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Sample records for lithium salt nature

  1. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  2. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  3. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  4. Clinical uses of lithium salts.

    PubMed

    Frost, R E; Messiha, F S

    1983-08-01

    A comprehensive overview of the clinical aspects of lithium therapy is presented. Emphasis is placed on recent developments regarding the clinical uses of Li2CO3 in non-psychiatric conditions. The established efficacy of the drug in the treatment and prophylaxis of mania and bipolar affective disorders is noted, and the evidence supporting the use of lithium salts as a prophylactic agent in unipolar depression, aggressive behavior, schizophrenic disorders and organic brain dysfunction is discussed. The use of lithium carbonate in various disorders of movement and in certain extrapyramidal diseases is summarized, as are the results of its trials in alcoholism and drug abuse. In addition, uses of Li2CO3 in asthma, thyroid diseases, granulocytopenia, headache, bowel disease, anesthesiology, cardiology, and sleep disorders are summarized. The data suggests the potential effectiveness of Li2CO3 in a variety of clinical conditions other than those for which it is classically indicated, provided more detailed double-blind studies are performed.

  5. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen [Mesa, AZ; Xu, Wu [Tempe, AZ

    2009-05-05

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  6. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Xu, Wu

    2008-01-01

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  7. Glyme-lithium salt phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Wesley A

    2006-07-01

    Phase diagrams are reported for glyme mixtures with simple lithium salts. The glymes studied include monoglyme (DME), diglyme, triglyme, and tetraglyme. The lithium salts include LiBETI, LiAsF6, LiI, LiClO4, LiBF4, LiCF3SO3, LiBr, LiNO3, and LiCF3CO2. The phase diagrams clearly illustrate how solvate formation and thermophysical properties are dictated by the ionic association strength of the salt (i.e., the properties of the anions) and chain length of the solvating molecules. This information provides critical predictive capabilities for solvate formation and ionic interactions common in organometallic reagents and battery electrolytes. PMID:16805630

  8. Antiproliferative Potential of Officinal Forms and Nanoparticles of Lithium Salts.

    PubMed

    Lykov, A P; Poveshchenko, O V; Bondarenko, N A; Bogatova, N P; Makarova, O P; Konenkov, V I

    2016-04-01

    We studied the effect of officinal forms and nanoparticles of lithium carbonate and lithium citrate on proliferative activity of hepatoma-29 cells. Lithium carbonate nanoparticles suppressed proliferation of hepatoma-29 cells in lower concentrations than officinal form of this salt. The antiproliferative effect of lithium salts i activation of apoptosis and arrest of hepatoma-29 cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. PMID:27165073

  9. Superacid-Based Lithium Salts For Polymer Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Prakash, Surya; Shen, David H.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Olah, George

    1995-01-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes exhibiting high lithium-ion conductivities made by incorporating salts of superacids into thin films of polyethylene oxide (PEO). These and other solid-polymer electrolytes candidates for use in rechargeable lithium-based electrochemical cells. Increases in room-temperature lithium-ion conductivities of solid electrolytes desirable because they increase achievable power and energy densities.

  10. Viscosity and carbon dioxide solubility for LiPF6, LiTFSI, and LiFAP in alkyl carbonates: lithium salt nature and concentration effect.

    PubMed

    Dougassa, Yvon Rodrigue; Jacquemin, Johan; El Ouatani, Loubna; Tessier, Cécile; Anouti, Mérièm

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we have reported the CO2 solubility in different pure alkyl carbonate solvents (EC, DMC, EMC, DEC) and their binary mixtures as EC/DMC, EC/EMC, and EC/DEC and for electrolytes [solvent + lithium salt] LiX (X = LiPF6, LiTFSI, or LiFAP) as a function of the temperature and salt concentration. To understand the parameters that influence the structure of the solvents and their ability to dissolve CO2, through the addition of a salt, we first analyzed the viscosities of EC/DMC + LiX mixtures by means of a modified Jones-Dole equation. The results were discussed considering the order or disorder introduced by the salt into the solvent organization and ion solvation sphere by calculating the effective solute ion radius, rs. On the basis of these results, the analysis of the CO2 solubility variations with the salt addition was then evaluated and discussed by determining specific ion parameters Hi by using the Setchenov coefficients in solution. This study showed that the CO2 solubility has been affected by the shape, charge density, and size of the ions, which influence the structuring of the solvents through the addition of a salt and the type of solvation of the ions.

  11. A Molten Salt Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Vincent; Tozier, Dylan; Tan, Hongjin; Burke, Colin M; Gallant, Betar M; Uddin, Jasim; Greer, Julia R; McCloskey, Bryan D; Chase, Gregory V; Addison, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Despite the promise of extremely high theoretical capacity (2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2, 1675 mAh per gram of oxygen), many challenges currently impede development of Li/O2 battery technology. Finding suitable electrode and electrolyte materials remains the most elusive challenge to date. A radical new approach is to replace volatile, unstable and air-intolerant organic electrolytes common to prior research in the field with alkali metal nitrate molten salt electrolytes and operate the battery above the liquidus temperature (>80 °C). Here we demonstrate an intermediate temperature Li/O2 battery using a lithium anode, a molten nitrate-based electrolyte (e.g., LiNO3-KNO3 eutectic) and a porous carbon O2 cathode with high energy efficiency (∼95%) and improved rate capability because the discharge product, lithium peroxide, is stable and moderately soluble in the molten salt electrolyte. The results, supported by essential state-of-the-art electrochemical and analytical techniques such as in situ pressure and gas analyses, scanning electron microscopy, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, demonstrate that Li2O2 electrochemically forms and decomposes upon cycling with discharge/charge overpotentials as low as 50 mV. We show that the cycle life of such batteries is limited only by carbon reactivity and by the uncontrolled precipitation of Li2O2, which eventually becomes electrically disconnected from the O2 electrode. PMID:26871485

  12. A Molten Salt Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Vincent; Tozier, Dylan; Tan, Hongjin; Burke, Colin M; Gallant, Betar M; Uddin, Jasim; Greer, Julia R; McCloskey, Bryan D; Chase, Gregory V; Addison, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Despite the promise of extremely high theoretical capacity (2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2, 1675 mAh per gram of oxygen), many challenges currently impede development of Li/O2 battery technology. Finding suitable electrode and electrolyte materials remains the most elusive challenge to date. A radical new approach is to replace volatile, unstable and air-intolerant organic electrolytes common to prior research in the field with alkali metal nitrate molten salt electrolytes and operate the battery above the liquidus temperature (>80 °C). Here we demonstrate an intermediate temperature Li/O2 battery using a lithium anode, a molten nitrate-based electrolyte (e.g., LiNO3-KNO3 eutectic) and a porous carbon O2 cathode with high energy efficiency (∼95%) and improved rate capability because the discharge product, lithium peroxide, is stable and moderately soluble in the molten salt electrolyte. The results, supported by essential state-of-the-art electrochemical and analytical techniques such as in situ pressure and gas analyses, scanning electron microscopy, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, demonstrate that Li2O2 electrochemically forms and decomposes upon cycling with discharge/charge overpotentials as low as 50 mV. We show that the cycle life of such batteries is limited only by carbon reactivity and by the uncontrolled precipitation of Li2O2, which eventually becomes electrically disconnected from the O2 electrode.

  13. Hydrodynamic simulation of a lithium chloride salt system.

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C. S.; Herrmann, S. D.; Knighton, G. C.

    1999-02-12

    A fused lithium chloride salt system's constitutive properties were evaluated and compared to a number of fluid properties, and water was shown to be an excellent simulant of lithium chloride salt. With a simple flow model, the principal scaling term was shown to be a function of the kinematic viscosity. A water mock-up of the molten salt was also shown to be within a {+-}3% error in the scaling analysis. This made it possible to consider developing water scaled tests of the molten salt system. Accurate flow velocity and pressure measurements were acquired by developing a directional velocity probe. The device was constructed and calibrated with a repeatable accuracy of {+-}15%. This was verified by a detailed evaluation of the probe. Extensive flow measurements of the engineering scale mockup were conducted, and the results were carefully compared to radial flow patterns of a straight blade stirrer. The flow measurements demonstrated an anti-symmetric nature of the stirring, and many additional effects were also identified. The basket design was shown to prevent fluid penetration into the fuel baskets when external stirring was the flow mechanism.

  14. Plasma and Brain Pharmacokinetics of Previously Unexplored Lithium Salts

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam J.; Kim, Seol-Hee; Tan, Jun; Sneed, Kevin B.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Shytle, R. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Despite its narrow therapeutic window, lithium is still regarded as the gold standard comparator and benchmark treatment for mania. Recent attempts to find new drugs with similar therapeutic activities have yielded new chemical entities. However, these potential new drugs have yet to match the many bioactivities attributable to lithium's efficacy for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. Consequently, an intense effort for re-engineering lithium therapeutics using crystal engineering is currently underway. We sought to improve the likelihood of success of these endeavors by evaluating the pharmacokinetics of previously unexplored lithium salts with organic anions (lithium salicylate and lithium lactate). We report that these lithium salts exhibit profoundly different pharmacokinetics compared to the more common FDA approved salt, lithium carbonate, in rats. Remarkably, lithium salicylate produced elevated plasma and brain levels of lithium beyond 48 hours post-dose without the sharp peak that contributes to the toxicity problems of current lithium therapeutics. These findings could be important for the development of the next generation of lithium therapeutics. PMID:25045517

  15. A new lithium salt with dihydroxybenzene and lithium tetrafluoroborate for lithium battery electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhao-Ming; Sun, Bin-Bin; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Chun-Hua

    2011-10-01

    A new unsymmetrical lithium salt containing F-, C6H4O22- [dianion of 1,2-benzenediol], lithium difluoro(1,2-benzene-diolato(2-)-o,o‧)borate (LDFBDB) is synthesized and characterized. Its thermal decomposition in nitrogen begins at 170 °C. The cyclic voltammetry study shows that the LDFBDB solution in propylene carbonate (PC) is stable up to 3.7 V versus Li+/Li. It is soluble in common organic solvents. The ionic dissociation properties of LDFBDB are examined by conductivity measurements in PC, PC+ ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), PC + dimethyl ether (DME), PC + ethylene carbonate (EC) + EMC solutions. The conductivity values of the 0.564 mol dm-3 LDFBDB electrolyte in PC + DME solution is 3.90 mS cm-1. All these properties of the new lithium salt including the thermal characteristics, electrochemical stabilities, solubilities, ionic dissociation properties are studied and compared with those of its derivatives, lithium difluoro(3-fluoro-1,2-benzene-diolato(2-)-o,o‧)borate (FLDFBDB), lithium [3-fluoro-1,2-benzenediolato(2-)-o,o‧ oxalato]borate (FLBDOB), and lithium bis(oxalate)borate (LBOB).

  16. Application of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gourishankar, K. V.

    1998-11-11

    Metallothermic reductions have been extensively studied in the field of extractive metallurgy. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we have developed a molten-salt based reduction process using lithium. This process was originally developed to reduce actinide oxides present in spent nuclear fuel. Preliminary thermodynamic considerations indicate that this process has the potential to be adapted for the extraction of other metals. The reduction is carried out at 650 C in a molten-salt (LiCl) medium. Lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), produced during the reduction of the actinide oxides, dissolves in the molten salt. At the end of the reduction step, the lithium is regenerated from the salt by an electrowinning process. The lithium and the salt from the electrowinning are then reused for reduction of the next batch of oxide fuel. The process cycle has been successfully demonstrated on an engineering scale in a specially designed pyroprocessing facility. This paper discusses the applicability of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes with specific reference to our process. Results are presented from our work on actinide oxides to highlight the role of lithium and its effect on process variables in these molten-salt based reduction processes.

  17. New MALDI matrices based on lithium salts for the analysis of hydrocarbons and wax esters.

    PubMed

    Horká, Petra; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Pecková, Karolina; Cvačka, Josef

    2014-07-01

    Lithium salts of organic aromatic acids (lithium benzoate, lithium salicylate, lithium vanillate, lithium 2,5-dimethoxybenzoate, lithium 2,5-dihydroxyterephthalate, lithium α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and lithium sinapate) were synthesized and tested as potential matrices for the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-mass spectrometry analysis of hydrocarbons and wax esters. The analytes were desorbed using nitrogen laser (337.1 nm) and ionized via the attachment of a lithium cation, yielding [M + Li](+) adducts. The sample preparation and the experimental conditions were optimized for each matrix using stearyl behenate and n-triacontane standards. The performance of the new matrices in terms of signal intensity and reproducibility, the mass range occupied by matrix ions and the laser power threshold were studied and compared with a previously recommended lithium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate matrix (LiDHB) (Cvačka and Svatoš, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2003, 17, 2203). Several of the new matrices performed better than LiDHB. Lithium vanillate offered a 2-3 times and 7-9 times higher signal for wax esters and hydrocarbons, respectively. Also, the signal reproducibility improved substantially, making this matrix a suitable candidate for imaging applications. In addition, the diffuse reflectance spectra and solubility of the synthesized compounds were investigated and discussed with respect to the compound's ability to serve as MALDI matrices. The applicability of selected matrices was tested on natural samples of wax esters and hydrocarbons.

  18. Electronic structure calculations on lithium battery electrolyte salts.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patrik

    2007-03-28

    New lithium salts for non-aqueous liquid, gel and polymeric electrolytes are crucial due to the limiting role of the electrolyte in modern lithium batteries. The solvation of any lithium salt to form an electrolyte solution ultimately depends on the strength of the cation-solvent vs. the cation-anion interaction. Here, the latter is probed via HF, B3LYP and G3 theory gas-phase calculations for the dissociation reaction: LiX <--> Li(+) + X(-). Furthermore, a continuum solvation method (C-PCM) has been applied to mimic solvent effects. Anion volumes were also calculated to facilitate a discussion on ion conductivities and cation transport numbers. Judging from the present results, synthesis efforts should target heterocyclic anions with a size of ca. 150 A(3) molecule(-1) to render new highly dissociative lithium salts that result in electrolytes with high cation transport numbers. PMID:17356757

  19. 40 CFR 721.9538 - Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9538 Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo... substance identified generically as lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9538 - Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9538 Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo... substance identified generically as lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9538 - Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9538 Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo... substance identified generically as lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9538 - Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9538 Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo... substance identified generically as lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9538 - Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9538 Lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo... substance identified generically as lithium salt of sulfophenyl azo phenyl azo disulfostilbene (PMN...

  4. Role of Constituent Hard Polymer in Enhancing Lithium Transference Number of Lithium Salt-Polymer Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Gyuha; Park, Moon Jeong

    2015-03-01

    Lithium polymer batteries have been projected as promising energy storage systems, owing to their unique advantages such as long cycle life, high specific capacity, and high cell potential. While the polymer electrolytes such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) employed in lithium polymer batteries have high ionic conductivity and low volatility, the PEO-lithium salt complexes indicated immense shortcomings of concentration polarization, ascribed to the motion of free anions within PEO. This has limited charge/discharge rate of lithium batteries. In this study, we present a new methodology for improving the ionic conductivity and lithium transference number of PEO, by block copolymerization with a hard polymer, namely poly(dithiooxamide) (PDTOA). Compared to a simple PEO/PDTOA blend, lithium-salt doped PEO-b-PDTOA block copolymers exhibited significantly improved ionic conductivity values. Further, lithium transference numbers as high as 0.66 were observed, which are much higher than the corresponding values for conventional PEO-salt electrolytes (~ 0 . 25).

  5. Effect of organo and inorganic lithium salt on human blood plasma glutathione- A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Hashmat; Khan, Muhammad Farid; Jan, Syed Umer; Hashmat, Farwa

    2016-03-01

    Investigation of toxicological effect of various metals is the field of interest for toxicological scientists since four to five decades and especially the toxicological effect of those drugs containing metals and there use is common because there is no other choice except to use these metal containing drugs. Inorganic as well as organic salts of lithium are commonly used in prophylaxis and treatments of many psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study was to see the difference between the effect of organic and inorganic salt of lithium commonly used in psychiatric disorders on the GSH of human blood plasma. It is the scientific fact that ionic dissociation of organic and inorganic salts of any metal is always quite different hence to prove this fact, the effect of lithium citrate (organic salt of lithium) and lithium carbonate (inorganic salt of lithium) was investigated on human blood plasma GSH to find the difference between the effect of two. Ellman's method was used for the quantification of glutathione contents in plasma. It was found that lithium citrate decrease plasma GSH contents less than lithium carbonate indicating that organic salts of lithium are safe than inorganic salts of lithium when are used in psychiatric disorders. Further to analyze the effect of organic and inorganic salt of lithium on blood plasma GSH with the increase in incubation time was also evaluated and was found that both concentration and time dependent effect of organic salt of lithium shows that this salt has decreased plasma GSH contents of human blood less than inorganic salt of lithium either by promoting oxidation of GSH into GSSG or by lithium glutathione complex formation. These results suggest the physicians that the use of organic lithium salts is much safer than inorganic salts of lithium in terms of depletion of blood plasma GSH contents. PMID:27087067

  6. Application of mix-salts composed of lithium borate and lithium aluminate in PEO-based polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ruoyuan; Fujinami, Tatsuo

    Mix-salts were prepared by mixing lithium borate (salt A or salt B) with lithium aluminate (salt C). Polymer electrolytes were prepared by dissolving lithium salt in PEO. Mix-salt polymer electrolytes exhibited higher ionic conductivities than pure-salt polymer electrolytes. The optimum-mixing ratio was investigated. Conductivity as high as 1 × 10 -4 S cm -1 at 40 °C was obtained for the optimized electrolyte system. A potential window of 4.3 V was determined for the mix-salt electrolyte. Good charge-discharge performance was observed for the mix-salt electrolyte composed cell, LiNi 0.8Co 0.2O 2//salt A(3)/salt C(11.8) 2/1-PEO 22//Li.

  7. A Stable Fluorinated and Alkylated Lithium Malonatoborate Salt for Lithium Ion Battery Application

    DOE PAGES

    Wan, Shun; Jiang, Xueguang; Guo, Bingkun; Dai, Sheng; Goodenough, John B.; Sun, Xiao-Guang

    2015-04-27

    A new fluorinated and alkylated lithium malonatoborate salt, lithium bis(2-methyl-2-fluoromalonato)borate (LiBMFMB), has been synthesized for lithium ion battery application. A 0.8 M LiBMFMB solution is obtained in a mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (1:2 by wt.). The new LiBMFMB based electrolyte exhibits good cycling stability and rate capability in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and graphite based half-cells.

  8. A stable fluorinated and alkylated lithium malonatoborate salt for lithium ion battery application.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shun; Jiang, Xueguang; Guo, Bingkun; Dai, Sheng; Goodenough, John B; Sun, Xiao-Guang

    2015-06-18

    A new fluorinated and alkylated lithium malonatoborate salt, lithium bis(2-methyl-2-fluoromalonato)borate (LiBMFMB), has been synthesized for lithium ion battery application. A 0.8 M LiBMFMB solution is obtained in a mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (1 : 2 by wt). The new LiBMFMB based electrolyte exhibits good cycling stability and rate capability in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and graphite based half-cells.

  9. Stable lithium electrodeposition in salt-reinforced electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Shu, Jonathan; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-04-01

    Development of high-energy lithium-based batteries that are safe remains a challenge due to the non-uniform lithium electrodeposition during repeated charge and discharge cycles. We report on the effectiveness of lithium bromide (LiBr) salt additives in a common liquid electrolyte (i.e. propylene carbonate (PC)) on the stability of lithium electrodeposition. From galvanostatic cycling measurements, we find that the presence of LiBr in PC provides more than 20-fold enhancement in cell lifetime over the control LiTFSI/PC electrolyte. Batteries containing 30 mol% LiBr additive in the electrolytes are able to cycle stably for at least 1.8 months with no observations of cell failure. From galvanostatic polarization measurements, an electrolyte containing 30 mol% LiBr shows a maximum improvement in lifetime. The formation of uneven lithium electrodeposits is significantly suppressed by the Br-containing SEI layers, evidenced by impedance spectra, post-mortem SEM and XPS analyses. The study also concludes that good solubility of halogenated salts is not necessary for achieving the observed improvements in cell lifetime.

  10. Lithium salts for advanced lithium batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S

    SciTech Connect

    Younesi, Reza; Veith, Gabriel M.; Johansson, Patrik; Edstrom, Kristina; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-06-01

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium sulphur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions and conditions within such cells. Furthermore, this review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.

  11. Lithium salts for advanced lithium batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S

    DOE PAGES

    Younesi, Reza; Veith, Gabriel M.; Johansson, Patrik; Edstrom, Kristina; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-06-01

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium sulphur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions andmore » conditions within such cells. Furthermore, this review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.« less

  12. Alkylated imidazolium salt electrolyte for lithium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Katsuya; Nemoto, Yasue; Akuto, Keiji; Sakurai, Yoji

    The use of a nonflammable electrolyte in a lithium secondary battery will greatly improve battery safety. Therefore, we focused on the nonflammability of ionic liquids and investigated these liquids as possible electrolyte solvents. In this study, we synthesized 1,2-diethyl-3,4(5)-dimethyl imidazolium (DEDMI) cations with imido anions. DEDMI cations with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imido anions (DEDMI-TFSI) showed a lower solidification point of -35 °C, and higher specific conductivity than DEDMI cations with BF4 -. We prepared an electrolyte consisting of DEDMI-TFSI with LiTFSI, and applied it to a Li/LiCoO 2 cell. The cell was capable of charge-discharge cycling with LiCoO 2 cathode material showing a specific capacity of about 100 mAh g-1.

  13. Inverse temperature dependence of electrical conductivity of solutions of lithium salts in aprotic media

    SciTech Connect

    Plakhotnik, V.N.; Tovmash, N.F.; Kovtum, Yu.V.

    1987-08-01

    Solutions of lithium salts in aprotic dipolar solvents are studied in this paper for their use as electrolytes in lithium batteries. The temperature dependence and isotherms of the electric conductivity of molten salts of lithium fluorides with arsenic and boron are assessed against a range of solvents including tetrahydrofuran, propylene carbonate, 1,3-dioxolane, gamma-butyrolactone, water, hydrogen, and dimethoxyethane. Ionization potentials are given and molar ratios for the salts and solvents are tabulated.

  14. Aggregation of 12-Hydroxystearic Acid and Its Lithium Salt in Hexane: Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ryan; Stober, Spencer T; Abrams, Cameron F

    2016-07-28

    12-Hydroxystearic acid (12HSA) is a well-known organogelator, and its metal salts and derivatives find roles in many important applications. The structures of aggregates of 12-hydroxysteric acid and its salts depend sensitively on cation type, but a fundamental understanding of this phenomenon is lacking. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted on the microsecond long time scales for (1) 12HSA and (2) its lithium salt, each at 12.5 wt % in explicit hexane solvent. Self-assembly was accelerated by using a modified potential to prohibit alkane chain dihedral gauche states (all-trans-12HSA) and then verified by continuation using standard force-field parameters. In three independent simulation, acceleration using "gauche-less" potentials resulted in self-assembled pseudocrystalline aggregates through formation of polarized five- and six-membered rings between inter-12-hydroxyl groups and head-to-head carboxylic acid dimerization. When subjected to the unmodified dihedral potential, two of the three structures remained stable after 1 μs of MD. Stable structures exhibited a "ring-of-rings" motif, composed of two six-membered acetic acid-dimerized ring bundles with six satellite rings, while the unstable structure did not. In strong contrast, the lithium salt produced a network of fibrils that spanned the volume of the sample. When lithium ions were substituted for carboxylic acid protons in the stable acid structures, they remained intact but lost their chiral nature. Both the acid and lithium structures displayed scattering peaks that agreed with experiment. Taken together, our results suggest that this ring-of-rings structure could be a primary feature of the self-assembly of 12HSA in organic solvents. PMID:27387154

  15. Enhanced charging capability of lithium metal batteries based on lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-lithium bis(oxalato)borate dual-salt electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Hongfa; Shi, Pengcheng; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Chen, Xilin; Mei, Donghai; Bowden, Mark E.; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Xu, Wu

    2016-06-01

    Rechargeable lithium (Li) metal batteries with conventional LiPF6-carbonate electrolytes have been reported to fail quickly at charging current densities of about 1.0 mA cm-2 and above. In this work, we demonstrate the rapid charging capability of Li||LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) cells can be enabled by a dual-salt electrolyte of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) in a carbonate solvent mixture. The cells using the LiTFSI-LiBOB dual-salt electrolyte significantly outperform those using the LiPF6 electrolyte at high charging current densities. At the charging current density of 1.50 mA cm-2, the Li||NCA cells with the dual-salt electrolyte can still deliver a discharge capacity of 131 mAh g-1 and a capacity retention of 80% after 100 cycles. The Li||NCA cells with the LiPF6 electrolyte start to show fast capacity fading after the 30th cycle and only exhibit a low capacity of 25 mAh g-1 and a low retention of 15% after 100 cycles. The reasons for the good chargeability and cycling stability of the cells using the LiTFSI-LiBOB dual-salt electrolyte can be attributed to the good film-formation ability of the electrolyte on the Li metal anode and the highly conductive nature of the sulfur-rich interphase layer.

  16. Characterization of Lithium Polysulfide Salts in Homopolymers and Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dunyang; Wujcik, Kevin; Balsara, Nitash

    Ion-conducting polymers are important for solid-state batteries due to the promise of better safety and the potential to produce higher energy density batteries. Nanostructured block copolymer electrolytes can provide high ionic conductivity and mechanical strength through microphase separation. One of the potential use of block copolymer electrolytes is in lithium-sulfur batteries, a system that has high theoretical energy density wherein the reduction of sulfur leads to the formation of lithium polysulfide intermediates. In this study we investigate the effect of block copolymer morphology on the speciation and transport properties of the polysulfides. The morphology and conductivities of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) containing lithium polysulfides were studies using small-angle X-ray scattering and ac impedance spectroscopy. UV-vis spectroscopy is being used to determine nature of the polysulfide species in poly(ethylene oxide) and SEO. Department of Energy, Soft Matter Electron Microscopy Program and Battery Materials Research Program.

  17. Ionic liquid-based electrolyte with binary lithium salts for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Zhu, Qizhen; Chen, Renjie; Chen, Nan; Chen, Yan; Ye, Yusheng; Qian, Ji; Li, Li

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable Li-S batteries have suffered several technical obstacles, such as rapid capacity fading and low coulombic efficiency. To overcome these problems, we design new electrolytes containing N-methoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide (Pyr1,2O1TFSI) and tri(ethylene glycol)dimethyl ether (TEGDME) in mass ratio of 7:3. Moreover, Lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate (LiODFB) is introduced for the modification. Although the addition of LiODFB as additive lead to extremely high viscosity of electrolyte and inferior performance of the cells, the electrolyte containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI, 0.84 nm) and LiODFB (0.60 nm) mixture with a total molar concentration of 0.4 mol kg-1 as binary lithium salt shows excellent electrochemical performance. The Pyr1,2O1TFSI/TEGDME electrolyte with LiTFSI/LiODFB binary lithium salts in mole ratio of 6:4 is obtained after optimizing ratio. The Li-S cells containing this electrolyte system show excellent capacity and cycle performance, whose initial discharge capacity is 1264.4 mAh g-1, and retains 911.4 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles with the coulombic efficiency more than 95%. It can be attributed the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI)-forming ability of LiODFB which protect Li anode from suffering lithium dendrites and prevent the shuttle phenomenon. The novel electrolytes provide good cycling stability and high coulombic efficiency for the Li-S batteries, which is suggested as a promising electrolyte for Li-S batteries.

  18. Salting the landscapes in Transbaikalia: natural and technogenic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peryazeva, E. G.; Plyusnin, A. M.; Chinavlev, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Salting the soils, surface and subsurface waters is widespread in Transbaikalia. Hearths of salting occur within intermountain depressions of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic age both in the steppe arid and forest humid landscapes. Total water mineralization reaches 80 g/dm3 in lakes and 4-5 g/dm3 in subsurface waters. The waters belong to hydrocarbonate sodium and sulfate sodium types by chemical composition. The soda type of waters is widely spread through the whole area. Sulfate waters are found in several hearths of salting. Deposition of salts takes place in some lakes. Mirabilite and soda depositions are most commonly observed in muds of salt lakes. Deposition of salts occurs both as a result of evaporative concentrating and during freezing out the solvent. In the winter period, efflorescences of salts, where decawater soda is main mineral, are observed on ice surface. Solonchaks are spread in areas of shallow ground waters (1-2m). Soil salting is most intense in the lower parts of depressions, where surface of ground waters is at depth 0.5-1.0m. In soil cover of solonchaks, salt horizon is of various thicknesses, and it has various morphological forms of occurrence, i.e. as thick deposits of salts on soil surface and salting the surficial horizons. The soil has low alkaline reaction of medium and is characterized by high content of exchangeable bases with significant content of exchangeable sodium in the absorbing complex. Total amount of salts varies from 0.7 to 1.3%. Their maximal quantity (3.1%) is confined to the surficial layer. Sulfate-sodium type of salting is noted in the solonchak upper horizons and sulfate-magnesium-calcium one in the lower ones (Ubugunov et al, 2009). Formation of salting hearths is associated with natural and technogenic conditions. The Mesozoic depressions of Transbaikalia are characterized by intense volcanism. Covers of alkaline and moderately alkaline basalts that are enriched in potassium, sodium, carbon dioxide, fluorine, chlorine

  19. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates. Acyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Afroz, Taliman; Seo, D. M.; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-03-06

    Solvate crystal structures serve as useful models for the molecular-level interactions within the diverse solvates present in liquid electrolytes. Although acyclic carbonate solvents are widely used for Li-ion battery electrolytes, only three solvate crystal structures with lithium salts are known for these and related solvents. The present work, therefore, reports six lithium salt solvate structures with dimethyl and diethyl carbonate: (DMC)2:LiPF6, (DMC)1:LiCF3SO3, (DMC)1/4:LiBF4, (DEC)2:LiClO4, (DEC)1:LiClO4 and (DEC)1:LiCF3SO3 and four with the structurally related methyl and ethyl acetate: (MA)2:LiClO4, (MA)1:LiBF4, (EA)1:LiClO4 and (EA)1:LiBF4.

  20. Six-Membered-Ring Malonatoborate-Based Lithium Salts as Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Zhang, Hanjun; Driscoll, Peter; Lucht, Brett; Kerr, John

    2011-09-30

    A new class of lithium salts of malonatoborate anions has been synthesized. These six-membered-ring salts provided slightly lower ionic conductivity than that of LiBOB and LiBF4. Nevertheless, compared with LiBOB and LiPF6, the lowered ring strains in the malonatoborate structures and reduced numbers of fluorine atoms in the molecules was found to enhance the thermal and water stabilities and compatibilities of these salts with ether solvents. Small amount LiDMMDFB when used as an additive, was found to stabilize LiPF6 in carbonate electrolytes at 80°C for one month. Employing LiMDFB as the electrolyte in Li/Li cells and full cells, large interfacial impedances were observed on lithium metal and the cathode. Moreover, the large impedances are at least partially attributed to the acidic hydrogen atoms in the malonate structure. This issue can be addressed by replacing the acidic atoms with methyl groups.

  1. Effects of Carbonate Solvents and Lithium Salts on Morphology and Coulombic Efficiency of Lithium Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Chen, Xilin; Zhang, Jian; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Yaohui; Johnson, Bradley R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Blake, Thomas A.; Liu, Xingjiang; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-09-04

    The application of lithium (Li) metal anode in rechargeable batteries is hindered by Li dendrite growth during Li deposition and low Li Coulombic efficiency (CE), where the nonaqueous electrolyte plays a critical role. In this work, the effects of different carbonate solvents and Li salts on Li deposition morphology and CE were systematically investigated. Typically cyclic carbonates are found to favor the formation of uniform Li film and improve Li CE than linear carbonates do. Several specific cyclic carbonates that are conventionally used as solid electrolyte interface formation additives in Li ion batteries can also improve the CE of Li anode. Furthermore, among the nine electrolyte salts studied, LiAsF6 and LiBOB lead to the highest CE for Li anode. LiBOB also leads to much smoother Li morphology than other salts do. Considering the better safety of LiBOB as compared to LiAsF6, LiBOB is a promising Li salt for rechargeable Li metal batteries with high CE. By combining the best electrolyte solvent/salt that can lead to high Li CE and novel electrolyte additives that can prevent dendrite formation, it is possible to find an electrolyte that not only prevents Li dendrite formation but also lead to high CE during Li deposition/stripping processes.

  2. Lithium in the brines of Fish Lake Valley and Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.L.; Meier, Allen L.; Downey, H.D.

    1977-01-01

    Analyses of waters-from springs in Nevada have led to the identification of an area containing anomalous amounts of lithium northwest of the Clayton Valley-area. Fish Lake Valley and Columbus Salt Marsh contain waters having, relatively high lithium and potassium concentrations. At least a part of these waters is probably derived from the leaching of Tertiary rocks containing saline minerals. The high-lithium waters at Columbus Salt Marsh could be derived not only by the leaching of rocks with a high soluble lithium ands, potassium content but also by subsurface outflow from Fish Lake Valley.

  3. Room temperature molten salt as medium for lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. S.; Zhou, R. Q.

    Due to the wide electrochemical window and high ionic conductivity, the 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MeEtImCl) room temperature molten salt (RTMS) was investigated as the medium for lithium battery in the present work. The addition of C 6H 5SO 2Cl to the RTMS was shown to improve its chemical stability and the reversibility of the lithium electrode because of the removal of Al 2Cl 7- from the melt. Electrochemical reaction which occurred at the LiCoO 2 was studied and the carbon current collector was found to interact with the melt. Out of the various carbon materials studied, graphite was found to be the best material. A LiAl/LiCoO 2 battery using RTMS as the electrolyte was assembled for battery test. Satisfactory results were obtained in preliminary cycling, showing a cell voltage of 3.45 V with better than 90% coulombic efficiency and a discharging capacity of 112 mA h/g LiCoO 2 at current density of 1 mA/cm 2.

  4. Measurements of the partial electronic conductivity in lithium chloride - potassium chloride molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, G.J.; Huggins, R.A.; Lee, M.C.Y.

    1983-05-01

    The partial electronic conductivity of the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic molten salt electrolyte has been studied as a function of lithium activity, temperature and melt composition using the Wagner asymmetric d-c polarization technique. Measurements were made over the temperature range 383-465/sup 0/C and at lithium activities extending from 1.95 X 10/sup -7/ to unity. The results confirmed the applicability of this technique to molten salt systems. The partial electronic conductivity was shown to be much greater than the partial hole conductivity over the range of lithium activities investigated, and was found to increase monotonically with temperature and lithium activity, but decreased on addition of excess LiCl to the eutectic composition. Approximate values of self-discharge currents for cells utilizing an ''Al/LiAl'' negative electrode and a LiCl-KCl molten salt electrolyte have been calculated.

  5. Lithium clearance in man: effects of dietary salt intake, acute changes in extracellular fluid volume, amiloride and frusemide.

    PubMed

    Atherton, J C; Green, R; Hughes, S; McFall, V; Sharples, J A; Solomon, L R; Wilson, L

    1987-12-01

    1. The effects of amiloride and frusemide on lithium clearance were studied during changes in dietary sodium chloride intake and during infusion of 0.9% NaCl in normal human volunteers. 2. Lithium and fractional lithium clearances were less on the low than on the high salt diet. Values for the medium salt diet were intermediate. Acute extracellular fluid volume expansion with 0.9% NaCl infusion and extracellular fluid volume contraction 3-4 h after intravenous frusemide caused lithium and fractional lithium clearances to increase and decrease respectively. 3. Amiloride caused small changes in lithium and fractional lithium clearances on a low salt diet, but was without effect when salt intake was medium or high. 4. Increases in lithium clearance occurred immediately after frusemide irrespective of dietary salt intake and in subjects infused with 0.9% NaCl. Only in salt-depleted subjects did frusemide cause a substantial increase in fractional lithium clearance. Changes induced under other circumstances were small. 5. It is concluded that the lithium clearance method for assessment of proximal tubule salt and water reabsorption can be used with some degree of confidence in certain circumstances (medium and high salt intake as well as in acute volume expansion) but may not be reliable when dietary salt intake is low. PMID:3690979

  6. Concentrated dual-salt electrolytes for improving the cycling stability of lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, Liu; Qiang, Ma; Zheng, Fang; Jie, Ma; Yong-Sheng, Hu; Zhi-Bin, Zhou; Hong, Li; Xue-Jie, Huang; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable Li batteries, due to its high theoretical specific capacity (3860 mAh/g), low density (0.534 g/cm3), and low negative electrochemical potential (‑3.040 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, the concentrated electrolytes with dual salts, composed of Li[N(SO2F)2] (LiFSI) and Li[N(SO2CF3)2] (LiTFSI) were studied. In this dual-salt system, the capacity retention can even be maintained at 95.7% after 100 cycles in Li|LiFePO4 cells. A Li|Li cell can be cycled at 0.5 mA/cm2 for more than 600 h, and a Li|Cu cell can be cycled at 0.5 mA/cm2 for more than 200 cycles with a high average Coulombi efficiency of 99%. These results show that the concentrated dual-salt electrolytes exhibit superior electrochemical performance and would be a promising candidate for application in rechargeable Li batteries. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210, 51472268, 51421002, and 11234013) and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010300).

  7. Concentrated dual-salt electrolytes for improving the cycling stability of lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, Liu; Qiang, Ma; Zheng, Fang; Jie, Ma; Yong-Sheng, Hu; Zhi-Bin, Zhou; Hong, Li; Xue-Jie, Huang; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable Li batteries, due to its high theoretical specific capacity (3860 mAh/g), low density (0.534 g/cm3), and low negative electrochemical potential (-3.040 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, the concentrated electrolytes with dual salts, composed of Li[N(SO2F)2] (LiFSI) and Li[N(SO2CF3)2] (LiTFSI) were studied. In this dual-salt system, the capacity retention can even be maintained at 95.7% after 100 cycles in Li|LiFePO4 cells. A Li|Li cell can be cycled at 0.5 mA/cm2 for more than 600 h, and a Li|Cu cell can be cycled at 0.5 mA/cm2 for more than 200 cycles with a high average Coulombi efficiency of 99%. These results show that the concentrated dual-salt electrolytes exhibit superior electrochemical performance and would be a promising candidate for application in rechargeable Li batteries. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210, 51472268, 51421002, and 11234013) and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010300).

  8. A new class of Solvent-in-Salt electrolyte for high-energy rechargeable metallic lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Suo, Liumin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Armand, Michel; Chen, Liquan

    2013-01-01

    Liquid electrolyte plays a key role in commercial lithium-ion batteries to allow conduction of lithium-ion between cathode and anode. Traditionally, taking into account the ionic conductivity, viscosity and dissolubility of lithium salt, the salt concentration in liquid electrolytes is typically less than 1.2 mol l(-1). Here we show a new class of 'Solvent-in-Salt' electrolyte with ultrahigh salt concentration and high lithium-ion transference number (0.73), in which salt holds a dominant position in the lithium-ion transport system. It remarkably enhances cyclic and safety performance of next-generation high-energy rechargeable lithium batteries via an effective suppression of lithium dendrite growth and shape change in the metallic lithium anode. Moreover, when used in lithium-sulphur battery, the advantage of this electrolyte is further demonstrated that lithium polysulphide dissolution is inhibited, thus overcoming one of today's most challenging technological hurdles, the 'polysulphide shuttle phenomenon'. Consequently, a coulombic efficiency nearing 100% and long cycling stability are achieved.

  9. Glyme-lithium salt equimolar molten mixtures: concentrated solutions or solvate ionic liquids?

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuhide; Yoshida, Kazuki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Tachikawa, Naoki; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2012-09-13

    To demonstrate a new family of ionic liquids (ILs), i.e., "solvate" ionic liquids, the properties (thermal, transport, and electrochemical properties, Lewis basicity, and ionicity) of equimolar molten mixtures of glymes (triglyme (G3) and tetraglyme (G4)) and nine different lithium salts (LiX) were investigated. By exploring the anion-dependent properties and comparing them with the reported data on common aprotic ILs, two different classes of liquid regimes, i.e., ordinary concentrated solutions and "solvate" ILs, were found in the glyme-Li salt equimolar mixtures ([Li(glyme)]X) depending on the anionic structures. The class a given [Li(glyme)]X belonged to was governed by competitive interactions between the glymes and Li cations and between the counteranions (X) and Li cations. [Li(glyme)]X with weakly Lewis basic anions can form long-lived [Li(glyme)](+) complex cations. Thus, they behaved as typical ionic liquids. The lithium "solvate" ILs based on [Li(glyme)]X have many desirable properties for lithium-conducting electrolytes, including high ionicity, a high lithium transference number, high Li cation concentration, and high oxidative stability, in addition to the common properties of ionic liquids. The concept of "solvate" ionic liquids can be utilized in an unlimited number of combinations of other metal salts and ligands, and will thus open a new field of research on ionic liquids.

  10. Influence of Lithium Salts on the Discharge Chemistry of Li-Air Cells.

    PubMed

    Veith, Gabriel M; Nanda, Jagjit; Delmau, Laetitia H; Dudney, Nancy J

    2012-05-17

    In this work, we show that the use of a high boiling point ether solvent (tetraglyme) promotes the formation of Li2O2 in a lithium-air cell. However, another major constituent in the discharge product of a Li-air cell contains halides from the lithium salts and C-O from the tetraglyme used as the solvent. This information is critical to the development of Li-air electrolytes, which are stable and promote the formation of the desired Li2O2 products. PMID:26286765

  11. Influence of lithium salts on the discharge chemistry of Li-air cells

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Nanda, Jagjit; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Dudney, Nancy J

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show that the use of a high boiling point ether solvent (tetraglyme) promotes the formation of Li2O2 in a lithium-air cell. In addition, another major constituent in the discharge product of a Li-air cell contains halides, from the lithium salt, and the tetraglyme used as the solvent. This information is critical to the development of Li-air electrolytes which are stable and promote the formation of the desired Li2O2 products.

  12. Anion Coordination Interactions in Solvates with the Lithium Salts LiDCTA and LiTDI

    SciTech Connect

    McOwen, Dennis W.; Delp, Samuel A.; Paillard, Elie; Herriot, Cristelle; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Sommer, Roger D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-04-17

    Lithium 4,5-dicyano-1,2,3-triazolate (LiDCTA) and lithium 2-trifluoromethyl-4,5-dicyanoimidazole (LiTDI) are two salts proposed for lithium battery electrolyte applications, but little is known about the manner in which the DCTA- and TDI- anions coordinate Li+ cations. To explore this in-depth, crystal structures are reported here for two solvates with LiDCTA: (G2)1:LiDCTA and (G1)1:LiDCTA with diglyme and monoglyme, respectively, and seven solvates with LiTDI: (G1)2:LiTDI, (G2)2:LiTDI, (G3)1:LiTDI, (THF)1:LiTDI, (EC)1:LiTDI, (PC)1:LiTDI and (DMC)1/2:LiTDI with monoglyme, diglyme, triglyme, tetrahydrofuran, ethylene carbonate, propylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, respectively. These latter solvate structures are compared with the previously reported acetonitrile (AN)2:LiTDI structure. The solvates indicate that the LiTDI salt is much less associated than the LiDCTA salt and that the ions in LiTDI, when aggregated in solvates, have a very similar TDI-...Li+ cation mode of coordination through both the anion ring and cyano nitrogen atoms. Such coordination facilitates the formation of polymeric ion aggregates, instead of dimers. Insight into such ion speciation is instrumental for understanding the electrolyte properties of aprotic solvent mixtures with these salts.

  13. Measurement of the Melting Point Temperature of Several Lithium-Sodium-Beryllium Fluoride Salt (Flinabe) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.M; Nygren, R.E.; Lutz, T.J.; Tanaka, T.J; Ulrickson, M.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Troncosa, K.P.

    2005-04-15

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium fluorides studied for molten salt fission reactors, has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for fusion applications. The melting points of 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} and LiF-BeF{sub 2} are 460 deg. C and 363 deg. C, but LiF-BeF{sub 2} is rather viscous and has less lithium for breeding. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing liquid for the first wall and blanket were investigated. Flinabe (a mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2} and NaF) was selected for a molten salt design because a melting temperature below 350 deg. C appeared possible and this provided an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a stainless steel crucible under vacuum. One had an apparent melting temperature of 305 deg. C. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, melting procedures and temperature curves for the melting and cooling are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible is reported in an accompanying paper.

  14. Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water using multivariate curve resolution of near-infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Barba, M Isabel; Larrechi, M Soledad; Coronas, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    The hydration process of lithium iodide, lithium bromide, lithium chloride and lithium nitrate in water was analyzed quantitatively by applying multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to their near infrared spectra recorded between 850 nm and 1100 nm. The experiments were carried out using solutions with a salt mass fraction between 0% and 72% for lithium bromide, between 0% and 67% for lithium nitrate and between 0% and 62% for lithium chloride and lithium iodide at 323.15 K, 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. Three factors were determined for lithium bromide and lithium iodide and two factors for the lithium chloride and lithium nitrate by singular value decomposition (SVD) of their spectral data matrices. These factors are associated with various chemical environments in which there are aqueous clusters containing the ions of the salts and non-coordinated water molecules. Spectra and concentration profiles of non-coordinated water and cluster aqueous were retrieved by MCR-ALS. The amount of water involved in the process of hydration of the various salts was quantified. The results show that the water absorption capacity increases in the following order LiI < LiBr < LiNO3 < LiCl. The salt concentration at which there is no free water in the medium was calculated at each one of the temperatures considered. The values ranged between 62.6 and 65.1% for LiBr, 45.5-48.3% for LiCl, 60.4-61.2% for LiI and 60.3-63.7% for LiNO3. These values are an initial approach to determining the concentration as from which crystal formation is favored. PMID:27086095

  15. Discharge characteristics of lithium/molten nitrate thermal battery cells using silver salts as solid cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManis, G. E.; Miles, M. H.; Fletcher, A. N.

    1985-12-01

    Thermal battery cells using molten nitrate electrolytes and liquid lithium anodes have been evaluated using several silver salts with low solubility in molten nitrates as solid cathode materials. These cathode materials do not readily diffuse into the anolyte and, thus, do not have parasitic reactions with the lithium anode. Furthermore, the solid cathode materials have voltammetric characteristics as favorable as many soluble silver salt cathodes. This paper presents the effects of temperature, current density, and cathode material on cell discharge characteristics.

  16. Measurement of the melting point temperature of several lithium-sodium-beryllium fluoride salt (FLINABE) mixtures.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Nygren, Richard Einar; Lutz, Thomas Joseph; McDonald, Jimmie M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2004-09-01

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium flourides, was studied for molten salt fission reactors and has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for the fusion applications. 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts at 460 C. LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts at a lower temperature, 363 C, but is rather viscous and has less lithium breeder. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing ternary molten salt for the first wall surface and blanket were investigated. The molten salt (FLiNaBe, a ternary mixture of LiF, BeF2 and NaF) salt was selected because a melting temperature below 350 C that would provide an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor application appeared possible. This information came from a Russian binary phase diagram and a US ternary phase diagram in the 1960's that were not wholly consistent. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and, BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a small stainless steel crucible under vacuum. The proportions of the three salts were selected to yield conglomerate salts with as low a melting temperature as possible. The temperature of the salts and the crucible were recorded during the melting and subsequent re-solidification using a thermocouple directly in the salt pool and two thermocouples embedded in the crucible. One mixture had an apparent melting temperature of 305 C. Particular attention was paid to the cooling curve of the salt temperature to observe evidence of any mixed intermediate phases between the fully liquid and fully solid states. The clarity, texture, and thickness were observed and noted as well. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, and the melting procedure are described. The temperature curves for the melting and cooling of each of the mixtures are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible was also done and is reported in a separate

  17. A new look at an old drug: neuroprotective effects and therapeutic potentials of lithium salts.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Liliana; Del Grande, Claudia; Gesi, Camilla; Carmassi, Claudia; Musetti, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlights bipolar disorder as being associated with impaired neurogenesis, cellular plasticity, and resiliency, as well as with cell atrophy or loss in specific brain regions. This has led most recent research to focus on the possible neuroprotective effects of medications, and particularly interesting findings have emerged for lithium. A growing body of evidence from preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies has in fact documented its neuroprotective effects from different insults acting on cellular signaling pathways, both preventing apoptosis and increasing neurotrophins and cell-survival molecules. Furthermore, positive effects of lithium on neurogenesis, brain remodeling, angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells functioning, and inflammation have been revealed, with a key role played through the inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase-3, a serine/threonine kinase implicated in the pathogenesis of many neuropsychiatric disorders. These recent evidences suggest the potential utility of lithium in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, neurodevelopmental disorders, and hypoxic-ischemic/traumatic brain injury, with positive results at even lower lithium doses than those traditionally considered to be antimanic. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the potential benefits of lithium salts on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, emphasizing preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting new therapeutic potentials of this drug beyond its mood stabilizing properties.

  18. A new look at an old drug: neuroprotective effects and therapeutic potentials of lithium salts

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Osso, Liliana; Del Grande, Claudia; Gesi, Camilla; Carmassi, Claudia; Musetti, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlights bipolar disorder as being associated with impaired neurogenesis, cellular plasticity, and resiliency, as well as with cell atrophy or loss in specific brain regions. This has led most recent research to focus on the possible neuroprotective effects of medications, and particularly interesting findings have emerged for lithium. A growing body of evidence from preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies has in fact documented its neuroprotective effects from different insults acting on cellular signaling pathways, both preventing apoptosis and increasing neurotrophins and cell-survival molecules. Furthermore, positive effects of lithium on neurogenesis, brain remodeling, angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells functioning, and inflammation have been revealed, with a key role played through the inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase-3, a serine/threonine kinase implicated in the pathogenesis of many neuropsychiatric disorders. These recent evidences suggest the potential utility of lithium in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, neurodevelopmental disorders, and hypoxic–ischemic/traumatic brain injury, with positive results at even lower lithium doses than those traditionally considered to be antimanic. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the potential benefits of lithium salts on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, emphasizing preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting new therapeutic potentials of this drug beyond its mood stabilizing properties. PMID:27468233

  19. A new look at an old drug: neuroprotective effects and therapeutic potentials of lithium salts.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Liliana; Del Grande, Claudia; Gesi, Camilla; Carmassi, Claudia; Musetti, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlights bipolar disorder as being associated with impaired neurogenesis, cellular plasticity, and resiliency, as well as with cell atrophy or loss in specific brain regions. This has led most recent research to focus on the possible neuroprotective effects of medications, and particularly interesting findings have emerged for lithium. A growing body of evidence from preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies has in fact documented its neuroprotective effects from different insults acting on cellular signaling pathways, both preventing apoptosis and increasing neurotrophins and cell-survival molecules. Furthermore, positive effects of lithium on neurogenesis, brain remodeling, angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells functioning, and inflammation have been revealed, with a key role played through the inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase-3, a serine/threonine kinase implicated in the pathogenesis of many neuropsychiatric disorders. These recent evidences suggest the potential utility of lithium in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, neurodevelopmental disorders, and hypoxic-ischemic/traumatic brain injury, with positive results at even lower lithium doses than those traditionally considered to be antimanic. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the potential benefits of lithium salts on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, emphasizing preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting new therapeutic potentials of this drug beyond its mood stabilizing properties. PMID:27468233

  20. Enhanced cycling performance of a Li metal anode in a dimethylsulfoxide-based electrolyte using highly concentrated lithium salt for a lithium-oxygen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togasaki, Norihiro; Momma, Toshiyuki; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    Stable charge-discharge cycling behavior for a lithium metal anode in a dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-based electrolyte is strongly desired of lithium-oxygen batteries, because the Li anode is rapidly exhausted as a result of side reactions during cycling in the DMSO solution. Herein, we report a novel electrolyte design for enhancing the cycling performance of Li anodes by using a highly concentrated DMSO-based electrolyte with a specific Li salt. Lithium nitrate (LiNO3), which forms an inorganic compound (Li2O) instead of a soluble product (Li2S) on a lithium surface, exhibits a >20% higher coulombic efficiency than lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide, and lithium perchlorate, regardless of the loading current density. Moreover, the stable cycling of Li anodes in DMSO-based electrolytes depends critically on the salt concentration. The highly concentrated electrolyte 4.0 M LiNO3/DMSO displays enhanced and stable cycling performance comparable to that of carbonate-based electrolytes, which had not previously been achieved. We suppose this enhancement is due to the absence of free DMSO solvent in the electrolyte and the promotion of the desolvation of Li ions on the solid electrolyte interphase surface, both being consequences of the unique structure of the electrolyte.

  1. Modeling viscosity and conductivity of lithium salts in γ-butyrolactone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagnes, A.; Carré, B.; Willmann, P.; Lemordant, D.

    Viscosity and conductivity properties of Li-salts (lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF 4), lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF 6), lithium hexafluoroarsenate (LiAsF 6), lithium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfone)-imide (LiTFSI)) dissolved in γ-butyrolactone (BL) have been investigated. The B- and D-coefficients of the Jones-Dole (JD) equation for the relative viscosity of concentrated electrolyte solutions (concentration: C=0.1-1.5 M): ηr=1+ AC1/2+ BC+ DC2, have been determined as a function of the temperature. The B-coefficient is linked to the hydrodynamic volume of the solute and remains constant within the temperature range investigated (25-55 °C). The D-coefficient, which originates mainly from long-range coulombic ion-ion interactions, is a reciprocal function of the temperature. The variations of the molar conductivity ( Λ) with C follow the cube root law Λ= Λ0'- S' C1/3 issued from quasi-lattice theory of electrolyte solutions. From the Walden product W= Λη which does not vary with C and the JD equation, the bell shape of the conductivity-concentration relationship is explained and it is shown that the concentration in salt at the maximum of conductivity is linked to the D-coefficient. Raman spectroscopy has been used as an additional tool to investigate ion pairing in BL. Ions pairs have been evidenced for LiClO 4 solutions in BL but not for LiPF 6. As little variations occur for the ions pairs dissociation coefficient when the salt concentration is increased, the cube root law remains valid, at least in the concentration range investigated.

