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Sample records for littoral cell angioma

  1. Angioma Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Excellence at University of Chicago. LEARN MORE Free Genetic Testing through Angioma Alliance Angioma Alliance is now able to offer free genetic testing to our members who have multiple cavernous angiomas. ...

  2. Littoral transport rates in the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell: a process-based model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, E. P. L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Brocatus, John

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the sediment transport patterns and pathways is essential for sustainable coastal zone management of the heavily modified coastline of Santa Barbara and Ventura County (California, USA). A process-based model application, based on Delft3D Online Morphology, is used to investigate the littoral transport potential along the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell (between Point Conception and Mugu Canyon). An advanced optimalization procedure is applied to enable annual sediment transport computations by reducing the ocean wave climate in 10 wave height - direction classes. Modeled littoral transport rates compare well with observed dredging volumes, and erosion or sedimentation hotspots coincide with the modeled divergence and convergence of the transport gradients. Sediment transport rates are strongly dependent on the alongshore variation in wave height due to wave sheltering, diffraction and focusing by the Northern Channel Islands, and the local orientation of the geologically-controlled coastline. Local transport gradients exceed the net eastward littoral transport, and are considered a primary driver for hot-spot erosion.

  3. Classification of rocky headlands in California with relevance to littoral cell boundary delineation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Douglas A.; Largier, John L.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of hydrodynamics and sediment flux along beaches, there is little information on the processes, pathways and timing of water and sediment transport around rocky headlands. In this study, headlands along the California coast are classified to advance understanding of headland dynamics and littoral cell boundaries in support of improved coastal management decisions. Geomorphological parameters for 78 headlands were quantified from geological maps, remote-sensing imagery, navigational charts, and shoreline geospatial databases. K-means cluster analysis grouped the headlands into eight distinct classes based on headland perimeter, bathymetric slope ratio, and the headland apex angle. Wave data were used to investigate the potential for sediment transport around the headland types and determine the efficacy of the headland as a littoral cell boundary. Four classes of headland appear to function well as littoral cell boundaries, with headland size (e.g., perimeter or area) and a marked change in nearshore bathymetry across the headland being relevant attributes. About half of the traditional California littoral cell boundaries align with headland classes that are expected to perform poorly in blocking alongshore sediment transport, calling into question these boundaries. Better definition of these littoral cell boundaries is important for regional sediment management decisions.

  4. A tufted angioma

    PubMed Central

    Prasuna, Aeerabolli; Rao, Potharaju Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Tufted angioma (TA) is a rare, benign, cutaneous angiomatous proliferation. It is more common in children, usually presenting as red-purple painful plaques on the trunk. We describe here a TA observed at nine months of age, appearing initially over the retroauricular area, gradually extending to involve skin of neck and trunk by two years of age. This case of a large TA (7 × 12 cm) in an Indian male child is reported here due to its rare presentation. PMID:26225332

  5. Regional Sediment Budget of the Columbia River Littoral Cell, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buijsman, Maarten C.; Sherwood, C.R.; Gibbs, A.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Kaminsky, G.M.; Ruggiero, P.; Franklin, J.

    2002-01-01

    Summary -- In this Open-File Report we present calculations of changes in bathymetric and topographic volumes for the Grays Harbor, Willapa Bay, and Columbia River entrances and the adjacent coasts of North Beach, Grayland Plains, Long Beach, and Clatsop Plains for four intervals: pre-jetty - 1920s (Interval 1), 1920s - 1950s (Interval 2), 1950s - 1990s (Interval 3), and 1920s 1990s (Interval 4). This analysis is part of the Southwest Washington Coastal Erosion Study (SWCES), the goals of which are to understand and predict the morphologic behavior of the Columbia River littoral cell on a management scale of tens of kilometers and decades. We obtain topographic Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data from a joint project by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE) and bathymetric data from the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), USGS, and the DOE. Shoreline data are digitized from T-Sheets and aerial photographs from the USC&GS and National Ocean Service (NOS). Instead of uncritically adjusting each survey to NAVD88, a common vertical land-based datum, we adjust some surveys to produce optimal results according to the following criteria. First, we minimize offsets in overlapping surveys within the same era, and second, we minimize bathymetric changes (relative to the 1990s) in deep water, where we assume minimal change has taken place. We grid bathymetric and topographic datasets using kriging and triangulation algorithms, calculate bathymetric-change surfaces for each interval, and calculate volume changes within polygons that are overlaid on the bathymetric-change surfaces. We find similar morphologic changes near the entrances to Grays Harbor and the Columbia River following jetty construction between 1898 and 1916 at the Grays Harbor entrance and between 1885 and

  6. Large-scale coastal change in the Columbia River littoral cell: an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelfenbaum, Guy; Kaminsky, George M.

    2010-01-01

    This overview introduces large-scale coastal change in the Columbia River littoral cell (CRLC). Covering 165 km of the southwest Washington and northwest Oregon coasts, the littoral cell is made up of wide low-sloping dissipative beaches, broad coastal dunes and barrier plains, three large estuaries, and is bounded by rocky headlands. The beaches and inner shelf are composed of fine-grained sand from the Columbia River and are exposed to a high-energy winter wave climate. Throughout the Holocene, the CRLC has undergone large fluctuations in shoreline change trends, responding to a variety of coastal change drivers, including changing rates of sea-level rise, infrequent, yet catastrophic, co-seismic subsidence events, a large regional sediment supply, inter-annual climatic fluctuations (El Niño cycles), seasonally varying wave climate, and numerous anthropogenic influences. Human influences on the CRLC include construction of over 200 dams in the Columbia River drainage basin, dredging of navigation channels removing sand to upland sites and offshore deep-water sites, and construction of large inlet jetties at the entrances to the Columbia River and Grays Harbor. The construction of these massive entrance jetties at the end of the 19th century has been the dominant driver of coastal change through most of the littoral cell over the last hundred years. Presently, some beaches in the littoral cell are eroding in response to nearshore sediment deficits resulting from a) ebb-jets of the confined entrances pushing the previously large, shallow ebb-tidal deltas offshore into deeper water, and b) waves dispersing the nearshore delta flanks initially onshore and then alongshore away from the jetties. This overview describes 1) the motivation for developing a system-wide understanding of sediment dynamics in the littoral cell at multiple time and space scales, 2) the formation and approach of the Southwest Washington Coastal Erosion Study, and 3) an introduction to the

  7. Beach morphology monitoring in the Elwha River Littoral Cell, 2004-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathon A.; George, Douglas A.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Eshleman, Jodi; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Kaminsky, George M.; Schwartz, Andrew K.; Bierne, Matt

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the methods used, data collected, and results of the Beach Morphology Monitoring Program in the Elwha River Littoral Cell, starting in 2004. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Washington State Department of Ecology collaborated in the data collection with the support of the local Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe. Beach monitoring efforts consisted of collecting topographic and bathymetric horizontal and vertical position data by using a Real Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System (RTK-DGPS). The monitoring program was designed to characterize the littoral system of the Elwha River before the scheduled removal of two large dams in 2012. A primary objective of this work is to quantitatively describe the topography and bathymetry of the Elwha River littoral system so that the effects of dam removal may be quantified. Sediment inputs following dam removal are hypothesized to result in (A) larger amounts of fine sediment grain-sizes entering the littoral system and, (B) a reduction or reversal of coastal erosion.

  8. A rapid compatibility analysis of potential offshore sand sources for beaches of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mustain, N.; Griggs, G.; Barnard, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    The beaches of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell, which are narrow as a result of either natural and/or anthropogenic factors, may benefit from nourishment. Sand compatibility is fundamental to beach nourishment success and grain size is the parameter often used to evaluate equivalence. Only after understanding which sand sizes naturally compose beaches in a specific cell, especially the smallest size that remains on the beach, can the potential compatibility of source areas, such as offshore borrow sites, be accurately assessed. This study examines sediments on the beach and in the nearshore (5-20m depth) for the entire Santa Barbara Littoral Cell east of Point Conception. A digital bed sediment camera, the Eyeball??, and spatial autocorrelation technique were used to determine sediment grain size. Here we report on whether nearshore sediments are comparable and compatible with beach sands of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  9. Seasonal to interannual morphodynamics along a high-energy dissipative littoral cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggiero, P.; Kaminsky, G.M.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Voigt, B.

    2005-01-01

    A beach morphology monitoring program was initiated during summer 1997 along the Columbia River littoral cell (CRLC) on the coasts of northwest Oregon and southwest Washington, USA. This field program documents the seasonal through interannual morphological variability of these high-energy dissipative beaches over a variety of spatial scales. Following the installation of a dense network of geodetic control monuments, a nested sampling scheme consisting of cross-shore topographic beach profiles, three-dimensional topographic beach surface maps, nearshore bathymetric surveys, and sediment size distribution analyses was initiated. Beach monitoring is being conducted with state-of-the-art real-time kinematic differential global positioning system survey methods that combine both high accuracy and speed of measurement. Sampling methods resolve variability in beach morphology at alongshore length scales of approximately 10 meters to approximately 100 kilometers and cross-shore length scales of approximately 1 meter to approximately 2 kilometers. During the winter of 1997/1998, coastal change in the US Pacific Northwest was greatly influenced by one of the strongest El Nin??o events on record. Steeper than typical southerly wave angles resulted in alongshore sediment transport gradients and shoreline reorientation on a regional scale. The La Nin??a of 1998/1999, dominated by cross-shore processes associated with the largest recorded wave year in the region, resulted in net beach erosion along much of the littoral cell. The monitoring program successfully documented the morphological response to these interannual forcing anomalies as well as the subsequent beach recovery associated with three consecutive moderate wave years. These morphological observations within the CRLC can be generalized to explain overall system patterns; however, distinct differences in large-scale coastal behavior (e.g., foredune ridge morphology, sandbar morphometrics, and nearshore beach slopes

  10. Angiomas of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Viale, G L; Pau, A; Viale, E S; Turtas, S

    1981-01-01

    Angiomas situated within the pontocerebellar cistern lie superficially on the ventrolateral aspect of the brain stem. Occasionally, minor extensions penetrate into the adjacent nervous structures. Five patients bearing such lesions were operated upon, using a microsurgical technique. Radical excision was performed in all cases. Within 2 to 12 months the patients had returned to their previous occupations, being fully able to work or attend school. There is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of surgical treatment of angiomas of the ventrolateral aspect of the brain stem and the cerebellopontine angle. The illness usually presents with hemorrhages of varying severity, ranging from mild to devastating. Impairment of consciousness, contralateral hemiparesis and ipsilateral cranial nerve palsies are the most frequent neurological signs after bleeding. The outcome following excision is primarily related to the preoperative condition. No additional deficits or only minor further impairment can be expected from surgical interference. Exploration is advisable whenever the malformation appears to lie on the surface rather than within the brain stem.

  11. An application of LIDAR to analyses of El Nino erosion in the Netarts littoral cell, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revell, D.L.; Komar, P.D.; Sallenger, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    El Nin??o produces coastal and beach erosion along the West Coast of the USA by elevating mean water levels so that tides are significantly higher than predicted, and by altering the paths of storms that generate large waves. In the past it has been difficult to adequately document the erosion impacts since they are so widespread. This difficulty has been solved through the application of LIDAR, which uses a scanning laser mounted in a small aircraft to rapidly and accurately survey beach elevations. This study uses LIDAR to document the beach changes and shoreline erosion that occurred during the 1997-98 El Nin??o within the Netarts Littoral Cell on the Oregon coast, a 14-km long "pocket beach" between large rocky headlands. The LIDAR surveys demonstrate that sand generally migrated northward within the cell due to the southwest approach of the El Nin??o storm waves, but there was a complex pattern of beach-elevation change due to the superposition of eroded rip-current embayments. The greatest beach erosion occurred near the south end of the cell, where it impacted Cape Lookout State Park, and to the north of the inlet to Netarts Bay where it threatened The Capes, a development of condominiums located on a high bluff. In both cases the LIDAR data proved to be extremely useful in quantifying the erosion, and in providing a better understanding of the erosion processes that occur during an El Nin??o.

  12. Cavernous angioma of the pineal region.

    PubMed

    Donati, P; Maiuri, F; Gangemi, M; Gallicchio, B; Sigona, L

    1992-01-01

    The pineal region is one of the most rare localizations of intracranial cavernous angiomas, with only 8 cases reported up today. The Authors report a case of cavernous angioma of such localization and review the pertinent literature. Magnetic resonance allows the correct diagnosis of cavernous malformations on the basis of their typical aspect, even in the absence of histological verification. We suggest that this imaging technique will allow to identify more frequently pineal cavernomas preoperatively, thus avoiding useless irradiation. PMID:1484302

  13. Beach morphology monitoring in the Columbia River Littoral Cell: 1997-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggiero, Peter; Eshleman, Jodi L.; Kingsley, Etienne; Thompson, David M.; Voigt, Brian; Kaminsky, George M.; Gelfenbaum, Guy

    2007-01-01

    This report describes methods used, data collected, and results of the Beach Morphology Monitoring Program in the Columbia River Littoral Cell (CRLC) from 1997 to 2005. A collaborative group primarily consisting of the US Geological Survey and the Washington State Department of Ecology performed this work. Beach Monitoring efforts consisted of collecting topographic and bathymetric horizontal and vertical position data using a Real Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System (RTK-DGPS). Sediment size distribution data was also collected as part of this effort. The monitoring program was designed to: 1) quantify the short- to medium-term (seasonal to interannual) beach change rates and morphological variability along the CRLC and assess the processes responsible for these changes; 2) collect beach state data (i.e., grain size, beach slope, and dune/sandbar height/position) to enhance the conceptual understanding of CRLC functioning and refine predictions of future coastal change and hazards; 3) compare and contrast the scales of environmental forcing and beach morphodynamics in the CRLC to other coastlines of the world; and 4) provide beach change data in a useful format to land use managers.

  14. Tufted angioma and myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silva, Roberto Souto da; Bressan, Aline Lopes; Nascimento, Lívia Barbosa; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2011-01-01

    Tufted angioma is a rare acquired vascular tumor. It is characterized by painful purplish macules that may progress to plaques containing angiomatous papules. The condition is benign; however, it often affects extensive areas of the skin, leading to functional disability of the affected limb if painful. The present report describes a case of a tufted angioma associated with myofascial pain syndrome in which the predisposing element was the presence of this tumor since childhood. Pain at the site of the lesion affected muscle use and led to the onset of the associated syndrome. Complete relief from symptoms was achieved by blocking the trigger points of the affected limb with anesthesia.

  15. L1 burst fracture with associated vertebral angioma.

    PubMed

    Armaganian, G; Adetchessi, T; Pech-Gourg, G; Blondel, B; Dufour, H; Fuentes, S

    2013-04-01

    Vertebral angioma is a common bone tumor. We report a case of L1 vertebral angioma revealed by type A3.2 traumatic pathological fracture of the same vertebra. Management comprised emergency percutaneous osteosynthesis and, after stabilization of the multiple trauma, arterial embolization and percutaneous kyphoplasty.

  16. Beach response dynamics of a littoral cell using a 17-year single-point time series of sand thickness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, P.L.; Hubbard, D.M.; Dugan, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    A 17-year time series of near-daily sand thickness measurements at a single intertidal location was compared with 5. years of semi-annual 3-dimensional beach surveys at the same beach, and at two other beaches within the same littoral cell. The daily single point measurements correlated extremely well with the mean beach elevation and shoreline position of ten high-spatial resolution beach surveys. Correlations were statistically significant at all spatial scales, even for beach surveys 10s of kilometers downcoast, and therefore variability at the single point monitoring site was representative of regional coastal behavior, allowing us to examine nearly two decades of continuous coastal evolution. The annual cycle of beach oscillations dominated the signal, typical of this region, with additional, less intense spectral peaks associated with seasonal wave energy fluctuations (~. 45 to 90. days), as well as full lunar (~. 29. days) and semi-lunar (~. 13. days; spring-neap cycle) tidal cycles. Sand thickness variability was statistically linked to wave energy with a 2. month peak lag, as well as the average of the previous 7-8. months of wave energy. Longer term anomalies in sand thickness were also apparent on time scales up to 15. months. Our analyses suggest that spatially-limited morphological data sets can be extremely valuable (with robust validation) for understanding the details of beach response to wave energy over timescales that are not resolved by typical survey intervals, as well as the regional behavior of coastal systems. ?? 2011.

  17. A case of acquired tufted angioma in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Pesapane, Filippo; Nazzaro, Gianluca; Alberti-Violetti, Silvia; Gianotti, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Tufted angioma is a rare vascular tumor whose name derives from its histopathological appearance, characterized by tufts of capillaries within the dermis. Its etiology and pathogenesis are uncertain. Tufted angioma typically occurs during infancy or early childhood and displays various clinical patterns. It may present as a subtle stain-like area that later thickens as a large plaque, infiltrated or dusky blue-purple lesion, or as an exophytic, firm, violaceous, cutaneous nodule. Medical treatment is not necessary for tufted angioma, given its benign nature and slow progression. Only clinical follow-up is therefore recommended. PMID:26312663

  18. Multiple cerebrospinal cavernous angiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kodeeswaran, M.; Udesh, Reshmi; Ramya, L.; Jothi Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous angiomas represent 5–12% of all spinal vascular lesions and 1% of all intramedullary lesions in pediatric patients. Intramedullary spinal cavernomas are relatively rare with only 24 cases reported till date to the best of our knowledge. A 15 -year-old boy presented to the clinic with acute onset motor weakness in all four limbs. He was diagnosed with multiple cerebral cavernomas and an acutely bleeding spinal cavernoma. Complete surgical excision of the spinal cavernoma was done. Postoperatively the patient's weakness gradually improved to a power of 4/5 in all his limbs over a period of 10 days. Only 24 cases of pediatric spinal cavernomas have been reported in the current literature. Current consensus on management of these rare lesions is based on previously published case reports/series and surgery appears to be the only definitive treatment. Further studies regarding any non-surgical expectant management appears warranted. PMID:27651109

  19. Multiple cerebrospinal cavernous angiomas.

    PubMed

    Kodeeswaran, M; Udesh, Reshmi; Ramya, L; Jothi Kumar, S

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous angiomas represent 5-12% of all spinal vascular lesions and 1% of all intramedullary lesions in pediatric patients. Intramedullary spinal cavernomas are relatively rare with only 24 cases reported till date to the best of our knowledge. A 15 -year-old boy presented to the clinic with acute onset motor weakness in all four limbs. He was diagnosed with multiple cerebral cavernomas and an acutely bleeding spinal cavernoma. Complete surgical excision of the spinal cavernoma was done. Postoperatively the patient's weakness gradually improved to a power of 4/5 in all his limbs over a period of 10 days. Only 24 cases of pediatric spinal cavernomas have been reported in the current literature. Current consensus on management of these rare lesions is based on previously published case reports/series and surgery appears to be the only definitive treatment. Further studies regarding any non-surgical expectant management appears warranted. PMID:27651109

  20. Tufted Angioma of Eyelid in an Adult - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anshul; Misra, Vatsala; Singh, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Tufted Angiomas also known as angioblastomas /Angioblastoma of Nagakawa are rare vascular neoplasms localised to the skin and subcutaneous tissues with the upper trunk and neck being most common sites. They are mainly seen in children but a few cases in juveniles and adults have been reported. We hereby report this case, a 40-year-old male who presented with a right lower lid, painless, slowly progressive, firm swelling diagnosed as Tufted Angioma on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:27504301

  1. Posterior foss avenous angiomas with drainage through the brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, T.R.; Truwit, C.L. ); Dowd, C.F. ); Symonds, D.L. )

    1994-04-01

    To describe 11 cases of posterior fossa venous angiomas with drainage through the brain stem. Eleven cases of posterior fossa venous angioma with drainage through the brain stem were evaluated using MR. Correlation with known routes of venous drainage for the cerebellum and brain stem is made. Six of the 11 venous angiomas were found in the cerebellum, four in the brain stem; one involved both the cerebellum and brain stem. The cerebellar venous angiomas drained to subependymal veins about the fourth ventricle and dorsal pons. These then connected with an enlarged transmesencephalic or transpontine vein, to drain anteriorly to the anterior pontine veins. The brain stem angiomas had variable drainage depending on location. Evidence of hemorrhage was seen in five cases. Cerebellar and brain stem venous angiomas have several potential routes of drainage, including an enlarged vein traversing the pons, midbrain, or medulla. A knowledge of the normal venous anatomy of this region helps to understand the occurrence of these uncommon routes of venous drainage. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Unilateral Glaucoma Associated with Conjunctival Angioma and Choroidal Thickening without Facial Angioma.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Osamah J; Chang, Luke Y; Arora, Karun S; Jampel, Henry D; Quigley, Harry A

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a suspected Sturge-Weber syndrome variant diagnosed at the age of 58 with the help of enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain ocular coherence tomography (EDI-SDOCT). A 58-year-old female with unilateral glaucoma was suspected to have choroidal vascular lesion, conjunctival angioma, and no facial port-wine stain who presented to the clinic with bleb dysesthesia many years after trabeculectomy. EDI-SDOCT was performed and revealed markedly increased choroidal thickness in the affected eye. EDI-SDOCT may be helpful in diagnosing Sturge-Weber variants without facial involvement and may aid in the investigation of the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:27555719

  3. Unilateral Glaucoma Associated with Conjunctival Angioma and Choroidal Thickening without Facial Angioma

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, Osamah J.; Chang, Luke Y.; Arora, Karun S.; Jampel, Henry D.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a suspected Sturge–Weber syndrome variant diagnosed at the age of 58 with the help of enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain ocular coherence tomography (EDI-SDOCT). A 58-year-old female with unilateral glaucoma was suspected to have choroidal vascular lesion, conjunctival angioma, and no facial port-wine stain who presented to the clinic with bleb dysesthesia many years after trabeculectomy. EDI-SDOCT was performed and revealed markedly increased choroidal thickness in the affected eye. EDI-SDOCT may be helpful in diagnosing Sturge–Weber variants without facial involvement and may aid in the investigation of the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:27555719

  4. Multifocal Annular Tufted Angioma: An Uncommon Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti

    2015-01-01

    Tufted angioma (TA) is a localized benign hamartomatous vascular proliferation usually presenting in the childhood as an erythematous plaque. We report here a rare case of multifocal TA in an 8-year-old boy who presented which two large annular lesions as well as multiple papules and nodules on the back for the duration of 4 years. Histology showed typical well circumscribed poorly canalized vascular lobules with ‘cannon ball’ configuration. PMID:26288441

  5. Established Dermascan Treatment Parameters Using Cherry Angiomas As A Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzkan, I.; Bourgelais, D. B. C.

