov, A S; Zamoshchina, T A

    1986-10-01

    Lithium hydroxybutyrate influence on excitability, functional mobility and frequency range power of the cortex electrograms, midbrain reticular formation, posterior hypothalamus caudate nucleus, dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala and medial thalamus in rabbits has been investigated. It has been shown that the drug suppresses the non-specific activating systems of the midbrain and posterior hypothalamus, intensifies work of the caudatocortical inhibitory mechanisms and the forebrain limbic formations (the hippocampus and amygdala).

  18. Lithium actinide recycle process demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.K.; Pierce, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1995-10-01

    Several pyrochemical processes have been developed in the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne Laboratory for recovery of actinide elements from LWR spent fuel. The lithium process was selected as the reference process from among the options. In this process the LWR oxide spent fuel is reduced by lithium at 650{degrees}C in the presence of molten LiCl. The Li{sub 2}O formed during the reduction process is soluble in the salt. The spent salt and lithium are recycled after the Li{sub 2}O is electrochemically reduced. The oxygen is liberated as CO{sub 2} at a carbon anode or oxygen at an inert anode. The reduced metal components of the LWR spent fuel are separated from the LiCL salt phase and introduced into an electrorefiner. The electrorefining step separates the uranium and transuranium (TRU) elements into two product streams. The uranium product, which comprises about 96% of the LWR spent fuel mass, may be enriched for recycle into the LWR fuel cycle, stored for future use in breeder reactors, or converted to a suitable form for disposal as waste. The TRU product can be recycled as fast reactor fuel or can be alloyed with constituents of the LWR cladding material to produce a stable waste form.

  19. Lithium batteries for pulse power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redey, Laszlo

    New designs of lithium batteries having bipolar construction and thin cell components possess the very low impedance that is necessary to deliver high-intensity current pulses. The research and development and understanding of the fundamental properties of these pulse batteries have reached an advanced level. Ranges of 50 to 300 kW/kg specific power and 80 to 130 Wh/kg specific energy have been demonstrated with experimental high-temperature lithium alloy/transition-metal disulfide rechargeable bipolar batteries in repeated 1- to 100-ms long pulses. Other versions are designed for repetitive power bursts that may last up to 20 or 30 s and yet may attain high specific power (1 to 10 kW/kg). Primary high-temperature Li-alloy/FeS2 pulse batteries (thermal batteries) are already commercially available. Other high-temperature lithium systems may use chlorine or metal-oxide positive electrodes. Also under development are low-temperature pulse batteries: a 50-kW Li/SOCl2 primary batter and an all solid-state, polymer-electrolyte secondary battery. Such pulse batteries could find use in commercial and military applications in the near future.

  20. Interfacial reactions in lithium batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Rachid; Ma, Zi-Feng; ...

    2017-06-29

    The lithium-ion battery was first commercially introduced by Sony Corporation on 1991 using LiCoO2 as the cathode material and mesocarbon microbeads as the anode material. After continuous research and development for 25 years, lithium-ion batteries have been the dominant energy storage devices for modern portable electronics, as well as for the emerging application for electric vehicles and smart grids. It has been a common sense that the success of lithium-ion technologies is rooted to the existence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that kinetically suppresses the parasitic reactions between the lithiated 2 graphitic anodes and the carbonate-based non-aqueous electrolytes. Recently,more » major attention has been paid to the importance of a similar passivation/protection layer on the surface of cathode materials, aiming for rational design of high-energy-density lithiumion batteries with extended cycle/calendar life. In this article, the physical model of the solid electrolyte interphase, as well as the recent research effort to under the nature and role SEI are summarized, and future perspectives on this important research field will also be presented.« less

  1. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Lithium plating in a commercial lithium-ion battery - A low-temperature aging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzl, Mathias; Kasper, Michael; Danzer, Michael A.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of metallic lithium on the negative graphite electrode in a lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery, also known as lithium plating, leads to severe performance degradation and may also affect the cell safety. This study is focused on the nondestructive characterization of the aging behavior during long-term cycling at plating conditions, i.e. low temperature and high charge rate. A commercial graphite/LiFePO4 Li-ion battery is investigated in order to elucidate the aging effects of lithium plating for real-world purposes. It is shown that lithium plating can be observed as a loss of cyclable lithium which affects the capacity balance of the electrodes. In this way, lithium plating counteracts its own occurrence during prolonged cycling. The capacity losses due to lithium plating are therefore decreasing at higher cycle numbers and the capacity retention curve exhibits an inflection point. It is further shown that the observed capacity fade is partly reversible. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) reveals a significant increase of the ohmic cell resistance due to electrolyte consumption during surface film formation on the plated lithium. Additional cell opening provides important quantitative information regarding the thickness of the lithium layer and the corresponding mass of the plated lithium.

  3. XPS analysis of lithium surface and modification of surface state for uniform deposition of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamura, K.; Shiraishi, S.; Takehara, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The surface modification of lithium deposited at various current densities in propylene carbonate containing 1.0 ml dm{sup {minus}3} LiClO{sub 4} was performed by addition of various amounts of HF into the electrolyte, in order to investigate the effect of the HF addition on the surface reaction of lithium. XPS and SEM analyses showed that the surface state of lithium was influenced by the concentration of HF and the electrodeposition current. These two parameters are related to the chemical reaction rate of the lithium surface with HF and the electrodeposition rate of lithium, respectively. The surface modification was highly effective in suppressing lithium dendrite formation when the chemical reaction rate with HF was greater than the electrochemical deposition rate of lithium.

  4. Towards High-Safe Lithium Metal Anodes: Suppressing Lithium Dendrites via Tuning Surface Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang; Rojo, Teófilo; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The formation of lithium dendrites induces the notorious safety issue and poor cycling life of energy storage devices, such as lithium-sulfur and lithium-air batteries. We propose a surface energy model to describe the complex interface between the lithium anode and electrolyte. A universal strategy of hindering formation of lithium dendrites via tuning surface energy of the relevant thin film growth is suggested. The merit of the novel motif lies not only fundamentally a perfect correlation between electrochemistry and thin film fields, but also significantly promotes larger-scale application of lithium-sulfur and lithium-air batteries, as well as other metal batteries (e.g., Zn, Na, K, Cu, Ag, and Sn).

  5. Mixed organic compound-ionic liquid electrolytes for lithium battery electrolyte systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanino, M.; Moreno, M.; Carewska, M.; Maresca, G.; Simonetti, E.; Lo Presti, R.; Alessandrini, F.; Appetecchi, G. B.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal, transport, rheological and flammability properties of electrolyte mixtures, proposed for safer lithium-ion battery systems, were investigated as a function of the mole composition. The blends were composed of a lithium salt (LiTFSI), organic solvents (namely EC, DEC) and an ionic liquid (PYR13TFSI). The main goal is to combine the fast ion transport properties of the organic compounds with the safe issues of the non-flammable and non-volatile ionic liquids. Preliminary tests in batteries have evidenced cycling performance approaching that observed in commercial organic electrolytes.

  6. Lithium nephrotoxicity: a progressive combined glomerular and tubulointerstitial nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, G S; Radhakrishnan, J; Kambham, N; Valeri, A M; Hines, W H; D'Agati, V D

    2000-08-01

    This study examines the clinical features, pathologic findings, and outcome of 24 patients with biopsy-proven lithium toxicity. The patient population was 50% male, 87.5% Caucasian, and had a mean age of 42.5 yr (range, 26 to 57). Mean duration of lithium therapy for bipolar disorder was 13.6 yr (range, 2 to 25). All patients were biopsied for renal insufficiency (mean serum creatinine 2.8 mg/dl; range, 1.3 to 8.0), with associated proteinuria >1.0 g/d in 41.7%. Nephrotic proteinuria (>3.0 g/d) was present in 25%. Other features included nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 87% and hypertension in 33.3%. Renal biopsy revealed a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy in 100%, with associated cortical and medullary tubular cysts (62.5%) or dilatation (33.3%). All of the renal cysts stained for epithelial membrane antigen, while 51.4% stained with lectin Arachis hypogaea, and only 3.8% stained with Tetragonolobus purpureas, indicating they originated from distal and collecting tubules. The degree of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis was graded as severe in 58.3%, moderate in 37.5%, and mild in 4.2% of cases. There was a surprisingly high prevalence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (50%) and global glomerulosclerosis (100%), sometimes of equivalent severity to the chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The significant degree of foot process effacement (mean 34%, five of 14 cases with >50%) suggests a potential direct glomerular toxicity. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis correlated with proteinuria >1.0 g/d (P = 0.0014, Fisher exact test). Despite discontinuation of lithium, seven of nine patients with initial serum creatinine values >2.5 mg/dl progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Only three patients, all with initial serum creatinine <2.1 mg/dl, had subsequent improvement in renal function. By Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the only significant predictor of progression to ESRD was serum creatinine >2.5 mg/dl at biopsy (P = 0. 008). In conclusion

  7. Two phase morphology limits lithium diffusion in TiO(2)(anatase): a (7)Li MAS NMR study.

    PubMed

    Wagemaker, M; van de Krol, R; Kentgens, A P; van Well, A A; Mulder, F M

    2001-11-21

    7Li magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to investigate the lithium local environment and lithium ion mobility in tetragonal anatase TiO(2) and orthorhombic lithium titanate Li(0.6)TiO(2). Upon lithium insertion, an increasing fraction of the material changes its crystallographic structure from anatase TiO(2) to lithium titanate Li(0.6)TiO(2). Phase separation occurs, and as a result, the Li-rich lithium titanate phase is coexisting with the Li-poor TiO(2) phase containing only small Li amounts approximately equal to 0.01. In both the anatase and the lithium titanate lattice, Li is found to be hopping over the available sites with activation energies of 0.2 and 0.09 eV, respectively. This leads to rapid microscopic diffusion rates at room temperature (D(micr) = 4.7 x 10(-12) cm(2)s(-1) in anatase and D(micr) = 1.3 x 10(-11) cm(2)s(-1) in lithium titanate). However, macroscopic intercalation data show activation energies of approximately 0.5 eV and smaller diffusion coefficients. We suggest that the diffusion through the phase boundary is determining the activation energy of the overall diffusion and the overall diffusion rate itself. The chemical shift of lithium in anatase is independent of temperature up to approximately 250 K but decreases at higher temperatures, reflecting a change in the 3d conduction electron densities. The Li mobility becomes prominent from this same temperature showing that such electronic effects possibly facilitate the mobility.

  8. Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water & Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J

    2015-11-30

    The global demand for rechargeable batteries is large and growing rapidly. Assuming the adoption of electric vehicles continues to increase, the need for smaller, lighter, and less expensive batteries will become even more pressing. In this vein, PolyPlus Battery Company has developed ultra-light high performance batteries based on its proprietary protected lithium electrode (PLE) technology. The Company’s Lithium-Air and Lithium-Seawater batteries have already demonstrated world record performance (verified by third party testing), and we are developing advanced lithium-sulfur batteries which have the potential deliver high performance at low cost. In this program PolyPlus Battery Company teamed with Corning Incorporated to transition the PLE technology from bench top fabrication using manual tooling to a pre- commercial semi-automated pilot line. At the inception of this program PolyPlus worked with a Tier 1 battery manufacturing engineering firm to design and build the first-of-its-kind pilot line for PLE production. The pilot line was shipped and installed in Berkeley, California several months after the start of the program. PolyPlus spent the next two years working with and optimizing the pilot line and now produces all of its PLEs on this line. The optimization process successfully increased the yield, throughput, and quality of PLEs produced on the pilot line. The Corning team focused on fabrication and scale-up of the ceramic membranes that are key to the PLE technology. PolyPlus next demonstrated that it could take Corning membranes through the pilot line process to produce state-of-the-art protected lithium electrodes. In the latter part of the program the Corning team developed alternative membranes targeted for the large rechargeable battery market. PolyPlus is now in discussions with several potential customers for its advanced PLE-enabled batteries, and is building relationships and infrastructure for the transition into manufacturing. It is likely

  9. Increased Beta Frequency (15-30 Hz) Oscillatory Responses in Euthymic Bipolar Patients Under Lithium Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Devran; Özerdem, Ayşegül; Güntekin, Bahar; Atagün, M Ilhan; Tülay, Elif; Karadağ, Figen; Başar, Erol

    2016-04-01

    The effect of lithium on neurocognition is not still fully explored. Brain oscillatory activity is altered in bipolar disorder. We aimed to assess the oscillatory responses of euthymic bipolar patients and how they are affected by lithium monotherapy. Event-related oscillations in response to visual target stimulus during an oddball paradigm in 16 euthymic drug-free and 13 euthymic lithium-treated bipolar patients were compared with 16 healthy controls. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitudes were measured for each subject's averaged beta (15-30 Hz) responses in the 0- to 300-ms time window over frontal (F3, Fz, F4), central (C3, Cz, C4), temporal (T7, T8), temporo-parietal (TP7, TP8), parietal (P3, Pz, P4), and occipital (O1, Oz, O2) areas. Patients under lithium monotherapy had significantly higher beta responses to visual target stimuli than healthy controls (P=.017) and drug-free patients (P=.015). The increase in beta response was observed at all electrode locations, however, the difference was statistically significant for the left (T7; P=.016) and right (T8; P=.031) temporal beta responses. Increased beta responses in drug-free patients and further significant increase in lithium-treated patients may be indicative of a core pathophysiological process of bipolar disorder and how it is affected by lithium. Whether the finding corresponds to lithium's corrective effect on the underlying pathology or to its neurocognitive side effect remains to be further explored. In either case, the finding is a sign that the oscillatory activity may be useful in tracking medication effect in bipolar disorder. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  10. Enhanced lithium storage capability of sodium lithium titanate via lithium-site doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Yi, Ting-Feng; Lin, Xiaoting; Yu, Haoxiang; Zhu, Yan-Rong; Qian, Shangshu; Shui, Miao; Shu, Jie

    2015-11-01

    In this work, Na2Li2Ti6O14 and its Li-site substitution Na2Li1.9M0.1Ti6O14 (Mn+ = Na+, Mg2+, Cr3+, Ti4+, V5+) samples are synthesized by a simple solid state reaction route and evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Their crystal structures and ion doping behaviors are described and verified by Rietveld refinement. Electrochemical results exhibit that Na+, Mg2+ and Cr3+ dopings can effectively improve the lithium storage capability of Na2Li2Ti6O14. Especially for Na2Li1.9Cr0.1Ti6O14, it shows the best cycling and rate properties among all the as-prepared samples, with a cycling reversible capacity of 262.2 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1 and a rate charge capacity of 233.3 mAh g-1 at 700 mA g-1. The enhanced electrochemical properties are contributed to the reduced particle size, decreased charge transfer resistance and improved ionic diffusion coefficient of Na2Li2Ti6O14 via Cr3+ doping. Furthermore, the zero-strain characteristic should also be responsible for the outstanding lithium storage capability of Na2Li1.9Cr0.1Ti6O14. Besides, in-situ X-ray diffraction also reveals that Na2Li1.9Cr0.1Ti6O14 has high structural stability and reversibility during charge-discharge process. Therefore, Na2Li1.9Cr0.1Ti6O14 may be a probable high performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Interaction of cyclic ageing at high-rate and low temperatures and safety in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhammer, Meike; Waldmann, Thomas; Bisle, Gunther; Hogg, Björn-Ingo; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2015-01-01

    The differences in the safety behaviour between un-aged and aged high-power 18650 lithium-ion cells were investigated at the cell and material level by Accelerating Rate Calorimetry (ARC) and Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). Commercial cells containing a LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2/LiyMn2O4 blend cathode, a carbon/graphite anode and a PP/PE/PP trilayer separator were aged by high-rate and low temperature cycling, leading to (i) mechanical deformation of the jelly roll and (ii) lithium plating on the anode. The results show a strong influence of the ageing history on the safety behaviour. While cycling at high current does not have a strong influence on the cell safety, lithium plating leads to a significant increase of heat formation during thermal runaway and thus to a higher hazard of safety.