  2. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Cyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, D. M.; Afroz, Taliman; Allen, Joshua L.; Boyle, Paul D.; Trulove, Paul C.; De Long, Hugh C.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-11-13

    Only limited information is available regarding the manner in which cyclic carbonate and ester solvents coordinate Li+ cations in electrolyte solutions for lithium batteries. One approach to gleaning significant insight into these interactions is to examine crystalline solvate structures. To this end, eight new solvate structures are reported with ethylene carbonate, γ-butyrolactone and γ-valerolactone: (EC)3:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiBF4, (GBL)4:LiPF6, (GBL)1:LiClO4, (GVL)1:LiClO4, (GBL)1:LiBF4 and (GBL)1:LiCF3SO3. The crystal structure of (EC)1:LiCF3SO3 is also re-reported for comparison. These structures enable the factors which govern the manner in which the ions are coordinated and the ion/solvent packing—in the solid-state—to be scrutinized in detail.

  3. Ionic conductivity of dual-phase polymer electrolytes comprised of NBR/SBR latex films swollen with lithium salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Ichino, Toshihiro; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro . NTT Interdisciplinary Research Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    Dual-phase polymer electrolytes (DPE) with high ionic conductivity and good mechanical strength were prepared by swelling poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) rubber (NBR) and poly(styrene-co-butadiene) rubber (SBR) mixed latex films with lithium salt solutions (e.g., 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-butyrolactone). The latex films retain particle morphology in the solid state. The NBR phase (formed from fused NBR latex particles) is polar and is impregnated selectively with polar lithium salt solutions, yielding ion-conductive channels, whereas the SBR phase (formed from fused SBR latex particles) is nonpolar and is not impregnated, providing a mechanically supportive matrix. The ionic conductivity of the DPE increased dramatically with increasing content of lithium salt solution, and higher amounts of solution were imbibed with increasing content of NBR relative to SBR. Several factors which affect the ionic conductivity of this system were examined, and the highest ionic conductivity (>10[sup [minus]3] S/cm) was obtained when either an NBR/SBR 70/30 (w/w) or a 50/50 (w/w) latex film was saturated with 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL solution or 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL/DME solution. Ion-conductive behavior changed critically with increasing lithium salt solution uptake. At low levels of lithium salt solution uptake, evidence suggested that ionic conductivity of the absorbed lithium salt solution was strongly influenced by the presence of the NBR in the ion-conductive channel, but at higher levels, the effects of the NBR were reduced and free'' lithium salt solution was present.

  4. Excess lithium salt functions more than compensating for lithium loss when synthesizing Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12 in alumina crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Ma, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Chang-An

    2014-08-01

    Garnet type electrolyte "Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12" (LLZTO) was prepared by conventional solid-state reaction in alumina crucibles and excess lithium salt (from 0% to 50 mol%) was added into the starting materials to investigate the effects of excess lithium salt on the property of LLZTO. SEM, XRD and AC impedance were used to determine the microstructure, phase formation and Li-ion conductivity. Cubic garnet with a minor second phase LiAlO2 in the grain boundary was obtained for the pellets with excess lithium salt. As the amount of excess lithium salt increased, more Al element diffused from alumina crucibles to LLZTO pellets and reacted with excess lithium salt to form liquid Li2O-Al2O3 phase in the grain boundary, which accelerated the pellets' densification and reduced lithium loss at a high temperature. Ionic conductivity of LLZTO pellets increased with the amount of excess lithium salt added and leveled off at ∼4 × 10-4 S cm-1 when lithium salt exceeded 30 mol%. The performance of Li-air batteries with hybrid electrolytes, using homemade LLZTO thin pellets as solid electrolytes, was investigated. The LLZTO thin pellet with more excess lithium salt in starting material had a higher density and resulted in better cell performance.

  5. Lithium recovery by means of electrochemical ion pumping: a comparison between salt capturing and selective exchange.

    PubMed

    Trocoli, Rafael; Bidhendi, Ghoncheh Kasiri; La Mantia, Fabio

    2016-03-23

    Currently, lithium carbonate is mainly produced through evaporation of lithium-rich brines, which are located in South American countries such as Bolivia, Chile, and Argentina. The most commonly used process, the lime-soda evaporation, requires a long time and several purification steps, which produces a considerable amount of chemical waste. Recently, several alternative electrochemical methods, based on LiFePO4 as a selective lithium capturing electrode and differing for the reaction at the counter electrode, have been proposed. In this work a comparison between the salt capturing method, based on silver / silver chloride reaction, and the selective exchange method, based on ion intercalation reaction in a Prussian Blue derivative, is performed in terms of energy consumption. In particular, the energy consumption is divided in thermodynamic and kinetic contribution, and the theoretical calculations are compared with the experimental results. The experimental results show a good agreement with the theoretical calculation. The selective exchange method shows superior performances to the salt exchange in terms of purity and efficiency, however the energy consumption is higher. PMID:26910577

  6. Thermophysical properties and corrosion characterization of low cost lithium containing nitrate salts produced in northern Chile for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ángel G.; Gomez, Judith C.; Galleguillos, Hector; Fuentealba, Edward

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, lithium containing salts have been studied for thermal energy storage (TES) systems applications, because of their optimal thermophysical properties. In solar power plants, lithium is seen as a way to improve the properties of molten salts used today. Lithium nitrate is a good candidate for sensible heat storage, due to its ability to increase the salt mixture's working temperature range. In the present research, thermophysical properties characterization of lithium nitrate containing salts, produced in Chile, have been carried out. Corrosion evaluations of carbon and low chromium steels were performed at 390°C for 1000 hours. Thermophysical properties of the salt mixtures, such as thermal stability and heat capacity, were measured before and after corrosion tests. Chemical composition of the salts was also determined and an estimation of Chilean production costs is reported. Results showed that purity, thermal stability and heat capacity of the salts were reduced, caused by partial thermal decomposition and incorporation of corrosion products from the steel.

  7. Liquid Fluoride Salt Experimentation Using a Small Natural Circulation Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne; Williams, David F; Elkassabgi, Yousri M.; Caja, Joseph; Caja, Mario; Jordan, John; Salinas, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    A small molten fluoride salt experiment has been constructed and tested to develop experimental techniques for application in liquid fluoride salt systems. There were five major objectives in developing this test apparatus: Allow visual observation of the salt during testing (how can lighting be introduced, how can pictures be taken, what can be seen) Determine if IR photography can be used to examine components submerged in the salt Determine if the experimental configuration provides salt velocity sufficient for collection of corrosion data for future experimentation Determine if a laser Doppler velocimeter can be used to quantify salt velocities. Acquire natural circulation heat transfer data in fluoride salt at temperatures up to 700oC All of these objectives were successfully achieved during testing with the exception of the fourth: acquiring velocity data using the laser Doppler velocimeter. This paper describes the experiment and experimental techniques used, and presents data taken during natural circulation testing.

  8. Disordered lithium niobate rock-salt materials prepared by hydrothermal synthesis.

    PubMed

    Modeshia, Deena R; Walton, Richard I; Mitchell, Martin R; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2010-07-14

    An investigation of the one-step hydrothermal crystallisation of lithium niobates reveals that reaction between Nb(2)O(5) and aqueous LiOH at 240 degrees C yields materials with a disordered rock-salt structure where the metals are statistically distributed over the cation sites. This contrasts with the well-studied reaction between Nb(2)O(5) and NaOH or KOH that produces ANbO(3) (A = Na, K) perovskites. Powder neutron diffraction shows that materials prepared at short reaction times and lower LiOH concentration (2.5 M) are lithium deficient and have a slight excess of niobium, but that at longer periods of reaction in 5 M LiOH, close to the ideal, stoichiometric Li(0.75)Nb(0.25)O composition is produced. Upon annealing this phase cleanly transforms into the known ordered rock-salt material Li(3)NbO(4), a process we have followed using thermodiffractometry, which indicates that transformation begins at approximately 700 degrees C. Solid-state (93)Nb and (7)Li NMR of the disordered and ordered rock-salt phases shows that both contain single metal sites but there is clear evidence for local disorder in the disordered samples. For the ordered material, NMR parameters derived from experiment are also compared to those calculated using density functional theory and are shown to be in good agreement. PMID:20442945

  9. Solid lithium electrolyte via addition of lithium salts to metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Wiers, Brian M.; Balsara, Nitash P.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of the invention disclose that the uptake of LiO.sup.iPr in Mg.sub.2(dobdc) (dobdc.sup.4-=1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate) followed by soaking in a typical electrolyte solution leads to a new solid lithium electrolyte Mg.sub.2(dobdc).0.35LiO.sup.iPr.0.25LiBF.sub.4.EC.DEC. Two-point ac impedance data show a pressed pellet of this material to have a conductivity of 3.1.times.10.sup.-4 S/cm at 300 K. In addition, the results from variable-temperature measurements reveal an activation energy of approximately 0.15 eV, while single-particle data suggest that intraparticle transport dominates conduction.

  10. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1.2 kt (1,300 st) of contained lithium, a 40-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium, and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2009, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 18.7 kt (20,600 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds.

  11. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1 kt (1,100 st) of contained lithium, a 23-percent decrease from 2009. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium. It remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2010, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 21 kt (22,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 12-percent increase from 2009.

  12. Large-scale dynamic compaction of natural salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.D.; Ahrens, E.H.

    1996-05-01

    A large-scale dynamic compaction demonstration of natural salt was successfully completed. About 40 m{sup 3} of salt were compacted in three, 2-m lifts by dropping a 9,000-kg weight from a height of 15 m in a systematic pattern to achieve desired compaction energy. To enhance compaction, 1 wt% water was added to the relatively dry mine-run salt. The average compacted mass fractional density was 0.90 of natural intact salt, and in situ nitrogen permeabilities averaged 9X10{sup -14}m{sup 2}. This established viability of dynamic compacting for placing salt shaft seal components. The demonstration also provided compacted salt parameters needed for shaft seal system design and performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

  13. The corrosion protection of AA2024-T3 aluminium alloy by leaching of lithium-containing salts from organic coatings.

    PubMed

    Visser, Peter; Liu, Yanwen; Zhou, Xiaorong; Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Lyon, Stuart B; van der Ven, Leendert G J; Mol, Arjan J M C; Terryn, Herman A

    2015-01-01

    Lithium carbonate and lithium oxalate were incorporated as leachable corrosion inhibitors in model organic coatings for the protection of AA2024-T3. The coated samples were artificially damaged with a scribe. It was found that the lithium-salts are able to leach from the organic coating and form a protective layer in the scribe on AA2024-T3 under neutral salt spray conditions. The present paper shows the first observation and analysis of these corrosion protective layers, generated from lithium-salt loaded organic coatings. The scribed areas were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy before and after neutral salt spray exposure (ASTM-B117). The protective layers typically consist of three different layered regions, including a relatively dense layer near the alloy substrate, a porous middle layer and a flake-shaped outer layer, with lithium uniformly distributed throughout all three layers. Scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry surface roughness measurements demonstrate that the formation of the layer occurs rapidly and, therefore provides an effective inhibition mechanism. Based on the observation of this work, a mechanism is proposed for the formation of these protective layers. PMID:25927079

  14. [Bipolar affective disorders and role of intraneuronal calcium. Therapeutic effects of the treatment with lithium salts and/or calcium antagonist in patients with rapid polar inversion].

    PubMed

    Manna, V

    1991-11-01

    Treatment with lithium salts produces improvements in bipolar affective disorders. Up to date, the relationship between neurochemical and behavioural effects of lithium and its actions on intraneuronal free calcium ions is not well known. Some calcium antagonist drugs resulted active in the treatment of bipolar affective syndromes, with therapeutic effects similar to lithium salts. Some studies suggest that also lithium salts act as calcium antagonist at intraneuronal level. In this preliminary open study the activity of nimodipine, a selective neuronal calcium antagonist drug, was evaluated alone and in association with lithium salts in the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar manic-depressive illness. During three periods of 6 months 12 rapid cycling patients were treated with lithium salts, lithium salts plus nimodipine 30 mg x 3/day, nimodipine 30 mg x 3/day. The association of lithium with nimodipine resulted more effective than lithium alone or nimodipine alone in the reduction of episodes of affective disorder. These results suggest a probable sinergic activity of both treatments. Further studies will be necessary to confirm the mechanism of action, perhaps calcium antagonism, at the basis of therapeutic effects of both treatments. The results seem to confirm the hypothesis that a calcium-ionic disorders play a role in the pathogenesis of bipolar affective disorders.

  15. Ionic conduction and self-diffusion near infinitesimal concentration in lithium salt-organic solvent electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Kyoko; Price, William S.; Hayamizu, Kikuko

    2000-08-01

    The Debye-Hückel-Onsager and Nernst-Einstein equations, which are based on two different conceptual approaches, constitute the most widely used equations for relating ionic conduction to ionic mobility. However, both of these classical (simple) equations are predictive of ionic conductivity only at very low salt concentrations. In the present work the ionic conductivity of four organic solvent-lithium salt-based electrolytes were measured. These experimental conductivity values were then contrasted with theoretical values calculated using the translational diffusion (also known as self-diffusion or intradiffusion) coefficients of all of the species present obtained using pulsed-gradient spin-echo (1H, 19F and 7Li) nuclear magnetic resonance self-diffusion measurements. The experimental results verified the applicability of both theoretical approaches at very low salt concentrations for these particular systems as well as helping to clarify the reasons for the divergence between theory and experiment. In particular, it was found that the correspondence between the Debye-Hückel-Onsager equation and experimental values could be improved by using the measured solvent self-diffusion values to correct for salt-induced changes in the solution viscosity. The concentration dependence of the self-diffusion coefficients is discussed in terms of the Jones-Dole equation.

  16. Solid-state supercapacitors with ionic liquid based gel polymer electrolyte: Effect of lithium salt addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, G. P.; Hashmi, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Performance characteristics of the solid-state supercapacitors fabricated with ionic liquid (IL) incorporated gel polymer electrolyte and acid treated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) electrodes have been studied. The effect of Li-salt (LiPF6) addition in the IL (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate, EMImFAP) based gel electrolyte on the performance of supercapacitors has been specifically investigated. The LiPF6/IL/poly(vinylidine fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) gel electrolyte film possesses excellent electrochemical window of 4 V (from -2.0 to 2.0 V), high ionic conductivity ˜2.6 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 20 °C and high enough thermal stability. The comparative performance of supercapacitors employing electrolytes with and without lithium salt has been evaluated by impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric studies. The acid-treated MWCNT electrodes show specific capacitance of ˜127 F g-1 with IL/LiPF6 containing gel polymer electrolyte as compared to that with the gel polymer electrolyte without Li-salt, showing the value of ˜76 F g-1. The long cycling stability of the solid state supercapacitor based on the Li-salt containing gel polymer electrolyte confirms the electrochemical stability of the electrolyte.

  17. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 25 kt (25,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 10-percent increase from 2010. U.S. consumption was estimated to have been about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, a 100-percent increase from 2010. The United States was estimated to be the fourth-ranked consumer of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  18. Effects of lithium salt concentration on graphited carbon microbead anodes in the piperidinium-based hybrid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Kun; Li, Shu-Dan

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: “Lithium aggregates” usually cause a significant decrease in Li{sup +} mobility and transfer efficiency. Therefore, as important as the problem of SEI, the content of lithium salt and the interaction between Li{sup +} and ILs’ anions should be taken into consideration in the optimization of ILs-based electrolytes for Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • “Lithium aggregates” in piperidinium-based electrolytes are evidenced by IR and NMR. • High LiPF{sub 6} content could decrease Li{sup +} mobility due to “ionic aggregates”. • Lithium salt concentration is an important factor affecting graphite performances. - Abstract: The variations in LiPF{sub 6} concentration lead to the very different electrochemical performances of carbon microbeads anodes in the piperidinium-based hybrid electrolytes. The “two peaks” behaviors of lithium plating observed in cyclic voltammetry tests, and some detailed changes in infrared spectra and nuclear magnetic resonance indicates that the formation of “ionic aggregates” related to lithium ions”. Therefore, the excessive lithium salts in the piperidinium-based hybrid electrolytes, usually cause a significant decrease in Li{sup +} mobility and transfer efficiency. The main behaviors are that, when LiPF{sub 6} concentrations increased from 0.2 to 1.2 mol kg{sup −1}, the apparent migration energies (E{sub a}) increase largely from 8.83 to 21.16 kJ mol{sup −1}, while the lithium transference numbers (t{sub Li{sup +}}) drop markedly from 0.538 to 0.292.

  19. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, lithium consumption in the United States was at 2.5 kt of contained lithium, nearly 32% more than the estimate for 2004. World consumption was 14.1 kt of lithium contained in minerals and compounds in 2003. Exports from the US increased slightly compared with 2004. Due to strong demand for lithium compounds in 2005, both lithium carbonate plants in Chile were operating at or near capacity.

  20. Analysis of cell performance and thermal regeneration of a lithium-tin cell having an immobilized fused-salt electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Cell performance and thermal regeneration of a thermally regenerative cell uses lithium and tin and a fused-salt electrolyte. The emf of the Li-Sn cell, as a function of cathode-alloy composition, is shown to resemble that of the Na-Bi cell.

  1. Association constants in solutions of lithium salts in butyrolactone and a mixture of propylene carbonate with 1,2-dimethoxyethane (1 : 1), according to conductometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernozhuk, T. V.; Sherstyuk, Yu. S.; Novikov, D. O.; Kalugin, O. N.

    2016-02-01

    A conductometric study is performed with solutions of lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) in γ-butyrolactone (γ-BL) at 278.15-388.15 K and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI), LiBOB, and lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) in mixtures of propylene carbonate and 1,2-dimethoxyethane (PC + 1,2-DME) (1 : 1) at 278.15-348.15 K. Limiting molar electrical conductivities (LMECs) and association constants ( K a) in the studied solutions of electrolytes are determined using the Lee-Wheaton equation. The effect temperature, the nature of the solvent, and the properties of the anion have on the conductivity and interparticle interactions in solutions of lithium salts in γ-BL and PC + 1,2-DME (1 : 1) is established. It was concluded that the studied solutions are characterized by low values of their association constants. It was found that the BOB;- anion destroys the structure of the solvent.The thickness of the dynamic solvation shell of ions (Δ R) remains constant for both solvents over the studied range of temperatures, and Δ R is significantly greater for Li+ than for other ions.

  2. Lithium salt with a super-delocalized perfluorinated sulfonimide anion as conducting salt for lithium-ion cells: Physicochemical and electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Han, Hongbo; Cheng, Xiaorong; Zheng, Liping; Cheng, Pengfei; Feng, Wenfang; Nie, Jin; Armand, Michel; Huang, Xuejie; Zhou, Zhibin

    2015-11-01

    Lithium salt with a super-delocalized imide anion, namely (trifluoromethane(S-trifluoromethanesulfonylimino)sulfonyl) (trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CF3SO(=NSO2CF3)2]-), [sTFSI]-), has been prepared and studied as conducting salt for Li-ion cells. The fundamental physicochemical and electrochemical properties of neat Li[sTFSI] and its carbonate-based liquid electrolyte have been characterized with various chemical and electrochemical tools. Li[sTFSI] shows a low melting point at 118 °C, and is thermally stable up to 300 °C without decomposition on the spectra of differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry (DSC-TG-MS). The electrolyte of 1.0 M (mol dm-3) Li[sTFSI] in ethylene carbonate (EC)/ethyl-methyl-carbonate (EMC) (3:7, v/v) containing 0.3% water does not show any hydrolytic decomposition on the spectra of 1H and 19F NMR, after storage at 85 °C for 10 days. The conductivities of 1.0 M Li[sTFSI]-EC/EMC (3:7, v/v) are slightly lower than those of Li[(CF3SO2)2N] (LiTFSI), but higher than those of Li[(C2F5SO2)2N] (LiBETI). The electrochemical behavior of Al foil in the Li[sTFSI]-based electrolyte has been investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is illustrated that Al metal does not corrode in the high potential region (3-5 V vs. Li/Li+) in the Li[sTFSI]-based electrolyte. On Pt electrode, the Li[sTFSI]-based electrolyte is highly resistant to oxidation (ca. 5 V vs. Li/Li+), and is also resistant to reduction to allow Li deposition and stripping. The applicability of Li[sTFSI] as conducting salt for Li-ion cells has been tested using graphite/LiCoO2 cells. It shows that the cell with Li[sTFSI] displays better cycling performance than that with LiPF6.

  3. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.

    1998-01-01

    The lithium industry can be divided into two sectors: ore concentrate producers and chemical producers. Ore concentrate producers mine lithium minerals. They beneficiate the ores to produce material for use in ceramics and glass manufacturing.

  4. Toward the design of high voltage magnesium-lithium hybrid batteries using dual-salt electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yingwen; Choi, Daiwon; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Sprenkle, Vincent L; Liu, Jun; Li, Guosheng

    2016-04-01

    We report a design of high voltage magnesium-lithium (Mg-Li) hybrid batteries through rational control of the electrolyte chemistry, electrode materials and cell architecture. Prototype devices with a structure of Mg-Li/LiFePO4 (LFP) and Mg-Li/LiMn2O4 (LMO) have been investigated. A Mg-Li/LFP cell using a dual-salt electrolyte 0.2 M [Mg2Cl2(DME)4][AlCl4]2 and 1.0 M LiTFSI exhibits voltages higher than 2.5 V (vs. Mg) and a high specific energy density of 246 W h kg(-1) under conditions that are amenable for practical applications. The successful demonstrations reported here could be a significant step forward for practical hybrid batteries. PMID:26959513

  5. Lithium salt of end-substituted nanotube: Structure and large nonlinear optical property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fang; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Li, Zhi-Ru; Wu, Di; Li, Ying; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2010-03-01

    Lithium salt of substituted nanotube is suggested as a new kind of nonlinear optical (NLO) material. It is found that the combination of the lithiation effect and the donor substitution effect can greatly enhance the static first hyperpolarizability ( β0). Specially, the unusual donor - acceptor(nanotube) - donor system Li-NT(6,0)-(NH 2) 2 has considerable β0 to be 6.8 × 10 5 au, due to its small transition energy and large transition moment. Further, the relationships between β0 and the number of Li atoms m and the substituents R for Li m-NT(6,0)-( R) 2 ( m = 1, 6 and R = -CN, -NH 2) systems are explored.

  6. New boron based salts for lithium-ion batteries using conjugated ligands.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, P; Wieczorek, W; Johansson, P

    2016-06-28

    A new anion design concept, based on combining a boron atom as the central atom and conjugated systems as ligands, is presented as a route for finding alternative Li-salts for lithium-ion batteries. The properties of a wide range of novel anions designed in this way have been evaluated by DFT calculations focusing on three different fundamental success factors/measures: the strength of the cation-anion interaction, ultimately determining both the solubility and the ionic conductivity, the oxidation limit, determining their possible use vs. high voltage cathodes, and the reduction stability, revealing a possible role of the anion in the SEI-formation at the anode. For a few anions superior properties vs. today's existing or suggested anions are predicted, especially the very low cation-anion interaction strengths are promising features. The design route itself is shown to be versatile in determining the correlation between different choices of ligands and the resulting overall properties - where the most striking feature is the decreased lithium cation interaction energy upon using the (1Z,3Z)-buta-1,3-diene-1,2,3,4-tetracarbonitrile ligands. This also opens avenues for the further design of novel anions beyond those with a boron central atom. PMID:27253752

  7. Mixed-Salt Effects on the Ionic Conductivity of Lithium-Doped PEO-Containing Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Wen-Shiue; Albert, Julie N.L.; Schantz, A. Benjamin; Epps, III, Thomas H.

    2012-10-10

    We demonstrate a simple, yet effective, mixed-salt method to increase the room temperature ionic conductivity of lithium-doped block copolymer electrolyte membranes by suppressing the crystalline phases in the conducting block. We examined a mixed-salt system of LiClO{sub 4} and LiN(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} (LiTFSI) doped into a lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) diblock copolymer. The domain spacings, morphologies, thermal behavior, and crystalline phases of salt-doped PS-PEO samples were characterized, and the ionic conductivities of block copolymer electrolytes were obtained through ac impedance measurements. Comparing the ionic conductivity profiles of salt-doped PS-PEO samples at different mixed-salt ratios and total salt concentrations, we found that the ionic conductivity at room temperature can be improved by more than an order of magnitude when coinhibition of crystallite growth is promoted by the concerted behavior of the PEO:LiClO{sub 4} and PEO:LiTFSI phases. Additionally, we examined the influence of mixed-salt ratio and total salt concentration on copolymer energetics, and we found that the slope of the effective interaction parameter ({chi}{sub eff}) vs salt concentration in our lamellae-forming PS-PEO system was lower than that reported for a cylinder-forming PS-PEO system due to the balance between chain stretching and salt segregation in the PEO domains.

  8. Natural variations of lithium isotopes in a mammalian model.

    PubMed

    Balter, Vincent; Vigier, Nathalie

    2014-03-01

    Despite lithium's extensive clinical applications, the cellular and molecular basis for the therapeutic effects remains to be elucidated. The large difference in mass between the two lithium isotopes ((6)Li and (7)Li) has prompted biochemists to explore the metabolism of Li by using pure (6)Li and (7)Li labeled drugs. However, experiments were carried out at very high Li concentrations, which did not reflect natural conditions. In the present study, we consider, for the first time, the natural variations of the (7)Li/(6)Li ratio in the organs and body fluids of an animal model, sheep. Each organ seems to be characterized by a specific Li isotope composition. So far, the range of the (7)Li/(6)Li ratio in the sheep body, expressed as δ permil variations relative to the L-SVEC standard (δ(7)Li), is about 40‰, between muscles (∼40‰) and kidney (∼0‰). Relative to a dietary δ(7)Li value of ∼+17‰, serum, red blood cells, muscle, liver, brain and kidney have a (7)Li enrichment of -12‰, -14‰, +22‰, +5‰, -3‰ and -15‰, respectively. The Li isotope composition is likely to be fractionated during intestinal absorption, with a greater absorption of (6)Li relative to (7)Li. According to previous conclusions obtained with (6)Li and (7)Li labeled chemicals, (6)Li appears to diffuse into erythrocytes faster than does (7)Li. However, this does not hold for myocytes and hepatocytes, because these two tissues have a higher δ(7)Li level than serum. Purely diffusive isotopic fractionation would leave all organs (7)Li-depleted relative to the serum, which is not the case, suggesting that active, molecule-specific, isotopic fractionation occurs in the body. Our preliminary results suggest that natural Li isotope variations can shed light on its regulation in the body, being active or passive.

  9. PC based electrolytes with LiDFOB as an alternative salt for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Brandon M.

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been greatly sought after as a source of renewable energy storage. LIBs have a wide range of applications including but not limited portable electronic devices, electric vehicles, and power tools. As a direct result of their commercial viability an insatiable hunger for knowledge, advancement within the field of LIBs has been omnipresent for the last two decades. However, there are set backs evident within the LIB field; most notably the limitations of standard electrolyte formulations and LiPF6 lithium salt. The standard primary carbonate of ethylene carbonate (EC) has a very limited operating range due to its innate physical properties, and the LiPF6 salt is known to readily decompose to form HF which can further degrade LIB longevity. The goal of our research is to explore the use of a new primary salt LiDFOB in conjunction with a propylene carbonate based electrolyte to establish a more flexible electrolyte formulation by constructing coin cells and cycling them under various conditions to give a clear understanding of each formulation inherent performance capabilities. Our studies show that 1.2M LiDFOB in 3:7 PC/EMC + 1.5% VC is capable of performing comparably to the standard 1.2M LiPF6 in 3:7 EC/EMC at 25°C and the PC electrolyte also illustrates performance superior to the standard at 55°C. The degradation of lithium manganese spinel electrodes, including LiNi 0.5Mn1.5O4, is an area of great concern within the field of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Manganese containing cathode materials frequently have problems associated with Mn dissolution which significantly reduces the cycle life of LIB. Thus the stability of the cathode material is paramount to the performance of Mn spinel cathode materials in LIBs. In an effort to gain a better understanding of the stability of LiNi0.5 Mn1.5O4 in common LiPF6/carbonate electrolytes, samples were stored at elevated temperature in the presence of electrolyte. Then after storage both

  10. Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

  11. [Lithium].

    PubMed

    Sparsa, A; Bonnetblanc, J-M

    2004-03-01

    The mode of action of the cation lithium is not well known. It is at present used as a topical drug in dermatology. Lithium inhibits many enzymes: Na/K ATPase, adenylcyclase, enzymes of the prostaglandines E1 synthesis, inositol-1-phosphatase. It is active on neutrophils et T lymphocytes, explaining in part its anti-inflammatory activity. It has a dose-dependent action on levures. It has possibly a direct inhibitory activity on DNA synthesis of herpes viruses. Lithium has a good local safety. Percutaneous penetration is weak and plasma concentrations are very much lower than that observed after oral intake. Lithium has been studied in seborrhoeic dermatitis. Its efficacy was primarily observed in psychotic patients. An assay with oral lithium did not confirmed the first observations. Topical lithium was found more efficient. Topical lithium succinate associated with zinc sulfate and lithium gluconate had a greater efficacy than placebo. Comparison with topical ketoconazole showed a non inferiority of lithium gluconate. Oral lithium also showed a reduction of symptoms' duration of herpes simplex. Cutaneous side-effects of oral lithium are frequent and numerous. Some of them may be explained by a lithium pharmacological cell activity (such as psoriasis). Teratogenicity is observed in mice and rats. Drug interactions are not expected after topical application. Irritants side effects are mainly observed after topical application; they are moderate and transitory. Lithium gluconate treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis is a bid application during at least 8 weeks. It may be used in renal insufficiency. It is not recommended in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  12. Structures of potassium, sodium and lithium bis(oxalato)borate salts from powder diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Zavalij, Peter Y; Yang, Shoufeng; Whittingham, M Stanley

    2003-12-01

    The crystal structures of the alkali-metal bis(oxalato)borate salts A[B(C2O4)2] (A = K, Na, Li) have been determined ab initio using powder diffraction data obtained from a laboratory diffractometer. The K compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm and its structure has been solved by direct methods applied to the integrated intensities from full pattern decomposition. The Na compound is isostructural with the K salt, while the crystal structure of the highly hydroscopic Li compound differs from the other two. It has an orthorhombic lattice, space group Pnma, and its structure was solved by the global optimization method using a parallel tempering approach. In the K and Na structures the metal ions and complex borate ions form chains with m2m symmetry. Metal-oxygen bonding between the chains links them into a layer and then a framework with square tunnels. The coordination number of both K and Na is eight. The Li compound also contains chains that have .m. symmetry and are bound together into a three-dimensional framework. The coordination polyhedron of the Li atom is a square pyramid with Li lying in its base. This square pyramidal coordination leads to its high reactivity with moisture to give Li[B(C2O4)2]H2O with lithium in six coordination.

  13. Salt or cocrystal of salt? Probing the nature of multicomponent crystal forms with infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Cameron Capeletti; Guimarães, Freddy Fernandes; Ribeiro, Leandro; Martins, Felipe Terra

    2016-10-01

    The recognition of the nature of a multicomponent crystal form (solvate, salt, cocrystal or cocrystal of salt) is of great importance for pharmaceutical industry because it is directly related to the performance of a pharmaceutical ingredient, since there is interdependence between the structure, its energy and its physical properties. In this context, here we have identified the nature of multicomponent crystal forms of the anti-HIV drug lamivudine with mandelic acid through infrared spectroscopy. These investigated crystal forms were the known S-mandelic acid cocrystal of lamivudine R-mandelate trihydrate (1), a cocrystal of salt, and lamivudine R-mandelate (2), a salt. This approach also supports the identification and distinction of both ionized and unionized forms of mandelic acid in the infrared spectrum of 1. In this way, infrared spectroscopy can be useful to distinguish a cocrystal of salt from either salt or cocrystal forms. In the course of this study, for the first time we have also characterized and determined the crystal structure of R-mandelic acid cocrystal of sodium R-mandelate (3).

  14. Novel dual-salts electrolyte solution for dendrite-free lithium-metal based rechargeable batteries with high cycle reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Rongrong; Yang, Jun; Feng, Xuejiao; Jia, Hao; Wang, Jiulin; Nuli, Yanna

    2014-12-01

    Metallic lithium is the most promising negative electrode for high energy rechargeable batteries due to its extremely high specific capacity and the lowest redox potential. However, the low cycle efficiency and lithium dendrite formation during charge/discharge processes consistently hinder its practical application. Here a new dual-salts electrolyte composed of Li[N(SO2F)2] and Li[N(SO2CF3)2] has been explored to simultaneously cope with these two problems. Under the unique protection of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film formed in this electrolyte solution and the improvement in Li crystal growth pattern, high cycle efficiency of ca. 99% and dendrite-free Li deposit have been achieved. Moreover, the excellent cycling performance and favorable lithium morphology can be retained even at high current density of 10 mA cm-2. This study will greatly promote the development of Li-metal rechargeable batteries with high power and high energy density.

  15. CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Kerry L; Mellegard, Kirby D; Callahan, Gary D; Goodman, William M

    2005-06-01

    This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

  16. Compatibility of Lithium Salts with Solvent of the Non-Aqueous Electrolyte in Li–O2 Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Peng; Lu, Jun; Lau, Kah Chun; Luo, Xiangyi; Bareno, Javier; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Curtiss, Larry A.; Sun, Yang-Kook; Amine, Khalil

    2013-02-20

    The stability of lithium salts, especially in the presence of reduced oxygen species, O2 and H2 O (even in a small amount), plays an important role in the cyclability and capacity of Li–O2 cells. This combined experimental and computational study provides evidence that the stability of the electrolyte used in Li–O2 cells strongly depends on the compatibility of lithium salts with solvent. In the case of the LiPF6-1NM3 electrolyte, the decomposition of LiPF6 occurs in the cell as evidenced by in situ XRD, FT-IR and XPS analysis, which triggers the decomposition of 1NM3 solvent due to formation of HF from the decomposition of LiPF6. These reactions lead to degradation of the electrolyte and cause poor cyclability of the cell. The same reactions are not observed when LiTFSI and LiCF3SO3 are used as the lithium salts in 1NM3 solvent, or LiPF6 is used in TEGDME solvent.

  17. Particle formation above natural and simulated salt lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilli, Katharina; Ofner, Johannes; Sattler, Tobias; Krause, Torsten; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Held, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Western Australia was originally covered by natural eucalyptus forests, but land-use has changed considerably after large scale deforestation from 1950 to 1970. Thus, the ground-water level rose and brought dissolved salts and minerals to the surface. Nowadays, Western Australia is known for a great plenty of salt lakes with pH levels reaching from 2.5 to 7.1. The land is mainly used for wheat farming and livestock and becomes drier due to the lack of rain periods. One possible reason could be the formation of ultrafine particles from salt lakes, which increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei and thus potentially suppresses precipitation. Several field campaigns have been conducted between 2006 and 2011 with car-based and airborne measurements, where new particle formation has been observed and has been related to the Western Australian salt lakes (Junkermann et al., 2009). To identify particle formation directly above the salt lakes, a 1.5 m³ Teflon chamber was set up above several lakes in 2012. Inside the chamber, photochemistry may take place whereas mixing through wind or advection of already existing particles is prevented. Salt lakes with a low pH level lead to strongly increased aerosol formation. As salt lakes have been identified as a source for reactive halogen species (RHS; Buxmann et al., 2012) and RHS seem to interact with precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), they could be producers of halogen induced secondary organic aerosol (XOA) (Ofner et al., 2012). As reference experiments, laboratory based aerosol smog-chamber runs were performed to examine XOA formation under atmospheric conditions using simulated sunlight and the chemical composition of a chosen salt lake. After adding α-pinene to the simulated salt lake, a strong nucleation event began in the absence of ozone comparable to the observed events in Western Australia. First results from the laboratory based aerosol smog-chamber experiments indicate a halogen-induced aerosol

  18. Lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate and LiBF4 blend salts electrolyte for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongming; Xiao, Kaiwen; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate (LiODFB) and LiBF4 blend salts in ethylene carbonate + dimethyl carbonate + ethyl(methyl) carbonate (EC + DMC + EMC, 1:1:1, by wt.) have been investigated for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode in lithium-ion batteries. The electric conductivity tests are utilized to examine the relationship among solution conductivity, the electrolyte composition and temperature. Through cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge test and AC impedance measurements, we compare the capacity and cycling efficiency of LNMO cathode in different electrolyte systems at different temperatures and discharge current rates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are served to analyze the surface nature of LNMO cathode after cycles at elevated temperature. These results demonstrate that LNMO cathode can exert excellent electrochemical performance with the increase of LiODFB concentration at room temperature and elevated temperature and it is found that just slight LiBF4, mixed with LiODFB as blend salts, can strikingly improve the cyclability at -20 °C, especially in high-rate cycling. Grouped together, the optimum LiODFB/LiBF4 molar ratio is around 4:1, which can present an excellent affinity to LNMO cathode in a wide electrochemical window.

  19. An approach of ionic liquids/lithium salts based microwave irradiation pretreatment followed by ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction for two coumarins preparation from Cortex fraxini.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zaizhi; Gu, Huiyan; Yang, Lei

    2015-10-23

    Ionic liquids/lithium salts solvent system was successfully introduced into the separation technique for the preparation of two coumarins (aesculin and aesculetin) from Cortex fraxini. Ionic liquids/lithium salts based microwave irradiation pretreatment followed by ultrasound-microwave synergy extraction (ILSMP-UMSE) procedure was developed and optimized for the sufficient extraction of these two analytes. Several variables which can potentially influence the extraction yields, including pretreatment time and temperature, [C4mim]Br concentration, LiAc content, ultrasound-microwave synergy extraction (UMSE) time, liquid-solid ratio, and UMSE power were optimized by Plackett-Burman design. Among seven variables, UMSE time, liquid-solid ratio, and UMSE power were the statistically significant variables and these three factors were further optimized by Box-Behnken design to predict optimal extraction conditions and find out operability ranges with maximum extraction yields. Under optimum operating conditions, ILSMP-UMSE showed higher extraction yields of two target compounds than those obtained by reference extraction solvents. Method validation studies also evidenced that ILSMP-UMSE is credible for the preparation of two coumarins from Cortex fraxini. This study is indicative of the proposed procedure that has huge application prospects for the preparation of natural products from plant materials. PMID:26411478

  20. Analysis of secondary cells with lithium anodes and immobilized fused-salt electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Rogers, G. L.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Secondary cells with liquid lithium anodes, liquid bismuth or tellurium cathodes, and fused lithium halide electrolytes immobilized as rigid pastes operate between 380 and 485 degrees. Applications include power sources in space, military vehicle propulsion and special commercial vehicle propulsion.

  1. Novel benzimidazole salts for lithium ion battery electrolytes: effects of substituents.

    PubMed

    Sriana, T; Leggesse, E G; Jiang, J C

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we report on our effort to design a novel lithium salt derived from bis(trifluoroborane)benzimidazolide by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The effects of different substituents are investigated with respect to ion pair dissociation energies and intrinsic anion oxidation potential of the molecules. Based on our calculations, we have found that ion pair dissociation energies and intrinsic anion oxidation potentials of the anions are mainly affected by the position and the type of substituents introduced into the parent structure. Compared to -CH3, substitution at the C2 position of the parent bis(trifluoroborane)benzimidazole (BTB(-)) by -CF3 results in an increase in anion oxidation stability. However, we observed a negligible change in the intrinsic anion oxidation potential as the length of the fluoroalkyl group increased to -C2F5. The most promising anions are generated by considering double-substitution at C2 and C5 positions. Among the possible anions, bis(trifluoroborane)-5-nitro-2-(trifluoromethyl) benzimidazolide (BTNTB(-)), with the calculated intrinsic anion oxidation potential of 5.50 V vs. Li(+)/Li, can be considered as a potential candidate for high voltage Li-ion batteries.

  2. Crystal structure of a lithium salt of a glucosyl derivative of lithocholic acid.

    PubMed

    Gubitosi, Marta; Meijide, Francisco; D'Annibale, Andrea; Vázquez Tato, José; Jover, Aida; Galantini, Luciano; Travaglini, Leana; di Gregorio, Maria Chiara; Pavel, Nicolae V

    2016-09-01

    The crystal structure of a Li(+) salt of a glucosyl derivative of lithocholic acid (lithium 3α-(α-d-glucopyranosyl)-5β-cholan-24-oate) has been solved. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system, P212121 spatial group, and includes acetone and water in the structure with a 1:1:2 stoichiometry. Monolayers, having a hydrophobic interior and hydrophilic edges, are recognized in the crystal structure. Li(+) is coordinated to three hydroxyl groups of three different glucose residues, with two of them belonging to the same monolayer. A fourth molecule, located in this monolayer, is involved in the coordination of the cation through the carboxylate ion by an electrostatic interaction, thus completing a distorted tetrahedron. All Li(+)-oxygen distances values are very close to the sum of the ionic radius of Li(+) and van der Waals radius of oxygen. Each steroid molecule is linked to other five steroid molecules through hydrogen bonds. Water and acetone are also involved in the hydrogen bond network. A hierarchical organization can be recognized in the crystal, the helical assembly along 21 screw axes being left-handed. PMID:27394960

  3. Novel benzimidazole salts for lithium ion battery electrolytes: effects of substituents.

    PubMed

    Sriana, T; Leggesse, E G; Jiang, J C

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we report on our effort to design a novel lithium salt derived from bis(trifluoroborane)benzimidazolide by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The effects of different substituents are investigated with respect to ion pair dissociation energies and intrinsic anion oxidation potential of the molecules. Based on our calculations, we have found that ion pair dissociation energies and intrinsic anion oxidation potentials of the anions are mainly affected by the position and the type of substituents introduced into the parent structure. Compared to -CH3, substitution at the C2 position of the parent bis(trifluoroborane)benzimidazole (BTB(-)) by -CF3 results in an increase in anion oxidation stability. However, we observed a negligible change in the intrinsic anion oxidation potential as the length of the fluoroalkyl group increased to -C2F5. The most promising anions are generated by considering double-substitution at C2 and C5 positions. Among the possible anions, bis(trifluoroborane)-5-nitro-2-(trifluoromethyl) benzimidazolide (BTNTB(-)), with the calculated intrinsic anion oxidation potential of 5.50 V vs. Li(+)/Li, can be considered as a potential candidate for high voltage Li-ion batteries. PMID:26051990

  4. Lithium

    MedlinePlus

    ... depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). Lithium is in a class of medications called antimanic agents. It works by decreasing abnormal activity in the brain.

  5. Structural and aggregate analyses of (Li salt + glyme) mixtures: the complex nature of solvate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Karina; Freitas, Adilson A; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G; FitzGerald, Paul A; Doi, Hiroyuki; Saito, Soshi; Ueno, Kazuhide; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Canongia Lopes, José N

    2015-09-14

    The structure and interactions of different (Li salt + glyme) mixtures, namely equimolar mixtures of lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, nitrate or trifluoroacetate salts combined with either triglyme or tetraglyme molecules, are probed using Molecular Dynamics simulations. structure factor functions, calculated from the MD trajectories, confirmed the presence of different amounts of lithium-glyme solvates in the aforementioned systems. The MD results are corroborated by S(q) functions derived from diffraction and scattering data (HEXRD and SAXS/WAXS). The competition between the glyme molecules and the salt anions for the coordination to the lithium cations is quantified by comprehensive aggregate analyses. Lithium-glyme solvates are dominant in the lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide systems and much less so in systems based on the other two salts. The aggregation studies also emphasize the existence of complex coordination patterns between the different species (cations, anions, glyme molecules) present in the studied fluid media. The analysis of such complex behavior is extended to the conformational landscape of the anions and glyme molecules and to the dynamics (solvate diffusion) of the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide plus triglyme system.

  6. Structural and aggregate analyses of (Li salt + glyme) mixtures: the complex nature of solvate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Karina; Freitas, Adilson A; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G; FitzGerald, Paul A; Doi, Hiroyuki; Saito, Soshi; Ueno, Kazuhide; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Canongia Lopes, José N

    2015-09-14

    The structure and interactions of different (Li salt + glyme) mixtures, namely equimolar mixtures of lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, nitrate or trifluoroacetate salts combined with either triglyme or tetraglyme molecules, are probed using Molecular Dynamics simulations. structure factor functions, calculated from the MD trajectories, confirmed the presence of different amounts of lithium-glyme solvates in the aforementioned systems. The MD results are corroborated by S(q) functions derived from diffraction and scattering data (HEXRD and SAXS/WAXS). The competition between the glyme molecules and the salt anions for the coordination to the lithium cations is quantified by comprehensive aggregate analyses. Lithium-glyme solvates are dominant in the lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide systems and much less so in systems based on the other two salts. The aggregation studies also emphasize the existence of complex coordination patterns between the different species (cations, anions, glyme molecules) present in the studied fluid media. The analysis of such complex behavior is extended to the conformational landscape of the anions and glyme molecules and to the dynamics (solvate diffusion) of the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide plus triglyme system. PMID:26245295

  7. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector

    2015-04-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  8. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector

    2015-04-29

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  9. Electrical Conductivity Study of Polymer Electrolyte Magnetic Nanocomposite Based Poly(Vinyl) Alcohol (PVA) Doping Lithium and Nickel Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, Mahardika Prasetya; Rahmawati, Silvia, Bijaksana, Satria; Khairurrijal, Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2010-10-01

    Composite polymer electrolyte magnetic systems composed of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) as the host polymer, lithium and nickel salt as dopant were studied. The effect upon addition of lithium ions in polimer PVA had been enhanced conductivity with the increase of lithium concentration. The conductivity values were 1.19x10-6, 1.25x10-5, 4.89x-5, 1.88x10-4, and 1.33x10-3 Sṡcm-1 for pure PVA and 1%, 3%, 5% and 7% LiOH complexed PVA, respectively. Meanwhile, the addition nickel salt into polymer electrolyte PVA-LiOH does not significantly change of conductivity value, on order 10-3 Sṡcm-1. The ionic transport is dominantly regarded by Li+ ions present in polymer electrolyte magnetic because the atomic mass Li+ is smaller than Ni2+. The absence of external magnetic field in polimer electrolyte magnetic causes the existence Ni2+ ions not significantly affected of conductivity.

  10. Determination of the electrochemical performance and stability of the lithium-salt, lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl) imidazolide, with various anodes in Li-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillet, Sabrina; Schmidt, Gregory; Ladouceur, Sébastien; Fréchette, Joël; Barray, Francis; Clément, Daniel; Hovington, Pierre; Guerfi, Abdelbast; Vijh, Ashok; Cayrefourcq, Ian; Zaghib, Karim

    2015-12-01

    The electrochemical performance and stability of lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl) imidazolide (LiTDI), which is a promising lithium salt for electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries, are discussed. The power capability of LiTDI in EC/DEC (3/7 v/v) in half cells was evaluated with standard anodes used in the lithium-ion battery industry: graphite and Li4Ti5O12 (LTO). The effects of two additives, vinylene carbonate (VC) and fluoro-ethylene carbonate (FEC), were investigated (2% weight in EC/DEC) and compared with a reference electrolyte, 1 M LiPF6 (EC/DEC + 2%VC). LiTDI forms a thin SEI with FEC that is uniformly deposited on graphite, which allows high power capability with 93.9% of the specific capacity at 10C (92.3% for 1 M LiPF6 + 2%VC). Excellent results were also obtained for LiTDI with LTO, 91.1% of the specific capacity was recovered at 10C vs. 91.5% for LiPF6. The stability of LiTDI was evaluated in pouch-cells: LFP/LTO (1C-rate) and NMC/LTO (C/4-rate). The results show that the performance of LiTDI is comparable to that of LiPF6, 85.4% of the capacity was recovered after 900 cycles (87.6% for LiPF6) for LFP/LTO, and 85.8% of capacity was obtained after 450 cycles (86.3% for LiPF6) for NMC/LTO.

  11. Synthesis of rock-salt type lithium borohydride and its peculiar Li+ ion conduction properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, R.; Maekawa, H.; Takamura, H.

    2014-05-01

    The high energy density and excellent cycle performance of lithium ion batteries makes them superior to all other secondary batteries and explains why they are widely used in portable devices. However, because organic liquid electrolytes have a higher operating voltage than aqueous solution, they are used in lithium ion batteries. This comes with the risk of fire due to their flammability. Solid electrolytes are being investigated to find an alternative to organic liquid. However, the nature of the solid-solid point contact at the interface between the electrolyte and electrode or between the electrolyte grains is such that high power density has proven difficult to attain. We develop a new method for the fabrication of a solid electrolyte using LiBH4, known for its super Li+ ion conduction without any grain boundary contribution. The modifications to the conduction pathway achieved by stabilizing the high pressure form of this material provided a new structure with some LiBH4, more suitable to the high rate condition. We synthesized the H.P. form of LiBH4 under ambient pressure by doping LiBH4 with the KI lattice by sintering. The formation of a KI - LiBH4 solid solution was confirmed both macroscopically and microscopically. The obtained sample was shown to be a pure Li+ conductor despite its small Li+ content. This conduction mechanism, where the light doping cation played a major role in ion conduction, was termed the "Parasitic Conduction Mechanism." This mechanism made it possible to synthesize a new ion conductor and is expected to have enormous potential in the search for new battery materials.

  12. Mechanism of dissolution of a lithium salt in an electrolytic solvent in a lithium ion secondary battery: a direct ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) study.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2014-06-01

    The mechanism of dissolution of the Li(+) ion in an electrolytic solvent is investigated by the direct ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method. Lithium fluoroborate (Li(+)BF4(-)) and ethylene carbonate (EC) are examined as the origin of the Li(+) ion and the solvent molecule, respectively. This salt is widely utilized as the electrolyte in the lithium ion secondary battery. The binding of EC to the Li(+) moiety of the Li(+)BF4(-) salt is exothermic, and the binding energies at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level for n=1, 2, 3, and 4, where n is the number of EC molecules binding to the Li(+) ion, (EC)n(Li(+)BF4(-)), are calculated to be 91.5, 89.8, 87.2, and 84.0 kcal mol(-1) (per EC molecule), respectively. The intermolecular distances between Li(+) and the F atom of BF4(-) are elongated: 1.773 Å (n=0), 1.820 Å (n=1), 1.974 Å (n=2), 1.942 Å (n=3), and 4.156 Å (n=4). The atomic bond populations between Li(+) and the F atom for n=0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 are 0.202, 0.186, 0.150, 0.038, and 0.0, respectively. These results indicate that the interaction of Li(+) with BF4(-) becomes weaker as the number of EC molecules is increased. The direct AIMD calculation for n=4 shows that EC reacts spontaneously with (EC)3(Li(+)BF4(-)) and the Li(+) ion is stripped from the salt. The following substitution reaction takes place: EC+(EC)3(Li(+)BF4(-))→(EC)4Li(+)-(BF4(-)). The reaction mechanism is discussed on the basis of the theoretical results. PMID:24616076

  13. Investigation of the Decomposition Mechanism of Lithium Bis(oxalate)borate (LiBOB) Salt in the Electrolyte of an Aprotic Li–O2 Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Kah Chun; Lu, Jun; Low, John; Peng, Du; Wu, Huiming; Albishri, Hassan M.; Al-Hady, D. Abd; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-13

    The stability of the lithium bis(oxalate) borate (LiBOB) salt against lithium peroxide (Li2O2) formation in an aprotic Li–O2 (Li–air) battery is investigated. From theoretical and experimental findings, we find that the chemical decomposition of LiBOB in electrolytes leads to the formation lithium oxalate during the discharge of a Li–O2 cell. According to density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the formation of lithium oxalate as the reaction product is exothermic and therefore is thermodynamically feasible. This reaction seems to be independent of solvents used in the Li–O2 cell, and therefore LiBOB is probably not suitable to be used as the salt in Li–O2 cell electrolytes.

  14. Synthesis of Ultrathin Si Nanosheets from Natural Clays for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jaegeon; Hong, Dongki; Choi, Sinho; Park, Soojin

    2016-02-23

    Two-dimensional Si nanosheets have been studied as a promising candidate for lithium-ion battery anode materials. However, Si nanosheets reported so far showed poor cycling performances and required further improvements. In this work, we utilize inexpensive natural clays for preparing high quality Si nanosheets via a one-step simultaneous molten salt-induced exfoliation and chemical reduction process. This approach produces high purity mesoporous Si nanosheets in high yield. As a control experiment, two-step process (pre-exfoliated silicate sheets and subsequent chemical reduction) cannot sustain their original two-dimensional structure. In contrast, one-step method results in a production of 5 nm-thick highly porous Si nanosheets. Carbon-coated Si nanosheet anodes exhibit a high reversible capacity of 865 mAh g(-1) at 1.0 A g(-1) with an outstanding capacity retention of 92.3% after 500 cycles. It also delivers high rate capability, corresponding to a capacity of 60% at 20 A g(-1) compared to that of 2.0 A g(-1). Furthermore, the Si nanosheet electrodes show volume expansion of only 42% after 200 cycles.

  15. Electrochemical performance of lithium-sulfur batteries based on a sulfur cathode obtained by H2S gas treatment of a lithium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Carina B.; Jha, Himendra; Eberle, Anna-Marietta; Gasteiger, Hubert A.; Fässler, Thomas F.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique to produce Li2S/C composites and Li2S cathodes as well as their application in high-capacity Li-S batteries is demonstrated. The simple but effective method converts an easy-to-handle lithium salt-containing composite or electrode to Li2S using H2S. The main advantage is that the conversion to Li2S can be performed towards the final stage of the electrode preparation process, which significantly reduces the need of controlled atmosphere otherwise required for Li2S handling. LiOH is used to demonstrate the technique, and such fabricated Li2S electrode is successfully used in a Li-S battery (half-cell) where it shows discharge capacities of up to 770 mAh g-1(Li2S) and retained >410 mAh g-1(Li2S) after 100 cycles at C/5.