    1987-03-01

    Cherry angiomas, small red spots found on normal skin, usually 1-3 mm in diameter, were used as a model to evaluate the Ofect on cutaneous vascular lesions of a cw laser treatment applied through a Dermascan delivery system. This device permits effective laser exposure times of 1 millisecond, thus limiting thermal diffusion damage in tissues adjacent to the optically absorbing vasculature. Treatment requires no anesthesia and produces no burn/blister response. Clearing of the lesion is complete about five weeks after treatment.

  6. Developmental venous anomalies (DVA): the so-called venous angioma.

    PubMed

    Lasjaunias, P; Burrows, P; Planet, C

    1986-01-01

    Following a review of the literature it is possible to demonstrate the "normality" of the so called venous angiomas. They should be named Developmental Venous Anomaly (DVA). They illustrate in their two extreme types (superficial and deep) the hemodynamic equilibrium of the transcortical venous drainage in the periependymal zones. Venous ectasias and varices which can be encountered, associated with DVA constitute an acquired feature in relation to a venous outlet obstacle. The sinus pericranii represents an extracerebral DVA, but also corresponds to a normal variation. As any extreme anatomical variant, each DVA corresponds to a weak situation which may express itself clinically; only rare situations justify a radical treatment.

  7. Extradural spinal cavernous angiomas: report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Antonio; Piccirilli, Manolo; Bristot, Roberto; di Norcia, Valerio; Salvati, Maurizio; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-10-01

    The authors describe seven cases of extradural spinal cavernous angioma. Although cavernoma itself is not rare, the extradural spinal localization is uncommon and makes preoperative differential diagnosis difficult. Routine MRI investigation has aided neurosurgeons in evaluating the true incidence of these vascular malformations, which was understimated in the past. The data published so far have not entirely clarified the treatment of choice for these lesions. Considering their rarity in this site, their presenting symptoms and the difficulties involved in neuroradiological diagnosis, the authors discuss the role of surgery as the principal form of treatment and review the relevant literature. Seven patients (4 male, 3 female) were admitted to our Institute of Neurosurgery between 1992 and 2004, with a 5-6 month history (range=2-365 days) of low back pain or radicular pain, sometimes associated with paresthesia. All patients had a CT scan, as well as MRI with gadolinium when possible, which detected an extradural roundish lesion: differential diagnosis was very difficult, especially between neurinoma and cavernoma. Treatment was always surgical and resection of the lesion radical. Postoperatively, all patients presented complete regression of clinical symptoms. In all cases histological diagnosis was cavernous angioma. Postoperative MRI with gadolinium or CT scan with IV contrast, performed before discharge, confirmed radical removal of the vascular malformation in all cases. Our experience confirms that surgery should be the treatment of choice for these lesions, in view of both their tendency to bleed and their straightforward surgical removal.

  8. Medullary Hemorrhage after Ischemic Wallenberg's Syndrome in a Patient with Cavernous Angioma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoe

    2010-01-01

    Background The main complication of cerebral cavernous angioma is hemorrhage. Ischemic stroke as a complication of cerebral cavernous angioma has rarely been described, and hemorrhage after ischemic Wallenberg's syndrome has not been reported before. Case Report A 45-year-old woman presented with perioral numbness, hoarseness, dysphagia, and worsening of her previous sensory symptoms. The patient had been taking aspirin for 3 years after suffering from ischemic Wallenberg's syndrome with left paresthesia as a residual symptom. Brain computed tomography revealed an acute medullary hematoma in the previously infarcted area. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cavernous angioma in the right medulla. Conclusions We presume that cerebral cavernous angioma was responsible for both the ischemia and the hemorrhage, and we also cautiously speculate that the aspirin contributed to the development of hemorrhage in the previously infarcted area. PMID:21264204

  9. Tufted Angioma in Children: Report of Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Alessandra Dutra; Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Gomes, Rita Fabiane Teixeira; Martins, Marco Antônio Trevizani; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron; Santa'Ana Filho, Manoel; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki; Hildebrand, Laura de Campos; Visioli, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Tufted angioma (TA) is a benign vascular tumor with endothelial origin. It is extremely rare in oral mucosa; only seven cases have been reported in the literature so far. Here, we describe two cases of tufted angioma observed in children and we also present a review of the literature about this pathology, concerning the differential diagnosis and management of this lesion in children. PMID:25436158

  10. Cauda equina cavernous angioma presenting as acute low back pain and sciatica. A report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Khalatbari, M R; Hamidi, M; Moharamzad, Y; Taheri, B

    2011-08-31

    Spinal cavernous angiomas are rare vascular lesions occurring mainly in the vertebral bodies extending secondary into the extradural space. Only 3% of these lesions are intradural, usually localized within the spinal cord. Rarely, cavernous angioma has been reported to occur in the cauda equina. We describe clinical, diagnostic imaging, and surgical procedures of two cases of cavernous angioma of the cauda equina who presented with acute back pain and sciatica. The relevant literature is also reviewed. PMID:24059723

  11. Association of chemokines and prolactin with cherry angioma in a sulfur mustard exposed population--Sardasht-Iran cohort study.

    PubMed

    Askari, Nayere; Vaez-Mahdavi, Mohammad-Reza; Moaiedmohseni, Sakine; Khamesipour, Ali; Soroush, Mohammad-Reza; Moin, Athar; Jalaie, Shohreh; Ghazanfari, Zeinab; Faghihzadeh, Elham; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to SM leads to short and long term adverse effects on various organs including the skin. Cherry angioma is one of the late skin disorders in SM exposed individuals. The pathogenesis of abnormal angiogenesis in cherry angioma is not well known but the role of inflammatory mediators and certain hormones, including prolactin, in the regulation of angiogenesis in other diseases has been reported. Alterations in serum levels of prolactin and chemokines in SM-exposed victims and the impact on angiogenesis are indications of the role in SM-induced cherry angioma. As part of the SICS, this study seeks to evaluate the possible association of prolactin and chemokines in the emergence of SM-induced cherry angioma. The serum concentrations of prolactin, IL-8/CXCL8, RANTES/CCL5, MCP-1/CCL2, and fractalkine/CX3CL1 were titrated using sandwich ELISA technique. There was a significant difference in the level of prolactin between the exposed subgroups (with cherry angioma n=72; mean: 10.13) and without cherry angioma (n=268; mean: 13.13, p<0.0096). Median of the serum levels of CCL2 in the exposed patients with cherry angioma was significantly higher than exposed patients without cherry angioma (median=203.5 pg/ml and median=187.10 pg/ml respectively, p=0.035). There was no significant difference in the serum levels of IL-8, RANTES and CX3L1 between the exposed subgroups with cherry angioma and without cherry angioma. This finding serves as a basis for further research on the molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of cherry angioma and other related disorders.

  12. [A case of cavernous angioma presenting as migrainous attack].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yohtaro; Taguchi, Yoshio; Uchida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-03-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with progressive visual impairment accompanied by throbbing headache. First he had throbbing headache in the left temporal region. At the same time he noticed a blind spot in the upper right quadrant. This blind spot gradually became enlarged. Since the patient had throbbing headache accompanied by right homonymous hemianopsia, his illness was initially diagnosed as migraine. Sumatriptan was prescribed. However, thereafter his headache still continued. He described his seeing of some lights like neon signs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a typical feature of cavernous angioma (CA) at the left temporooccipital lobe and electroencephalogram showed frequent spike waves at the same region. Because of progressive deterioration of his condition despite the treatment with antiepileptics, left temporal craniotomy was performed. The CA was removed with a small amount of surrounding gliotic tissue using an intraoperative cortical EEG recording. Postoperatively, his visual symptoms and headache disappeared. Although migraine is one of the most frequently encountered symptoms in daily practice, differentiation of migraine from seizure - associated headache is extremely difficult, because both conditions may manifest similar features of visual impairment with throbbing headache. When clinicians see a patient presenting with throbbing headache accompanied by visual symptoms, CAs or other space occupying lesions, should be kept in mind of a differential diagnosis of migrainous attacks. PMID:20229775

  13. Venous angioma may be associated with epilepsy in children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Ryung; Lee, Yun Jin; Nam, Sang Ook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Venous angioma (VA) is the most common congenital abnormality of the intracranial vasculature. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between VA and epilepsy and to identify the characteristics of children with VA and epilepsy. Methods The records of all patients aged less than 18 years who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at Pusan National University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with isolated VA and patients with normal MRI were compared in terms of the prevalence of epilepsy. Results In total, 2,385 pediatric patients who underwent brain MRI were enrolled. Isolated VA was identified in 26 patients (VA group). Among the patients with normal MRI findings, 225 age- and sex-matched patients to the VA-group were assigned to the control group. Nine patients in the VA group (9 of 26, 34.6%) and 27 patients in the control group (26 of 225, 11.5%; P<0.001) had epilepsy. In the VA group, 20 patients (76.9%) had the VA in the cerebral hemispheres, and 6 patients (23.1%) had the VA in the brainstem and cerebellum. The latter showed a higher prevalence of epilepsy (5 of 6, 83.3%) than the former (4 of 20, 20.0%; P=0.004). Among the nine patients who had epilepsy with VA, patients whose VA involved the brainstem and cerebellum showed a significantly higher frequency of abnormal Electroencephalographic findings than patients whose VA involved the cerebral hemispheres (P=0.016). Conclusion VA, especially in the brainstem and cerebellum, might be associated with epilepsy.

  14. Venous angioma may be associated with epilepsy in children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Ryung; Lee, Yun Jin; Nam, Sang Ook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Venous angioma (VA) is the most common congenital abnormality of the intracranial vasculature. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between VA and epilepsy and to identify the characteristics of children with VA and epilepsy. Methods The records of all patients aged less than 18 years who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at Pusan National University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with isolated VA and patients with normal MRI were compared in terms of the prevalence of epilepsy. Results In total, 2,385 pediatric patients who underwent brain MRI were enrolled. Isolated VA was identified in 26 patients (VA group). Among the patients with normal MRI findings, 225 age- and sex-matched patients to the VA-group were assigned to the control group. Nine patients in the VA group (9 of 26, 34.6%) and 27 patients in the control group (26 of 225, 11.5%; P<0.001) had epilepsy. In the VA group, 20 patients (76.9%) had the VA in the cerebral hemispheres, and 6 patients (23.1%) had the VA in the brainstem and cerebellum. The latter showed a higher prevalence of epilepsy (5 of 6, 83.3%) than the former (4 of 20, 20.0%; P=0.004). Among the nine patients who had epilepsy with VA, patients whose VA involved the brainstem and cerebellum showed a significantly higher frequency of abnormal Electroencephalographic findings than patients whose VA involved the cerebral hemispheres (P=0.016). Conclusion VA, especially in the brainstem and cerebellum, might be associated with epilepsy. PMID:27610183

  15. The clinical spectrum of kaposiform hemangioendothelioma and tufted angioma.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Stacy E; Gupta, Deepti

    2016-03-01

    Kasposiform hemoangioendothelioma (KHE) and tufted angioma (TA) are classifed as vascular tumors with locally aggressive and benign growth potential, respectively, within the classification schema proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies. A unique feature of these vascular tumors is the risk of Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon (KMP), a severe thrombocytopenia with mild to moderate coagulopathy resulting from intralesional platelet trapping. As with many vascular anomalies, accurate description of clinical course, responses to therapy, and long-term outcomes have been hindered by lesion misidentification, imprecise nomenclature, and lack of prospective, randomized clinical trials to assess therapeutic efficacy. The classic dermatologic features of these lesions can facilitate diagnosis for the astute provider; however, the absence of or unusual integumentary involvement or presentation in a less common age group (adolescents/adults) poses a diagnostic challenge. Current approaches to the management of KHE/TA are often informed by lesion features such as presence of KMP, extent and location of the tumor, and symptomatology. Evidence-based treatment guidelines are limited. Corticosteroids, vincristine, interferon, multi-agent regimens and newer therapies, such as sirolimus, have demonstrated efficacy in patient series. The use of surgical excision and interventional radiology guided therapies have been described with mixed clinical benefit. Collaboration among emerging vascular anomaly centers and an increasing number of providers across subspecialties with interest in this field are facilitating the development of standardized approaches to diagnosis and management. The rarity of KHE-spectrum lesions and the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations necessitate rationally designed, multisite clinical trials to investigate risk stratification schemas and formally evaluate the short and long-term efficacy of available and novel therapies

  16. Littoral steering of deltaic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-11-01

    The typically single-threaded channels on wave-influenced deltas show striking differences in their orientations, with some channels oriented into the incoming waves (e.g., Ombrone, Krishna), and others oriented away from the waves (e.g., Godavari, Sao Francisco). Understanding the controls on channel orientation is important as the channel location greatly influences deltaic morphology and sedimentology, both subaerially and subaqueously. Here, we explore channel orientation and consequent feedbacks with local shoreline dynamics using a plan-form numerical model of delta evolution. The model treats fluvial sediment delivery to a wave-dominated coast in two ways: 1) channels are assumed to prograde in a direction perpendicular to the local shoreline orientation and 2) a controlled fraction of littoral sediment transport can bypass the river mouth. Model results suggest that channels migrate downdrift when there is a significant net littoral transport and alongshore transport bypassing of the river mouth is limited. In contrast, river channels tend to orient themselves into the waves when fluvial sediment flux is relatively large, causing the shoreline of the downdrift delta flank to attain the orientation of maximum potential sediment transport for the incoming wave climate. Using model results, we develop a framework to estimate channel orientations for wave-influenced deltas that shows good agreement with natural examples. An increase in fluvial sediment input can cause a channel to reorient itself into incoming waves, behavior observed, for example, in the Ombrone delta in Italy. Our results can inform paleoclimate studies by linking channel orientation to fluvial sediment flux and wave energy. In particular, our approach provides a means to quantify past wave directions, which are notoriously difficult to constrain.

  17. A field study of littoral processes in Estero Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, J.R.; Anima, R.J.; Molzan, D.E.; Luepke, Gretchen; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Estero Bay, which lies on the central California coast, has rocky headlands at both ends and sandy beaches within it. The shoreline of the bay has adjusted to be in equilibrium with the predominant wave climate, which is from the northwest. Because of its present shoreline configuration, the net southward littoral transport found along much of the California coast does not occur within Estero Bay. Instead, the sand primarily moves on- and offshore with a reversing longshore component. This sand transport pattern produces a littoral cell within Estero Bay even though there is no submarine canyon in the area. The primary sand sinks for this cell appear to be the sand spit south of Morro Rock and the entrance to Morro Bay itself, although this opinion was not experimentally verified. Field work during one summer (1978) and the following winter (1979) produced baseline data on the profile of and grain-size distribution across the littoral zone. In the offshore part of the littoral zone we also studied ripple size and type, internal structure, depth of erosion, and mineralogy. Although these data, which were collected along nine transects spaced 2 km apart, are inadequate to yield transport and energy rates, they indicate a northward decrease in wave energy within Estero Bay and a mixing of the sediments in the offshore. Box core and rod height data from grid points in seven meters of water showed that on the order of a meter of erosion occurred in the central part of the bay between the two sampling periods. Offshore, the data were incomplete, but at one station, in 17 m of water, at least 20 cm of erosion occurred.

  18. Holocene coastal dune fields used as indicators of net littoral transport: West Coast, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, C.D.; Stock, E.; Hart, R.; Percy, D.; Hostetler, S.W.; Knott, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Between Point Grenville, Washington, and Point Conception, California (1500 km distance) 21 dune fields record longshore transport in 20 littoral cells during the late Holocene. The direction of predominant littoral transport is established by relative positions of dune fields (north, central, or south) in 17 representative littoral cells. Dune field position is north of cell midpoints in northernmost Oregon and Washington, but is south of cell midpoints in southern Oregon and California. Downdrift sand trapping occurs at significant changes in shoreline angle and/or at bounding headlands that project at least 2.5 km seaward from the general coastal trend. Sand bypassing occurs around small headlands of less than 0.5 km in projection distance. A northward shift of the winter low-pressure center in the northeast Pacific Ocean is modeled from 11 ka to 0 ka. Nearshore current forcing in southern Oregon and northern California switched from northward in earliest Holocene time to southward in late Holocene time. The late Holocene (5-0 ka) is generally characterized by net northward littoral drift in northernmost Oregon and Washington and by net southward littoral drift in southernmost Oregon and California. A regional divergence of net transport direction in central Oregon, i.e. no net drift, is consistent with modeled wind and wave forcing at the present time (0 ka). ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Variable Response to Propranolol Treatment of Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma, Tufted Angioma, and Kasabach-Merritt Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yvonne E.; Drolet, Beth A.; Blei, Francine; Carcao, Manuel; Fangusaro, Jason; Kelly, Michael E.; Krol, Alfons; Lofgren, Sabra; Mancini, Anthony J.; Metry, Denise W.; Recht, Michael; Silverman, Robert A.; Tom, Wynnis L.; Pope, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Propranolol is a non-selective beta-adrenergic antagonist successfully used in a case of kaposiform hemangioendothelioma associated with Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon. We report eleven patients treated with propranolol for kaposiform hemangioendothelioma and the related variant tufted angioma, six of whom also had Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon. The varied responses to treatment, with only 36% responding in our series, demonstrate the need for further study of this medication before routine use for these indications. PMID:22648868

  20. [Use of Doppler ultrasound in the examination of the extent of venous angiomas].