  12. A Safe, High-Power-Density Lithium Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    metallated dibenzotetraaza-[14]-annulene (TAA) meets the design requirements for a fully-configured high energy/power density battery. ECO has recently...cell design to meet these goals, ECO has * followed the disk-type electrode design of GTE (4) on the basis *that this design type has cost advantages...AD-Ri55 223 A SAFE HIGH-PaIWER-DENSITY LITHIUM BATTERY<U) ECO ENERGY i/i. CONVERSION NEWTON MR F WALSH MAR 85 N8084-84-C-0724 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 1@/3

  13. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome and lithium carbonate.

    PubMed Central

    Fava, S; Galizia, A C

    1995-01-01

    The authors describe a case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome that occurred in a patient on amitriptyline and lithium carbonate. They suggest that lithium-antidepressant combination can precipitate this syndrome. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction was a prominent feature in the patient in this study. PMID:7647084

  14. Temperature Dependence of Lithium Reactions with Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, Roman; Skinner, C. H.; Koel, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Liquid lithium plasma facing components (PFCs) are being developed to handle long pulse, high heat loads in tokamaks. Wetting by lithium of its container is essential for this application, but can be hindered by lithium oxidation by residual gases or during tokamak maintenance. Lithium PFCs will experience elevated temperatures due to plasma heat flux. This work presents measurements of lithium reactions at elevated temperatures (298-373 K) when exposed to natural air. Cylindrical TZM wells 300 microns deep with 1 cm2 surface area were filled with metallic lithium in a glovebox containing argon with less than 1.6 ppm H20, O2, and N2. The wells were transferred to a hot plate in air, and then removed periodically for mass gain measurements. Changes in the surface topography were recorded with a microscope. The mass gain of the samples at elevated temperatures followed a markedly different behavior to that at room temperature. One sample at 373 K began turning red indicative of lithium nitride, while a second turned white indicative of lithium carbonate formation. Data on the mass gain vs. temperature and associated topographic changes of the surface will be presented. Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship funded by Department of Energy.

  15. Lithium Ion Battery Design and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Au, George; Locke, Laura

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation makes several recommendations to ensure the safe and effective design of Lithium ion cell batteries. Large lithium ion cells require pressure switches and small cells require pressure disconnects and other safety devices with the ability to instantly interrupt flow. Other suggestions include specifications for batteries and battery chargers.

  16. Jeff Chamberlain on Lithium-air batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Chamberlain, Jeff

    2016-07-12

    Jeff Chamberlain, technology transfer expert at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries. More information at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/batteries090915.html

  17. Anode for rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ambient room temperature, high density, rechargeable lithium battery includes a Li(x)Mg2Si negative anode which intercalates lithium to form a single crystalline phase when x is up to 1.0 and an amorphous phase when x is from 1 to 2.0. The electrode has good reversibility and mechanical strength after cycling.

  18. Lithium-Induced Downbeat Nystagmus and Horizontal Gaze Palsy.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jesper Skovlund; Landschoff Lassen, Lisbeth; Wegener, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium-induced downbeat nystagmus and horizontal gaze palsy in a 62-year-old woman who was treated for a bipolar affective disorder with lithium carbonate for one month. At presentation serum lithium was within therapeutic range. No alternative causes of the ocular motility disturbances were found, and the patient improved significantly as lithium carbonate was discontinued.

  19. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. As used in this section, lithium cell(s) or battery(ies... the lithium cells or batteries will provide electrical power for its operation. (a) Classification. (1...

  20. The observation of damage regions produced by neutron irradiation in lithium-doped silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Sargent, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study regions of lattice disorder produced in lithium-doped float-zone melted n/p-type silicon solar cells by irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at doses between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 13th per cu cm. The defect regions were revealed by chemically etching the surface of the solar cells and by observing carbon replicas in an electron microscope. It was found that the defect density increased with increasing irradiation dose and increased lithium content, whereas the average defect diameter was found to decrease. From thermal annealing experiments it was found that in the lithium-doped material the defect structure was stable at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. This was found to be in contrast to the undoped material where at the lowest doses considerable annealing was observed to occur. These results are discussed in terms of the theoretical predictions and models of defect clusters proposed by Gossick (1959) and Crawford and Cleland (1959).

  1. Technical Challenges for Vehicle 14V/28V Lithium Ion Battery Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-19

    or lithium iron phosphate ( LiFePO4 ), on a current collector of aluminum foil, (iii) a microporous separator between the electrodes, and (iv) a liquid...with four LiFePO4 lithium ion cells will likely result in a closely matched voltage. However, other types of lithium ion cells also consisting of...20.5 15- 24.6 17.5- 28.7 20- 32.8 22.5- 36.9 Voltage(V) ( LiFePO4 ) 3.3 6.6 9.9 13.2 16.5 19.8 23.1 26.4 29.7 n x 3.3 Voltage range (V

  2. The observation of damage regions produced by neutron irradiation in lithium-doped silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Sargent, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study regions of lattice disorder produced in lithium-doped float-zone melted n/p-type silicon solar cells by irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at doses between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 13th per cu cm. The defect regions were revealed by chemically etching the surface of the solar cells and by observing carbon replicas in an electron microscope. It was found that the defect density increased with increasing irradiation dose and increased lithium content, whereas the average defect diameter was found to decrease. From thermal annealing experiments it was found that in the lithium-doped material the defect structure was stable at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. This was found to be in contrast to the undoped material where at the lowest doses considerable annealing was observed to occur. These results are discussed in terms of the theoretical predictions and models of defect clusters proposed by Gossick (1959) and Crawford and Cleland (1959).

  3. A Lithium-Ion Battery with Enhanced Safety Prepared using an Environmentally Friendly Process.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Franziska; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, R Jürgen; Passerini, Stefano

    2016-06-08

    A new lithium-ion battery chemistry is presented based on a conversion-alloying anode material, a carbon-coated Fe-doped ZnO (TMO-C), and a LiNi1/3 Mn1/3 Co1/3 O2 (NMC) cathode. Both electrodes were fabricated using an environmentally friendly cellulose-based binding agent. The performance of the new lithium-ion battery was evaluated with a conventional, carbonate-based electrolyte (ethylene carbonate:diethyl carbonate-1 m lithium hexafluorophosphate, EC:DEC 1 m LiPF6 ) and an ionic liquid (IL)-based electrolyte (N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-0.2 m lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, Pyr14 TFSI 0.2 m LiTFSI), respectively. Galvanostatic charge/discharge tests revealed a reduced rate capability of the TMO-C/Pyr14 TFSI 0.2 m LiTFSI/NMC full-cell compared to the organic electrolyte, but the coulombic efficiency was significantly enhanced. Moreover, the IL-based electrolyte substantially improves the safety of the system due to a higher thermal stability of the formed anodic solid electrolyte interphase and the IL electrolyte itself. While the carbonate-based electrolyte shows sudden degradation reactions, the IL exhibits a slowly increasing heat flow, which does not constitute a serious safety risk.

  4. A preliminary deposit model for lithium brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Munk, LeeAnn; Jochens, Hillary; Hynek, Scott; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    This report is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to update existing mineral deposit models and to develop new ones. The global transition away from hydrocarbons toward energy alternatives increases demand for many scarce metals. Among these is lithium, a key component of lithium-ion batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Lithium brine deposits account for about three-fourths of the world’s lithium production. Updating an earlier deposit model, we emphasize geologic information that might directly or indirectly help in exploration for lithium brine deposits, or for assessing regions for mineral resource potential. Special attention is given to the best-known deposit in the world—Clayton Valley, Nevada, and to the giant Salar de Atacama, Chile.

  5. Lithium ion batteries based on nanoporous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Tolbert, Sarah H.; Nemanick, Eric J.; Kang, Chris Byung-Hwa

    2015-09-22

    A lithium ion battery that incorporates an anode formed from a Group IV semiconductor material such as porous silicon is disclosed. The battery includes a cathode, and an anode comprising porous silicon. In some embodiments, the anode is present in the form of a nanowire, a film, or a powder, the porous silicon having a pore diameters within the range between 2 nm and 100 nm and an average wall thickness of within the range between 1 nm and 100 nm. The lithium ion battery further includes, in some embodiments, a non-aqueous lithium containing electrolyte. Lithium ion batteries incorporating a porous silicon anode demonstrate have high, stable lithium alloying capacity over many cycles.

  6. Is lithium essential for epididymal sperm maturation?

    PubMed

    Halder, Tanmoy; Datta, Uttam; Basu, Siddhartha; Mukherjee, Prasenjit

    2016-11-01

    A wider biological role of ultratrace element lithium in the mammalian reproduction has been reported, however, presence of lithium in the epididymal luminal fluid (ELF) and its influence on sperm during maturation events in the epididymal regions are still unknown. A pilot study was carried out in Jamunapari buck which revealed that levels of lithium in the ELF diminished gradually and significantly (P<0.01) from caput to cauda epididymis, concomitantly, a distinct increase (P<0.01) in the spermatozoan motility, viability and hypo-osmotic reactive sperm were observed, except spermatozoan motility that was found absent in the caput epididymis. Therefore, we hypothesize that levels of lithium in the epididymal regions is one of the motility initiation and/or regulatory factor for epididymal sperm maturation essential for acquiring fertilizing competence of sperm cells, hence, lithium could also be considered as one of the biomarker of sperm maturation in any species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Material requirements for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, L.; Fouchard, D.; Megahed, S.

    1995-12-31

    Lithium-ion (or rocking-chair) batteries with lithiated oxide cathodes and carbon anodes are finding increasing acceptance in many electronic applications including low rates (e.g., memory backup, real time clock, bridge function) and high rates (e.g, laptop computers, cellular phones, camcorders, etc.). This technology offers significant improvements in safety relative to cells using lithium metal anodes, with only a modest reduction in energy density. In general, materials for lithium-ion cells are chosen to minimize the energy density penalties associated with replacing the lithium electrode with an intercalation electrode. In this review paper, the authors describe the properties of the cathode, anode and electrolyte, and discuss requirements for improved materials for advanced lithium-ion systems. Consideration is given to energy density, rate capability, cycleability and thermal stability.

  8. A lithium deposition system for tokamak devices*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziul, Christopher; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Hoffman, Daniel; Timberlake, John; Card, David

    2002-11-01

    The production of a lithium deposition system using commercially available components is discussed. This system is intended to provide a fresh lithium wall coating between discharges in a tokamak. For this purpose, a film 100-200 Å thick is sufficient to ensure that the plasma interacts solely with the lithium. A test system consisting of a lithium evaporator and a deposition monitor has been designed and constructed to investigate deposition rates and coverage. A Thermionics 3kW e-gun is used to rapidly evaporate small amounts of solid lithium. An Inficon XTM/2 quartz deposition monitor then measures deposition rate at varying distances, positions and angles relative to the e-gun crucible. Initial results from the test system will be presented. *Supported by US DOE contract #DE-AC02-76CH-03073

  9. Tritium recovery from lithium oxide pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, P.C.; Jassby, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    The TFTR Lithium Blanket Module is an assembly containing 650 kg of lithium oxide that will be used to test the ability of neutronics codes to model the tritium breeding characteristics of limited-coverage breeding zones in a tokamak. It is required that tritium concentrations as low as 0.1 nCi/g bred in both metallic lithium samples and lithium oxide pellets be measured with an uncertainty not exceeding +- 6%. A tritium assay technique for the metallic samples which meets this criterion has been developed. Two assay techniques for the lithium oxide pellets are being investigated. In one, the pellets are heated in a flowing stream of hydrogen, while in the other, the pellets are dissolved in 12 M hydrochloric acid.

  10. A safe lithium mimetic for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Halliday, Amy C; Thomas, Justyn M; Kuznetsova, Olga V; Baldwin, Rhiannon; Woon, Esther C Y; Aley, Parvinder K; Antoniadou, Ivi; Sharp, Trevor; Vasudevan, Sridhar R; Churchill, Grant C

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is the most effective mood stabilizer for the treatment of bipolar disorder, but it is toxic at only twice the therapeutic dosage and has many undesirable side effects. It is likely that a small molecule could be found with lithium-like efficacy but without toxicity through target-based drug discovery; however, therapeutic target of lithium remains equivocal. Inositol monophosphatase is a possible target but no bioavailable inhibitors exist. Here we report that the antioxidant ebselen inhibits inositol monophosphatase and induces lithium-like effects on mouse behaviour, which are reversed with inositol, consistent with a mechanism involving inhibition of inositol recycling. Ebselen is part of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, a chemical library of bioavailable drugs considered clinically safe but without proven use. Therefore, ebselen represents a lithium mimetic with the potential both to validate inositol monophosphatase inhibition as a treatment for bipolar disorder and to serve as a treatment itself.

  11. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Lee, Yun Jung; Luo, Xiangyi; Lau, Kah Chun; Asadi, Mohammad; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Brombosz, Scott; Wen, Jianguo; Zhai, Dengyun; Chen, Zonghai; Miller, Dean J; Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Kumar, Bijandra; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-21

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported. However, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime. These studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery. However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). Here we show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage.

  12. Research and development of lithium batteries in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dao-zhi

    Basic research work on lithium cells in China was initiated in 1965, and a variety of primary cells has been developed and introduced to the market. Lithium-iodine (1978), lithium-thionyl chloride (1977), lithium-sulfur dioxide (1979) and lithium-manganese dioxide (1980) cells, and lithium thermal batteries (1982) have been successfully manufactured and have found wide application. In this paper, the development and the state-of-the-art of various lithium battery systems in China are presented and the present applications and future markets are discussed.

  13. Tracking Lithium Ions via Widefield Fluorescence Microscopy for Battery Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Nicolas A; Rea, Morgan T; Foy, Michael; Upadhyay, Sunil P; Desrochers, Kyle A; Derus, Tyler; Knapper, Kassandra A; Hunter, Nathanael H; Wood, Sharla; Hinton, Daniel A; Cavell, Andrew C; Masias, Alvaro G; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-07-28

    Direct tracking of lithium ions with time and spatial resolution can provide an important diagnostic tool for understanding mechanisms in lithium ion batteries. A fluorescent indicator of lithium ions, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)naphthoxazole, was synthesized and used for real-time tracking of lithium ions via widefield fluorescence microscopy. The fluorophore can be excited with visible light and was shown to enable quantitative determination of the lithium ion diffusion constant in a microfluidic model system for a plasticized polymer electrolyte lithium battery. The use of widefield fluorescence microscopy for in situ tracking of lithium ions in batteries is discussed.

  14. High conducting oxide--sulfide composite lithium superionic conductor

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Chengdu; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Dudney, Nancy J.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Rondinone, Adam Justin

    2017-01-17

    A solid electrolyte for a lithium-sulfur battery includes particles of a lithium ion conducting oxide composition embedded within a lithium ion conducting sulfide composition. The lithium ion conducting oxide composition can be Li.sub.7La.sub.3Zr.sub.2O.sub.12 (LLZO). The lithium ion conducting sulfide composition can be .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 (LPS). A lithium ion battery and a method of making a solid electrolyte for a lithium ion battery are also disclosed.

  15. Characterization of reactive tracers for C-wells field experiments 1: Electrostatic sorption mechanism, lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.; Newman, B.D.