  16. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    Because of lithium’s possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. We predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiDβ , β =0.25 , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid-solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. We also observe formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.

  17. Physicochemical and electrochemical properties of N-methyl-N-methoxymethylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide and its lithium salt composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shunsuke; Yoshizawa-Fujita, Masahiro; Takeoka, Yuko; Rikukawa, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    The ionic liquid (IL) N-Methyl-N-methoxymethylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide ([Pyr1,1O1][FSA]) was synthesized, and its physicochemical and electrochemical properties were investigated with respect to its application as an electrolyte in lithium-ion secondary batteries operating over a wide temperature range. [Pyr1,1O1][FSA]/Li salt (0.34 mol kg-1) composites were prepared by adding lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (LiTFSA) into the IL. [Pyr1,1O1][FSA] and [Pyr1,1O1][FSA]/LiTFSA exhibited melting temperatures (Tm) below -30 °C. [Pyr1,1O1][FSA] exhibited a higher ionic conductivity value as compared with that of the corresponding IL with only alkyl substituents. The electrochemical window for both [Pyr1,1O1][FSA] and [Pyr1,1O1][FSA]/LiTFSA was 5.1 V. Stable lithium deposition and dissolution occurred on a Ni electrode at 25 °C.

  18. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  19. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  20. 76 FR 28074 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT... inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake... remains was made by the Utah Museum of Natural History professional staff......

  1. STORAGE OF CHILLED NATURAL GAS IN BEDDED SALT STORAGE CAVERNS

    SciTech Connect

    JOel D. Dieland; Kirby D. Mellegard

    2001-11-01

    This report provides the results of a two-phase study that examines the economic and technical feasibility of converting a conventional natural gas storage facility in bedded salt into a refrigerated natural gas storage facility for the purpose of increasing the working gas capacity of the facility. The conceptual design used to evaluate this conversion is based on the design that was developed for the planned Avoca facility in Steuben County, New York. By decreasing the cavern storage temperature from 43 C to -29 C (110 F to -20 F), the working gas capacity of the facility can be increased by about 70 percent (from 1.2 x 10{sup 8} Nm{sup 3} or 4.4 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 2.0 x 10{sup 8} Nm{sup 3} or 7.5 Bcf) while maintaining the original design minimum and maximum cavern pressures. In Phase I of the study, laboratory tests were conducted to determine the thermal conductivity of salt at low temperatures. Finite element heat transfer calculations were then made to determine the refrigeration loads required to maintain the caverns at a temperature of -29 C (-20 F). This was followed by a preliminary equipment design and a cost analysis for the converted facility. The capital cost of additional equipment and its installation required for refrigerated storage is estimated to be about $13,310,000 or $160 per thousand Nm{sup 3} ($4.29 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf)) of additional working gas capacity. The additional operating costs include maintenance refrigeration costs to maintain the cavern at -29 C (-20 F) and processing costs to condition the gas during injection and withdrawal. The maintenance refrigeration cost, based on the current energy cost of about $13.65 per megawatt-hour (MW-hr) ($4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu)), is expected to be about $316,000 after the first year and to decrease as the rock surrounding the cavern is cooled. After 10 years, the cost of maintenance refrigeration based on the $13.65 per MW-hr ($4 per MMBtu) energy cost is

  2. Discerning the Impact of a Lithium Salt Additive in Thin-Film Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bastatas, Lyndon D; Lin, Kuo-Yao; Moore, Matthew D; Suhr, Kristin J; Bowler, Melanie H; Shen, Yulong; Holliday, Bradley J; Slinker, Jason D

    2016-09-20

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEECs) from small molecules, such as iridium complexes, have great potential as low-cost emissive devices. In these devices, ions rearrange during operation to facilitate carrier injection, bringing about efficient operation from simple, single-layer devices. Prior work has shown that the luminance, efficiency, and responsiveness of iridium LEECs is greatly enhanced by the inclusion of small fractions of lithium salts, but much remains to be understood about the origin of this enhancement. Recent work with planar devices demonstrates that lithium additives in iridium LEECs enhance double-layer formation. However, the quantitative influence of lithium salts on the underlying physics of conventional thin-film, sandwich structure LEECs, which beneficially operate at low voltages and generate higher luminance, has yet to be clarified. Here, we use electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to discern the impact of the lithium salt concentration on double-layer formation within the device and draw correlations with performance metrics, such as current, luminance, and external quantum efficiency.

  3. "Water-in-salt" electrolyte enables high-voltage aqueous lithium-ion chemistries.

    PubMed

    Suo, Liumin; Borodin, Oleg; Gao, Tao; Olguin, Marco; Ho, Janet; Fan, Xiulin; Luo, Chao; Wang, Chunsheng; Xu, Kang

    2015-11-20

    Lithium-ion batteries raise safety, environmental, and cost concerns, which mostly arise from their nonaqueous electrolytes. The use of aqueous alternatives is limited by their narrow electrochemical stability window (1.23 volts), which sets an intrinsic limit on the practical voltage and energy output. We report a highly concentrated aqueous electrolyte whose window was expanded to ~3.0 volts with the formation of an electrode-electrolyte interphase. A full lithium-ion battery of 2.3 volts using such an aqueous electrolyte was demonstrated to cycle up to 1000 times, with nearly 100% coulombic efficiency at both low (0.15 coulomb) and high (4.5 coulombs) discharge and charge rates.

  4. Solvation of the fluorine containing anions and their lithium salts in propylene carbonate and dimethoxyethane.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    Electrolyte solutions based on the propylene carbonate (PC)-dimethoxyethane (DME) mixtures are of significant importance and urgency due to emergence of lithium-ion batteries. Solvation and coordination of the lithium cation in these systems have been recently attended in detail. However, analogous information concerning anions (tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate) is still missed. This work reports PM7-MD simulations (electronic-structure level of description) to include finite-temperature effects on the anion solvation regularities in the PC-DME mixture. The reported result evidences that the anions appear weakly solvated. This observation is linked to the absence of suitable coordination sites in the solvent molecules. In the concentrated electrolyte solutions, both BF4(-) and PF6(-) prefer to exist as neutral ion pairs (LiBF4, LiPF6). PMID:26067106

  5. Polymer electrolytes with multiple conductive channels prepared from NBR/SBR latex films impregnated with lithium salt and plasticizer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro

    1995-09-01

    Polymer electrolytes, composed of a polar polymer acting as a host matrix for lithium-salt solutions, have high ionic conductivity and have been studied for application in advanced electronic devices such as the rechargeable lithium battery. Polymer electrolytes with high ionic conductivity (> 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm) and good tensile strength were prepared by swelling poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) (NBR)/poly(styrene-co-butadiene) (SBR)/LiClO{sub 4} latex films with {gamma}-butyrolactone ({gamma}-BL) or LiClO{sub 4}/{gamma}-BL plasticizer. Before swelling, the LiClO{sub 4} phase is formed at the particle interface. After politicization, two ion-conductive channels are present: the LiClO{sub 4} phase is present at the interface of the latex particles, and the NBR phase is formed from NBR latex particles. These regions are polar and impregnated selectively with polar {gamma}-BL solvent or LiClO{sub 4}/{gamma}-BL solution, building primary and secondary ion-conductive channels, respectively. The SBR phase (formed from SBR latex particles) is nonpolar and not impregnated, providing a mechanically supportive matrix. High ionic conductivity on the order of 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm is achieved when NBR/SBR(50/50)/LiClO{sub 4} latex film was saturated on 0.2 to 0.4M LiClO{sub 4}/{gamma}-BL solutions. Various microscopic and macroscopic analyses suggest that two types of ion-conductive channels exist in the polymer electrolyte film.

  6. Advanced Surface and Microstructural Characterization of Natural Graphite Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Meyer III, Harry M; Howe, Jane Y; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Payzant, E Andrew; Lance, Michael J; Yoon, Steve; Denlinger, Matthew; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    Natural graphite powders were subjected to a series of thermal treatments in order to improve the anode irreversible capacity loss (ICL) and capacity retention during long-term cycling of lithium ion batteries. A baseline thermal treatment in inert Ar or N2 atmosphere was compared to cases with a proprietary additive to the furnace gas environment. This additive substantially altered the surface chemistry of the natural graphite powders and resulted in significantly improved long-term cycling performance of the lithium ion batteries over the commercial natural graphite baseline. Different heat-treatment temperatures were investigated ranging from 950-2900 C with the intent of achieving the desired long-term cycling performance with as low of a maximum temperature and thermal budget as possible. A detailed summary of the characterization data is also presented, which includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS). This characterization data was correlated to the observed capacity fade improvements over the course of long-term cycling at high charge-discharge rates in full lithium-ion coin cells. It is believed that the long-term performance improvements are a result of forming a more stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the anode graphite surfaces, which is directly related to the surface chemistry modifications imparted by the proprietary gas environment during thermal treatment.

  7. Dissecting the genetic control of natural variation in salt tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    PubMed Central

    Katori, Taku; Ikeda, Akiro; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Maehashi, Kenji; Sakata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Shigeo; Taji, Teruaki

    2010-01-01

    Many accessions (ecotypes) of Arabidopsis have been collected. Although few differences exist among their nucleotide sequences, these subtle differences induce large genetic variation in phenotypic traits such as stress tolerance and flowering time. To understand the natural variability in salt tolerance, large-scale soil pot experiments were performed to evaluate salt tolerance among 350 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. The evaluation revealed a wide variation in the salt tolerance among accessions. Several accessions, including Bu-5, Bur-0, Ll-1, Wl-0, and Zu-0, exhibited marked stress tolerance compared with a salt-sensitive experimental accession, Col-0. The salt-tolerant accessions were also evaluated by agar plate assays. The data obtained by the large-scale assay correlated well with the results of a salt acclimation (SA) assay, in which plants were transferred to high-salinity medium following placement on moderate-salinity medium for 7 d. Genetic analyses indicated that the salt tolerance without SA is a quantitative trait under polygenic control, whereas salt tolerance with SA is regulated by a single gene located on chromosome 5 that is common among the markedly salt-tolerant accessions. These results provide important information for understanding the mechanisms underlying natural variation of salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:20080827

  8. Long-term response to lithium salts in bipolar illness is influenced by the glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta -50 T/C SNP.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Serretti, Alessandro; Pontiggia, Adriana; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Lorenzi, Cristina; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2005-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms driving the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus may play a role in mood disorders. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (-50 T/C) falling into the effective promoter region (nt -171 to +29) of the gene coding for glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3-beta) has been linked with different age at onset of bipolar illness and with different antidepressant effects of total sleep deprivation. GSK3-beta codes for an enzyme which is a target for the action of lithium and possibly of valproic acid. We studied the effect of this polymorphism on the therapeutic response to lithium salts of 88 bipolar type I patients. Data about recurrence rate of mood episodes were collected for at least 2 years before lithium and 2 years on lithium. Results showed that homozygotes for the wild variant did not change their recurrence index while carriers of the mutant allele improved, thus supporting the hypothesis that GSK is a target for the therapeutic action of lithium. Results warrant interest for the variants of genes pertaining to the molecular clock as possible endophenotypes of bipolar disorder, but caution ought to be taken in interpreting these preliminary results and future replication studies must be awaited because of the low frequency of the GSK3-beta*C/C genotype in the studied populations.

  9. Rock-salt-type lithium metal sulphides as novel positive-electrode materials

    PubMed Central

    Sakuda, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Tomonari; Okamura, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Hironori; Sakaebe, Hikari; Tatsumi, Kuniaki; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2014-01-01

    One way of increasing the energy density of lithium-ion batteries is to use electrode materials that exhibit high capacities owing to multielectron processes. Here, we report two novel materials, Li2TiS3 and Li3NbS4, which were mechanochemically synthesised at room temperature. When used as positive-electrode materials, Li2TiS3 and Li3NbS4 charged and discharged with high capacities of 425 mA h g−1 and 386 mA h g−1, respectively. These capacities correspond to those resulting from 2.5- and 3.5-electron processes. The average discharge voltage was approximately 2.2 V. It should be possible to prepare a number of high-capacity materials on the basis of the concept used to prepare Li2TiS3 and Li3NbS4. PMID:24811191

  10. Lithium salt of tetrahydroxybenzoquinone: toward the development of a sustainable Li-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Armand, Michel; Courty, Matthieu; Jiang, Meng; Grey, Clare P; Dolhem, Franck; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Poizot, Philippe

    2009-07-01

    The use of lithiated redox organic molecules containing electrochemically active C=O functionalities, such as lithiated oxocarbon salts, is proposed. These represent alternative electrode materials to those used in current Li-ion battery technology that can be synthesized from renewable starting materials. The key material is the tetralithium salt of tetrahydroxybenzoquinone (Li(4)C(6)O(6)), which can be both reduced to Li(2)C(6)O(6) and oxidized to Li(6)C(6)O(6). In addition to being directly synthesized from tetrahydroxybenzoquinone by neutralization at room temperature, we demonstrate that this salt can readily be formed by the thermal disproportionation of Li(2)C(6)O(6) (dilithium rhodizonate phase) under an inert atmosphere. The Li(4)C(6)O(6) compound shows good electrochemical performance vs Li with a sustained reversibility of approximately 200 mAh g(-1) at an average potential of 1.8 V, allowing a Li-ion battery that cycles between Li(2)C(6)O(6) and Li(6)C(6)O(6) to be constructed. PMID:19476355

  11. Modern generation of polymer electrolytes based on lithium conductive imidazole salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzicki, L.; Kasprzyk, M.; Kuziak, K.; Żukowska, G. Z.; Armand, M.; Bukowska, M.; Marcinek, M.; Szczeciński, P.; Wieczorek, W.

    In this paper the application of completely new generation imidazole-derived salts in a model polymer electrolyte is described. As a polymer matrix, two types of liquid low molecular weight PEO analogues e.g. dimethyl ether of poly(ethylene glycol) of 500 g mol -1 average molar mass (PEGDME500) and methyl ether of poly(ethylene glycol) of 350 g mol -1 average molar mass (PEGME350) were used. Room temperature conductivities measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were found to be as high as 10 -3-10 -4 S cm -1 in the 0.1-1 mol dm -3 range of salt concentrations. Li + transference numbers higher than 0.5 were measured and calculated using the Bruce-Vincent method. For a complete electrochemical characterization the interphase resistance stability over time was carefully monitored for a period of 30 days. Structural analysis and interactions between electrolyte components were done by Raman spectroscopy. Fuoss-Kraus semiempirical method was applied for estimation of free ions and ionic agglomerates showing that fraction of ionic agglomerates for salt concentration of 0.1-1 mol dm -3 is much lower than in electrolytes containing LiClO 4 in corresponding concentrations.

  12. The Salts of Mars: A Rich and Ubiquitous Natural Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, Jeff S.

    1998-01-01

    The Viking and Pathfinder Mars landers have shown that martian soil is highly enriched in Cl, S, P, and perhaps Br. which, in all likelihood, occur as salts (chlorides, sulfates, phosphates, and perhaps bromides). Carbonates also may be present Many martian salt minerals are believed to be hydrated. These water-soluble constituents of the soil will offer the first colonists a rich source of many industrial commodities needed to sustain and grow the colony. Being hydrous, martian salts hold a tremendous potential to supply water in regions of Mars where otherwise preferable ice may be absent or difficult to access A caliche-like form of concrete or adobe may be manufactured by the drying of briny mud. Sulfates and phosphates may be used as additives for the manufacture of soil prepared and balanced for agriculture. Sulfates and chlorides offer a raw material for the manufacture of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids. Electrolytic processes applied to magnesium sulfate solution may yield metallic Mg. In short, martian salts will offer colonists abroad industrial base of chemical substances potentially useful in development of indigenous construction, chemical, and agricultural industries. Best of all, such salty dust deposits are among the most widespread and chemically uniform (i.e., dependable) raw materials on Mars. A simple method of preprocessing martian soil to extract and isolate the major salt consituents and to obtain water will be presented, as will a more thorough presentation of possible industrial uses of these materials in a Mars base.

  13. Dynamics and relaxation of charge carriers in poly(methylmethacrylate)-lithium salt based polymer electrolytes plasticized with ethylene carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, P.; Ghosh, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we have studied the dynamics and relaxation of charge carriers in poly(methylmethacrylate)-lithium salt based polymer electrolytes plasticized with ethylene carbonate. Structural and thermal properties have been examined using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. We have analyzed the complex conductivity spectra by using power law model coupled with the contribution of electrode polarization at low frequencies and high temperatures. The temperature dependence of the ionic conductivity and crossover frequency exhibits Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher type behavior indicating a strong coupling between the ionic and the polymer chain segmental motions. The scaling of the ac conductivity indicates that relaxation dynamics of charge carriers follows a common mechanism for all temperatures and ethylene carbonate concentrations. The analysis of the ac conductivity also shows the existence of a nearly constant loss in these polymer electrolytes at low temperatures and high frequencies. The fraction of free anions and ion pairs in polymer electrolyte have been obtained from the analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectra. It is observed that these quantities influence the behavior of the composition dependence of the ionic conductivity.

  14. Oxidative-stability enhancement and charge transport mechanism in glyme-lithium salt equimolar complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Nakamura, Megumi; Kazue, Yuichi; Tachikawa, Naoki; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2011-08-24

    The oxidative stability of glyme molecules is enhanced by the complex formation with alkali metal cations. Clear liquid can be obtained by simply mixing glyme (triglyme or tetraglyme) with lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (Li[TFSA]) in a molar ratio of 1:1. The equimolar complex [Li(triglyme or tetraglyme)(1)][TFSA] maintains a stable liquid state over a wide temperature range and can be regarded as a room-temperature ionic liquid consisting of a [Li(glyme)(1)](+) complex cation and a [TFSA](-) anion, exhibiting high self-dissociativity (ionicity) at room temperature. The electrochemical oxidation of [Li(glyme)(1)][TFSA] takes place at the electrode potential of ~5 V vs Li/Li(+), while the oxidation of solutions containing excess glyme molecules ([Li(glyme)(x)][TFSA], x > 1) occurs at around 4 V vs Li/Li(+). This enhancement of oxidative stability is due to the donation of lone pairs of ether oxygen atoms to the Li(+) cation, resulting in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level lowering of a glyme molecule, which is confirmed by ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The solvation state of a Li(+) cation and ion conduction mechanism in the [Li(glyme)(x)][TFSA] solutions is elucidated by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electrochemical methods. The experimental results strongly suggest that Li(+) cation conduction in the equimolar complex takes place by the migration of [Li(glyme)(1)](+) cations, whereas the ligand exchange mechanism is overlapped when interfacial electrochemical reactions of [Li(glyme)(1)](+) cations occur. The ligand exchange conduction mode is typically seen in a lithium battery with a configuration of [Li anode|[Li(glyme)(1)][TFSA]|LiCoO(2) cathode] when the discharge reaction of a LiCoO(2) cathode, that is, desolvation of [Li(glyme)(1)](+) and insertion of the resultant Li(+) into the cathode, occurs at the electrode-electrolyte interface. The battery can be operated for more than 200 charge

  15. Intergranular fracture of lithium fluoride-22 percent calcium fluoride hypereutectic salt at 800 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Subramanium V.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Substantial strain-hardening was noted during the initial stages of deformation in constant-velocity compression tests conducted on as-cast samples of the LiF-22 mol pct CaF2 hypereutectic salt at 800 K. The deformed specimens exhibited extensive grain-boundary cracking and cavitation, suggesting that such cracking, in conjunction with interfacial sliding, is important for cavity nucleation at grain boundaries and at the LiF-CaF2 interfaces. Cavity growth and interlinkage occur through the preferential failure of the weaker LiF phase.

  16. Molecular modeling of salt (lithium chloride) effects on the enantioselectivity of diethylzinc addition to benzaldehyde in the presence of chiral beta-amino alcohols.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Rivadeneyra, Martha; Muñoz-Muñiz, Omar; Anaya de Parrodi, Cecilia; Quintero, Leticia; Juaristi, Eusebio

    2003-03-21

    Beta-amino alcohols (S,S,S)-1 and (R,R,S)-1, derived from cyclohexene oxide and containing alpha-phenylethyl auxiliaries, were examined as chiral promoters in the addition of diethylzinc to benzaldehyde. In agreement with literature precedent, the N-alpha-phenylethyl chiral auxiliary had no significant impact on enantioinduction, which is determined by the configuration of the framework's C(OH), with unlike induction. Contrary to some literature reports, stereoinduction by lithium salt derivatives of (S,S,S)-1 and (R,R,S)-1 was lower than that obtained with the free amino alcohol. Remarkable lithium chloride salt effects were observed in the reaction. In particular, an opposite chiral induction was found with (S,S,S)-1-Li(2) as ligand and in the presence of "inert" salt. N-Alkylated derivatives (S,S,S)-3-7 proved to be more efficient ligands, providing higher yields and enantioselectivities in the formation of carbinols (R)- or (S)-2. BP86/DN**//PM3 theoretical calculations proved remarkably successful in reproducing the experimental observations and permitted expansion of Noyori's catalytic cycle [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 6327] to understand the relevant N-substitution and medium salt effects that determine the enantioselection in this catalytic asymmetric reaction.

  17. Ion pairing in aqueous lithium salt solutions with monovalent and divalent counter-anions.

    PubMed

    Pluhařová, Eva; Mason, Philip E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-11-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations of concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl and Li2SO4 were conducted in order to provide molecular insight into recent neutron scattering data. The structures predicted from the molecular dynamics simulations using standard nonpolarizable force fields provided a very poor fit to the experiment; therefore, refinement was needed. The electronic polarizability of the medium was effectively accounted for by implementing the electronic continuum correction, which practically means rescaling the ionic charges. Consistent with previous studies, we found that this approach in each case provided a significantly improved fit to the experimental data, which was further enhanced by slightly adjusting the radius of the lithium ion. The polarization effect was particularly pronounced in the Li2SO4 solution where the ions in the nonpolarizable simulations tended to cluster unphysically. With the above alterations, the employed force field displayed an excellent fit to the neutron scattering data and provided a useful interpretative framework for the experimental measurements. At the same time, the present study underlines the importance of solvent polarization effects in hydration of ions with high charge density.

  18. The Nature of Magnetic Chemically Peculiar Stars Phenomenon and the Origin of Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopka, V. F.; Shavrina, A. V.; Yushchenko, A. V.; Yushchenko, V. A.

    According to the modern theory of the evolution of chemical elements their origin seems understandable for most of the elements, from the lightest up to the heavy ones. For element with atomic number Z=3 (lithium) the situation is following: the physical processes and the possible mechanisms of lithium production in stars of different types and ages remain completely unidentified up to now. This paper is an attempt to explain the observed properties of lithium in the magnetic chemically peculiar (MCP) stars by the existence of a neutron star (NS) companion. It is supposed that MCP stars are binary systems with stable relativistic outflow of charged particles falling on the poles of MCP stars along the magnetic field lines (Gopka et al., 2010). The production of lithium is possible as a result of interaction of highly accelerated charged particle and the photosphere of MCP star. The location of lithium spots on the magnetic poles seems natural. The problem of lithium formation is directly connected to the problem of origin of MCP stars. The assumption of origin of double systems with presupernova is based on the observations of binary population in OB association Sco2 (Brown, 2001) is discussed. The distribution of primordial binary population clearly answers the question about the origin of systems with NS companions. The phenomenon of MCP stars with lithium production can be the key to he understanding of the origin of Li in other stellar objects. It is assumed that the formation of binaries with a primary star at the evolutionary stage of pre-supernova occurs in the areas of star formation due to the ambient matter accretion and the mass exchange between the stars of intermediate mass in binary systems. The explosion of a more massive companion as a type II supernova results in a qualitative change in binary system when a young star is accompanied by a neutron star. Such systems can be a lithium producers. An important aspect of this assumption is a clear

  19. Particle formation above natural and simulated salt lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilli, Katharina A.; Ofner, Johannes; Sattler, Tobias; Krause, Torsten; Held, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Originally, Western Australia was covered with Eucalyptus trees. Large scale deforestation for agricultural purposes led to rising ground water levels and brought dissolved salts and minerals to the surface. Nowadays, Western Australia is known for a great plenty of salt lakes with pH levels reaching from 2.5 to 7.1. The land is mainly used for wheat farming and livestock and becomes drier due to the lack of rain periods. One possible reason could be the formation of ultrafine particles from salt lakes, which increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, and thus potentially suppresses precipitation. Several field campaigns have been conducted between 2006 and 2011 with car-based and airborne measurements, where new particle formation has been observed and has been related to the Western Australian salt lakes (Junkermann et al., 2009). To identify particle formation directly above the salt lakes, a 2.35 m³ PTFE chamber was set up above several lakes in 2012 and 2013. Inside the chamber, photochemistry may take place whereas mixing through wind or advection of already existing particles is prevented. Salt lakes with a low pH level led to strongly increased aerosol formation. Also, the dependence on meteorological conditions has been examined. To obtain chemical information of the newly formed particles, during the chamber experiments also aerosol filter samples have been taken. The analysis of the anions by ion chromatography in 2012 showed an 8 to 17 times higher concentration of Cl- than SO42-, which led to the assumption that particle formation may have been influenced by halogens. As reference experiments, laboratory based aerosol smog-chamber runs were performed to examine halogen induced aerosol formation under atmospheric conditions using simulated sunlight and the simplified chemical composition of a salt lake. The mixture included FeSO4, NaCl and Na2SO4. After adding α-pinene to the simulated salt lake, a strong nucleation event began comparable to

  20. Carbon catalysis of reactions in the lithium SOCl2 and SO2 systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilroy, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    Certain hazards associated with lithium batteries have delayed widespread acceptance of these power sources. The reactivity of ground lithium carbon mixtures was examined. The effect of carbon types on this reactivity was determined. The basic reaction involved mixtures of lithium and carbon with battery electrolyte. The various parameters that influenced this reactivity included: the nature and freshness of the carbon; the freshness, the purity, and the conductive salt of the electrolyte; and the effect of Teflon or moisture.

  1. Salinity tolerance in soybean is modulated by natural variation in GmSALT3.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rongxia; Qu, Yue; Guo, Yong; Yu, Lili; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jinghan; Chen, Jiangang; Ren, Yulong; Liu, Guangyu; Tian, Lei; Jin, Longguo; Liu, Zhangxiong; Hong, Huilong; Chang, Ruzhen; Gilliham, Matthew; Qiu, Lijuan

    2014-12-01

    The identification of genes that improve the salt tolerance of crops is essential for the effective utilization of saline soils for agriculture. Here, we use fine mapping in a soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) population derived from the commercial cultivars Tiefeng 8 and 85-140 to identify GmSALT3 (salt tolerance-associated gene on chromosome 3), a dominant gene associated with limiting the accumulation of sodium ions (Na+) in shoots and a substantial enhancement in salt tolerance in soybean. GmSALT3 encodes a protein from the cation/H+ exchanger family that we localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and which is preferentially expressed in the salt-tolerant parent Tiefeng 8 within root cells associated with phloem and xylem. We identified in the salt-sensitive parent, 85-140, a 3.78-kb copia retrotransposon insertion in exon 3 of Gmsalt3 that truncates the transcript. By sequencing 31 soybean landraces and 22 wild soybean (Glycine soja) a total of nine haplotypes including two salt-tolerant haplotypes and seven salt-sensitive haplotypes were identified. By analysing the distribution of haplotypes among 172 Chinese soybean landraces and 57 wild soybean we found that haplotype 1 (H1, found in Tiefeng 8) was strongly associated with salt tolerance and is likely to be the ancestral allele. Alleles H2-H6, H8 and H9, which do not confer salinity tolerance, were acquired more recently. H1, unlike other alleles, has a wide geographical range including saline areas, which indicates it is maintained when required but its potent stress tolerance can be lost during natural selection and domestication. GmSALT3 is a gene associated with salt tolerance with great potential for soybean improvement.

  2. Lithium in Medicine: Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Mota de Freitas, Duarte; Leverson, Brian D; Goossens, Jesse L

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the mechanism of action of lithium salts from a chemical perspective. A description on how lithium salts are used to treat mental illnesses, in particular bipolar disorder, and other disease states is provided. Emphasis is not placed on the genetics and the psychopharmacology of the ailments for which lithium salts have proven to be beneficial. Rather we highlight the application of chemical methodologies for the characterization of the cellular targets of lithium salts and their distribution in tissues.

  3. Synthesis of rock-salt type lithium borohydride and its peculiar Li{sup +} ion conduction properties

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, R.; Maekawa, H.; Takamura, H.

    2014-05-01

    The high energy density and excellent cycle performance of lithium ion batteries makes them superior to all other secondary batteries and explains why they are widely used in portable devices. However, because organic liquid electrolytes have a higher operating voltage than aqueous solution, they are used in lithium ion batteries. This comes with the risk of fire due to their flammability. Solid electrolytes are being investigated to find an alternative to organic liquid. However, the nature of the solid-solid point contact at the interface between the electrolyte and electrode or between the electrolyte grains is such that high power density has proven difficult to attain. We develop a new method for the fabrication of a solid electrolyte using LiBH{sub 4,} known for its super Li{sup +} ion conduction without any grain boundary contribution. The modifications to the conduction pathway achieved by stabilizing the high pressure form of this material provided a new structure with some LiBH{sub 4}, more suitable to the high rate condition. We synthesized the H.P. form of LiBH{sub 4} under ambient pressure by doping LiBH{sub 4} with the KI lattice by sintering. The formation of a KI - LiBH{sub 4} solid solution was confirmed both macroscopically and microscopically. The obtained sample was shown to be a pure Li{sup +} conductor despite its small Li{sup +} content. This conduction mechanism, where the light doping cation played a major role in ion conduction, was termed the “Parasitic Conduction Mechanism.” This mechanism made it possible to synthesize a new ion conductor and is expected to have enormous potential in the search for new battery materials.

  4. The SALT NORM : a quantitative chemical-mineralogical characterization of natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodine, Marc W.; Jones, Blair F.

    1986-01-01

    The new computer program SNORM calculates the salt norm from the chemical composition of a natural water. The salt norm is the quantitative ideal equilibrium assemblage that would crystallize if the water evaporated to dryness at 25 C and 1 bar pressure under atmospheric partial pressure of CO2. SNORM proportions solute concentrations to achieve charge balance. It quantitatively distributes the 18 acceptable solutes into normative salts that are assigned from 63 possible normative salts to allow only stable associations based on the Gibbs Phase Rule, available free energy values, and observed low-temperature mineral associations. Although most natural water compositions represent multiple solute origins, results from SNORM identify three major categories: meteoric or weathering waters that are characterized by normative alkali-bearing sulfate and carbonate salts: connate marine-like waters that are chloride-rich with a halite-bischofite-carnallite-kieserite-anhydrite association; and diagenetic waters that are frequently of marine origin but yield normative salts, such as Ca-bearing chlorides (antarcticite and tachyhydrite) and sylvite, which suggest solute alteration by secondary mineral reactions. The solute source or reaction process within each of the above categories is commonly indicated by the presence or absence of diagnostic normative salts and their relative abundance in the normative salt assemblage. For example, salt norms: (1) may identify lithologic source; (2) may identify the relative roles of carbonic and sulfuric acid hydrolysis in the evolution of weathering waters; (3) may identify the origin of connate water from normal marine, hypersaline, or evaporite salt resolution processes; and (4) may distinguish between dolomitization and silicate hydrolysis or exchange for the origin of diagenetic waters. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Second hyperpolarizability of the calcium-doped lithium salt of pyridazine Li-H3C4N2 ⋯ Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Suélio; Castro, Marcos A.; Leão, Salviano A.; Fonseca, Tertius L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we report results of coupled cluster calculations for the second hyperpolarizability of the calcium-doped lithium salt of pyridazine (Li-H3C4N2 ⋯ Ca) molecule. In the static limit an unusual value of 4.34 ×106 au was obtained at the CCSD level of calculation. Results obtained for the dc-Kerr effect through SCF, CCS and CCSD methods show that γ (- ω; ω, 0, 0) is strongly dependent of the electron correlation treatment. Dynamic results obtained at the CCSD level are also reported for the IDRI, dc-SHG and THG nonlinear optical processes.

  6. Preparation of nanocrystalline silicon from SiCl4 at 200 °C in molten salt for high-performance anodes for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Han, Ying; Wang, Liangbiao; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2015-03-16

    Crystalline Si nanoparticles are prepared by reduction of SiCl4 with metallic magnesium in the molten salt of AlCl3 at 200 °C in an autoclave. AlCl3 not only acts as molten salt, but also participates in the reaction. The related experiments confirm that metallic Mg reduces AlCl3 to create nascent Al which could immediately reduce SiCl4 to Si, and the by-product MgCl2 would combine with AlCl3 forming complex of MgAl2Cl8. As anode for rechargeable lithium ion batteries, the as-prepared Si delivers the reversible capacity of 3083 mAh g(-1) at 1.2 A g(-1) after 50 cycles, and 1180 mAh g(-1) at 3 A g(-1) over 500 cycles.

  7. Natural sisal fibers derived hierarchical porous activated carbon as capacitive material in lithium ion capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhewei; Guo, Huajun; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Yan, Zhiliang; Wang, Yansen

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is a novel advanced electrochemical energy storage (EES) system bridging gap between lithium ion battery (LIB) and electrochemical capacitor (ECC). In this work, we report that sisal fiber activated carbon (SFAC) was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment followed by KOH activation and served as capacitive material in LIC for the first time. Different particle structure, morphology, specific surface area and heteroatoms affected the electrochemical performance of as-prepared materials and corresponding LICs. When the mass ratio of KOH to char precursor was 2, hierarchical porous structured SFAC-2 was prepared and exhibited moderate specific capacitance (103 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1), superior rate capability and cyclic stability (88% capacity retention after 5000 cycles at 1 A g-1). The corresponding assembled LIC (LIC-SC2) with optimal comprehensive electrochemical performance, displayed the energy density of 83 Wh kg-1, the power density of 5718 W kg-1 and superior cyclic stability (92% energy density retention after 1000 cycles at 0.5 A g-1). It is worthwhile that the source for activated carbon is a natural and renewable one and the synthesis method is eco-friendly, which facilitate that hierarchical porous activated carbon has potential applications in the field of LIC and other energy storage systems.

  8. Resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.D.; Sandberg, S.K.

    2000-04-01

    The authors demonstrate the use of resistivity/induced polarization (IP) monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic loads. Electrical monitoring of saline tracer transport during forced injection has been demonstrated previously. Detection of tracer transport under natural hydraulic loading is difficult because neither the hydraulic load nor the tracer resistivity can be controlled. In one study, the authors identify the electrical response to salt transport in a dynamic beach environment. Resistivity/IP imagine resolved the structure of the saltwater-freshwater interface and evidence for tide-induced groundwater transport. Resistivity increases in the near surface and at depth, upbeach of the high-tide mark, accompanied by tidal transgression. They attribute this to desaturation and decreasing salinity in the near surface and to decreasing salinity at depth, despite tidal transgression. Monitoring of groundwater levels indicates a phase lag between the tide level and groundwater level, supporting the electrical data. IP was insensitive to groundwater salinity variation. In a second study, the authors identify the electrical response to recharge-induced salt transport from a road-sale storage facility. Conductivity and IP models for monitoring lines, located on the basis of an EM31 survey, resolved the subsurface salt distribution, IP modeling resolved the sediment-bedrock interface. Modeling of monthly conductivity differences revealed conductivity increases and decreases at the locations of salt contamination, which correlate with the recharge pattern. They attribute near-surface conductivity increases after heavy rainfall to increasing saturation and ion dissolution. Corresponding conductivity decreases at depth are attributed to flushing of the bedrock with freshwater. Essentially, the opposite response was observed during a quiet monitoring period following heavy recharge. Near-surface IP changes are consistent with this interpretation. Salt

  9. Novel binary deep eutectic electrolytes for rechargeable Li-ion batteries based on mixtures of alkyl sulfonamides and lithium perfluoroalkylsulfonimide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiculescu, O. E.; DesMarteau, D. D.; Creager, S. E.; Haik, O.; Hirshberg, D.; Shilina, Y.; Zinigrad, E.; Levi, M. D.; Aurbach, D.; Halalay, I. C.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL's) were proposed for use in Li-ion batteries (LIBs), in order to mitigate some of the well-known drawbacks of LiPF6/mixed organic carbonates solutions. However, their large cations seriously decrease lithium transference numbers and block lithium insertion sites at electrode-electrolyte interfaces, leading to poor LIB rate performance. Deep eutectic electrolytes (DEEs) (which share some of the advantages of ILs but possess only one cation, Li+), were then proposed, in order to overcome the difficulties associated with ILs. We report herein on the preparation, thermal properties (melting, crystallization, and glass transition temperatures), transport properties (specific conductivity and viscosity) and thermal stability of binary DEEs based on mixtures of lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide or lithium bis(fluoro)sulfonimide salts with an alkyl sulfonamide solvent. Promise for LIB applications is demonstrated by chronoamperometry on Al current collectors, and cycling behavior of negative and positive electrodes. Residual current densities of 12 and 45 nA cm-2 were observed at 5 V vs. Li/Li+ on aluminum, 1.5 and 16 nA cm-2 at 4.5 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively for LiFSI and LiTFSI based DEEs. Capacities of 220, 130, and 175 mAh· g-1 were observed at low (C/13 or C/10) rates, respectively for petroleum coke, LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 (a.k.a. NMC 111) and LiAl0.05Co0.15Ni0.8O2 (a.k.a. NCA).

  10. Rechargeable lithium cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, M.; Plichta, E. J.

    1984-09-01

    The general object of this invention is to provide an improved rechargeable lithium cell. A more specific object of the invention is to provide a rechargeable lithium cell having an improved low temperature performance and rate capability. It has now been found that the aformentioned objects can be attained using lithium as the anode, a solution of a lithium salt such as LiF6 or LiAlC14 in a mixed organic solvent as the electrolyte and a lithium intercalating cathode.

  11. A Facile Molten-Salt Route for Large-Scale Synthesis of NiFe2O4 Nanoplates with Enhanced Lithium Storage Capability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Du, Xinchuan; Zhang, Feifei; Yin, Dongming; Wang, Limin

    2015-09-28

    Binary metal oxides have been deemed as a promising class of electrode materials for high-performance lithium ion batteries owing to their higher conductivity and electrochemical activity than corresponding monometal oxides. Here, NiFe2O4 nanoplates consisting of nanosized building blocks have been successfully fabricated by a facile, large-scale NaCl and KCl molten-salt route, and the changes in the morphology of NiFe2O4 as a function of the molten-salt amount have been systemically investigated. The results indicate that the molten-salt amount mainly influences the diameter and thickness of the NiFe2O4 nanoplates as well as the morphology of the nanosized building blocks. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements have been conducted to evaluate the lithium storage properties of the NiFe2O4 nanoplates prepared with a Ni(NO3)2/Fe(NO3)3/KCl/NaCl molar ratio of 1:2:20:60. A high reversible capacity of 888 mAh g(-1) is delivered over 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g(-1). Even at a current density of 5000 mA g(-1) , the discharge capacity could still reach 173 mAh g(-1). Such excellent electrochemical performances of the NiFe2O4 nanoplates are contributed to the short Li(+) diffusion distance of the nanosized building blocks and the synergetic effect of the Ni(2+) and Fe(3+) ions.

  12. On the nature of lithium biphenyl in ethereal solvents. A critical analysis unifying DFT calculations, physicochemical data in solution, and a X-ray structure.

    PubMed

    de la Viuda, Mónica; Yus, Miguel; Guijarro, Albert

    2011-12-15

    The lithium ion is an important type of electrolyte that has technological applications in the manufacture of lithium ion cells; therefore, a better understanding of the nature of its solutions is desirable. When associated to the radical anion of biphenyl in an organic solvent, it forms conducting solutions comparable to strong electrolytes such as lithium perchlorate. We have studied the lithium biphenyl solution in dimethoxyethane using DFT calculations. The nature of these ionic solutions is described in terms of a dynamic equilibrium between different types of ionic associations, the composition of which depends on the solvent and the temperature. The X-ray structure of [Li(+)·4C(5)H(10)O][C(12)H(10)(•-)], a solvent-separated ion pair of lithium biphenyl complexed with tetrahydropyran, is reported. Its main structural characteristics coincide with the calculated one, which we think is the dominant species at room temperature, in agreement with the available physicochemical data.

  13. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  14. Lithium orotate, carbonate and chloride: pharmacokinetics, polyuria in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D F

    1976-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion administered as lithium orotate were studied in rats. Parallel studies were carried out with lithium carbonate and lithium chloride. 2 No differences in the uptake, distribution and excretion of the lithium ion were observed between lithium orotate, lithium carbonate and lithium chloride after single intraperitoneal, subcutaneous or intragastric injections (0.5-1.0 mEq lithium/kg) or after administration of the lithium salts for 20 days in the food. 3 The findings oppose the notion that the pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion given as lithium orotate differ from lithium chloride or lithium carbonate. 4 Polyuria and polydipsia developed more slowly in rats given lithium orotate than in those given lithium carbonate or lithium chloride, perhaps due to an effect of the orotate anion. PMID:1260219

  15. Lithium orotate, carbonate and chloride: pharmacokinetics, polyuria in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F

    1976-04-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion administered as lithium orotate were studied in rats. Parallel studies were carried out with lithium carbonate and lithium chloride. 2 No differences in the uptake, distribution and excretion of the lithium ion were observed between lithium orotate, lithium carbonate and lithium chloride after single intraperitoneal, subcutaneous or intragastric injections (0.5-1.0 mEq lithium/kg) or after administration of the lithium salts for 20 days in the food. 3 The findings oppose the notion that the pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion given as lithium orotate differ from lithium chloride or lithium carbonate. 4 Polyuria and polydipsia developed more slowly in rats given lithium orotate than in those given lithium carbonate or lithium chloride, perhaps due to an effect of the orotate anion. PMID:1260219

  16. From the Disordered State to the Frank-Kasper Sigma Phase: Readily Tuning the Phase Behavior of Block Polymers via Lithium Salt Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Matthew; Hickey, Robert; Bates, Frank; Lodge, Timothy

    Sphere-forming block copolymers have long been known to assemble onto a body-centered cubic (BCC) lattice, but recent work has demonstrated that with the correct thermal treatments, more exotic morphologies such as dodecagonal quasicrystals or the Frank-Kasper sigma phase can be observed. In this presentation, we show that a similar variety of morphologies can be obtained by simply adding small amounts of lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI), which preferentially partitions into one of the domains. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, we have found that block copolymers, which are disordered when neat, can form spheres with liquid-like packing, BCC crystals, the Frank-Kasper sigma phase, or hexagonally close packed crystals upon increasing the salt loading. This work demonstrates a unique, alternative route to highly segregated sphere-forming block copolymers and examines the universality of the formation of these complex morphologies.

  17. Nature of chalcogen hor ellipsis chalcogen contact interactions in organic donor-molecule salts

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan . Dept. of Chemistry); Williams, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The nature of chalcogen{hor ellipsis}chalcogen contact interactions in organic donor-molecule salts was examined by performing ab initio SCF-MO/MP2 calculations on H{sub 2}X{hor ellipsis}XH{sub 2}(X = O, S, SE, Te) and MM2 calculations on donor dimers (TXF){sub 2} (X = S, SE, Te) and (BEDX-TTF){sub 2} (X = O, S). 14 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

    2003-04-24

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals

  19. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  20. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  1. Effect of the salting-out agent anion nature on the phase separation of a potassium salt-potassium bis(alkyl polyoxyethylene)phosphate-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elokhov, A. M.; Lesnov, A. E.; Kudryashova, O. S.

    2016-10-01

    The effect the salting-out agent anion nature has on the temperature and concentration intervals of the existence of the separation area is established by analyzing the phase diagrams of pseudoternary KCl (KBr, KI, KNO3, K2SO4, K4P2O7)-potassium bis(alkyl polyoxyethylene)phosphate (oxyphos B)-water systems. It is concluded that the anionic salting-out capability is reduced in the order P2O 7 4- > SO 4 2- > Cl- > Br‒> NO 7 4- > SO 3 - > I-. The thermodynamic parameters of phase separation used to interpret the results are calculated. The observed pattern of a change in the salting-out ability of the investigated salts relative to aqueous solutions of the surfactants is in good agreement with the lyotropic (Hofmeister) series.

  2. An Aliphatic Solvent-Soluble Lithium Salt of the Perhalogenated Weakly Coordinating Anion [Al(OC(CCl3)(CF3)2)4](-).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Zaichao; Tan, Gengwen; Wang, Xinping

    2016-02-01

    The facile synthesis of a new highly aliphatic solvent-soluble Li(+) salt of the perhalogenated weakly coordinating anion [Al(OC(CCl3)(CF3)2)4](-) and its application in stabilizing the Ph3C(+) cation were investigated. The lithium salt Li[Al(OC(CCl3)(CF3)2)4] (4) was prepared by the treatment of 4 mol equiv of HOC(CCl3)(CF3)2 with purified LiAlH4 in n-hexane from -20 °C to room temperature. Compound 4 is highly soluble in both polar and nonpolar solvents, and it bears both CCl3 and CF3 groups, resulting in a lower symmetry around the Al center compared to that of Li[Al(OC(CF3)3)4] (1). Treatment of 4 with Ph3CCl afforded the ionic compound [Ph3C][Al(OC(CCl3)(CF3)2)4] (5) bearing the Ph3C(+) cation with concomitant elimination of LiCl, suggesting the potential application of [Al(OC(CCl3)(CF3)2)4](-) in stabilizing reactive cationic species. Compounds 4 and 5 were fully characterized by spectroscopic and structural methods. PMID:26784742

  3. Recommended design for more accurate duplication of natural conditions in salt marsh creation.

    PubMed

    Darnell, T M; Smith, E H

    2002-06-01

    Construction of 653 ha of salt marsh habitat from dredged material near the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, has been proposed, with the goal of increasing the area of habitat available to endangered whooping cranes ( Grus americana). We assessed prototype created wetlands, and their similarity to natural reference sites, in terms of topography, vegetation, and hydrology. The created sites were steeply sloped relative to natural sites and were dominated by monotypic stands of Spartina alterniflora. Natural sites were dominated by vegetation more tolerant of desiccation and hypersalinity and by unvegetated salt pans. Differences in vegetation communities and distributions of habitat types resulted from efforts to enhance habitat diversity in created marsh cells through manipulation of marsh topography. However, the scale at which this diversity occurred in natural marsh of the study area was not considered. When constructing wetlands in cellular configurations, we recommend creation of large complexes of adjoining, hydrologically linked, cells wherein the desired habitat diversity is created at the scale of the entire complex, rather than within a single cell. Suggested design modifications would increase the similarity of created marshes to natural reference sites, potentially improving habitat function.

  4. Marine fungal diversity: a comparison of natural and created salt marshes of the north-central Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Walker, Allison K; Campbell, Jinx

    2010-01-01

    Marine fungal communities of created salt marshes of differing ages were compared with those of two reference natural salt marshes. Marine fungi occurring on the lower 30 cm of salt marsh plants Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus were inventoried with morphological and molecular methods (ITS T-RFLP analysis) to determine fungal species richness, relative frequency of occurrence and ascomata density. The resulting profiles revealed similar fungal communities in natural salt marshes and created salt marshes 3 y old and older with a 1.5 y old created marsh showing less fungal colonization. A 26 y old created salt marsh consistently exhibited the highest fungal species richness. Ascomata density of the dominant fungal species on each host was significantly higher in natural marshes than in created marshes at all three sampling dates. This study indicates marine fungal saprotroph communities are present in these manmade coastal salt marshes as early as 1 y after marsh creation. The lower regions of both plant hosts were dominated by a small number of marine ascomycete species consistent with those species previously reported from salt marshes of the East Coast of USA. PMID:20524584

  5. Marine fungal diversity: a comparison of natural and created salt marshes of the north-central Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Walker, Allison K; Campbell, Jinx

    2010-01-01

    Marine fungal communities of created salt marshes of differing ages were compared with those of two reference natural salt marshes. Marine fungi occurring on the lower 30 cm of salt marsh plants Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus were inventoried with morphological and molecular methods (ITS T-RFLP analysis) to determine fungal species richness, relative frequency of occurrence and ascomata density. The resulting profiles revealed similar fungal communities in natural salt marshes and created salt marshes 3 y old and older with a 1.5 y old created marsh showing less fungal colonization. A 26 y old created salt marsh consistently exhibited the highest fungal species richness. Ascomata density of the dominant fungal species on each host was significantly higher in natural marshes than in created marshes at all three sampling dates. This study indicates marine fungal saprotroph communities are present in these manmade coastal salt marshes as early as 1 y after marsh creation. The lower regions of both plant hosts were dominated by a small number of marine ascomycete species consistent with those species previously reported from salt marshes of the East Coast of USA.

  6. Synthesis of Ti-based electrodes using Ti-salt flocculated sludge and their application in lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jungwon; Rai, Alok Kumar; Kim, Sungjin; Choi, Eunseok; Yoo, Insun; Kim, Jongho; Kim, Jaekook

    2012-10-15

    We report a simple strategy to synthesize the nanostructured TiO{sub 2} samples by a solid state reaction using Ti-salt flocculated sludge. The structure and morphology of the Ti-salt flocculated sludge, nanostructured TiO{sub 2} samples and pure commercial Aldrich TiO{sub 2} powder were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The electrochemical performances were evaluated in coin type cells. Nanostructured TiO{sub 2} samples, obtained by Ti-salt flocculated sludge shows a higher capacity and better cycling performances than pure commercial Aldrich TiO{sub 2} powder at the cutoff of 1.0–2.5 V especially at high current rate. The enhanced cycling performance can be attributed to the facts that their high crystallinity and uniform nano-sized distribution.

  7. The Stereoselective Reductions of Ketones to the Most Thermodynamically Stable Alcohols Using Lithium and Hydrated Salts of Common Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicole; Cohen, Theodore

    2015-08-21

    A simple method is presented for the highly stereoselective reductions of ketones to the most thermodynamically stable alcohols. In this procedure, the ketone is treated with lithium dispersion and either FeCl2·4H2O or CuCl2·2H2O in THF at room temperature. This protocol is applied to a large number and variety of ketones and is both more convenient and efficient than those commonly reported for the diastereoselective reduction of five- and six-membered cyclic ketones. PMID:26226182

  8. Oxidation of aromatic lithium thiolates into sulfinate salts: an attractive entry to aryl sulfones labeled with carbon-11.

    PubMed

    Martin, Claudie; Sandrinelli, Franck; Perrio, Cécile; Perrio, Stéphane; Lasne, Marie-Claire

    2006-01-01

    [reaction: see text] Aromatic 11C-sulfones were synthesized by S alkylation of lithium arenesulfinates, which are readily available from the corresponding thiols by an oxaziridine-mediated oxidation reaction with [11C]alkyl iodides in THF/H2O (4:1) at 150 degrees C. The radiosyntheses, including purification by HPLC, were completed in an average of 35 min from the end of the bombardment with 55-76% overall radiochemical yields (decay corrected). The described procedure extends the range of accessible labeling methods.

  9. Ionic liquids-lithium salts pretreatment followed by ultrasound-assisted extraction of vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside and vitexin from Phyllostachys edulis leaves.

    PubMed

    Hou, Kexin; Chen, Fengli; Zu, Yuangang; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-29

    An efficient method for the extraction of vitexin, vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside from Phyllostachys edulis leaves comprises heat treatment using an ionic liquid-lithium salt mixture (using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as the solvent and lithium chloride as the additive), followed by ultrasound-assisted extraction. To obtain higher extraction yields, the effects of the relevant experimental parameters (including heat treatment temperature and time, relative amounts of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide and lithium chloride, power and time of the ultrasound irradiation, and the liquid-solid ratio) are evaluated and response surface methodology is used to optimize the significant factors. The morphologies of the treated and untreated P. edulis leaves are studied by scanning electron microscopy. The improved extraction method proposed provides high extraction yield, good repeatability and precision, and has wide potential applications in the analysis of plant samples. PMID:26763300

  10. Ionic liquids-lithium salts pretreatment followed by ultrasound-assisted extraction of vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside and vitexin from Phyllostachys edulis leaves.

    PubMed

    Hou, Kexin; Chen, Fengli; Zu, Yuangang; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-29

    An efficient method for the extraction of vitexin, vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside from Phyllostachys edulis leaves comprises heat treatment using an ionic liquid-lithium salt mixture (using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as the solvent and lithium chloride as the additive), followed by ultrasound-assisted extraction. To obtain higher extraction yields, the effects of the relevant experimental parameters (including heat treatment temperature and time, relative amounts of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide and lithium chloride, power and time of the ultrasound irradiation, and the liquid-solid ratio) are evaluated and response surface methodology is used to optimize the significant factors. The morphologies of the treated and untreated P. edulis leaves are studied by scanning electron microscopy. The improved extraction method proposed provides high extraction yield, good repeatability and precision, and has wide potential applications in the analysis of plant samples.