    PubMed

    Van Der Molen, H R

    1976-01-01

    After emphasizing that the treatment of a strawberry naevus in a newborn is usually unnecessary, the author shows the value of the Sonar Doppler in delimiting the extent of pseudovaricose and cavernous, venous angiomas. Arterio-venous fistulas above a certain size can be localized by this procedure. Sometimes these disappear spontaneously (traumatism, thrombosis). On the other hand, the delicate arteriovenous fistulas found in cases of the Klippel and Trenaunay triad are inaccessible to this procedure.

  1. Does littoral sand bypass the head of Mugu Submarine Canyon? - a modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Jingping; Elias, Edwin; Kinsman, Nicole; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    A newly developed sand-tracer code for the process-based model Delft3D (Deltares, The Netherlands) was used to simulate the littoral transport near the head of the Mugu Submarine Canyon in California, USA. For westerly swells, which account for more than 90% of the wave conditions in the region, the sand tracers in the downcoast littoral drift were unable to bypass the canyon head. A flow convergence near the upcoast rim of the canyon intercepts the tracers and moves them either offshore onto the shelf just west of the canyon rim (low wave height conditions) or into the canyon head (storm wave conditions). This finding supports the notion that Mugu Canyon is the true terminus of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell.

  2. [The influence of salinity on the rate of dark respiration and structure of the cells of brown algae thallus from the Barents sea littoral].

    PubMed

    Tropin, I V; Radzinskaia, N V; Voskoboĭnikov, G M

    2003-01-01

    We studied the changes in the rate of dark respiration (DR) and structure of the cells in Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus thalluses during the incubation at 40, 34, 20, 10, and 2@1000 salinity for 14 days. The changes in salinity affect the rate of DR and the structure of the thallus apical cells: the organelles swell and later are destroyed. The effect of decreased salinity on the algae was more pronounced as compared to the increase. The stress intensity directly increased with the rate of desalination. Further adaptation of the algae to low salinity enhanced DR and, hence, was an energy-dependent process. Despite higher DR rates (during the stress and adaptation) in F. vesiculosus as compared to A. nodosum, the seaweeds had similar pattern of adaptation to the changed salinity. Different primary response of the seaweeds to 20@1000 salinity was an important exception; apparently, the salinity around 20@1000 is the limit of these species distribution in desalination zones.

  3. Two cystic cavernous angiomas after radiotherapy for atypical meningioma in adult woman : case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Andrea Gennaro; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Pichierri, Angelo; Delfini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A correlation between radiation therapy and cavernoma has been suspected since 1994. Since then, only a few cases of radio-induced cavernomas have been reported in the literature (85 patients). Most of them were children, and the most frequent original tumour had been medulloblastoma. The authors report a case of two cystic cavernous angiomas after radiation therapy for atypical meningioma in adult woman. This is the first case of cavernous angioma after radiotherapy for low grade meningioma. A 39-year-old, Latin american woman was operated on for a frontal atypical meningioma with intradiploic component and adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered (6000 cGy local brain irradiation, fractionated over 6 weeks). Follow-up MR imaging showed no recurrences of the tumour and no other lesions. Ten years later, at the age of 49, she consulted for progressive drug-resistant headache. MR imaging revealed two new well defined areas of different signal intensity at the surface of each frontal pole. Both lesions were surgically removed; the histopathological diagnosis was cavernous angioma. This is the first case of cavernous angioma after radiation therapy for atypical meningioma : it confirms the development of these lesions after standard radiation therapy also in patients previously affected by non-malignant tumours.

  4. Two Cystic Cavernous Angiomas after Radiotherapy for Atypical Meningioma in Adult Woman : Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Andrea Gennaro; Pichierri, Angelo; Delfini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A correlation between radiation therapy and cavernoma has been suspected since 1994. Since then, only a few cases of radio-induced cavernomas have been reported in the literature (85 patients). Most of them were children, and the most frequent original tumour had been medulloblastoma. The authors report a case of two cystic cavernous angiomas after radiation therapy for atypical meningioma in adult woman. This is the first case of cavernous angioma after radiotherapy for low grade meningioma. A 39-year-old, Latin american woman was operated on for a frontal atypical meningioma with intradiploic component and adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered (6000 cGy local brain irradiation, fractionated over 6 weeks). Follow-up MR imaging showed no recurrences of the tumour and no other lesions. Ten years later, at the age of 49, she consulted for progressive drug-resistant headache. MR imaging revealed two new well defined areas of different signal intensity at the surface of each frontal pole. Both lesions were surgically removed; the histopathological diagnosis was cavernous angioma. This is the first case of cavernous angioma after radiation therapy for atypical meningioma : it confirms the development of these lesions after standard radiation therapy also in patients previously affected by non-malignant tumours. PMID:24570817

  5. Biological warfare in the littorals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.W.

    1997-05-01

    Biological warfare (BW) has emerged as a significant threat to military operations and is particularly challenging at the operational level of warfare in a littoral environment. There are compelling reasons why an operational commander should be concerned about BW: global proliferation of biotechnology and biological weapons capabilities; suitability of BW for disrupting force projection across the littorals; and the vulnerability of American, allied and coalition forces to BW. The threat of facing an adversary capable and willing to use biological weapons will influence the commander`s application of the operational art across the six operational functions. Degradation of operational tempo, effects of psychological responses among the force, and stress on the organizational structure may challenge the command and control process. Operational intelligence will demand robust integration of technical analysis, intentions and warnings, meteorological information, and medical intelligence. The maneuver and movement processes will be taxed to function effectively when ports and airfields offer such lucrative BW targets. Biological weapons may dictate the location of operational fires assets as well as the make-up of the target lists. Operational logistics assumes great importance in the medical functions, decontamination processes, and troop replacement and unit reconstitution. Operational protection encompasses nearly every aspect of BW defense and will demand a balance between what is necessary and what is possible to protect. As daunting as the challenges appear, the operational-level commander has at his disposal many tools necessary to prepare for biological warfare in the littorals. Ultimately, the commander must convince his force, his allies, and his enemies that the command can fight effectively in a BW environment, on land and sea.

  6. Modeling of spectral signatures of littoral waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltrin, Vladimir I.

    1997-12-01

    The spectral values of remotely obtained radiance reflectance coefficient (RRC) are compared with the values of RRC computed from inherent optical properties measured during the shipborne experiment near the West Florida coast. The model calculations are based on the algorithm developed at the Naval Research Laboratory at Stennis Space Center and presented here. The algorithm is based on the radiation transfer theory and uses regression relationships derived from experimental data. Overall comparison of derived and measured RRCs shows that this algorithm is suitable for processing ground truth data for the purposes of remote data calibration. The second part of this work consists of the evaluation of the predictive visibility model (PVM). The simulated three-dimensional values of optical properties are compared with the measured ones. Preliminary results of comparison are encouraging and show that the PVM can qualitatively predict the evolution of inherent optical properties in littoral waters.

  7. Clinical Outcomes for Systemic Corticosteroids Versus Vincristine in Treating Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma and Tufted Angioma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohan; Li, Jiaying; Qu, Xinhua; Yan, Weili; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Shanyong; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of systemic corticosteroids versus those of vincristine in the treatment of kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) and tufted angioma (TA). A literature search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science was performed for clinical studies on systemic corticosteroid versus vincristine therapies in treating KHE/TA. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and response rate with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to measure outcomes. Heterogeneity, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and publication bias analysis were performed for result evaluation. Thirteen studies, comprising 344 participants, were used in the analysis. Vincristine therapy was found to be relatively more effective than systemic corticosteroids (RRs = 0.45, 95%CI: 0.35–0.58). The result of pooled adverse reactions response rate for systemic corticosteroids was 0.31 (95%CI, 0.18–0.43), significantly higher than that for vincristine, which was 0.12 (95%CI, 0.06–0.19). In subgroup analyses, factors including mean age and race of patients, and period of follow-up were examined as possible sources of heterogeneity. This is the first meta-analysis estimating the clinical outcomes of systemic corticosteroids in comparison with those of vincristine in the treatment of KHE/TA. The results showed that vincristine was considerably more effective with lower complication rates than systemic corticosteroids; thus, vincristine could be suggested as the first-line therapy for KHE/TA. PMID:27196448

  8. EO system concepts in the littoral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwering, Piet B. W.; van den Broek, Sebastiaan P.; van Iersel, Miranda

    2007-04-01

    In recent years, operations executed by naval forces have taken place at many different locations. At present, operations against international terrorism and asymmetric warfare in coastal environments are of major concern. In these scenarios, the threat caused by pirates on-board of small surface targets, such as jetskis and fast inshore attack crafts, is increasing. In the littoral environment, the understanding of its complexity and the efficient use of the limited reaction time, are essential for successful operations. Present-day electro-optical sensor suites, also incorporating Infrared Search and Track systems, can be used for varying tasks as detection, classification and identification. By means of passive electro-optical systems, infrared and visible light sensors, improved situational awareness can be achieved. For long range capability, elevated sensor masts and flying platforms are ideally suited for the surveillance task and improve situational awareness. A primary issue is how to incorporate new electro-optical technology and signal processing into the new sensor concepts, to improve system performance. It is essential to derive accurate information from the high spatial-resolution imagery created by the EO sensors. As electro-optical sensors do not have all-weather capability, the performance degradation in adverse scenarios must be understood, in order to support the operational use of adaptive sensor management techniques. In this paper we discuss the approach taken at TNO in the design and assessment of system concepts for future IRST development. An overview of our maritime programme in future IRST and EO system concepts including signal processing is presented.

  9. Lake shoreline and littoral physical habitat structure in a national lakes assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian and littoral habitat components are important to lake biological assemblages, providing refuge from predation, living and egg-laying substrates, and food. Shoreline structure also affects nutrient cycling, littoral production, and sedimentation rates. Measures of ripar...

  10. Neonatal birth weight variations between inland and littoral Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bralić, Irena; Rodin, Urelija; Matanić, Dubravka; Jovancevic, Milivoj

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess neonatal birth weight (BW) differences between inland and littoral Croatia, to identify BW groups with most pronounced differences, and possible variations in the rate of BW > or = 4000 g between Sibenik area and the rest of littoral (counties with access to the Adriatic Sea) and inland Croatia. The study included data on 99.42% of 200,740 live births recorded in 37 Croatian maternity hospitals during the 2001-2005 period. Distribution of 500-g BW groups was analyzed irrespective of neonatal sex and gestational age. Differences were found between the inland and littoral parts of Croatia according to distribution of the BW groups of < 2500 g (5.4% vs. 4.4%), 2500-3999 g (84% vs. 80.2%) and > or = 4000 g (10.6% vs. 15.4%) (chi2 = 882; p < 0.001).The highest rate of BW > or = 4000 g was recorded in Sibenik-Knin County (5-year mean 18.32%) and was greater throughout the littoral as compared with inland Croatia (5-year mean 14.99% vs. 9.58%). A shift towards higher BWgroups recorded throughout littoral as compared with inland Croatia supports the hypothesis on variation in anthropologic characteristics in the respective populations to be pronounced as early as at birth. Study results confirmed fetal macrosomia not to be exclusively characteristic of Sibenik-Knin County, since the rate of neonatal BW > or =4000 g was significantly higher in the entire littoral as compared with inland Croatia.

  11. Small-beam, low-power argon-pumped tunable dye laser at 585 nm for the treatment of cherry angiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littler, Curt M.

    1990-06-01

    An argon-pumped tunable dye laser tuned to 585 nm was used to treat clinically typical cherry angiomas in a preliminary study. A spot size of 0.1 mm and low power (0.1 - 0.15W) in the continuous mode was used for treatment. Results ranged from decrease in size of the cherry angioma to complete regression. In all cases, there was minimal to no scarring. Further study in the treatment of elevated cutaneous vascular lesions with the continuous wave dye laser seems warranted.

  12. High-resolution imagery applications in the littorals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abileah, Ronald

    2001-12-01

    We focus on three applications of high-resolution imagery in the littorals: mapping bathymetry, monitoring the health of coral reefs, and taking censuses of marine mammals. All three applications show the importance and potential benefits of higher-resolution imagery. Increased radiometric sensitivity and the simultaneous collection of panchromatic and multispectral imagery are also important. An Ikonos image of Maui is used to demonstrate these applications. We also briefly explain some important differences between multispectral remote sensing over water and land.

  13. Emergent littoral deposits in the eastern Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meco, Joaquin; Stearns, Charles E.

    1981-03-01

    K-Ar ages ( A. Abdel-Monem, P. D. Watkins, and P. W. Gast, 1971, American Journal of Science271, 490-521; this paper) and revised paleontological determinations ( J. Meco, 1977, "Los Strombus neogenos y cuatenarios del Atlantico euroafricano", Las Palmas, Ediciones del Excmo. Cabildo Insular de Gran Canaria) show that "Quaternary" ( R. Crofts, 1967, Quaternaria 9, 247-260; G. Lecointre, K. J. Tinkler, and G. Richards, 1967, Academy of Natural Science of Philadelphia Proceedings119, 325-344) littoral deposits on Lanzarote and Fuerteventura are early Pliocene and late Pleistocene. Early and middle Pleistocene strand lines are not represented. Early Pliocene littoral and marine deposits contain a characteristic fossil assemblage: Strombus coronatus, Nerità emiliana, Gryphaea virleti, Patella cf. intermedia, and Rothpletzia rudista. Differences in elevation record differential post-Pliocene uplift of the coastal platforms on which they lie. Late Pleistocene beach deposits at low elevations belong to two groups, an older with Strombus bubonius and a younger without. Differences in elevation of early Pliocene littoral deposits are reflected by differences in elevation of late Pleistocene beach deposits nearby.

  14. Littoral processes: US Coast Guard Station, Fort Point, San Francisco

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

    1983-10-01

    The US Coast Guard Station, Fort Point is located three-quarters of a nautical mile southeast of the Golden Gate Strait, the entrance to San Francisco Bay. The existing storm wave conditions at Fort Point Station pier make it extremely dangerous for the SAR crews to get on and off the Motor Life Boats at times requiring the vessels to be moored at the San Francisco Yacht Harbor about 1.5 miles east of the Fort Point Station. To mitigate these harsh working conditions the US Coast Guard is considering the feasibility of constructing suitable all-weather moorings for the three Motor Life Boats at the Fort Point Station to enable unimpeded SAR operations, to provide safe working conditions for Coast Guard small boat crews, and to improve small boat maintenance conditions at Fort Point Station. The purpose of this report is to identify, analyze and evaluate physical environmental factors that could affect all-weather moorings siting, configuration and entrance location, as well as potential post construction alterations to littoral conditions and processes. This report includes a description of the site, description of pertinent littoral processes, evaluation of how these processes could affect construction of all-weather moorings, and discussion of design considerations, as well as mitigation measures to minimize potential adverse effects to the physical environment. 19 references, 27 figures, 26 tables.

  15. Littoral lichens as a novel source of potentially bioactive Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Parrot, Delphine; Antony-Babu, Sanjay; Intertaglia, Laurent; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie; Suzuki, Marcelino T.

    2015-01-01

    Cultivable Actinobacteria are the largest source of microbially derived bioactive molecules. The high demand for novel antibiotics highlights the need for exploring novel sources of these bacteria. Microbial symbioses with sessile macro-organisms, known to contain bioactive compounds likely of bacterial origin, represent an interesting and underexplored source of Actinobacteria. We studied the diversity and potential for bioactive-metabolite production of Actinobacteria associated with two marine lichens (Lichina confinis and L. pygmaea; from intertidal and subtidal zones) and one littoral lichen (Roccella fuciformis; from supratidal zone) from the Brittany coast (France), as well as the terrestrial lichen Collema auriforme (from a riparian zone, Austria). A total of 247 bacterial strains were isolated using two selective media. Isolates were identified and clustered into 101 OTUs (98% identity) including 51 actinobacterial OTUs. The actinobacterial families observed were: Brevibacteriaceae, Cellulomonadaceae, Gordoniaceae, Micrococcaceae, Mycobacteriaceae, Nocardioidaceae, Promicromonosporaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Sanguibacteraceae and Streptomycetaceae. Interestingly, the diversity was most influenced by the selective media rather than lichen species or the level of lichen thallus association. The potential for bioactive-metabolite biosynthesis of the isolates was confirmed by screening genes coding for polyketide synthases types I and II. These results show that littoral lichens are a source of diverse potentially bioactive Actinobacteria. PMID:26514347

  16. Littoral lichens as a novel source of potentially bioactive Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Parrot, Delphine; Antony-Babu, Sanjay; Intertaglia, Laurent; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie; Suzuki, Marcelino T

    2015-10-30

    Cultivable Actinobacteria are the largest source of microbially derived bioactive molecules. The high demand for novel antibiotics highlights the need for exploring novel sources of these bacteria. Microbial symbioses with sessile macro-organisms, known to contain bioactive compounds likely of bacterial origin, represent an interesting and underexplored source of Actinobacteria. We studied the diversity and potential for bioactive-metabolite production of Actinobacteria associated with two marine lichens (Lichina confinis and L. pygmaea; from intertidal and subtidal zones) and one littoral lichen (Roccella fuciformis; from supratidal zone) from the Brittany coast (France), as well as the terrestrial lichen Collema auriforme (from a riparian zone, Austria). A total of 247 bacterial strains were isolated using two selective media. Isolates were identified and clustered into 101 OTUs (98% identity) including 51 actinobacterial OTUs. The actinobacterial families observed were: Brevibacteriaceae, Cellulomonadaceae, Gordoniaceae, Micrococcaceae, Mycobacteriaceae, Nocardioidaceae, Promicromonosporaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Sanguibacteraceae and Streptomycetaceae. Interestingly, the diversity was most influenced by the selective media rather than lichen species or the level of lichen thallus association. The potential for bioactive-metabolite biosynthesis of the isolates was confirmed by screening genes coding for polyketide synthases types I and II. These results show that littoral lichens are a source of diverse potentially bioactive Actinobacteria.

  17. Toxic effects of decomposing red algae on littoral organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eklund, Britta; Svensson, Andreas P.; Jonsson, Conny; Malm, Torleif

    2005-03-01

    Large masses of filamentous red algae of the genera Polysiphonia, Rhodomela, and Ceramium are regularly washed up on beaches of the central Baltic Sea. As the algal masses start to decay, red coloured effluents leak into the water, and this tinge may be traced several hundred meters off shore. In this study, possible toxic effects of these effluents were tested on littoral organisms from different trophic levels. Effects on fertilisation, germination and juvenile survival of the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus were investigated, and mortality tests were performed on the crustaceans Artemia salina and Idotea baltica, as well as on larvae and adults of the fish Pomatoschistus microps. Fucus vesiculosus was the most sensitive species of the tested organisms to the red algal extract. The survival of F. vesiculosus recruits was reduced with 50% (LC50) when exposed to a concentration corresponding to 1.7 g l -1 dw red algae. The lethal concentration for I. baltica, A. salina and P. microps were approximately ten times higher. The toxicity to A. salina was reduced if the algal extract was left to decompose during two weeks but the decline in toxicity was not affected by different light or temperature conditions. This study indicates that the filamentous red algae in the central Baltic Sea may produce and release compounds with negative effects on the littoral ecosystem. The effects may be particularly serious for the key species F. vesiculosus, which reproduce in autumn when filamentous red algal blooms are most severe.