    1989-11-01

    Lithium (Li{sup +}) was introduced as lithium bromide (LiBr), as a retarded tracer for experiments in the C-wells complex at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The objective was to evaluate the potential of lithium to sorb predominately by physical forces. lithium was selected as a candidate tracer on the basis of high solubility, good chemical and biological stability, and relatively low sorptivity; lack of bioaccumulation and exclusion as a priority pollutant in pertinent federal environmental regulations; good analytical detectability and low natural background concentrations; and a low cost Laboratory experiments were performed with suspensions of Prow Pass cuttings from drill hole UE-25p{number_sign}1 at depths between 549 and 594 m in J-13 water at a pH of approximately 8 and in the temperature range of 25{degree}C to 45{degree}C. Batch equilibrium and kinetics experiments were performed; estimated thermodynamic constants, relative behavior between adsorption and desorption, and potentiometric studies provided information to infer the physical nature of lithium sorption.

  16. Amorphous vanadium oxide films synthesised by ALCVD for lithium rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Van, K.; Groult, H.; Mantoux, A.; Perrigaud, L.; Lantelme, F.; Lindström, R.; Badour-Hadjean, R.; Zanna, S.; Lincot, D.

    This study addresses the lithium insertion performances of amorphous vanadium oxide films, synthesized by atomic layer chemical vapour deposition (ALCVD). AFM and SEM investigations showed that the as-deposited films are amorphous, compact and homogeneous. As revealed by XPS and Raman spectroscopy, the ALCVD oxide films after deposition are mainly composed of V 2O 5, with V 4+ surface content (about 10%). The insertion of Li + into the lattice was investigated in 1 M LiClO 4-PC. The results show that the electrochemical performances obtained with amorphous vanadium oxide films, with an optimal thickness of 200 nm (455 mAh g -1, i.e. composition of Li 2.9V 2O 5), were superior to crystalline V 2O 5 films. The amorphous films exhibit higher capacity and better cycle ability even for deep lithium insertion ratio compared to crystalline V 2O 5 films. The chemical diffusion coefficients, deduced from numerical simulation of chronopotentiograms, were comprised between 3 × 10 -12 and 10 -13 cm 2 s -1 for a lithium insertion ratio comprised between 0 and 2.9. AFM and Raman spectroscopy performed before and after lithiation showed that neither the morphology nor the local order of the amorphous films were significantly affected by the insertion/extraction of lithium. Raman measurements also revealed that a very small amount of lithium are locally trapped in the oxide lattice.

  17. Neutron Depth Profiling benchmarking and analysis of applications to lithium ion cell electrode and interfacial studies research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Scott M.

    at different current rates. The results conclude that NDP is a valuable asset to the characterization of the Solid Electrolyte Interface (SEI) growth as a function of storage time. The NDP results were able to conclude that LiFePO4 cell anodes have a factor of 21 times slower rate of SEI growth than anodes from LiFePSO 4. This indicates that the capacity fade of the LiFePO4 cell will be less than that of the LiFePSO4 cell due to storage at 50°C. Furthermore, NDP was able to conclude that cycling of cells had little effect on the lithium concentration within the cathode materials. The lithium concentration was found to be uniform throughout the first 10 mum of the LiFePO4 and LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O 2 cathodes. These measurements agreed with the initial hypothesis. However, NDP analysis of cells charged at different current rates found that lithium was concentrating within the first 2 mum of the cathode's surface at the electrode-electrolyte interface. This was an unexpected conclusion, but the results also concluded that effect of the lithium concentrating near the surface is amplified by charging the cells at higher current rates. The ultimate conclusion of this research was that NDP is capable of providing invaluable insight to the behavior of lithium within the electrodes of lithium ion cells. It is the author's conclusion that NDP may be most useful in the investigation of SEI layers and their variation according to electrode composition, electrolyte compositions, and the conditions, such as temperature, to which the cells are exposed.

  18. Advanced Micro/Nanostructures for Lithium Metal Anodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Nian‐Wu; Cheng, Xin‐Bing; Yin, Ya‐Xia

    2017-01-01

    Owning to their very high theoretical capacity, lithium metal anodes are expected to fuel the extensive practical applications in portable electronics and electric vehicles. However, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and lithium dendrite growth during lithium plating/stripping induce poor safety, low Coulombic efficiency, and short span life of lithium metal batteries. Lately, varies of micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes are proposed to address these issues in lithium metal batteries. With the unique surface, pore, and connecting structures of different nanomaterials, lithium plating/stripping processes have been regulated. Thus the electrochemical properties and lithium morphologies have been significantly improved. These micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes shed new light on the future applications for lithium metal batteries. PMID:28331792

  19. Advanced Micro/Nanostructures for Lithium Metal Anodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Nian-Wu; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Owning to their very high theoretical capacity, lithium metal anodes are expected to fuel the extensive practical applications in portable electronics and electric vehicles. However, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and lithium dendrite growth during lithium plating/stripping induce poor safety, low Coulombic efficiency, and short span life of lithium metal batteries. Lately, varies of micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes are proposed to address these issues in lithium metal batteries. With the unique surface, pore, and connecting structures of different nanomaterials, lithium plating/stripping processes have been regulated. Thus the electrochemical properties and lithium morphologies have been significantly improved. These micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes shed new light on the future applications for lithium metal batteries.

  20. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium wallsa)

    DOE PAGES

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; ...

    2015-05-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasm surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceedmore » several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.« less

  1. Stable Lithium Deposition Generated from Ceramic-Cross-Linked Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Anode.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chih-Hao; Hsiao, Yang-Hung; Hsu, Chun-Han; Kuo, Ping-Lin

    2016-06-22

    In this work, a composite gel electrolyte comprising ceramic cross-linker and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) matrix is shown to have superior resistance to lithium dendrite growth and be applicable to gel polymer lithium batteries. In contrast to pristine gel electrolyte, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes show good compatibility with liquid electrolytes, wider electrochemical window, and a superior rate and cycling performance. These silica cross-linkers allow the PEO to form the lithium ion pathway and reduce anion mobility. Therefore, the gel not only features lower polarization and interfacial resistance, but also suppresses electrolyte decomposition and lithium corrosion. Further, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes increase the lithium transference number to 0.5, and exhibit superior electrochemical stability up to 5.0 V. Moreover, the lithium cells feature long-term stability and a Coulombic efficiency that can reach 97% after 100 cycles. The SEM image of the lithium metal surface after the cycling test shows that the composite gel electrolyte with 20% silica cross-linker forms a uniform passivation layer on the lithium surface. Accordingly, these features allow this gel polymer electrolyte with ceramic cross-linker to function as a high-performance lithium-ionic conductor and reliable separator for lithium metal batteries.

  2. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  3. Lithium batteries. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, D. M.

    1980-07-01

    Federally funded research on design, development, components, testing corrosion, electrolytes, sealing, hazards of lithium cells are presented. Batteries studied include lithium organic cells, lithium sulfur cells, lithium water air cells, and lithium nickel fluoride cells. Applications cover use in spacecraft, electric vehicles, off peak energy storage, and forklift trucks. This updated bibliography contains 151 citations, 57 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  4. Intermetallic insertion anodes for lithium batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Thackeray, M. M.; Vaughey, J.; Johnson, C. S.; Kepler, K. D.

    1999-11-12

    Binary intermetallic compounds containing lithium, or lithium alloys, such as Li{sub x}Al, Li{sub x}Si and Li{sub x}Sn have been investigated in detail in the past as negative electrode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries. It is generally acknowledged that the major limitation of these systems is the large volumetric expansion that occurs when lithium reacts with the host metal. Such large increases in volume limit the practical use of lithium-tin electrodes in electrochemical cells. It is generally recognized that metal oxide electrodes, MO{sub y}, in lithium-ion cells operate during charge and discharge by means of a reversible lithium insertion/extraction process, and that the cells offer excellent cycling behavior when the crystallographic changes to the unit cell parameters and unit cell volume of the Li{sub x}MO{sub y} electrode are kept to a minimum. An excellent example of such an electrode is the spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}, which maintains its cubic symmetry without any significant change to the lattice parameter (and hence unit cell volume) during lithium insertion to the rock-salt composition Li{sub 7}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. This spinel electrode is an example of a ternary Li{sub x}MO{sub y} system in which a binary MO{sub y} framework provides a stable host structure for lithium. With this approach, the authors have turned their attention to exploring ternary intermetallic systems Li{sub x}MM{prime} in the hope of finding a system that is not subject to the high volumetric expansion that typifies many binary systems. In this paper, the authors present recent data of their investigations of lithium-copper-tin and lithium-indium-antimonide electrodes in lithium cells. The data show that lithium can be inserted reversibly into selected intermetallic compounds with relatively small expansion of the lithiated intermetallic structures.

  5. Structural diversity in lithium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangzheng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Cohen, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium-carbon binary system possesses a broad range of chemical compounds, which exhibit fascinating chemical bonding characteristics, which give rise to diverse and technologically important properties. While lithium carbides with various compositions have been studied or suggested previously, the crystal structures of these compounds are far from well understood. In this work, we present the first comprehensive survey of all ground state (GS) structures of lithium carbides over a broad range of thermodynamic conditions, using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) crystal structure searching methods. Thorough searches were performed for 29 stoichiometries ranging from Li12C to LiC12 at 0 and 40 GPa. Based on formation enthalpies from optimized van der Waals density functional calculations, three thermodynamically stable phases (Li4C3 , Li2C2 , and LiC12) were identified at 0 GPa, and seven thermodynamically stable phases (Li8C , Li6C , Li4C , Li8C3 , Li2C , Li3C4 , and Li2C3 ) were predicted at 40 GPa. A rich diversity of carbon bonding, including monomers, dimers, trimers, nanoribbons, sheets, and frameworks, was found within these structures, and the dimensionality of carbon connectivity existing within each phase increases with increasing carbon concentration. We find that the well-known composition LiC6 is actually a metastable one. We also find a unique coexistence of carbon monomers and dimers within the predicted thermodynamically stable phase Li8C3 , and different widths of carbon nanoribbons coexist in a metastable phase of Li2C2 (Imm2). Interesting mixed sp2-sp3 carbon frameworks are predicted in metastable phases with composition LiC6.

  6. Optical storage in lithium niobate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alphonse, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    Holographic storage and retrieval using photorefractive media (electro-optic ferroelectric materials), particularly iron-doped lithium niobate with its enhanced sensitivity, are discussed. Refractive index changes induced by exposure to light render the materials useful for read-write memories and read-write memory simulation. Resolution, dark storage time, write and erase times, reversibility, and noise levels of the materials are examined. The laser source, deflection system, hololens, page composer, and detector array of the holographic memory system are described. High SNR and two orders of magnitude improvement in speed are reported over earlier experimental prototypes, but the system is still too slow to meet practical needs.

  7. A lithium oxygen secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semkow, Krystyna W.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1987-01-01

    Some recent work on a lithium-oxygen secondary battery is reported in which stabilized zirconia oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolytes were used for the effective separation of respective half-cell reactions. The electroactive material consisted of alloys possessing the general composition Li(x)FeSi2 immersed in a ternary molten salt comprising LiF, LiCl, and Li2O. The manufacture of the cell is described, and discharge-current voltage curves for partially charged cells are shown and discussed. A galvanostatic IR free-changing curve and an IR-free charge-discharge curve are also shown.

  8. Lithium Niobate Reactive Ion Etching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    sputter method. The coated substrates were then patterned using a photolithographic mask with AZP 4620 photoresist. The NiCr layer was sputter etched to...create the NiCr RIE mask and the photoresist residual removed. Sputter etch was the chosen technology to pattern the NiCr for two main reasons; - An...2. Experimental Description 2.1 Preparation of Lithium Niobate Samples The LiNbO3 substrates were coated with a 3000 A layer of NiCr using the RF

  9. A lithium oxygen secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semkow, Krystyna W.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1987-01-01

    Some recent work on a lithium-oxygen secondary battery is reported in which stabilized zirconia oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolytes were used for the effective separation of respective half-cell reactions. The electroactive material consisted of alloys possessing the general composition Li(x)FeSi2 immersed in a ternary molten salt comprising LiF, LiCl, and Li2O. The manufacture of the cell is described, and discharge-current voltage curves for partially charged cells are shown and discussed. A galvanostatic IR free-changing curve and an IR-free charge-discharge curve are also shown.

  10. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2007-02-02

    Lithium insertion into various iron vanadates has been investigated. Fe{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 13} and Fe{sub 4}(V{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O have discharge capacities approaching 200 mAh/g above 2.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li. Although the potential profiles change significantly between the first and subsequent discharges, capacity retention is unexpectedly good. Other phases, structurally related to FeVO{sub 4}, containing copper and/or sodium ions were also studied. One of these, {beta}-Cu{sub 3}Fe{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 6}, reversibly consumes almost 10 moles of electrons per formula unit (ca. 240 mAh g{sup -1}) between 3.6 and 2.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li, in a non-classical insertion process. It is proposed that both copper and vanadium are electrochemically active, whereas iron(III) reacts to form LiFe{sup III}O{sub 2}. The capacity of the Cu{sub 3}Fe{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 6}/Li system is nearly independent of cycling rate, stabilizing after a few cycles at 120-140 mAh g{sup -1}. Iron vanadates exhibit better capacities than their phosphate analogues, whereas the latter display more constant discharge potentials.

  11. Lithium Isotopic Fractionation in Subduction Zones: Clues From Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, L. B.; Hervig, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    Lithium isotope ratios show such large variations in nature (>30 per mil), that many areas of geosciences are exploring the usefulness of this system in explaining the evolution of particular rocks. Here we show how the lithium isotope ratios change during the transformation of smectite clay minerals to illite during burial metamorphism. Such a transition may be a common feature in the shallow regions of subduction zones and may ultimately affect the Li isotope compositions of fluids contributing to arc magmatism. Lithium is a ubiquitous trace element in natural formation waters that, like B, shows large isotopic fractionation especially during interactions with clay minerals. Lithium is adsorbed in the interlayer region of expandable clay minerals but is easily exchanged. Lithium is also incorporated into the octahedral sites. The substitutions of Li in two crystallographic sites of clay minerals may complicate interpretations of bulk Li-isotope ratios. We suggest that the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of Li between fluid and clay is different in the interlayer sites of clay minerals than in the octahedral sites of clay minerals. Examination of Li contents and isotope variations in experimental reactions of smectite to illite (300C, 100MPa) shows changes with structural re-arrangement of the clay layers. The Li-isotope trend declines (from ~+6 to -13 per mil, expressed as ratios of 7/6) throughout R1-ordering of the mixed-layered illite smectite (I/S). However, the equilibrium end products of the reaction have R3-ordering and show a heavier isotope ratio (~0 per mil). This observation is very similar to the trends we observed for B-isotopes, where the interlayer B initially overprinted the tetrahedral-layer B isotope composition, but as the interlayer sites were collapsed during illitization, the equilibrium isotope composition was approached. The significant Li and B isotopic changes that occur during ordering of I/S coincides with the temperatures

  12. Lithium Diffusion in Lithium-Transition-Metal Oxides Detected by μ+SR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Jun; Mukai, Kazuhiko; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Harada, Masashi; Kamazawa, Kazuya; YutakaIkedo; Månsson, Martin; Ofer, Oren; Ansaldo, Eduardo J.; Brewer, Jess H.; Chow, Kim H.; IsaoWatanabe; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Ohzuku, Tsutomu

    Diffusion of Li+ ionsin solidsisa basic principle behindthe operationof Li-ion batteries. Suchdiffusive behavior is represented by the diffusion equation (Fick's law), J = -D × δϕ/δx, where J is the diffusion flux, D is the self diffusion coeffcient, ϕ is the concentration, and x is the position. Although D of Li+ ions(DLi)in solids is usually evaluatedby 7Li-NMR, diffculties arise for materials that contain magnetic ions. This is because the magnetic ions contribute additional spin-lattice relaxation processes thatis considerably larger than the1/T1 expected from only Li diffusion[1-3]. This implies that 7Li-NMRprovidesa rough estimateof DLi for the positive electrode materials of Li-ion batteries, which include transition metal ions in order to compensate charge neutrality during a Li+ intercala-tion/deintercalation reaction. This is an unsatisfactory situation since DLi is one of the primary parameters that govern the charge/discharge rate of a Li-ion battery. We have, therefore, attempted to measure DLi for lithium-transition-metal-oxides with muon-spin relaxation (μ+SR) since 2005 [4-6]. Muons do not feel fluctuating magnetic moments at high T, but instead sense the change in nuclear dipole field due to Li diffusion. Even if magnetic moments still affect the muon-spin depolarization rate, such aneffectis, in principle, distinguishablefromthatof nucleardipole fields.In particular,aweak longitudinal field can be applied that decouples the magnetic and nuclear dipole interactions [7,8]. Here, we wish to summarize our μ+SR study on the lithium-transition-metal-oxides, LixCoO2, LiNiO2, and LiCrO2.