  11. Comparison of wetland structural characteristics between created and natural salt marshes in southwest Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, K.R.; Proffitt, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The use of dredge material is a well-known technique for creating or restoring salt marshes that is expected to become more common along the Gulf of Mexico coast in the future. However, the effectiveness of this restoration method is still questioned. Wetland structural characteristics were compared between four created and three natural salt marshes in southwest Louisiana, USA. The created marshes, formed by the pumping of dredge material into formerly open water areas, represent a chronosequence, ranging in age from 3 to 19 years. Vegetation and soil structural factors were compared to determine whether the created marshes become more similar over time to the natural salt marshes. Vegetation surveys were conducted in 1997, 2000, and 2002 using the line-intercept technique. Site elevations were measured in 2000. Organic matter (OM) was measured in 1996 and 2002, while bulk density and soil particle-size distribution were determined in 2002 only. The natural marshes were dominated by Spartina alterniflora, as were the oldest created marshes; these marshes had the lowest mean site elevations ( 35 cm NGVD) and became dominated by high marsh (S. patens, Distichlis spicata) and shrub (Baccharis halimifolia, Iva frutescens) species. The higher elevation marsh seems to be following a different plant successional trajectory than the other marshes, indicating a relationship between marsh elevation and species composition. The soils in both the created and natural marshes contain high levels of clays (30-65 %), with sand comprising < 1 % of the soil distribution. OM was significantly greater and bulk density significantly lower in two of the natural marshes when compared to the created marshes. The oldest created marsh had significantly greater OM than the younger created marshes, but it may still take several decades before equivalency is reached with the natural marshes. Vegetation structural characteristics in the created marshes take only a few years to become similar

  12. Lithium in Medicine: Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Mota de Freitas, Duarte; Leverson, Brian D; Goossens, Jesse L

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the mechanism of action of lithium salts from a chemical perspective. A description on how lithium salts are used to treat mental illnesses, in particular bipolar disorder, and other disease states is provided. Emphasis is not placed on the genetics and the psychopharmacology of the ailments for which lithium salts have proven to be beneficial. Rather we highlight the application of chemical methodologies for the characterization of the cellular targets of lithium salts and their distribution in tissues. PMID:26860311

  13. Natural macromolecule based carboxymethyl cellulose as a gel polymer electrolyte with adjustable porosity for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. S.; Xiao, S. Y.; Li, M. X.; Chang, Z.; Wang, F. X.; Gao, J.; Wu, Y. P.

    2015-08-01

    A porous membrane of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) from natural macromolecule as a host of a gel polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries is reported. It is prepared, for the first time, by a simple non-solvent evaporation method and its porous structure is fine-adjusted by varying the composition ratio of the solvent and non-solvent mixture. The electrolyte uptake of the porous membrane based on CMC is 75.9%. The ionic conductivity of the as-prepared gel membrane saturated with 1 mol L-1 LiPF6 electrolyte at room temperature can be up to 0.48 mS cm-1. Moreover, the lithium ion transference in the gel membrane at room temperature is as high as 0.46, much higher than 0.27 for the commercial separator Celgard 2730. When evaluated by using LiFePO4 cathode, the prepared gel membrane exhibits very good electrochemical performance including higher reversible capacity, better rate capability and good cycling behaviour. The obtained results suggest that this porous polymer membrane shows great attraction to the lithium ion batteries requiring high safety, low cost and environmental friendliness.

  14. Salt Lakes of Western Australia - Emissions of natural volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Tobias; Krause, Torsten; Schöler, Heinfried; Kamilli, Katharina; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Ofner, Johannes; Junkermann, Wolfgang; Atlas, Elliot

    2013-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by global climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its many saline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters. This area has been repeatedly investigated since 2006 and consists of ephemeral saline and saline groundwater sourced lakes with a pH reaching from 2.5 to 7.1. The semi-/arid region was originally covered by natural eucalyptus forests, but land-use has changed considerably after large scale deforestation from 1950 to 1970. Today the region is mostly used for growing wheat and live stock. The deforestation led to a rising groundwater table, bringing dissolved salts and minerals to the surface. In the last decades, a concurrent alteration of rain periods has been observed. A reason could be the regional formation of ultra-fine particles that were measured with car-based and airborne instruments around the salt lakes in several campaigns between 2006 and 2011. These ultra-fine particles emitted from the lakes and acting as cloud condensation nuclei can modify cloud microphysics and thus suppress rain events [1]. New data from a campaign in 2012 accentuates the importance of these hyper saline environments for the local climate. Ground-based particle measurements around the salt lakes in 2012 were accompanied by novel chamber experiments directly on the lakes. The 1.5 m³ cubic chamber was constructed from transparent PTFE foil permitting photochemistry within while preventing dilution of the air due to lateral wind transport. This experimental setup allows linking the measured data directly to the chemistry of and above the salt lakes. Another advantage of the PTFE chamber is the enrichment of volatile organic compounds (VOC) that are emitted from salt lakes as possible precursors for the ultra-fine particles. Chamber air was sampled using stainless steel canisters. Sediment, crust and water samples were taken for investigation of potential VOC emissions in

  15. Asymmetric bromine-lithium exchange: application toward the synthesis of natural product.

    PubMed

    Graff, Julien; Debande, Thibaut; Praz, Jézabel; Guénée, Laure; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2013-08-16

    Asymmetric bromine-lithium exchange has been successfully employed to synthesize bicoumarin chiral building blocks of (+)-isokotanin A and (-)-kotanin in good yields and with an excellent level of enantioselectivity. This is the first reported example of formal syntheses, using this direct methodology, leading to the single (M)-atropoisomer of (+)-isokotanin A and (-)-kotanin building blocks, without any resolution step.

  16. Graphite electrode thermal behavior and solid electrolyte interphase investigations: Role of state-of-the-art binders, carbonate additives and lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestier, Coralie; Grugeon, Sylvie; Davoisne, Carine; Lecocq, Amandine; Marlair, Guy; Armand, Michel; Sannier, Lucas; Laruelle, Stephane

    2016-10-01

    The risk of thermal runaway is, for Li-ion batteries, a critical issue for large-scale applications. This results in manufacturers and researchers placing great emphasis on minimizing the heat generation and thereby mitigating safety-related risks through the search for suitable materials or additives. To this end, an in-depth stepwise investigation has been undertaken to provide a better understanding of the exothermic processes that take place at the negative electrode/electrolyte interface as well as an increased visibility of the role of the state-of-the-art electrode binders, additives and lithium salt by means of the classical DSC technique. A reliable experimental set up helped quantify the beneficial or harmful contribution of binder polymers to the exothermic behavior of the CMC/SBR containing graphite electrode film in contact with 1 M LiPF6 in EC:DMC:EMC (1:1:1 v/v/v) electrolyte. Further, the role of the VC, FEC and VEC electrolyte additives (2 wt%) in reinforcing the protective SEI layer towards thermally induced electrolyte reduction is discussed in the light of infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyzes results. Moreover, after a preliminary corrosion study of LiPF6/LiFSI mixtures, we showed that the 0.66/0.33 M composition can be used in commercial NMC-based LiBs with a positive effect on the thermal runaway.

  17. Performance evaluation of two protective treatments on salt-laden limestones and marble after natural and artificial weathering.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Barbara; Pinna, Daniela; Porcinai, Simone

    2014-02-01

    Salt crystallization is a major damage factor in stone weathering, and the application of inappropriate protective products may amplify its effects. This research focuses on the evaluation of two protective products' performance (organic polydimethylsiloxane and inorganic ammonium oxalate (NH4)2(COO)2·H2O) in the case of a salt load from behind. Experimental laboratory simulations based on salt crystallization cycles and natural weathering in an urban area were carried out. The effects were monitored over time, applying different methods: weight loss evaluation, colorimetric and water absorption by capillarity measurements, stereomicroscope observations, FTIR and SEM-EDS analyses. The results showed minor impact exerted on the short term on stones, particularly those treated with the water repellent, by atmospheric agents compared to salt crystallization. Lithotypes with low salt load (Gioia marble) underwent minor changes than the heavily salt-laden limestones (Lecce and Ançã stones), which were dramatically damaged when treated with polysiloxane. The results suggest that the ammonium oxalate treatment should be preferred to polysiloxane in the presence of soluble salts, even after desalination procedures which might not completely remove them. In addition, the neo-formed calcium oxalate seemed to effectively protect the stone, improving its resistance against salt crystallization without occluding the pores and limiting the superficial erosion caused by atmospheric agents. PMID:23996736

  18. Performance evaluation of two protective treatments on salt-laden limestones and marble after natural and artificial weathering.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Barbara; Pinna, Daniela; Porcinai, Simone

    2014-02-01

    Salt crystallization is a major damage factor in stone weathering, and the application of inappropriate protective products may amplify its effects. This research focuses on the evaluation of two protective products' performance (organic polydimethylsiloxane and inorganic ammonium oxalate (NH4)2(COO)2·H2O) in the case of a salt load from behind. Experimental laboratory simulations based on salt crystallization cycles and natural weathering in an urban area were carried out. The effects were monitored over time, applying different methods: weight loss evaluation, colorimetric and water absorption by capillarity measurements, stereomicroscope observations, FTIR and SEM-EDS analyses. The results showed minor impact exerted on the short term on stones, particularly those treated with the water repellent, by atmospheric agents compared to salt crystallization. Lithotypes with low salt load (Gioia marble) underwent minor changes than the heavily salt-laden limestones (Lecce and Ançã stones), which were dramatically damaged when treated with polysiloxane. The results suggest that the ammonium oxalate treatment should be preferred to polysiloxane in the presence of soluble salts, even after desalination procedures which might not completely remove them. In addition, the neo-formed calcium oxalate seemed to effectively protect the stone, improving its resistance against salt crystallization without occluding the pores and limiting the superficial erosion caused by atmospheric agents.

  19. Culturable halophilic archaea at the initial and crystallization stages of salt production in a natural solar saltern of Goa, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Goa is a coastal state in India and salt making is being practiced for many years. This investigation aimed in determining the culturable haloarchaeal diversity during two different phases of salt production in a natural solar saltern of Ribandar, Goa. Water and sediment samples were collected from the saltern during pre-salt harvesting phase and salt harvesting phase. Salinity and pH of the sampling site was determined. Isolates were obtained by plating of the samples on complex and synthetic haloarchaeal media. Morphology of the isolates was determined using Gram staining and electron microscopy. Response of cells to distilled water was studied spectrophotometrically at 600nm. Molecular identification of the isolates was performed by sequencing the 16S rRNA. Results Salinity of salt pans varied from 3-4% (non-salt production phase) to 30% (salt production phase) and pH varied from 7.0-8.0. Seven haloarchaeal strains were isolated from water and sediment samples during non-salt production phase and seventeen haloarchaeal strains were isolated during the salt production phase. All the strains stained uniformly Gram negative. The orange-red acetone extract of the pigments showed similar spectrophotometric profile with absorption maxima at 393, 474, 501 and 535 nm. All isolates obtained from the salt dilute phase were grouped within the genus Halococcus. This was validated using both total lipid profiling and 16S rRNA data sequencing. The isolates obtained from pre-salt harvesting phase were resistant to lysis. 16S rRNA data showed that organisms belonging to Halorubrum, Haloarcula, Haloferax and Halococcus genera were obtained during the salt concentrated phase. The isolates obtained from salt harvesting phase showed varied lysis on suspension in distilled water and /or 3.5% NaCl. Conclusion Salterns in Goa are transiently operated during post monsoon season from January to May. During the pre-salt harvesting phase, all the isolates obtained belonged to

  20. Qualitative evaluation of the adesive interface between lithium disilicate, luting composite and natural tooth.

    PubMed

    Mobilio, Nicola; Fasiol, Alberto; Catapano, Santo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this work was to qualitatively evaluate the interface between tooth, luting composite and lithium disilicate surface using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An extracted restoration-free human molar was stored in physiological solution until it was embedded in an autopolimerysing acrylic resin. A standard preparation for overlay was completed and after preparation an anatomic overlay was waxed on the tooth and then hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. After cementation the sample was dissected and the section was analysed using an Automatic Micromet (Remet s.a.s) and the section was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM evaluation of the tooth showed the three layers seamlessly; by increasing the enlargement the interface did not change.

  1. Qualitative evaluation of the adesive interface between lithium disilicate, luting composite and natural tooth

    PubMed Central

    Mobilio, Nicola; Fasiol, Alberto; Catapano, Santo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim of this work was to qualitatively evaluate the interface between tooth, luting composite and lithium disilicate surface using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An extracted restoration-free human molar was stored in physiological solution until it was embedded in an autopolimerysing acrylic resin. A standard preparation for overlay was completed and after preparation an anatomic overlay was waxed on the tooth and then hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. After cementation the sample was dissected and the section was analysed using an Automatic Micromet (Remet s.a.s) and the section was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM evaluation of the tooth showed the three layers seamlessly; by increasing the enlargement the interface did not change. PMID:27486504

  2. Qualitative evaluation of the adesive interface between lithium disilicate, luting composite and natural tooth.

    PubMed

    Mobilio, Nicola; Fasiol, Alberto; Catapano, Santo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this work was to qualitatively evaluate the interface between tooth, luting composite and lithium disilicate surface using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An extracted restoration-free human molar was stored in physiological solution until it was embedded in an autopolimerysing acrylic resin. A standard preparation for overlay was completed and after preparation an anatomic overlay was waxed on the tooth and then hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. After cementation the sample was dissected and the section was analysed using an Automatic Micromet (Remet s.a.s) and the section was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM evaluation of the tooth showed the three layers seamlessly; by increasing the enlargement the interface did not change. PMID:27486504

  3. Sustainable natural resource management and environmental assessment in the Salt Lake (Tuz Golu) Specially Protected Area.

    PubMed

    Dengiz, Orhan; Ozcan, Hesna; Koksal, E Selim; Baskan, Oguz; Kosker, Yakup

    2010-02-01

    The Salt Lake Specially Protected Area is a unique ecosystem for both agricultural activities and natural life in Turkey. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a conceptual land use strategy and methodology, taking into account ecological factors for regional development in the Salt Lake Specially Protected Area. A detailed Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis was done to create a comprehensive database including land use, land suitability, and environmental factors (soil, climate, water quality, fertilizing status, and heavy metal and pesticide pollution). The results of the land suitability survey for agricultural use showed that, while 62.6% of the study area soils were classified as best and relatively good, about 15% were classified as problematic and restricted lands, only 22.2% of the study area soils were not suitable for agricultural uses. However, this is not enough to derive maximum benefit with minimum degradation. Therefore, environmental factors and ecological conditions were combined to support this aim and to protect the ecosystem. Excessive irrigation practices, fertilizer and pesticide application, and incorrect management practices all accelerate salinization and degradation. In addition to this, it was found that a multi-layer GIS analysis made it easy to develop a framework for optimum land use and could increase the production yield preserving the environmental conditions. Finally, alternative management and crop patterns were undertaken to sustain this unique ecosystem, considering water, soil, climate, land use characteristics, and to provide guidance for planners or decision makers.

  4. Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

    2012-10-09

    Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

  5. Effects of solvents and salt on the thermal stability of lithiated graphite used in lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingsong; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Chunhua

    2009-08-15

    The thermal stability of lithiated graphite in the presence of solvents, electrolytes and LiPF(6) salt was studied using C80 micro-calorimeter. The presence of cyclic carbonates or linear carbonates increases the activity of Li(x)C(6)-solvent coexisting system, especially for the Li(x)C(6)-linear carbonates one. LiPF(6) was detected that it increases the activity greatly of its coexisting system with lithiated graphite. The coexisting system of Li(x)C(6) with the electrolyte of LiPF(6)/ethylene carbonate+diethyl carbonate shows less thermal stability, which is attributed to the activity between diethyl carbonate and Li(x)C(6). This also agrees with the experiment result of Li(x)C(6)-diethyl carbonate coexisting system. PMID:19261386

  6. Dispersion of Louisiana crude oil in salt water environment by Corexit 9500A in the presence of natural coastal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansel, Berrin; Lee, Mengshan; Berbakov, Jillian; Tansel, Derya Z.; Koklonis, Urpiana

    2014-04-01

    Effectiveness of Corexit 9500A for dispersing Louisiana crude oil was evaluated in salt water solutions containing natural materials in relation to salinity and dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR). Experimental results showed that both salinity and DOR had significant effects on dispersion of Louisiana crude oil in the presence of different natural materials. The natural materials added to the salt water solutions included sea sand (South Beach, Miami, Florida), red mangrove leaves (Rhizophora mangle), seaweed (Sargassum natans), and sea grass (Halodule wrightii). Dispersant effectiveness (amount of oil dispersed into the water) was reduced significantly with increasing salinity with the minimum effectiveness observed in the salinity range between 30 and 50 ppt in all aqueous samples containing natural materials. When significant amounts of floating oil were present, the partially submerged natural materials enhanced the transfer of oil into the water column, which improved the dispersion effectiveness. However, dispersant effectiveness was significantly reduced when the amount of floating oil was relatively small and could not be released back to the water column. Surface tension may not be an adequate parameter for monitoring the effectiveness of dispersants in salt water environment. When distilled water was used (i.e., zero salinity), surface tension was significantly reduced with increasing dispersant concentration. However, there was no clear trend in the surface tension of the salt water solutions (17-51 ppt) containing crude oil and natural materials with increasing dispersant concentration.

  7. Recent developments and likely advances in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Andrew; Howard, Wilmont

    Advances in lithium-ion battery technology since the last International Power Sources Symposium in Amsterdam in September 2003 are reviewed. Cost and safety are still seen as important factors limiting further expansion of application of lithium-ion batteries. Lithium bis-oxalato borate electolyte salt and lithium iron phosphate cathode material are being actively investigated.

  8. A natural carbonized leaf as polysulfide diffusion inhibitor for high-performance lithium-sulfur battery cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sheng-Heng; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2014-06-01

    Attracted by the unique tissue and functions of leaves, a natural carbonized leaf (CL) is presented as a polysulfide diffusion inhibitor in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The CL that is covered on the pure sulfur cathode effectively suppresses the polysulfide shuttling mechanism and enables the use of pure sulfur as the cathode. A low charge resistance and a high discharge capacity of 1320 mA h g(-1) arise from the improved cell conductivity due to the innately integral conductive carbon network of the CL. The unique microstructure of CL leads to a high discharge/charge efficiency of >98 %, low capacity fade of 0.18 % per cycle, and good long-term cyclability over 150 cycles. The structural gradient and the micro/mesoporous adsorption sites of CL effectively intercept/trap the migrating polysulfides and facilitate their reutilization. The green CL polysulfide diffusion inhibitor thus offers a viable approach for developing high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

  9. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  10. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  11. Characterization of halophiles in natural MgSO 4 salts and laboratory enrichment samples: Astrobiological implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian S.; King, Penelope L.; Hyde, Brendt C.; Southam, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    The presence of sulfate salts and limited subsurface water (ice) on Mars suggests that any liquid water on Mars today will occur as (magnesium) sulfate-rich brines in regions containing sources of magnesium and sulfur. The Basque Lakes of British Columbia, Canada, represent a hypersaline terrestrial analogue site, which possesses chemical and physical properties similar to those observed on Mars. The Basque Lakes also contain diverse halophilic organisms representing all three Kingdoms of life, growing in surface and near-subsurface environments. Of interest from an astrobiological perspective, crushed magnesium sulfate samples that were analyzed using a modified Lowry protein assay contained biomass in every crystal inspected, with biomass values from 0.078 to 4.21 mg biomass/g salt; average=0.74±0.7 mg biomass/g salt. Bacteria and Archaea cells were easily observed even in low-biomass samples using light microscopy, and bacteria trapped within magnesium sulfate crystals were observed using confocal microscopy. Regions within the salt also contained bacterial pigments, e.g., carotenoids, which were separate from the cells, indicating that cell lysis might have occurred during entrapment within the salt matrix. These biosignatures, cells, and any 'soluble' organic constituents were primarily found trapped within fluid inclusions or fluid-filled void spaces between intergrown crystals. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (reflectance IR) analysis of enrichment cultures, containing cyanobacteria, Archaea, or dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria, highlighted molecular biosignature features between 550-1650 and 2400-3000 cm -1. Spectra from natural salts demonstrated that we can detect biomass within salt crystals using the most sensitive biosignatures, which are the 1530-1570 cm -1, C-N, N-H, -COOH absorptions and the 1030-1050 cm -1 C-OH, C-N, PO 43- bond features. The lowest detection limit for a biosignature absorption feature using

  12. Novel Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, Brett L.

    2014-12-12

    We have been investigating three primary areas related to lithium ion battery electrolytes. First, we have been investigating the thermal stability of novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, in particular borate based salts. Second, we have been investigating novel additives to improve the calendar life of lithium ion batteries. Third, we have been investigating the thermal decomposition reactions of electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

  13. Rechargeable lithium battery technology - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Surampudi, Subbarao

    1990-01-01

    The technology of the rechargeable lithium battery is discussed with special attention given to the types of rechargeable lithium cells and to their expected performance and advantages. Consideration is also given to the organic-electrolyte and polymeric-electrolyte cells and to molten salt lithium cells, as well as to technical issues, such as the cycle life, charge control, rate capability, cell size, and safety. The role of the rechargeable lithium cell in future NASA applications is discussed.

  14. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-01

    In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H(2)O(2) (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75°C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H(2)O(2) in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1-(1-X)(1/3)=k(c)t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model 'ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles' i.e. 1-3(1-X)(2/3)+2(1-X)=k(c)t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  15. Lithium Dinitramide as an Additive in Lithium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkovenko, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    Lithium dinitramide, LiN(NO2)2 has shown promise as an additive to nonaqueous electrolytes in rechargeable and non-rechargeable lithium-ion-based electrochemical power cells. Such non-aqueous electrolytes consist of lithium salts dissolved in mixtures of organic ethers, esters, carbonates, or acetals. The benefits of adding lithium dinitramide (which is also a lithium salt) include lower irreversible loss of capacity on the first charge/discharge cycle, higher cycle life, lower self-discharge, greater flexibility in selection of electrolyte solvents, and greater charge capacity. The need for a suitable electrolyte additive arises as follows: The metallic lithium in the anode of a lithium-ion-based power cell is so highly reactive that in addition to the desired main electrochemical reaction, it engages in side reactions that cause formation of resistive films and dendrites, which degrade performance as quantified in terms of charge capacity, cycle life, shelf life, first-cycle irreversible capacity loss, specific power, and specific energy. The incidence of side reactions can be reduced through the formation of a solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) a thin film that prevents direct contact between the lithium anode material and the electrolyte. Ideally, an SEI should chemically protect the anode and the electrolyte from each other while exhibiting high conductivity for lithium ions and little or no conductivity for electrons. A suitable additive can act as an SEI promoter. Heretofore, most SEI promotion was thought to derive from organic molecules in electrolyte solutions. In contrast, lithium dinitramide is inorganic. Dinitramide compounds are known as oxidizers in rocket-fuel chemistry and until now, were not known as SEI promoters in battery chemistry. Although the exact reason for the improvement afforded by the addition of lithium dinitramide is not clear, it has been hypothesized that lithium dinitramide competes with other electrolyte constituents to react with

  16. Palmitoleic acid calcium salt: a lubricant and bactericidal powder from natural lipids.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Kawamura, Yuki; Yamazaki, Yuki; Kijima, Tatsuro; Morikawa, Toshiya; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoleic acid is a promising bactericidal agent for cleansing products with alternative bactericidal abilities. In this study, we focus on the physical and biological activity of palmitoleic acid calcium salt (C16:1 fatty acid Ca salt) because it forms via an ion-exchange reaction between palmitoleic acid and Ca ions in tap water, and remains on the skin surface during the cleansing process. Here, we prepared C16:1 fatty acid Ca salt to investigate its crystal structure and physical and bactericidal properties. The Ca salt was a plate-shaped lamellar crystalline powder with a particle diameter of several micrometers to several tens of micrometers; it exhibited significant lubricity and alternative bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). We also examined other fatty acid Ca salts prepared from lauric acid (C12:0 fatty acid), palmitic acid (C16:0 fatty acid), and oleic acid (C18:1 fatty acid). The bactericidal activities and lubricity of the fatty acid Ca salts changed with the alkyl chain length and the degree of unsaturation. The C16:1 fatty acid Ca salt exhibited the strongest selective bactericidal ability among the four investigated fatty acid Ca salts. These findings suggest that C16:1 fatty acid and its Ca salt have potential applications in cleansing and cosmetic products. PMID:25757432

  17. Preservation of artifacts in salt mines as a natural analog for the storage of transuranic wastes at the WIPP repository

    SciTech Connect

    Martell, M.A.; Hansen, F.; Weiner, R.

    1998-10-01

    Use of nature`s laboratory for scientific analysis of complex systems is a largely untapped resource for understanding long-term disposal of hazardous materials. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the US is a facility designed and approved for storage of transuranic waste in a salt medium. Isolation from the biosphere must be ensured for 10,000 years. Natural analogs provide a means to interpret the evolution of the underground disposal setting. Investigations of ancient sites where manmade materials have experienced mechanical and chemical processes over millennia provide scientific information unattainable by conventional laboratory methods. This paper presents examples of these pertinent natural analogs, provides examples of features relating to the WIPP application, and identifies potential avenues of future investigations. This paper cites examples of analogical information pertaining to the Hallstatt salt mine in Austria and Wieliczka salt mine in Poland. This paper intends to develop an appreciation for the applicability of natural analogs to the science and engineering of a long-term disposal facility in geomedia.

  18. Porous carbon particles derived from natural peanut shells as lithium ion battery anode and its electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaoyu; Chen, Shuangqiang; Wang, Guoxiu

    2014-07-01

    Abandoned peanut shells, a common farm waste, have caused tremendous environmental pollution and huge waste deposits through burned and buried disposal approaches. In targeting to enhance the potential value of peanut shells and discover a new alternative candidate for lithium ion batteries, we adopted an easy to scale-up and highly repeated method to treat fresh and dry peanut shells via acid-treatment and pyrolysis, making porous structures on carbonized peanut shells. The pyrolysis process transformed the peanut shells to porous carbon (PC) materials in a quartz tube furnace at a series of temperatures from 500°C to 700°C in N2 under the condition of 40°C gradient temperatures with a heating rate of 2°C min-1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the irregular porous structures and hundreds of micropores are distributed on the PC materials. The cyclic voltammogram (CV) test and particle size analysis are employed to investigate their characteristics of voltammetry and particle size distribution. PC material obtained at 620°C (PC-620) exhibited good particle distribution, porous structure and less agglomerated particles. When applied as anode materials in lithium ion batteries, the PC-620 electrode displayed the high reversible capacity of 608 mAh g-1. Moreover, the cycling performance of PC-620 was the most stable, with a high Coulombic efficiency of 98.9% at the 20th cycle, demonstrating a reversible capacity of 418 mAh g-1, which is higher than the theoretical capacity of graphite. Most importantly, the PC materials harvested from the wastes of natural resources are turned into valuable electrode materials for the high demand energy storage devices, which can significantly reduce severe environmental pollution and alleviate an energy shortage. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Evidence of sealing and brine distribution at grain boundaries in natural fine-grained Halite (Qum Kuh salt fountain, Central Iran): implications for rheology of salt extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.; de Bresser, J. H. P.

    2010-05-01

    When grain boundary movement is stopped, surface energy related forces reassert themselves driving the system to its equilibrium conditions ([2], [6], [7], [8]). This could result in growth of islands and shrinking of channels and hence in healing the boundary by internal redistribution of fluid and solid in the contact region. Such islands are proposed to grow preferentially close to the contact rim and promote the healing of the grain-grain contact, which in turn prevents transport in or out the boundary region and thus traps the fluids in isolated inclusions. This contribution is focused on observation of grain boundary microstructures in natural mylonitic rocksalt collected from the distal part of Kum-Quh salt fountain (central Iran) in order to give unprecedented insight of grain boundary microstructures using argon-beam cross-sectioning to prepare high quality polished surfaces suitable for high-resolution SEM imaging. The possibility to use our SEM under cryogenic conditions allows also imaging the in-situ distribution of fluids. Results show that brine at grain boundaries occurs as thick layers (> µm in scale) corresponding to cross-sectioned wetted triple junction tubes, as filling at triple junction and as array of isolated fluids inclusions at grain-grain contacts. Close observations at islands contacts suggest the presence of a very thin fluid film (<100 nm). The most remarkable is evidence for sealing of pore space appearing as subhedral crystals filling the void space and decoupled from surrounding crystals by a thin brine layer. In parallel to this microstructural study, we deformed the same samples in order to simulate the simple shear flow at very low mean stress as in the salt fountain. First results suggest a complicated rheology. Samples loaded at σ < 0.7 MPa show no measurable deformation in a month, indicating strain rates less than 10-12 s-1 though, in fully activated pressure-solution (PS) creep, strain rates of several orders of magnitude

  20. Effects of Natural and Anthropogenic Change on Habitat Use and Movement of Endangered Salt Marsh Harvest Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine R.; Barthman-Thompson, Laureen; Gould, William R.; Mabry, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The northern salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris halicoetes) is an endangered species endemic to the San Francisco Bay Estuary. Using a conservation behavior perspective, we examined how salt marsh harvest mice cope with both natural (daily tidal fluctuations) and anthropogenic (modification of tidal regime) changes in natural tidal wetlands and human-created diked wetlands, and investigated the role of behavioral flexibility in utilizing a human-created environment in the Suisun Marsh. We used radio telemetry to determine refuge use at high tide, space use, and movement rates to investigate possible differences in movement behavior in tidal versus diked wetlands. We found that the vast majority of the time salt marsh harvest mice remain in vegetation above the water during high tides. We also found no difference in space used by mice during high tide as compared to before or after high tide in either tidal or diked wetlands. We found no detectable difference in diurnal or nocturnal movement rates in tidal wetlands. However, we did find that diurnal movement rates for mice in diked wetlands were lower than nocturnal movement rates, especially during the new moon. This change in movement behavior in a relatively novel human-created habitat indicates that behavioral flexibility may facilitate the use of human-created environments by salt marsh harvest mice. PMID:25310800

  1. Effects of natural and anthropogenic change on habitat use and movement of endangered salt marsh harvest mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine R; Barthman-Thompson, Laureen; Gould, William R; Mabry, Karen E

    2014-01-01

    The northern salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris halicoetes) is an endangered species endemic to the San Francisco Bay Estuary. Using a conservation behavior perspective, we examined how salt marsh harvest mice cope with both natural (daily tidal fluctuations) and anthropogenic (modification of tidal regime) changes in natural tidal wetlands and human-created diked wetlands, and investigated the role of behavioral flexibility in utilizing a human-created environment in the Suisun Marsh. We used radio telemetry to determine refuge use at high tide, space use, and movement rates to investigate possible differences in movement behavior in tidal versus diked wetlands. We found that the vast majority of the time salt marsh harvest mice remain in vegetation above the water during high tides. We also found no difference in space used by mice during high tide as compared to before or after high tide in either tidal or diked wetlands. We found no detectable difference in diurnal or nocturnal movement rates in tidal wetlands. However, we did find that diurnal movement rates for mice in diked wetlands were lower than nocturnal movement rates, especially during the new moon. This change in movement behavior in a relatively novel human-created habitat indicates that behavioral flexibility may facilitate the use of human-created environments by salt marsh harvest mice. PMID:25310800

  2. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of solvent-in-salt electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liumin, Suo; Fang, Zheng; Yong-Sheng, Hu; Liquan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Cation-anion interaction with different ratios of salt to solvent is investigated by FT-Raman spectroscopy. The fitting result of the C-N-C bending vibration manifests that the cation-anion coordination structure changes tremendously with the variation of salt concentration. It is well known that lithium-ion transport in ultrahigh salt concentration electrolyte is dramatically different from that in dilute electrolyte, due to high viscosity and strong cation-anion interaction. In ultrahigh salt concentrated “solvent-in-salt” electrolyte (SIS-7#), we found, on one hand, that the cation and anion in the solution mainly formed cation-anion pairs with a high Li+ coordination number (≥ 1), including intimate ion pairs (20.1%) and aggregated ion pairs (79.9%), which not only cause low total ionic conductivity but also cause a high lithium transference number (0.73). A possible lithium transport mechanism is proposed: in solvent-in-salt electrolytes, lithium ions’ direct movement presumably depends on Li-ion exchange between aggregated ion pairs and solvent molecules, which repeats a dissolving and re-complexing process between different oxygen groups of solvent molecules. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB932300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210, 51472268, and 11234013), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010300).

  3. A rapid method for the determination of lithium transference numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Dai, H.; Sanderson, S.; Davey, J.; Uribe, F.

    1997-05-01

    Lithium ion-conducting polymer electrolytes are of increasing interest for use in lithium-polymer batteries. Lithium transference numbers, the net fraction of current carried by lithium in a cell, are key figures of merit for potential lithium battery electrolytes. The authors describe the Electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) method for the determination of lithium ion transference numbers (T{sub Li}). The work presented is a proof-of-concept of the application of the ENMR method to lithium ion transference measurements for several different lithium salts in gelled electrolytes. The NMR method allows accurate determination of T{sub Li} values, as indicated by the similarity of T{sub Li} in the gelled electrolytes to those in aqueous electrolyte solutions at low salt concentration. Based on calculated tradeoffs of various experimental parameters, they also discuss some conclusions concerning the range of applicability of the method to other electrolytes with lower lithium mobility.

  4. Solid Polymer Electrolytes Based on Functionalized Tannic Acids from Natural Resources for All-Solid-State Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jimin; Bae, Ki Yoon; Kim, Hee Joong; Lee, Jin Hong; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Yoon, Woo Young; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2015-12-21

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries are prepared by simple one-pot polymerization induced by ultraviolet (UV) light using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) as an ion-conducting monomeric unit and tannic acid (TA)-based crosslinking agent and plasticizer. The crosslinking agent and plasticizer based on natural resources are obtained from the reaction of TA with glycidyl methacrylate and glycidyl poly(ethylene glycol), respectively. Dimensionally stable free-standing SPE having a large ionic conductivity of 5.6×10(-4)  Scm(-1) at room temperature can be obtained by the polymerization of PEGMA into P(PEGMA) with a very small amount (0.1 wt %) of the crosslinking agent and 2.0 wt % of the plasticizer. The ionic conductivity value of SPE with a crosslinked structure is one order of magnitude larger than that of linear P(PEGMA) in the waxy state.

  5. The electrorheological behavior of suspensions based on molten-salt synthesized lithium titanate nanoparticles and their core-shell titanate/urea analogues.

    PubMed

    Plachy, T; Mrlik, M; Kozakova, Z; Suly, P; Sedlacik, M; Pavlinek, V; Kuritka, I

    2015-02-18

    This paper concerns the preparation of novel electrorheological (ER) materials using microwave-assisted synthesis as well as utilizing a suitable shell-providing system with enhanced ER performance. Lithium titanate nanoparticles were successfully synthesized, and their composition was confirmed via X-ray diffraction. Rheological properties were investigated in the absence as well as in the presence of an external electric field. Dielectric properties clarified the response of the particles to the application of an electric field. The urea-coated lithium titanate nanoparticle-based suspension exhibits higher ER performance in comparison to suspensions based on bare particles.

  6. Alignment nature of ZnO nanowires grown on polished and nanoscale etched lithium niobate surface through self-seeding thermal evaporation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanan, Ajay Achath; Parthiban, R.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanowires were grown directly on LiNbO{sub 3} surface for the first time by thermal evaporation. • Self-alignment of the nanowires due to step bunching of LiNbO{sub 3} surface is observed. • Increased roughness in surface defects promoted well-aligned growth of nanowires. • Well-aligned growth was then replicated in 50 nm deep trenches on the surface. • Study opens novel pathway for patterned growth of ZnO nanowires on LiNbO{sub 3} surface. - Abstract: High aspect ratio catalyst-free ZnO nanowires were directly synthesized on lithium niobate substrate for the first time through thermal evaporation method without the use of a buffer layer or the conventional pre-deposited ZnO seed layer. As-grown ZnO nanowires exhibited a crisscross aligned growth pattern due to step bunching of the polished lithium niobate surface during the nanowire growth process. On the contrary, scratches on the surface and edges of the substrate produced well-aligned ZnO nanowires in these defect regions due to high surface roughness. Thus, the crisscross aligned nature of high aspect ratio nanowire growth on the lithium niobate surface can be changed to well-aligned growth through controlled etching of the surface, which is further verified through reactive-ion etching of lithium niobate. The investigations and discussion in the present work will provide novel pathway for self-seeded patterned growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowires on lithium niobate based micro devices.

  7. Impact of solid second phases on deformation mechanisms of naturally deformed salt rocks (Kuh-e-Namak, Dashti, Iran) and rheological stratification of the Hormuz Salt Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, P.; Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; Schulmann, K.; Rahmati, M.; Lexa, O.; Wollenberg, U.

    2015-05-01

    Viscosity contrasts displayed in flow structures of a mountain namakier (Kuh-e-Namak - Dashti), between 'weak' second phase bearing rock salt and 'strong' pure rock salt types are studied for deformation mechanisms using detailed quantitative microstructural study. While the solid inclusions rich ("dirty") rock salts contain disaggregated siltstone and dolomite interlayers, "clean" salts reveal microscopic hematite and remnants of abundant fluid inclusions in non-recrystallized cores of porphyroclasts. Although the flow in both, the recrystallized "dirty" and "clean" salt types is accommodated by combined mechanisms of pressure-solution creep (PS), grain boundary sliding (GBS), transgranular microcracking and dislocation creep accommodated grain boundary migration (GBM), their viscosity contrasts observed in the field outcrops are explained by: 1) enhanced ductility of "dirty" salts due to increased diffusion rates along the solid inclusion-halite contacts than along halite-halite contacts, and 2) slow rates of intergranular diffusion due to dissolved iron and inhibited dislocation creep due to hematite inclusions for "clean" salt types Rheological contrasts inferred by microstructural analysis between both salt rock classes apply in general for the "dirty" salt forming Lower Hormuz and the "clean" salt forming the Upper Hormuz of the Hormuz Formation and imply strain rate gradients or decoupling along horizons of mobilized salt types of different composition and microstructure.

  8. Influence of the nature of calcium salts on serum calcium, phosphorus, calcitonin, growth hormone, and somatomedin C.

    PubMed

    Reginster, J Y; Denis, D; Albert, A; Gaspar, S; Heynen, G; Deroisy, R; Franchimont, P

    1988-01-01

    Twenty healthy males were randomly divided into three groups. Each subject received either 405 mg elemental calcium (Ca) as a salt linked to an amino acid precursor, 405 mg CaC12 or 1000 mg Ca as Ca gluconolactate and carbonate. In all three cases, Ca intake led to an increase of serum Ca and TCT production and a decrease of PTH liberation. However, when Ca is linked to the amino acid precursor, an elective stimulation of growth hormone (GH) and somatomedin C (SmC) occurs. Due to the nature of its amino acid precursor, this salt seems to stimulate GH and SmC liberation through hypophysis. This could be a major pathway in decoupling of the sequence resorption-formation and therapy of metabolic bone diseases. PMID:3375576

  9. Air breathing lithium power cells

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15

    A cell suitable for use in a battery according to one embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; a stabilized zirconia electrolyte for selective oxygen anion transport; a molten salt electrolyte; and a lithium-based anode. A cell suitable for use in a battery according to another embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; an electrolyte; a membrane selective to molecular oxygen; and a lithium-based anode.

  10. Solubility of calcium salts of unconjugated and conjugated natural bile acids.

    PubMed

    Gu, J J; Hofmann, A F; Ton-Nu, H T; Schteingart, C D; Mysels, K J

    1992-05-01

    The approximate solubility products of the calcium salts of ten unconjugated bile acids and several taurine conjugated bile acids were determined. The formation of micelles, gels, and/or precipitates in relation to Ca2+,Na+, and bile salt concentration was summarized by "phase maps." Because the ratio of Ca2+ to bile salt in the precipitates was ca. 1:2, and the activity of Ca2+ but not that of bile salt (BA-) could be measured, the ion product of aCa2+ [BA-]2 was calculated. The ion product (= Ksp) ranged over nine orders of magnitude and the solubility thus ranged over three orders of magnitude; its value depended on the number and orientation of the hydroxyl groups in the bile acid. Ion products (in units of 10(-9) mol/l)3 were as follows: cholic (3 alpha OH,7 alpha OH,12 alpha OH) 640; ursocholic (3 alpha OH,7 beta OH,12 alpha OH) 2300; hyocholic (3 alpha OH,6 alpha OH,7 alpha OH) 11; ursodeoxycholic (3 alpha OH,7 beta OH) 91; chenodeoxycholic (3 alpha OH,7 alpha OH) 10; deoxycholic (3 alpha OH,12 alpha OH) 1.5; 12-epideoxycholic (lagodeoxycholic, 3 alpha OH,12 beta OH) 2.2; hyodeoxycholic (3 alpha OH,6 alpha OH) 0.7; and lithocholic (3 alpha OH) 0.00005. The critical micellization temperature of the sodium salt of murideoxycholic acid (3 alpha OH,6 beta OH) was greater than 100 degrees C, and its Ca2+ salt was likely to be very insoluble. Taurine conjugates were much more soluble than their corresponding unconjugated derivatives: chenodeoxycholyltaurine, 384; deoxycholyltaurine, 117; and cholyltaurine, greater than 10,000. Calcium salts of unconjugated bile acids precipitated rapidly in contrast to those of glycine conjugates which were metastable for months. Thus, hepatic conjugation of bile acids with taurine or glycine not only enhances solubility at acidic pH, but also at Ca2+ ion concentrations present in bile and intestinal content.

  11. Lithium/bromine cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.G.; Skarstad, P.M.; Hayes, T.G.; Owens, B.B.

    1980-01-01

    Bromine is attractive as a cathode material because cells with a high energy density and high cell voltage are theoretically possible. The addition of small amounts of certain salts or organic compounds results in bromine solutions of sufficient conductivity for cathode applications. However, given these highly conductive bromine cathodes, lithium/bromine cells are limited in rate and practical available capacity by the high resistivity of the discharge product. The rate of resistance increase for the best bromine cells in this study is more than one order of magnitude greater than that observed for corresponding lithium/iodine cells. Lithium/bromine cells can function at pacemaker rates and they may be superior to cells used in early pacemakers. However, the authors have not found the lithium/bromine cells described to be superior to existing lithium/iodine cells available for cardiac pacemakers. 17 refs.

  12. Lithium air batteries having ether-based electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Curtiss, Larry A.; Lu, Jun; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2016-10-25

    A lithium-air battery includes a cathode including a porous active carbon material, a separator, an anode including lithium, and an electrolyte including a lithium salt and polyalkylene glycol ether, where the porous active carbon material is free of a metal-based catalyst.

  13. RECOVERY AND SEPARATION OF LITHIUM VALUES FROM SALVAGE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Hansford, D.L.; Raabe, E.W.

    1963-08-20

    Lithium values can be recovered from an aqueous basic solution by reacting the values with a phosphate salt soluble in the solution, forming an aqueous slurry of the resultant aqueous insoluble lithium phosphate, contacting the slurry with an organic cation exchange resin in the acid form until the slurry has been clarified, and thereafter recovering lithium values from the resin. (AEC)

  14. Lithium to the Rescue.

    PubMed

    Jope, Richard S; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    Lithium, an element that Mother Nature has put in some drinking water sources, has been used for its curative powers for centuries. Today, it's given in capsule form as a mood stabilizer for bipolar disorder and depression. New research, however, reveals its role as a neuroprotector, and suggests that a better understanding of the role enzymes modulated by lithium play could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27408673

  15. Liquid surface skimmer apparatus for molten lithium and method

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Samuel C.; Pollard, Roy E.; Thompson, William F.; Stark, Marshall W.; Currin, Jr., Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for separating two fluids having different specific gravities. The invention also relates to a method for using the separating apparatus of the present invention. This invention particularly relates to the skimming of molten lithium metal from the surface of a fused salt electrolyte in the electrolytic production of lithium metal from a mixed fused salt.

  16. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  17. Development of a bipolar cell for electrochemical production of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Mack, G.; Peterman, K.; Weinland, S.; McKenzie, P.

    1995-02-22

    Lithium metal can be electrolytically refined from aqueous solutions of its compounds by partial reduction to form a lithium amalgam, followed by reduction of the amalgam to liquid lithium in a molten salt cell at 225 C. A bipolar cell (with a continuous, amalgam electrode circulating between the aqueous and salt cells) was designed, constructed and successfully tested on the bench scale, as a proof of principle of an efficient, safe and low-temperature alternative to existing processes.

  18. Electrochemical performance of cobalt vanadium oxide/natural graphite as anode for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Shibing; Ma, Jianjun; Zhang, Jicheng; Yang, Xuelin; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-05-01

    CoV2O6/natural graphite electrode with sodium alginate binder is prepared, which shows excellent electrochemical performance as anode for Li-ion batteries. It exhibits initial discharge and charge capacity of 902 and 638 mAh g-1 at a specific current of 110 mA g-1. After 100 cycles, the discharge and charge capacity maintain of 669 and 665 mAh g-1, respectively. The charge/discharge mechanism of CoV2O6 is also studied, suggesting a structure variation in discharging, which involves the initial formation of LiV2O5 and Co3V2O8, the subsequent transition from Co3V2O8 to LixV2O5 and CoO, and the later reduction of CoO into Co. The structure variation of Co3V2O8 accompanies by an amorphization process, which maintains in the subsequent discharging and charging process.

  19. Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  20. Electrophysical behavior of ion-conductive organic-inorganic polymer system based on aliphatic epoxy resin and salt of lithium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matkovska, Liubov; Iurzhenko, Maksym; Mamunya, Yevgen; Matkovska, Olga; Demchenko, Valeriy; Lebedev, Eugene; Boiteux, Gisele; Serghei, Anatoli

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, ion-conductive hybrid organic-inorganic polymers based on epoxy oligomer of diglycide aliphatic ester of polyethylene glycol (DEG) and lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) were synthesized. The effect of LiClO4 content on the electrophysical properties of epoxy polymers has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS). The effect of LiClO4 content on the structure has been studied by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). It was found that LiClO4 impacts on the structure of the synthesized hybrid epoxy polymers, probably, by formation of coordinative complexes {ether oxygen-lithium cations-ether oxygen} as evidenced from a significant increase in their glass transition temperatures with increasing LiClO4 concentration and WAXS studies. The presence of ether oxygen in DEG macromolecules provides a transfer mechanism of the lithium cations with the ether oxygen similar to polyethylene oxide (PEO). Thus, the obtained hybrid polymers have high values of ionic conductivity σ' (approximately 10-3 S/cm) and permittivity ɛ' (6 × 105) at elevated temperatures (200°C). On the other hand, DEG has higher heat resistance compared to PEO that makes these systems perspective as solid polymer electrolytes able to operate at high temperature.

  1. Lithium isotopes in large rivers reveal the cannibalistic nature of modern continental weathering and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, Mathieu; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien; Galy, Valier; Hilton, Robert G.; Louvat, Pascale; France-Lanord, Christian

    2014-09-01

    The erosion of major mountain ranges is thought to be largely cannibalistic, recycling sediments that were deposited in the ocean or on the continents prior to mountain uplift. Despite this recognition, it has not yet been possible to quantify the amount of recycled material that is presently transported by rivers to the ocean. Here, we have analyzed the Li content and isotope composition (δLi7) of suspended sediments sampled along river depth profiles and bed sands in three of the largest Earth's river systems (Amazon, Mackenzie and Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers). The δLi7 values of river-sediments transported by these rivers range from +5.3 to -3.6‰ and decrease with sediment grain size. We interpret these variations as reflecting a mixture of unweathered rock fragments (preferentially transported at depth in the coarse fraction) and present-day weathering products (preferentially transported at the surface in the finest fraction). Only the finest surface sediments contain the complementary reservoir of Li solubilized by water-rock interactions within the watersheds. Li isotopes also show that river bed sands can be interpreted as a mixture between unweathered fragments of igneous and sedimentary rocks. A mass budget approach, based on Li isotopes, Li/Al and Na/Al ratios, solved by an inverse method allows us to estimate that, for the large rivers analyzed here, the part of solid weathering products formed by present-day weathering reactions and transported to the ocean do not exceed 35%. Li isotopes also show that the sediments transported by the Amazon, Mackenzie and Ganga-Brahmaputra river systems are mostly sourced from sedimentary rocks (>60%) rather than igneous rocks. This study shows that Li isotopes in the river particulate load are a good proxy for quantifying both the erosional rock sources and the fingerprint of present-day weathering processes. Overall, Li isotopes in river sediments confirm the cannibalistic nature of erosion and weathering.

  2. EVALUATING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR RADIONUCLIDE & ORGANIC CONTAMINATION IN GROUNDWATER (SALT LAKE CITY, UT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for radionuclides and inorganic contaminants is dependent on naturally occurring processes in the subsurface that act without human intervention to reduce the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume or concentration of contaminants. EPA is developing ...

  3. The Nature of the lithium rich giants. Mixing episodes on the RGB and early-AGB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, C.; Balachandran, S. C.

    2000-07-01

    We present a critical analysis of the nature of the so-called Li-rich RGB stars. For a majority of the stars, we have used Hipparcos parallaxes to determine masses and evolutionary states by comparing their position on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical evolutionary tracks. Among the twenty Li-rich giants whose location on the HR diagram we were able to determine precisely, five appear to be Li-rich because they have not completed the standard first dredge-up dilution, and three have abundances compatible with the maximum allowed by standard dilution. Thus, these should be re-classified as Li-normal. For the remaining stars, the high Li abundance must be a result of fresh synthesis of this fragile element. We identify two distinct episodes of Li production which occur in advanced evolutionary phases depending upon the mass of the star. Low-mass RGB stars, which later undergo the helium flash, produce Li at the phase referred to as the bump in the luminosity function. At this evolutionary phase, the outwardly-moving hydrogen shell burns through the mean molecular weight discontinuity created by the first dredge-up. Any extra-mixing process can now easily connect the 3He-rich envelope material to the outer regions of the hydrogen-burning shell, enabling Li production by the Cameron & Fowler (1971) process. While very high Li abundances are then reached, this Li-rich phase is extremely short lived because once the mixing extends deep enough to lower the carbon isotopic ratio below the standard dilution value, the freshly synthesized Li is quickly destroyed. In intermediate-mass stars, the mean molecular weight gradient due to the first dredge-up is not erased until after the star has begun to burn helium in its core. The Li-rich phase in these stars occurs when the convective envelope deepens at the base of the AGB, permitting extra-mixing to play an effective role. Li production ceases when a strong mean molecular weight gradient is built up between the

  4. Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, as a near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1983-11-01

    Since high concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not normally encountered in salt domes or beds, finding an exact geologic analog of expected near-field conditions in a mined nuclear waste repository in salt will be difficult. The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, however, provides an opportunity to investigate the migration and retardation of naturally occurring U, Th, Ra, Cs, Sr and other elements in hot brines which have been moving through clay-rich sedimentary rocks for up to 100,000 years. The more than thirty deep wells drilled in this field to produce steam for electrical generation penetrate sedimentary rocks containing concentrated brines where temperatures reach 365/sup 0/C at only 2 km depth. The brines are primarily Na, K, Ca chlorides with up to 25% of total dissolved solids; they also contain high concentrations of metals such as Fe, Mn, Li, Zn, and Pb. This report describes the geology, geophysics and geochemistry of this system as a prelude to a study of the mobility of naturally occurring radionuclides and radionuclide analogs within it. The aim of this study is to provide data to assist in validating quantitative models of repository behavior and to use in designing and evaluating waste packages and engineered barriers. 128 references, 33 figures, 13 tables.

  5. Sulfide variation in the pore and surface waters of artificial salt-marsh ditches and a natural tidal creek

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, J.R.; Shaffer, J.; Kain, T.; Stahl, R.; Crossman, R. )

    1992-09-01

    Pore and surface water sulfide variation near artificial ditches and a natural creek are examined in salt marshes bordering the Indian River Lagoon in east-central Florida. Pore water sulfide concentrations ranged from 0 [mu]g-at l[sup [minus]1] to 1,640 [mu]g-at l[sup [minus]1]. On average, the natural creek had the lowest sulfide concentrations (mean < 1.0 [mu]g-at l[sup [minus]1]) and the perimeter ditch of a managed salt marsh impoundment the highest (436.5 [mu]g-at l[sup [minus]1]). There was a trend of increasing sulfide concentration in the summer, and sharp peaks in late fall-early winter which correspond with peak litter input into the sediments. Significant differences in sulfide concentration between sites are attributed to differences in water flow and in organic matter content. Delaying the seasonal opening of culverts (which connect impounded marshes with the lagoon) until lagoon water levels rise in fall may prevent massive fish kills that have been associated with high sulfide levels in the impoundment perimeter ditches. 35 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan

    2011-10-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by {gamma}- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. {chi}{sup 2} test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

  7. Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by γ- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. χ2 test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

  8. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Manis Kumar Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: • Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. • Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. • The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. • Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. • After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 °C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 − (1 − X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ‘ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles’ i.e. 1 − 3(1 − X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 − X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  9. Batteries using molten salt electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, Ronald A.

    2003-04-08

    An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

  10. Sputter deposition of lithium silicate - lithium phosphate amorphous electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N.J.; Bates, J.B.; Luck, C.F. ); Robertson, J.D. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of an amorphous lithium-conducting electrolyte were deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of ceramic targets containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The lithium content of the films was found to depend more strongly on the nature and composition of the targets than on many other sputtering parameters. For targets containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, most of the lithium was found to segregate away from the sputtered area of the target. Codeposition using two sputter sources achieves a high lithium content in a controlled and reproducible film growth. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Alamgir, Mohamed; Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.