  18. Littoral lichens as a novel source of potentially bioactive Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Parrot, Delphine; Antony-Babu, Sanjay; Intertaglia, Laurent; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie; Suzuki, Marcelino T

    2015-01-01

    Cultivable Actinobacteria are the largest source of microbially derived bioactive molecules. The high demand for novel antibiotics highlights the need for exploring novel sources of these bacteria. Microbial symbioses with sessile macro-organisms, known to contain bioactive compounds likely of bacterial origin, represent an interesting and underexplored source of Actinobacteria. We studied the diversity and potential for bioactive-metabolite production of Actinobacteria associated with two marine lichens (Lichina confinis and L. pygmaea; from intertidal and subtidal zones) and one littoral lichen (Roccella fuciformis; from supratidal zone) from the Brittany coast (France), as well as the terrestrial lichen Collema auriforme (from a riparian zone, Austria). A total of 247 bacterial strains were isolated using two selective media. Isolates were identified and clustered into 101 OTUs (98% identity) including 51 actinobacterial OTUs. The actinobacterial families observed were: Brevibacteriaceae, Cellulomonadaceae, Gordoniaceae, Micrococcaceae, Mycobacteriaceae, Nocardioidaceae, Promicromonosporaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Sanguibacteraceae and Streptomycetaceae. Interestingly, the diversity was most influenced by the selective media rather than lichen species or the level of lichen thallus association. The potential for bioactive-metabolite biosynthesis of the isolates was confirmed by screening genes coding for polyketide synthases types I and II. These results show that littoral lichens are a source of diverse potentially bioactive Actinobacteria. PMID:26514347

  19. Zooplankton in littoral waters of a tropical lake: a revisited biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Maia-Barbosa, P M; Peixoto, R S; Guimarães, A S

    2008-11-01

    The present study was carried out in Lake Dom Helvécio, in the state of Minas Gerais, with two main objectives: to demonstrate the contribution of the littoral zone, in order to better characterize zooplankton fauna; and to assess the distribution of zooplankton species in different habitats, i.e., the littoral zone with and without aquatic vegetation. The samples were collected in February and July 2006, throughout the littoral zone of the lake, in areas with and without aquatic vegetation. We identified a total of 188 species, of which 130 are new records for Lake Dom Helvécio. One hundred and eighty-four species were identified in the littoral zone with aquatic vegetation, and 117 in the zone with no vegetation. The higher zooplankton richness in areas of the littoral zone with aquatic vegetation can be related to the greater environmental heterogeneity. Compared to previous studies on the littoral zones of lakes along the middle River Doce, the present study expended greater sampling effort, and identified many more species. In relation to biological conservation, this study demonstrated the importance of the littoral zone for better characterization and conservation of the zooplankton fauna, especially when it is colonized by aquatic vegetation. Underestimating the richness of species may provide inaccurate data on the biota, as well as on the ecological conditions in an environment.

  20. Edge detection of red hind grouper vocalizations in the littorals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Cameron A.; Beaujean, Pierre-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Littoral regions typically present to passive sensors as a high noise acoustic environment, particularly with respect to port and harbor regions where tidal variation, often characterized as pink, mixes with reverberation from on-shore business and commercial shipping, often characterized as white. Some fish in these regions, in particular epiphenalius Guttatus or more commonly the red hind grouper, emit relatively narrowband tones in low frequencies to communicate with other fish in such regions. The impact of anthropogenic noise sources on the red Hind and other fish is a topical area of interest for wildlife fisheries, private sportsmen and military offices that is not considered here; the fact that fish species continue to populate and communicate in these regions in the presence of high noise content lends some study to the signal content and modeling of a potential biologically inspired receiver structure.

  1. Littoral decapods of Socorro Island, Revillagigedo Archipelago, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mille-Pagaza, Silvia; Pérez-Chi, A; Sánchez-Salazar, M E

    2003-03-01

    Decapod community inhabiting the rocky littoral of eight bays from Socorro island, Revillagigedo Archipelago, was studied during March 1992. Samples were collected from one-square meter plots placed following transects drawn perpendicularly to the shoreline along the intertidal zone. Species richness and abundance were determined in each bay, as well as the similarity between bays using Morisita's index. Organisms collected belong to six families, 20 genera and 26 species of the Brachyura and Anomura infraorders. Xanthidae was the family with the highest number of species, and the highest species richness was recorded at the V. Lozano bay. Pachygrapsus transversus, Xanthodius cooksoni and Calcinus explorator were the most abundant species in nearly all localities. Dendrogram obtained define two groups of bays at a similarity level above 0.67, given the similarity in the crab's species richness and their abundance between bays in the island.

  2. Physical habitat structure of the lake shoreline and littoral zone -- How important is it?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent National Lakes Assessment (NLA) included the first national assessment of littoral and lakeshore physical habitat. It quantified water depth, surface characteristics, bank morphology, lake level fluctuations, substrate, fish concealment features, aquatic macrophytes, l...

  3. Small lakes in big landscape: Multi-scale drivers of littoral ecosystem in alpine lakes.

    PubMed

    Zaharescu, Dragos G; Burghelea, Carmen I; Hooda, Peter S; Lester, Richard N; Palanca-Soler, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    In low nutrient alpine lakes, the littoral zone is the most productive part of the ecosystem, and it is a biodiversity hotspot. It is not entirely clear how the scale and physical heterogeneity of surrounding catchment, its ecological composition, and larger landscape gradients work together to sustain littoral communities. A total of 113 alpine lakes from the central Pyrenees were surveyed to evaluate the functional connectivity between littoral zoobenthos and landscape physical and ecological elements at geographical, catchment and local scales, and to ascertain how they affect the formation of littoral communities. At each lake, the zoobenthic composition was assessed together with geolocation, catchment hydrodynamics, geomorphology and topography, riparian vegetation composition, the presence of trout and frogs, water pH and conductivity. Multidimensional fuzzy set models integrating benthic biota and environmental variables revealed that at geographical scale, longitude unexpectedly surpassed altitude and latitude in its effect on littoral ecosystem. This reflects a sharp transition between Atlantic and Mediterranean climates and suggests a potentially high horizontal vulnerability to climate change. Topography (controlling catchment type, snow coverage and lakes connectivity) was the most influential catchment-scale driver, followed by hydrodynamics (waterbody size, type and volume of inflow/outflow). Locally, riparian plant composition significantly related to littoral community structure, richness and diversity. These variables, directly and indirectly, create habitats for aquatic and terrestrial stages of invertebrates, and control nutrient and water cycles. Three benthic associations characterised distinct lakes. Vertebrate predation, water conductivity and pH had no major influence on littoral taxa. This work provides exhaustive information from relatively pristine sites, and unveils a strong connection between littoral ecosystem and catchment

  4. Small lakes in big landscape: Multi-scale drivers of littoral ecosystem in alpine lakes.

    PubMed

    Zaharescu, Dragos G; Burghelea, Carmen I; Hooda, Peter S; Lester, Richard N; Palanca-Soler, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    In low nutrient alpine lakes, the littoral zone is the most productive part of the ecosystem, and it is a biodiversity hotspot. It is not entirely clear how the scale and physical heterogeneity of surrounding catchment, its ecological composition, and larger landscape gradients work together to sustain littoral communities. A total of 113 alpine lakes from the central Pyrenees were surveyed to evaluate the functional connectivity between littoral zoobenthos and landscape physical and ecological elements at geographical, catchment and local scales, and to ascertain how they affect the formation of littoral communities. At each lake, the zoobenthic composition was assessed together with geolocation, catchment hydrodynamics, geomorphology and topography, riparian vegetation composition, the presence of trout and frogs, water pH and conductivity. Multidimensional fuzzy set models integrating benthic biota and environmental variables revealed that at geographical scale, longitude unexpectedly surpassed altitude and latitude in its effect on littoral ecosystem. This reflects a sharp transition between Atlantic and Mediterranean climates and suggests a potentially high horizontal vulnerability to climate change. Topography (controlling catchment type, snow coverage and lakes connectivity) was the most influential catchment-scale driver, followed by hydrodynamics (waterbody size, type and volume of inflow/outflow). Locally, riparian plant composition significantly related to littoral community structure, richness and diversity. These variables, directly and indirectly, create habitats for aquatic and terrestrial stages of invertebrates, and control nutrient and water cycles. Three benthic associations characterised distinct lakes. Vertebrate predation, water conductivity and pH had no major influence on littoral taxa. This work provides exhaustive information from relatively pristine sites, and unveils a strong connection between littoral ecosystem and catchment

  5. Major implication of the littoral zone for methane release from boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juutinen, Sari; Alm, Jukka; Larmola, Tuula; Huttunen, Jari T.; Morero, Micaela; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Silvola, Jouko

    2003-12-01

    Transitions between aquatic and terrestrial environments can be recognized as biogeochemically active ecotones that support high CH4 release. We studied the links between littoral CH4 fluxes and aquatic vegetation, hydrologic conditions, and sediment quality, and integrated the CH4 fluxes into a whole-lake assessment. Methane fluxes were measured using a closed chamber method in the littoral and pelagic zones of three Finnish mid-boreal lakes from May to October. The cumulative CH4 fluxes were spatially integrated over the lake relative to the vegetation coverage in the littoral, and to depth zones in the pelagic regions. During the ice-free period, 66-77% of the CH4 was released from the littoral zone, and the mean CH4 effluxes from these lakes were 0.08-0.42 mol m-2 ice-free season-1. Littoral and pelagic productivity was reflected in CH4 release from the lakes. Our results show that estimates of lake CH4 release should include an assessment of the vegetated littoral zone.

  6. DARLA: Data Assimilation and Remote Sensing for Littoral Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, A.; Holman, R. A.; Chickadel, C.; Elgar, S.; Farquharson, G.; Haller, M. C.; Kurapov, A. L.; Özkan-Haller, H. T.; Raubenheimer, B.; Thomson, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    DARLA is 5-year collaborative project that couples state-of-the-art remote sensing and in situ measurements with advanced data assimilation (DA) modeling to (a) evaluate and improve remote sensing retrieval algorithms for environmental parameters, (b) determine the extent to which remote sensing data can be used in place of in situ data in models, and (c) infer bathymetry for littoral environments by combining remotely-sensed parameters and data assimilation models. The project uses microwave, electro-optical, and infrared techniques to characterize the littoral ocean with a focus on wave and current parameters required for DA modeling. In conjunction with the RIVET (River and Inlets) Project, extensive in situ measurements provide ground truth for both the remote sensing retrieval algorithms and the DA modeling. Our goal is to use remote sensing to constrain data assimilation models of wave and circulation dynamics in a tidal inlet and surrounding beaches. We seek to improve environmental parameter estimation via remote sensing fusion, determine the success of using remote sensing data to drive DA models, and produce a dynamically consistent representation of the wave, circulation, and bathymetry fields in complex environments. The objectives are to test the following three hypotheses: 1. Environmental parameter estimation using remote sensing techniques can be significantly improved by fusion of multiple sensor products. 2. Data assimilation models can be adequately constrained (i.e., forced or guided) with environmental parameters derived from remote sensing measurements. 3. Bathymetry on open beaches, river mouths, and at tidal inlets can be inferred from a combination of remotely-sensed parameters and data assimilation models. Our approach is to conduct a series of field experiments combining remote sensing and in situ measurements to investigate signature physics and to gather data for developing and testing DA models. A preliminary experiment conducted at

  7. High methane emissions from a littoral zone on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huai; Wu, Ning; Yao, Shouping; Gao, Yongheng; Zhu, Dan; Wang, Yanfen; Xiong, Wan; Yuan, Xingzhong

    The littoral zones of lakes have been regarded as hotspots of methane (CH 4) fluxes through several studies. In the present study, we measured CH 4 fluxes in six kinds of littoral zones of Huahu Lake on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the peak growing season of 2006 and 2007. We found that CH 4 efflux (ranging from -0.1 to 90 mg CH 4 m -2 h -1) from the littoral zones of this lake was relatively high among those of boreal and temperate lakes. Our results also showed that emergent plant zones ( Hippuris vulgaris and Glyceria maxima stands) recorded the highest CH 4 flux rate. The CH 4 flux in the floating mat zone of Carex muliensis was significantly lower than those of the emergent plant zones. CH 4 fluxes in the floating-leaved zone of Polygonum amphibium and bare lakeshore showed no significant difference and ranked last but one, only higher than that of the littoral meadow ( Kobresia tibetica). Plant biomass and standing water depths were important factors to explain such spatial variations in CH 4 fluxes. No significant temporal variations in CH 4 fluxes were found due to the insignificant variations of physical factors in the peak growing season. These results may help in our understanding of the importance of the littoral zone of lakes, especially the emergent plant zone, as a hotspot of CH 4 emission.

  8. Modeling the effects of wave skewness and beach cusps on littoral sand transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, K.A.; Check, L.A.; Hanes, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    A process-based numerical modeling system is utilized for predicting littoral sand transport. The intent is to examine conditions slightly more complex than linear waves impinging upon a plane beach. Two factors that we examine are wave skewness and longshore varying bathymetry. An empirical model is used for calculating the skewed bottom wave orbital velocity. The advection of sediment due to the skewed wave velocity is larger and in the direction of the waves, opposite to the results with sinusoidal wave velocities, due to the increase in the bottom shear stress under the wave crests. The model system is also applied to bathymetry containing beach cusps. When the wave field has relatively weak longshore wave power, the currents and the littoral transport exhibit significant longshore variability, thereby altering the overall mean littoral transport.

  9. Cavernous Angioma and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurologist to see if there might be an alternative medication. Children with even mild muscle weakness or decreased coordination resulting from a cavernous malformation bleed often have reduced physical stamina. It simply requires more energy to use legs that feel heavy or that ...

  10. Development of a regional littoral benthic macroinvertebrate multi-metric index (MMI) for lakes from the National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the 2007 National Lakes Assessment (NLA) benthic macroinvertebrate samples were collected from the lake littoral zone. The purpose of the sampling was to assess the feasibility of a multi-metric index (MMI) to assess the condition of the littoral benthic macroinvertebrate...

  11. Lower Respiration in the Littoral Zone of a Subtropical Shallow Lake

    PubMed Central

    They, Ng Haig; da Motta Marques, David; Souza, Rafael Siqueira

    2013-01-01

    Macrophytes are important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to littoral zones of lakes, but this DOC is believed to be mostly refractory to bacteria, leading to the hypothesis that bacterial metabolism is different in littoral and pelagic zones of a large subtropical shallow lake. We tested this hypothesis by three approaches: (I) dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) accumulation in littoral and pelagic water; (II) O2 consumption estimate for a cloud of points (n = 47) covering the entire lake; (III) measurement of O2 consumption and CO2 accumulation in dark bottles, pCO2 in the water, lake-atmosphere fluxes of CO2 (fCO2) and a large set of limnological variables at 19 sampling points (littoral and pelagic zones) during seven extensive campaigns. For the first two approaches, DIC and O2 consumption were consistently lower in the littoral zone, and O2 consumption increased marginally with the distance to the nearest shore. For the third approach, we found in the littoral zone consistently lower DOC, total phosphorus (TP), and chlorophyll a, and a higher proportion of low-molecular-weight substances. Regression trees confirmed that high respiration (O2 consumption and CO2 production) was associated to lower concentration of low-molecular-weight substances, while pCO2 was associated to DOC and TP, confirming that CO2 supersaturation occurs in an attempt to balance phosphorus deficiency of macrophyte substrates. Littoral zone fCO2 showed a tendency to be a CO2 sink, whereas the pelagic zone showed a tendency to act as CO2 source to the atmosphere. The high proportion of low-molecular-weight, unreactive substances, together with lower DOC and TP may impose lower rates of respiration in littoral zones. This effect of perennial stands of macrophytes may therefore have important, but not yet quantified implications for the global carbon metabolism of these lakes, but other issues still need to be carefully addressed before rejecting the general belief that

  12. Wide-area littoral discreet observation: success at the tactical edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Susan; Hughes, William; Ladas, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    In June 2011, the United States Army Research Laboratory (ARL) participated in Empire Challenge 2011 (EC-11). EC-11 was United States Joint Forces Command's (USJFCOM) annual live, joint and coalition intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) interoperability demonstration under the sponsorship of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence (USD/I). EC-11 consisted of a series of ISR interoperability events, using a combination of modeling & simulation, laboratory and live-fly events. Wide-area Littoral Discreet Observation (WALDO) was ARL's maritime/littoral capability. WALDO met a USD(I) directive that EC-11 have a maritime component and WALDO was the primary player in the maritime scenario conducted at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The WALDO effort demonstrated the utility of a networked layered sensor array deployed in a maritime littoral environment, focusing on maritime surveillance targeting counter-drug, counter-piracy and suspect activity in a littoral or riverine environment. In addition to an embedded analytical capability, the sensor array and control infrastructure consisted of the Oriole acoustic sensor, iScout unattended ground sensor (UGS), OmniSense UGS, the Compact Radar and the Universal Distributed Management System (UDMS), which included the Proxy Skyraider, an optionally manned aircraft mounting both wide and narrow FOV EO/IR imaging sensors. The capability seeded a littoral area with riverine and unattended sensors in order to demonstrate the utility of a Wide Area Sensor (WAS) capability in a littoral environment focused on maritime surveillance activities. The sensors provided a cue for WAS placement/orbit. A narrow field of view sensor would be used to focus on more discreet activities within the WAS footprint. Additionally, the capability experimented with novel WAS orbits to determine if there are more optimal orbits for WAS collection in a littoral environment. The demonstration objectives for WALDO at EC-11 were

  13. Littoral assessment of mine burial signatures (LAMBS): buried-landmine hyperspectral data collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenton, Arthur C.; Geci, Duane M.; McDonald, James A.; Ray, Kristofer J.; Thomas, Clayton M.; Holloway, John H., Jr.; Petee, Danny A.; Witherspoon, Ned H.

    2003-09-01

    The objective of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Rapid Overt Reconnaissance (ROR) program and the Airborne Littoral Reconnaissance Technologies project's Littoral Assessment of Mine Burial Signatures (LAMBS) contract is to determine if electro-optical spectral discriminants exist that are useful for the detection of land mines located in littoral regions. Statistically significant buried mine overburden and background signature data were collected over a wide spectral range (0.35 to 14 μm) to identify robust spectral features that might serve as discriminants for new airborne sensor concepts. The LAMBS program further expands the hyperspectral database previously collected and analyzed on the U.S. Army's Hyperspectral Mine Detection Phenomenology program [see "Detection of Land Mines with Hyperspectral Data," and "Hyperspectral Mine Detection Phenomenology Program," Proc. SPIE Vol. 3710, pp 917-928 and 819-829, AeroSense April 1999] to littoral areas where tidal, surf, and wind action can additionally modify spectral signatures. This work summarizes the LAMBS buried mine collections conducted at three beach sites - an inland bay beach site (Eglin AFB, FL, Site A-22), an Atlantic beach site (Duck, NC), and a Gulf beach site (Eglin AFB, FL, Site A-15). Characteristics of the spectral signatures of the various dry and damp beach sands are presented. These are then compared to buried land mine signatures observed for the tested background types, burial ages, and environmental conditions experienced.

  14. Life on the boundary: Environmental factors as drivers of habitat distribution in the littoral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalì, Maria Elena; Cebrian, Emma; Chappuis, Eglantine; Pinedo, Susana; Terradas, Marc; Mariani, Simone; Ballesteros, Enric

    2016-04-01

    The boundary between land and sea, i.e. the littoral zone, is home to a large number of habitats whose distribution is primarily driven by the distance to the sea level but also by other environmental factors such as littoral's geomorphological features, wave exposure, water temperature or orientation. Here we explore the relative importance of those major environmental factors that drive the presence of littoral rocky habitats along 1100 Km of Catalonia's shoreline (Spain, NW Mediterranean) by using Geographic Information Systems and Generalized Linear Models. The distribution of mediolittoral and upper infralittoral habitats responded to different environmental factors. Mediolittoral habitats showed regional differences drawn by sea-water temperature and substrate type. Wave exposure (hydrodynamism), slope and geological features were only relevant to those mediolittoral habitats with specific environmental needs. We did not find any regional pattern of distribution in upper infralittoral habitats, and selected factors only played a moderate role in habitat distribution at the local scale. This study shows for the first time that environmental factors determining habitat distribution differ within the mediolittoral and the upper infralittoral zones and provides the basis for further development of models oriented at predicting the distribution of littoral marine habitats.