  13. Advanced Nanofiber-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprakci, Ozan

    composite nanofibers were synthesized by using a combination of sol-gel and electrospinning. During the material preparation, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was used as an electrospinning media and a carbon source. LiFePO 4 precursor materials and/or conductive materials (carbon nanotubes and graphene) and PAN were dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide separately and they were mixed before electrospinning. LiFePO4 precursor/PAN fibers were heat treated, during which LiFePO4 precursor transformed to energy-storage LiFePO4 material and PAN was converted to carbon. The surface morphology, microstructure and electrochemical performance of the materials were analyzed. Compared with conventional powder based positive electrodes, the novel LiFePO4/C composite nanofiber cathodes possess better electrochemical performance. Furthermore, the newly developed LiFePO 4/C composite nanofibers are easy to fabricate, highly controllable, and can be used in practical Lithium-ion battery applications. In addition to LiFePO4, more recent efforts have been directed to mixed form of layered lithiummetal oxides (Li-Ni-Mn-Co). Nickel and manganese are of importance because of their lower cost, safety and higher abundance in nature. These new cathodes offer noticeable improvement in the capacity and cycling behavior. In these cathodes, LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn 1/3O2 attracted significant interest because of its good electrochemical properties such as high capacity, prolonged cycling life, and so on. On the other hand, it has some disadvantages such as instability at high voltages and high current densities. To overcome these problems, synthesis of layered Li-rich composite materials such as xLi2MnO3˙(1-x)LiCo 1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 can be a promising approach. In this study, various xLi2MnO3˙(1-x)LiCo 1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5) composite cathode materials were prepared by a one-step sol-gel route. Morphology, microstructure and electrochemical behavior of these cathode materials were evaluated. The

  14. Synthesis, Characterization and Performance of Cathodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianxin

    Lithium ion batteries provide a high energy density, higher voltage as well as a long shelf life compared to traditionally used lead acid, NiMH and NiCd batteries. Thus, they are a very promising energy storage system for our daily life. As one of the most important components in a battery, cathode materials have been investigated intensively in recent years as they play a key role in determining the cell voltage and discharge capacity in a battery. Both layered Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O 2 (NCM) and olivine-structured LiFePO4 (LFP) materials are promising cathode candidates. However, these cathodes also have some disadvantages that have hindered further commercialization. The main issue with NCM is its rapid performance decay upon cycling. In addition, LFP is hindered by a low rate capacity and low lithium ion diffusivity. We studied the crystal growth behavior and performance of both Li(Ni 1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 and LiFePO4 cathodes in order to develop synthesis-structure-function relationships. Three different crystal growth behaviors were observed for the NCM annealing process: surface, volume and grain boundary diffusion. Further exploration of the mechanism of NCM performance decay revealed that microstructural changes were related to the strain accommodation ability in this system and that nanostructured materials were more stable during cycling. In the LFP synthesis, we observed both oriented attachment (OA) and Ostwald ripening (OR) during growth in a triethylene-glycol system. Both polycrystalline and single crystalline particles evolved as a function of a time-dependent pH change. Thus, the lithium ion diffusion rate of LiFePO4 was improved by tailoring the morphology and size though our modification of the precursor environment, revealing that polycrystalline LFP displayed better performance than single crystalline particles. Finally, the electronic conductivity of LiFePO4 was successfully increased via a polymer solution coating method. By producing more uniform

  15. Apollo 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center, during the fourth television transmission from the Apollo 13 spacecraft while enroute to the Moon. Eugene F. Kranz (foreground, back to camera), one of four Apollo 13 Flight Directors, views the large screen at front of MOCR. Astronaut Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot, is seen on the screen. The fourth television transmission from the Apollo 13 mission was on the evening of April 13, 1970. Shortly after the transmission ended and during a routine proceedure that required the crew to flip a switch that stirred one of the cryogenic liquid oxygen tanks, an explosion occurred that ended any hope of a lunar landing and jeopordized the lives of the three crew members.

  16. Novel polymer electrolyte from poly(carbonate-ether) and lithium tetrafluoroborate for lithium-oxygen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Gao, Yonggang; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Ji; Wang, Xianhong; Wang, Fosong

    2013-11-01

    Novel polymer electrolyte based on low-molecular weight poly(carbonate-ether) and lithium tetrafluoroborate has been prepared and used in lithium-oxygen battery for the first time, the electrolyte with approximate 17% of LiBF4 showed ionic conductivity of 1.57 mS cm-1. Infrared spectra analysis indicates that obvious interaction between the lithium ions and partial oxygen atoms in the host polymer exists, and the lithium salt and the host polymer have good miscibility. The lithium-oxygen battery from this polymer electrolyte shows similar cyclic stability to traditional liquid electrolyte observed by FT-IR, AFM and electrochemical measurements, which may provide a new choice for fabrication of all-solid-state high-capacity rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery with better safety.

  17. Lithium plating in lithium-ion batteries investigated by voltage relaxation and in situ neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lüders, Christian; Zinth, Veronika; Erhard, Simon V.; Osswald, Patrick J.; Hofmann, Michael; Gilles, Ralph; Jossen, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    In this work, lithium plating is investigated by means of voltage relaxation and in situ neutron diffraction in commercial lithium-ion batteries. We can directly correlate the voltage curve after the lithium plating with the ongoing phase transformation from LiC12 to LiC6 according to the neutron diffraction data during the relaxation. Above a threshold current of C/2 at a temperature of -2 °C, lithium plating increases dramatically. The results indicate that the intercalation rate of deposited lithium seems to be constant, independent of the deposited amount. It can be observed that the amount of plating correlates with the charging rate, whereas a charging current of C/2 leads to a deposited amount of lithium of 5.5% of the charge capacity and a current of 1C to 9.0%.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of lithium response in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Alda, M

    1999-01-01

    Lithium is the first-line treatment for bipolar disorder. In the past, genetic studies have attempted to identify factors associated with positive treatment response or side effects. Several research groups have shown that familial factors, family history of primary bipolar disorder, and negative family history of schizophrenia in particular, correlate well with prophylactic lithium response. Conversely, studies of lithium responsive patients and their families can assist genetic research of bipolar disorder. Lithium responders appear to suffer from a form of bipolar disorder that is more genetically based and more homogeneous. In a series of family studies, the author and his colleagues have confirmed the differences in family histories of lithium responders and nonresponders and shown that the mode of inheritance in lithium responders is compatible with a major-gene model. Subsequently, they initiated an international collaborative study to map the gene(s) predisposing to the illness or treatment response, or both, using both linkage and association strategies. To date, a sample of 32 families, 138 unrelated patients and 163 control subjects has been studied. In these studies, they found support for the role of phospholipase C in lithium responsive bipolar disorder. PMID:10212559

  19. Lithium protects ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Jin . E-mail: jizhong@iupui.edu; Yang Xianlin; Yao Weiguo; Lee Weihua

    2006-12-01

    Lithium is widely used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Recent studies have demonstrated its neuroprotective effect. Ethanol is a potent neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to the developing nervous system. In this study, we evaluated lithium's neuroprotection against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Transient exposure of infant mice to ethanol caused apoptotic cell death in brain, which was prevented significantly by administering a low dose of lithium 15 min later. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons, ethanol-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3/9, both of which were prevented by lithium. However, lithium's protection is not mediated by its commonly known inhibition of glycogen synthase3{beta}, because neither ethanol nor lithium has significant effects on the phosphorylation of Akt (ser473) or GSK3{beta} (ser9). In addition, the selective GSK-3{beta} inhibitor SB-415286 was unable to prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis. These data suggest lithium may be used as a potential preventive measure for ethanol-induced neurological deficits.

  20. Lithium Manganese Silicate Positive Electrode Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong

    As the fast development of the electronic portable devices and drastic fading of fossil energy sources. The need for portable secondary energy sources is increasingly urgent. As a result, lithium ion batteries are being investigated intensely to meet the performance requirements. Among various electrode materials, the most expensive and capacity limiting component is the positive materials. Based on this, researches have been mostly focused on the development of novel cathode materials with high capacity and energy density and the lithium transition metal orthosilicates have been identified as possible high performance cathodes. Here in, we report the synthesis of a kind of lithium transition metal orthosilicates electrode lithium manganese silicate. Lithium manganese silicate has the advantage of high theoretical capacity, low cost raw material and safety. In this thesis, lithium manganese silicate are prepared using different silicon sources. The structure of silicon sources preferred are examined. Nonionic block copolymers surfactant, P123, is tried as carbon source and mophology directing agent. Lithium manganese silicate's performances are improved by adding P123.

  1. Lithium and kidney, 60 years later.

    PubMed

    Raja, Michele

    2011-11-01

    Lithium, an old and invaluable psychiatric therapy, is still the best treatment option in several clinical circumstances, including acute mania, bipolar and unipolar recurrent mood disorders, suicidal ideation and behavior, recurrent or chronic unipolar depression that has not responded to other treatments, aggressive or impulsive behavior and alcoholism, especially when an affective component is manifest. However, lithium has a narrow therapeutic index and is associated with many serious acute and long-term side effects. Furthermore, monitoring requirements, i.e., frequent blood draws and frequent visits, discourage lithium use. Therefore, the drug is underused. Full awareness of lithium side effects and competence to minimize them is the only contrast to this ominous trend. Renal side effects are frequent in the course of lithium treatment. Although not serious in the large majority of cases, they may seldom become severe and result in chronic renal failure and end stage renal disease. The aim of the paper is reviewing the renal safety profile of lithium and the suggested strategies in the management of the lithium associated renal side effects.

  2. JPL lithium doped solar cell development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    One of the most significant problems encountered in the use of silicon solar cells in space is the sensitivity of the device to electron and proton radiation exposure. The p-diffused-into-n-base solar cells were replaced with the more radiation tolerant n-diffused-into-p-base solar cells. Another advancement in achieving greater radiation tolerance was the discovery that the addition of lithium to n-base silicon resulted in what appeared to be annealing of radiation-induced defects. This phenomenon is being exploited to develop a high efficiency radiation resistant lithium-doped solar cell. Lithium-doped solar cells fabricated from oxygen-lean and oxygen-rich silicon were obtained with average initial efficiencies of 11.9% at air mass zero and 28 C, as compared to state-of-the-art n-p cells fabricated from 10 ohm cm silicon with average efficiencies of 11.3% under similar conditions. Lithium-doped cells demonstrated the ability to withstand three to five times the fluence of 1-MeV electrons before degrading to a power equivalent to state-of-the-art solar cells. The principal investigations are discussed with respect to fabrication of high efficiency radiation resistant lithium-doped cells, including starting material, p-n junction diffusion, lithium source introduction, and lithium diffusion.

  3. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  4. Higher energy and safety of lithium-ion batteries with ionic liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaba, Shinichi; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Katayama, Yasushi; Miura, Takashi

    2010-04-01

    Ionic liquid has been utilized as safe electrolyte solution for lithium-ion batteries. Reversible charge / discharge cycling of the graphite electrode in the ionic liquid has been achieved with polyacrylic acid polymer binder, which can suppress the organic cation intercalation to the graphite. Cycleability of the graphite-silicon composite electrodes prepared with polyacrylate binder was significantly improved in comparison to the conventional PVdF binder, and it has been demonstrated that the reversible cycling with 1000 mAh g-1 for 30 cycling test is possible in ionic liquid. The possibility of the safe and high-energy lithium-ion battery is discussed through the preliminary study on Li2MnO3-LiCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2 based positive electrode and graphite-silicon-polyacrylate composite negative electrode with the ionic liquid electrolyte.

  5. Preliminary investigation of lithium for mood disorder symptoms in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Matthew; Beresford, Carol A; Bunker, Madisun; Verdi, Mary; Vishnevetsky, Donna; Karlsson, Cassie; Teer, Olivia; Stedman, Amy; Smith, Kahsi A

    2014-09-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have higher rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, than the general child population. Although children with ASD may experience irritability (aggression, self-injury, and tantrums), a portion also experience symptoms that are typical of a mood disorder, such as euphoria/elevated mood, mania, hypersexuality, paranoia, or decreased need for sleep. Despite lithium's established efficacy in controlling mood disorder symptoms in the neurotypical population, lithium has been rarely studied in children with ASD. We performed a retrospective chart review of 30 children and adolescents diagnosed with ASD by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria who were prescribed lithium in order to assess target symptoms, safety, and tolerability. Clinical Global Impressions - Improvement (CGI-I) ratings were performed by two board-certified child psychiatrists with expertise in ASD. CGI-I scores were dichotomized into "improved" (CGI-I score of 1 or 2) or "not improved" (CGI-I score ≥3). Forty-three percent of patients who received lithium were rated as "improved" on the CGI-I. Seventy-one percent of patients who had two or more pretreatment mood disorder symptoms were rated as "improved." The presence of mania (p=0.033) or euphoria/elevated mood (p=0.041) were the pretreatment symptoms significantly associated with an "improved" rating. The mean lithium blood level was 0.70 mEq/L (SD=0.26), and the average length of lithium treatment was 29.7 days (SD=23.9). Forty-seven percent of patients were reported to have at least one side effect, most commonly vomiting (13%), tremor (10%), fatigue (10%), irritability (7%), and enuresis (7%). This preliminary assessment of lithium in children and adolescents with ASD suggests that lithium may be a medication of interest for those who exhibit two or more mood disorder symptoms, particularly mania or euphoria

  6. Density Optimization of Lithium Lanthanum Titanate Ceramics for Lightweight Lithium-Air Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Thangadurai V, Weppner W. Lithium lanthanum titanates: a review. Chemistry of Materials. 2003;15:3974–3990. 4. Knauth P. Inorganic solid Li ion conductors...an overview. Solid State Ionics. 2009;180:911–916. 5. Ban CW, Choi GM. The effect of sintering on the grain boundary conductivity of lithium ...lanthanum titanates. Solid State Ionics. 2001;140:285–292. 6. Inada R, Kimura K, Kusakabe K, Tojo T, Sakurai Y. Synthesis and lithium -ion conductivity

  7. Full and Partial Thickness Burns from Spontaneous Combustion of E-Cigarette Lithium-Ion Batteries with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Treitl, Daniela; Solomon, Rachele; Davare, Dafney L; Sanchez, Rafael; Kiffin, Chauniqua