    1993-01-01

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  12. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

    1993-10-12

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

  13. Salt lakes of Western Australia - Natural abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, T.; Studenroth, S.; Mulder, I.; Tubbesing, C.; Kotte, K.; Ofner, J.; Junkermann, W.; Schöler, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by global climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its many ephemeral saline and hypersaline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters that have gradually changed over the last fifty years. Historically, the region was covered by eucalyptus trees and shrubs, but was cleared mainly within 10 years after WWII to make room for wheat and live stock. After the clearance of the deep rooted native plants the groundwater started to rise, bringing increased amounts of dissolved salts and minerals to the surface and discharging them into streams and lakes. Thus most of Western Australia is influenced by secondary salinisation (soil salting) [1]. Another problem is that the discharged minerals affect the pH of ground and surface water, which ranges from acidic to slightly basic. During the 2011 campaign surface water was measured with a pH between 2.5 and 7.1. Another phenomenon in Western Australia is the decrease of rainfall over the last decades assumed to be linked to the secondary salinisation. The rising saline and mineral rich groundwater increases the biotical and abiotical activity of the salt lakes. Halogenated and non-halogenated volatile organic compounds emitted from those lakes undergo fast oxidation and chemical reactions to form small particles modifying cloud microphysics and thus suppressing rain events [2]. Our objective is to gain a better understanding of this extreme environment with its hypersaline acidic lakes with regard to the potential abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds and its impact on the local climate. In spring 2011 fifty-three sediment samples from ten salt lakes in the Lake King region where taken, freeze-dried and ground. In order to simulate the abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds the soil samples were resuspended with water in gas-tight headspace vials. The headspace was measured using a purge and trap GC

  14. Synthesis of tetraaza bromide macrocyclic and studies of its effect on poly(methyl methacrylate) grafted natural rubber (MG49) - lithium tertrafluoroborate (LiBF4) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariam, Siti Nor; Yamin, Bohari M.; Ahmad, Azizan

    2013-11-01

    Good Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Grafted natural Rubber (MG49) films with homogeneous and smooth surface were obtained in the presence of Lithium Tertrafluoroborate (LiBF4) and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7,14-dienium bromide, (Me6N4H4)Br2 as dopants. The conductivity was found to be 3.63×10-6 S/cm an increase by seven fold compare to the undoped MG49.

  15. Synthesis of tetraaza bromide macrocyclic and studies of its effect on poly(methyl methacrylate) grafted natural rubber (MG49) - lithium tertrafluoroborate (LiBF{sub 4}) films

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Siti Nor; Yamin, Bohari M.; Ahmad, Azizan

    2013-11-27

    Good Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Grafted natural Rubber (MG49) films with homogeneous and smooth surface were obtained in the presence of Lithium Tertrafluoroborate (LiBF{sub 4}) and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7,14-dienium bromide, (Me{sub 6}N{sub 4}H{sub 4})Br{sub 2} as dopants. The conductivity was found to be 3.63×10{sup −6} S/cm an increase by seven fold compare to the undoped MG49.

  16. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  17. Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-30

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

  18. Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Godshall, Ned A.; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

  19. Electrolytic method for the production of lithium using a lithium-amalgam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Krikorian, Oscar H.; Homsy, Robert V.

    1979-01-01

    A method for recovering lithium from its molten amalgam by electrolysis of the amalgam in an electrolytic cell containing as a molten electrolyte a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of two or more alkali metal halides, preferably alkali metal halides selected from lithium iodide, lithium chloride, potassium iodide and potassium chloride. A particularly suitable molten electrolyte is a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of at least three components obtained by modifying an eutectic mixture of LiI-KI by the addition of a minor amount of one or more alkali metal halides. The lithium-amalgam fused-salt cell may be used in an electrolytic system for recovering lithium from an aqueous solution of a lithium compound, wherein electrolysis of the aqueous solution in an aqueous cell in the presence of a mercury cathode produces a lithium amalgam. The present method is particularly useful for the regeneration of lithium from the aqueous reaction products of a lithium-water-air battery.

  20. Studies on the translational and rotational motions of ionic liquids composed of N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13) cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Fujii, Kenta; Suenaga, Masahiko; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL, IL) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13, Py13, PYR13, or mppy) is an important cation and produces stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO2CF3)2, TFSA, TFSI, NTf2, or Tf2N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [N(SO2F)2, FSA, or FSI], were investigated. In addition to P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, lithium salt doped samples were prepared (P13-TFSA-Li and P13-FSA-Li). The individual ion diffusion coefficients (D) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured by H1, F19, and L7i NMR. At the same time, the ionic conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and density (ρ) were measured over a wide temperature range. The van der Waals volumes of P13, TFSA, FSA, Li(TFSA)2, and Li(FSA)3 were estimated by molecular orbital calculations. The experimental values obtained in this study were analyzed by the classical Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein (NE), and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations and Walden plots were also made for the neat and binary ILs to clarify physical and mobile properties of individual ions. From the temperature-dependent velocity correlation coefficients for neat P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, the NE parameter 1-ξ was evaluated. The ionicity (electrochemical molar conductivity divided by the NE conductivity from NMR) and the 1-ξ had exactly the same values. The rotational and translational motions of P13 and jump of a lithium ion are also discussed.

  1. Synthesis of nano-sized silicon from natural halloysite clay and its high performance as anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Wu, Lili; Yang, Juan; Tang, Jingjing; Xi, Lihua; Wang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Recently, nanostructured Si has been intensively studied as a promising anode candidate for lithium ion batteries due to its ultrahigh capacity. However, the downsizing of Si to nanoscale dimension is often impeded by complicated and expensive methods. In this work, natural halloysite clay was utilized for the production of Si nanoparticles through selective acid etching and modified magnesiothermic reduction processes. The physical and chemical changes of these samples during the various processes have been analyzed. The as-prepared Hsbnd Si from halloysite clay is composed of many interconnected Si nanoparticles with an average diameter of 20-50 nm. Owing to the small size and porous nature, the Hsbnd Si nanoparticles exhibit a satisfactory performance as an anode for lithium ion batteries. Without further modification, a stable capacity over 2200 mAh g-1 at a rate of 0.2 C after 100 cycles and a reversible capacity above 800 mAh g-1 at a rate of 1 C after 1000 cycles can be obtained. As a result, this synthetic route is cost-effective and can be scaled up for mass production of Si nanoparticles, which may facilitate valuable utilization of halloysite clay and further commercial application of Si-based anode materials.

  2. Synthesis of nano-sized silicon from natural halloysite clay and its high performance as anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Wu, Lili; Yang, Juan; Tang, Jingjing; Xi, Lihua; Wang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Recently, nanostructured Si has been intensively studied as a promising anode candidate for lithium ion batteries due to its ultrahigh capacity. However, the downsizing of Si to nanoscale dimension is often impeded by complicated and expensive methods. In this work, natural halloysite clay was utilized for the production of Si nanoparticles through selective acid etching and modified magnesiothermic reduction processes. The physical and chemical changes of these samples during the various processes have been analyzed. The as-prepared Hsbnd Si from halloysite clay is composed of many interconnected Si nanoparticles with an average diameter of 20-50 nm. Owing to the small size and porous nature, the Hsbnd Si nanoparticles exhibit a satisfactory performance as an anode for lithium ion batteries. Without further modification, a stable capacity over 2200 mAh g-1 at a rate of 0.2 C after 100 cycles and a reversible capacity above 800 mAh g-1 at a rate of 1 C after 1000 cycles can be obtained. As a result, this synthetic route is cost-effective and can be scaled up for mass production of Si nanoparticles, which may facilitate valuable utilization of halloysite clay and further commercial application of Si-based anode materials.

  3. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  4. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  5. Effects of the anion salt nature on the rate constants of the aqueous proton exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Jose M; Garzon, Andres; Crovetto, Luis; Orte, Angel; Lopez, Sergio G; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2012-04-28

    The proton-transfer ground-state rate constants of the xanthenic dye 9-[1-(2-methyl-4-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (TG-II), recovered by Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS), have proven to be useful to quantitatively reflect specific cation effects in aqueous solutions (J. M. Paredes, L. Crovetto, A. Orte, J. M. Alvarez-Pez and E. M. Talavera, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 1685-1694). Since these phenomena are more sensitive to anions than to cations, in this paper we have accounted for the influence of salts with the sodium cation in common, and the anion classified according to the empirical Hofmeister series, on the proton transfer rate constants of TG-II. We demonstrate that the presence of ions accelerates the rate of the ground-state proton-exchange reaction in the same order than ions that affect ion solvation in water. The combination of FLCS with a fluorophore undergoing proton transfer reactions in the ground state, along with the desirable feature of a pseudo-dark state when the dye is protonated, allows one unique direct determination of kinetic rate constants of the proton exchange chemical reaction. PMID:22421957

  6. Natural sources of salinity in the Brazos River, Texas with particular reference to the Croton and salt Croton Creek basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, R.C.; Hughes, Leon S.; Yost, I.D.

    1964-01-01

    The salt water may be disposed of by impounding it in reservoirs for evaporation or by injecting it underground through oil wells, oil tests, or wells drilled for saltwater disposal. Sediments in which the salt water possibly could be injected underlie the. Dove Creek Salt Flats at depths of less than 7,000 feet.

  7. Removal of nanoaerosol during the bubbling of the salt melt of beryllium and lithium fluorides for the preparation of reactor radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnit'ko, A. V.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.

    2010-06-01

    The parameters of aerosol particles formed in the course of the spontaneous thermal condensation of vapors and bubbling a 66LiF-34BeF2 (mol %) eutectic salt mixture with helium have been studied. For this purpose, a vertical bubbling mode at T ≈ 900 K and an ampule device for obtaining reactor radioisotopes for medical applications were used. The rate of the bulk removal and the chemical composition of aerosols were measured. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was bimodal, and the mass concentration of the particles exceeded by far the maximum permissible concentration (MPC). The characteristics of regenerated nickel multilayer nanofilters for ultrahigh filtration of aerosols from the salt liquid melt were analyzed.

  8. Copepod colonization of natural and artificial substrates in a salt marsh pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eileen; Ruber, Ernest

    1987-12-01

    Pre-weighed packets of Spartina alterniflora and of plastic (polypropylene) twine were placed in a salt marsh pool and recovered on 40 dates spanning 14 months. New packets were placed out regularly to provide a contrast with ageing material. Twelve species of copepods were extracted, counted, and identified. Dry weight and Kjeldahl-nitrogen were determined for Spartina packets. Eight species of copepods, Amphiascus pallidus, Onychocamptus mohammed, Cletocamptus deitersei, Halicyclops sp., Harpacticus chelifer, Mesochra lilljeborgii, Metis jousseaumei and Nitocra sp. were found in higher densities on old grass or plastic packets than on new. The quantity of material was important in that the relative attractiveness of old grass was much lower early in the second year when 7-15% dw and 0·7% nitrogen remained than early in the first year when over 60% dw and 2·0% nitrogen remained. Old plastic polypropylene was equally or more attractive than old grass to 7 of 8 species, therefore, nitrogen decline in old grass was not the factor making it less attractive. Once aged, the quantity of substrate was more important than its quality. Apparently, this is due to colonization by microflora or settlement of detritus but these were not studied. The four clear exceptions to these trends were Darcythompsonia fairliensis and Eurytemora affinis which showed highest densities 72% and 50% of the time in new grass, Apocyclops spartinus with 70% in grass and equal numbers between old and new packets and Acartia tonsa a bay calanoid with 82% of highest densities in the water column and only two occurrences out of 40 dates in the packets.

  9. Novel pseudo-delocalized anions for lithium battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Jónsson, Erlendur; Armand, Michel; Johansson, Patrik

    2012-05-01

    A novel anion concept of pseudo-delocalized anions, anions with distinct positive and negative charge regions, has been studied by a computer aided synthesis using DFT calculations. With the aim to find safer and better performing lithium salts for lithium battery electrolytes two factors have been evaluated: the cation-anion interaction strength via the dissociation reaction LiAn ⇌ Li(+) + An(-) and the anion oxidative stability via a vertical ionisation from anion to radical. Based on our computational results some of these anions have shown promise to perform well as lithium salts for modern lithium batteries and should be interesting synthetic targets for future research. PMID:22441354

  10. Modeling the dissociation conditions of salt hydrates and gas semiclathrate hydrates: application to lithium bromide, hydrogen iodide, and tetra-n-butylammonium bromide + carbon dioxide systems.

    PubMed

    Paricaud, Patrice

    2011-01-20

    A thermodynamic approach is proposed to determine the dissociation conditions of salt hydrates and semiclathrate hydrates. The thermodynamic properties of the liquid phase are described with the SAFT-VRE equation of state, and the solid-liquid equilibria are solved by applying the Gibbs energy minimization criterion under stoichiometric constraints. The methodology is applied to water + halide salt systems, and an excellent description of the solid-liquid coexistence curves is obtained. The approach is extended to the water + tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) binary mixture, and an accurate representation of the solid-liquid coexistence curves and dissociation enthalpies is obtained. The van der Waals-Platteeuw (vdW-P) theory combined with the new model for salt hydrates is used to determine the dissociation temperatures of semiclathrate hydrates of TBAB + carbon dioxide. A good description of the dissociation pressures of CO(2) semiclathrate hydrates is obtained over wide temperature, pressure, and TBAB composition ranges (AAD = 10.5%). For high TBAB weight fractions the new model predicts a change of hydrate structure from type A to type B as the partial pressure of CO(2) is increased. The model can also capture a change of behavior with respect to TBAB concentration, which has been observed experimentally: an increase of the TBAB weight fraction leads to a stabilization of the gas semiclathrate hydrate at low initial TBAB concentrations below the stoichiometric composition but leads to a destabilization of the hydrate at TBAB concentrations above the stoichiometric composition. PMID:21171658

  11. Ionic liquid based lithium battery electrolytes: charge carriers and interactions derived by density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Angenendt, Knut; Johansson, Patrik

    2011-06-23

    The solvation of lithium salts in ionic liquids (ILs) leads to the creation of a lithium ion carrying species quite different from those found in traditional nonaqueous lithium battery electrolytes. The most striking differences are that these species are composed only of ions and in general negatively charged. In many IL-based electrolytes, the dominant species are triplets, and the charge, stability, and size of the triplets have a large impact on the total ion conductivity, the lithium ion mobility, and also the lithium ion delivery at the electrode. As an inherent advantage, the triplets can be altered by selecting lithium salts and ionic liquids with different anions. Thus, within certain limits, the lithium ion carrying species can even be tailored toward distinct important properties for battery application. Here, we show by DFT calculations that the resulting charge carrying species from combinations of ionic liquids and lithium salts and also some resulting electrolyte properties can be predicted. PMID:21591707

  12. Ternary mixtures of ionic liquids for better salt solubility, conductivity and cation transference number improvement

    PubMed Central

    Karpierz, E.; Niedzicki, L.; Trzeciak, T.; Zawadzki, M.; Dranka, M.; Zachara, J.; Żukowska, G. Z.; Bitner-Michalska, A.; Wieczorek, W.

    2016-01-01

    We hereby present the new class of ionic liquid systems in which lithium salt is introduced into the solution as a lithium cation−glyme solvate. This modification leads to the reorganisation of solution structure, which entails release of free mobile lithium cation solvate and hence leads to the significant enhancement of ionic conductivity and lithium cation transference numbers. This new approach in composing electrolytes also enables even three-fold increase of salt concentration in ionic liquids. PMID:27767069

  13. Chemical and morphological characteristics of lithium electrode surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D.; Vasquez, R. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Somoano, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Lithium electrode surfaces were analyzed for chemical and morphological characteristics, using electron spectroscopy chemical analysis (ESCA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Samples included lithium metal and lithium electrodes which were cycled in a 1.5 M lithium arsenic hexafluoride/two-methyl tetrahydrofuran electrolyte. Results show that the surface of the as-received lithium metal was already covered by a film composed of LiO2 and an Li2O/CO2 adduct with a thickness of approximately 100-200 A. No evidence of Ni3 was found. Upon exposure of the lithium electrode to a 1.5 M LiAsF6/2-Me-THF electrochemical environment, a second film was observed to form on the surface, consisting primarily of As, Si, and F, possibly in the form of lithium arsenic oxyfluorides or lithium fluorosilicates. It is suggested that the film formation may be attributed to salt degradation.

  14. Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiations: Lithium Chloride Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Lekha; Hoepker, Alexander C.; Singh, Kanwal J.

    2009-01-01

    Ortholithiations of a range of arenes mediated by lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) in THF at -78 °C reveal substantial accelerations by as little as 0.5 mol % LiCl (relative to LDA). Substrate dependencies suggest a specific range of reactivity within which the LiCl catalysis is optimal. Standard protocols using unpurified commercial samples of n-butyllithium to prepare LDA or commercially available LDA show marked batch-dependent rates--up to 100-fold--that could prove significant to the unwary practitioner. Other lithium salts elicit more modest accelerations. The mechanism is not discussed. PMID:19191711

  15. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOEpatents

    Coops, Melvin S.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  16. Quaternary ammonium room-temperature ionic liquid including an oxygen atom in side chain/lithium salt binary electrolytes: ab initio molecular orbital calculations of interactions between ions.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Hayamizu, Kikuko; Seki, Shiro; Ohno, Yasutaka; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashiro, Hajime

    2008-08-14

    Interactions of the lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (LiTFSA) complex with N, N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl) ammonium (DEME), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMIM) cations, neutral diethylether (DEE), and the DEMETFSA complex were studied by ab initio molecular orbital calculations. An interaction energy potential calculated for the DEME cation with the LiTFSA complex has a minimum when the Li atom has contact with the oxygen atom of DEME cation, while potentials for the EMIM cation with the LiTFSA complex are always repulsive. The MP2/6-311G**//HF/6-311G** level interaction energy calculated for the DEME cation with the LiTFSA complex was -18.4 kcal/mol. The interaction energy for the neutral DEE with the LiTFSA complex was larger (-21.1 kcal/mol). The interaction energy for the DEMETFSA complex with LiTFSA complex is greater (-23.2 kcal/mol). The electrostatic and induction interactions are the major source of the attraction in the two systems. The substantial attraction between the DEME cation and the LiTFSA complex suggests that the interaction between the Li cation and the oxygen atom of DEME cation plays important roles in determining the mobility of the Li cation in DEME-based room temperature ionic liquids.

  17. Surface characterization of the carbon cathode and the lithium anode of Li-O₂ batteries using LiClO₄ or LiBOB salts.

    PubMed

    Younesi, Reza; Hahlin, Maria; Edström, Kristina

    2013-02-01

    The surface compositions of a MnO₂ catalyst containing carbon cathode and a Li anode in a Li-O₂ battery were investigated using synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Electrolytes comprising LiClO₄ or LiBOB salts in PC or EC:DEC (1:1) solvents were used for this study. Decomposition products from LiClO₄ or LiBOB were observed on the cathode surface when using PC. However, no degradation of LiClO₄ was detected when using EC/DEC. We have demonstrated that both PC and EC/DEC solvents decompose during the cell cycling to form carbonate and ether containing compounds on the surface of the carbon cathode. However, EC/DEC decomposed to a lesser degree compared to PC. PES revealed that a surface layer with a thickness of at least 1-2 nm remained on the MnO₂ catalyst at the end of the charged state. It was shown that the detachment of Kynar binder influences the surface composition of both the carbon cathode and the Li anode of Li-O₂ cells. The PES results indicated that in the charged state the SEI on the Li anode is composed of PEO, carboxylates, carbonates, and LiClO₄ salt. PMID:23336349

  18. Lithium ion battery with improved safety

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chun-hua; Hyung, Yoo Eup; Vissers, Donald R.; Amine, Khalil

    2006-04-11

    A lithium battery with improved safety that utilizes one or more additives in the battery electrolyte solution wherein a lithium salt is dissolved in an organic solvent, which may contain propylene, carbonate. For example, a blend of 2 wt % triphenyl phosphate (TPP), 1 wt % diphenyl monobutyl phosphate (DMP) and 2 wt % vinyl ethylene carbonate additives has been found to significantly enhance the safety and performance of Li-ion batteries using a LiPF6 salt in EC/DEC electrolyte solvent. The invention relates to both the use of individual additives and to blends of additives such as that shown in the above example at concentrations of 1 to 4-wt % in the lithium battery electrolyte. This invention relates to additives that suppress gas evolution in the cell, passivate graphite electrode and protect it from exfoliating in the presence of propylene carbonate solvents in the electrolyte, and retard flames in the lithium batteries.

  19. Tungsten carbide production from ore concentrates by molten salt-natural gas sparging treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, T.G.; Kazonich, G.; Raddatz, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a bench-scale study to delineate the important parameters in a three-step process to produce commercial-quality tungsten carbide (WC) directly from tungsten minerals. In the process, tungsten concentrates of wolframite or wolframite and scheelite are decomposed at 1,050{sup 0}C in a molten mixture of NcCl and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} that forms two immiscible phases. Tungsten, as sodium tungstate, reports to the halide phase and is separated from the gangue constituents, which report to the silicate phase. After decanting to separate the two phases, natural gas is sparged into the molten halide phase a 1,070{sup 0}C. Submicrometer crystals of WC are initially produced. These crystals grow into thin triangular-shaped plates up to 100 {mu}m on a side or into popcorn-shaped conglomerates. Sparged WC was examined for its suitability for use in sintered carbide products. In physical evaluations, sparged WC ground to an average particle size of 1.52 {mu}m and compacted with 10 pct Co binder into standard 6-by 22-mm test bars had a density of 14.35 and a Rockwell A hardness of 89.6. This compared favorably with 14.39 and 89.7 respectively, for test bars made from a standard commercial 1.52-{mu}m WC powder. Test bars made from Bureau of Mines WC had no C'' porosity or eta phase.

  20. After-effects of lithium-mediated alumination of 3-iodoanisole: isolation of molecular salt elimination and trapped-benzyne products.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Elaine; Kennedy, Alan R; Mulvey, Robert E; Robertson, Stuart D

    2012-02-14

    Gaining a deeper understanding of the modus operandi of heterometallic lithium aluminate bases towards deprotonative metallation of substituted aromatic substrates, we have studied the reactions and their aftermath between our recently developed bis-amido base '(i)Bu(2)Al(μ-TMP)(2)Li'3 and 3-halogenated anisoles. Ortho-metallation of 3-iodoanisole with 3 results in a delicately poised heterometallic intermediate whose breakdown into homometallic species and benzyne cannot be suppressed, even at low temperature or in a non-polar solvent (hexane). Homometallic components [LiI·TMP(H)](4) (5) and (i)Bu(2)Al(TMP)·THF (6) have been isolated while the reactive benzyne intermediate has been trapped via Diels-Alder cyclization with 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran yielding 1-methoxy-9-10-diphenyl-9-10-epoxyanthracene (7). In polar THF solution, nucleophilic addition of LiTMP across the benzyne functionality followed by electrophilic quenching with iodine yields the trisubstituted aromatic species 1-(2-iodo-3-methoxyphenyl)-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide (8). Compounds 5-8 have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction in the solid state and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy in solution. By considering these collated results, a plausible reaction mechanism has been proposed for the breakdown of the aforementioned intermediate bimetallic framework. Interestingly, the metallation reaction can be controlled by changing to 3-chloroanisole with an excess of base 3, as evidenced by electrophilically trapping the deprotonated aromatic with iodine to give 2-iodo-3-chloroanisole (9).

  1. Lithium Ion Polymer Electrolyte Based on Pva-Pan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F. Kingslin Mary; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Rajeswari, N.; Devi, S. Siva; Karthikeyan, S.; Raja, C. Sanjeevi

    2013-07-01

    The polymer blend electrolytes based on polyvinylalcohol(PVA) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) doped with lithium per chlorate (LiClO4) have been prepared by solution casting technique using DMF as solvent. The complex formation between blend polymer and the salt has been confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The amorphous nature of the blend polymer electrolyte has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The ionic conductivity of the prepared blend polymer electrolyte has been found by ac impedence spectroscopic analysis. The highest ionic conductivity has been found to be 5.0 X10-4 S cm -1 at room temperature for 92.5 PVA: 7.5PAN: 20 molecular wt. % of LiClO4. The effect of salt concentration on the conductivity of the blend polymer electrolyte has been discussed.

  2. Nature of the water molecules in the palisade layer of a triton X-100 micelle in the presence of added salts: A solvation dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Kumbhakar, Manoj; Goel, Teena; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Pal, Haridas

    2005-07-28

    The effect of added electrolytes on the nature of water molecules in the palisade layer of a Triton X-100 (TX-100) micelle has been investigated using solvation dynamics studies of C153 dye in the presence of different concentrations of NaCl, KCl, and CsCl salts. In all of the cases, the solvation dynamics is found to be biexponential in nature. It is seen that in the presence of added salts the solvation dynamics becomes slower. As previously reported (Charlton et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 8327; Molina-Bolivar et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2002, 106, 870), the presence of salt increases micellar hydration (and also size) for TX-100, mainly due to enhancement in the mechanically trapped water content in the palisade layer. Under normal circumstances, increased micellar hydration was expected to cause faster solvation dynamics (Kumbhakar et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2004, 108, 19246), though in the present work, a reverse trend is in fact observed with the added salts. In accordance with solvation dynamics results, fluorescence anisotropy studies also indicate an increase in microviscosity for the palisade layer of the TX-100 micelle with the added salts. The present results have been rationalized assuming that the ions reside in the palisade layer, and due to the hydration of the ions, especially the cations, the water molecules in the palisade layer undergo a kind of clustering, causing the microviscosity to in fact increase rather than decrease as expected due to increased micellar hydration. A partial collapse of the surfactant chains due to their dehydration as caused by the hydration of the ions in the palisade layer may also add to the increase in microviscosity and the consequent retardation in relaxation dynamics in the presence of salts.

  3. Lithium toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... dialysis (machine) Medicines to treat symptoms Whole bowel irrigation with a special solution taken by mouth or through a tube through the nose into the stomach (to flush sustained-release lithium quickly through the stomach and intestines)

  4. Occlusion and ion exchange in the molten (lithium chloride + potassium chloride + alkaline earth chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with alkaline earth chlorides of calcium and strontium, and in the molten (lithium chloride + potassium chloride + actinide chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with the actinide chloride of uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Lexa, D.; Chemical Engineering

    2003-04-01

    The interaction between molten salts of the type LiCl-KCl-MeCl n (Me=Ca, Sr, U; x{sub MeCLn} $$ = to 0.45; and x {sub KCl}/x LiCl=0.69) and zeolite 4A have been studied at 823 K. The main interactions between these salts and zeolite are molten salt occlusion to form salt-loaded zeolite and ion exchange between the molten salt and salt-loaded zeolite. An irreversible chemical reaction has been observed in the LiCl-KCl-UCl{sup 3+}zeolite system. The extent of occlusion is a function of the concentration of MeCl n in the zeolite and is equal to 10{+-}1 Cl- per zeolite unit cell, (AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 12}, at infinite MeCl n dilution. The ion-exchange mole-fraction equilibrium constants (separation factors) with respect to Li are decreasing functions of the concentration of SrCl{sub 2} and UCl{sub 3}, but an increasing function of the concentration of CaCl{sub 2} in the zeolite. At infinite MeCl n dilution, they are equal to 0.9, 11.9, and 13 for CaCl{sub 2}, SrCl{sub 2}, and UCl{sub 3}, respectively. The standard ion-exchange chemical potentials are equal to -50.0, -84, and -101.1 kJ x mol-1 for Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and U{sup 3+}, respectively.

  5. Electrolytes for Wide Operating Temperature Lithium-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Provided herein are electrolytes for lithium-ion electrochemical cells, electrochemical cells employing the electrolytes, methods of making the electrochemical cells and methods of using the electrochemical cells over a wide temperature range. Included are electrolyte compositions comprising a lithium salt, a cyclic carbonate, a non-cyclic carbonate, and a linear ester and optionally comprising one or more additives.

  6. Expanding Mg-Zn hybrid chemistry: inorganic salt effects in addition reactions of organozinc reagents to trifluoroacetophenone and the implications for a synergistic lithium-magnesium-zinc activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; McCall, Matthew D; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-07-18

    Numerous organic transformations rely on organozinc compounds made through salt-metathesis (exchange) reactions from organolithium or Grignard reagents with a suitable zinc precursor. By combining X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this study sheds new light on the constitution of the organometallic species involved in this important synthetic tool. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of equimolar amounts of Grignard reagents (RMgX) and ZnCl(2) in THF led to the isolation of novel magnesium-zinc hybrids, [{(thf)(2)Mg(μ-Cl)(3)ZnR}(2)] (R=Et, tBu, nBu or o-OMe-C(6)H(4)), which exhibit an unprecedented structural motif in mixed magnesium-zinc chemistry. Furthermore, theoretical modelling of the reaction of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) reveals that formation of the mixed-metal compound is thermodynamically preferred to that of the expected homometallic products, RZnCl and MgCl(2). This study also assesses the alkylating ability of hybrid 3 towards the sensitive ketone trifluoroacetophenone, revealing a dramatic increase in the chemoselectivity of the reaction when LiCl is introduced as an additive. This observation, combined with recent related breakthroughs in synthesis, points towards the existence of a trilateral Li/Mg/Zn synergistic effect. PMID:21656589

  7. Li-cycling properties of molten salt method prepared nano/submicrometer and micrometer-sized CuO for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M V; Yu, Cai; Jiahuan, Fan; Loh, Kian Ping; Chowdari, B V R

    2013-05-22

    We report the synthesis of CuO material by molten salt method at a temperature range, 280 to 950 °C for 3 h in air. This report includes studies on the effect of morphology, crystal structure and electrochemical properties of CuO prepared at different temperatures. Obtained CuO was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area methods. Samples prepared at ≥410 °C showed a single-phase material with a lattice parameter value of a = 4.69 Å, b = 3.43 Å, c = 5.13 Å and surface area values are in the range 1.0-17.0 m(2) g(-1). Electrochemical properties were evaluated via cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic cycling studies. CV studies showed a minor difference in the peak potentials depending on preparation temperature and all compounds exhibit a main anodic peak at ~2.45 V and cathodic peaks at ~0.85 V and ~1.25 V vs Li. CuO prepared at 750 °C showed high and stable capacity of ~620 mA h g(-1) at the end of 40th cycle.

  8. Method for forming thin composite solid electrolyte film for lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A composite solid electrolyte film is formed by dissolving a lithium salt such as lithium iodide in a mixture of a first solvent which is a co-solvent for the lithium salt and a binder polymer such as polyethylene oxide and a second solvent which is a solvent for the binder polymer and has poor solubility for the lithium salt. Reinforcing filler such as alumina particles are then added to form a suspension followed by the slow addition of binder polymer. The binder polymer does not agglomerate the alumina particles. The suspension is cast into a uniform film.

  9. Method for forming thin composite solid electrolyte film for lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A composite solid electrolyte film is formed by dissolving a lithium salt such as lithium iodide in a mixture of a first solvent which is a cosolvent for the lithium salt and a binder polymer such as polyethylene oxide and a second solvent which is a solvent for the binder polymer and has poor solubility for the lithium salt. Reinforcing filler such as alumina particles are then added to form a suspension followed by the slow addition of binder polymer. The binder polymer does not agglomerate the alumina particles. The suspension is cast into a uniform film.

  10. Reactivity of lithium intercalated into petroleum coke in carbonate electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Jean, M.; Tranchant, A.; Messina, R.

    1996-02-01

    There have been considerable efforts to develop lithium rocking chair batteries where the lithium metal anode is replaced by a nonmetal material capable of storing and exchanging large quantities of lithium ions. The results of a study of the reactivity of lithium intercalated into petroleum coke (Conoco) in a PC/EC/DMC (1/1/3 volume) mixture and LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} as the lithium salt are presented here. The authors show the loss of intercalated lithium is due to its reactivity with the electrolyte and increases quasi-linearly during 1,000 h of storage, and thereafter becomes less important as the storage time increases. The storage of passivated petroleum coke electrodes without any lithium content allowed the authors to determine the rates of the precipitation and dissolution reactions involving the passivating layer.

  11. [Lithium carbonate-induced hyperparathyroidism in a patient after removal of a parathyroid adenoma].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Lithium compounds are widely used and effective drugs in the treatment of mood disorders. However, despite their efficacy, the use of lithium salts is limited by their narrow therapeutic window. Treatment with lithium salts may be associated with the risk of development of numerous adverse effects. Endocrine complications include: thyroid dysfunction, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and hyperparathyroidism. Because symptoms of lithium-induced hyperparathyroidism may resemble those of the underlying disorder, hyperparathyroidism sometimes remains undetected. The pathogenic mechanism for parathyroid dysfunction in lithium-treated patients is still unclear. We report a patient who had undergone removal of a parathyroid adenoma and later developed lithium-induced hyperparathyroidism. Cessation of lithium treatment normalised parathyroid function. The described case suggests that patients with pre-existing parathyroid disorders may be particularly susceptible to the development of lithium-induced hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26094339

  12. Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2014-08-05

    A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

  13. Effect of lithium salts on the microstructure of the thymus and on vitamin C content in some lymphatic organs, the liver and suprarenal glands in F1 mouse crosses (CBA x C57BL).

    PubMed

    Ficek, W; Lesniewska, J; Mrowca, D

    1993-01-01

    The administration of lithium chloride (LiCl) to mice by intraperitoneal injection caused involution in the thymus, both in the cortex and medulla. Lithium also considerably decreased vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content in all of the organs that were studied: thymus, lymph nodes, spleen, suprarenal glands, and liver.

  14. The ion transport mechanism of lithium polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongli

    Lithium polymer electrolytes are of great interest for use in polymer-electrolyte rechargeable batteries. However, the lithium transport mechanism in the polymer electrolyte has not been fully understood, due partly to the lack of a means to characterize a key lithium transport property, the transference number, correctly and efficiently. This research pioneered the use of the electrophoretic nuclear magnetic resonance technique to measure the lithium transference number (TsbLi) of polymer electrolytes. The development of this technique is described. It is shown that the technique is strictly valid regardless of the degree of dissociation of the electrolyte and the measurement protocol is relatively straightforward. As a result, the accuracy of the technique is high compared to existing techniques. The lithium transport mechanism in polymer gel electrolytes are investigated systematically with complementary techniques including vibrational spectroscopy (Raman scattering), nuclear magnetic resonance, and a.c. impedance spectroscopy. The characteristic lithium transport behavior as a function of the temperature, the salt concentration, the anion type, and the polymer matrices is established. Perfluoroimide and perfluoromethide lithium salts always lead to a larger lithium transference number compared to conventional lithium salts. In poly(vinylidene fluororide-hexfloropropylene) based gel electrolytes, the perfluoroimide anion, (CFsb3SOsb3)sb2Nsp-, results in a nearly invariant TsbLi over a wide salt concentration range. In contrast, the CFsb3SOsb3sp- anion results in TsbLi decreasing monotonically with increasing salt concentration. In poly(acrylonitrile), which binds with Lisp+, the TsbLi versus LiCFsb3SOsb3 concentration curve is nearly parabolic. A qualitative model is proposed which defines the important molecular interactions underlying the lithium transport behavior and extends the Fuoss and Onsager theory to systems with extensive ion complexation.

  15. Electrolyte Suitable for Use in a Lithium Ion Cell or Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Electrolyte suitable for use in a lithium ion cell or battery. According to one embodiment, the electrolyte includes a fluorinated lithium ion salt and a solvent system that solvates lithium ions and that yields a high dielectric constant, a low viscosity and a high flashpoint. In one embodiment, the solvent system includes a mixture of an aprotic lithium ion solvating solvent and an aprotic fluorinated solvent.

  16. Electroactive compositions with poly(arylene oxide) and stabilized lithium metal particles

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Zhengcheng; Yuan, Shengwen; Amine, Khalil

    2015-05-12

    An electroactive composition includes an anodic material; a poly(arylene oxide); and stabilized lithium metal particles; where the stabilized lithium metal particles have a size less than about 200 .mu.m in diameter, are coated with a lithium salt, are present in an amount of about 0.1 wt % to about 5 wt %, and are dispersed throughout the composition. Lithium secondary batteries including the electroactive composition along with methods of making the electroactive composition are also discussed.

  17. Retrospective salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

  18. Low temperature electrolytes for lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhovak, Denise R.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    1991-01-01

    Combinations of methyl formate (MF) and propylene carbonate (PC) using salt concentrations of 0.6 to 2.4 M, with lithium hexafluoroarsenate and lithium tetrafluoroborate in a five to one molar ratio, were investigated as electrolytes in lithium/silver vanadium oxide batteries. The composition of the electrolyte affected cell performance at low temperature, self-discharge and abuse resistance as characterized by short circuit and crush testing. The electrolyte that provided the best combination of good low temperature performance, low cell self-discharge and abuse resistance was 0.6 M salt in 10:90 PC/MF.

  19. Permeability of natural rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during damage evolution and healing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy has developed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the bedded salt of southeastern New Mexico to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive transuranic wastes. Four vertical shafts provide access to the underground workings located at a depth of about 660 meters. These shafts connect the underground facility to the surface and potentially provide communication between lithologic units, so they will be sealed to limit both the release of hazardous waste from and fluid flow into the repository. The seal design must consider the potential for fluid flow through a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that develops in the salt near the shafts. The DRZ, which forms initially during excavation and then evolves with time, is expected to have higher permeability than the native salt. The closure of the shaft openings (i.e., through salt creep) will compress the seals, thereby inducing a compressive back-stress on the DRZ. This back-stress is expected to arrest the evolution of the DRZ, and with time will promote healing of damage. This paper presents laboratory data from tertiary creep and hydrostatic compression tests designed to characterize damage evolution and healing in WIPP salt. Healing is quantified in terms of permanent reduction in permeability, and the data are used to estimate healing times based on considerations of first-order kinetics.

  20. Fluid distribution in grain boundaries of natural fine-grained rock salt deformed at low differential stress (Qom Kuh salt fountain, central Iran): Implications for rheology and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.; de Bresser, Johannes H. P.

    2012-10-01

    We used a combination of broad ion beam cross-sectioning and cryogenic SEM to image polished surfaces and corresponding pairs of fractured grain boundaries in an investigation of grain boundary microstructures and fluid distribution in naturally deformed halite from the Qom Kuh salt glacier (central Iran). At the scale of observations, four types of fluid-filled grain boundary can be distinguished by morphology (from straight to wavy), thickness (from 5000 to 50 nm) and the presence of fluid inclusions. The mobility of the brine is shown after cutting the inclusions by broad ion beam (BIB) in vacuum and fine-grained halite forms efflorescence and precipitates on internal walls of inclusions. At cryogenic temperature, grain boundary brine is shown either as continuous film or in isolated inclusions. The halite-halite grain boundary between isolated fluid inclusions is interpreted to have formed by fluid-assisted grain boundary healing. Preliminary experiments on the samples at shear stress conditions of natural salt glacier show very slow strain rates (7.4 × 10-10 s-1 and 1 × 10-9 s-1), which are less than expected for pressure solution creep. Both microstructures and deformation experiments suggest interfacial energy-driven grain boundary healing and therefore rendering inactive the pressure solution creep in our samples. This result disagrees with previous microstructural studies of the same sample, which showed microstructural evidence for pressure solution (and dislocation creep). Different explanations are discussed, which imply that both healing and reactivation of grain boundaries are important in salt glaciers, leading to heterogeneous distribution of deformation mechanisms and strain rates in both space and time.

  1. Lithium Ion Electrolytes and Lithium Ion Cells With Good Low Temperature Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    There is provided in one embodiment of the invention an electrolyte for use in a lithium ion electrochemical cell. The electrolyte comprises a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), an ester cosolvent, and a lithium salt. The ester cosolvent comprises methyl propionate (MP), ethyl propionate (EP), methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate (EB), propyl butyrate (PB), or butyl butyrate (BB). The electrochemical cell operates in a temperature range of from about -60 C to about 60 C. In another embodiment there is provided a lithium ion electrochemical cell using the electrolyte of the invention.

  2. Lithium brines: A global perspective: Chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munk, LeeAnn; Hynek, Scott; Bradley, Dwight C.; Boutt, David; Labay, Keith A.; Jochens, Hillary; Verplanck, Philip L.; Hitzman, Murray W.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium is a critical and technologically important element that has widespread use, particularly in batteries for hybrid cars and portable electronic devices. Global demand for lithium has been on the rise since the mid-1900s and is projected to continue to increase. Lithium is found in three main deposit types: (1) pegmatites, (2) continental brines, and (3) hydrothermally altered clays. Continental brines provide approximately three-fourths of the world’s Li production due to their relatively low production cost. The Li-rich brine systems addressed here share six common characteristics that provide clues to deposit genesis while also serving as exploration guidelines. These are as follows: (1) arid climate; (2) closed basin containing a salar (salt crust), a salt lake, or both; (3) associated igneous and/or geothermal activity; (4) tectonically driven subsidence; (5) suitable lithium sources; and (6) sufficient time to concentrate brine. Two detailed case studies of Li-rich brines are presented; one on the longest produced lithium brine at Clayton Valley, Nevada, and the other on the world’s largest producing lithium brine at the Salar de Atacama, Chile.

  3. A case with reversible neurotoxicity after 2 years of dementia secondary to maintenance lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Barceló, Juan; Alonso, María Tajes; Traba, María Begoña Portela; Vilar, Alberte Araúxo; Kahn, David A

    2015-03-01

    Chronic neurotoxicity caused by lithium salts can be reversible or irreversible and may appear after years of treatment, even at serum levels considered within the usual therapeutic range. The authors present the case of a patient with bipolar disorder who developed dementia at the age of 54 after being treated with lithium carbonate at therapeutic levels for 4 years. Nevertheless, lithium treatment was continued. At age 56, the patient presented with an acute encephalopathy caused by toxic lithium levels, which resolved only after lithium carbonate was discontinued. Full recovery from the dementia, which had started 2 years earlier, occurred only after cessation of lithium. The authors conclude that when patients treated with lithium develop subacute cognitive impairment, the possibility of lithium toxicity should be considered, even if the serum levels are considered within the therapeutic range. A long duration of neurotoxicity associated with lithium treatment does not necessarily indicate an irreversible prognosis. PMID:25782766

  4. Electrochemical and in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy studies of bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide based ionic liquids on graphite and gold electrodes and lithium salt influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Chunlei; Yan, Jiawei; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-10-01

    We report electrochemical and in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of surface processes on graphite and Au(111) electrodes in N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (Py13FSI) and N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Py13TFSI) ionic liquids in the absence and presence of LiTFSI salt. In both of neat ionic liquids, the intercalation of cations and exfoliation of HOPG layers occur during cathodic excursion. However, the surface decomposition of FSI anions can form an effective protection film on the surface, which suppresses the intercalation and exfoliation processes, while the surface decomposition of TFSI anions mainly causes etching of the surface, which makes the intercalation and exfoliation easier to proceed. The addition of Li salt can promote the formation of the protective film, especially in Py13FSI, and thus significantly suppress the intercalation and exfoliation processes. The discrepancies between these two ionic liquids are caused by the different anion interactions with graphite. Additionally, comparisons of the behaviors on HOPG and on Au(111) confirm that the surface processes are crucially dependent on the nature of the electrode. Trace amounts of oxygen and water can cause the formation of a film-like structure on Au(111), but show no apparent influence on HOPG.

  5. Benzimidazole-derived anion for lithium-conducting electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzicki, Leszek; Oledzki, Piotr; Bitner, Anna; Bukowska, Maria; Szczecinski, Przemyslaw

    2016-02-01

    In this work we announce new lithium salt of 5,6-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzimidazolide (LiTDBI) designed for application in lithium conductive electrolytes. It was synthesized and completely characterized by NMR techniques. Studies show salt's thermal stability up to 270 °C and electrochemical stability in liquid solvents up to +4.7 V vs. metallic lithium anode. Basic characterization of electrolytes made with this salt show conductivity over 1 mS cm-1 and unusually high transference number at high concentrations (0.74 in EC:DMC 1:2 ratio mixture) along with low onset of conductivity peak. As a final proof of concept, cycling in half-cell was performed and electrolyte based on LiTDBI showed perfect capacity retention. Such properties show remarkable progress in creating efficient lithium-conducting electrolytes with use of weakly-coordinating anions.

  6. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2004-10-28

    The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

  7. Enhanced performance of spherical natural graphite coated by Li4Ti5O12 as anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mi; Tian, Yanyan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Gao, Jun; Huang, Bing

    2012-12-01

    The natural graphite (NG) is coated with Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) and the composite shows a markedly enhanced rate performance due to the decrease of charge transfer resistance after LTO coating. The specific capacity of the NG charge-discharged at 2 C is increased by 60.3% (128.7 vs. 80.3 mAh g-1) by coating it with 1 wt.% of Li4Ti5O12 (LTO). The comparison of the NG and that coated with 1 wt.% LTO at 0.1 C shows that the initial reversible capacity is increased from 318.1 mAh g-1 to 357.5 mAh g-1 after coating, while the total irreversible capacity loss after 50 cycles is decreased from 122.8 mAh g-1 to 103.9 mAh g-1. The composite improves the energy and power densities, safety, cycle life and lowers the price of the lithium-ion battery while avoiding the gas-swelling of full battery caused by Ti4+ because the final coating material is the lithiated LTO (Li7Ti5O12 or Li9Ti5O12).

  8. Molten salt electrolyte battery cell with overcharge tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Nelson, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte battery having an increased overcharge tolerance employs a negative electrode with two lithium alloy phases of different electrochemical potential, one of which allows self-discharge rates which permits battery cell equalization.

  9. Technical report on galvanic cells with fused-salt electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Crouthamel, C. E.; Fischer, A. K.; Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Johnson, C. E.; Shimotake, H.; Tevebaugh, A. D.

    1969-01-01

    Technical report is presented on sodium and lithium cells using fused salt electrolytes. It includes a discussion of the thermally regenerative galvanic cell and the secondary bimetallic cell for storage of electricity.

  10. Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Jr., Robert D.

    1977-01-01

    A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

  11. Single-Ion Block Copoly(ionic liquid)s as Electrolytes for All-Solid State Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Porcarelli, Luca; Shaplov, Alexander S; Salsamendi, Maitane; Nair, Jijeesh R; Vygodskii, Yakov S; Mecerreyes, David; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2016-04-27

    Polymer electrolytes have been proposed as replacement for conventional liquid electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to their intrinsic enhanced safety. Nevertheless, the power delivery of these materials is limited by the concentration gradient of the lithium salt. Single-ion conducting polyelectrolytes represent the ideal solution since their nature prevents polarization phenomena. Herein, the preparation of a new family of single-ion conducting block copolymer polyelectrolytes via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization technique is reported. These copolymers comprise poly(lithium 1-[3-(methacryloyloxy)propylsulfonyl]-1-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate blocks. The obtained polyelectrolytes show low Tg values in the range of -61 to 0.6 °C, comparatively high ionic conductivity (up to 2.3 × 10(-6) and 1.2 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 25 and 55 °C, respectively), wide electrochemical stability (up to 4.5 V versus Li(+)/Li), and a lithium-ion transference number close to unity (0.83). Owing to the combination of all mentioned properties, the prepared polymer materials were used as solid polyelectrolytes and as binders in the elaboration of lithium-metal battery prototypes with high charge/discharge efficiency and excellent specific capacity (up to 130 mAh g(-1)) at C/15 rate.

  12. Transparent plastic scintillators for neutron detection based on lithium salicylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabe, Andrew N.; Glenn, Andrew M.; Carman, M. Leslie; Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent plastic scintillators with pulse shape discrimination containing 6Li salicylate have been synthesized by bulk polymerization with a maximum 6Li loading of 0.40 wt%. Photoluminescence and scintillation responses to gamma-rays and neutrons are reported herein. Plastics containing 6Li salicylate exhibit higher light yields and permit a higher loading of 6Li as compared to previously reported plastics based on lithium 3-phenylsalicylate. However, pulse shape discrimination performance is reduced in lithium salicylate plastics due to the requirement of adding more nonaromatic monomers to the polymer matrix as compared to those based on lithium 3-phenylsalicylate. Reduction in light yield and pulse shape discrimination performance in lithium-loaded plastics as compared to pulse shape discrimination plastics without lithium is interpreted in terms of energy transfer interference by the aromatic lithium salts.

  13. Lithium in 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, estimated world lithium consumption was about 28 kt (31,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, an 8 percent increase from that of 2011. Estimated U.S. consumption was about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, the same as that of 2011. The United States was thought to rank fourth in consumption of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Rockwood Lithium Inc., produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  14. Seed dispersal and seedling emergence in a created and a natural salt marsh on the Gulf of Mexico coast in Southwest Louisiana, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsey-Quirk, T.; Middleton, B.A.; Proffitt, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Early regeneration dynamics related to seed dispersal and seedling emergence can contribute to differences in species composition among a created and a natural salt marsh. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) whether aquatic and aerial seed dispersal differed in low and high elevations within a created marsh and a natural marsh and (2) whether seedling emergence was influenced by marsh, the presence of openings in the vegetation, and seed availability along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. Aerial seed traps captured a greater quantity of seeds than aquatic traps. Several factors influenced aquatic and aerial seed dispersal in a created and a natural salt marsh, including distance from the marsh edge, cover of existing vegetation, and water depth. The natural marsh had a high seed density of Spartina alterniflora and Distichlis spicata, the low-elevation created marsh had a high seed density of S. alterniflora, and the high-elevation created marsh had a high seed density of Aster subulatus and Iva frutescens. The presence of adult plants and water depth above the marsh surface influenced seed density. In the natural marsh, openings in vegetation increased seedling emergence for all species, whereas in the low-elevation created marsh, S. alterniflora had higher seedling density under a canopy of vegetation. According to the early regeneration dynamics, the future vegetation in areas of the low-elevation created marsh may become similar to that in the natural marsh. In the high-elevation created marsh, vegetation may be upland fringe habitat dominated by high-elevation marsh shrubs and annual herbaceous species. ?? 2009 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  15. Lithium ion phase-transfer reaction at the interface between the lithium manganese oxide electrode and the nonaqueous electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shota; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-07-14

    The lithium ion phase-transfer reaction between the spinel lithium manganese oxide electrode and a nonaqueous electrolyte was investigated by the ac impedance spectroscopic method. The dependence of the impedance spectra on the electrochemical potential of the lithium ion in the electrode, the lithium salt concentration in the electrolyte, the kind of solvent, and the measured temperature were examined. Nyquist plots, obtained from the impedance measurements, consist of two semicircles for high and medium frequency and warburg impedance for low frequency, indicating that the reaction process of two main steps for high and medium frequency obey the Butler-Volmer type equation and could be related to the charge-transfer reaction process accompanied with lithium ion phase-transfer at the interface. The dependency on the solvent suggests that both steps in the lithium ion phase-transfer at the electrode/electrolyte interface include the desolvation process and have high activation barriers. PMID:16852662

  16. Cooking without salt

    MedlinePlus

    ... flavor and nutrition. Plant-based foods -- carrots, spinach, apples, and peaches -- are naturally salt-free. Sun-dried ... types of pepper, including black, white, green, and red. Experiment with vinegars (white and red wine, rice ...

  17. Effect of electrode density on cycle performance and irreversible capacity loss for natural graphite anode in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-12-02

    The effect of electrode thickness and density for unpressed and pressed natural graphite electrodes were studied using electrochemical characterization. Pressing the graphite electrode decreases the reversible capacity and the irreversible capacity loss during formation. As electrode density increased, the capacity retention at high rate increased until 0.9g/cm{sup 3}, and then decreased. The cycle performances of the pressed graphite electrodes were more stable than the unpressed one. Pressing graphite electrode affected on its electrochemical characterization such as irreversible capacity loss, high rate cycling and cycle performance.

  18. Fluid distribution in grain boundaries of natural fine-grained rock salt deformed at low shear stress: implications for rheology and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; De Bresser, J. H. P.

    2012-04-01

    We used a combination of broad ion beam (BIB) cross-sectioning and high resolution (cryogenic) SEM to image polished surfaces and corresponding pairs of fractured grain boundaries in an investigation of grain boundary (GB) microstructures and fluid distribution in naturally deformed halite from a salt glacier (Kum Quh, central Iran). At the scale of observations, four types of fluid or gas filled grain boundaries can be distinguished: (1) straight boundaries with thick (up to 10 µm) GB tubes (2) straight boundaries with narrow (about 50 nm) GB tubes (3) wavy (tens of µm wavelength) GB with isolated inclusions of a few µm, and (4) wavy (µm wavelength) GB with small (µm) isolated inclusions. Grain boundary fluid inclusions can have three types of morphologies: the inclusion of Type 1 is intruded completely in one grain, inclusion of Type 2 has its major part included in one grain with a minor part in the second grain and the inclusion of Type 3 is located in both grains. Solid second phases in GB are mainly euhedral anhydrite crystals. The mobility of the brine is shown after cutting the inclusions by BIB in vacuum and fine-grained halite forms efflorescence and precipitates on internal walls of inclusions. At cryogenic temperature, in-situ brine is seen as continuous film in GB of type (1) and (2), and in isolated inclusions in GB of type (3) and (4). The structure of halite-halite contact between isolated fluid inclusions in GB of type (3) and (4) is below the resolution of SEM. GB of type (3) and (4) are interpreted to have formed by healing of mobile fluid films. First results of deformation experiments on the same samples under shear stress corresponding to conditions of natural salt glacier, show very low strain rates (7.43x10-10 s-1 and 1x10-9 s-1), up to one order of magnitude below of expected strain rates by solution precipitation creep. Both microstructures and deformation experiments suggest interfacial energy-driven GB healing, in agreement with the

  19. RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-04-16

    The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North

  20. Δ17O Isotopic Investigation of Nitrate Salts Found in Co-Occurrence with Naturally Formed Perchlorate in the Mojave Desert, California, USA and the Atacama Desert, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Parker, D.; Rech, J.; Prellwitz, J.; Michalski, G.