  15. Littoral and Shoreline Wood in Mid-continent Great Rivers (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Less is known about the ecology of wood in great rivers than in smaller lotic systems. We used a probability survey to estimate the abundance of littoral and shoreline wood along the mid-continent great rivers of the United States: the Missouri, Upper Mississippi, and the Ohio Ri...

  16. A comparison of shoreline seines with fyke nets for sampling littoral fish communities in floodplain lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, S.J.; Jackson, J.R.; Lochmann, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    We compared shoreline seines with fyke nets in terms of their ability to sample fish species in the littoral zone of 22 floodplain lakes of the White River, Arkansas. Lakes ranged in size from less than 0.5 to 51.0 ha. Most contained large amounts of coarse woody debris within the littoral zone, thus making seining in shallow areas difficult. We sampled large lakes (>2 ha) using three fyke nets; small lakes (<2 ha) were sampled using two fyke nets. Fyke nets were set for 24 h. Large lakes were sampled with an average of 11 seine hauls/ lake and small lakes were sampled with an average of 3 seine hauls/lake, but exact shoreline seining effort varied among lakes depending on the amount of open shoreline. Fyke nets collected more fish and produced greater species richness and diversity measures than did seining. Species evenness was similar for the two gear types. Two species were unique to seine samples, whereas 13 species and 3 families were unique to fyke-net samples. Although fyke nets collected more fish and more species than did shoreline seines, neither gear collected all the species present in the littoral zone of floodplain lakes. These results confirm the need for a multiple-gear approach to fully characterize the littoral fish assemblages in floodplain lakes. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  17. Suitability of Taxodium distichum for Afforesting the Littoral Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Du, Chunlan; Yuan, Xingzhong; Willison, J H Martin; Xiao, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    The littoral zone ecosystem of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) has become significantly degraded by annual cycles of prolonged winter flooding and summer drought. For purposes of flood control and sediment management, the water level in the reservoir is lowered by 30 m during the summer monsoon season and raised again to 175 m above sea level each year at the end of the monsoon period. To explore an effective way to promote biodiversity and associated ecosystem services, we examined Taxodium distichum as a species for afforesting the littoral zone. Sapling growth variations were measured after two rounds of winter flooding. Dominant influence factors were determined by redundancy analysis. Herb community similarities between the experimental afforested areas and nearby control areas were assessed to detect the ecosystem influence of the experimental afforestation. 94.5% of saplings planted at elevations above 168 m survived. All measured growth indices (tree height, diameter at breast height, crown width and foliage density) decreased as the flood depth increased. Completely submerged saplings had a mean dieback height of -0.65 m. Greater initial foliage density led to increased tree height and stem diameter. Shannon-Wiener indices were not significantly different between plots in experimental and control areas, but the low similarity of herb communities between experimental and control areas (0.242 on average) suggested that afforestation would enrich plant community structure and improve littoral zone ecosystem stability. Because littoral zone afforestation provides several ecosystem services (habitat, carbon sink, water purification and landscaping), it is a promising revegetation model for the TGR.

  18. Suitability of Taxodium distichum for Afforesting the Littoral Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Du, Chunlan; Yuan, Xingzhong; Willison, J H Martin; Xiao, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    The littoral zone ecosystem of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) has become significantly degraded by annual cycles of prolonged winter flooding and summer drought. For purposes of flood control and sediment management, the water level in the reservoir is lowered by 30 m during the summer monsoon season and raised again to 175 m above sea level each year at the end of the monsoon period. To explore an effective way to promote biodiversity and associated ecosystem services, we examined Taxodium distichum as a species for afforesting the littoral zone. Sapling growth variations were measured after two rounds of winter flooding. Dominant influence factors were determined by redundancy analysis. Herb community similarities between the experimental afforested areas and nearby control areas were assessed to detect the ecosystem influence of the experimental afforestation. 94.5% of saplings planted at elevations above 168 m survived. All measured growth indices (tree height, diameter at breast height, crown width and foliage density) decreased as the flood depth increased. Completely submerged saplings had a mean dieback height of -0.65 m. Greater initial foliage density led to increased tree height and stem diameter. Shannon-Wiener indices were not significantly different between plots in experimental and control areas, but the low similarity of herb communities between experimental and control areas (0.242 on average) suggested that afforestation would enrich plant community structure and improve littoral zone ecosystem stability. Because littoral zone afforestation provides several ecosystem services (habitat, carbon sink, water purification and landscaping), it is a promising revegetation model for the TGR. PMID:26771509

  19. Suitability of Taxodium distichum for Afforesting the Littoral Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Du, Chunlan; Yuan, Xingzhong; Willison, J. H. Martin; Xiao, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    The littoral zone ecosystem of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) has become significantly degraded by annual cycles of prolonged winter flooding and summer drought. For purposes of flood control and sediment management, the water level in the reservoir is lowered by 30 m during the summer monsoon season and raised again to 175 m above sea level each year at the end of the monsoon period. To explore an effective way to promote biodiversity and associated ecosystem services, we examined Taxodium distichum as a species for afforesting the littoral zone. Sapling growth variations were measured after two rounds of winter flooding. Dominant influence factors were determined by redundancy analysis. Herb community similarities between the experimental afforested areas and nearby control areas were assessed to detect the ecosystem influence of the experimental afforestation. 94.5% of saplings planted at elevations above 168 m survived. All measured growth indices (tree height, diameter at breast height, crown width and foliage density) decreased as the flood depth increased. Completely submerged saplings had a mean dieback height of -0.65 m. Greater initial foliage density led to increased tree height and stem diameter. Shannon-Wiener indices were not significantly different between plots in experimental and control areas, but the low similarity of herb communities between experimental and control areas (0.242 on average) suggested that afforestation would enrich plant community structure and improve littoral zone ecosystem stability. Because littoral zone afforestation provides several ecosystem services (habitat, carbon sink, water purification and landscaping), it is a promising revegetation model for the TGR. PMID:26771509

  20. Littoral assessment of mine burial signatures (LAMBS): buried landmine/background spectral-signature analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenton, Arthur C.; Geci, Duane M.; Ray, Kristofer J.; Thomas, Clayton M.; Salisbury, John W.; Mars, John C.; Crowley, James K.; Witherspoon, Ned H.; Holloway, John H., Jr.

    2004-09-01

    The objective of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Rapid Overt Reconnaissance (ROR) program and the Airborne Littoral Reconnaissance Technologies (ALRT) project's LAMBS effort is to determine if electro-optical spectral discriminants exist that are useful for the detection of land mines in littoral regions. Statistically significant buried mine overburden and background signature data were collected over a wide spectral range (0.35 to 14 μm) to identify robust spectral features that might serve as discriminants for new airborne sensor concepts. LAMBS has expanded previously collected databases to littoral areas - primarily dry and wet sandy soils - where tidal, surf, and wind conditions can severely modify spectral signatures. At AeroSense 2003, we reported completion of three buried mine collections at an inland bay, Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico beach sites. We now report LAMBS spectral database analyses results using metrics which characterize the detection performance of general types of spectral detection algorithms. These metrics include mean contrast, spectral signal-to-clutter, covariance, information content, and spectral matched filter analyses. Detection performance of the buried land mines was analyzed with regard to burial age, background type, and environmental conditions. These analyses considered features observed due to particle size differences, surface roughness, surface moisture, and compositional differences.

  1. Heterotrophic flagellates in the littoral and sublittoral zones of the southeast part of the Pechora Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazei, Yu. A.; Tikhonenkov, D. V.

    2006-05-01

    For the first time, data on the heterotrophic flagellate fauna in the littoral and the sublittoral zones of the southeastern part of the Pechora Sea were obtained. Sixty-six heterotrophic flagellate species were found in the study region: 48 and 42 species were found on the shelf and in the intertidal zone, respectively. The most common species were Cafeteria roenbergensis, Paraphysomonas sp., Ancyromonas sigmoides, Cafeteria minuta, Actinomonas mirabilis, and Spumella sp. The littoral fauna of the heterotrophic flagellates was more peculiar than the sublittoral fauna and equally rich. In the region studied, the community can be divided into two types: (a) the predominantly littoral community characterized by a special composition of the dominant species and by high similarity between its local varieties and (b) the heterogeneous predominantly sublittoral community characterized by a lack of a complex of particular species. The local diversity of the heterotrophic flagellate community was low (on the average, 4.5 species per one sample 1 cm3 in volume). The overall distribution pattern of the flagellates was extremely heterogeneous. The large amount of species that were encountered only once causes a great variability in the species structure from one station to another. The total number of the species monotonously increased with the growth in the number of samples and no manifested saturation of the cumulative curve was reached. This indicates the potentially greater diversity of the heterotrophic flagellate species in the region studied.

  2. Between tide and wave marks: a unifying model of physical zonation on littoral shores.

    PubMed

    Bird, Christopher E; Franklin, Erik C; Smith, Celia M; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The effects of tides on littoral marine habitats are so ubiquitous that shorelines are commonly described as 'intertidal', whereas waves are considered a secondary factor that simply modifies the intertidal habitat. However mean significant wave height exceeds tidal range at many locations worldwide. Here we construct a simple sinusoidal model of coastal water level based on both tidal range and wave height. From the patterns of emergence and submergence predicted by the model, we derive four vertical shoreline benchmarks which bracket up to three novel, spatially distinct, and physically defined zones. The (1) emergent tidal zone is characterized by tidally driven emergence in air; the (2) wave zone is characterized by constant (not periodic) wave wash; and the (3) submergent tidal zone is characterized by tidally driven submergence. The decoupling of tidally driven emergence and submergence made possible by wave action is a critical prediction of the model. On wave-dominated shores (wave height ≫ tidal range), all three zones are predicted to exist separately, but on tide-dominated shores (tidal range ≫ wave height) the wave zone is absent and the emergent and submergent tidal zones overlap substantially, forming the traditional "intertidal zone". We conclude by incorporating time and space in the model to illustrate variability in the physical conditions and zonation on littoral shores. The wave:tide physical zonation model is a unifying framework that can facilitate our understanding of physical conditions on littoral shores whether tropical or temperate, marine or lentic.

  3. Phosphorus mobilization from littoral sediments of an inlet region in Lake Delavan, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, W.F.; Barko, J.W.; Field, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Rates of P release from littoral sediments of the inlet region of Lake Delavan, Wisconsin, were examined in the laboratory under different redox and pH regimes using sediment systems and also in situ using sediment peppers. In the laboratory, rates of P release from sediments increased about two-fold (i.e., to 7 mg m-2 d-1) under oxic conditions as a result of adjusting the pH of the overlying water from 8.5 to about 9.0. Laboratory rates increased to a maximum of 23 mg m-2 d-1 under anoxic conditions. Both in situ pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) exhibited marked seasonal fluctuations due, primarily, to metabolism by submersed macrophytes, which occupied over 50% of the inlet region. Using continuous records of in situ pH and DO and ranges in rates of P release measured in the laboratory, we estimated an overall mean rate of P release of 5.7 mg m-2 d-1 from the littoral sediments during the summer (April-September) of 1994. Rates of P release estimated from Fickean diffusional fluxes were similar to rates estimated from pH and DO. Our results suggest that aquatic macrophyte communities of the inlet region enhance the mobilization of P from littoral sediment by regulating pH and DO in the surrounding environment.

  4. Littoral Assessment of Mine Burial Signatures (LAMBS) buried land mine/background spectral signature analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenton, A.C.; Geci, D.M.; Ray, K.J.; Thomas, C.M.; Salisbury, J.W.; Mars, J.C.; Crowley, J.K.; Witherspoon, N.H.; Holloway, J.H.; Harmon R.S.Broach J.T.Holloway, Jr. J.H.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Rapid Overt Reconnaissance (ROR) program and the Airborne Littoral Reconnaissance Technologies (ALRT) project's LAMBS effort is to determine if electro-optical spectral discriminants exist that are useful for the detection of land mines in littoral regions. Statistically significant buried mine overburden and background signature data were collected over a wide spectral range (0.35 to 14 ??m) to identify robust spectral features that might serve as discriminants for new airborne sensor concepts. LAMBS has expanded previously collected databases to littoral areas - primarily dry and wet sandy soils - where tidal, surf, and wind conditions can severely modify spectral signatures. At AeroSense 2003, we reported completion of three buried mine collections at an inland bay, Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico beach sites.1 We now report LAMBS spectral database analyses results using metrics which characterize the detection performance of general types of spectral detection algorithms. These metrics include mean contrast, spectral signal-to-clutter, covariance, information content, and spectral matched filter analyses. Detection performance of the buried land mines was analyzed with regard to burial age, background type, and environmental conditions. These analyses considered features observed due to particle size differences, surface roughness, surface moisture, and compositional differences.

  5. Trophic niche partitioning of littoral fish species from the rocky intertidal of Helgoland, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, N. N.; Malzahn, A. M.; Diekmann, R.; Aberle, N.

    2015-12-01

    During a 3-year field study, interspecific and interannual differences in the trophic ecology of littoral fish species were investigated in the rocky intertidal of Helgoland island (North Sea). We investigated trophic niche partitioning of common coexisting littoral fish species based on a multi-tracer approach using stable isotope and fatty acids in order to show differences and similarities in resource use and feeding modes. The results of the dual-tracer approach showed clear trophic niche partitioning of the five target fish species, the goldsinny wrasse Ctenolabrus rupestris, the sand goby Pomatoschistus minutus, the painted goby Pomatoschistus pictus, the short-spined sea scorpion Myoxocephalus scorpius and the long-spined sea scorpion Taurulus bubalis. Both stable isotopes and fatty acids showed distinct differences in the trophic ecology of the studied fish species. However, the combined use of the two techniques added an additional resolution on the interannual scale. The sand goby P. minutus showed the largest trophic plasticity with a pronounced variability between years. The present data analysis provides valuable information on trophic niche partitioning of fish species in the littoral zones of Helgoland and on complex benthic food webs in general.

  6. Between tide and wave marks: a unifying model of physical zonation on littoral shores.

    PubMed

    Bird, Christopher E; Franklin, Erik C; Smith, Celia M; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The effects of tides on littoral marine habitats are so ubiquitous that shorelines are commonly described as 'intertidal', whereas waves are considered a secondary factor that simply modifies the intertidal habitat. However mean significant wave height exceeds tidal range at many locations worldwide. Here we construct a simple sinusoidal model of coastal water level based on both tidal range and wave height. From the patterns of emergence and submergence predicted by the model, we derive four vertical shoreline benchmarks which bracket up to three novel, spatially distinct, and physically defined zones. The (1) emergent tidal zone is characterized by tidally driven emergence in air; the (2) wave zone is characterized by constant (not periodic) wave wash; and the (3) submergent tidal zone is characterized by tidally driven submergence. The decoupling of tidally driven emergence and submergence made possible by wave action is a critical prediction of the model. On wave-dominated shores (wave height ≫ tidal range), all three zones are predicted to exist separately, but on tide-dominated shores (tidal range ≫ wave height) the wave zone is absent and the emergent and submergent tidal zones overlap substantially, forming the traditional "intertidal zone". We conclude by incorporating time and space in the model to illustrate variability in the physical conditions and zonation on littoral shores. The wave:tide physical zonation model is a unifying framework that can facilitate our understanding of physical conditions on littoral shores whether tropical or temperate, marine or lentic. PMID:24109544

  7. Impacts to Dungeness Crab from the Southwest Washington Littoral Drift Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Greg D.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, J R.

    2005-11-09

    The Benson Beach littoral drift restoration project is a demonstration project that will replenish sand on Benson Beach, the public beach north of the North Jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River (MCR), using material dredged from the river during normal maintenance dredging of the navigational channel. A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) proposal involves pumping the material from a sump area on the south side of the jetty to Benson Beach using a cutter suction dredge, also known as a pipeline dredge. If this one-time demonstration project proves feasible and successful, up to a million cubic yards of sediment could be used to replenish the outer coast littoral drift system in successive years by the same process. The primary goal of this study was to assess the potential risk of impacts to Dungeness crab from the proposed Benson Beach littoral drift restoration process of using the cutter suction dredge to move sediment from the proposed sump area on one side of the North Jetty to the beach on the other side of the jetty. Because there are no direct measurements of crab entrainment by pipeline dredge operating outside of the lower Columbia River navigation channel, dredge impacts for the proposed demonstration project were estimated using a modification of the dredge impact model (DIM) of Armstrong et al. (1987). The model estimates adult equivalent loss (AEL) of crabs using crab population density from trawl surveys, dredge project information (gear type, season, location, volume), and an entrainment function relating crab population density to entrainment by the dredge. The input used in applying the DIM to the Benson Beach littoral drift restoration included the specific dredging scenario provided by the Corps, existing data on crab density in previously proposed sump areas, and a series of entrainment functions. A total of fourteen scenarios were modeled and the outcomes compared with six reference scenarios intended to represent realistic to worst cases

  8. Temperature relations of aerial and aquatic respiration in six littoral snails in respiration in six littoral snails in relation to their vertical zonation.

    PubMed

    McMahon, R F; Russell-Hunter, W D

    1977-04-01

    Aerial and aquatic rates of oxygen consumption were determined over a range of 5 degrees to 45 degrees C at 5 degrees C intervals for six species of marine littoral snails: including the sublittoral species, Acmaea testudinalis, Mitrella lunata, and Lacuna vincta; and the truly intertidal species, Littorina obtusata, L. littorea, and L. saxatilis. Polarographic oxygen electrodes were used with normally active snails collected from populations on Nobska and Manomet Points, Massachusetts. Three subtidal species, A. testudinalis, Lacuna vincta, and M. lunata, do not display any metabolic adjustment to increasing temperature, with thermal limits reached at 30 degrees to 35 degrees C. Aerial respiration in A. testudinalis is similar to aquatic O2 uptake, but rates average only 36.4% of aquatic rates. The intertidal congeners, Littorina obtusata, L. littorea and L. saxatilis, have varying degrees of aerial and aquatic metabolic regulation with increasing temperature. L. obtusata, a low intertidal snail exposed to air for 15% to 45% of the tidal cycle, displays a respiratory pattern of "passive endurance" to high temperatures both in air and in water. L. littorea, the dominant snail of the midlittoral region, remains active when exposed to air (30% to 75% of the tidal cycle) and has a zone of metabolic regulation between 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Over this, the normal ambient temperature range, the Q10 closely approximates one, and nearly equivalent O2 uptake rates occur in air and in water. L. saxatilis from the upper littoral region is exposed to air for 70% to 95% of the tidal cycle and is characterized by reduced aerial and aquatic O2 uptake rates above 25 degrees C, representing a reversible torpor up to its thermal maximum at 44 degrees C. For these six snail species, respiratory responses to increasing temperature are thus directly related to the pattern of vertical distribution in the intertidal environment. Discussion of this relationship stresses that the

  9. Occurrence of Clinical and Sub-Clinical Mastitis in Dairy Herds in the West Littoral Region in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Gianneechini, R; Concha, C; Rivero, R; Delucci, I; López, J Moreno

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine dairy farms were selected to determine the incidence of clinical mastitis, prevalence of sub-clinical mastitis and bacterial aetiology in the West Littoral Region of Uruguay. In samples taken by the owner and frozen at -20°C during a week the incidence rate of clinical mastitis was determined as 1.2 cases per 100 cow-months at risk. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolated pathogen in 37.5% of 40 milk samples from clinical cases obtained in 1 month. No bacteria grew in the 32.5% of the total samples. A sub-sample including 1077 dairy cows from randomly selected farms was used to determine the prevalence of sub-clinical mastitis. These samples were taken on one visit to each farm. The prevalence was 52.4% on a cow basis and 26.7% on an udder quarter basis. In 55.1% of the quarters of the selected animals with more than 300 000 cells/ml there was no growth. The isolated pathogens from sub-clinical cases and their relative frequencies were: Staphylococcus aureus 62.8%, Streptococcus agalactiae 11.3%, Enterococcus sp. 8%, coagulase-negative staphylococci 7.4%, Streptococus uberis 6.4%, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 1.8%, Escherichia coli 1.5% and Staphylococcus hyicus coagulase-positive 0.6%. PMID:12831175