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has increased worldwide. Most electronic nicotine delivery systems use rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are relatively safe, but in rare cases these batteries can spontaneously combust, leading to serious full and partial thickness burn injuries. Explosions from lithium-ion batteries can cause a flash fire and accelerant-related burn injuries. A retrospective chart review was conducted of 3 patients with lithium-ion battery burns seen at our Level I community-based trauma center. Clinical presentation, management, and outcome are presented. All 3 patients sustained burn injuries (total body surface area range 5-13%) from the spontaneous combustion of lithium-ion batteries used for e-cigarettes. All patients were treated with debridement and local wound care. All fully recovered without sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians can expect to treat burn cases due to spontaneous lithium-ion battery combustion as e-cigarette use continues to increase. The cases presented here are intended to bring attention to lithium-ion battery-related burns, prepare physicians for the clinical presentation of this burn mechanism, and facilitate patient education to minimize burn risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. RNA-sequencing of bipolar disorder lymphoblastoid cell lines implicates the neurotrophic factor HRP-3 in lithium's clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Elena; Voinsky, Irena; Hadar, Adva; Srouji, Ala; Maj, Carlo; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Gershovits, Michael; Gilad, Shlomit; Chillotti, Caterina; Squassina, Alessio; Potash, James B; Schulze, Thomas G; Goes, Fernando; Zandi, Peter; Kelsoe, John R; Gurwitz, David

    2017-08-31

    Lithium remains the oldest and most effective treatment for mood stabilization in bipolar disorder (BD) even though at least half of patients are only partially responsive or do not respond. This study aimed to identify biomarkers associated with lithium response in BD, based on comparing RNA-sequencing information derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) of lithium responsive (LR) vs. lithium non-responsive (LNR) BD patients, to assess gene expression variations that might bear on treatment outcome. RNA-sequencing was carried out on 24 LCLs from female BD patients (12 LR and 12 LNR) followed by qPCR validation in two additional independent cohorts (41 and 17 BD patients, respectively). Fifty-six genes showed nominal differential expression comparing LR and LNR (FC≥|1.3|, p≤0.01). The differential expression of HDGFRP3 and ID2 was validated by qPCR in the independent cohorts. We observed higher expression levels of HDGFRP3 and ID2 in BD patients who favorably respond to lithium. Both of these genes are involved in neurogenesis and HDGFRP3 has been suggested to be a neurotrophic factor. Additional studies in larger BD cohorts are needed to confirm the potential of HDGFRP3 and ID2 expression levels in blood cells as tentative favorable lithium response biomarkers.

  9. Influence of corannulene's curved carbon lattice (C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) on lithium intercalation.

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, L. G.

    1998-06-08

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been used to investigate the influence of corannulene's curved carbon lattice (C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) on lithium intercalation. This has been approximated by investigating the reaction of lithium atoms with either the corannulene molecule directly or with a sandwich structure formed from two corannulene molecules. In the first case, one corannulene molecule, three, six and seven lithiums have been used to form Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}), Li{sub 6}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) and Li{sub 7}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}). The last complex has a lithium to carbon ratio of 1:2.86 indicative of a high capacity lithium carbon anode versus the 1:6 ratio found in stage 1 lithium intercalated graphite. The change in Gibbs energy for formation of Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) with a multiplicity of 4 (3 unpaired electrons) is -4.75 kcal/mole. However, when a multiplicity of 2 is used (1 unpaired electron), the change in Gibbs energy is -8.49 kcal/mole. The change in Gibbs energy for formation of Li{sub 6}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) and Li{sub 7}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) (multiplicity of 2) are -26.48 and -26.47 kcal/mole, respectively. In all the lithium corannulene complexes described, each complex has a molecular orbital composed only of lithium orbitals, indicative of lithium cluster formation. However, in the formation of Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) with three lithium atoms intercalated between two corannulene carbon lattices, there are no molecular orbitals indicative of lithium cluster formation. The multiplicity for this chemical system is 4 and the corannulene lattices are stacked one over the other like saucers. The corannulene carbon lattices are separated by approximately 4.5 {angstrom}. The separations between lithiums are 3.13, 3.60 and 3.79 {angstrom}. These results are in contrast to those found in the Li{sub 3}C{sub 60} endohedral complex with a multiplicity of 4. In this complex there is a molecular orbital composed only of lithium orbitals

  10. Lithium D-cell study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Size, P.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this contract is to evaluate parametrically the effects of various factors including the electrolyte type, electrolyte concentration, depolarizer type, and cell configuration on lithium cell electrical performance and safety. This effort shall allow for the selection and optimization of cell design for future NASA applications while maintaining close ties with WGL's continuous improvements in manufacturing processes and lithium cell design. Taguchi experimental design techniques are employed in this task, and allow for a maximum amount of information to be obtained while requiring significantly less cells than if a full factorial design were employed. Acceptance testing for this task is modeled after the NASA Document EP5-83-025, Revision C, for cell weights, OCV's and load voltages. The performance attributes that are studied in this effort are fresh capacity and start-up characteristics evaluated at two rates and two temperatures, shelf-life characteristics including start-up and capacity retention, and iterative microcalorimetry measurements. Abuse testing includes forced over discharge at two rates with and without diode protection, temperature tolerance testing, and shorting tests at three rates with the measurement of heat generated during shorting conditions.

  11. Thermal properties of lithium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, B. M.; Gustavsson, M.; Karawacki, E.; Lundén, A.

    1997-09-01

    The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of lithium sulphate have been measured simultaneously, using the transient plane source technique over the temperature range 300 - 900 K. The thermal conductivity decreases slowly up to about 640 K, whereupon a distinct rise occurs, indicating the onset of a pre-transitional behaviour, which causes a continuous growth of the conductivity up to the structural phase transition at 851 K, whereupon a very sharp increase occurs. A similar behaviour has been observed for the thermal diffusivity, for which a very sharp dip occurs at the transition point due to the exceptionally large transition enthalpy. The pre-transitional behaviour of heat transport is associated with the librational disorder of the sulphate anions known from Raman scattering studies of both phases (and neutron scattering from the cubic phase), whereas the translational disorder of lithium cations is of hardly any importance. It is thus possible to link the `paddle-wheel' concept of ion migration in the cubic phase to the enhancement of heat transport observed in the `pre-transition' region, as well as to the large difference in heat-transport rates between the monoclinic and cubic phases.

  12. The Lithium Vapor Box Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert; Hakim, Ammar; Hammett, Gregory; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Schwartz, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Projections of scrape-off layer width to a demonstration power plant suggest an immense parallel heat flux, of order 12 GW/m2, which will necessitate nearly fully detached operation. Building on earlier work by Nagayama et al. and by Ono et al., we propose to use a series of differentially pumped boxes filled with lithium vapor to isolate the buffering vapor from the main plasma chamber, allowing stable detachment. This powerful differential pumping is only available for condensable vapors, not conventional gases. We demonstrate the properties of such a system through conservation laws for vapor mass and enthalpy, and then include plasma entrainment and ultimately an estimate of radiated power. We find that full detachment should be achievable with little leakage of lithium to the main plasma chamber. We also present progress towards solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically for the chain of vapor boxes, including self-consistent wall boundary conditions and fully-developed shocks, as well as concepts for an initial experimental demonstration-of-concept. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Initial NSTX Lithium Pellet Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Biewer, T.; Gates, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Leblanc, B.; Paul, S.; Samtaney, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Raman, R.; Bush, C.; Maingi, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Nishino, N.; Lee, K. C.; Stutman, D.

    2004-11-01

    A cartridge style Lithium Pellet Injector was installed on NSTX for midplane radial injection. Deuterium gas was used to propel a Li pellet-bearing cartridge down a barrel to a cartridge stop, and the pellet continued into the NSTX plasma at about 150 m/s. 16 lithium pellets, about 2 mg each were injected into LSN and DND, NBI-heated, H-mode plasmas, and into L-mode LSN Ohmic plasmas, and were observed with a Li I filtered Plasma-TV. Li pellets injected into NBI-heated LSN and DND plasmas appeared to ablate in the outer boundary. The pellets injected into OH plasmas exhibited good penetration to the HFS region. Lastly, a NBI preheat was added prior to pellet arrival, and the penetration depth was found to be very sensitive to the NBI turn-off time relative to pellet arrival. As this work progressed, Li luminosity started to be observed from the very initiation of discharges, due to depositions from preceding discharges. Initial modeling results will be presented.

  14. Possible nephotoxic interaction of lithium and metronidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Teicher, M.H.; Altesman, R.I.; Cole, J.O.; Schatzberg, A.F.

    1987-06-26

    Several classes of drugs can promote renal retention of lithium and, occasionally, can induce lithium intoxication. The antimicrobial agent metronidazole hydrochloride (Flagyl I.V.) was also implicated in producing such a reaction in one woman. The authors describe two patients who experienced toxic reactions to lithium following brief use of metronidazole. However, in these two patients, in contrast to the previous case, the degree of acute intoxication was less severe and treatment with metronidazole was completed without apparent suspicion, but persistent signs of renal damage later emerged.

  15. Improving Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Gerard K.; Goswami, Tarun

    2011-01-01

    As energy demands increase for applications such as automotive, military, aerospace, and biomedical, lithium-ion battery capacities are forced to increase in a corresponding manner. For this reason, much research is directed toward the development of improved battery anodes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), silicon, tin, and nanocomposites with these metals are the leading candidates for the next generation of lithium-ion battery anodes, leading to capacities 3 to 10 times that of graphite alone. This review looks at some of the studies addressing high capacity lithium-ion battery anodes.

  16. Ionic Liquids in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are among the most widespread energy storage devices in our society. In order to introduce these devices in new key applications such as transportation, however, their safety and their operative temperature range need to be significantly improved. These improvements can be obtained only by developing new electrolytes. Ionic liquids are presently considered among the most attractive electrolytes for the development of advanced and safer lithium-ion batteries. In this manuscript, the use of various types of ionic liquids, e.g. aprotic and protic, in lithium-ion batteries is considered. The advantages and the limits associated to the use of these innovative electrolytes are critically analysed.

  17. Improved Separators For Rechargeable Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David; Surampudi, Subbarao; Huang, Chen-Kuo; Halpert, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Improved pairs of separators proposed for use in rechargeable lithium cells operating at ambient temperature. Block growth of lithium dendrites and help prevent short circuits. Each cell contains one separator made of microporous polypropylene placed next to anode, and one separator made of microporous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) next to cathode. Separators increase cycle lives of secondary lithium cells. Cells to which concept applicable those of Li/TiS(2), Li/NbSe(3), Li/CoO(2), Li/MoS(2), Li/VO(x), and Li/MnO(2) chemical systems. Advantageous in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high energy density and rechargeability needed.

  18. Primary Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Cell Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    AD A09466 0 AFWAL-TR-80-2076 PRIMARY LITHIUM THIONYL - CHLORIDE CELL EVALUATION Dr. A.E. Zolla R.R. Waterhouse D.J. DeBiccari G.L. Griffin, Jr. Altus...dS.,_b,I ......... S TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Primary Lithium - Thionyl Chloride Final 9/79 - 4/80 Cell Evaluation, 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...the high performance characteristics of the Altus lithium - thionyl chloride cell. In particular features such as the inherent high energy density, the

  19. High-pressure synthesis of lithium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howie, Ross T.; Narygina, Olga; Guillaume, Christophe L.; Evans, Shaun; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2012-08-01

    By compressing elemental lithium and hydrogen in a diamond anvil cell, we have synthesized lithium hydride (LiH) at pressures as low as 50 MPa at room temperature. Combined Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements reveal that, once synthesized, LiH remains stable at 300 K up to 160 GPa in the presence of molecular hydrogen. The mixture of lithium hydride and molecular hydrogen and application of pressure alone cannot form a higher H2 content hydride (LiHx, x>1) as was suggested from the theoretical ab initio calculations and therefore, cannot be considered as a route to low-pressure hydrogen rich material metallization.

  20. Lithium in Stellar Atmospheres: Observations and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, L. S.

    2016-09-01

    Of all the light elements, lithium is the most sensitive indicator of stellar evolution. This review discusses current data on the abundance of lithium in the atmospheres of A-, F-, G-, and K-stars of different types, as well as the consistency of these data with theoretical predictions. The variety of observed Li abundances is illustrated by the following objects in different stages of evolution: (1) Old stars in the galactic halo, which have a lithium abundance logɛ(Li)=2.2 (the "lithium plateau") that appears to be 0.5 dex lower than the primordial abundance predicted by cosmological models. (2) Young stars in the galactic disk, which have been used to estimate the contemporary initial lithium abundance logɛ(Li)=3.2±0.1 for stars in the Main sequence. Possible sources of lithium enrichment in the interstellar medium during evolution of the galaxy are discussed. (3) Evolving FGK dwarfs in the galactic disk, which have lower logɛ(Li) for lower effective temperature T eff and mass M. The "lithium dip" near T eff ~6600 K in the distribution of logɛ(Li) with respect to T eff in old clusters is discussed. (4) FGK giants and supergiants, of which most have no lithium at all. This phenomenon is consistent with rotating star model calculations. (5) Lithium rich cold giants with logɛ(Li) ≥ 2.0, which form a small, enigmatic group. Theoretical models with rotation can explain the existence of these stars only in the case of low initial rotation velocities V 0 <50 km/s. In all other cases it is necessary to assume recent synthesis of lithium (capture of a giant planet is an alternative). (6) Magnetic Ap-stars, where lithium is concentrated in spots located at the magnetic poles. There the lithium abundance reaches logɛ(Li)=6. Discrepancies between observations and theory are noted for almost all the stars discussed in this review.

  1. Lithium iodide cardiac pacemakers: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A new long-life cardiac pacemaker pulse generator powered by a lithium iodide fuel cell was introduced in Canada in 1973. The compact, hermetically sealed unit is easily implanted and reliable, has excellent patient acceptance and has an anticipated battery life of almost 14 years. Among 105 patients who received a lithium iodide pacemaker, complications occurred in 18. The lithium iodide pacemaker represents a significant advance in pacemaker generator technology and is recommended for long-term cardiac pacing; the manufacturer guarantees the pulse generator for 6 years. Images FIG. 1 PMID:974965

  2. Electrolytic method for the production of lithium using a lithium-amalgam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Krikorian, Oscar H.; Homsy, Robert V.

    1979-01-01

    A method for recovering lithium from its molten amalgam by electrolysis of the amalgam in an electrolytic cell containing as a molten electrolyte a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of two or more alkali metal halides, preferably alkali metal halides selected from lithium iodide, lithium chloride, potassium iodide and potassium chloride. A particularly suitable molten electrolyte is a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of at least three components obtained by modifying an eutectic mixture of LiI-KI by the addition of a minor amount of one or more alkali metal halides. The lithium-amalgam fused-salt cell may be used in an electrolytic system for recovering lithium from an aqueous solution of a lithium compound, wherein electrolysis of the aqueous solution in an aqueous cell in the presence of a mercury cathode produces a lithium amalgam. The present method is particularly useful for the regeneration of lithium from the aqueous reaction products of a lithium-water-air battery.