    2009-12-01

    Perchlorate is both a naturally occurring and manmade contaminant that has been identified in soil, groundwater and surface water. Perchlorate directly affects human health by interfering with iodide uptake in the thyroid gland, which may in turn lower the production of key hormones that are needed for proper growth and development. Until recently, the Atacama Desert, Chile was thought to be the only location where perchlorate salts formed naturally. Recent work has documented the occurrence of these salts in several semi-arid regions of the United States. This study identified putatively natural sources of perchlorate in the Mojave Desert of California. Soil samples were collected from six field sites varying in geologic age. The co-occurrence of perchlorate and nitrate in caliches from the Atacama Desert and soils from the Mojave Desert was also investigated. Although the former are richer in NO3-, near-ore-grade (~5%) deposits occur in the vicinity of Death Valley National Park. Weak but significant correlations exist between ClO4- and NO3- at both locations, but the perchlorate levels are much higher (up to 800 mg/kg) in the Chilean samples than in California (<25 mg/kg). Oxygen isotopes in the nitrate were examined to identify variation within the Mojave Desert field sites, and to compare with those in samples collected from the Atacama Desert. The Mojave Desert Δ17O values ranged from 7-13‰ and those from the Atacama were between 17-21‰. This isotopic analysis revealed a dominantly atmospheric origin for the Atacama nitrate salts, and a mixture between biological nitrate and atmospherically-derived nitrate for the Mojave samples. When corrected for the percentage of atmospheric nitrate measured in the Atacama samples, the Mojave samples still contain much lower perchlorate concentrations than would be expected if the occurrence of perchlorate correlated strictly with atmospherically derived nitrate. These results indicate that the variation in the

  1. Lithium in drinking water and suicide mortality: interplay with lithium prescriptions

    PubMed Central

    Helbich, Marco; Leitner, Michael; Kapusta, Nestor D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of lithium intake through drinking water on suicide. This intake originates either from natural rock and soil elution and/or accumulation of lithium-based pharmaceuticals in ground water. Aims To examine the interplay between natural lithium in drinking water, prescribed lithium-based pharmaceuticals and suicide in Austria. Method Spatial Bayesian regressions for males, females and pooled suicide mortality rates were estimated. Results Although the expected inverse association between lithium levels in drinking water and suicide mortality was confirmed for males and for total suicide rates, the relationship for females was not significant. The models do not indicate that lithium from prescriptions, assumed to accumulate in drinking water, is related to suicide risk patterns either as an individual effect or as a moderator of lithium levels in drinking water. Gender-specific differences in risk factors and local risk hot spots are confirmed. Conclusions The findings do not support the hypotheses that lithium prescriptions have measureable protective effects on suicide or that they interact with lithium in drinking water. PMID:25953888

  2. Comparative Study of Ether-Based Electrolytes for Application in Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Lorenzo; Gobet, Mallory; Peng, Jing; Devany, Matthew; Scrosati, Bruno; Greenbaum, Steve; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-07-01

    Herein, we report the characteristics of electrolytes using various ether-solvents with molecular composition CH3O[CH2CH2O]nCH3, differing by chain length, and LiCF3SO3 as the lithium salt. The electrolytes, considered as suitable media for lithium-sulfur batteries, are characterized in terms of thermal properties (TGA, DSC), lithium ion conductivity, lithium interface stability, cyclic voltammetry, self-diffusion properties of the various components, and lithium transference number measured by NMR. Furthermore, the electrolytes are characterized in lithium cells using a sulfur-carbon composite cathode by galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The results clearly evidence the influence of the solvent chain length on the species mobility within the electrolytes that directly affects the behavior in lithium sulfur cell. The results may effectively contribute to the progress of an efficient, high-energy lithium-sulfur battery.

  3. Comparative Study of Ether-Based Electrolytes for Application in Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Lorenzo; Gobet, Mallory; Peng, Jing; Devany, Matthew; Scrosati, Bruno; Greenbaum, Steve; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-07-01

    Herein, we report the characteristics of electrolytes using various ether-solvents with molecular composition CH3O[CH2CH2O]nCH3, differing by chain length, and LiCF3SO3 as the lithium salt. The electrolytes, considered as suitable media for lithium-sulfur batteries, are characterized in terms of thermal properties (TGA, DSC), lithium ion conductivity, lithium interface stability, cyclic voltammetry, self-diffusion properties of the various components, and lithium transference number measured by NMR. Furthermore, the electrolytes are characterized in lithium cells using a sulfur-carbon composite cathode by galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The results clearly evidence the influence of the solvent chain length on the species mobility within the electrolytes that directly affects the behavior in lithium sulfur cell. The results may effectively contribute to the progress of an efficient, high-energy lithium-sulfur battery. PMID:26057152

  4. Low-Cost Al2O3 Coating Layer As a Preformed SEI on Natural Graphite Powder To Improve Coulombic Efficiency and High-Rate Cycling Stability of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tianyu; Xu, Youlong; Zhang, Zhengwei; Du, Xianfeng; Sun, Xiaofei; Xiong, Lilong; Rodriguez, Raul; Holze, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Coulombic efficiency especially in the first cycle, cycling stability, and high-rate performance are crucial factors for commercial Li-ion batteries (LIBs). To improve them, in this work, Al2O3-coated natural graphite powder was obtained through a low-cost and facile sol-gel method. Based on a comparison of various coated amounts, 0.5 mol % Al(NO3)3 (vs mole of graphite) could bring about a smooth Al2O3 coating layer with proper thickness, which could act as a preformed solid electrolyte interface (SEI) to reduce the regeneration of SEI and lithium-ions consumption during subsequent cycling. Furthermore, we examined the advantages of Al2O3 coating by relating energy levels in LIBs using density functional theory calculations. Owing to its proper bandgap and lithium-ion conduction ability, the coating layer performs the same function as a SEI does, preventing an electron from getting to the outer electrode surface and allowing lithium-ion transport. Therefore, as a preformed SEI, the Al2O3 coating layer reduces extra cathode consumption observed in commercial LIBs.

  5. Lithium-associated hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Siyam, Fadi F; Deshmukh, Sanaa; Garcia-Touza, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Goiters and hypothyroidism are well-known patient complications of the use of lithium for treatment of bipolar disease. However, the occurrence of lithium-induced hyperthyroidism is a more rare event. Many times, the condition can be confused with a flare of mania. Monitoring through serial biochemical measurement of thyroid function is critical in patients taking lithium. Hyperthyroidism induced by lithium is a condition that generally can be controlled medically without the patient having to discontinue lithium therapy, although in some circumstances, discontinuation of lithium therapy may be indicated. We report on a patient case of lithium-associated hyperthyroidism that resolved after discontinuation of the medication. PMID:23948626

  6. A lithium oxygen secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semkow, Krystyna W.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1987-01-01

    Some recent work on a lithium-oxygen secondary battery is reported in which stabilized zirconia oxygen vacancy conducting solid electrolytes were used for the effective separation of respective half-cell reactions. The electroactive material consisted of alloys possessing the general composition Li(x)FeSi2 immersed in a ternary molten salt comprising LiF, LiCl, and Li2O. The manufacture of the cell is described, and discharge-current voltage curves for partially charged cells are shown and discussed. A galvanostatic IR free-changing curve and an IR-free charge-discharge curve are also shown.

  7. Process for manufacturing a lithium alloy electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, William R.

    1992-10-13

    A process for manufacturing a lithium alloy, metal sulfide cell tape casts slurried alloy powders in an organic solvent containing a dissolved thermoplastic organic binder onto casting surfaces. The organic solvent is then evaporated to produce a flexible tape removable adhering to the casting surface. The tape is densified to increase its green strength and then peeled from the casting surface. The tape is laminated with a separator containing a lithium salt electrolyte and a metal sulfide electrode to form a green cell. The binder is evaporated from the green cell at a temperature lower than the melting temperature of the lithium salt electrolyte. Lithium alloy, metal sulfide and separator powders may be tape cast.

  8. LMWOA (low molecular weight organic acid) exudation by salt marsh plants: Natural variation and response to Cu contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Ana P.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Bordalo, Adriano A.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2010-06-01

    This work aimed to evaluate, in vitro, the capability of roots of two salt marsh plants to release low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) and to ascertain whether Cu contamination would stimulate or not organic acids exudation. The sea rush Juncus maritimus and the sea-club rush Scirpus maritimus, both from the lower Douro river estuary (NW Portugal), were used. Plants were collected seasonally, four times a year in 2004, during low tide. After sampling, plant roots were washed for removal of adherent particles and immersed for 2 h in a solution that matched salinity (3) and pH (7.5) of the pore water from the same location to obtain plant exudates. In one of the seasons, similar experiments were carried out but spiking the solution with different amounts of Cu in order to embrace the range between 0 and 1600 nM. In the final solutions as well as in sediment pore water LMWOAs were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Plants were able to release, in a short period of time, relatively high amounts of LMWOAs (oxalate, citrate, malate, malonate, and succinate). In the sediment pore water oxalate, succinate and acetate were also detected. Therefore, plant roots probably contributed to the presence of some of these organic compounds in pore water. Exudation differed between the plant species and also showed some seasonally variation, particularly for S. maritimus. The release of oxalate by J. maritimus increased with Cu increase in the media. However, exudation of the other LMWOAs did not seem to be stimulated by Cu contamination in the media. This fact is compatible with the existence of alternative internal mechanisms for Cu detoxification, as denoted by the fact that in media contaminated with Cu both plant species accumulated relatively high amounts (29-83%) of the initially dissolved Cu. This study expands our knowledge on the contribution of globally dominant salt marsh plants to the release of LMWOAs into the environment.

  9. Effects of electrolyte salts on the performance of Li-O2 batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Xu, Wu; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nie, Zimin; Burton, Sarah D.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Gross, Mark E.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-02-05

    It is well known that the stability of nonaqueous electrolyte is critical for the rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. Although stability of many solvents used in the electrolytes has been investigated, considerably less attention has been paid to the stability of electrolyte salt which is the second major component. Herein, we report the systematic investigation of the stability of seven common lithium salts in tetraglyme used as electrolytes for Li-O2 batteries. The discharge products of Li-O2 reaction were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The performance of Li-O2 batteries was strongly affected by the salt used in the electrolyte. Lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) decompose and form LiF and lithium borates, respectively during the discharge of Li-O2 batteries. Several other salts, including lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (LiTFSI), lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiTf), lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6), lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) , and lithium bromide (LiBr) led to the discharge products which mainly consisted of Li2O2 and only minor signs of decomposition of LiTFSI, LiTf, LPF6 and LiClO4 were detected. LiBr showed the best stability during the discharge process. As for the cycling performance, LiTf and LiTFSI were the best among the studied salts. In addition to the instability of lithium salts, decomposition of tetraglyme solvent was a more significant factor contributing to the limited cycling stability. Thus a more stable nonaqueous electrolyte including organic solvent and lithium salt still need to be further developed to reach a fully reversible Li-O2 battery.

  10. Nitrogen-doped aligned carbon nanotube/graphene sandwiches: facile catalytic growth on bifunctional natural catalysts and their applications as scaffolds for high-rate lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Tian, Gui-Li; Peng, Hong-Jie; Wei, Fei

    2014-09-17

    Nitrogen-doped aligned CNT/graphene sandwiches are rationally designed and in-situ fabricated by a facile catalytic growth on bifunctional natural catalysts that exhibit high-rate performances as scaffolds for lithium-sulfur batteries, with a high initial capacity of 1152 mA h g(-1) at 1.0 C. A remarkable capacity of 770 mA h g(-1) can be achieved at 5.0 C. Such a design strategy for materials opens up new perspectives to novel advanced functional composites, especially interface-modified hierarchical nanocarbons for broad applications.

  11. The role and impact of rubber in poly(methyl methacrylate)/lithium triflate electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, Famiza; Aziz, Madzlan; Katun, Nasir; Ali, Ab Malik Marwan; Yahya, Muhd Zuazhan

    In this research, new thin freestanding films of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/50% epoxidised natural rubber (ENR 50) were doped with lithium triflate, LiCF 3SO 3 salt was prepared by a solvent casting method. The incorporation of ENR 50 is found to increase the conductivity of PMMA/LiCF 3SO 3 by two orders of magnitude at room temperature. The highest conductivity achieved was 5.09 × 10 -5 S cm -1 at room temperature when 60% of LiCF 3SO 3 salt was introduced into the PMMA blend containing 10% ENR 50. The formation of excessive hydrogen bonds and interchain crosslinking limit the performance of the blend at higher concentrations of ENR 50. The ionic conduction mechanisms in PMMA/ENR 50/LiCF 3SO 3 electrolytes obey the Arrhenius rule in which the ion transport in these materials is thermally assisted.

  12. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark; Borodin, Oleg; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium metal is an ideal battery anode. However, dendrite growth and limited Coulombic efficiency during cycling have prevented its practical application in rechargeable batteries. Herein, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide salt enables the high-rate cycling of a lithium metal anode at high Coulombic efficiency (up to 99.1%) without dendrite growth. With 4 M lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide in 1,2-dimethoxyethane as the electrolyte, a lithium|lithium cell can be cycled at 10 mA cm(-2) for more than 6,000 cycles, and a copper|lithium cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm(-2) for more than 1,000 cycles with an average Coulombic efficiency of 98.4%. These excellent performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of lithium ion concentration in the electrolyte. Further development of this electrolyte may enable practical applications for lithium metal anode in rechargeable batteries. PMID:25698340

  13. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark; Borodin, Oleg; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium metal is an ideal battery anode. However, dendrite growth and limited Coulombic efficiency during cycling have prevented its practical application in rechargeable batteries. Herein, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide salt enables the high-rate cycling of a lithium metal anode at high Coulombic efficiency (up to 99.1%) without dendrite growth. With 4 M lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide in 1,2-dimethoxyethane as the electrolyte, a lithium|lithium cell can be cycled at 10 mA cm−2 for more than 6,000 cycles, and a copper|lithium cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm−2 for more than 1,000 cycles with an average Coulombic efficiency of 98.4%. These excellent performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of lithium ion concentration in the electrolyte. Further development of this electrolyte may enable practical applications for lithium metal anode in rechargeable batteries. PMID:25698340

  14. Lithium and magnesium isotopes fractionation by zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. V.; Egorov, N. B.; Dyachenko, A. N.; Pustovalova, M. P.; Podoinikov, I. R.

    2016-06-01

    The process of changing isotopic composition of the lithium and magnesium salts was studied by using the process of zone melting. It was founded in the paper that the process of separation of the lithium isotopes is more effective than for magnesium isotopes when the conditions of process were the same. The coefficients of isotopes separation were calculated and have the next value: α = 1.006 for 26Mg isotope and α = 1.0022 for 6Li isotope.

  15. Strong tendency of homeotropic alignment and anisotropic lithium ion conductivity of sulfonate functionalized zwitterionic imidazolium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Rondla, Rohini; Lin, Joseph C Y; Yang, C T; Lin, Ivan J B

    2013-09-17

    Here, we report the first attempt to investigate the liquid crystal (LC) behavior of SO3(-) functionalized imidazolium zwitterionic (SO3(-)ImZI) salts, which display homeotropic alignment on a glass slide without the aid of any aligning approach. Doping lithium salt to ImZI salts lowers the melting temperatures and raises the clearing temperatures substantially to form room temperature ImZILCs. Excellent anisotropic lithium ion conductivity is achieved; which is strengthened by their tendency for homeotropic alignment. PMID:24010889

  16. Integrated Salt Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2015-04-01

    The growing importance of salt in the energy, subsurface storage, and chemical and food industries also increases the challenges with prediction of geometries, kinematics, stress and transport in salt. This requires an approach, which integrates a broader range of knowledge than is traditionally available in the different scientific and engineering disciplines. We aim to provide a starting point for a more integrated understanding of salt, by presenting an overview of the state of the art in a wide range of salt-related topics, from (i) the formation and metamorphism of evaporites, (ii) rheology and transport properties, (iii) salt tectonics and basin evolution, (iv) internal structure of evaporites, (v) fluid flow through salt, to (vi) salt engineering. With selected case studies we show how integration of these domains of knowledge can bring better predictions of (i) sediment architecture and reservoir distribution, (ii) internal structure of salt for optimized drilling and better cavern design, (iii) reliable long-term predictions of deformations and fluid flow in subsurface storage. A fully integrated workflow is based on geomechanical models, which include all laboratory and natural observations and links macro- and micro-scale studies. We present emerging concepts for (i) the initiation dynamics of halokinesis, (ii) the rheology and deformation of the evaporites by brittle and ductile processes, (iii) the coupling of processes in evaporites and the under- and overburden, and (iv) the impact of the layered evaporite rheology on the structural evolution.

  17. Performance and properties of arsenic passivated lithium-titanium disulfide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D.; Fitzgerald, D.; Vasquez, R. P.; Somoano, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    In order to inhibit chemical degradation associated with the lithium-electrolyte interaction in ambient temperature lithium cells, an attempt was made to synthetically passivate the anode via ion implantation of arsenic. Solvent reduction is reduced although salt reaction with lithium is still present. The performance of the Li-TiS2 cell differs from those with standard electrodes, but further work is necessary to clarify the efficacy of this mode of passivation.

  18. Phosphoryl-rich flame-retardant ions (FRIONs): towards safer lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Rectenwald, Michael F; Gaffen, Joshua R; Rheingold, Arnold L; Morgan, Alexander B; Protasiewicz, John D

    2014-04-14

    The functionalized catecholate, tetraethyl (2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-phenylene)bis(phosphonate) (H2 -DPC), has been used to prepare a series of lithium salts Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)], Li[B(DPC)2], Li[B(DPC)F2], and Li[P(DPC)3]. The phosphoryl-rich character of these anions was designed to impart flame-retardant properties for their use as potential flame-retardant ions (FRIONs), additives, or replacements for other lithium salts for safer lithium-ion batteries. The new materials were fully characterized, and the single-crystal structures of Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)] and Li[P(DPC)3] have been determined. Thermogravimetric analysis of the four lithium salts show that they are thermally stable up to around 200 °C. Pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry reveals that these salts produce high char yields upon combustion.

  19. Phosphoryl-rich flame-retardant ions (FRIONs): towards safer lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Rectenwald, Michael F; Gaffen, Joshua R; Rheingold, Arnold L; Morgan, Alexander B; Protasiewicz, John D

    2014-04-14

    The functionalized catecholate, tetraethyl (2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-phenylene)bis(phosphonate) (H2 -DPC), has been used to prepare a series of lithium salts Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)], Li[B(DPC)2], Li[B(DPC)F2], and Li[P(DPC)3]. The phosphoryl-rich character of these anions was designed to impart flame-retardant properties for their use as potential flame-retardant ions (FRIONs), additives, or replacements for other lithium salts for safer lithium-ion batteries. The new materials were fully characterized, and the single-crystal structures of Li[B(DPC)(oxalato)] and Li[P(DPC)3] have been determined. Thermogravimetric analysis of the four lithium salts show that they are thermally stable up to around 200 °C. Pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry reveals that these salts produce high char yields upon combustion. PMID:24615890

  20. Non-aqueous electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil

    2015-11-12

    The present invention is generally related to electrolytes containing anion receptor additives to enhance the power capability of lithium-ion batteries. The anion receptor of the present invention is a Lewis acid that can help to dissolve LiF in the passivation films of lithium-ion batteries. Accordingly, one aspect the invention provides electrolytes comprising a lithium salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and an anion receptor additive; and wherein the electrolyte solution is substantially non-aqueous. Further there are provided electrochemical devices employing the electrolyte and methods of making the electrolyte.

  1. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  2. Lithium intoxication: a coordinated treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Minden, S L; Bassuk, E L; Nadler, S P

    1993-01-01

    This case illustrates the clinical features of lithium intoxication and the problems in treating it that may arise as a result of lithium's effects on the kidney. It also demonstrates the difficulties that can develop when a delicate physiologic balance is inadvertently disrupted by nonpharmacologic interventions such as seclusion and consequent restriction of access to food and water. Patients with lithium-induced urine-concentrating defects are especially at risk for dehydration, and care must be taken to ensure adequate fluid and salt intake. This case also shows how intense negative feelings evoked by chronically mentally ill patients can adversely affect their psychiatric and medical care. While such feelings are inevitable, their impact may be lessened by improved communication and coordination between the medical and psychiatric systems of care and by the presence of psychiatrists in the general medical hospital. PMID:8419561

  3. [Use of metal salts for radioprotection of plants during radioactive pollution of the territory].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, I N; Kitsno, V E; Grisiuk, S N; Tkachenko, G M; Ivanova, E A; Saenko, K V; Gural'chuk, Zh Z

    1999-01-01

    The applying salts of some metals to radionuclide contaminated soddy-podzolic soil in the zone of Chernobyl nuclear power station or the spraying of plants by its solutions are showing the radioprotective effect (salts of iron, zinc, cobalt and manganese) and decreasing the uptake of 90Sr and 137Cs through roots (salts of zinc, manganese, boron, lithium, cobalt and copper). PMID:10366969

  4. A new application of high-efficient silver salts-based photocatalyst under natural indoor weak light for wastewater cleaning.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xia; Teng, Fei; Zhao, Yunxuan; Xu, Juan; Xu, Chuangye; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qiqi; Paul, Shashi; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Mindong; Zhao, Xudong

    2015-09-15

    As a high-quantum-efficiency photocatalyst, the serious photo-corrosion of silver phosphate (Ag3PO4), limits the practical applications in water purification and challenges us. Herein, Ag3PO4 is found to have a high stability under natural indoor weak light irradiation, suggesting that we can employ it by adopting a new application strategy. In our studies, rhodamine B (RhB, cationic dye), methyl orange (MO, anionic dye) and RhB-MO mixture aqueous solutions are used as the probing reaction for the degradation of organic wastewater. It is found that RhB, MO and RhB-MO can be completely degraded after 28 h under natural indoor weak light irradiation, indicating that multi-component organic contaminants can be efficiently degraded by Ag3PO4 under natural indoor weak light irradiation. The density of natural indoor weak light is measured to be 72cd, which is merely one-thousandth of 300 W xenon lamp (68.2 × 10(3)cd). Most importantly, Ag3PO4 shows a high stability under natural indoor weak light irradiation, demonstrated by the formation of fairly rare Ag. Furthermore, we also investigate the influence of inorganic ions on organic dyes degradation. It shows that the Cl(-) and Cr(6+) ions with high concentrations in wastewater have significantly decreased the degradation rate. From the viewpoint of energy saving and stability, this study shows us that we can utilize the Ag-containing photocatalysts under natural indoor weak light, which could be extended to indoor air cleaning process.

  5. Arctic Sea Salt Aerosol from Blowing Snow and Sea Ice Surfaces - a Missing Natural Source in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Nishimura, K.; Jones, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles in the polar regions consist mostly of sea salt aerosol (SSA). SSA plays an important role in regional climate change through influencing the surface energy balance either directly or indirectly via cloud formation. SSA irradiated by sunlight also releases very reactive halogen radicals, which control concentrations of ozone, a pollutant and greenhouse gas. However, models under-predict SSA concentrations in the Arctic during winter pointing to a missing source. It has been recently suggested that salty blowing snow above sea ice, which is evaporating, to be that source as it may produce more SSA than equivalent areas of open ocean. Participation in the 'Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE 2015)' on board the research vessel `Lance' allowed to test this hypothesis in the Arctic sea ice zone during winter. Measurements were carried out from the ship frozen into the pack ice North of 80º N during February to March 2015. Observations at ground level (0.1-2 m) and from the ship's crows nest (30 m) included number concentrations and size spectra of SSA (diameter range 0.3-10 μm) as well as snow particles (diameter range 50-500 μm). During and after blowing snow events significant SSA production was observed. In the aerosol and snow phase sulfate is fractionated with respect to sea water, which confirms sea ice surfaces and salty snow, and not the open ocean, to be the dominant source of airborne SSA. Aerosol shows depletion in bromide with respect to sea water, especially after sunrise, indicating photochemically driven release of bromine. We discuss the SSA source strength from blowing snow in light of environmental conditions (wind speed, atmospheric turbulence, temperature and snow salinity) and recommend improved model parameterisations to estimate regional aerosol production. N-ICE 2015 results are then compared to a similar study carried out previously in the Weddell Sea during the Antarctic winter.

  6. Occlusion and ion exchange in the molten (lithium chloride-potassium chloride-alkali metal chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with alkali metal chlorides of sodium, rubidium, and cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexa, Dusan; Johnson, Irving

    2001-06-01

    Interaction between molten salts of the type LiCl-KCl-MeCl (Me = Na, Rb, Cs, x MeCl = 0 to 0.5, x KCl/ x LiCl = 0.69) and zeolite 4A have been studied at 823 K. The main interactions between these salts and zeolite are molten salt occlusion to form salt-loaded zeolite and ion exchange between the molten salt and salt-loaded zeolite. No chemical reaction has been observed. The extent of occlusion is a function of the concentration of MeCl in the zeolite and is equal to 11±1 Cl- per zeolite unit cell, (AlSiO4)12, at infinite MeCl dilution. The ion-exchange mole fraction equilibrium constants (separation factors) with respect to Li are decreasing functions of concentration of MeCl in the zeolite. At infinite MeCl dilution, they are equal to 0.84, 0.87, and 2.31 for NaCl, RbCl, and CsCl, respectively, and increase in the order Na

  7. Conductive polymeric compositions for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles A.; Xu, Wu

    2009-03-17

    Novel chain polymers comprising weakly basic anionic moieties chemically bound into a polyether backbone at controllable anionic separations are presented. Preferred polymers comprise orthoborate anions capped with dibasic acid residues, preferably oxalato or malonato acid residues. The conductivity of these polymers is found to be high relative to that of most conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes. The conductivity at high temperatures and wide electrochemical window make these materials especially suitable as electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  8. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  9. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy

  10. Chitosan-gold-Lithium nanocomposites as solid polymer electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Begum, S N Suraiya; Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Aswal, Vinod K; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal

    2014-08-01

    Lithium micro batteries are emerging field of research. For environmental safety biodegradable films are preferred. Recently biodegradable polymers have gained wide application in the field of solid polymer electrolytes. To make biodegradable polymers films plasticizers are usually used. However, use of plasticizers has disadvantages such as inhomogenities in phases and mechanical instability that will affect the performance of Lithium micro batteries. We have in this research used gold nanoparticles that are environmentally friendly, instead of plasticizers. Gold nanoparticles were directly template upon chitosan membranes by reduction process so as to enhance the interactions of Lithium with the polymer. In this article, for the first time the characteristics of Chitosan-gold-Lithium nanocomposite films are investigated. The films were prepared using simple solution casting technique. We have used various characterization tools such as Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), XRD, FTIR, Raman, FESEM, and AFM, Light scattering, Dielectric and electrical conductivity measurements. Our investigations show that incorporation of gold results in enhancement of conductivity in Lithium containing Chitosan films. Also it affects the dielectric characteristics of the films. We conclude through various characterization tools that the enhancement in the conductivity was due to the retardation of crystal growth of lithium salt in the presence of gold nanoparticles. A model is proposed regarding the formation of the new nanocomposite. The conductivity of these biodegradable films is comparable to those of the current inorganic Lithium micro batteries. This new chitosan-Au-Li nanocomposite has potential applications in the field of Lithium micro batteries.

  11. Molten salt electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, U.F.; Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this work is to develop preparation and clean-up processes for the fuel and carrier salt used in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology molten salt nuclear system. The front-end or fuel preparation process focuses on the removal of fission products, uranium, and zirconium from spent nuclear fuel by utilizing electrochemical methods. The same method provide the separation of the transition metal fission products at the back end of the fuel cycle. Molten salts provide a natural medium for the separation of actinides and fission products from one another because they are robust, radiation resistant solvents that can be recycled. The presentation will describe the design of the electrochemistry system, the method used for salt purification, and results of preliminary experiments.

  12. Preliminary petrological and geochemical results from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California: A near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt: Topical report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.; Williams, A.E.; Neville, S.; Collier, P.; Oakes, C.

    1986-03-01

    High concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not naturally encountered in salt beds. For this reason, the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) may be the best available geologic analog of some of the processes expected to occur in high level nuclear waste repositories in salt. Subsurface temperatures and brine concentrations in the SSGF span most of the temperature range and fluid inclusion brine range expected in a salt repository, and the clay-rich sedimentary rocks are similar to those which host bedded or domal salts. As many of the chemical processes observed in the SSGF are similar to those expected to occur in or near a salt repository, data derived from it can be used in the validation of geochemical models of the near-field of a repository in salt. This report describes preliminary data on petrology and geochemistry, emphasizing the distribution of rare earth elements and U and Th, of cores and cuttings from several deep wells chosen to span a range of temperature gradients and salinities. Subsurface temperature logs have been augmented by fluid inclusion studies, to reveal the effects of brines of varying temperature and salinity. The presence of brines with different oxygen isotopic signatures also indicate lack of mixing. Whole rock major, minor and trace element analyses and data on brine compositions are being used to study chemical migration in these sediments. 65 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Partitioning of Pb, Cd, and Cu in natural and disturbed salt marshes of eastern San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Alai, M.; Fegan, N. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Sediment from different marsh systems along eastern San Francisco Bay was analyzed to determine how metals are partitioned in different environments influenced by human activity. Human influences in the marshes may have altered the geochemical processes controlling the metal partitioning. The three marsh systems analyzed include a natural marsh (San Francisco Wildlife Refuge), a natural marsh influenced by landfill leachate (Triangle Marsh), and a disturbed marsh constructed of artificial fill (Hayward Landing). The trace metal concentrations were compared in: easily exchangeable, weakly acid soluble, reducible, and oxidizable fractions representing the sediment phases of: clays, carbonates, Mn or Fe oxyhydroxides, and sulfides or organic material, respectively. The sediment fractions were analyzed for Pb, Cd, and Cu. In all three marshes, the pattern of metal partitioning with depth is similar; however, there are some inconsistencies. The Pb, Cd, and Cu in the reducible fraction typically decrease with depth while the metals in the oxidizable fraction generally increase or remain approximately constant with depth. This data suggests that the partitioning of metals in all three environments is initially controlled by sorption of metals onto Mn or Fe oxyhydroxides at the surface and shifts to organic or sulfides as the sediments is buried and the environment becomes more reducing.

  14. Review of lithium effects on brain and blood.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2009-01-01

    Clinicians have long used lithium to treat manic depression. They have also observed that lithium causes granulocytosis and lymphopenia while it enhances immunological activities of monocytes and lymphocytes. In fact, clinicians have long used lithium to treat granulocytopenia resulting from radiation and chemotherapy, to boost immunoglobulins after vaccination, and to enhance natural killer activity. Recent studies revealed a mechanism that ties together these disparate effects of lithium. Lithium acts through multiple pathways to inhibit glycogen synthetase kinase-3beta (GSK3 beta). This enzyme phosphorylates and inhibits nuclear factors that turn on cell growth and protection programs, including the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and WNT/beta-catenin. In animals, lithium upregulates neurotrophins, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 (NT3), as well as receptors to these growth factors in brain. Lithium also stimulates proliferation of stem cells, including bone marrow and neural stem cells in the subventricular zone, striatum, and forebrain. The stimulation of endogenous neural stem cells may explain why lithium increases brain cell density and volume in patients with bipolar disorders. Lithium also increases brain concentrations of the neuronal markers n-acetyl-aspartate and myoinositol. Lithium also remarkably protects neurons against glutamate, seizures, and apoptosis due to a wide variety of neurotoxins. The effective dose range for lithium is 0.6-1.0 mM in serum and >1.5 mM may be toxic. Serum lithium levels of 1.5-2.0 mM may have mild and reversible toxic effects on kidney, liver, heart, and glands. Serum levels of >2 mM may be associated with neurological symptoms, including cerebellar dysfunction. Prolonged lithium intoxication >2 mM can cause permanent brain damage. Lithium has low mutagenic and carcinogenic risk. Lithium is still the most effective therapy for depression. It "cures" a third

  15. SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.

    1959-01-20

    It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

  16. Lithium use in batteries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  17. Equilibrium distribution of lanthanum, neodymium, and thorium between lithium chloride melt and liquid bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnit'ko, A. V.; Ignat'ev, V. V.

    2013-04-01

    The distribution of lanthanum, neodymium, and thorium between a lithium chloride melt and liquid bismuth with additions of lithium as a reducing agent are investigated at 650°C. Equilibrium values of their distribution constants are measured. It is shown that in contrast to neodymium and lanthanum, thorium cannot be extracted from bismuth into lithium chloride. This allows us to propose an efficient scheme for separating lanthanides and thorium in a system for the extraction of fuel salts in molten-salt nuclear reactors.

  18. Crystallization of lithium borate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goktas, A. A.; Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of lithium borate compositions, in the diborate-to-metaborate-range, were studied. In particular, the nature and sequence of formation of crystalline phases and the tendency toward devitrification were investigated as functions of temperature, thermal history and batch composition. It was found that the sequence of crystalline phase formation was sensitive to all of the three latter factors, and it was observed that under certain conditions metastable defect structures of the metaborate can appear.

  19. Aluminum-lithium alloys in helicopters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.F.

    1997-10-01

    Aluminium-lithium alloys are widely applied on the EH101 helicopter, designed and built jointly by GKN Westland Helicopters of England and Agusta S.p.A. of Italy. With the exception of the powder metallurgy alloy AA 5091, all the current commercially available aluminum-lithium alloys are produced by direct-chill casting, and require a precipitation-aging heat treatment to achieve the required properties. In aluminum-lithium alloys containing greater than 1.3% (by weight) of lithium, the intermetallic phase {delta}{prime}-Al{sub 3}Li precipitates upon natural or artificial aging, but the associated strengthening effect is insufficient to meet the medium or high strength levels usually required (the damage tolerant temper in AA 8090 is an exception).

  20. Large natural pH, CO2 and O2 fluctuations in a temperate tidal salt marsh on diel, seasonal, and interannual time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumann, Hannes; Wallace, Ryan; Tagliaferri, Tristen N.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine organisms experience dynamic pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions in their natural habitats, which may impact their susceptibility to long-term anthropogenic changes. Robust characterizations of all temporal scales of natural pH and DO fluctuations in different marine habitats are needed; however, appropriate time series of pH and DO are still scarce. We used multiyear (2008–2012), high-frequency (6 min) monitoring data to quantify diel, seasonal, and interannual scales of pH and DO variability in a productive, temperate tidal salt marsh (Flax Pond, Long Island, US). pHNBS and DO showed strong and similar seasonal patterns, with average (minimum) conditions declining from 8.2 (8.1) and 12.5 (11.4) mg l−1 at the end of winter to 7.6 (7.2) and 6.3 (2.8) mg l−1 in late summer, respectively. Concomitantly, average diel fluctuations increased from 0.22 and 2.2 mg l−1 (February) to 0.74 and 6.5 mg l−1 (August), respectively. Diel patterns were modulated by tides and time of day, eliciting the most extreme minima when low tides aligned with the end of the night. Simultaneous in situ pCO2 measurements showed striking fluctuations between ∼330 and ∼1,200 (early May), ∼2,200 (mid June), and ∼4,000 μatm (end of July) within single tidal cycles. These patterns also indicate that the marsh’s strong net heterotrophy influences its adjacent estuary by ‘outwelling’ acidified and hypoxic water during ebb tides. Our analyses emphasize the coupled and fluctuating nature of pH and DO conditions in productive coastal and estuarine environments, which have yet to be adequately represented by experiments.

  1. Boric ester-type molten salt via dehydrocoupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumi, Noriyoshi; Toyota, Yoshiyuki; Joshi, Prerna; Puneet, Puhup; Vedarajan, Raman; Takekawa, Toshihiro

    2014-11-14

    Novel boric ester-type molten salt was prepared using 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride as a key starting material. After an ion exchange reaction of 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride with lithium (bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide) (LiNTf2), the resulting 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium NTf2 was reacted with 9-borabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (9-BBN) to give the desired boric ester-type molten salt in a moderate yield. The structure of the boric ester-type molten salt was supported by 1H-, 13C-, 11B- and 19F-NMR spectra. In the presence of two different kinds of lithium salts, the matrices showed an ionic conductivity in the range of 1.1 × 10⁻⁴-1.6 × 10⁻⁵ S cm⁻¹ at 51 °C. This was higher than other organoboron molten salts ever reported.

  2. Electrochemical properties of a lithium-impregnated metal foam anode for thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yu-Song; Yu, Hye-Ryeon; Cheong, Hae-Won

    2015-02-01

    Lithium-impregnated metal foam anodes (LIMFAs) are fabricated and investigated. The LIMFAs are prepared by the impregnation of lithium into molten-salt-coated nickel metal foam. A single cell with the LIMFA exhibits a specific capacity of 3009 As g-1. For comparison, a single cell with a LiSi alloy anode is also discharged, demonstrating a specific capacity of 1050 As g-1. These significant improvements can be attributed to the large amount of lithium impregnated into the metal foam as well as the molten lithium holding capability of the foam. Due to their excellent electrochemical properties, LIMFAs are suitable for use in thermal batteries.

  3. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  4. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  5. An Attempt to Asses Suitability of Middle-Poland Salt Domes for Natural Gas Storage / Ocena Przydatności Środkowopolskich Wysadów Solnych Do Magazynowania Gazu Ziemnego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślizowski, Jarosław; Urbańczyk, Kazimierz

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the paper is to assess geological conditions in Middle-Poland salt domes and their suitability for natural gas storage. The starting point to the assessment were statistical distributions of caverns depth and volume in Mogilno CUGS. The distributions were generalized to other domes using the part of anticline forms in the salt mirror surface. The expected average cavern volumes, depths with their standard deviations are evaluated. Storing capacity of the caverns and the risk of a borehole unsuitable for cavern location are also given.

  6. Salt stress or salt shock: which genes are we studying?

    PubMed

    Shavrukov, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the method of NaCl application, whether gradual or in a single step, plants may experience either salt stress or salt shock, respectively. The first phase of salt stress is osmotic stress. However, in the event of salt shock, plants suffer osmotic shock, leading to cell plasmolysis and leakage of osmolytes, phenomena that do not occur with osmotic stress. Patterns of gene expression are different in response to salt stress and salt shock. Salt stress initiates relatively smooth changes in gene expression in response to osmotic stress and a more pronounced change in expression of significant numbers of genes related to the ionic phase of salt stress. There is a considerable time delay between changes in expression of genes related to the osmotic and ionic phases of salt stress. In contrast, osmotic shock results in strong, rapid changes in the expression of genes with osmotic function, and fewer changes in ionic-responsive genes that occur earlier. There are very few studies in which the effects of salt stress and salt shock are described in parallel experiments. However, the patterns of changes in gene expression observed in these studies are consistently as described above, despite the use of diverse plant species. It is concluded that gene expression profiles are very different depending the method of salt application. Imposition of salt stress by gradual exposure to NaCl rather than salt shock with a single application of a high concentration of NaCl is recommended for genetic and molecular studies, because this more closely reflects natural incidences of salinity. PMID:23186621

  7. A diverse group of halophilic bacteria exist in Lunsu, a natural salt water body of Himachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Srivastava, Malay; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Five halophilic bacterial isolates namely SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5 and SS8 were isolated from soil sediments of Lunsu, a salty water body. All the bacterial isolates showed growth in LB medium containing up to 8.7% NaCl, pH 7-8 and at temperature range of 30-37°C. The bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 require at least 3.8% NaCl for their growth, indicating their strict halophilic nature. Interestingly, bacterial isolates SS2, SS5 and SS8 but not SS1 and SS3 exhibited growth in medium supplemented with KCl. Accordingly, Na(+) and K(+) ions were detected at 1.39 and 0.0035%, respectively in Lunsu water. All the bacterial isolates were analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using four different random primers and produced PCR fragments ranging from 0.1 to 5 kb in size. Phylogenetic tree based on RAPD finger prints showed that SS1 and SS3 formed one group, while SS2 and SS5 formed the second group, whereas SS8 was out group. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA identified SS1 and SS3 as Halobacillus trueperi, SS2 as Shewanella algae, SS5 as Halomonas venusta, and SS8 as Marinomonas sp. were deposited in GenBank with accession numbers of KM260166, KF751761, KF751760, KF751762 and KF751763, respectively. This is the first report on the presence of diverse halophilic bacteria in the foot hills of Himalayas. PMID:26090321

  8. Dynamics of salt playa polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Fourrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    In natural salt playa or in evaporation pools for the salt extraction industry, one can sometimes see surprising regular structures formed by ridges of salt. These ridges connect together to form a self-organized network of polygons one to two meters in diameter, which we call salt polygons. Here we propose a mechanism based on porous media convection of salty water in soil to explain the formation and the scaling of the salt polygons. Surface evaporation causes a steady upward flow of salty water, which can cause precipitation near the surface. A vertical salt gradient then builds up in the porous soil, with heavy salt-saturated water lying over the less salty source water. This can drive convection when a threshold is reached, given by a critical Rayleigh number of about 7. We suggest that the salt polygons are the surface expression of the porous medium convection, with salt crystallizing along the positions of the convective downwellings. To study this instability directly, we developed a 2D analogue experiment using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a porous medium saturated with a salt solution and heated from above. We perform a linear stability analysis of this system, and find that it is unstable to convection, with a most unstable wavelength that is set by a balance between salt diffusion and water evaporation. The Rayleigh number in our experiment is controlled by the particle size of our model soil, and the evaporation rate. We obtain results that scale with the observation of natural salt polygons. Using dye, we observe the convective movement of salty water and find downwelling convective plumes underneath the spots where surface salt ridges form, as shown in the attached figure.

  9. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered.

  10. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-01

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes.

  11. Kidney function and lithium concentrations of rats given an injection of lithium orotate or lithium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F; Schou, M

    1979-03-01

    A recent study by Kling et al (1978) noted the finding of higher lithium concentrations in serum and brain of rats after an intraperitoneal injection (2 mmol lithium kg-1) of lithium orotate as a slurry than of lithium carbonate in solution. The authors suggested that lithium orotate might offer advantages in the treatment of patients. We repeated the experiments of Kling et al but in addition examined the kidney function of the rats. Glomerular filtration rate and urine flow were markedly lower in rats given lithium orotate than in rats given lithium carbonate, sodium chloride or a sham injection. The renal lithium clearance was significantly lower, the kidney weight and the lithium concentrations in serum, kidney and heart significantly higher after injection of lithium orotate than after injection of lithium carbonate. The higher lithium concentrations could be accounted for by the lower kidney function. It seems inadvisable to use lithium orotate for the treatment of patients. PMID:34690

  12. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes. PMID:26081242

  13. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-17

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes.

  14. Coating protects magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Coating protects newly developed magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion. The procedure includes heating the ingots in a salt bath and rolling them to the desired sheet thickness. The black coating, which is tough though thin and ductile, is derived mainly from chromium.

  15. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  16. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  17. Halocyclization of Unsaturated Guanidines Mediated by Koser's Reagent and Lithium Halides.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Marion; Blanchard, Florent; Nocquet-Thibault, Sophie; Cariou, Kevin; Dodd, Robert H

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis of halogenated cyclic guanidines through iodine(III)-mediated umpolung of halide salts is described. Cyclic guanidines of various sizes can be obtained with generally excellent regioselectivities through either a chloro- or a bromocyclization, using Koser's reagent and the corresponding lithium salt. PMID:26492553

  18. Direct Lit Electrolysis In A Metallic Lithium Fusion Blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Colon-Mercado, H.; Babineau, D.; Elvington, M.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Teprovich, J.; Vaquer, A.

    2015-10-13

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed.  The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fission/fusion reactors is critical in order to maintained low concentrations.  This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket, extraction is complicated at the required low levels. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering the hydrogen and deuterium thru an electrolysis step at high temperatures. 

  19. Lithium Resources for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, S.; Gruber, P.; Medina, P.; Keolian, G.; Everson, M. P.; Wallington, T.

    2011-12-01

    (Great Salt Lake, Searles Lake), geothermal systems (Salton Sea) and oil fields contain lithium, but in low concentrations that add relatively little to estimated global resources. Igneous deposits, which constitute 26% of estimated global resources, consist largely of pegmatites, including past and present producers at Kings Mountain-Bessemer City (USA), Greenbushes (Australia) and Bikita (Zimbabwe), as well as numerous active prospects, especially in Canada and China. Amenability of these deposits to economic extraction is controlled by mineralogy and zoning of lithium, which vary considerably from deposit to deposit. An additional 8% of global lithium resources is estimated to be present in unusual deposits including largely hectorite clays in volcaniclastic rocks at Kings Valley (USA) and jadarite in lacustrine evaporite deposits (Serbia), which present new challenges to both mining and processing. If this highly varied population of deposits can be converted to reserves, lithium supplies for the 21st century EV market are relatively secure.

  20. Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus gen. nov., sp. nov., a phosphate-solubilizing and nitrogen-fixing alphaproteobacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a natural salt-meadow plant.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Christian; Ratering, Stefan; Geissler-Plaum, Rita; Schnell, Sylvia

    2014-09-01

    A phosphate-mobilizing, Gram-negative bacterium was isolated from rhizospheric soil of Plantago winteri from a natural salt meadow as part of an investigation of rhizospheric bacteria from salt-resistant plant species and evaluation of their plant-growth-promoting abilities. Cells were rods, motile, strictly aerobic, oxidase-positive and catalase-negative. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain E19(T) was distinct from other taxa within the class Alphaproteobacteria. Strain E19(T) showed less than 93.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with members of the genera Rhizobium (≤93.5 %), Labrenzia (≤93.1 %), Stappia (≤93.1 %), Aureimonas (≤93.1 %) and Mesorhizobium (≤93.0 %) and was most closely related to Rhizobium rhizoryzae (93.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain). The sole respiratory quinone was Q-10, and the polar lipids comprised phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, an aminolipid and an unidentified phospholipid. Major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c (71.4 %), summed feature 2 (C14 : 0 3-OH and/or iso-C16 : 1; 8.3 %), C20 : 0 (7.9 %) and C16 : 0 (6.1 %). The DNA G+C content of strain E19(T) was 59.9±0.7 mol%. The capacity for nitrogen fixation was confirmed by the presence of the nifH gene and the acetylene reduction assay. On the basis of the results of our polyphasic taxonomic study, the new isolate represents a novel genus and species, for which the name Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus is E19(T) ( = LMG 27460(T) = KACC 17263(T)).

  1. Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus gen. nov., sp. nov., a phosphate-solubilizing and nitrogen-fixing alphaproteobacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a natural salt-meadow plant.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Christian; Ratering, Stefan; Geissler-Plaum, Rita; Schnell, Sylvia

    2014-09-01

    A phosphate-mobilizing, Gram-negative bacterium was isolated from rhizospheric soil of Plantago winteri from a natural salt meadow as part of an investigation of rhizospheric bacteria from salt-resistant plant species and evaluation of their plant-growth-promoting abilities. Cells were rods, motile, strictly aerobic, oxidase-positive and catalase-negative. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain E19(T) was distinct from other taxa within the class Alphaproteobacteria. Strain E19(T) showed less than 93.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with members of the genera Rhizobium (≤93.5 %), Labrenzia (≤93.1 %), Stappia (≤93.1 %), Aureimonas (≤93.1 %) and Mesorhizobium (≤93.0 %) and was most closely related to Rhizobium rhizoryzae (93.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain). The sole respiratory quinone was Q-10, and the polar lipids comprised phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, an aminolipid and an unidentified phospholipid. Major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c (71.4 %), summed feature 2 (C14 : 0 3-OH and/or iso-C16 : 1; 8.3 %), C20 : 0 (7.9 %) and C16 : 0 (6.1 %). The DNA G+C content of strain E19(T) was 59.9±0.7 mol%. The capacity for nitrogen fixation was confirmed by the presence of the nifH gene and the acetylene reduction assay. On the basis of the results of our polyphasic taxonomic study, the new isolate represents a novel genus and species, for which the name Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus is E19(T) ( = LMG 27460(T) = KACC 17263(T)). PMID:24961682

  2. Hot filament technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of molten lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Perry, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Molten salts, such as lithium fluoride, are attractive candidates for thermal energy storage in solar dynamic space power systems because of their high latent heat of fusion. However, these same salts have poor thermal conductivities which inhibit the transfer of heat into the solid phase and out of the liquid phase. One concept for improving the thermal conductivity of the thermal energy storage system is to add a conductive filler material to the molten salt. High thermal conductivity pitch-based graphite fibers are being considered for this application. Although there is some information available on the thermal conductivity of lithium fluoride solid, there is very little information on lithium fluoride liquid, and no information on molten salt graphite fiber composites. This paper describes a hot filament technique for determining the thermal conductivity of molten salts. The hot filament technique was used to find the thermal conductivity of molten lithium fluoride at 930 C, and the thermal conductivity values ranged from 1.2 to 1.6 W/mK. These values are comparable to the slightly larger value of 5.0 W/mK for lithium fluoride solid. In addition, two molten salt graphite fiber composites were characterized with the hot filament technique and these results are also presented.

  3. Lithium dendrite growth through solid polymer electrolyte membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, Katherine; Schauser, Nicole; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Replacing the graphite-based anode in current batteries with a lithium foil will result in a qualitative increase in the energy density of lithium batteries. The primary reason for not adopting lithium-foil anodes is the formation of dendrites during cell charging. In this study, stop-motion X-ray microtomography experiments were used to directly monitor the growth of lithium dendrites during electrochemical cycling of symmetric lithium-lithium cells with a block copolymer electrolyte. In an attempt to understand the relationship between viscoelastic properties of the electrolyte on dendrite formation, a series of complementary experiments including cell cycling, tomography, ac impedance, and rheology, were conducted above and below the glass transition temperature of the non-conducting poly(styrene) block; the conducting phase is a mixture of rubbery poly(ethylene oxide) and a lithium salt. The tomography experiments enable quantification of the evolution of strain in the block copolymer electrolyte. Our work provides fundamental insight into the dynamics of electrochemical deposition of metallic films in contact with high modulus polymer electrolytes. Rational approaches for slowing down and, perhaps, eliminating dendrite growth are proposed.

  4. Stability of aluminum substrates in lithium-ion battery electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Wishvender K.; Plichta, Edward J.

    The stability of aluminum positive electrode substrates in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries was investigated in solutions of lithium imide salt in ethylene carbonate-propylene carbonate-dimethyl carbonate (20:20:60 vol.%) using the technique of controlled potential coulometry. It was found that the protective surface film formed on aluminum in these solutions breaks down at potentials above 3.5 V during the charging of lithium-ion cells resulting in the corrosion of aluminum substrates and the premature failure of these cells. It was also found that the use of lithium tetrafluoroborate as an electrolyte additive prevents the breakdown of the protective film on aluminum substrates and prevents their corrosion at potentials above 3.5 V. In contrast to the lithium imide solutions, the aluminum substrates were found to be quite stable in lithium methide electrolyte solutions and did not undergo any significant corrosion at potentials up to about 4.25 V vs. the lithium reference electrode.

  5. Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4 Microspheres by Salt-Assisted Spray Drying for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myeong-Seong; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Suk-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ruan, Dianbo; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Lee, Sang Hyun; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2016-05-01

    Microsized, spherical, three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based composites as electrode materials exhibit improved tap density and electrochemical properties. In this study, we report 3D LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4/reduced graphene oxide microspheres synthesized by one-step salt-assisted spray drying using a mixed solution containing a precursor salt and graphene oxide and a subsequent heat treatment. During this process, it was found that the type of metal salt used has significant effects on the morphology, phase purity, and electrochemical properties of the synthesized samples. Furthermore, the amount of the chelating agent used also affects the phase purity and electrochemical properties of the samples. The composite exhibited a high tap density (1.1 g cm‑3) as well as a gravimetric capacity of 161 mA h g‑1 and volumetric capacity of 281 mA h cm‑3 at 0.05 C-rate. It also exhibited excellent rate capability, delivering a discharge capacity of 90 mA h g‑1 at 60 C-rate. Furthermore, the microspheres exhibited high energy efficiency and good cyclability, showing a capacity retention rate of 93% after 1000 cycles at 10 C-rate.

  6. Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4 Microspheres by Salt-Assisted Spray Drying for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong-Seong; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Suk-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ruan, Dianbo; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Lee, Sang Hyun; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Microsized, spherical, three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based composites as electrode materials exhibit improved tap density and electrochemical properties. In this study, we report 3D LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4/reduced graphene oxide microspheres synthesized by one-step salt-assisted spray drying using a mixed solution containing a precursor salt and graphene oxide and a subsequent heat treatment. During this process, it was found that the type of metal salt used has significant effects on the morphology, phase purity, and electrochemical properties of the synthesized samples. Furthermore, the amount of the chelating agent used also affects the phase purity and electrochemical properties of the samples. The composite exhibited a high tap density (1.1 g cm−3) as well as a gravimetric capacity of 161 mA h g−1 and volumetric capacity of 281 mA h cm−3 at 0.05 C-rate. It also exhibited excellent rate capability, delivering a discharge capacity of 90 mA h g−1 at 60 C-rate. Furthermore, the microspheres exhibited high energy efficiency and good cyclability, showing a capacity retention rate of 93% after 1000 cycles at 10 C-rate. PMID:27220812

  7. Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4 Microspheres by Salt-Assisted Spray Drying for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Seong; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Suk-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ruan, Dianbo; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Lee, Sang Hyun; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2016-05-25

    Microsized, spherical, three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based composites as electrode materials exhibit improved tap density and electrochemical properties. In this study, we report 3D LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4/reduced graphene oxide microspheres synthesized by one-step salt-assisted spray drying using a mixed solution containing a precursor salt and graphene oxide and a subsequent heat treatment. During this process, it was found that the type of metal salt used has significant effects on the morphology, phase purity, and electrochemical properties of the synthesized samples. Furthermore, the amount of the chelating agent used also affects the phase purity and electrochemical properties of the samples. The composite exhibited a high tap density (1.1 g cm(-3)) as well as a gravimetric capacity of 161 mA h g(-1) and volumetric capacity of 281 mA h cm(-3) at 0.05 C-rate. It also exhibited excellent rate capability, delivering a discharge capacity of 90 mA h g(-1) at 60 C-rate. Furthermore, the microspheres exhibited high energy efficiency and good cyclability, showing a capacity retention rate of 93% after 1000 cycles at 10 C-rate.