  10. Habitat Degradation and Seasonality Affect Physiological Stress Levels of Eulemur collaris in Littoral Forest Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Balestri, Michela; Barresi, Marta; Campera, Marco; Serra, Valentina; Ramanamanjato, Jean Baptiste; Heistermann, Michael; Donati, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The littoral forest on sandy soil is among the most threatened habitats in Madagascar and, as such, it represents a hot-spot within a conservation hot-spot. Assessing the health of the resident lemur fauna is not only critical for the long-term viability of these populations, but also necessary for the future re-habilitation of this unique habitat. Since the Endangered collared brown lemur, Eulemur collaris, is the largest seed disperser of the Malagasy south-eastern littoral forest its survival in this habitat is crucial. In this study we compared fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM) levels, a measure of physiological stress and potential early indicator of population health, between groups of collared brown lemurs living in a degraded forest fragment and groups occurring in a more preserved area. For this, we analysed 279 fecal samples collected year-round from 4 groups of collared brown lemurs using a validated 11-oxoetiocholanolone enzyme immunoassay and tested if fGCM levels were influenced by reproductive stages, phenological seasons, sex, and habitat degradation. The lemurs living in the degraded forest had significantly higher fGCM levels than those living in the more preserved area. In particular, the highest fGCM levels were found during the mating season in all animals and in females during gestation in the degraded forest. Since mating and gestation are both occurring during the lean season in the littoral forest, these results likely reflect a combination of ecological and reproductive pressures. Our findings provide a clear indication that habitat degradation has additive effects to the challenges found in the natural habitat. Since increased stress hormone output may have long-term negative effects on population health and reproduction, our data emphasize the need for and may add to the development of effective conservation plans for the species. PMID:25229944

  11. Nitrous oxide fluxes from the littoral zone of a lake on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai; Wang, Meng; Wu, Ning; Wang, Yanfen; Zhu, Dan; Gao, Yongheng; Peng, Changhui

    2011-11-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) fluxes were measured in six littoral mirco-zones of Lake Huahu on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the peak growing season of years of 2006 and 2007. The weighted mean N(2)O flux rate was 0.08 mg N m(-2) h(-1) (ranged from -0.07 to 0.35 mg N m(-2) h(-1)). The result was relatively high in the scope of N(2)O fluxes from boreal and temperate lakes. Emergent plant zones (Hippuris vulgaris and Glyceria maxima stands) recorded the highest N(2)O flux rate (0.11 ± 0.24 and 0.08 ± 0.17 mg N m(-2) h(-1), respectively). Non-vegetated lakeshore recorded the lowest N(2)O flux (0.03 ± 0.11 mg N m(-2) h(-1)), lower than that from the floating mat zone of Carex muliensis (0.05 ± 0.18 mg N m(-2) h(-1)), the floating-leaved plant zone of Polygonum amphibium (0.07 ± 0.11 mg N m(-2) h(-1)), and the wet meadow (0.07 ± 0.15 mg N m(-2) h(-1)). Standing water depths were important factors to explain such spatial variations in N(2)O fluxes. Significant temporal variations in N(2)O fluxes were also found. Such temporal variation in N(2)O flux in the littoral zone may be dependent on the interaction of water regime and thermal conditions, instead of the latter solely. These results showed the importance of the littoral zone of lake, especially the emergent plant zone, as a hotspot of N(2)O fluxes in such grazing meadows.

  12. Using catenas for GIS-based mapping of NW Mediterranean littoral habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Simone; Cefalì, Maria Elena; Terradas, Marc; Chappuis, Eglantine; Ballesteros, Enric

    2014-06-01

    Studies aimed at describing habitats and mapping their distributions are pivotal to implementing management plans and to effectively guide conservation measures. We developed a novel approach of data collection and entry (CAT-LIT) to establish a detailed cartography of the littoral habitats found along the Catalan coast (Spain). Field data were recorded using coded, two-digit hierarchical lists (e.g. Aa, Ab, etc.) of horizons found at each point along the coast, called catenas. The horizons were either dominated by species (on the rocky bottoms) or sediment types (on the beaches) and corresponded to LPRE, EUNIS and CORINE habitats. Catenas were transferred into a database and calculations about the extent of bottom types, habitats, and catenas themselves along the coast were carried out with GIS tools. In addition, habitat link richness was calculated and represented using network analysis programs. The application of CAT-LIT to the Catalan coast showed that the habitats dominated by the lichen Verrucaria amphibia and the flattened barnacle Euraphia depressa and those dominated by the barnacle Chthamalus spp. were almost ubiquitous. Those dominated by the red alga Corallina elongata, the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and the red alga Rissoella verruculosa were also common. Because of the frequency of their connections, those habitats formed a huge hub of links in the networks. By using catenas, the habitats can be viewed using GIS based programs keeping the catena as the main informational and ecological unit. The catenas allow maximum compactness when vertically distributed habitats are to be shown on a 2D map. The complete cartography and dataset on the spatial distribution of the littoral habitats from Catalonia is valuable for coastal management and conservation to study changes in the habitat distribution and relate such changes to anthropogenic pressures. Furthermore, the CAT-LIT can be easily adapted to shores of other seas and oceans to obtain accurate

  13. Seasonal changes of littoral transport and beach width and resulting effect on protective structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaughter, T. H.

    1973-01-01

    The shorelines of Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay exhibit seasonal changes in direction of littoral transport and resulting beach width. Observation and study of this process at selected locations emphasizes the necessity of study for a complete year's seasonal cycle before stating erosion rates of an area to be protected by structures and the cyclincal presence or absence of beaches. Seasonal beach conditions at four selected sites are described along with resulting physical changes to protective structures. Through the use of ERTS-1 multi-spectral photography, it will be possible to make widespread predictions elsewhere in the Bay as a direct aid in protective structure design.

  14. Spatial variation in the littoral vertebrate community of a reservoir relative to physical and biological gradients

    PubMed Central

    Soski, Jessica J.; Roosenburg, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs possess gradients in conditions and resources along their long (deep-shallow) axis, but the response of littoral vertebrates (fish and turtles) to these gradients is poorly understood. We have quantified the littoral vertebrate communities throughout a small reservoir in Southeastern Ohio during July and August using traps, and related community composition to environmental variables using NMDS ordination. Ordination revealed that fish and turtles were broadly separated in ordination space, and three distinctly different environmental gradients were significantly associated with the underlying observed species abundances. Observed turtle abundance was explained by measurements of bathymetry, turbidity, and benthic resources, but none of these environmental variables were a reliable predictor of observed fish abundance. Temperature was a poor predictor of observed abundance for both fish and turtles independently, but when fish and turtles were considered together, it became apparent that there were cold areas of the reservoir where observed fish and turtle abundances were different than in other areas of the reservoir. These results suggest that the predictor (environmental) variables we used were appropriate for investigating turtle ecology in reservoirs, but that observed fish abundance is mediated by factors that were not modeled. The efficacy of using traps, the ecological implications of considering fish and turtles together as sympatric and potentially competing species, and directions for future study are discussed. PMID:25538870

  15. Influence of nutrient additions on cadmium bioaccumulation by aquatic invertebrates in littoral enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, R.S.; Muir, D.C.G.; Fairchild, W.L.; Holoka, M.H.; Hecky, R.E.

    1998-12-01

    Cadmium distribution and bioaccumulation were examined over a 2-year period (1991--1992) in two nutrient-enriched and two control littoral enclosures and in the littoral zone in Lake 382 (L382). Lake 382, a small oligotrophic lake, is located within the Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario, Canada, and received experimental Cd additions from 1987 to 1992. In the second year of this study, chlorophyll a and suspended C concentrations in the nutrient-enriched enclosures increased by 6.6 and 3.4 times, respectively, compared to the controls. As a result of increased particulate produced by the nutrient additions, Cd concentrations in water from the nutrient-enriched enclosures were higher compared to the controls. Estimated Cd/C concentrations in water were lower in the nutrient-enriched enclosures relative to the controls because of higher particle concentrations. Effects on Cd bioaccumulation were limited even though mesotrophic to eutrophic conditions were reached in the nutrient-enriched enclosures had consistently higher Cd concentrations compared to the controls, but significant differences were not detected. Enhanced accumulation of Cd-rich particulate matter by these organisms may account for this trend. Mussels and crayfish accumulated significantly more Cd when exposed in the lake compared to the enclosures. This observation is due to elevated Cd water concentrations in the lake compared to the enclosures because of continued Cd additions to the lake. These results suggest that the water route of exposure is an important pathway for Cd accumulation by these organisms.

  16. Littoral microcrustacean (Cladocera and Copepoda) indicators of acidification in Canadian Shield lakes.

    PubMed

    Walseng, Bjørn; Yan, Norman D; Schartau, Ann Kristin

    2003-04-01

    We identify littoral microcrustacean indicators of acidification in 2 surveys of Canadian Shield lakes conducted 10 years apart. We found a total of 90 cladoceran and copepod species with richness increasing severalfold from acidic to nonacidic lakes. The fauna of the nonacidic lakes differed between the surveys. The 1987 survey employed activity traps, and caught more littoral taxa than the more recent, net-haul-based survey. Similar faunas were identified in the acidified lakes in both surveys, and several good indicator species were identified. For example, Acanthocycops vernalis was restricted to lakes with pH < 6. Sinobosmina sp. was very common but only in lakes with pH > 4.8. Tropocyclops extensus, Mesocyclops edax, and Sida crystallina were commonly found but only at pH > 5, and Chydorus faviformis only at pH > 5.9. These indicators showed promise in gauging the early stages of recovery from acidification in 3 lakes that were included in both surveys. PMID:12839197

  17. Littoral and Coastal Management in Supporting Maritime Security for Realizing Indonesia as World Maritime Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotosusilo, Agus; Wayan Agus Apriana, I.; Agung Satria, Afrizal; Jokopitoyo, Trisasono

    2016-02-01

    The Indonesian under President Joko Widodo has new goal to make Indonesia as the world maritime axis. This is supported by the geographic of Indonesia as the largest archipelagic country where the sea is two-thirds wide among the whole spacious. Indonesia is the world largest archipelagic state. More than two-third of its territory consist of seas. The ecosystem of littoral and coastal has correlative relationship with country development. There is no doubt of physically facts that Indonesian littoral and coastal with total wide of 5.8 million km2 is rich with various natural resources. Therefore, the condition of Indonesia with its world second longest coastline has several comparative advantages. Not only the country has an abundant natural resources, but it also blessed by demographic bonus advantage. The population of Indonesian is the fifth largest in the world which approximately 220 million people and approximately 60 percent among them live at coastal areas. The people in coastal area relies their live from its surrounding natural resource. Hence, most of their life and daily activity is related with the presence of natural resources. The dealing of conflict potential and attention to maritime security are important to be studied as a reference in preparing and facing the government policies that will lead to the development of maritime.

  18. Methyl mercury dynamics in littoral sediments of a temperate seepage lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Gilmour, C.C.; Benoit, J.M.; Babiarz, C.L.; Andren, A.W.; Hurley, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The sites and rates of methyl mercury (MeHg) production and transport in littoral zone sediments were investigated at Pallette Lake in northern Wisconsin. In littoral areas where groundwater inflow occurs, sulfate supply from groundwater creates profiles of electron acceptors (sulfate) and donors (methane, sulfide) that are reversed from those found in sediments whose sulfate supply is delivered from overlying water. The highest MeHg concentrations in porewaters and the maximal advective MeHg flux rates (4.5-61.7 ng??m-2??day-1) were observed in the spring, while highest bulk phase concentrations occur later in the summer. These estimated MeHg fluxes are greater than the mean areal production rates estimated previously for the water column and are similar to the atmospheric flux. Gross MeHg production was measured using the addition of 203Hg as a tracer to sediments. The depth at which maximal 203Hg methylation occurred coincided with the observed maximums m solid-phase and porewater MeHg concentrations. Because input, advection, and accumulation of MeHg in these sediments were measured directly, an independent estimate of MeHg production could be made and compared with 203Hg-derived rates. This comparison suggests that the 203Hg tracer method provides reasonable estimates of gross methylation rates and that a substantial fraction of solid-phase Hg is available for methylation.

  19. Littoral microcrustacean (Cladocera and Copepoda) indicators of acidification in Canadian Shield lakes.

    PubMed

    Walseng, Bjørn; Yan, Norman D; Schartau, Ann Kristin

    2003-04-01

    We identify littoral microcrustacean indicators of acidification in 2 surveys of Canadian Shield lakes conducted 10 years apart. We found a total of 90 cladoceran and copepod species with richness increasing severalfold from acidic to nonacidic lakes. The fauna of the nonacidic lakes differed between the surveys. The 1987 survey employed activity traps, and caught more littoral taxa than the more recent, net-haul-based survey. Similar faunas were identified in the acidified lakes in both surveys, and several good indicator species were identified. For example, Acanthocycops vernalis was restricted to lakes with pH < 6. Sinobosmina sp. was very common but only in lakes with pH > 4.8. Tropocyclops extensus, Mesocyclops edax, and Sida crystallina were commonly found but only at pH > 5, and Chydorus faviformis only at pH > 5.9. These indicators showed promise in gauging the early stages of recovery from acidification in 3 lakes that were included in both surveys.

  20. Littoral hydrovolcanic explosions: A case study of lava-seawater interaction at Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattox, T.N.; Mangan, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of hydrovolcanic explosions may occur as basaltic lava flows into the ocean. Observations and measurements were made during a two-year span of unusually explosive littoral activity as tube-fed pahoehoe from Kilauea Volcano inundated the southeast coastline of the island of Hawai'i. Our observations suggest that explosive interactions require high entrance fluxes (??? 4 m3/s) and are most often initiated by collapse of a developing lava delta. Two types of interactions were observed. "Open mixing" of lava and seawater occurred when delta collapse exposed the mouth of a severed lava tube or incandescent fault scarp to wave action. The ensuing explosions produced unconsolidated deposits of glassy lava fragments or lithic debris. Interactions under "confined mixing" conditions occurred when a lava tube situated at or below sea level fractured. Explosions ruptured the roof of the tube and produced circular mounds of welded spatter. We estimate a water/rock mass ratio of 0.15 for the most common type of littoral explosion and a kinetic energy release of 0.07-1.3 kJ/kg for the range of events witnessed.

  1. Use and occupation of Olinda littoral (NE, Brazil): guidelines for an integrated coastal management.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luci Cajueiro Carneiro; Jiménez, José A; Medeiros, Carmen; da Costa, Rauquírio Marinho

    2007-08-01

    Located on the northeast Brazilian coast, Olinda is one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites, which is economically dependent on tourism, commerce, industry, and the informal economy. Despite its environmental and socioeconomic importance, the city of Olinda (understanding the coast as part of it) has suffered several environmental and human disturbances over the last decades. This work describes the environmental and social status of Olinda's beaches and makes recommendations concerning the development of an Integrated Coastal Management Plan for this coastal zone of the Brazilian littoral. The methodology adopted in this study is based on field campaigns (social, physical, chemical, and biological data collection), local observations, and the collection of sea contention building project data from city hall. The results showed that along the seven studied beaches, the main problems were related to the: (i) building of coastal protections, (ii) inefficient sewage disposal systems, (iii) inefficient urban management, and (iv) natural events (equinoctial spring tides and precipitation/evaporation rates). Casa Caiada beach showed the best hydrologic conditions as a consequence of its morphology and it presents facilities that attract housing and recreation investments (by private and public sectors) valuing and improving local use conditions. The obtained data showed that the studied beaches need an urgent action plan to minimize the environmental degradation of Olinda's littoral and to promote sustainable development of the local coastal environments.

  2. Hydrology is reflected in the functioning and community composition of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a boreal lake.

    PubMed

    Siljanen, Henri M P; Saari, Anne; Krause, Sascha; Lensu, Anssi; Abell, Guy C J; Bodrossy, Levente; Bodelier, Paul L E; Martikainen, Pertti J

    2011-03-01

    In lake ecosystems a major proportion of methane (CH(4) ) emissions originate from the littoral zone, which can have a great spatial variability in hydrology, soil quality and vegetation. Hitherto, spatial heterogeneity and the effects it has on functioning and diversity of methanotrophs in littoral wetlands have been poorly understood. A diagnostic microarray based on the particulate methane monooxygenase gene coupled with geostatistics was used to analyse spatial patterns of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a eutrophic boreal lake (Lake Kevätön, Eastern Finland). The wetland had a hydrology gradient with a mean water table varying from -8 to -25 cm. The wettest area, comprising the highest CH(4) oxidation, had the highest abundance and species richness of methanotrophs. A high water table favoured the occurrence of type Ib methanotrophs, whereas types Ia and II were found under all moisture conditions. Thus the spatial heterogeneity in functioning and diversity of methanotrophs in littoral wetlands is highly dependent on the water table, which in turn varies spatially in relation to the geomorphology of the wetland. We suggest that changes in water levels resulting from regulation of lakes and/or global change will affect the abundance, activity and diversity of methanotrophs, and consequently CH(4) emissions from such systems.

  3. [Some adaptations of Monodonta turbinata (born, 1780) (Gastropoda, Prosobranchia, Trochidae) to feeding and habitation in the littoral zone].

    PubMed

    Aliakrinskaia, I O

    2010-01-01

    The basic morphological, ethological, and physiological-biochemical adaptations of Monodonta turbinata to survival in the littoral zone were investigated in this work. Quantitative estimation of myoglobin content in radular tissues of mollusks inhabiting the Mediterranean Sea Basin has been carried out.

  4. Hydrology is reflected in the functioning and community composition of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a boreal lake.