  3. Lithium in drinking water and suicide mortality: interplay with lithium prescriptions.

    PubMed

    Helbich, Marco; Leitner, Michael; Kapusta, Nestor D

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the effects of lithium intake through drinking water on suicide. This intake originates either from natural rock and soil elution and/or accumulation of lithium-based pharmaceuticals in ground water. To examine the interplay between natural lithium in drinking water, prescribed lithium-based pharmaceuticals and suicide in Austria. Spatial Bayesian regressions for males, females and pooled suicide mortality rates were estimated. Although the expected inverse association between lithium levels in drinking water and suicide mortality was confirmed for males and for total suicide rates, the relationship for females was not significant. The models do not indicate that lithium from prescriptions, assumed to accumulate in drinking water, is related to suicide risk patterns either as an individual effect or as a moderator of lithium levels in drinking water. Gender-specific differences in risk factors and local risk hot spots are confirmed. The findings do not support the hypotheses that lithium prescriptions have measureable protective effects on suicide or that they interact with lithium in drinking water. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  4. Modeling Lithium Movement over Multiple Cycles in a Lithium-Metal Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrese, A; Newman, J

    2014-04-11

    This paper builds on the work by Ferrese et al. [J. Electrochem., 159, A1615 (2012)], where a model of a lithium-metal battery with a LiyCoO2 positive electrode was created in order to predict the movement of lithium in the negative electrode along the negative electrode/separator interface during cell cycling. In this paper, the model is expanded to study the movement of lithium along the lithium-metal anode over multiple cycles. From this model, it is found that when a low percentage of lithium at the negative electrode is utilized, the movement of lithium along the negative electrode/separator interface reaches a quasi steady state after multiple cycles. This steady state is affected by the slope of the open-circuit-potential function in the positive electrode, the rate of charge and discharge, the depth of discharge, and the length of the rest periods. However, when a high percent of the lithium at the negative electrode is utilized during cycling, the movement does not reach a steady state and pinching can occur, where the lithium nearest the negative tab becomes progressively thinner after cycling. This is another nonlinearity that leads to a progression of the movement of lithium over multiple cycles. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society.

  5. Lithium in drinking water and suicide mortality: interplay with lithium prescriptions

    PubMed Central

    Helbich, Marco; Leitner, Michael; Kapusta, Nestor D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of lithium intake through drinking water on suicide. This intake originates either from natural rock and soil elution and/or accumulation of lithium-based pharmaceuticals in ground water. Aims To examine the interplay between natural lithium in drinking water, prescribed lithium-based pharmaceuticals and suicide in Austria. Method Spatial Bayesian regressions for males, females and pooled suicide mortality rates were estimated. Results Although the expected inverse association between lithium levels in drinking water and suicide mortality was confirmed for males and for total suicide rates, the relationship for females was not significant. The models do not indicate that lithium from prescriptions, assumed to accumulate in drinking water, is related to suicide risk patterns either as an individual effect or as a moderator of lithium levels in drinking water. Gender-specific differences in risk factors and local risk hot spots are confirmed. Conclusions The findings do not support the hypotheses that lithium prescriptions have measureable protective effects on suicide or that they interact with lithium in drinking water. PMID:25953888

  6. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  7. High-Energy All-Solid-State Lithium Batteries with Ultralong Cycle Life.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiayin; Liu, Deng; Wang, Chunsheng; Long, Peng; Peng, Gang; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Chen, Liquan; Xu, Xiaoxiong

    2016-11-09

    High energy and power densities are the greatest challenge for all-solid-state lithium batteries due to the poor interfacial compatibility between electrodes and electrolytes as well as low lithium ion transfer kinetics in solid materials. Intimate contact at the cathode-solid electrolyte interface and high ionic conductivity of solid electrolyte are crucial to realizing high-performance all-solid-state lithium batteries. Here, we report a general interfacial architecture, i.e., Li7P3S11 electrolyte particles anchored on cobalt sulfide nanosheets, by an in situ liquid-phase approach. The anchored Li7P3S11 electrolyte particle size is around 10 nm, which is the smallest sulfide electrolyte particles reported to date, leading to an increased contact area and intimate contact interface between electrolyte and active materials. The neat Li7P3S11 electrolyte synthesized by the same liquid-phase approach exhibits a very high ionic conductivity of 1.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) with a particle size of 0.4-1.0 μm. All-solid-state lithium batteries employing cobalt sulfide-Li7P3S11 nanocomposites in combination with the neat Li7P3S11 electrolyte and Super P as the cathode and lithium metal as the anode exhibit excellent rate capability and cycling stability, showing reversible discharge capacity of 421 mAh g(-1) at 1.27 mA cm(-2) after 1000 cycles. Moreover, the obtained all-solid-state lithium batteries possesses very high energy and power densities, exhibiting 360 Wh kg(-1) and 3823 W kg(-1) at current densities of 0.13 and 12.73 mA cm(-2), respectively. This contribution demonstrates a new interfacial design for all-solid-state battery with high performance.

  8. A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

    2005-08-29

    Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

  9. Catastrophic event modeling. [lithium thionyl chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the catastrophic failures (venting or explosion of the cell) in lithium thionyl chloride batteries is presented. The phenomenology of the various processes leading to cell failure is reviewed.

  10. Lithium-6 coated wire mesh neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.A.; Geelhood, B.D.

    1984-11-06

    A neutron detection apparatus is provided which includes a selected number of surfaces of Lithium-6 coated wire mesh and which further includes a gas mixture in contact with each sheet of Lithium-6 coated wire mesh for selectively reacting to charged particles emitted or radiated by the Lithium-6 coated mesh. A container is provided to seal the Lithium-6 coated mesh and the gas mixture in a volume from which water vapor and atmospheric gases are excluded, the container having one or more walls which are transmissive to neutrons. Monitoring equipment in contact with the gas mixture detects the generation of charged particles in the gas mixture and, in response to such charged particles, provides an indication of the flux of neutrons passing through the volume of the detector.

  11. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-20

    The Early Flight Fission -- Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  12. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  13. Lithium ion battery with improved safety

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chun-hua; Hyung, Yoo Eup; Vissers, Donald R.; Amine, Khalil

    2006-04-11

    A lithium battery with improved safety that utilizes one or more additives in the battery electrolyte solution wherein a lithium salt is dissolved in an organic solvent, which may contain propylene, carbonate. For example, a blend of 2 wt % triphenyl phosphate (TPP), 1 wt % diphenyl monobutyl phosphate (DMP) and 2 wt % vinyl ethylene carbonate additives has been found to significantly enhance the safety and performance of Li-ion batteries using a LiPF6 salt in EC/DEC electrolyte solvent. The invention relates to both the use of individual additives and to blends of additives such as that shown in the above example at concentrations of 1 to 4-wt % in the lithium battery electrolyte. This invention relates to additives that suppress gas evolution in the cell, passivate graphite electrode and protect it from exfoliating in the presence of propylene carbonate solvents in the electrolyte, and retard flames in the lithium batteries.

  14. Quantum and isotope effects in lithium metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackland, Graeme J.; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Martinez-Canales, Miguel; Loa, Ingo; Zhang, Rong; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Cai, Weizhao; Deemyad, Shanti

    2017-06-01

    The crystal structure of elements at zero pressure and temperature is the most fundamental information in condensed matter physics. For decades it has been believed that lithium, the simplest metallic element, has a complicated ground-state crystal structure. Using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells and multiscale simulations with density functional theory and molecular dynamics, we show that the previously accepted martensitic ground state is metastable. The actual ground state is face-centered cubic (fcc). We find that isotopes of lithium, under similar thermal paths, exhibit a considerable difference in martensitic transition temperature. Lithium exhibits nuclear quantum mechanical effects, serving as a metallic intermediate between helium, with its quantum effect-dominated structures, and the higher-mass elements. By disentangling the quantum kinetic complexities, we prove that fcc lithium is the ground state, and we synthesize it by decompression.

  15. A highly reversible lithium metal anode.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Sik; Ma, Sang Bok; Lee, Dong Joon; Im, Dongmin; Doo, Seok-Gwang; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2014-01-22

    Lithium metal has shown a lot of promise for use as an anode material in rechargeable batteries owing to its high theoretical capacity. However, it does not meet the cycle life and safety requirements of rechargeable batteries owing to electrolyte decomposition and dendrite formation on the surfaces of the lithium anodes during electrochemical cycling. Here, we propose a novel electrolyte system that is relatively stable against lithium metal and mitigates dendritic growth. Systematic design methods that combined simulations, model-based experiments, and in situ analyses were employed to design the system. The reduction potential of the solvent, the size of the salt anions, and the viscosity of the electrolyte were found to be critical parameters determining the rate of dendritic growth. A lithium metal anode in contact with the designed electrolyte exhibited remarkable cyclability (more than 100 cycles) at a high areal capacity of 12 mAh cm(-2).

  16. Layered electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Johnson; Christopher S. , Thackeray; Michael M. , Vaughey; John T. , Kahaian; Arthur J. , Kim; Jeom-Soo

    2008-04-15

    Lithium metal oxide compounds of nominal formula Li.sub.2MO.sub.2, in which M represents two or more positively charged metal ions, selected predominantly and preferably from the first row of transition metals are disclosed herein. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds have a layered-type structure, which can be used as positive electrodes for lithium electrochemical cells, or as a precursor for the in-situ electrochemical fabrication of LiMO.sub.2 electrodes. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds of the invention may have additional functions in lithium cells, for example, as end-of-discharge indicators, or as negative electrodes for lithium cells.

  17. A Polymer Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-08-04

    Herein we report the characteristics of a lithium-oxygen battery using a solid polymer membrane as the electrolyte separator. The polymer electrolyte, fully characterized in terms of electrochemical properties, shows suitable conductivity at room temperature allowing the reversible cycling of the Li-O2 battery with a specific capacity as high as 25,000 mAh gC(-1) reflected in a surface capacity of 12.5 mAh cm(-2). The electrochemical formation and dissolution of the lithium peroxide during Li-O2 polymer cell operation is investigated by electrochemical techniques combined with X-ray diffraction study, demonstrating the process reversibility. The excellent cell performances in terms of delivered capacity, in addition to its solid configuration allowing the safe use of lithium metal as high capacity anode, demonstrate the suitability of the polymer lithium-oxygen as high-energy storage system.

  18. A Polymer Lithium-Oxygen Battery

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report the characteristics of a lithium-oxygen battery using a solid polymer membrane as the electrolyte separator. The polymer electrolyte, fully characterized in terms of electrochemical properties, shows suitable conductivity at room temperature allowing the reversible cycling of the Li-O2 battery with a specific capacity as high as 25,000 mAh gC−1 reflected in a surface capacity of 12.5 mAh cm−2. The electrochemical formation and dissolution of the lithium peroxide during Li-O2 polymer cell operation is investigated by electrochemical techniques combined with X-ray diffraction study, demonstrating the process reversibility. The excellent cell performances in terms of delivered capacity, in addition to its solid configuration allowing the safe use of lithium metal as high capacity anode, demonstrate the suitability of the polymer lithium-oxygen as high-energy storage system. PMID:26238552

  19. A Highly Reversible Lithium Metal Anode

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Sik; Ma, Sang Bok; Lee, Dong Joon; Im, Dongmin; Doo, Seok-Gwang; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium metal has shown a lot of promise for use as an anode material in rechargeable batteries owing to its high theoretical capacity. However, it does not meet the cycle life and safety requirements of rechargeable batteries owing to electrolyte decomposition and dendrite formation on the surfaces of the lithium anodes during electrochemical cycling. Here, we propose a novel electrolyte system that is relatively stable against lithium metal and mitigates dendritic growth. Systematic design methods that combined simulations, model-based experiments, and in situ analyses were employed to design the system. The reduction potential of the solvent, the size of the salt anions, and the viscosity of the electrolyte were found to be critical parameters determining the rate of dendritic growth. A lithium metal anode in contact with the designed electrolyte exhibited remarkable cyclability (more than 100 cycles) at a high areal capacity of 12 mAh cm−2. PMID:24448586

  20. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  1. Electrode Nanostructures in Lithium-Based Batteries.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Nasir; Hou, Yanglong

    2014-12-01

    Lithium-based batteries possessing energy densities much higher than those of the conventional batteries belong to the most promising class of future energy devices. However, there are some fundamental issues related to their electrodes which are big roadblocks in their applications to electric vehicles (EVs). Nanochemistry has advantageous roles to overcome these problems by defining new nanostructures of electrode materials. This review article will highlight the challenges associated with these chemistries both to bring high performance and longevity upon considering the working principles of the various types of lithium-based (Li-ion, Li-air and Li-S) batteries. Further, the review discusses the advantages and challenges of nanomaterials in nanostructured electrodes of lithium-based batteries, concerns with lithium metal anode and the recent advancement in electrode nanostructures.

  2. Layered electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Christopher S [Naperville, IL; Thackeray, Michael M [Naperville, IL; Vaughey, John T [Elmhurst, IL; Kahaian, Arthur J [Chicago, IL; Kim, Jeom-Soo [Naperville, IL

    2008-04-15

    Lithium metal oxide compounds of nominal formula Li.sub.2MO.sub.2, in which M represents two or more positively charged metal ions, selected predominantly and preferably from the first row of transition metals are disclosed herein. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds have a layered-type structure, which can be used as positive electrodes for lithium electrochemical cells, or as a precursor for the in-situ electrochemical fabrication of LiMO.sub.2 electrodes. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds of the invention may have additional functions in lithium cells, for example, as end-of-discharge indicators, or as negative electrodes for lithium cells.

  3. Lithium batteries: Status, prospects and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrosati, Bruno; Garche, Jürgen

    Lithium batteries are characterized by high specific energy, high efficiency and long life. These unique properties have made lithium batteries the power sources of choice for the consumer electronics market with a production of the order of billions of units per year. These batteries are also expected to find a prominent role as ideal electrochemical storage systems in renewable energy plants, as well as power systems for sustainable vehicles, such as hybrid and electric vehicles. However, scaling up the lithium battery technology for these applications is still problematic since issues such as safety, costs, wide operational temperature and materials availability, are still to be resolved. This review focuses first on the present status of lithium battery technology, then on its near future development and finally it examines important new directions aimed at achieving quantum jumps in energy and power content.