  8. Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4 Microspheres by Salt-Assisted Spray Drying for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Seong; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Suk-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ruan, Dianbo; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Lee, Sang Hyun; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Microsized, spherical, three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based composites as electrode materials exhibit improved tap density and electrochemical properties. In this study, we report 3D LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4/reduced graphene oxide microspheres synthesized by one-step salt-assisted spray drying using a mixed solution containing a precursor salt and graphene oxide and a subsequent heat treatment. During this process, it was found that the type of metal salt used has significant effects on the morphology, phase purity, and electrochemical properties of the synthesized samples. Furthermore, the amount of the chelating agent used also affects the phase purity and electrochemical properties of the samples. The composite exhibited a high tap density (1.1 g cm(-3)) as well as a gravimetric capacity of 161 mA h g(-1) and volumetric capacity of 281 mA h cm(-3) at 0.05 C-rate. It also exhibited excellent rate capability, delivering a discharge capacity of 90 mA h g(-1) at 60 C-rate. Furthermore, the microspheres exhibited high energy efficiency and good cyclability, showing a capacity retention rate of 93% after 1000 cycles at 10 C-rate. PMID:27220812

  9. Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4 Microspheres by Salt-Assisted Spray Drying for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myeong-Seong; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Suk-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ruan, Dianbo; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Lee, Sang Hyun; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2016-05-01

    Microsized, spherical, three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based composites as electrode materials exhibit improved tap density and electrochemical properties. In this study, we report 3D LiMn0.75Fe0.25PO4/reduced graphene oxide microspheres synthesized by one-step salt-assisted spray drying using a mixed solution containing a precursor salt and graphene oxide and a subsequent heat treatment. During this process, it was found that the type of metal salt used has significant effects on the morphology, phase purity, and electrochemical properties of the synthesized samples. Furthermore, the amount of the chelating agent used also affects the phase purity and electrochemical properties of the samples. The composite exhibited a high tap density (1.1 g cm-3) as well as a gravimetric capacity of 161 mA h g-1 and volumetric capacity of 281 mA h cm-3 at 0.05 C-rate. It also exhibited excellent rate capability, delivering a discharge capacity of 90 mA h g-1 at 60 C-rate. Furthermore, the microspheres exhibited high energy efficiency and good cyclability, showing a capacity retention rate of 93% after 1000 cycles at 10 C-rate.

  10. Lithium Redistribution in Lithium-Metal Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrese, A; Albertus, P; Christensen, J; Newman, J

    2012-01-01

    A model of a lithium-metal battery with a CoO2 positive electrode has been modeled in order to predict the movement of lithium in the negative electrode along the negative electrode/separator interface during cell cycling. A finite-element approach was used to incorporate an intercalation positive electrode using superposition, electrode tabbing, transport using concentrated solution theory, as well as the net movement of the lithium electrode during cycling. From this model, it has been found that movement of lithium along the negative electrode/separator interface does occur during cycling and is affected by three factors: the cell geometry, the slope of the open-circuit-potential function of the positive electrode, and concentration gradients in both the solid and liquid phases in the cell. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.027210jes] All rights reserved.

  11. Anodic behavior of lithium in a melt of a eutectic of lithium, potassium, and sodium nitrates

    SciTech Connect

    Volgin, M.A.; Gneushev, V.V. Denisova, L.N.

    1985-09-01

    Despite the importance of the problem of the anodic behavior of lithium in a melt of alkali metal nitrates, the kinetics and mechanism of this reaction had, according to the authors, been insufficiently studied. In this work, the anodic oxidation of lithium in a melt of a eutectic of the nitrates of lithium, sodium, and potassium at the temperature 423/sup 0/K by galvanostatic, potentiostatic, and potentiodynamic nonsteady-state methods. The electrochemical experiment, as well as an analysis of the phase diagram of the triple nitrate eutectic, showed that in the case of intensive anodic dissolution of lithium, enrichment of the layer near the electrode with lithium nitrate and its precipitation in the form of a solid salt film on the electrode are possible. At 423/sup 0/K, the first crystals of LiNO/sub 3/ may appear when its concentration is increased by 20%, which, according to the authors, is very realistic in the scale of the thin diffusion layer.

  12. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  13. Selective Reduction of Active Metal Chlorides from Molten LiCl-KCl using Lithium Drawdown

    SciTech Connect

    Michael F. Simpson; Daniel LaBrier; Michael Lineberry; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2012-10-01

    In support of optimizing electrorefining technology for treating spent nuclear fuel, lithium drawdown has been investigated for separating actinides from molten salt electrolyte. Drawdown reaction selectivity is a major issue that needs to be investigated, since the goal is to remove actinides while leaving the fission products in the salt. A series of lithium drawdown tests with surrogate fission product chlorides was run to obtain selectivity data with non-radioactive salts, develop a predictive model, and draw conclusions about the viability of using this process with actinide-loadd salt. Results of tests with CsCl, LaCl3, CeCl3, and NdCl3 are reported here. An equilibrium model has been formulated and fit to the experimental data. Excellent fits to the data were achieved. Based on analysis and results obtained to date, it is concluded that clean separation between minor actinides and lanthanides will be difficult to achieve using lithium drawdown.

  14. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, R.F.; Meadows, G.E.

    1984-01-10

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  15. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, Robert F.; Meadows, George E.

    1985-01-01

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  16. Sustainable governance of scarce metals: the case of lithium.

    PubMed

    Prior, Timothy; Wäger, Patrick A; Stamp, Anna; Widmer, Rolf; Giurco, Damien

    2013-09-01

    Minerals and metals are finite resources, and recent evidence suggests that for many, primary production is becoming more difficult and more expensive. Yet these resources are fundamentally important for society--they support many critical services like infrastructure, telecommunications and energy generation. A continued reliance on minerals and metals as service providers in modern society requires dedicated and concerted governance in relation to production, use, reuse and recycling. Lithium provides a good example to explore possible sustainable governance strategies. Lithium is a geochemically scarce metal (being found in a wide range of natural systems, but in low concentrations that are difficult to extract), yet recent studies suggest increasing future demand, particularly to supply the lithium in lithium-ion batteries, which are used in a wide variety of modern personal and commercial technologies. This paper explores interventions for sustainable governance and handling of lithium for two different supply and demand contexts: Australia as a net lithium producer and Switzerland as a net lithium consumer. It focuses particularly on possible nation-specific issues for sustainable governance in these two countries' contexts, and links these to the global lithium supply chain and demand scenarios. The article concludes that innovative business models, like 'servicizing' the lithium value chain, would hold sustainable governance advantages for both producer and consumer countries. PMID:23768895

  17. Sustainable governance of scarce metals: the case of lithium.

    PubMed

    Prior, Timothy; Wäger, Patrick A; Stamp, Anna; Widmer, Rolf; Giurco, Damien

    2013-09-01

    Minerals and metals are finite resources, and recent evidence suggests that for many, primary production is becoming more difficult and more expensive. Yet these resources are fundamentally important for society--they support many critical services like infrastructure, telecommunications and energy generation. A continued reliance on minerals and metals as service providers in modern society requires dedicated and concerted governance in relation to production, use, reuse and recycling. Lithium provides a good example to explore possible sustainable governance strategies. Lithium is a geochemically scarce metal (being found in a wide range of natural systems, but in low concentrations that are difficult to extract), yet recent studies suggest increasing future demand, particularly to supply the lithium in lithium-ion batteries, which are used in a wide variety of modern personal and commercial technologies. This paper explores interventions for sustainable governance and handling of lithium for two different supply and demand contexts: Australia as a net lithium producer and Switzerland as a net lithium consumer. It focuses particularly on possible nation-specific issues for sustainable governance in these two countries' contexts, and links these to the global lithium supply chain and demand scenarios. The article concludes that innovative business models, like 'servicizing' the lithium value chain, would hold sustainable governance advantages for both producer and consumer countries.

  18. Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz,John; Newman, John

    2005-09-29

    We have investigated possible anticipated advantages of ionic-liquid electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries. Thermal stabilities and phase behavior were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazoliumTFSI systems, pyrrolidiniumTFSI, BMIMPF{sub 6}, BMIMBF{sub 4}, and BMIMTf. Thermal stabilities were measured for neat ionic liquids and for BMIMBF{sub 4}-LiBF{sub 4}, BMIMTf-LiTf, BMIMTFSI-LiTFSI mixtures. Conductivities have been measured for various ionic-liquid lithium-salt systems. We show the development of interfacial impedance in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell and we report results from cycling experiments for a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + 1 mol/kg LIBF{sub 4}|C cell. The interfacial resistance increases with time and the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode. As expected, imidazolium-based ionic liquids react with lithium electrodes. We seek new ionic liquids that have better chemical stabilities.

  19. Determination of lithium in rocks: Fluorometric method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, C.E.; Fletcher, M.H.; Parks, J.

    1951-01-01

    The gravimetric method in general use for the determination of lithium is tedious, and the final weighed product often contains other alkali metals. A fluorometric method was developed to shorten the time required for the analysis and to assure that the final determination is for lithium alone. This procedure is based on the complex formed between lithium and 8-hydroxyquinoline. The fluorescence is developed in a slightly alkaline solution of 95% alcohol and measurement is made on a photoelectric fluorometer. Separation from the ore is carried out by the wet method or by the distillation procedure. Sodium and potassium are removed by alcohol and ether, but complete separation is not necessary. Comparison of analyzed samples shows excellent agreement with spectrographic and gravimetric methods. The fluorometric method is more rapid than the gravimetric and produces more conclusive results. Another useful application is in the preparation of standard lithium solutions from reagent quality salts when a known standard is available. In this case no separations are necessary.

  20. Polymer electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Meyer, W H

    1998-04-01

    The motivation for lithium battery development and a discussion of ion conducting polymers as separators begin this review, which includes a short history of polymer electrolyte research, a summary of the major parameters that determine lithium ion transport in polymer matrices, and consequences for solid polymer electrolyte development. Two major strategies for the application of ion conducting polymers as separators in lithium batteries are identified: One is the development of highly conductive materials via the crosslinking of mobile chains to form networks, which are then swollen by lithium salt solutions ("gel electrolytes"). The other is the construction of solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) with supramolecular architectures, which intrinsically give rise to much enhanced mechanical strength. These materials as yet exhibit relatively common conductivity levels but may be applied as very thin films. Molecular composites based on poly(p-phenylene)- (PPP)-reinforced SPEs are a striking example of this direction. Neither strategy has as yet led to a "breakthrough" with respect to technical application, at least not for electrically powered vehicles. Before being used as separators, the gel electrolytes must be strengthened, while the molecularly reinforced solid polymer electrolytes must demonstrate improved conductivity.

  1. Lithium storage mechanisms in purpurin based organic lithium ion battery electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Arava Leela Mohana; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Chumyim, Porramate; Gowda, Sanketh R.; Pradhan, Padmanava; Jadhav, Swapnil R.; Dubey, Madan; John, George; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    Current lithium batteries operate on inorganic insertion compounds to power a diverse range of applications, but recently there is a surging demand to develop environmentally friendly green electrode materials. To develop sustainable and eco-friendly lithium ion batteries, we report reversible lithium ion storage properties of a naturally occurring and abundant organic compound purpurin, which is non-toxic and derived from the plant madder. The carbonyl/hydroxyl groups present in purpurin molecules act as redox centers and reacts electrochemically with Li-ions during the charge/discharge process. The mechanism of lithiation of purpurin is fully elucidated using NMR, UV and FTIR spectral studies. The formation of the most favored six membered binding core of lithium ion with carbonyl groups of purpurin and hydroxyl groups at C-1 and C-4 positions respectively facilitated lithiation process, whereas hydroxyl group at C-2 position remains unaltered. PMID:23233879

  2. Remote Estimation of Salt Marsh Biophysical Parameters in the Georgia Coast: Model Cal/Val using NASA Sensors to Improve Monitoring and Restoration Efforts by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.; Padgett-Vasquez, S.; Ghosh, S.; Baruch, A.; Chen, N.; Mote, J.; Mishra, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Salt marshes are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat and nutrition to wildlife, offer protection from flooding and storm surges, and help filter polluted run-off from upland areas. This study demonstrates the ability to identify ';hotspots' of early stages of marsh degradation which can only be delineated by evaluating marsh biophysical characteristics including distribution of chlorophyll content (Chl), leaf area index (LAI) (a ratio of green foliage area vs. ground area), and green vegetation fraction (VF) (percent green canopy cover). These biophysical characteristics are primary indicators of photosynthetic capacity, nitrogen content, and physiological status of vegetation. Through use of NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, we retrieve the above described biophysical characteristics in Georgia salt marshes. This work is significant because it allows for the first time the use of NASA satellite data to study the biophysical characteristics of salt marshes along Georgia's coast. Our results show an efficient and non-destructive biophysical mapping protocol for emergent wetlands to be used in restoration decision-making by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Our primary objectives are (1) to calibrate and validate a range of MODIS-based vegetation indices (VIs) and develop prototype weekly and monthly composites of the salt marsh biophysical characteristics for the coast of Georgia from 2000 through 2013, for the growing season (March-November) and (2) to perform a time-series analysis, with map products developed from MODIS imagery, to study the overall trend of salt marsh productivity during the last decade. These VIs (NDVI, WDRVI, EVI2, SAVI, and VARI) have been widely used and tested for monitoring terrestrial vegetation, but not for salt marsh ecosystems.

  3. Trichloroacetic acid in the vegetation of polluted and remote areas of both hemispheres—Part II: salt lakes as novel sources of natural chlorohydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissflog, Ludwig; Elansky, Nikolai; Putz, Erich; Krueger, Gert; Lange, Christian A.; Lisitzina, Lida; Pfennigsdorff, Andrea

    One of the issues provided for by the 1993 existing substances regulation (793/93/EEC) is the assessment of the environmental risk emanating from waste materials. One such material is the highly volatile substance perchloroethene (PER; TECE). PER is produced in large quantities all over the world by the chemical industry. There are many industrial processes in which PER escapes into the environment, especially the atmosphere. It has since been proven that after entering plants via the air/leaf pathway, airborne PER can be metabolised into the phytotoxic substance trichloroacetic acid. However our own studies detected relatively high levels of TCA in environmental compartments in regions far away from industry which cannot be explained by the anthropogenic input of airborne substances into the relevant ecosystems. This indicates that natural PER emittents also exist and must be identified, in order to find out more about the global spread of PER. This paper reports on the findings of related fieldwork in the Kalmykian Steppe. This area of steppe in southern Russia spans an area extending west-to-east from the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea and north-to-south between the Greater Caucasus and Volgograd. The main aim of the experiments in the Kalmykian Steppe was to study water from lakes, rivers and springs with differing levels of salinity. The concentrations of the chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHCs) chloroform (CHCl 3), tetrachloromethane (CCl 4), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-C 2H 3Cl 3), trichloroethene (TRI; C 2HCl 3), tetrachloroethene (PER; C 2Cl 4) and TCA in these waters were measured, along with the levels of cations and anions and the pH-value of the waters. The measurements indicate that in particular water from salt lakes located in semiarid/arid areas of the study region must be considered as new types of natural emittents of PER and other chlorinated hydrocarbons as well as trichloroacetic acid. Furthermore, attention is drawn to ecological impacts

  4. Veins in Paleo-reservoir as a Natural Indication of Coupled Changes in Pore Pressure and Stress, Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwon, S.; Edwards, P.; Kim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofracturing associated with elevated fluid pressure coupled with changes in stress has been crucial in enhancing the production and recovery of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, it is also an important issue to access the efficiency and stability of long-term CO2 geologic storage reservoirs. Veins are mineral-filled extension fractures developed along the plane of σ1-σ2 and perpendicular to σ3, and the fluid pressure must exceed σ3applied to the plane when the vein opens. Therefore, vein is a well-known natural analogue for fluid migration in a paleo-reservoir. In the Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, CO2-charged vein systems hosted in the bleached Entrada Formation are well developed and examined to understand the conditions of fluid pressure and stress during the injections of CO2-charged fluid. Based on color and relative cross-cutting relationship in the field, veins are subdivided into two sets; sub-vertical black mineral-rich veins and orthogonal calcite veins that have previously been described as 'grid-lock fractures'. The vein distribution and fluid leakage along through-going fractures in mechanic units allow us to determine the stress regime and driving stress condition through 3D-Mohr circle reconstruction. The results of this statistical analysis for the veins show that the orthogonal veins indicate a 'stress transition' with maximum principal stress direction changing from vertical to NNW-SSE sub-horizontal which coincides with the current regional stress regime. The possible causes of the stress transition can be considered. The process of repeated sealing, reactivation and localization of veins within the bleached zone is a natural indication of a coupled change in pore pressure and stress in the reservoir. Thus, an understanding of the effect of stress changes due to the volumetric injection of CO2 in the subsurface as well as a knowledge of how pre-existing fractures affect fluid flow with respect to elevated pore pressures in layered rocks are

  5. Phosphate-stabilized Lithium intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2002-07-22

    Four manganese and iron phosphates with alluaudite or fillowite structures have been prepared by solid state reactions: Na2FeMn2(PO4)3, LiNaFeMn2(PO4)3, NaFe3(PO4)3, and Na2Mn3(PO4)3. LixNa2-xFeMn2(PO4)3 with x close to 2 was prepared from Na2FeMn2(PO4)3 by molten salt ion exchange. These materials are similar in stoichiometry to the phospho-olivines LiFe(Mn)PO4, but have a more complex structure that can accommodate mixed transition metal oxidation states. They are of interest as candidates for lithium battery cathodes because of their somewhat higher electronic conductivity, high intercalant ion mobility, and ease of preparation. Their performance as intercalation electrodes in non-aqueous lithium cells was, however, poor.

  6. NASA lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juvinall, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages of lithium systems are described and a general summary of their application in present and future NASA programs is presented. Benefits of the lithium systems include an increased payload weight and an increased cost effectiveness to the customer. This also allows for more flexibility in the design of future space transportation systems.

  7. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  8. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  9. Lithium and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Motoi, Yumiko; Shimada, Kohei; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-06-18

    Lithium, a drug used to treat bipolar disorders, has a variety of neuroprotective mechanisms, including autophagy regulation, in various neuropsychiatric conditions. In neurodegenerative diseases, lithium enhances degradation of aggregate-prone proteins, including mutated huntingtin, phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein, and causes damaged mitochondria to degrade, while in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer's disease autophagy downregulation by lithium is observed. The signaling pathway of lithium as an autophagy enhancer might be associated with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent pathway, which is involved in myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the mTOR-dependent pathway might be involved in inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in other diseases. Lithium's autophagy-enhancing property may contribute to the therapeutic benefit of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  11. Lithium: a versatile tool for understanding renal physiology

    PubMed Central

    Ecelbarger, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    By virtue of its unique interactions with kidney cells, lithium became an important research tool in renal physiology and pathophysiology. Investigators have uncovered the intricate relationships of lithium with the vasopressin and aldosterone systems, and the membrane channels or transporters regulated by them. While doing so, their work has also led to 1) questioning the role of adenylyl cyclase activity and prostaglandins in lithium-induced suppression of aquaporin-2 gene transcription; 2) unraveling the role of purinergic signaling in lithium-induced polyuria; and 3) highlighting the importance of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Lithium-induced remodeling of the collecting duct has the potential to shed new light on collecting duct remodeling in disease conditions, such as diabetes insipidus. The finding that lithium inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) has opened an avenue for studies on the role of GSK3β in urinary concentration, and GSK isoforms in renal development. Finally, proteomic and metabolomic profiling of the kidney and urine in rats treated with lithium is providing insights into how the kidney adapts its metabolism in conditions such as acquired NDI and the multifactorial nature of lithium-induced NDI. This review provides state-of-the-art knowledge of lithium as a versatile tool for understanding the molecular physiology of the kidney, and a comprehensive view of how this tool is challenging some of our long-standing concepts in renal physiology, often with paradigm shifts, and presenting paradoxical situations in renal pathophysiology. In addition, this review points to future directions in research where lithium can lead the renal community. PMID:23408166

  12. High Performance Batteries Based on Hybrid Magnesium and Lithium Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yingwen; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Jiguang; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun; Li, Guosheng

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium and lithium (Mg/Li) hybrid batteries that combine Mg and Li electrochemistry, consisting of a Mg anode, a lithium-intercalation cathode and a dual-salt electrolyte with both Mg2+ and Li+ ions, were constructed and examined in this work. Our results show that hybrid (Mg/Li) batteries were able to combine the advantages of Li-ion and Mg batteries, and delivered outstanding rate performance (83% for capacities at 15C and 0.1C) and superior cyclic stability (~5% fade after 3000 cycles).

  13. Anodic oxidation of sulfide ions in molten lithium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C.L.; Gilbert, J.B. II . Applied Research Lab.)

    1994-10-01

    The study of sulfur and sulfide oxidation in molten salt systems is of current interest in high energy battery, and metallurgical applications. Cyclic voltammetry experiments have been performed on lithium sulfide in a lithium fluoride electrolyte at 1,161 K using a graphite working electrode and a platinum quasi-reference electrode. Two distinct oxidation mechanisms are observed for the sulfide ions. The first oxidation produces sulfur and at a higher potential a disulfide species is proposed to have formed. Both oxidations appear to be reversible and diffusion controlled.

  14. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kim, Jeom-Soo; Johnson, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  15. Development and utility of manganese oxides as cathodes in lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher S.

    Manganese oxides have a long history of serving as a cathode in charge storage applications. Electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) is widely used in alkaline batteries and MnO 2 originally was part of the Leclanché wet cell patented in 1866. Leclanché wet cells used a naturally occurring MnO 2 ore with Zn metal as anode and ammonium chloride electrolyte. While there are a vast number of topics to discuss on manganese oxides, in this short paper, two topics researched at Argonne over the last 12 years are highlighted. First, the addition of lithia (Li 2O) as a stabilizing component in 3 V alpha-MnO 2 is examined. Second, an overview of the evolution of layered-layered composite-structured electrodes derived from the lithium-manganese oxide (Li 2MnO 3) layered rock-salt phase is presented.

  16. Composite Electrolytes for Lithium Batteries: Ionic Liquids in APTES Crosslinked Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigelaar, Dean M.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Solvent free polymer electrolytes were made consisting of Li(+) and pyrrolidinium salts of trifluoromethanesulfonimide added to a series of hyperbranched poly(ethylene oxide)s (PEO). The polymers were connected by triazine linkages and crosslinked by a sol-gel process to provide mechanical strength. The connecting PEO groups were varied to help understand the effects of polymer structure on electrolyte conductivity in the presence of ionic liquids. Polymers were also made that contain poly(dimethylsiloxane) groups, which provide increased flexibility without interacting with lithium ions. When large amounts of ionic liquid are added, there is little dependence of conductivity on the polymer structure. However, when smaller amounts of ionic liquid are added, the inherent conductivity of the polymer becomes a factor. These electrolytes are more conductive than those made with high molecular weight PEO imbibed with ionic liquids at ambient temperatures, due to the amorphous nature of the polymer.

  17. Hybrid Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with a Solid Electrolyte Membrane and Lithium Polysulfide Catholyte.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xingwen; Bi, Zhonghe; Zhao, Feng; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-08-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are receiving great attention as the most promising next-generation power source with significantly high charge-storage capacity. However, the implementation of Li-S batteries is hampered by a critical challenge because of the soluble nature of the intermediate polysulfide species in the liquid electrolyte. The use of traditional porous separators unavoidably allows the migration of the dissolved polysulfide species from the cathode to the lithium-metal anode and results in continuous loss of capacity. In this study, a LiSICON (lithium super ionic conductor) solid membrane is used as a cation-selective electrolyte for lithium-polysulfide (Li-PS) batteries to suppress the polysulfide diffusion. Ionic conductivity issue at the lithium metal/solid electrolyte interface is successfully addressed by insertion of a "soft", liquid-electrolyte integrated polypropylene interlayer. The solid LiSICON lithium-ion conductor maintains stable ionic conductivity during the electrochemical cycling of the cells. The Li-PS battery system with a hybrid solid/liquid electrolyte exhibits significantly enhanced cyclability relative to the cells with the traditional liquid-electrolyte integrated porous separator. PMID:26161547

  18. 21 CFR 172.660 - Salts of furcelleran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salts of furcelleran. 172.660 Section 172.660 Food... Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.660 Salts of furcelleran. The food additive salts... the concentration of one of the naturally occurring salts (ammonium, calcium, potassium, or sodium)...

  19. 21 CFR 172.660 - Salts of furcelleran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salts of furcelleran. 172.660 Section 172.660 Food... Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.660 Salts of furcelleran. The food additive salts... the concentration of one of the naturally occurring salts (ammonium, calcium, potassium, or sodium)...

  20. 21 CFR 172.660 - Salts of furcelleran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Salts of furcelleran. 172.660 Section 172.660 Food... Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.660 Salts of furcelleran. The food additive salts... the concentration of one of the naturally occurring salts (ammonium, calcium, potassium, or sodium)...

  1. 21 CFR 172.626 - Salts of carrageenan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salts of carrageenan. 172.626 Section 172.626 Food... Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.626 Salts of carrageenan. The food additive salts... the concentration of one of the naturally occurring salts (ammonium, calcium, potassium, or sodium)...

  2. 21 CFR 172.660 - Salts of furcelleran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salts of furcelleran. 172.660 Section 172.660 Food... Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.660 Salts of furcelleran. The food additive salts... the concentration of one of the naturally occurring salts (ammonium, calcium, potassium, or sodium)...

  3. 21 CFR 172.626 - Salts of carrageenan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salts of carrageenan. 172.626 Section 172.626 Food... Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.626 Salts of carrageenan. The food additive salts... the concentration of one of the naturally occurring salts (ammonium, calcium, potassium, or sodium)...

  4. 21 CFR 172.626 - Salts of carrageenan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Salts of carrageenan. 172.626 Section 172.626 Food... Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.626 Salts of carrageenan. The food additive salts... the concentration of one of the naturally occurring salts (ammonium, calcium, potassium, or sodium)...

  5. 21 CFR 172.626 - Salts of carrageenan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salts of carrageenan. 172.626 Section 172.626 Food... Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.626 Salts of carrageenan. The food additive salts... the concentration of one of the naturally occurring salts (ammonium, calcium, potassium, or sodium)...

  6. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Liu, Jun; Vissers, Donald R.; Lu, Wenquan

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In some embodiments the additives include a substituted or unsubstituted cyclic or spirocyclic hydrocarbon containing at least one oxygen atom and at least one alkenyl or alkynyl group. When used in electrochemical devices with, e.g., lithium manganese oxide spinel electrodes or olivine or carbon-coated olivine electrodes, the new electrolytes provide batteries with improved calendar and cycle life.

  7. Influence of Phosphatidylcholine and Calcium on Self-Association and Bile Salt Mixed Micellar Binding of the Natural Bile Pigment, Bilirubin Ditaurate.

    PubMed

    Neubrand, Michael W; Carey, Martin C; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-11-17

    Recently [Neubrand, M. W., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, 1542-1557], we determined a concentration-dependent monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium in aqueous bilirubin ditaurate (BDT) solutions and explored the nature of high-affinity binding of BDT monomers with monomers and micelles of the common taurine-conjugated bile salts (BS). We now investigate, employing complementary physicochemical methods, including fluorescence emission spectrophotometry and quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy, the influence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the predominant phospholipid of bile and calcium, the major divalent biliary cation, on these self-interactions and heterointeractions. We have used short-chain, lyso and long-chain PC species as models and contrasted our results with those of parallel studies employing unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) as the fully charged dianion. Both bile pigments interacted with the zwitterionic headgroup of short-chain lecithins, forming water-soluble (BDT) and insoluble ion-pair complexes (UCB), respectively. Upon micelle formation, BDT monomers apparently remained at the headgroup mantle of short-chain PCs, but the ion pairs with UCB became internalized within the micelle's hydrophobic core. BDT interacted with the headgroups of unilamellar egg yolk (EY) PC vesicles; however, with the simultaneous addition of CaCl2, a reversible aggregation took place, but not vesicle fusion. With mixed EYPC/BS micelles, BDT became bound to the hydrophilic surface (as with simple BS micelles), and in turn, both BDT and BS bound calcium, but not other divalent cations. The calcium complexation of BDT and BS was enhanced strongly with increases in micellar EYPC, suggesting calcium-mediated cross-bridging of hydrophilic headgroups at the micelle's surface. Therefore, the physicochemical binding of BDT to BS in an artificial bile medium is influenced not only by BS species and concentration but also by long-chain PCs and calcium ions that exert a specific rather

  8. Influence of Phosphatidylcholine and Calcium on Self-Association and Bile Salt Mixed Micellar Binding of the Natural Bile Pigment, Bilirubin Ditaurate.

    PubMed

    Neubrand, Michael W; Carey, Martin C; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-11-17

    Recently [Neubrand, M. W., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, 1542-1557], we determined a concentration-dependent monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium in aqueous bilirubin ditaurate (BDT) solutions and explored the nature of high-affinity binding of BDT monomers with monomers and micelles of the common taurine-conjugated bile salts (BS). We now investigate, employing complementary physicochemical methods, including fluorescence emission spectrophotometry and quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy, the influence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the predominant phospholipid of bile and calcium, the major divalent biliary cation, on these self-interactions and heterointeractions. We have used short-chain, lyso and long-chain PC species as models and contrasted our results with those of parallel studies employing unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) as the fully charged dianion. Both bile pigments interacted with the zwitterionic headgroup of short-chain lecithins, forming water-soluble (BDT) and insoluble ion-pair complexes (UCB), respectively. Upon micelle formation, BDT monomers apparently remained at the headgroup mantle of short-chain PCs, but the ion pairs with UCB became internalized within the micelle's hydrophobic core. BDT interacted with the headgroups of unilamellar egg yolk (EY) PC vesicles; however, with the simultaneous addition of CaCl2, a reversible aggregation took place, but not vesicle fusion. With mixed EYPC/BS micelles, BDT became bound to the hydrophilic surface (as with simple BS micelles), and in turn, both BDT and BS bound calcium, but not other divalent cations. The calcium complexation of BDT and BS was enhanced strongly with increases in micellar EYPC, suggesting calcium-mediated cross-bridging of hydrophilic headgroups at the micelle's surface. Therefore, the physicochemical binding of BDT to BS in an artificial bile medium is influenced not only by BS species and concentration but also by long-chain PCs and calcium ions that exert a specific rather

  9. Perchlorate (ClO4) and Perchlorate Salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Perchlorate ( ClO4 - ) and Perchlorate Salts CASRN 7790 - 98 - 9 Ammonium perchlorate CASRN 7791 - 03 - 9 Lithium perchlorate CASRN 7778 - 74 - 7 Potassium perchlorate CASRN 7601 - 89 - 0 Sodium perchlorate This U.S . EPA IRIS Summary is based on the U.S . Government - sponsored technical review of

  10. Size effects in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu-Rong, Yao; Ya-Xia, Yin; Yu-Gao, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Size-related properties of novel lithium battery materials, arising from kinetics, thermodynamics, and newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms, are reviewed. Complementary experimental and computational investigations of the use of the size effects to modify electrodes and electrolytes for lithium ion batteries are enumerated and discussed together. Size differences in the materials in lithium ion batteries lead to a variety of exciting phenomena. Smaller-particle materials with highly connective interfaces and reduced diffusion paths exhibit higher rate performance than the corresponding bulk materials. The thermodynamics is also changed by the higher surface energy of smaller particles, affecting, for example, secondary surface reactions, lattice parameter, voltage, and the phase transformation mechanism. Newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms that result in superior storage capacity are also briefly highlighted. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51225204 and 21303222), the Shandong Taishan Scholarship, China, the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2012CB932900), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010000).

  11. Reduction of the spent nuclear fuel of a VVER-1000 reactor by lithium in a lithium chloride melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, A. V.; Ishunin, V. S.; Kormilitsyn, M. V.

    2010-08-01

    Researchers at FGUP GNTs RF NIIAR performed a series of experiments on the lithium reduction of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of a VVER-1000 reactor to a metal in a lithium chloride melt. The depletion of the nuclear fuel taken before experiments is about 30000 (MW day)/t, and the cooling time is 5 years. The experiments are performed on 5.8-kg samples of a prepared SNF powder. Data are obtained on a decrease in the heat release, the specific activity of the processed powder, and the distribution of actinides and the main fission products between a salt phase and a reduced SNF powder.

  12. Lithium-Ion Electrolytes Containing Flame Retardant Additives for Increased Safety Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Smith, Kiah A. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Prakash, Surya G. (Inventor); Krause, Frederick Charles (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention discloses various embodiments of Li-ion electrolytes containing flame retardant additives that have delivered good performance over a wide temperature range, good cycle life characteristics, and improved safety characteristics, namely, reduced flammability. In one embodiment of the invention there is provided an electrolyte for use in a lithium-ion electrochemical cell, the electrolyte comprising a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), a fluorinated co-solvent, a flame retardant additive, and a lithium salt. In another embodiment of the invention there is provided an electrolyte for use in a lithium-ion electrochemical cell, the electrolyte comprising a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), a flame retardant additive, a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film forming agent, and a lithium salt.

  13. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-04-26

    The principal research effort for the first half of Year 3 of the project has been resource assessment. Emphasis has been on estimating the total volume of hydrocarbons generated and the potential amount of this resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Subbasin and the Conecuh Subbasin. The amount of this resource that has been expelled, migrated and entrapped is also the focus of the first half of Year 3 of this study.

  14. Hectorite-based nanocomposite electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Michael William

    Hectorite clay is presented in this work as a promising component for electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries. This negatively-charged, plate-shaped (250 nm diameter by 1 nm thickness) clay has exchangeable cations for which lithium may be substituted. When properly dispersed in high-dielectric solvents such as the carbonates (ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate) typically used in lithium-ion cells, a shear-thinning physical gel is created possessing a good conductivity (as high as 2 x 10-4 S/cm at room temperature has been measured) with near unity lithium-ion transference numbers. As a result, hectorite-based electrolytes could drastically reduce concentration polarization and present an inherently safer electrolyte as toxic salts such as LiPF6 that are typically used could be eliminated. Hectorite clay dispersions in aqueous and non-aqueous (1:1 (v:v) ethylene carbonate: poly(ethylene)glycol dimethyl ether 250 MW) solvents have been studied using rheology (dynamic and steady) and conductivity. The aqueous dispersions show a highly-exfoliated microstructure (fractal dimension, Df ≈ 1.6) created primarily through electrostatic repulsive forces which recovers after shear deformation by reorientation of the clay platelets. The non-aqueous dispersions form gel structures with a much higher degree of aggregation (Df ≈ 2.5), and recovery after shear deformation appears to be an aggregation controlled process as well. TEM imaging of non-aqueous clay dispersions shows the clay to be uniformly distributed, with the platelets existing in aggregates of 3 to 5 layers. Use of the hectorite-based electrolytes in lithium-ion cells requires electrodes that contain a single-ion conductor in the typically porous structures. Cathodes based on LiCoO2 that contain various lithium-conducting species (lithium hectorite, lithium LaponiteRTM, and lithium-exchanged NAFIONRTM) have been studied. AC impedance spectroscopy was used to probe the cells and equivalent circuits were

  15. Polystyrene-Al2O3 composite solid polymer electrolyte for lithium secondary battery.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yu-Jeong; An, Yu-Ha; Jo, Nam-Ju

    2012-01-05

    In a common salt-in-polymer electrolyte, a polymer which has polar groups in the molecular chain is necessary because the polar groups dissolve lithium salt and coordinate cations. Based on the above point of view, polystyrene [PS] that has nonpolar groups is not suitable for the polymer matrix. However, in this PS-based composite polymer-in-salt system, the transport of cations is not by segmental motion but by ion-hopping through a lithium percolation path made of high content lithium salt. Moreover, Al2O3 can dissolve salt, instead of polar groups of polymer matrix, by the Lewis acid-base interactions between the surface group of Al2O3 and salt. Notably, the maximum enhancement of ionic conductivity is found in acidic Al2O3 compared with neutral and basic Al2O3 arising from the increase of free ion fraction by dissociation of salt. It was revealed that PS-Al2O3 composite solid polymer electrolyte containing 70 wt.% salt and 10 wt.% acidic Al2O3 showed the highest ionic conductivity of 9.78 × 10-5 Scm-1 at room temperature.

  16. Lithium cell test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

  17. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  18. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  19. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  20. Enhancing the hole-conductivity of spiro-OMeTAD without oxygen or lithium salts by using spiro(TFSI)₂ in perovskite and dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, William H; Bailie, Colin D; Unger, Eva L; McGehee, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    2,2',7,7'-Tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD), the prevalent organic hole transport material used in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells and perovskite-absorber solar cells, relies on an uncontrolled oxidative process to reach appreciable conductivity. This work presents the use of a dicationic salt of spiro-OMeTAD, named spiro(TFSI)2, as a facile means of controllably increasing the conductivity of spiro-OMeTAD up to 10(-3) S cm(-1) without relying on oxidation in air. Spiro(TFSI)2 enables the first demonstration of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated and operated with the complete exclusion of oxygen after deposition of the sensitizer with higher and more reproducible device performance. Perovskite-absorber solar cells fabricated with spiro(TFSI)2 show improved operating stability in an inert atmosphere. Gaining control of the conductivity of the HTM in both dye-sensitized and perovskite-absorber solar cells in an inert atmosphere using spiro(TFSI)2 is an important step toward the commercialization of these technologies.

  1. Conductivity through Polymer Electrolytes and Its Implications in Lithium-Ion Batteries: Real-World Application of Periodic Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Owen C.; Egan, Martin; Kanakaraj, Rupa; Higgins, Thomas B.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.

    2012-01-01

    Periodic conductivity trends are placed in the scope of lithium-ion batteries, where increases in the ionic radii of salt components affect the conductivity of a poly(ethyleneoxide)-based polymer electrolyte. Numerous electrolytes containing varying concentrations and types of metal salts are prepared and evaluated in either one or two laboratory…

  2. Diffusive Fractionation of Lithium Isotopes in Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homolova, V.; Richter, F. M.; Watson, E. B.; Chaussidon, M.

    2014-12-01

    Systematic lithium isotope variations along concentration gradients found in olivine and pyroxene grains from terrestrial, lunar and martian rocks have been attributed to diffusive isotopic fractionation [Beck et al., 2006; Tang et al., 2007]. In some cases, these isotopic excursions are so large that a single grain may display isotopic variability that spans almost the entire range of documented terrestrial values [Jeffcoate et al., 2007]. In this study, we present the results of experiments to examine diffusive isotopic fractionation of lithium in olivine. The experiments comprised crystallographically oriented slabs of San Carlos olivine juxtaposed with either spodumene powder or a lithium rich pyroxene crystal. Experiments were conducted at 1 GPa and 0.1MPa over a temperature range of 1000 to 1125⁰C. Oxygen fugacity in the 0.1MPa experiments was controlled using the wustite-magnetite and nickel-nickel oxide solid buffer assemblages. Lithium concentrations generally decrease smoothly away from the edges of the grains; however, experiments involving diffusion parallel to the a-axis consistently show peculiar wavy or segmented concentration profiles. Lithium diffusivity parallel to the c-axis is on the order of 1E-14m2/s at 1100⁰C. The diffusivity parallel to the c-axis is more than an order of magnitude faster than diffusion parallel to the b-axis and correlates positively with oxygen fugacity. The lithium isotopic composition, δ7Li = 1000‰ * ((δ7Lisample- δ7Ligrain center)/ δ7Ligrain center), shows a decrease away from the edge of the grain to a minimum value (up to 70‰ lighter) and then an abrupt increase back to the initial isotopic composition of the olivine grain. This isotopic profile is similar to those found in natural grains and an experimental study on diffusive fractionation of lithium isotopes in pyroxene [Richter et al., 2014]. Results from the present study are modeled using the approach of Dohmen et al. [2010], which assumes lithium

  3. A stable graphite negative electrode for the lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Jeschull, Fabian; Brandell, Daniel; Edström, Kristina; Lacey, Matthew J

    2015-12-14

    Efficient, reversible lithium intercalation into graphite in ether-based electrolytes is enabled through a protective electrode binder, polyacrylic acid sodium salt (PAA-Na). In turn, this enables the creation of a stable "lithium-ion-sulfur" cell, using a lithiated graphite negative electrode with a sulfur positive electrode, using the common DME:DOL solvent system suited to the electrochemistry of the lithium-sulfur battery. Graphite-sulfur lithium-ion cells show average coulombic efficiencies of ∼99.5%, compared with <95% for lithium-sulfur cells, and significantly better capacity retention, taking into account cell balancing considerations. The high efficiency derives from the considerably better interfacial stability of the graphite electrode, which suppresses the polysulfide redox shuttle and self-discharge.

  4. Lithium-Ion Electrolytes with Improved Safety Tolerance to High Voltage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Prakash, Surya G. (Inventor); Krause, Frederick C. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention discloses various embodiments of electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries, the electrolytes having improved safety and the ability to operate with high capacity anodes and high voltage cathodes. In one embodiment there is provided an electrolyte for use in a lithium-ion battery comprising an anode and a high voltage cathode. The electrolyte has a mixture of a cyclic carbonate of ethylene carbonate (EC) or mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) co-solvent, ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), a flame retardant additive, a lithium salt, and an electrolyte additive that improves compatibility and performance of the lithium-ion battery with a high voltage cathode. The lithium-ion battery is charged to a voltage in a range of from about 2.0 V (Volts) to about 5.0 V (Volts).

  5. A stable graphite negative electrode for the lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Jeschull, Fabian; Brandell, Daniel; Edström, Kristina; Lacey, Matthew J

    2015-12-14

    Efficient, reversible lithium intercalation into graphite in ether-based electrolytes is enabled through a protective electrode binder, polyacrylic acid sodium salt (PAA-Na). In turn, this enables the creation of a stable "lithium-ion-sulfur" cell, using a lithiated graphite negative electrode with a sulfur positive electrode, using the common DME:DOL solvent system suited to the electrochemistry of the lithium-sulfur battery. Graphite-sulfur lithium-ion cells show average coulombic efficiencies of ∼99.5%, compared with <95% for lithium-sulfur cells, and significantly better capacity retention, taking into account cell balancing considerations. The high efficiency derives from the considerably better interfacial stability of the graphite electrode, which suppresses the polysulfide redox shuttle and self-discharge. PMID:26451894

  6. Geospatial examination of lithium in drinking water and suicide mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lithium as a substance occurring naturally in food and drinking water may exert positive effects on mental health. In therapeutic doses, which are more than 100 times higher than natural daily intakes, lithium has been proven to be a mood-stabilizer and suicide preventive. This study examined whether natural lithium content in drinking water is regionally associated with lower suicide rates. Methods Previous statistical approaches were challenged by global and local spatial regression models taking spatial autocorrelation as well as non-stationarity into account. A Geographically Weighted Regression model was applied with significant independent variables as indicated by a spatial autoregressive model. Results The association between lithium levels in drinking water and suicide mortality can be confirmed by the global spatial regression model. In addition, the local spatial regression model showed that the association was mainly driven by the eastern parts of Austria. Conclusions According to old anecdotic reports the results of this study support the hypothesis of positive effects of natural lithium intake on mental health. Both, the new methodological approach and the results relevant for health may open new avenues in the collaboration between Geographic Information Science, medicine, and even criminology, such as exploring the spatial association between violent or impulsive crime and lithium content in drinking water. PMID:22695110

  7. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D; Hammel, C J

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EVs). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  8. Study of passive film formation on graphite surface lithiated in the polysiloxane based electrolyte for the application to lithium secondary battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Hiroshi

    The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) which passivates the carbonaceous material in an organic electrolyte is at the forefront of battery research because the nature of the SEI strongly affects lithium ion battery performance. Aside from lithium ion cells, the lithium cell with polymer electrolyte has received considerable attention because of efforts to improve lithium cell safety. However, the nature of the SEI on the carbonaceous material in a polymer electrolyte is not understood in depth to the same extent as the SEI in organic electrolytes. In this project, siloxane-based electrolyte was studied to improve safety and performance of lithium secondary cells, and the SEI on the carbonaceous materials charged in the siloxane-based electrolyte was investigated. Two types of SEI films were observed to form on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) lithiated in the siloxane-based electrolyte. These films were morphologically and compositionally distinct, and were described as island-like and gel-like. In addition, electrochemical impedance analysis was performed with an electrochemical cell containing a thin graphite electrode to clarify the electrical characteristics of the SEI. The value of the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for siloxane-based electrolyte was two orders of greater than conventional carbonate-based electrolytes. Electrolyte additives, such as vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC), the type of electrolyte salt, and siloxane molecule structure reduced the value of Rct. Based on FT-IR spectra, the SEI was composed of the flexible groups -Si-O- and -C-O-. These flexible function groups are expected to absorb the volumetric changes of graphite particles during lithiating and delithiating in an electrochemical cell, which will prevent continuous decomposition of siloxane electrolyte on the graphite surface. In addition, the surface species on the lithium transition metal oxide (LiMeO2) delithiated in the polysiloxane-based electrolyte was investigated

  9. Cathodic polarization of sulfur in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, A.I.; Dukhanin, G.P.; Morachevskii, A.G.; Simikov, I.A.

    1985-12-01

    As a continuation of studies on the electrochemical behavior of sulfur in molten salts, this paper reports work on the determination of lithium and potassium ion discharge potentials at a sulfur electrode during cathodic polarization in molten LiNO/sub 3/-LiNO/sub 2/-LiOH and LiNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ at 423/sup 0/K as well as in molten LiF-LiCl-LiI and LiC1-KC1 ay 650/sup 0/K. The studies were carried out by taking polarization curves in a pulsed galvanostatic mode using a three-electrode electrochemical cell. The sulfur electrode floating on the molten salt electrolyte contacted a 5-mm-diameter graphite rod that also touched the molten salt. The same patterns were observed for the cathodic polarization of sulfur in both halide and nitrate melts.

  10. Toxic Effects of Lithium Chloride during Early Neonatal Period of Rat Development.

    PubMed

    Menshanov, P N; Bannova, A V; Dygalo, N N

    2016-02-01

    Lithium chloride (85, 255, or 255+127 μg/kg) or dexamethasone (0.2 or 2 mg/kg) were subcutaneously injected to 3-day-old rat pups, whose excretory system did not yet attain functional maturity. Both agents retarded the growth of rat pups and delayed the appearance of negative geotaxis. LD50 and therapeutic index of lithium chloride were 255 μg/kg and TI≤3, respectively. Thus, lithium salts even in low doses can be highly toxic for the developing organism. PMID:26906201

  11. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  12. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  13. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. V. Acetonitrile-Lithium Bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang D.; Borodin, Oleg; Seo, D. M.; Zhou, Zhi B.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-09-30

    Electrolytes with the salt lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) have been evaluated relative to comparable electrolytes with other lithium salts. Acetonitrile (AN) has been used as a model electrolyte solvent. The information obtained from the thermal phase behavior, solvation/ionic association interactions, quantum chemical (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with an APPLE&P many-body polarizable force field for the LiFSI salt) of the (AN)n-LiFSI mixtures provides detailed insight into the coordination interactions of the FSI- anions and the wide variability noted in the electrolyte transport property (i.e., viscosity and ionic conductivity).

  14. Nonflammable perfluoropolyether-based electrolytes for lithium batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Dominica H. C.; Thelen, Jacob L.; Fu, Yanbao; Devaux, Didier; Pandya, Ashish A.; Battaglia, Vincent S.; Balsara, Nitash P.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The flammability of conventional alkyl carbonate electrolytes hinders the integration of large-scale lithium-ion batteries in transportation and grid storage applications. In this study, we have prepared a unique nonflammable electrolyte composed of low molecular weight perfluoropolyethers and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide lithium salt. These electrolytes exhibit thermal stability beyond 200 °C and a remarkably high transference number of at least 0.91 (more than double that of conventional electrolytes). Li/LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cells made with this electrolyte show good performance in galvanostatic cycling, confirming their potential as rechargeable lithium batteries with enhanced safety and longevity. PMID:24516123

  15. Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Justin; Prausnitz, John M.; Newman, John

    2006-06-01

    In this work, thermal and electrochemical properties of neat and mixed ionic liquid - lithium salt systems have been studied. The presence of a lithium salt causes both thermal and phase-behavior changes. Differential scanning calorimeter DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis TGA were used for thermal analysis for several imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, trifluoromethansulfonate, BF{sub 4}, and PF{sub 6} systems. Conductivities and diffusion coefficient have been measured for some selected systems. Chemical reactions in electrode - ionic liquid electrolyte interfaces were studied by interfacial impedance measurements. Lithium-lithium and lithium-carbon cells were studied at open circuit and a charged system. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazolium systems that are already known to be electrochemically unstable in the presence of lithium metal. In this work the development of interfacial resistance is shown in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell as well as results from some cycling experiments. As the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode the interfacial resistance increases. The results show the magnitude of reactivity due to reduction of the ionic liquid electrolyte that eventually has a detrimental effect on battery performance.

  16. Stabilizing lithium metal using ionic liquids for long-lived batteries.

    PubMed

    Basile, A; Bhatt, A I; O'Mullane, A P

    2016-01-01

    Suppressing dendrite formation at lithium metal anodes during cycling is critical for the implementation of future lithium metal-based battery technology. Here we report that it can be achieved via the facile process of immersing the electrodes in ionic liquid electrolytes for a period of time before battery assembly. This creates a durable and lithium ion-permeable solid-electrolyte interphase that allows safe charge-discharge cycling of commercially applicable Li|electrolyte|LiFePO4 batteries for 1,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiencies >99.5%. The tailored solid-electrolyte interphase is prepared using a variety of electrolytes based on the N-propyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide room temperature ionic liquid containing lithium salts. The formation is both time- and lithium salt-dependant, showing dynamic morphology changes, which when optimized prevent dendrite formation and consumption of electrolyte during cycling. This work illustrates that a simple, effective and industrially applicable lithium metal pretreatment process results in a commercially viable cycle life for a lithium metal battery. PMID:27292652

  17. Stabilizing lithium metal using ionic liquids for long-lived batteries

    PubMed Central

    Basile, A.; Bhatt, A. I.; O'Mullane, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Suppressing dendrite formation at lithium metal anodes during cycling is critical for the implementation of future lithium metal-based battery technology. Here we report that it can be achieved via the facile process of immersing the electrodes in ionic liquid electrolytes for a period of time before battery assembly. This creates a durable and lithium ion-permeable solid–electrolyte interphase that allows safe charge–discharge cycling of commercially applicable Li|electrolyte|LiFePO4 batteries for 1,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiencies >99.5%. The tailored solid–electrolyte interphase is prepared using a variety of electrolytes based on the N-propyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide room temperature ionic liquid containing lithium salts. The formation is both time- and lithium salt-dependant, showing dynamic morphology changes, which when optimized prevent dendrite formation and consumption of electrolyte during cycling. This work illustrates that a simple, effective and industrially applicable lithium metal pretreatment process results in a commercially viable cycle life for a lithium metal battery. PMID:27292652

  18. Transient existence of crystalline lithium disulfide Li2S2 in a lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolella, Andrea; Zhu, Wen; Marceau, Hugues; Kim, Chi-su; Feng, Zimin; Liu, Dongqiang; Gagnon, Catherine; Trottier, Julie; Abdelbast, Guerfi; Hovington, Pierre; Vijh, Ashok; Demopoulos, George P.; Armand, Michel; Zaghib, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Crystalline lithium disulfide (Li2S2) is identified, for the first time, as a transient species in the lithium-sulfur cell, by using an operando X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The observed XRD pattern precisely matches with the predicted pattern based on the density function theory. The formation of Li2S2 crystals is repetitively found in the highly concentrated (7 M Li+) electrolyte at high voltage region (>2 V) near the end of the first charge cycle and before the end of the second discharge cycle. These conditions indicate that crystalline Li2S2 exists in the non-equilibrium regime. The formation of crystalline Li2S2 under only the specified conditions suggests that it is not formed as an intermediate discharge product, contrary to what is generally believed, but as a transient species by the disproportionation reaction from higher order polysulfides which is facilitated by the "solvent-in-salt" conditions.

  19. Lithium counterdoped silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I. (Inventor); Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The resistance to radiation damage of an n(+)p boron doped silicon solar cell is improved by lithium counterdoping. Even though lithium is an n-dopant in silicon, the lithium is introduced in small enough quantities so that the cell base remains p-type. The lithium is introduced into the solar cell wafer by implantation of lithium ions whose energy is about 50 keV. After this lithium implantation, the wafer is annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere at 375 C for two hours.

  20. Aluminum-lithium for aerospace

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.S.; Wolf, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys were developed primarily to reduce the weight of aircraft and aerospace structures. Lithium is the lightest metallic element, and each 1% of lithium added to aluminum reduces alloy density by about 3% and increases modulus by about 5%. Though lithium has a solubility limit of 4.2% in aluminum, the amount of lithium ranges between 1 and 3% in commercial alloys. Aluminum-lithium alloys are most often selected for aerospace components because of their low density, high strength, and high specific modulus. However, other applications now exploit their excellent fatigue resistance and cryogenic toughness.

  1. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  2. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J.

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  3. Effects of Long-Term Acid-Mine Drainage Contamination on Diversity and Activity of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a Natural Salt Marsh.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, J. W.; Banfield, J. F.