    PubMed

    Siljanen, Henri M P; Saari, Anne; Krause, Sascha; Lensu, Anssi; Abell, Guy C J; Bodrossy, Levente; Bodelier, Paul L E; Martikainen, Pertti J

    2011-03-01

    In lake ecosystems a major proportion of methane (CH(4) ) emissions originate from the littoral zone, which can have a great spatial variability in hydrology, soil quality and vegetation. Hitherto, spatial heterogeneity and the effects it has on functioning and diversity of methanotrophs in littoral wetlands have been poorly understood. A diagnostic microarray based on the particulate methane monooxygenase gene coupled with geostatistics was used to analyse spatial patterns of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a eutrophic boreal lake (Lake Kevätön, Eastern Finland). The wetland had a hydrology gradient with a mean water table varying from -8 to -25 cm. The wettest area, comprising the highest CH(4) oxidation, had the highest abundance and species richness of methanotrophs. A high water table favoured the occurrence of type Ib methanotrophs, whereas types Ia and II were found under all moisture conditions. Thus the spatial heterogeneity in functioning and diversity of methanotrophs in littoral wetlands is highly dependent on the water table, which in turn varies spatially in relation to the geomorphology of the wetland. We suggest that changes in water levels resulting from regulation of lakes and/or global change will affect the abundance, activity and diversity of methanotrophs, and consequently CH(4) emissions from such systems. PMID:21175697

  5. The littoral zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xing-zhong; Zhang, Yue-wei; Liu, Hong; Xiong, Sen; Li, Bo; Deng, Wei

    2013-10-01

    For flood control purpose, the water level of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) varies significantly. The annual reservoir surface elevation amplitude is about 30 m behind the dam. Filling of the reservoir has created about 349 km(2) of newly flooded riparian zone. The average flooding period lasts for more than 6 months, from mid-October to late April. The dam and its associated reservoir provide flood control, power generation, and navigation, but there are also many environmental challenges. The littoral zone is the important part of the TGR, once its eco-health and stability are damaged,which will directly endanger the ecological safety of the whole reservoir area and even the Yangtze River Basin. So, understanding the great ecological opportunities which are hidden in littoral zone of TGR (LZTGR) and putting forward approaches to solve the environmental problems are very important. LZTGR involves a wide field of problems, such as the landslides, potential water pollution, soil erosion, biodiversity loss, land cover changes, and other issues. The Three Gorges dam (TGD) is a major trigger of environmental change in the Yangtze River. The landslides, water quality, soil erosion, loss of biodiversity, dam operation, and challenge for land use are closely interrelated across spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, the ecological and environmental impacts caused by TGD are necessarily complex and uncertain. LZTGR is not only a great environmental challenge but also an ecological opportunity for us. In fact, LZTGR is an important structural unit of TGR ecosystem and has special ecosystem services function. Vegetation growing in LZTGR is therefore a valuable resource due to accumulation of carbon and nutrients. Everyone thinks that the ecological approach to the problem is needed. If properly designed, dike-pond systems, littoral woods systems, and re-created waterfowl habitats will have the capacity to capture nutrients from uplands and obstruct soil erosion

  6. The littoral zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xing-zhong; Zhang, Yue-wei; Liu, Hong; Xiong, Sen; Li, Bo; Deng, Wei

    2013-10-01

    For flood control purpose, the water level of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) varies significantly. The annual reservoir surface elevation amplitude is about 30 m behind the dam. Filling of the reservoir has created about 349 km(2) of newly flooded riparian zone. The average flooding period lasts for more than 6 months, from mid-October to late April. The dam and its associated reservoir provide flood control, power generation, and navigation, but there are also many environmental challenges. The littoral zone is the important part of the TGR, once its eco-health and stability are damaged,which will directly endanger the ecological safety of the whole reservoir area and even the Yangtze River Basin. So, understanding the great ecological opportunities which are hidden in littoral zone of TGR (LZTGR) and putting forward approaches to solve the environmental problems are very important. LZTGR involves a wide field of problems, such as the landslides, potential water pollution, soil erosion, biodiversity loss, land cover changes, and other issues. The Three Gorges dam (TGD) is a major trigger of environmental change in the Yangtze River. The landslides, water quality, soil erosion, loss of biodiversity, dam operation, and challenge for land use are closely interrelated across spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, the ecological and environmental impacts caused by TGD are necessarily complex and uncertain. LZTGR is not only a great environmental challenge but also an ecological opportunity for us. In fact, LZTGR is an important structural unit of TGR ecosystem and has special ecosystem services function. Vegetation growing in LZTGR is therefore a valuable resource due to accumulation of carbon and nutrients. Everyone thinks that the ecological approach to the problem is needed. If properly designed, dike-pond systems, littoral woods systems, and re-created waterfowl habitats will have the capacity to capture nutrients from uplands and obstruct soil erosion

  7. Sediment fluxes and the littoral drift along northeast Andhra Pradesh Coast, India: estimation by remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Kunte, Pravin D; Alagarsamy, R; Hursthouse, A S

    2013-06-01

    The littoral drift regime along the northeastern coast of India was investigated by analyzing coastal drift indicators and shoreline changes based on multitemporal satellite images. The study of offshore turbidity patterns and quantitative estimation of suspended sediments was undertaken to understand the magnitude and direction of movement of sediment fluxes. The study revealed that: (1) the character of coastal landforms and sedimentation processes indicate that the sediment transport is bidirectional and monsoon dependent; (2) multidate, multitemporal analysis of satellite images helps to show the nature of sediment transport along the coast. The dominant net sediment transport is in a NE direction along the eastern coast of India. Finally, this assessment demonstrates the potential of remote sensing technology in understanding the coastal morphometric changes, long-term sediment transport, shoreline changes, and offshore turbidity distribution pattern and the implications for the transport of sediment-associated pollutants. PMID:23064851

  8. The FRALIT teledetection program, using the ERTS-A satellite, for the oceanic littoral of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Cazabat, C.; Demathieu, P.; Dupuis, J.

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The French Atlantic Littoral program, utilizing data from the ERTS-1 satellite, is considered. It involves teledetection of the French shoreline along the Atlantic Ocean and English Channel. A description is given of the ERTS-1 orbit and the satellite itself, including the attitude control system, and the data acquisition and transmission equipment. The geographic extent of the area covered by the program is delineated and the subjects studied are enumerated. These include the geomorphology, pedology, hydrology, and vegetation of the maritime marshes; sedimentology, morphology, and hydrology of the intertidal zones; and transport of material in suspension to the mouths of the Seine, the Loire, and the Gironde as a part of the coastal waters study.

  9. Littoral zones as sources of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon in lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, E.G.; Cotner, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 12 lakes in Minnesota, USA, was conducted to examine the factors controlling variability in biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) concentration. The principal question addressed was whether BDOC concentration was more strongly related to lake trophic status or morphometric parameters. BDOC concentration was determined by incubating filtered lake water for a period of 15 months and fitting an exponential decay curve to measured DOC concentrations. BDOC concentrations varied from 73 to 427 mmol C.L-1 and composed 15%-63% of the total DOC pool. There were no significant correlations between BDOC and measures of lake trophic status. Instead, BDOC was most closely associated with the percentage of lake area covered by littoral zone, suggesting a significant source of BDOC from aquatic macrophytes and lake surface sediments. ?? 2008 NRC.

  10. Dioctophyme renale in Vulpes vulpes from the Caspian Sea littoral of Iran

    PubMed Central

    HAJIALILO, Elham; MOBEDI, Iraj; MASOUD, Jafar; HASANPOUR, Hamid; MOWLAVI, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    During a long term of road survey for detection of the zoonotic helminthes in carnivores, a male Vulpes vulpes was naturally found infected by Dioctophyme renale in Caspian Sea littoral in Iran. Since the parasite transmission usually occurs through consumption of fish and other accidental food items, investigation of the worm amongst fish-eating animals in the areas with potential circulation of the helminth life cycle, has been regarded as a public health importance so far. Concerning the rout of parasite transmission to humans, different epidemiological aspects should be studied in the country. Present paper describes a destructive lesion of the kidney in the fox due to D. renale after almost a decade of monitoring for the parasite reservoirs in the region. PMID:26284212

  11. Trace fossils of talitrid sandhoppers in interglacial littoral calcareous sandstones, Cornwall, U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scourse, James

    Small (<6cm) isolated cylindrical shafts observed in carbonate-cemented current-bedded interglacial littoral sands ('sandrock') in Cornwall have previously been interpreted as intrasedimentary stalactites. An alternative explanation as trace fossils of the ichnogenus Skolithos is proposed. Probable attribution to talitrid Amphipoda (sandhoppers), in particular Talitrus saltator (Montagu), is supported by the similarity of the features to the modern burrows of this organism, the facies-dependence of the features, and by independent evidence on the backshore-frontal dune environment of deposition. The ecological requirements of T. saltator support the interpretation of the raised beaches as interglacial in status based on thermoluminescence (TL) dating and aminostratigraphy, and conflict with a recent suggestion that they may be of cold stage origin.

  12. Better Few than Hungry: Flexible Feeding Ecology of Collared Lemurs Eulemur collaris in Littoral Forest Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Giuseppe; Kesch, Kristina; Ndremifidy, Kelard; Schmidt, Stacey L.; Ramanamanjato, Jean-Baptiste; Borgognini-Tarli, Silvana M.; Ganzhorn, Joerg U.

    2011-01-01

    Background Frugivorous primates are known to encounter many problems to cope with habitat degradation, due to the fluctuating spatial and temporal distribution of their food resources. Since lemur communities evolved strategies to deal with periods of food scarcity, these primates are expected to be naturally adapted to fluctuating ecological conditions and to tolerate a certain degree of habitat changes. However, behavioral and ecological strategies adopted by frugivorous lemurs to survive in secondary habitats have been little investigated. Here, we compared the behavioral ecology of collared lemurs (Eulemur collaris) in a degraded fragment of littoral forest of south-east Madagascar, Mandena, with that of their conspecifics in a more intact habitat, Sainte Luce. Methodology/Principal Findings Lemur groups in Mandena and in Sainte Luce were censused in 2004/2007 and in 2000, respectively. Data were collected via instantaneous sampling on five lemur groups totaling 1,698 observation hours. The Shannon index was used to determine dietary diversity and nutritional analyses were conducted to assess food quality. All feeding trees were identified and measured, and ranging areas determined via the minimum convex polygon. In the degraded area lemurs were able to modify several aspects of their feeding strategies by decreasing group size and by increasing feeding time, ranging areas, and number of feeding trees. The above strategies were apparently able to counteract a clear reduction in both food quality and size of feeding trees. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that collared lemurs in littoral forest fragments modified their behavior to cope with the pressures of fluctuating resource availability. The observed flexibility is likely to be an adaptation to Malagasy rainforests, which are known to undergo periods of fruit scarcity and low productivity. These results should be carefully considered when relocating lemurs or when selecting suitable areas for

  13. A field proof-of-concept of tomographic slug tests in an anisotropic littoral aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Daniel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Lefebvre, René; Giroux, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Hydraulic tomography is increasingly recognized as a characterization approach that can image pathways or barriers to flow as well as their connectivity. In this study, we assess the performance of a transient analysis of tomographic slug test head data in estimating heterogeneity in horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kh), hydraulic conductivity anisotropy (the ratio between vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity - Kv/Kh) and specific storage (Ss) under actual field conditions. The tomographic experiment was carried out between two wells in a moderately heterogeneous and highly anisotropic silt and sand littoral aquifer. In this field proof-of-concept, the inversion of the two-dimensional (2D) head dataset was computed with a 2D radial flow algorithm that considers Kh, Kv/Kh, Ss and wellbore storage effects. This study demonstrated that a transient analysis of tomographic slug tests is able to capture the key features of the littoral environment of the test: the vertical profiles of Kh and Kv are indeed in agreement with those from other field and laboratory tests, and Ss values exhibit physically plausible profiles. Furthermore, the simulation of independent inter-well hydraulic tests (slug and pumping tests screened over the entire aquifer) using resolved Kh, Kv/Kh and Ss tomograms produce responses very close to field observations. This study demonstrates that the effects of fine scale heterogeneity that induces K-anisotropy at larger scales can be captured through a transient analysis of tomographic slug tests, which are very difficult to quantify otherwise with conventional hydraulic tests, thus allowing a better representation of properties controlling flow and transport in aquifer systems.

  14. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of Ascophyllum harvesting on the littoral ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaden, P. J. S.; Dring, M. T.

    1980-03-01

    Little is known of the ecological effects of harvesting littoral algae although this is a worldwide commercial activity. In 1976 an attempt to establish harvesting in Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland, was opposed on mainly theoretical conservation grounds. The attempt began and stopped within a single small bay leaving a sharp boundary between cut and uncut areas. A subjective survey apparently confirmed the predicted loss of cryptic fauna, decline through predation and the resorting of interboulder sediment. In April 1979 the cut and uncut areas were examined in detail to determine whether any of these effects had persisted and were demonstrable scientifically. Beach and boulder transects and various other studies showed some increases in the cut area. There was significantly more Fucus, Enteromorpha and Ulva; Cirratulus (inhabiting Rhodochorton-bound sediment on boulder surfaces) had a greater biomass. Some changes in Littorina colour morphs were apparent. Sediment in the cut area was coarser and had significantly more crustacean meiofauna. Ascophyllum internodal length and lateral branching were increased but it still provided 20% less shore cover than in the uncut area. There were significant decreases in the cover of Cladophora on the sides of boulders and of Halichondria, Hymeniacodon and Balanus on undersurfaces. Indeed on the habitable underside of boulders total animal cover had been reduced by nearly two-thirds and the average number of species per boulder by one-third. It is concluded that Ascophyllum harvesting has a significant and persistent effect on shore ecology. Littoral algae are a valuable commercial asset but it is important that some fairly large intertidal areas should be left unharvested for general conservation purposes.

  15. Guide to the littoral zone vascular flora of Carolina bay lakes (U.S.A.)

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Nathan; Braham, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Carolina bays are elliptic, directionally aligned basins of disputed origin that occur on the Atlantic Coastal Plain from the Delmarva Peninsula to southern Georgia. In southeastern North Carolina, several large, natural, lacustrine systems (i.e., Carolina bay lakes) exist within the geomorphological features known as Carolina bays. Within the current distribution of Carolina bays, Bladen and Columbus counties (North Carolina) contain the only known examples of Carolina bay lakes. The Carolina bay lakes can be split into two major divisions, the “Bladen Lakes Group” which is characterized as being relatively unproductive (dystrophic – oligotrophic), and Lake Waccamaw, which stands alone in Columbus County and is known for its high productivity and species richness. Although there have been several studies conducted on these unique lentic systems, none have documented the flora comprehensively. New information Over the 2013−2014 growing seasons, the littoral zone flora of Carolina bay lakes was surveyed and vouchered. Literature reviews and herbarium crawls complemented this fieldwork to produce an inventory of the vascular plant species. This survey detected 205 taxa (species/subspecies and varieties) in 136 genera and 80 vascular plant families. Thirty-one species (15.2%) are of conservation concern. Lake Waccamaw exhibited the highest species richness with 145 catalogued taxa and 26 species of conservation concern. Across all sites, the Cyperaceae (25 spp.), Poaceae (21 spp.), Asteraceae (13 spp.), Ericaceae (8 spp.), Juncaceae (8 spp.), and Lentibulariaceae (6 spp.) were the six most species-rich vascular plant families encountered. A guide to the littoral zone flora of Carolina bay lakes is presented herein, including dichotomous keys, species accounts (including abundance, habitat, phenology, and exsiccatae), as well as images of living species and vouchered specimens. PMID:27350764

  16. Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleton, M.A.; Ramirez, R.; Hargrave, C.W.; Gido, K.B.; Masoner, J.R.; Schnell, G.D.; Matthews, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    We sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fish-environment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities sampled at the same sites later in the year. Larval, juvenile and adult fish communities were dominated by Atherinidae (mainly inland silverside, Menidia beryllina) and Moronidae (mainly juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis) and were consistently structured along a gradient of site exposure to prevailing winds and waves. Larval, juvenile and adult communities along this gradient varied from atherinids and moronids at highly exposed sites to mostly centrarchids (primarily Lepomis and Micropterus spp.) at protected sites. Secondarily, zooplankton densities, water clarity, and land-use characteristics were related to fish community structure. Rank correlation analyses and Mantel tests indicated that the spatial consistency and predictability of fish communities was high as larval fishes sampled during spring were concordant with juvenile and adult fishes sampled at the same sites during summer and fall in terms of abundance, richness, and community structure. We propose that the high predictability and spatial consistency of littoral-zone fishes in Lake Texoma was a function of relatively simple communities (dominated by 1-2 species) that were structured by factors, such as site exposure to winds and waves, that varied little through time. ?? Springer 2005.

  17. Treatment of angiomas and telangiectasias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Junichiro

    2003-12-01

    Background Vascular lesions still present a major problem, and the search for a good treatment continues. The use of inappropriate treatment methods, can occasionally cause unwanted side effects. Even when the method used is appropriate, the result can be disappointing. It is important to choose an appropriate laser, and where laser treatment is not effective, we must select the most appropriate conventional treatment or combination of treatments. My treatment program is as follows; a 532 nm diode laser is the first choice for telangiectasias; the flashlamp-pumped dye laser for port wine stains and strawberry marks; and the Nd:YAG laser with a cooling device for 1 - 3 mm leg veins of the reticular and web type. For leg veins over 3 mm, surgery is required. The diode pumped 532 nm laser is excellent for superficial telangiectasias. Good effects with the pulsed dye laser are limited to vessels in the upper layers of the dermis, thus the penetration depth of the laser must thus be optimized combined with epidermal cooling. We must always avoid side effects in laser treatment of vascular lesions. Development of new wavelengths and adaptation of existing wavelengths are currently being investigated.

  18. Microbial Iron(II) Oxidation in Littoral Freshwater Lake Sediment: The Potential for Competition between Phototrophic vs. Nitrate-Reducing Iron(II)-Oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Melton, E. D.; Schmidt, C.; Kappler, A.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of neutrophilic microbial iron oxidation is mainly determined by local gradients of oxygen, light, nitrate and ferrous iron. In the anoxic top part of littoral freshwater lake sediment, nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers compete for the same e− donor; reduced iron. It is not yet understood how these microbes co-exist in the sediment and what role they play in the Fe cycle. We show that both metabolic types of anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms are present in the same sediment layer directly beneath the oxic-anoxic sediment interface. The photoferrotrophic most probable number counted 3.4·105 cells·g−1 and the autotrophic and mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers totaled 1.8·104 and 4.5·104 cells·g−1 dry weight sediment, respectively. To distinguish between the two microbial Fe(II) oxidation processes and assess their individual contribution to the sedimentary Fe cycle, littoral lake sediment was incubated in microcosm experiments. Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria exhibited a higher maximum Fe(II) oxidation rate per cell, in both pure cultures and microcosms, than photoferrotrophs. In microcosms, photoferrotrophs instantly started oxidizing Fe(II), whilst nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers showed a significant lag-phase during which they probably use organics as e− donor before initiating Fe(II) oxidation. This suggests that they will be outcompeted by phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers during optimal light conditions; as phototrophs deplete Fe(II) before nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers start Fe(II) oxidation. Thus, the co-existence of the two anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizers may be possible due to a niche space separation in time by the day-night cycle, where nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers oxidize Fe(II) during darkness and phototrophs play a dominant role in Fe(II) oxidation during daylight. Furthermore, metabolic flexibility of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes may play a paramount role in the

  19. Invasive Mussels Alter the Littoral Food Web of a Large Lake: Stable Isotopes Reveal Drastic Shifts in Sources and Flow of Energy

    PubMed Central

    Ozersky, Ted; Evans, David O.; Barton, David R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how establishment of invasive dreissenid mussels impacted the structure and energy sources of the littoral benthic food web of a large temperate lake. We combined information about pre- and postdreissenid abundance, biomass, and secondary production of the littoral benthos with results of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of archival (predreissenid) and recent (postdreissenid) samples of all common benthic taxa. This approach enabled us to determine the importance of benthic and sestonic carbon to the littoral food web before, and more than a decade after dreissenid establishment. Long term dreissenid presence was associated with a 32-fold increase in abundance, 6-fold increase in biomass, and 14-fold increase in secondary production of the littoral benthos. Dreissenids comprised a large portion of the post-invasion benthos, making up 13, 38, and 56% of total abundance, biomass, and secondary production, respectively. The predreissenid food web was supported primarily by benthic primary production, while sestonic material was relatively more important to the postdreissenid food web. The absolute importance of both sestonic material and benthic primary production to the littoral benthos increased considerably following dreissenid establishment. Our results show drastic alterations to food web structure and suggest that dreissenid mussels redirect energy and material from the water column to the littoral benthos both through biodeposition of sestonic material as well as stimulation of benthic primary production. PMID:23284673

  20. The utilization of ERTS-1 data for the study of the French Atlantic Littoral. [coastal water and geomorphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demathieu, P. G.; Verger, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The French Atlantic Littoral (FRALIT) program uses ERTS-1 data to study coastal geomorphology and waters. ERTS-1 gives an overall picture of the phenomena for the first time due mainly to channel 4 data, but the other channels also contribute valuable complementary data on superficial waters. These studies have already resulted in accurate maps of the mud transported south-westwards from the mouth of the River Loire.