  4. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper will discuss the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  5. The Lithium Battery: assessing the neurocognitive profile of lithium in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Gin S; McAulay, Claire; Gershon, Samuel; Gessler, Danielle; Fritz, Kristina; Das, Pritha; Outhred, Tim

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the neurocognitive effects of lithium in bipolar disorder to inform clinical and research approaches for further investigation. Key words pertaining to neurocognition in bipolar disorder and lithium treatment were used to search recognized databases to identify relevant literature. The authors also retrieved gray literature (e.g., book chapters) known to them and examined pertinent articles from bibliographies. A limited number of studies have examined the effects of lithium on neurocognition in bipolar disorder and, although in some domains a consistent picture emerges, in many domains the findings are mixed. Lithium administration appears to reshape key components of neurocognition - in particular, psychomotor speed, verbal memory, and verbal fluency. Notably, it has a sophisticated neurocognitive profile, such that while lithium impairs neurocognition across some domains, it seemingly preserves others - possibly those vulnerable to the effects of bipolar disorder. Furthermore, its effects are likely to be direct and indirect (via mood, for example) and cumulative with duration of treatment. Disentangling the components of neurocognition modulated by lithium in the context of a fluctuating and complex illness such as bipolar disorder is a significant challenge but one that therefore demands a stratified and systematic approach, such as that provided by the Lithium Battery. In order to delineate the effects of lithium therapy on neurocognition in bipolar disorder within both research and clinical practice, a greater understanding and measurement of the relatively stable neurocognitive components is needed to examine those that indeed change with lithium treatment. In order to achieve this, we propose a Lithium Battery-Clinical and a Lithium Battery-Research that can be applied to these respective settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. PDE11A negatively regulates lithium responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, G.; Agostino, M.J.; Bishara, K.; Capell, W.R.; Fisher, J.L.; Hegde, S.; Ibrahim, B.A.; Pilarzyk, Kaitlyn; Sabin, C.; Tuczkewycz, Taras; Wilson, Steven; Kelly, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium responsivity in patients with bipolar disorder has been genetically associated with Phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A), and lithium decreases PDE11A mRNA in IPSC-derived hippocampal neurons originating from lithium responsive patients. PDE11 is an enzyme uniquely enriched in the hippocampus that breaks down cAMP and cGMP. Here, we determined if decreasing PDE11A expression is sufficient to increase lithium responsivity in mice. In dorsal hippocampus (DHIPP) and ventral hippocampus (VHIPP), lithium-responsive C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEvTac mice show decreased PDE11A4 protein expression relative to lithium-unresponsive BALB/cJ mice. In VHIPP, C57BL/6J mice also show differences in PDE11A4 compartmentalization relative to BALB/cJ mice. In contrast, neither PDE2A nor PDE10A expression differ among the strains. The compartment-specific differences in PDE11A4 protein expression are explained by a coding SNP at amino acid 499, which falls within the GAF-B homodimerization domain. Relative to the BALB/cJ 499T, the C57BL/6J 499A decreases PDE11A4 homodimerization, which removes PDE11A4 from the membrane. Consistent with the observation that lower PDE11A4 expression correlates with better lithium responsiveness, we found that Pde11a KO mice given 0.4% lithium chow for 3+ weeks exhibit greater lithium responsivity relative to WT littermates in tail suspension, an antidepressant predictive assay, and amphetamine hyperlocomotion, an anti-manic predictive assay. Reduced PDE11A4 expression may represent a lithium-sensitive pathophysiology, because both C57BL/6J and Pde11a KO mice show increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 relative to BALB/cJ and PDE11A WT mice, respectively. Our finding that PDE11A4 negatively regulates lithium responsivity in mice suggests that the PDE11A SNPs identified in patients may be functionally relevant. PMID:27646265

  7. Characterization of Graphite Lithium-Ion Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Figure 46. Dual Pulse 125 Stored Energy Resistance Welding Power Supply.................75 Figure 47. Thin-Line Model 88F Parallel Gap Welder...problem is lithium-ion batteries. Lithium-ion batteries, with their high energy density, can provide a means for reducing spacecraft weight and...and discharge rates will be twice what they were in the previous test. This amounts to the same energy in and out of the cell during an orbit. The

  8. Design and simulation of lithium rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, C.M.

    1995-08-01

    Lithium -based rechargeable batteries that utilize insertion electrodes are being considered for electric-vehicle applications because of their high energy density and inherent reversibility. General mathematical models are developed that apply to a wide range of lithium-based systems, including the recently commercialized lithium-ion cell. The modeling approach is macroscopic, using porous electrode theory to treat the composite insertion electrodes and concentrated solution theory to describe the transport processes in the solution phase. The insertion process itself is treated with a charge-transfer process at the surface obeying Butler-Volmer kinetics, followed by diffusion of the lithium ion into the host structure. These models are used to explore the phenomena that occur inside of lithium cells under conditions of discharge, charge, and during periods of relaxation. Also, in order to understand the phenomena that limit the high-rate discharge of these systems, we focus on the modeling of a particular system with well-characterized material properties and system parameters. The system chosen is a lithium-ion cell produced by Bellcore in Red Bank, NJ, consisting of a lithium-carbon negative electrode, a plasticized polymer electrolyte, and a lithium-manganese-oxide spinel positive electrode. This battery is being marketed for consumer electronic applications. The system is characterized experimentally in terms of its transport and thermodynamic properties, followed by detailed comparisons of simulation results with experimental discharge curves. Next, the optimization of this system for particular applications is explored based on Ragone plots of the specific energy versus average specific power provided by various designs.

  9. Mangalith: a new lithium pacemaker battery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbier, G.; Lehmann, G.

    1980-01-01

    An original lithium battery system is being developed for pacemaker application. The material used, lithium-manganese dioxide, industrially available at the present time for a variety of electronic applications, has been modified and adapted for pacemaker power requirements. The utilization of a different modification of manganese dioxide offers performance advantages. The cell technology is described and performance comparisons between this new cathode material and the industrial counterpart are reported. 7 refs.

  10. Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yongguang; Gosselink, Denise; Doan, The Nam Long; Sadhu, Mikhail; Cheang, Ho-Jae; Chen, Pu

    2012-01-01

    This review evaluates the characteristics and advantages of employing polymer electrolytes in lithium/sulfur (Li/S) batteries. The main highlights of this study constitute detailed information on the advanced developments for solid polymer electrolytes and gel polymer electrolytes, used in the lithium/sulfur battery. This includes an in-depth analysis conducted on the preparation and electrochemical characteristics of the Li/S batteries based on these polymer electrolytes. PMID:24958296

  11. Improved Lithium-Intercalation Cathode Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    D-A149 39 IMPROVED LITHIUM-INTERCALATION CATHODE MATERIAL(U) ECO / UNCLASSIFIED F/O 7/4 NL M..’. ..... ~~~~. . .--...-. ~ .. . 7 -7 1111& 1&.O8 L& L...program, ECO will evaluate cycle life, . lithium diffusion rate, and self-discharge rates of the five TAAs. Sincerely, Fraser Walsh FW:nck | D TAB I t

  12. Design Evaluation of High Reliability Lithium Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchman, R. C.; Helgeson, W. D.; Istephanous, N. S.

    1985-01-01

    Within one year, a lithium battery design can be qualified for device use through the application of accelerated discharge testing, calorimetry measurements, real time tests and other supplemental testing. Materials and corrosion testing verify that the battery components remain functional during expected battery life. By combining these various methods, a high reliability lithium battery can be manufactured for applications which require zero defect battery performance.

  13. A Cable-Shaped Lithium Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-01-20

    A carbon nanostructured hybrid fiber is developed by integrating mesoporous carbon and graphene oxide into aligned carbon nanotubes. This hybrid fiber is used as a 1D cathode to fabricate a new cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery. The fiber cathode exhibits a decent specific capacity and lifespan, which makes the cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery rank far ahead of other fiber-shaped batteries.

  14. Rechargeable Thin-film Lithium Batteries

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bates, J. B.; Gruzalski, G. R.; Dudney, N. J.; Luck, C. F.; Yu, Xiaohua

    1993-08-01

    Rechargeable thin film batteries consisting of lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have recently been developed. The batteries, which are typically less than 6 {mu}m thick, can be fabricated to any specified size, large or small, onto a variety of substrates including ceramics, semiconductors, and plastics. The cells that have been investigated include Li TiS{sub 2}, Li V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Li Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5, 3.6, and 4.2, respectively. The development of these batteries would not have been possible without the discovery of a new thin film lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride, that is stable in contact with metallic lithium at these potentials. Deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in N{sub 2}, this material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46} and a conductivity at 25{degrees}C of 2 {mu}S/cm. The maximum practical current density obtained from the thin film cells is limited to about 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} due to a low diffusivity of Li{sup +} ions in the cathodes. In this work, the authors present a short review of their work on rechargeable thin film lithium batteries.

  15. Modified lithium borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Au, Ming; Jurgensen, Arthur

    2006-04-06

    In an attempt to develop lithium borohydrides as reversible hydrogen storage materials with high hydrogen storage capacities, the feasibility of reducing the dehydrogenation temperature of the lithium borohydride and moderating rehydrogenation conditions was explored. The lithium borohydride was modified by ball milling with metal oxides and metal chlorides as additives. The modified lithium borohydrides released 9 wt % hydrogen starting from 473 K. The dehydrided modified lithium borohydrides absorbed 7-9 wt % hydrogen at 873 K and 7 MPa. The modification with additives reduced the dehydriding starting temperature from 673 to 473 K and moderated the rehydrogenation conditions from 923 K/15 MPa to 873 K/7 MPa. XRD and SEM analysis revealed the formation of an intermediate compound that might play a key role in changing the reaction path, resulting in the lower dehydriding temperature and reversibility. The reversible hydrogen storage capacity of the oxide-modified lithium borohydrides decreased gradually during hydriding/dehydriding cycling. One of the possible reasons for this effect might be the loss of boron during dehydrogenation, but this can be prevented by changing the dehydriding path using appropriate additives. The additives reduced the dehydriding temperature and improved the reversibility, but they also reduced the hydrogen storage capacity. The best compromise can be reached by selecting appropriate additives, optimizing the additive loading, and using new synthesis processes other than ball milling.

  16. Predictors of Lithium Response in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, Sarah K.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Potash, James B.

    2011-01-01

    While lithium is generally regarded as the first-line agent for patients with bipolar disorder, it does not work for everyone, which raises the question: can we predict who will be most likely to respond? In this paper, we review the most compelling clinical, biologic, and genetic predictors of lithium response in bipolar disorder. Among clinical factors, the strongest predictors of good response are fewer hospitalizations preceding treatment, an episodic course characterized by an illness pattern of mania followed by depression, and a later age at onset of bipolar disorder. While several biologic predictors have been studied, the results are preliminary and require replication with studies of larger patient samples over longer observation periods. Neuroimaging is a particularly promising method given that it might concurrently illuminate pathophysiologic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, the mechanism of action of lithium, and potential predictors of lithium response. The first genome-wide association study of lithium response was recently completed. No definitive results emerged, perhaps because the study was underpowered. With major new initiatives in progress aiming to identify genes and genetic variations associated with lithium response, there is much reason to be hopeful that clinically useful information might be generated within the next several years. This could ultimately translate into tests that could guide the choice of mood-stabilizing medication for patients. In addition, it might facilitate pharmacologic research aimed at developing newer, more effective medications that might act more quickly and yield fewer side effects. PMID:23251751

  17. A lithium–oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Jun; Jung Lee, Yun; Luo, Xiangyi; ...

    2016-01-11

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported(1-3). But, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research(4-8) into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies(9-16) of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime(17). Our studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery.more » However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form(18) because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). We show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We also anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage.« less

  18. Lithium isotopes: differential effects on renal function and histology.

    PubMed

    Stoll, P M; Stokes, P E; Okamoto, M

    2001-08-01

    Reduction in renal concentrating ability has been reported in patients undergoing chronic lithium treatment. Prior work has demonstrated differences in physiological effects of the stable lithium isotopes, 6Li and 7Li. Here, we measured the degree of polyuria, polydipsia and kidney histological changes induced in rats by equimolar amounts of 6LiCl, 7LiCl and the commercially available mixture of both isotopes. Rats were given 1.0 mEq/kg of either 6LiCl, 7LiCl or 'nLiCl' (isotope mixture, 93% 7LiCl) by subcutaneous injection twice daily for up to 49 days. Twenty-four-hour urine volume and water intake were measured daily. Kidneys from rats treated for 7 days with 1.5 mEq/kg 6LiCl, 7LiCl and vehicle were examined under light microscopy and histopathologic changes graded on a 4-point scale of severity. All rats showed loss in renal concentrating ability manifested by increasing urine volume and water intake. Peak effects occurred after 9-13 days treatment, then declined to stable levels at two to three times pre-treatment level. Mean peak effect was significantly greater for 6LiCl than for 7LiCl. Chronic effects of 6LiCl (weeks 3-7 of treatment) on polyuria and polydipsia were persistently higher than that of 7LiCl. nLiCl effect was intermediate. Kidneys from rats treated for 7 days with 6LiCl showed more frequently severe lesions in renal tubules than did 7LiCl-treated rats. Our current data and prior studies suggest that elimination or reduction of 6Li from pharmaceutical preparations may merit further evaluation as a possibly less potentially nephrotoxic form of lithium treatment.

  19. Electrode for a lithium cell

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2008-10-14

    This invention relates to a positive electrode for an electrochemical cell or battery, and to an electrochemical cell or battery; the invention relates more specifically to a positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell or battery when the electrode is used therein. The positive electrode includes a composite metal oxide containing AgV.sub.3O.sub.8 as one component and one or more other components consisting of LiV.sub.3O.sub.8, Ag.sub.2V.sub.4O.sub.11, MnO.sub.2, CF.sub.x, AgF or Ag.sub.2O to increase the energy density of the cell, optionally in the presence of silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrode and to improve the power capability of the cell or battery.

  20. Rechargeable lithium-ion cell

    DOEpatents

    Bechtold, Dieter; Bartke, Dietrich; Kramer, Peter; Kretzschmar, Reiner; Vollbert, Jurgen

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a rechargeable lithium-ion cell, a method for its manufacture, and its application. The cell is distinguished by the fact that it has a metallic housing (21) which is electrically insulated internally by two half shells (15), which cover electrode plates (8) and main output tabs (7) and are composed of a non-conductive material, where the metallic housing is electrically insulated externally by means of an insulation coating. The cell also has a bursting membrane (4) which, in its normal position, is located above the electrolyte level of the cell (1). In addition, the cell has a twisting protection (6) which extends over the entire surface of the cover (2) and provides centering and assembly functions for the electrode package, which comprises the electrode plates (8).

  1. The cosmological lithium problem revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Shubhchintak

    2016-07-07

    After a brief review of the cosmological lithium problem, we report a few recent attempts to find theoretical solutions by our group at Texas A&M University (Commerce & College Station). We will discuss our studies on the theoretical description of electron screening, the possible existence of parallel universes of dark matter, and the use of non-extensive statistics during the Big Bang nucleosynthesis epoch. Last but not least, we discuss possible solutions within nuclear physics realm. The impact of recent measurements of relevant nuclear reaction cross sections for the Big Bang nucleosynthesis based on indirect methods is also assessed. Although our attempts may not able to explain the observed discrepancies between theory and observations, they suggest theoretical developments that can be useful also for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  2. Glass for sealing lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Leedecke, C.J.

    1981-08-28

    Glass compositions resistant to corrosion by lithium cell electrolyte and having an expansion coefficient of 45 to 85 x 10/sup -70/C/sup -1/ have been made with SiO/sub 2/, 25 to 55% by weight; B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 5 to 12%; Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 12 to 35%; CaO, 5 to 15%; MgO, 5 to 15%; SrO, 0 to 10%; and La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0 to 5%. Preferred compositions within that range contain 3 to 8% SrO and 0.5 to 2.5% La/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  3. Electroplating lithium transition metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huigang; Ning, Hailong; Busbee, John; Shen, Zihan; Kiggins, Chadd; Hua, Yuyan; Eaves, Janna; Davis, Jerome; Shi, Tan; Shao, Yu-Tsun; Zuo, Jian-Min; Hong, Xuhao; Chan, Yanbin; Wang, Shuangbao; Wang, Peng; Sun, Pengcheng; Xu, Sheng; Liu, Jinyun; Braun, Paul V.

    2017-01-01

    Materials synthesis often provides opportunities for innovation. We demonstrate a general low-temperature (260°C) molten salt electrodeposition approach to directly electroplate the important lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery cathode materials LiCoO2, LiMn2O4, and Al-doped LiCoO2. The crystallinities and electrochemical capacities of the electroplated oxides are comparable to those of the powders synthesized at much higher temperatures (700° to 1000°C). This new growth method significantly broadens the scope of battery form factors and functionalities, enabling a variety of highly desirable battery properties, including high energy, high power, and unprecedented electrode flexibility. PMID:28508061

  4. Origami lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Zeming; Ma, Teng; Tang, Rui; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Xu; Krishnaraju, Deepakshyam; Panat, Rahul; Chan, Candace K; Yu, Hongyu; Jiang, Hanqing

    2014-01-01

    There are significant challenges in developing deformable devices at the system level that contain integrated, deformable energy storage devices. Here we demonstrate an origami lithium-ion battery that can be deformed at an unprecedented high level, including folding, bending and twisting. Deformability at the system level is enabled using rigid origami, which prescribes a crease pattern such that the materials making the origami pattern do not experience large strain. The origami battery is fabricated through slurry coating of electrodes onto paper current collectors and packaging in standard materials, followed by folding using the Miura pattern. The resulting origami battery achieves significant linear and areal deformability, large twistability and bendability. The strategy described here represents the fusion of the art of origami, materials science and functional energy storage devices, and could provide a paradigm shift for architecture and design of flexible and curvilinear electronics with exceptional mechanical characteristics and functionalities.