    2003-12-01

    Constructed wetlands have been studied as sites or analogs for in situ bioremediation of metal contaminants from acid mine drainage (AMD) or industrial sources (e.g. Webb et al. 1998). Wetlands bioremediation necessarily invokes the ubiquity and robustness of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to sequester dissolved metals into various poorly soluble metal-sulfides (e.g. PbS, CdS). However, few studies of natural wetlands under long-term ecological forcing by AMD or other contaminant sources are available for context. We are investigating the microbial diversity, mineralogy and geochemistry of a highly contaminated salt marsh along the East Central San Francisco Bay. For nearly a half-century, areas within this marsh have received acidic and/or metal-rich groundwaters from near-surface pyrite tailings (transported there from Iron Mountain Mine, near Redding, CA) and local industrial sources (e.g. paint and explosives manufacturers). Sediment cores (30-40 cm long) were taken from six contaminated sites in the marsh with pH range of ˜2 to ˜8. Previous analyses (URS Corp. 2001) reported As, Cd, Cu, Se, Zn, and Pb present in sediments at extremely high concentrations (100s of ppm), yet our ICP-AES analyses of pore waters showed only As present at concentrations of 10-50 ppb. We infer, from high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) studies of biogenic (SRB biofilm) ZnS (Moreau et al. 2003, in review) and marsh sediments, that contaminant metals have been sequestered into aggregates of nanocrystalline metal-sulfides. Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS) analyses of pore-water sulfate and sedimentary sulfides allow resolution of contributions to dissolved sulfate and sulfide from tailings oxidation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Sulfate analyses from subsections of three cores (pH 2-3, 6-7, 7-8, respectively) all yield δ 34S values consistent with bacterial sulfate reduction. We note that all three cores also contain very fine

  4. [Neuroprotective actions of lithium].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Jeong, Mi Ra; Senatorov, Vladimir V; Christ, Lori; Leeds, Peter; Chuang, De-Maw; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has long been one of the primary drugs used to treat bipolar mood disorder. However, neither the etiology of this disease nor the therapeutic mechanism(s) of this drug is well understood. Several lines of clinical evidence suggest that lithium has neurotrophic actions. For example chronic lithium treatment increases the volume of gray matter and the content of N-acetyl-aspartate, a cell survival marker, in bipolar mood disorder patients (Moore et al., 2000). Moreover, treatment with this mood-stabilizer suppresses the decrease in the volume of the subgenual pre-frontal cortex found in bipolar patients (Drevets, 2001). To elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions of lithium, we employed a preparation of cultured cortical neurons prepared form embryonic rats. We found that treatment with therapeutic doses (0.2-1.2 mM) of lithium robustly protects cortical neurons from multiple insults, notably glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. The neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity is time-dependent, requiring treatment for 5-6 days for maximal effect, and is associated with a reduction in NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx. The latter is correlated with a decrease in Tyrosine 1472 phosphorylation levels in the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors and a loss of Src kinase activity which is involved in NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation. Neither the activity of total tyrosine protein kinase nor that of tyrosine protein phosphatase is affected by this drug, indicating the selectivity of the modulation. Lithium neuroprotection against excitotoxicity is inhibited by a BDNF-neutralizing antibody and K252a, a Trk antagonist. Lithium treatment time-dependently increases the intracellular level of BDNF in cortical neurons and activates its receptor, TrkB. The neuroprotection can be completely blocked by either heterozygous or homozygous knockout of the BDNF gene. These results suggest a central role of BDNF and TrkB in mediating the

  5. Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2011-09-01

    The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

  6. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  7. Polymeric electrolytes for ambient temperature lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, G. C.

    1987-09-01

    During this reporting period a number of novel solid polymer electrolytes formed by salts of multivalent cations and polyethylene oxide (PEO) have been prepared and characterized. These materials are of interest not only because of their potential ionic conductivities, but also because some of them may have electronic conductivity and oxidizing power which would be useful for novel electrode materials in all-solid-state batteries. Two broad classes of materials were investigated: PEO solutions of Zn(2), Cd(2), and Pb(2), all of which are potential electrolytes for solid-state batteries, and PEO solutions of transition metal salts, which are of interest as possible cathode materials. Mixed compositions containing both divalent cations and lithium ions were also prepared. Electrolytes formed with small, highly-polarizing ions, such as Mg(2) and Ca(2), are essentially pure anion conductors. Electrolytes containing Zn(2) behave similarly, unless they are hydrated, in which case the Zn(2) ions are quite mobile. Electrolytes formed with larger, more polarizable cations, such as Pb(2) and Cd(2), conduct both anions and cations. Solutions of salts of transition metal cations form a third group of electrolytes. Of the electrolytes investigated so far, those formed with Ni(++) salts are the most unusual. It appears as if the transport number of Ni(2) and the electrolyte conductivity can be greatly enhanced by controlling the hydration and dehydration of the polymer.

  8. A Car-Parrinello and path integral molecular dynamics study of the intramolecular lithium bond in the lithium 2-pyridyl-N-oxide acetate.

    PubMed

    Durlak, Piotr; Latajka, Zdzisław; Berski, Sławomir

    2009-07-14

    Lithium bonding in lithium 2-pyridyl-N-oxide acetate has been investigated using classic Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) and the path integral approach [path integrals molecular dynamics (PIMD)]. The simulations have been performed in 300 K. Structures, energies, and lithium trajectories have been determined. The CPMD results show that the lithium atom is generally equidistant between heavy atoms in the (O...Li...O) bridge. Applying quantum effects through the PIMD leads to similar conclusion. The theoretical lithium 2-pyridyl-N-oxide acetate infrared spectrum has also been determined using the CPMD calculations. This shows very good agreement with available experimental results and reproduces well the broad low-frequency band observed experimentally. In order to gain deeper understanding of the nature of the lithium bonding topological analysis of the electron localization function has been applied.

  9. A Car-Parrinello and path integral molecular dynamics study of the intramolecular lithium bond in the lithium 2-pyridyl-N-oxide acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durlak, Piotr; Latajka, Zdzisław; Berski, Sławomir

    2009-07-01

    Lithium bonding in lithium 2-pyridyl-N-oxide acetate has been investigated using classic Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) and the path integral approach [path integrals molecular dynamics (PIMD)]. The simulations have been performed in 300 K. Structures, energies, and lithium trajectories have been determined. The CPMD results show that the lithium atom is generally equidistant between heavy atoms in the (O⋯Li⋯O) bridge. Applying quantum effects through the PIMD leads to similar conclusion. The theoretical lithium 2-pyridyl-N-oxide acetate infrared spectrum has also been determined using the CPMD calculations. This shows very good agreement with available experimental results and reproduces well the broad low-frequency band observed experimentally. In order to gain deeper understanding of the nature of the lithium bonding topological analysis of the electron localization function has been applied.

  10. Comparative study on lithium borates as corrosion inhibitors of aluminum current collector in lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kisung; Yu, Sunghun; Lee, Chulhaeng; Lee, Hochun

    2015-11-01

    Lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) is a promising salt that can possibly overcome the limitations of lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) in current Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Aluminum (Al) corrosion issue, however, is a major bottleneck for the wide use of LiFSI. This study investigates lithium borate salts as Al corrosion inhibitors in LiFSI electrolytes. Through a systematic comparison among lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4), lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), and lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate (LiDFOB), and LiPF6, the inhibition ability of the additives is revealed to be in the following order: LiDFOB > LiBF4 ≈ LiPF6 > LiBOB. In particular, the inhibition effect of LiDFOB is outstanding; the anodic behavior of Al in 0.8 M LiFSI + 0.2 M LiDFOB ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolyte is comparable to that of corrosion-free 1 M LiPF6 solution. The superior inhibition ability of LiDFOB is attributed to the formation of a passive layer composed of Al-F, Al2O3, and B-O species, as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. A LiCoO2/graphite cell with 0.8 M LiFSI + 0.2 M LiDFOB electrolyte exhibits a rate capability comparable to a cell with 1 M LiPF6 solution, whereas a cell with 0.8 M LiFSI solution without LiDFOB suffers from poor power performance resulting from severe Al corrosion.

  11. Rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    The cycling performance of a secondary lithium cell with a 2-methyl THF lithium hectofluorarsenate electrolyte is discussed. Stripping efficiency, dendritization, passivation on standing, and discharge efficiency are considered.

  12. Lithium: for harnessing renewable energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, which has the chemical symbol Li and an atomic number of 3, is the first metal in the periodic table. Lithium has many uses, the most prominent being in batteries for cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid vehicles. Worldwide sources of lithium are broken down by ore-deposit type as follows: closed-basin brines, 58%; pegmatites and related granites, 26%; lithium-enriched clays, 7%; oilfield brines, 3%; geothermal brines, 3%; and lithium-enriched zeolites, 3% (2013 statistics). There are over 39 million tons of lithium resources worldwide. Of this resource, the USGS estimates there to be approximately 13 million tons of current economically recoverable lithium reserves. To help predict where future lithium supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where identified resources are concentrated in the Earth’s crust, and they use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered resources also exist.

  13. US Navy lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of lithium systems that are already in the fleet are discussed. The approach that the Navy is taking in the control of the introduction of lithium batteries into the fleet is also discussed.

  14. The influence of perchlorates on the fluorescence quenching of 9,10-dichloroanthracene by bromide salts in acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac, Marek; Tokarczyk, Bogdan

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching of 9,10-dichloroanthracene by lithium bromide and tetra- n-butylammonium bromide in acetone has been investigated in the presence of perchlorate salts. In the presence of LiBr, the Stern-Volmer (S-V) plots exhibit downward curvatures indicating that two species are responsible for the quenching process, namely free bromide anions and lithium bromide ion pairs. The addition of a perchlorate salt modifies the S-V dependencies due to the influence of perchlorates on the degree of lithium bromide dissociation. The association constant of lithium bromide has been determined by conductivity measurements and it agrees well with the estimates made from the fluorescence quenching measurements. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching by lithium bromide is discussed on the basis of electron transfer and the heavy-atom effect.

  15. Lithium question for nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, P.S.S.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the lithium reserve (the economically recoverable lithium) for the tritium breeding in D-T fusion reactors and other uses. Similar development patterns for fusion energy and fission energy are assumed to estimate the future lithium requirements. These requirements are grouped into three categories; the commercial uses, the lithium batteries for electric cars, and the fusion reactor uses. 5 refs.

  16. Treatment of oxide spent fuel using the lithium reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, E.J.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.

    1996-05-01

    The wide variety in the composition of DOE spent nuclear fuel complicates its long-term disposition because of the potential requirement to individually qualify each type of fuel for repository disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed the electrometallurgical treatment technique to convert all of these spent fuel types into a single set of disposal forms, simplifying the qualification process. While metallic fuels can be directly processed using the electrometallurgical treatment technique, oxide fuels must first be reduced to the metallic form. The lithium reduction process accomplishes this pretreatment. In the lithium process the oxide components of the fuel are reduced using lithium at 650 C in the presence of molten LiCl, yielding the corresponding metals and Li{sub 2}O. The reduced metal components are then separated from the LiCl salt phase and become the feed material for electrometallurgical treatment. A demonstration test of the lithium reduction process was successfully conducted using a 10-kg batch of simulated oxide spent fuel and engineering-scale equipment specifically constructed for that purpose. This paper describes the lithium process, the equipment used in the demonstration test, and the results of the demonstration test.

  17. Plasticized Polymer Composite Single-Ion Conductors for Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Asfour, Fadi; Fu, Yanbao; Jia, Zhe; Yuan, Wen; Bai, Ying; Ling, Min; Hu, Heyi; Baker, Gregory; Liu, Gao

    2015-09-01

    Lithium bis(trifluoromethane) sulfonamide (TFSI) is a promising electrolyte salt in lithium batteries, due to its good conductivity and high dissociation between the lithium cation and its anion. By tethering N-pentane trifluoromethane sulfonamide (C5NHTf), a TFSI analogue molecule, onto the surface of silica nanoparticle as a monolayer coverage should increase the Li(+) transference number to unity since anions bound to particles have reduced mobilities. Silica polymer composite has better mechanical property than that of the pure PEO. Analogously trifluoromethane sulfonic aminoethyl methacrylate (TfMA), a TFSI analogue vinyl monomer, was polymerized on silica nanoparticle surface as a multilayer coverage. Anchored polyelectrolytes to particle surfaces offer multiple sites for anions, and in principle the carrier concentration would increase arbitrarily and approach the carrier concentration of the bulk polyelectrolyte. Monolayer grafted nanoparticles have a lithium content of 1.2 × 10(-3) g Li/g, and multilayer grafted nanoparticles have a lithium content over an order higher at 2 × 10(-2) g Li/g. Electrolytes made from monolayer grafted particles exhibit a weak conductivity dependence on temperature, exhibiting an ionic conductivity in the range of 10(-6) S/cm when temperatures increase to 80 °C. While electrolytes made from multilayer grafted particles show a steep increase in conductivity with temperature with an ionic conductivity increase to 3 × 10(-5) S/cm at 80 °C, with an O/Li ratio of 32.

  18. Synergism of organic zinc salts and sulfhydryl compounds (thiols) in the protection of mice against acute ethanol toxicity, and protective effects of various metal salts.

    PubMed

    Floersheim, G L

    1987-06-01

    Organic zinc salts such as zinc aspartate, zinc orotate, zinc histidine and zinc acetate protected mice against the lethality of an acute intraperitoneal challenge with ethanol. A similar activity was also provided by salts of cobalt, zirconium, lithium and magnesium. Organic zinc salts acted synergistically with sulfhydryl compounds in protecting the mice and potentiation between the two categories of agents was seen. The results are in analogy to radioprotective effects by zinc and thiols and imply that organic zinc salts may, alone or in conjunction with thiols, reduce in a wider context tissue injury caused by free radical-mediated mechanisms. PMID:3630856

  19. Improvement in the capacity and safety of lithium/inorganic electrolyte sulfur dioxide rechargeable cells, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaikjer, Carl R.; Jones, Medlinda D.; Johnson, Arden P.; Torkelson, James E.; Vanschalkwijk, Walter

    1990-11-01

    The objective was to develop a prototype rechargeable lithium/sulfur dioxide/carbon cell, using practical AA size hardware, in which the electrolyte was to be a sulfur dioxide solution of lithium bromide or thiocyanate, together with a highly soluble cosolute, a second non-lithium salt of the same anion. The cosolute was intended to replace the organic cosolvents familiar from the primary cells, and hopefully, to improve lithium plating efficiency and electrolyte stability during cycling. The primary discharge capacities for AA size cells containing 1.25M CsBr/0.12 M LiBr/SO2 were only about 400mAh, while secondary and subsequent capacities were less than 200 mAh. The rates of solvolysis of bromide and of thiocyanate were exacerbated apparently both by the high anion concentrations and by increased lithium ion concentration. Lithium/sulfur dioxide/carbon rechargeable cells were examined in which the electrolytes were mixtures of tetrachloro aluminate salts in sulfur dioxide, to take advantage of the better performance, but to face the problem of limited capacity. It was determined that the capacity of lithium/bromine soluble positive cells was being limited by the loss of electrical contact between the carbon and the positive electrode current collector. Also, lithium plating efficiency was poor.

  20. Evaluation of the Impacts of Marine Salts and Asian Dust on the Forested Yakushima Island Ecosystem, a World Natural Heritage Site in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanori; Yokoo, Yoriko; Okumura, Masao; Jean, Seo-Ryong; Satake, Kenichi

    2012-11-01

    To elucidate the influence of airborne materials on the ecosystem of Japan's Yakushima Island, we determined the elemental compositions and Sr and Nd isotope ratios in streamwater, soils, vegetation, and rocks. Streamwater had high Na and Cl contents, low Ca and HCO(3) contents, and Na/Cl and Mg/Cl ratios close to those of seawater, but it had low pH (5.4 to 7.1), a higher Ca/Cl ratio than seawater, and distinct (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios that depended on the bedrock type. The proportions of rain-derived cations in streamwater, estimated by assuming that Cl was derived from sea salt aerosols, averaged 81 % for Na, 83 % for Mg, 36 % for K, 32 % for Ca, and 33 % for Sr. The Sr value was comparable to the 28 % estimated by comparing Sr isotope ratios between rain and granite bedrock. The soils are depleted in Ca, Na, P, and Sr compared with the parent materials. At Yotsuse in the northwestern side, plants and the soil pool have (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios similar to that of rainwater with a high sea salt component. In contrast, the Sr and Nd isotope ratios of soil minerals in the A and B horizons approach those of silicate minerals in northern China's loess soils. The soil Ca and P depletion results largely from chemical weathering of plagioclase and of small amounts of apatite and calcite in granitic rocks. This suggests that Yakushima's ecosystem is affected by large amounts of acidic precipitation with a high sea salt component, which leaches Ca and its proxy (Sr) from bedrock into streams, and by Asian dust-derived apatite, which is an important source of P in base cation-depleted soils.

  1. Influence of the nature of the alcohol on the principles of the photocatalytic liberation of hydrogen from aqueous-organic solutions of europium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Myakon'kii, A.G.; Rozenkevich, M.B.; Potapova, G.V.

    1988-09-01

    The process of photocatalytic liberation of hydrogen from aqueous alcohol (ROH - CH/sub 3/OH, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH, C/sub 3/H/sub 7/OH, iso-C/sub 3/H/sub 7/OH) solutions of europium salts was investigated. In solutions containing sodium formate as a second organic component, HCOONa and ROH take part in the photoreduction of Eu(III), whereas the main role in the photooxidation of Eu(II) is played by ROH molecules. Such behavior of the system is explained by transfer of an electron in these reactions according to outer- and inner-sphere mechanism, respectively.

  2. Influence of LOTUS concrete structure, boron-loaded sheets, and B[sub 4]C filter on the integral tritium production of a nature lithium graphite-reflected blanket and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Joneja, O.P.; Schneeberger, J.P. ); Nargundkar, V.R. )

    1993-07-01

    Integral tritium production rate (TPR) measurements are important in comparisons of calculations to ascertain the suitability of computer codes and cross-section sets used in calculation. At the LOTUS facility, one of the objectives is to make measurements with different types of pure fusion and hybrid blankets and compare the results with calculations. Since the concrete cavity housing the blankets is small, it is of direct relevance to determine the influence of room-reflected neutrons on the integral TPR and, if possible, to reduce this effect by special absorbers. The effects on the TPR of a stainless steel-natural lithium-graphite-reflected blanket due to the concrete structure, B[sub 4]C filter, and boron-loaded sheets covering the assembly are studied. Calculations are performed by the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Since the room-returned component depends strongly on the composition of the concrete and, more-over, does not correspond to a real blanket situation, it is advisable to compare measurements with calculations for the region where such interference is minimal. A central region is identified for the purpose of comparison. In addition to calculations for a fully homogenized blanket, the important central blanket region is considered in the form of rods, and the remaining blanket as a homogeneous region, to assess the effect of neutron streaming on the TPR of the assembly. An experiment is done by irradiating several Li[sub 2]CO[sub 3] probes positioned in each tube so that the central region of interest is fully covered. The activity of the probes is measured by the standard liquid scintillation method, and the TPR for the entire region can be derived from the experimental reaction rate data. The complete details of the calculational model and the experimental procedure are provided. Good agreement is found between the calculated and experimental TPRs after accounting for various sources of errors. 14 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Energy Storage Materials from Nature through Nanotechnology: A Sustainable Route from Reed Plants to a Silicon Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Kopold, Peter; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2015-08-10

    Silicon is an attractive anode material in energy storage devices, as it has a ten times higher theoretical capacity than its state-of-art carbonaceous counterpart. However, the common process to synthesize silicon nanostructured electrodes is complex, costly, and energy-intensive. Three-dimensional (3D) porous silicon-based anode materials have been fabricated from natural reed leaves by calcination and magnesiothermic reduction. This sustainable and highly abundant silica source allows for facile production of 3D porous silicon with very good electrochemical performance. The obtained silicon anode retains the 3D hierarchical architecture of the reed leaf. Impurity leaching and gas release during the fabrication process leads to an interconnected porosity and the reductive treatment to an inside carbon coating. Such anodes show a remarkable Li-ion storage performance: even after 4000 cycles and at a rate of 10 C, a specific capacity of 420 mA h g(-1) is achieved.

  4. [Determination of sodium, magnesium, calcium, lithium and strontium in natural mineral drinking water by microwave plasma torch spectrometer with nebulization sample introduction system].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Xiong, Hai-long; Feng, Guo-dong; Yu, Ai-min; Chen, Huan-wen

    2014-06-01

    The microwave plasma torch (MPT) was used as the emission light source. Aqueous samples were introduced with a nebulizer and a desolvation system. A method for the determination of Na, Mg, Ca, Li and Sr in natural mineral drinking water by argon microwave plasma torch spectrometer (ArMPT spectrometer) was established. The effects of microwave power, flow rate of carrier gas and support gas were investigated in detail and these parameters were optimized. Under the optimized condition, the experiments for the determination of Na, Mg, Ca, Li and Sr in 11 kinds of bottled mineral drinking water were carried out by ArMPT spectrometer. The limit-of-detection (LOD) of Na, Mg, Ca, Li and Sr was found to be 4.4, 21, 56, 11 and 84 μg x mL(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviation (n = 6) was in the range of 1.30%-5.45% and standard addition recoveries were in the range of 84.6%-98.5%. MPT spectrometer was simpler, more convenient and of lower cost as compared to ICP unit. MPT spectrometer demonstrated its rapid analysis speed, accuracy, sensitivity and simultaneous multi element analysis ability during the analysis process. The results showed that MPT spectrometer was suitable for metal elements detection for natural mineral drinking water. This approach provides not only one way for resisting the illegal dealings, but also a security for the quality of drinking water. Moreover, the usability of MPT spectrometer in the field of food security; drug safety; clinical diagnostic is promised.

  5. A review of lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Huang, Jun; Yann Liaw, Bor; Metzler, Viktor; Zhang, Jianbo

    2014-05-01

    Major aspects related to lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries are reviewed. For lithium-ion batteries with carbonaceous anode, lithium deposition may occur under harsh charging conditions such as overcharging or charging at low temperatures. The major technical solutions include: (1) applying electrochemical models to predict the critical conditions for deposition initiation; (2) preventions by improved battery design and material modification; (3) applying adequate charging protocols to inhibit lithium deposition. For lithium metal secondary batteries, the lithium deposition is the inherent reaction during charging. The major technical solutions include: (1) the use of mechanistic models to elucidate and control dendrite initiation and growth; (2) engineering surface morphology of the lithium deposition to avoid dendrite formation via adjusting the composition and concentration of the electrolyte; (3) controlling battery working conditions. From a survey of the literature, the areas that require further study are proposed; e.g., refining the lithium deposition criteria, developing an effective AC self pre-heating method for low-temperature charging of lithium-ion batteries, and clarifying the role the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays in determining the deposition morphology; to facilitate a refined control of the lithium deposition.

  6. Lithium overdosage and related tests.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, Paolo D; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Guzzi, Gianpaolo

    2016-12-01

    Lithium acts biochemically through the inositol depletion in brain cortex. At low doses, however, it is partly effective and/or ineffective, whereas in high concentrations is toxic. We would like to make one point about this review. In fact, in our view, the patient should be given a support to correct hypernatremia and even sodium levels should be tested serially-along with serum lithium concentrations-because high sodium levels reduce the rate of elimination of lithium. Lithium is mainly a neurotoxicant. Lithium-related central nervous system toxicity as well as the cardiovascular and thyroid changes are most likely due to the cations (Na2 (+) and K(+)) competition. PMID:26753697

  7. Effect of acid scavengers on electrochemical performance of lithium-sulfur batteries: Functional additives for utilization of LiPF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Taeeun; Kang, Kyoung Seok; Yu, Ji-Sang; Kim, Ki Jae; Park, Min-Sik; Woo, Sang-Gil; Jeong, Goojin; Jo, Yong Nam; Im, Keun Yung; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young-Jun

    2014-08-01

    We investigated a novel approach for utilizing LiPF6 as the lithium salt for Li-S batteries and verifying its chemical reactivity with the main solvent. It is found that the main obstacle for the adoption of LiPF6 is the undesired acid-catalyzed, cascade-type polymerization reaction between cyclic ether components in the solvent and LiPF6. Therefore, several kinds of acid scavengers are proposed to enhance the chemical stability between the main solvent and LiPF6. Simple storage tests indicate that polymerization occurred as acid residue is removed from the electrolyte. Consequently, the cell with a modified electrolyte shows excellent discharge capacity and moderate retention based on its improved chemical stability. These results indicate that assuring the chemical stability is the most important factor to utilizing LiPF6 as the main lithium salt for a Li-S cell. Additionally, it is believed that an understanding of the nature of chemical reactivity will be beneficial to constructing more efficient electrolyte systems owing to enhanced electrochemical performance of many kinds of energy storage systems including Li-S, Li-air, and metal-air batteries.

  8. Community solar salt production in Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Mani, Kabilan; Salgaonkar, Bhakti B; Das, Deepthi; Bragança, Judith M

    2012-01-01

    Traditional salt farming in Goa, India has been practised for the past 1,500 years by a few communities. Goa's riverine estuaries, easy access to sea water and favourable climatic conditions makes salt production attractive during summer. Salt produced through this natural evaporation process also played an important role in the economy of Goa even during the Portuguese rule as salt was the chief export commodity. In the past there were 36 villages involved in salt production, which is now reduced to 9. Low income, lack of skilled labour, competition from industrially produced salt, losses incurred on the yearly damage of embankments are the major reasons responsible for the reduction in the number of salt pans.Salt pans (Mithagar or Mithache agor) form a part of the reclaimed waterlogged khazan lands, which are also utilised for aquaculture, pisciculture and agriculture. Salt pans in Goa experience three phases namely, the ceased phase during monsoon period of June to October, preparatory phase from December to January, and salt harvesting phase, from February to June. After the monsoons, the salt pans are prepared manually for salt production. During high tide, an influx of sea water occurs, which enters the reservoir pans through sluice gates. The sea water after 1-2 days on attaining a salinity of approximately 5ºBé, is released into the evaporator pans and kept till it attains a salinity of 23 - 25ºBé. The brine is then released to crystallizer pans, where the salt crystallises out 25 - 27ºBé and is then harvested.Salt pans form a unique ecosystem where succession of different organisms with varying environmental conditions occurs. Organisms ranging from bacteria, archaea to fungi, algae, etc., are known to colonise salt pans and may influence the quality of salt produced.The aim of this review is to describe salt farming in Goa's history, importance of salt production as a community activity, traditional method of salt production and the biota

  9. Community solar salt production in Goa, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traditional salt farming in Goa, India has been practised for the past 1,500 years by a few communities. Goa’s riverine estuaries, easy access to sea water and favourable climatic conditions makes salt production attractive during summer. Salt produced through this natural evaporation process also played an important role in the economy of Goa even during the Portuguese rule as salt was the chief export commodity. In the past there were 36 villages involved in salt production, which is now reduced to 9. Low income, lack of skilled labour, competition from industrially produced salt, losses incurred on the yearly damage of embankments are the major reasons responsible for the reduction in the number of salt pans. Salt pans (Mithagar or Mithache agor) form a part of the reclaimed waterlogged khazan lands, which are also utilised for aquaculture, pisciculture and agriculture. Salt pans in Goa experience three phases namely, the ceased phase during monsoon period of June to October, preparatory phase from December to January, and salt harvesting phase, from February to June. After the monsoons, the salt pans are prepared manually for salt production. During high tide, an influx of sea water occurs, which enters the reservoir pans through sluice gates. The sea water after 1–2 days on attaining a salinity of approximately 5ºBé, is released into the evaporator pans and kept till it attains a salinity of 23 - 25ºBé. The brine is then released to crystallizer pans, where the salt crystallises out 25 - 27ºBé and is then harvested. Salt pans form a unique ecosystem where succession of different organisms with varying environmental conditions occurs. Organisms ranging from bacteria, archaea to fungi, algae, etc., are known to colonise salt pans and may influence the quality of salt produced. The aim of this review is to describe salt farming in Goa’s history, importance of salt production as a community activity, traditional method of salt production and the

  10. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  11. Rheological contrasts in salt and their effects on flow in salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2014-05-01

    The majority of numerical and analogue models of salt tectonics assume homogeneous rheological models, and consequently produce simple internal structures. This is in contrast to observations in salt mines and 3D seismic, showing complex folding at a wide range of scales, in combination with boudinage and fracturing, which point to large rheological contrasts in salt bodies. The rheology of rock salt during slow deformation can be both Newtonian and Power law. Dislocation creep and dissolution-precipitation processes, such as solution-precipitation creep and dynamic recrystallisation, both play a significant role and grain boundary healing in deforming salt may result in cyclic softening and hardening behaviour. The switch between these processes can cause major changes in rock salt rheology, at time scales both relevant to geologic evolution and subsurface operations. In the dislocation creep field, a compilation of laboratory data show that different rock salts can creep at four orders of magnitude different strain rates under otherwise the same conditions. Potassium - Magnesium salts are in turn much weaker, and Anhydrite much stronger than rock salt. Anhydrite - carbonate inclusions embedded in deforming salt bodies respond to the movements of the salt in a variety of ways including boudinage and folding. New methods of microstructure analysis integrated with paleorheology indicators observed in natural laboratories allows an integration of these data and the development of a unified model for salt creep for both underground cavities and natural deformation, including the effect of high fluid pressures in salt which lead to a dramatic increases in permeability. For example, modeling of anhydrite stringer sinking is an important way to obtain the long term rheology of the halite, indicating that the rheology of Zechstein salt during the Tertiary was dominated by dislocation creep. These form the basis of a new generation of mechanical models to predict the

  12. Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

    2001-02-13

    This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

  13. Helping crops stand up to salt

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, P.

    1985-05-01

    A new approach to the problem of increasing soil salinity is to raise salt-tolerant plants. The search for such plants involves finding new applications for naturally occurring salt-resistant plants (halophytes), using conventional breeding techniques to identify and strengthen crop varieties known to have better-than-average salt tolerance, and applying recombinant DNA methods to introduce salt resistance into existing plants. One promising plant is salicornia, which produces oil high in polyunsaturates at a greater yield than soybeans. Two varieties of atriplex yield as much animal feed as alfalfa and can be harvested several times a year. Seed companies are supporting the research.

  14. Characterization of natural wax esters by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Cvacka, Josef

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to the analysis of wax esters (WEs) was investigated. A series of metal salts of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) was synthesized and tested as possible matrices. Alkali metal (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) and transition metal (Cu, Ag) salts were studied. The matrix properties were evaluated, including solubility in organic solvents, threshold laser power that should be applied for successful desorption/ionization of WEs, the nature of the matrix ions and the mass range occupied by them, and the complexity of the isotope clusters for individual metals. Lithium salt of dihydroxybenzoic acid (LiDHB) performed the best and matrices with purified lithium isotopes ((6)LiDHB or (7)LiDHB) were recommended for WEs. Three sample preparation procedures were compared: (1) mixing the sample and matrix in a glass vial and deposition of the mixture on a MALDI plate (Mix), (2) deposition of sample followed by deposition of matrix (Sa/Ma), and (3) deposition of matrix followed by deposition of sample (Ma/Sa). Morphology of the samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The best sample preparation technique was Ma/Sa with the optimum sample to matrix molar ratio 1 : 100. Detection limit was in the low picomolar range. The relative response of WEs decreased with their molecular weight, and minor differences between signals of saturated and monounsaturated WEs were observed. MALDI spectra of WEs showed molecular adducts with lithium [M + Li](+). Fragments observed in postsource decay (PSD) spectra were related to the acidic part of WEs [RCOOH + Li](+) and they were used for structure assignment. MALDI with LiDHB was used for several samples of natural origin, including insect and plant WEs. A good agreement with GC/MS data was achieved. Moreover, MALDI allowed higher WEs to be analyzed, up to 64 carbon atoms in Ginkgo biloba leaves extract. PMID:18821728

  15. Use of Ionic Liquids in Rod-Coil Block Copolyimides for Improved Lithium Ion Conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.; Chapin, Kara; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Solvent-free, solid polymer electrolytes (SPE) have the potential to improve safety, increase design flexibility and enhance performance of rechargeable lithium batteries. Solution based electrolytes are flammable and typically incompatible with lithium metal anodes, limiting energy density. We have previously demonstrated use of polyimide rod coil block copolymers doped with lithium salts as electrolytes for lithium polymer batteries. The polyimide rod blocks provide dimensional stability while the polyethylene oxide (PEO) coil portions conduct ions. Phase separation of the rods and coils in these highly branched polymers provide channels with an order of magnitude improvement in lithium conduction over polyethylene oxide itself at room temperature. In addition, the polymers have been demonstrated in coin cells to be compatible with lithium metal. For practical use at room temperature and below, however, at least an order of magnitude improvement in ion conduction is still required. The addition of nonvolatile, room temperature ionic liquids has been shown to improve the ionic conductivity of high molecular weight PEO. Herein we describe use of these molten salts to improve ionic conductivity in the rod-coil block copolymers.

  16. [Is there an increased risk for renal tumors during long-term treatment with lithium?].

    PubMed

    Conell, J; Lewitzka, U; Ritter, P; Severus, E; Pilhatsch, M; Pfennig, A; Berghöfer, M; Bauer, M

    2015-09-01

    Lithium salts are the recommended first-line treatment (gold standard) in national and international treatment guidelines for acute and maintenance treatment of affective disorders, such as bipolar disorders. Lithium has also been shown to have a unique protective effect against suicide in patients suffering from affective disorders. Despite the well-known acute and long-term adverse effects lithium therapy can be safely administered if patients are properly educated and carefully monitored. A recent study from France now shows that patients with severely impaired renal function who had been treated with lithium salts for more than 10 years could have an increased risk for kidney tumors (benign and malignant). This resulted in an adjustment concerning information within the package leaflet by European authorities. The authors of this article reflect the currently available data in order to better understand and handle this new finding and to warn about uncritical reactions including withdrawal of lithium in successfully treated patients. This article provides clinical recommendations to provide further insight relating to the risk of kidney cancer in long-term lithium therapy. PMID:26341836

  17. 77 FR 28259 - Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... for mailpieces containing lithium metal or lithium-ion cells or batteries and applies regardless of...'' instead of ``lithium content'' for secondary lithium-ion batteries when describing maximum quantity limits...-ion (Rechargeable) Cells and Batteries Small consumer-type lithium-ion cells and batteries like...

  18. Two-Dimensional Wavelike Spinel Lithium Titanate for Fast Lithium Storage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiehua; Wei, Xiangfeng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Safe fast-charging lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have huge potential market size on demand according to their shortened charging time for high-power devices. Zero-strain spinel Li4Ti5O12 is one of ideal candidates for safe high-power batteries owing to its good cycling performance, low cost and safety. However, the inherent insulating characteristic of LTO seriously limits its high-rate capability. In this work, we successfully synthesize novel wavelike spinel LTO nanosheets using a facile ‘co-hydrolysis’ method, which is superior to molten-salt approach and traditional solvothermal method in some respects. The unique 2D structures have single-crystal framework with shortened path for Li ion transport. As a result, the N-doped 2D wavelike LTO with 0.6 wt.% of ‘carbon joint’ not only exhibits exciting capacity of ~180 and ~150 mA h g−1 for fast lithium storage at high discharge/charge rates of 1.7 and 8.5 A g−1 (10C and 50C) respectively, but also shows excellent low-temperature performance at −20°C. In addition, the cost may be further decreased due to recycled functional reagents. This novel nanostructured 2D LTO anode material makes it possible to develop safe fast-charging high-power lithium ion batteries. PMID:25985465

  19. Binding of ether and carbonyl oxygens to lithium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Blint, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    The electrolyte for a lithium battery is a lithium salt (e.g. lithium Perchlorate) dissolved in an organic solvent or a mixture of organic solvents. The conductivity in these electrolytes is ionic and needs to be as high as possible to efficiently remove energy from the battery. The diffusion coefficient of the solvated ion in liquid electrolytes is inversely dependent on the radius of the salvation sphere. Consequently conductivity will increase with a decrease in the size of the salvation shell. The size of the salvation shell is determined by the size and coordination number of the solvent molecules. The types of organic solvents in electrolytes used in lithium battery applications are usually differentiated based on their perceived solvation properties. These solvents are often small, oxygen containing organic molecules which move with the Li{sup +} ions. This paper calculates the binding energies of some of these solvents to Li{sup +} using molecular quantum mechanics (MQM) techniques. The binding energies of the various solvents to Li{sup +} may determine which solvents will be preferentially bound to the ion. In liquid organic electrolytes, then, it will be the identity of the solvent and the coordination number which most affect the conductivity; the binding energies determine both of these properties. Carbonyl oxygens which occur in formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate have different Li{sup +} bonding properties than do the ether oxygens which occur in water, dimethyl ether and diethyl ether. Polymer solvents for the lithium salts such as the polyethers have chains which are too long to move with the binding energies then serve as the basis for a different Li{sup +} transport. Dimethyl ether and diethyl ether serve both as solvents and models for the polyethers.

  20. Lithium modulates tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene expression and serotonin release in primary cultures of serotonergic raphe neurons.

    PubMed

    Scheuch, Kathrin; Höltje, Markus; Budde, Holger; Lautenschlager, Marion; Heinz, Andreas; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Priller, Josef

    2010-01-11

    Lithium salts are mood-stabilizing agents with acute antimanic properties and proven efficacy in the long-term prevention of manic and depressive episodes. Furthermore, lithium augmentation is a well-established strategy to treat depressed patients, which do not respond to antidepressants alone. There is evidence to suggest that these effects of lithium are due to a synergism with central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission. In this study, we investigated the effects of lithium chloride (LiCl, 1 mM) on 5-HT uptake and release in primary serotonergic neurons from rat raphe nuclei. Short-term (8 h) and long-term (14 days) treatment with LiCl resulted in a 20% and 23% increase in 5-HT release, but neither influenced 5-HT uptake across the plasma membrane nor vesicular 5-HT uptake. In lithium-treated raphe neurons, the inhibition of 5-HT uptake by fluoxetine was unchanged. Using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, we examined the effect of lithium on tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme in brain 5-HT biosynthesis. Short-term lithium treatment resulted in a 45% decrease in tph2 mRNA expression and a 31% reduction of TPH2 protein levels, which was completely compensated after long-term treatment. Our results suggest that lithium can modify tph2 gene expression and 5-HT release in raphe neurons, providing new insight into the serotonergic mechanisms of action of lithium.

  1. Measurement of Solubility of Metallic Lithium Dissolved in Molten LiCl-Li2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burak, Adam J.; Simpson, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    The solubility of lithium metal in molten LiCl-Li2O mixtures has been measured at various concentrations of Li2O ranging from 0 wt.% to 2.7 wt.% at a temperature of approximately 670-680°C. After contacting molten lithium with molten LiCl-Li2O for several hours to achieve equilibrium saturation, samples were taken by freezing the salt onto a room-temperature steel rod and dissolving in water for analysis. Both volume of hydrogen gas generated and volume of titrated HCl were measured to investigate two different approaches to calculating the lithium concentration. There appeared to be no effect of Li2O concentration on the Li solubility in the salt. But the results vary between different methods of deducing the amount of dissolved Li. The H2 collection method is recommended, but care must be taken to ensure all of the H2 has been included.

  2. Measurement of Solubility of Metallic Lithium Dissolved in Molten LiCl-Li2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burak, Adam J.; Simpson, Michael F.

    2016-10-01

    The solubility of lithium metal in molten LiCl-Li2O mixtures has been measured at various concentrations of Li2O ranging from 0 wt.% to 2.7 wt.% at a temperature of approximately 670-680°C. After contacting molten lithium with molten LiCl-Li2O for several hours to achieve equilibrium saturation, samples were taken by freezing the salt onto a room-temperature steel rod and dissolving in water for analysis. Both volume of hydrogen gas generated and volume of titrated HCl were measured to investigate two different approaches to calculating the lithium concentration. There appeared to be no effect of Li2O concentration on the Li solubility in the salt. But the results vary between different methods of deducing the amount of dissolved Li. The H2 collection method is recommended, but care must be taken to ensure all of the H2 has been included.

  3. Observations of the freeze/thaw performance of lithium fluoride by motion picture photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    To gain direct observation of the molten salt phase change, a novel containerless technique was developed where the high surface tension of lithium fluoride was used to suspend a bead of the molten salt inside a specially designed wire cage. By varying the current passing through the wire, the cage also served as a variable heat source. In this way, the freeze/thaw performance of the lithium fluoride could be photographed by motion picture photography without the influence of container walls. The motion picture photography of the lithium fluoride sample revealed several zones during the phase change, a solid zone and a liquid zone, as expected, and a slush zone that was predicted by thermal analysis modeling.

  4. Preliminary Evaluations of Polymer-based Lithium Battery Electrolytes Under Development for the Polymer Electrolyte Rechargeable Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Bennett, William R.

    2003-01-01

    A component screening facility has been established at The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to evaluate candidate materials for next generation, lithium-based, polymer electrolyte batteries for aerospace applications. Procedures have been implemented to provide standardized measurements of critical electrolyte properties. These include ionic conductivity, electronic resistivity, electrochemical stability window, cation transference number, salt diffusion coefficient and lithium plating efficiency. Preliminary results for poly(ethy1ene oxide)-based polymer electrolyte and commercial liquid electrolyte are presented.

  5. Thermoluminescence of ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Louis

    2003-05-01

    Ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride (10 -30 g cm -3) have been irradiated by X- and γ-rays at 77 K, then progressively rewarmed to room temperature. During that phase, their thermoluminescence has been studied and it was found that, despite their dilution beyond the Avogadro number, the emitted light was specific of the original salts dissolved initially.

  6. Lithium disulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1988-01-01

    A negative electrode limited secondary electrochemical cell having dense FeS.sub.2 positive electrode operating exclusively on the upper plateau, a Li alloy negative electrode and a suitable lithium-containing electrolyte. The electrolyte preferably is 25 mole percent LiCl, 38 mole percent LiBr and 37 mole percent KBr. The cell may be operated isothermally.

  7. Lithium battery discharge tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The long term discharge of a variety of lithium cells was characterized and the susceptibility of the cells to chemical variation during the slow discharge was tested. A shunt resistor was set across the terminals to monitor the voltage as a function of time. Failures were identified by premature voltage drops.

  8. Investigation of a novel ternary electrolyte based on dimethyl sulfite and lithium difluoromono(oxalato)borate for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renjie; Zhu, Lu; Wu, Feng; Li, Li; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Lithium difluoromono(oxalato)borate (LiODFB) has been used as a novel lithium salt for battery in recent studies. In this study, a series of novel electrolytes has been prepared by adding 30 vol% dimethyl sulfite (DMS) or dimethyl carbonate (DMC) as co-solvent into an ethylene carbonate (EC)/ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + LiX mixture, in which the LiX could be LiClO4, LiODFB, LiBOB, LiTFSI, or LiCF3SO3. These ternary electrolytes have been investigated for use in lithium ion batteries. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis shows that characteristic functional groups (-CO3, -SO3) undergo red-shift or blue-shift with the addition of different lithium salts. The LiODFB-EC/EMC/DMS electrolyte exhibits high ionic conductivity, which is mainly because of the low melting point of DMS, and LiODFB possessing high solubility. The Li/MCMB cells containing this novel electrolyte exhibit high capacities, good cycling performance, and excellent rate performance. These performances are probably because both LiODFB and DMS can assist in the formation of SEI films by reductive decomposition. Additionally, the discharge capacity of Li/LiCoO2 half cell containing LiODFB-EC/EMC/DMS electrolyte is 130.9 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles, and it is very comparable with the standard-commercial electrolyte. The results show that this study produces a promising electrolyte candidate for lithium ion batteries.

  9. Investigation of fundamental transport properties and thermodynamics in diglyme-salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Petrowsky, Matt; Frech, Roger; Suarez, Sophia N; Jayakody, J R P; Greenbaum, Steven

    2006-11-23

    Ionic mobility, the thermodynamics of ionic association, and the structure of associated species are studied in solutions of diglyme containing either lithium triflate or tetrabutylammonium triflate. Infrared spectroscopic, PFG NMR, thermodynamic, and crystallographic data suggest that the solute species existing in diglyme-lithium triflate are "free" ions, contact ion pairs, and dimers. Equilibrium constants, S(o), deltaH(o), and deltaG(o) are calculated for processes occurring between these species. In particular, the equilibrium constant, corrected for nonideality using a modified Debye-Hückel expression, is calculated for the dissociation of contact ion pairs into "free" cations and anions. A second equilibrium constant for the formation of dimers from contact ion pairs is also calculated; these constants do not significantly vary with salt concentration up to about 1.3 x 10(-3) mol cm(-3). The measured temperature dependence of equilibrium constants was used to calculate deltaH(o) and deltaS(o) for the two processes. The value of deltaS(o) = -102 J mol(-1) K(-1) for the dissociation of contact ion pairs shows that the large entropy decrease due to cation solvation outweighs the entropy increase due to dissociation of a contact ion pair. Ionic mobilities are calculated in lithium triflate-diglyme solutions using conductivity data in conjunction with information about the nature and concentrations of solute species obtained from IR spectroscopy. Mobilities in tetrabutlyammonium triflate-diglyme solutions are calculated directly from conductivity data. It was concluded that the concentration dependence of the molar conductivity is due in large part to the variation of the ion mobilities with concentration.

  10. Effect of Branching on Rod-coil Polyimides as Membrane Materials for Lithium Polymer Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Cubon, Valerie A.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Bennett, William R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a series of rod-coil block co-polymers that produce easy to fabricate, dimensionally stable films with good ionic conductivity down to room temperature for use as electrolytes for lithium polymer batteries. The polymers consist of short, rigid rod polyimide segments, alternating with flexible, polyalkylene oxide coil segments. The highly incompatible rods and coils should phase separate, especially in the presence of lithium ions. The coil phase would allow for conduction of lithium ions, while the rigid rod phase would provide a high degree of dimensional stability. An optimization study was carried out to study the effect of four variables (degree of branching, formulated molecular weight, polymerization solvent and lithium salt concentration) on ionic conductivity, glass transition temperature and dimensional stability in this system.

  11. [Nursing care of a patient with bipolar disorder and lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    García de la Orden, Lucía; García Carretero, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is one of the most common, severe and persistent mental disorders. The evaluation of all data and variables related to bipolar disorder is a difficult task, because there is no clear agreement on what should be included in this category. One of the traditional treatments for this disease is the lithium metal that is administered in the form of lithium salt. Lithium has a narrow therapeutic window and there is a significant risk of complications arising from its use, mainly neurological and renal. In the case presented, the preparation of a care plan is described for a patient diagnosed with bipolar disorder who suffered a complication with lithium treatment. To do this, it was decided to use a standardized care plan and later completed it with diagnostic, objectives and interventions to the specific needs of the patient, aimed at achieving optimal levels of independence.

  12. Environmental aspects of produced-water salt releases in onshore and coastal petroleum-producing areas of the conterminous U.S. - a bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.

    2006-01-01

    Environmental effects associated with the production of oil and gas have been reported since the first oil wells were drilled in the Appalachian Basin in Pennsylvania and Kentucky in the early to mid-1800s. The most significant of these effects are the degradation of soils, ground water, surface water, and ecosystems they support by releases of suspended and dissolved hydrocarbons and co-produced saline water. Produced water salts are less likely than hydrocarbons to be adsorbed by mineral phases in the soil and sediment and are not subject to degradation by biologic processes. Sodium is a major dissolved constituent in most produced waters and it causes substantial degradation of soils through altering of clays and soil textures and subsequent erosion. Produced water salts seem to have the most wide-ranging effects on soils, water quality, and ecosystems. Trace elements, including boron, lithium, bromine, fluorine, and radium, also occur in elevated concentrations in some produced waters. Many trace elements are phytotoxic and are adsorbed and may remain in soils after the saline water has been flushed away. Radium-bearing scale and sludge found in oilfield equipment and discarded on soils pose additional hazards to human health and ecosystems. This bibliography includes studies from across the oil- and natural-gas-producing areas of the conterminous United States that were published in the last 80 yrs. The studies describe the effects of produced water salts on soils, water quality, and ecosystems. Also included are reports that describe (1) the inorganic chemistry of produced waters included in studies of formation waters for various purposes, (2) other sources of salt affecting water quality that may be mistaken for produced water effects, (3) geochemical and geophysical techniques that allow discrimination of salt sources, (4) remediation technologies designed to repair damage caused to soils and ground water by produced water salts, and (5) contamination by

  13. Mixed solvent electrolytes for ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Deligiannis, Fotios (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention comprises an improved electrolyte for secondary lithium-based cells as well as batteries fabricated using this electrolyte. The electrolyte is a lithium containing salt dissolved in a non-aqueous solvent, which is made from a mixture of ethylene carbonate, ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, 2-methylfuran, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. This improved, mixed solvent electrolyte is more conductive than prior electrolytes and much less corrosive to lithium anodes. Batteries constructed with this improved electrolyte utilize lithium or lithium alloy anodes and cathodes made of metal chalcogenides or oxides, such as TiS.sub.2, NbSe.sub.3, V.sub.6 O.sub.13, V.sub.2 O.sub.5, MoS.sub.2, MoS.sub.3, CoO.sub.2, or CrO.sub.2, dissolved in a supporting polymer matrix, like EPDM. The preferred non-aqueous solvent mixture comprises approximately 5 to 30 volume percent ethylene carbonate, approximately 0.01 to 0.1 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and approximately 0.2 to 2 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The most preferred solvent comprises approximately 10 to 20 volume percent ethylene carbonate, about 0.05 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and about 1.0 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The concentration of lithium arsenic hexafluoride can range from about 1.0 to 1.8 M; a concentration 1.5 M is most preferred. Secondary batteries made with the improved electrolyte of this invention have lower internal impedance, longer cycle life, higher energy density, low self-discharge, and longer shelf life.

  14. Interfacial transport in lithium-ion conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaofei, Wang; Liquan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Physical models of ion diffusion at different interfaces are reviewed. The use of impedance spectroscopy (IS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques are also discussed. The diffusion of ions is fundamental to the operation of lithium-ion batteries, taking place not only within the grains but also across different interfaces. Interfacial ion transport usually contributes to the majority of the resistance in lithium-ion batteries. A greater understanding of the interfacial diffusion of ions is crucial to improving battery performance. Project supported by the Beijing S&T Project, China (Grant No. Z13111000340000), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51325206 and 11234013) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB932900).

  15. Lithium recovery from brine using a λ-MnO2/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoni; Lee, Jaehan; Kang, Jin Soo; Jo, Kyusik; Kim, Seonghwan; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoon, Jeyong

    2015-04-01

    Lithium is one of the most important elements in various fields including energy storage, medicine manufacturing and the glass industry, and demands for lithium are constantly increasing these days. The lime soda evaporation process using brine lake water is the major extraction method for lithium, but this process is not only inefficient and time-consuming but also causes a few environmental problems. Electrochemical recovery processes of lithium ions have been proposed recently, but the better idea for the silver negative electrodes used in these systems is required to reduce its cost or increase long term stability. Here, we report an electrochemical lithium recovery method based on a λ-MnO2/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor system. In this system, lithium ions and counter anions are effectively captured at each electrode with low energy consumption in a salt solution containing various cationic species or simulated Salar de Atacama brine lake water in Chile. Furthermore, we designed this system as a flow process for practical applications. By experimental analyses, we confirmed that this system has high selectivity and long-term stability, with its performance being retained even after repetitive captures and releases of lithium ions. PMID:25681679

  16. Lithium recovery from brine using a λ-MnO2/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoni; Lee, Jaehan; Kang, Jin Soo; Jo, Kyusik; Kim, Seonghwan; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoon, Jeyong

    2015-04-01

    Lithium is one of the most important elements in various fields including energy storage, medicine manufacturing and the glass industry, and demands for lithium are constantly increasing these days. The lime soda evaporation process using brine lake water is the major extraction method for lithium, but this process is not only inefficient and time-consuming but also causes a few environmental problems. Electrochemical recovery processes of lithium ions have been proposed recently, but the better idea for the silver negative electrodes used in these systems is required to reduce its cost or increase long term stability. Here, we report an electrochemical lithium recovery method based on a λ-MnO2/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor system. In this system, lithium ions and counter anions are effectively captured at each electrode with low energy consumption in a salt solution containing various cationic species or simulated Salar de Atacama brine lake water in Chile. Furthermore, we designed this system as a flow process for practical applications. By experimental analyses, we confirmed that this system has high selectivity and long-term stability, with its performance being retained even after repetitive captures and releases of lithium ions.

  17. Salt deposits in Arizona promise gas-storage opportunities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rauzi, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    Massive salt formations and their proximity to pipeline systems and power plants make Arizona attractive for natural gas storage. Caverns dissolved in subsurface salt are used to store LPG at Ferrellgas Partners LP facility near Holbrook and the AmeriGas Partners LP facility near Glendale. Three other companies are investigating the feasibility of storing natural gas in Arizona salt: Copper Eagle Gas Storage LLC, Desert Crossing Gas Storage and Transportation System LLC, and Aquila Inc. The most extensive salt deposits are in the Colorado Plateau Province. Marine and nonmarine salt deposits are present in Arizona.

  18. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  19. Compatibility of molten salts with advanced solar dynamic receiver materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    Metal-coated graphite fibers are being considered as a thermal conductivity enhancement filler material for molten salts in solar dynamic thermal energy storage systems. The successful metal coating chosen for this application must exhibit acceptable wettability and must be compatible with the molten salt environment. Contact angle values between molten lithium fluoride and several metal, metal fluoride, and metal oxide substrates have been determined at 892 C using a modification of the Wilhelmy plate technique. Reproducible contact angles with repeated exposure to the molten LiF indicated compatibility.

  20. High cycle life secondary lithium battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Carter, Boyd J. (Inventor); Shen, David H. (Inventor); Somoano, Robert B. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A secondary battery (10) of high energy density and long cycle is achieved by coating the separator (18) with a film (21) of cationic polymer such as polyvinyl-imidazoline. The binder of the positive electrode (14) such as an ethylene-propylene elastomer binder (26) containing particles (28) of TiS.sub.2 chalcogenide can also be modified to contain sulfone functional groups by incorporating liquid or solid sulfone materials such as 0.1 to 5 percent by weight of sulfolane into the binder. The negative lithium electrode (14), separator (18) and positive electrode (16) are preferably spirally wound and disposed within a sealed casing (17) containing terminals (32, 34). The modified separator and positive electrode are more wettable by the electrolytes in which a salt is dissolved in a polar solvent such as sulfolane.