  5. Origami lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zeming; Ma, Teng; Tang, Rui; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Xu; Krishnaraju, Deepakshyam; Panat, Rahul; Chan, Candace K.; Yu, Hongyu; Jiang, Hanqing

    2014-01-01

    There are significant challenges in developing deformable devices at the system level that contain integrated, deformable energy storage devices. Here we demonstrate an origami lithium-ion battery that can be deformed at an unprecedented high level, including folding, bending and twisting. Deformability at the system level is enabled using rigid origami, which prescribes a crease pattern such that the materials making the origami pattern do not experience large strain. The origami battery is fabricated through slurry coating of electrodes onto paper current collectors and packaging in standard materials, followed by folding using the Miura pattern. The resulting origami battery achieves significant linear and areal deformability, large twistability and bendability. The strategy described here represents the fusion of the art of origami, materials science and functional energy storage devices, and could provide a paradigm shift for architecture and design of flexible and curvilinear electronics with exceptional mechanical characteristics and functionalities.

  6. Predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Vangerow, J. von; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.; Bogomolov, A. S.; Baklanov, A. V.; Reich, D. M.; Skomorowski, W.; Koch, C. P.

    2015-01-28

    The predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide (LiI) in the first excited A-state is investigated for molecules in the gas phase and embedded in helium nanodroplets, using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. In the gas phase, the transient Li{sup +} and LiI{sup +} ion signals feature damped oscillations due to the excitation and decay of a vibrational wave packet. Based on high-level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of LiI and simulations of the wave packet dynamics, the exponential signal decay is found to result from predissociation predominantly at the lowest avoided X-A potential curve crossing, for which we infer a coupling constant V{sub XA} = 650(20) cm{sup −1}. The lack of a pump-probe delay dependence for the case of LiI embedded in helium nanodroplets indicates fast droplet-induced relaxation of the vibrational excitation.

  7. The cosmological lithium problem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Shubhchintak

    2016-07-01

    After a brief review of the cosmological lithium problem, we report a few recent attempts to find theoretical solutions by our group at Texas A&M University (Commerce & College Station). We will discuss our studies on the theoretical description of electron screening, the possible existence of parallel universes of dark matter, and the use of non-extensive statistics during the Big Bang nucleosynthesis epoch. Last but not least, we discuss possible solutions within nuclear physics realm. The impact of recent measurements of relevant nuclear reaction cross sections for the Big Bang nucleosynthesis based on indirect methods is also assessed. Although our attempts may not able to explain the observed discrepancies between theory and observations, they suggest theoretical developments that can be useful also for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  8. Lithium prophylaxis during pregnancy and the postpartum period in women with lithium-responsive bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Gianluca; Albert, Umberto; Di Salvo, Gabriele; Scatà, Manuela; Todros, Tullia; Maina, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lithium prophylaxis during the peripartum period in women with lithium-responsive bipolar I disorder. Seventeen lithium-treated patients were selected and underwent preconception counseling that included both a psychiatric and an obstetric evaluation. Treatment was continued with flexible-doses of lithium combined with supportive psychotherapy throughout the pregnancy and the postpartum period. The results support the prophylaxis efficacy of lithium in lithium-responder bipolar women who have a high risk of severe peripartum recurrences.

  9. Solute-solvent interactions in micellar electrokinetic chromatography. Selectivity of lithium dodecyl sulfate-lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate mixed-micellar buffers.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, E; Ràfols, C; Bosch, E; Rosés, M; Abraham, M H

    2001-01-12

    The solvation parameter model has been applied to the characterization of micellar electrokinetic chromatographic (MEKC) systems with mixtures of lithium dodecyl sulfate and lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate as surfactant. The variation in MEKC surfactant composition results in changes in the coefficients of the correlation equation, which in turns leads to information on solute-solvent and solute-micelle interactions. Lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate is more dipolar and hydrogen bond acidic but less polarizable and hydrogen bond basic than lithium dodecyl sulfate. Therefore mixtures of lithium dodecyl sulfate and lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate cover a very wide range of polarity and hydrogen bond properties, which in turn results in important selectivity changes for analytes with different solute properties.

  10. Kinetics of aluminum lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletcher, Ben A.

    2009-12-01

    Aluminum lithium alloys are increasingly used in aerospace for their high strength-to-weight ratio. Additions of lithium, up to 4.2 wt% decrease the alloy density while increasing the modulus and yield strength. The metastable, second phase Al3Li or delta' is intriguing, as it remains spherical and coherent with the matrix phase, alpha, well into the overaged condition. Small interfacial strain energy allows these precipitates to remain spherical for volume fractions (VV ) of delta' less than 0.3, making this alloy system ideal for investigation of late-stage coarsening phenomena. Experimental characterization of three binary Al-Li alloys are presented as a critical test of diffusion screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy is used to image the precipitates directly using the centered dark-field technique. Images are analyzed autonomously within a novel Matlab function that determines the center and size of each precipitate. Particle size distribution, particle growth kinetics, and maximum particle size are used to track the precipitate growth and correlate with the predictions of screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. This project is the first extensive study of Al-Li alloys, in over 25 years, applying modern transmission electron microscopy and image analysis techniques. Previous studies sampled but a single alloy composition, and measured far fewer precipitates. This study investigates 3 alloys with volume fractions of the delta precipitates, VV =0.1-0.27, aged at 225C for 1 to 10 days. More than 1000 precipitates were sampled per aging time, creating more statistically significant data. Experimental results are used to test the predictions based on diffusion screening theory and multi-particle aging simulations. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  11. An improved lithium-vanadium pentoxide cell and comparison with a lithium-thionyl chloride cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorn, G.

    1985-03-01

    This paper describes a programme of experiments conducted to assess the effects of: (a) diluting the electrolyte in lithium-vanadium pentoxide cells; (b) optimizing the volume of electrolyte per unit cathode mass. This programme led to the development of an improved cell, the performance of which is compared with that of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell of similar configuration.

  12. Magnesium oxide doping reduces acoustic wave attenuation in lithium metatantalate and lithium metaniobate crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, W.; Damon, R.; Kedzie, R.; Kestigian, M.; Smith, A.; Worley, J.

    1970-01-01

    Single crystals of lithium metatantalate and lithium metaniobate, grown from melts having different stoichiometries and different amounts of magnesium oxide, show that doping lowers temperature-independent portion of attenuation of acoustic waves. Doped crystals possess optical properties well suited for electro-optical and photoelastic applications.

  13. Selective Recovery of Lithium from Cathode Materials of Spent Lithium Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Akitoshi; Ankei, Naoki; Nishihama, Syouhei; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu

    2016-10-01

    Selective recovery of lithium from four kinds of cathode materials, manganese-type, cobalt-type, nickel-type, and ternary-type, of spent lithium ion battery was investigated. In all cathode materials, leaching of lithium was improved by adding sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) as an oxidant in the leaching solution, while the leaching of other metal ions (manganese, cobalt, and nickel) was significantly suppressed. Optimum leaching conditions, such as pH, temperature, amount of Na2S2O8, and solid/liquid ratio, for the selective leaching of lithium were determined for all cathode materials. Recovery of lithium from the leachate as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) was then successfully achieved by adding sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) to the leachate. Optimum recovery conditions, such as pH, temperature, and amount of Na2CO3, for the recovery of lithium as Li2CO3 were determined for all cases. Purification of Li2CO3 was achieved by lixiviation in all systems, with purities of the Li2CO3 higher than 99.4%, which is almost satisfactory for the battery-grade purity of lithium.

  14. Lithium Prescribing during Pregnancy: A UK Primary Care Database Study

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Rachel L.; Nazareth, Irwin; Evans, Stephen J. W.; Osborn, David P. J.; Pinfold, Vanessa; Cowen, Phil J.; Petersen, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Background Women taking lithium must decide whether to continue the medication if they conceive or plan to conceive. Little is known about the extent of prescribing of lithium during pregnancy. Aims To determine: 1) the prevalence of lithium prescribing during pregnancy and 2) to assess whether pregnancy is associated with discontinuation of lithium. Method First, we identified women receiving any lithium prescriptions before and during pregnancy using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database. Subsequently, we used a Kaplan-Meier plot to compare time to last prescription in women prescribed lithium continuously three months before pregnancy and a comparison group of non-pregnant women. Finally, we described the characteristics of the women prescribed lithium in pregnancy. Results Very few women were prescribed lithium during pregnancy; out of 458,761 pregnancies, we identified 47 (0.01%) in which lithium was prescribed after the 6th week of pregnancy (when the pregnancy was likely to be known). In our study of discontinuation, we found pregnant women were more likely to stop lithium than those who were not pregnant. Of the 52 women who were being continuously prescribed lithium three months before pregnancy, only 17 (33%) continued receiving prescriptions beyond the 6th week of pregnancy. However, most of these 17 women continued treatment throughout pregnancy. Conclusions Pregnancy was strongly associated with discontinuation of lithium. Further evidence on the risks of lithium is needed so that women can weight these against the risk of a deterioration in maternal mental health. PMID:25793580

  15. Starting lithium prophylaxis early v. late in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2014-09-01

    No study has investigated when preventive treatment with lithium should be initiated in bipolar disorder. To compare response rates among patients with bipolar disorder starting treatment with lithium early v. late. Nationwide registers were used to identify all patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in psychiatric hospital settings who were prescribed lithium during the period 1995-2012 in Denmark (n = 4714). Lithium responders were defined as patients who, following a stabilisation lithium start-up period of 6 months, continued lithium monotherapy without being admitted to hospital. Early v. late intervention was defined in two ways: (a) start of lithium following first contact; and (b) start of lithium following a diagnosis of a single manic/mixed episode. Regardless of the definition used, patients who started lithium early had significantly decreased rates of non-response to lithium compared with the rate for patients starting lithium later (adjusted analyses: first v. later contact: P<0.0001; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI 0.76-0.91; single manic/mixed episode v. bipolar disorder: P<0.0001; HR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.67-0.84). Starting lithium treatment early following first psychiatric contact or a single manic/mixed episode is associated with increased probability of lithium response. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  16. Lithium-cyclo-difluoromethane-1,1-bis(sulfonyl)imide as a stabilizing electrolyte additive for improved high voltage applications in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Murmann, Patrick; Streipert, Benjamin; Kloepsch, Richard; Ignatiev, Nikolai; Sartori, Peter; Winter, Martin; Cekic-Laskovic, Isidora

    2015-04-14

    Lithium-cyclo-difluoromethane-1,1-bis(sulfonyl)imide (LiDMSI) was evaluated as an electrolyte additive in lithium-ion batteries for improved high voltage applications. Cycling the cathode at high potentials leads to the electrochemical oxidation of the salt to form a cathode electrolyte interphase (CEI) layer on the cathode surface. With the addition of 2 wt% of LiDMSI to the 1 M LiPF6 in 1 : 1 (by wt) EC : DEC electrolyte, the capacity retention and the Coulombic efficiency in LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2/Li-half-cells as well as in LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2/graphite-full-cells were improved. The cycling results point out the less over-potential and resistance at the cathode/electrolyte interface. These improvements are studied by SEM, EIS and XPS techniques.

  17. Changes in drug disposition of lithium during pregnancy: a retrospective observational study of patient data from two routine therapeutic drug monitoring services in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Brekke, Malin; Molden, Espen; Skogvoll, Eirik; Aadal, Marianne; Spigset, Olav

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Pregnancy may cause changes in drug disposition, dose requirements and clinical response. For lithium, changes in disposition during pregnancy have so far been explored in a single-dose study on 4 participants only. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pregnancy on serum levels of lithium in a larger patient material in a naturalistic setting. Design A retrospective observational study of patient data from 2 routine therapeutic drug monitoring services in Norway, linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Setting Norway, October 1999 to December 2011. Measurements Dose-adjusted drug concentrations of lithium during pregnancy were compared with the women's own baseline (non-pregnant) values, using a linear mixed model. Results Overall, coupling 196 726 serum concentration measurements from 54 393 women to the national birth registry identified 25 serum lithium concentration analyses obtained from a total of 14 pregnancies in 13 women, and 63 baseline analyses from the same women. Dose-adjusted serum concentrations in the third trimester were significantly lower than baseline (−34%; CI −44% to −23%, p<0.001). Conclusions Pregnancy causes a clinically relevant decline in maternal lithium serum concentrations. In order to maintain stable lithium concentrations during the third trimester of pregnancy, doses generally need to be increased by 50%. Individual variability in decline implies that lithium levels should be even more closely monitored throughout pregnancy and in the puerperium than in non-pregnant women to ensure adequate dosing. PMID:28249852

  18. Solubility of Lithium Polysulfides in a Block Copolymer Electrolyte for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teran, Alexander; Balsara, Nitash

    2011-03-01

    The primary challenges to commercialization of the high-energy-density lithium sulfur battery are dendrite growth of the lithium metal at the anode and capacity fade due to loss of active mass through dissolution at the cathode. Nanostructured solid polymer electrolytes offer one potential solution to reduce the amount of capacity fade seen in lithium metal/sulfur batteries by keeping the active material localized at the cathode and to prevent the growth of dendrites at the anode due to their high shear moduli. The block copolymer electrolyte poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) has shown acceptable ionic conductivity and sufficient shear modulus to retard lithium dendrite growth. The solubility of the lithium polysulfide reaction intermediates Li 2 Sx , where 1 <= x <= 8 , was studied in SEO copolymers with a range of molecular weights and salt concentrations using small angle X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetery.

  19. Anomalous interfacial lithium storage in graphene/TiO2 for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enzuo; Wang, Jiamei; Shi, Chunsheng; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Chunnian; Li, Jiajun; Jiang, Jian-Zhong

    2014-10-22

    Graphene/metal-oxide nanocomposites have been widely studied as anode materials for lithium ion batteries and exhibit much higher lithium storage capacity beyond their theoretical capacity through mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In this research, we present a comprehensive understanding in microscale of the discharge process of graphene/TiO2 containing surface, bulk, and interfacial lithium storage based on the first-principles total energy calculations. It is revealed that interfacial oxygen atoms play an important role on the interfacial lithium storage. The additional capacity originating from surface and interfacial lithium storage via an electrostatic capacitive mechanism contributes significantly to the electrode capacity. The research demonstrates that for nanocomposites used in energy storage materials, electrode and capacitor behavior could be optimized to develop high-performance electrode materials with the balance of storage capacity and rate.

  20. Study of the microdynamics of liquid lithium and lithium-hydrogen melt by inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Blagoveshchenskii, N. M.; Morozov, V. A.; Novikov, A. G.; Pashnev, M. A. Savostin, V. V.; Shimkevich, A. L.

    2007-05-15

    The frequency spectra of vibrations of Li atoms at temperatures of 22, 227, 397, and 557 deg. C and the lithium-hydrogen melt (98 at % {sup 7}Li, 2 at % H) at 557 deg. C have been obtained from the experimental neutron inelastic scattering data. On the basis of the frequency spectra, the temperature dependences of the mean-square displacement of Li atoms, the mean-square amplitudes of atomic vibrations, and the velocity autocorrelation function of atoms have been calculated. The speed of sound in liquid lithium has been estimated within the Debye model. The frequency spectra of lithium-hydrogen melt and solid lithium hydride are compared. A generalized frequency spectrum of vibrations of hydrogen atoms in lithium-hydrogen melt is obtained.