  1. Shoreline variations and coastal dynamics: A space-time data analysis of the Jonian littoral, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Antonello; Canora, Filomena; Pasquariello, Guido; Spilotro, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    Morphological variations of coastlines are caused by several key processes that are influenced by climate conditions, sea level variations, wave energy, tectonics and human-induced phenomena. These processes affect the dynamics of catchment basins and the coastal environment. Since the second half of the 20th century, the Jonian coast of the Basilicata Region (Italy) has witnessed a widespread retreating phenomenon, predominantly due to anthropogenic causes affecting transport processes along the riverbeds and causing reductions in the sediment supply to the coast. The disturbance in the balance between sediment transport carried out by the sea and the sediment supply performed by rivers has led to a deficit in the sediment budget. To understand the morphological dynamics of the littoral environment and quantify the amount of coastal erosion, an analysis of coastline change has been carried out using various data sources: historical cartography, aerial photographs and GPS surveys. Between 1870 and 1954, the 32-km-long Jonian littoral under examination showed an accretion trend, while the loss in beach surface steadily increased between 1954 and 2005. The average change in beach surface has been calculated as about +55,000 m2/yr (accretion) between 1870 and 1954 and -16,500 m2/yr (erosion) between 1954 and 2005. Overall, 640,000 m2 of sandy beaches were lost along the entire Jonian coast of the Basilicata Region between 1954 and 2005. Comparing the shoreline between 1870 and 1954, the average net shoreline movement (NSM) is +110 m vs. -30 m between 1954 and 2005. This analysis approach has proven to be effective in quantifying the erosion phenomenon and its effects, despite the lack of homogeneous data series and the variety of spatial and temporal scales over which coastal evolution occurs. The study represents an important step in understanding coastal dynamics in this region. As coastal areas are being affected by an increasing number of population and socio

  2. An integrated evaluation of the persistence and effects of 4-nonylphenol in an experimental littoral ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Liber, K.; Knuth, M.L.; Stay, F.S.

    1999-03-01

    A comprehensive littoral enclosure study was conducted to assess the persistence and distribution of 4-nonylphenol (NP) in a littoral ecosystem, and to evaluate the compound`s effects on resident aquatic biota. Enclosures with a mean ({+-} SD) surface area and volume of 31.4 {+-} 3.3 m{sup 2} and 32.0 {+-} 6.4 m{sup 3}, respectively, received eleven applications at 48-h intervals with one of four different rates of NP. This created a 20-d application period which was followed by a three to fourteen month observation period, depending on the endpoint measured. Mean {+-} SD NP concentrations in the water column measured 2 h after each application averaged 5 {+-} 4, 23 {+-} 11, 76 {+-} 21, and 243 {+-} 41 {micro}g/L at nominal treatments of 3, 30, 100, and 300 {micro}g/L, respectively. Persistence in the water column was relatively short, with a dissipation half-life estimated at {le} 1.2 d. Persistence of NP in sediment and on macrophytes was substantially longer, with estimated half-lives of 28 to 104 d and 8 to 13 d, respectively. Zooplankton was the most sensitive group of organisms evaluated, with significant reductions in population abundances of some copepod taxa observed at the 23 {+-} 11-{micro}g/L treatment. Fish survival was affected at 243 {+-} 41 {micro}g/L. The most sensitive benthic macroinvertebrate taxon, Pisidium (Bivalvia) was affected at 76 {+-} 21 {micro}g/L, but most taxa were only affected at the 243 {+-} 41-{micro}g/L treatment. None of the assessed populations were affected at the 5 {+-} 4-{micro}g/L treatment. Macrophytes and periphyton were not adversely affected by any of the treatments. Overall community composition, assessed at the family level or higher, was not affected at or below the 23 {+-} 11-{micro}g/L treatment, but did exhibit substantial changes at the 243 {+-} 41-{micro}g/L treatment. Some minor changes were observed at the 76 {+-} 21-{micro}g/L treatment. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration in the water column, based

  3. Seasonal trophic shift of littoral consumers in eutrophic Lake Taihu (China) revealed by a two-source mixing model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiong; Xie, Ping; Xu, Jun; Liang, Xufang; Qin, Jianhui; Cao, Te; Chen, Feizhou

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the seasonal variation in the contributions of planktonic and benthic resources to 11 littoral predators in eutrophic Lake Taihu (China) from 2004 to 2005. Seasonal fluctuations in consumer delta 13C and delta 15N were attributed to the combined impacts of temporal variation in isotopic signatures of basal resources and the diet shift of fishes. Based on a two-end-member mixing model, all target consumers relied on energy sources from coupled benthic and planktonic pathways, but the predominant energy source for most species was highly variable across seasons, showing seasonal trophic shift of littoral consumers. Seasonality in energy mobilization of consumers focused on two aspects: (1) the species number of consumers that relied mainly on planktonic carbon showed the lowest values in the fall and the highest during spring/summer, and (2) most consumer species showed seasonal variation in the percentages of planktonic reliance. We concluded that seasonal trophic shifts of fishes and invertebrates were driven by phytoplankton production, but benthic resources were also important seasonally in supporting littoral consumers in Meiliang Bay. Energy mobilization of carnivorous fishes was more subject to the impact of resource availability than omnivorous species. PMID:21805013

  4. The influence of productivity and width of littoral zone on the trophic position of a large-bodied omnivore.

    PubMed

    Stenroth, Patrik; Holmqvist, Niklas; Nyström, Per; Berglund, Olof; Larsson, Per; Granéli, Wilhelm

    2008-06-01

    Omnivory is common in many food webs. Omnivores in different habitats can potentially change their feeding behaviour and alter their trophic position and role according to habitat conditions. Here we examine the trophic level and diet of the omnivorous signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) in gradients of trophic status and lake size, both of which have been previously suggested to affect trophic position of predators separately or combined as productive space. We found the trophic position of omnivorous crayfish to be positively correlated with lake trophic status, but found no evidence for any influence of lake size or productive space on crayfish trophic position. The higher trophic position of crayfish in eutrophic lakes was largely caused by a shift in crayfish diet and not by an increase in trophic links in basal parts of the food web. Hence, our results support the "productivity hypothesis," suggesting that food chains can be longer in more productive systems. Furthermore, stable isotope data indicated that larger crayfish are more predatory than smaller crayfish in lakes with wider littoral zones. Wider littoral zones promoted the development of intrapopulation differences in trophic position whereas narrow littoral zones did not. Hence, differences in habitat quality between and within lakes seem to influence the trophic positions of omnivorous crayfish.

  5. Applying a reservoir functional-zone paradigm to littoral bluegills: differences in length and catch frequency?

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelis, Holly; Crosby, Abigale M.; Roosenburg, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs exhibit gradients in conditions and resources along the transition from lotic to lentic habitat that may be important to bluegill ecology. The lotic–lentic gradient can be partitioned into three functional zones: the riverine, transitional, and lacustrine zones. We measured catch frequency and length of bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) captured along the periphery of these areas (i.e., in the littoral zone of each functional zone) for four small reservoirs in Southeastern Ohio during the summer months of three years. Catch frequency differed between zones for two reservoirs, but these differences were not observed in other years. There was no relationship between reservoir zone and either standard length or catch frequency when the data for all reservoirs were pooled, but we did observe a bimodal length distribution in all reservoirs. A combination of ecological factors including inter and intraspecific competition, predation intensity, management practices, limnology, and assemblage complexity may be mitigating bluegill distribution and abundance in reservoirs. Therefore, a functional zone (categorical) approach to understanding bluegill ecology in reservoirs may not be appropriate. PMID:25177535

  6. Comparison of species composition and richness of fish assemblages in altered and unaltered littoral habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poe, T.P.; Hatcher, C.O.; Brown, C.L.; Schloesser, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Species composition and richness of fish assemblages in altered and unaltered littoral habitats in Lake St. Clair, Michigan, differed between areas. A percid-cyprinid-cyprinodontid assemblage dominated in the unaltered area, Muscamoot Bay, which has a natural shoreline (with almost no alteration due to dredging or bulkheading), high water quality, and high species richness of aquatic macrophytes. A centrarchid assemblage dominated in the altered area, Belvidere Bay, which has a bulkheaded shoreline, many dredged areas, reduced water quality due to inputs of nutrients from a nearby river, and relatively low species richness of aquatic macrophytes. Habitat factors, species richness and abundance of aquatic macrophytes, had the most influence on fish community structure in both areas. The percid-cyprinid-cyprinodontid assemblage was significantly correlated with six species of macrophytes whereas the centrarchid assemblage was significantly correlated with only four. These patterns suggest that preference for diverse habitats was higher, and tolerance to habitat alteration lower, in percid-cyprinid-cyprinodontid assemblages than in centrarchid assemblages.

  7. Spectral identification of sperm whales from Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center passive acoustic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Richard, Blake; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    2005-09-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) made a series of passive broadband acoustic recordings in the Gulf of Mexico and Ligurian Sea to study noise and marine mammal phonations. The collected data contain a large amount of various types of sperm whale phonations, such as isolated clicks and communication codas. It was previously reported that the spectrograms of the extracted clicks and codas contain well-defined null patterns that seem to be unique for individuals. The null pattern is formed due to individual features of the sound production organs of an animal. These observations motivated the present studies of adapting human speech identification techniques for deep-diving marine mammal phonations. A three-state trained hidden Markov model (HMM) was used with the phonation spectra of sperm whales. The HHM-algorithm gave 75% accuracy in identifying individuals when it had been initially tested for the acoustic data set correlated with visual observations of sperm whales. A comparison of the identification accuracy based on null-pattern similarity analysis and the HMM-algorithm is presented. The results can establish the foundation for developing an acoustic identification database for sperm whales and possibly other deep-diving marine mammals that would be difficult to observe visually. [Research supported by ONR.

  8. Restoring ecosystem services to littoral zones of rivers in the urban core of Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Xian, Xu-Dong; Feng, Yi-Long; Willison, J H Martin; Ai, Li-Jiao; Wang, Ping; Wu, Zhi-Neng

    2015-08-01

    Two examples of the creation of naturalized areas in the littoral zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir in the urban core of Chongqing City, China, are described. The areas were created for the purpose of restoring ecological functions and services. Plants were selected based on surveys of natural wetland vegetation in the region, and experiments were conducted to discover the capacity of species of interest to survive the sometimes extreme hydrological regimes at the sites. Novel methods were developed to stabilize the plants against the rigors of extreme summer floods and constant swash, notably zigzag berms of rocks wrapped in iron mesh. The areas include native reeds, grasses, shrubs, and trees. Plant communities in the areas are zoned according to flooding stress, and their structure is less stable at lower elevations that are subjected to greater stress. The tall grass Saccharum spontaneum (widespread in Southern Asia) and the tree Pterocarya stenoptera (native to Southwest China) are notable for their utility at these sites in the center of a large city. Communities of tall reeds and grasses have become so dense and stable that they now provide the ecosystem services of capturing river sediments and resisting erosion of the river banks. It is recommended that extensive greening of the riparian zones in urban areas of the Three Gorges Reservoir be conducted for the purpose of providing ecosystem services, based in part on the experiences described here.

  9. Restoring ecosystem services to littoral zones of rivers in the urban core of Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Xian, Xu-Dong; Feng, Yi-Long; Willison, J H Martin; Ai, Li-Jiao; Wang, Ping; Wu, Zhi-Neng

    2015-08-01

    Two examples of the creation of naturalized areas in the littoral zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir in the urban core of Chongqing City, China, are described. The areas were created for the purpose of restoring ecological functions and services. Plants were selected based on surveys of natural wetland vegetation in the region, and experiments were conducted to discover the capacity of species of interest to survive the sometimes extreme hydrological regimes at the sites. Novel methods were developed to stabilize the plants against the rigors of extreme summer floods and constant swash, notably zigzag berms of rocks wrapped in iron mesh. The areas include native reeds, grasses, shrubs, and trees. Plant communities in the areas are zoned according to flooding stress, and their structure is less stable at lower elevations that are subjected to greater stress. The tall grass Saccharum spontaneum (widespread in Southern Asia) and the tree Pterocarya stenoptera (native to Southwest China) are notable for their utility at these sites in the center of a large city. Communities of tall reeds and grasses have become so dense and stable that they now provide the ecosystem services of capturing river sediments and resisting erosion of the river banks. It is recommended that extensive greening of the riparian zones in urban areas of the Three Gorges Reservoir be conducted for the purpose of providing ecosystem services, based in part on the experiences described here. PMID:25907628

  10. Habitat selection by three littoral zone fishes: effects of predation pressure, plant density and macrophyte type

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chick, J.H.; McIvor, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments which demonstrated that three littoral zone fishes differentially selected among three macrophytes when seeking refuge from predation. In the presence of a predator (a juvenile Micropterus salmoides), mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna). and dollar sunfish (Lepomis marginatus) displayed ferential use of four tank areas containing patches of either Hydrilla verticillata, Potamogeton illinoensis, Panicum hemitomon, or no plants. Patterns habitat selection, and the consistency of these patterns among replicates, differed among the three fishes and among three plant-density treatments - natural (each macrophyte presented at its mean field density), equal (all three macrophytes at the same density), and control (no plants). Selection for H. verticillata by mosquitofish was significant for both the equal and natural treatments, and thus was not caused by differences in plant density alone. Sailfin mollies displayed significant selection for H. verticillata only in the natural plant-density treatments. Dollar sunfish showed less consistent habitat selection than either mosquitofish or sailfin mollies. Significant habitat selection was not found in the absence of a predator, and there was no evidence for lection among the tank areas in control treatments. Patterns of habitat selection by the three fishes in our laboratory study corresponded to observed habitat use in Lake Okeechobee.

  11. [Taxonomic composition and distribution of the echinoderms associations in the littoral ecosystems from the Colombian Pacific].

    PubMed

    Neira, Raúl; Cantera, Jaime R

    2005-12-01

    This paper examines published information and gray literature about taxonomy and ecology of echinoderm species of the Colombian Pacific Coast. Unpublished collection data of specimens kept in the Marine Sciences Museum of the University of Valle are also considered. Sixty-six species are found in coastal ecosystems and shallow bottoms of ten geographical, coastal and insular localities of the Pacific coast of Colombia. Main habitats having echinoderms are: rocky cliffs and shores, coral reefs, sand beaches, mud substrates, mangroves, and shallow bottoms of mud, sand, gravel and rocks. Regular Echinoidea and Asteroidea are the most diverse and abundant groups, mainly in subtidal rocky shallow bottoms and coral reefs. Ophiuroidea are abundant below rocky boulders. Irregular Echinoidea are abundant on sand beaches. The relatively high number of species shows that this geographical area presents a high diversity of echinoderms compared with other tropical shallow and littoral zones of the world. Rocky substrates and coral reefs are the ecosystems with the highest numbers of echinoderm species and individuals. A conservation status assessment is difficult because the lack of periodical sampling and few data about deep zones. In general, the species reported in the last 25 years, have not experimented important changes in their populations, although in some specific places, populations may decrease because human activities in coastal areas increase sedimentation rates change some rocky substrates to mud or sand.

  12. Effects of 4-nonylphenol on the biota in a littoral pond ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Liber, K.; Schmude, K.; O`Halloran, S.; Corry, T.; Gangl, J.; Stay, F.

    1994-12-31

    National water quality criteria for 4-nonylphenol, a surfactant precursor and metabolite, are currently being developed by the US EPA. Preliminary data from laboratory tests indicate that the criterion maximum concentration may be as low as 3--10 {mu}g/L; field data on biological effects are rare. The study presented here was designed to assess the effects of 4-nonylphenol on a natural aquatic community using a set of 18 littoral enclosures (average volume 33 m{sup 3}). The common occurrence of 4-nonylphenol in municipal and industrial discharges dictated the use of a ``chronic`` exposure scenario for this study. Test concentrations ranged from 3 to 300 {mu}g/L, with applications every 48 hours for a 20 day period. This ensured a 21-day ``chronic`` exposure period and allowed sediment concentration of 4-nonylphenol to steadily increase. Survival of juvenile bluegill sunfish was reduced at 300 {mu}g/L, but not at 100, {mu}g/L; no effects on growth were noted over the 68-day assessment period. Abundance of Cladocera and Copepoda were also reduced at 300 {mu}g/L, with recovery observed within 2--4 weeks after the last nonylphenol application. Benthic macroinvertebrates, including Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, and Mollusca, were affected at 100--300 {mu}g/L, with impacts persisting for several months. The slow recovery of benthic macroinvertebrates was partially attributed to their prolonged exposure to sediment associated nonylphenol residues.

  13. Comparative diversity analysis in sandy littoral ecosystems of the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombini, I.; Fallaci, M.; Milanesi, F.; Scapini, F.; Chelazzi, L.

    2003-10-01

    A comparative faunal analysis was carried out in sandy littoral localities differing both morphologically and in human impact. The study sites were located in the western Mediterranean basin along the coasts of Morocco, Tunisia, the Maltese Islands and Italy. These were typical beach-dune ecosystems more (Smir, Morocco; Zouara, Tunisia; Burano, Italy) or less (Ir-Ramla tat-Torri, Malta and Ir-Ramla l-Hamra, Gozo) structurally developed accordingly. Species richness was evaluated using standard trapping techniques with pitfall traps along the transects perpendicular to the shoreline. Only isopods and coleopterans were used in the analysis. In each locality, an analysis was conducted on both the beach and the dune separately, and on the entire ecosystem in the two seasons (spring and autumn). Species were studied both quantitatively and qualitatively using ecological coefficients (relative abundance) and Fisher's diversity index. To evaluate the evenness of the community, Shannon-Weaver index was calculated and compared with Brillouin index. For both indices, the maximum values were computed and were used to obtain the evenness of the community through Pielou index. In addition, Simpson's dominance index was considered. Percentages of similarities between localities were analysed in the two seasons and in total using the Renkonen index. The overall analysis showed that general trends could be found for both orders that were studied and gave indications on habitat quality. The study showed that when monitoring was carried out systematically both in space and time, arthropods could be used as important tool to assess beach health.

  14. Modeling subsurface transport in extensive glaciofluvial and littoral sediments to remediate a municipal drinking water aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergvall, M.; Grip, H.; Sjöström, J.; Laudon, H.

    2011-07-01

    Few studies have been carried out that cover the entire transport process of pesticides, from application at the soil surface, through subsurface transport, to contamination of drinking water in esker aquifers. In formerly glaciated regions, such as Scandinavia, many of the most important groundwater resources are situated in glaciofluvial eskers. The purpose of the present study was to model and identify significant processes that govern subsurface transport of pesticides in extensive glaciofluvial and littoral sediments. To simulate the transport processes, we coupled a vadose zone model at soil profile scale to a regional groundwater flow model. The model was applied to a municipal drinking-water aquifer, contaminated with the pesticide-metabolite BAM (2,6-dichlorobenzoamide). At regional scale, with the combination of a ten-meter-deep vadose zone and coarse texture, the observed concentrations could be described by the model without assuming preferential flow. A sensitivity analysis revealed that hydraulic conductivity in the aquifer and infiltration rate accounted for almost half of the model uncertainty. The calibrated model was applied to optimize the location of extraction wells for remediation, which were used to validate the predictive modeling. Running a worst-case scenario, the model showed that the establishment of two remediation wells would clean the aquifer in four years, compared to nine years without them. Further development of the model would require additional field measurements in order to improve the description of macrodispersion in deep, sandy vadose zones. We also suggest that future research should focus on characterization of the variability of hydraulic conductivity and its effect on contaminant transport in eskers.

  15. Survey of pesticide application on vegetables in the Littoral area of Togo.

    PubMed

    Adjrah, Yao; Dovlo, Agbéko; Karou, Simplice D; Eklu-Gadegbeku, Kwashie; Agbonon, Amégnona; de Souza, Comlan; Gbeassor, Messanvi

    2013-01-01

    Vegetable production in Togo is seriously affected by pests attack. To reduce damage, farmers indiscriminately use pesticides. Various studies have reported high concentrations of pesticide residues more than acceptable limits in vegetables and other edible food. The aim of the presented study is to study the attitudes and practices developed by vegetable growers about pesticides applications. A standardized questionnaires which included socio-professional factors, provisions and operations concerning the use of varieties of pesticides were addressed to 150 growers in vegetable farms along the Littoral of Togo. In order to complete data concerning pesticides, seven runoff private companies and agents of the 'Direction de la Protection des Végétaux' were interviewed. Data were statistical treated using Sphinx Plus. The survey showed that vegetable growers have an acceptable educational level (36% have more than 7 years of formal education) to exploit instructions concerning pesticide use, but more than 97% do not use recommended tools. Only 21% of them received training for pesticide use. Moreover, 84% of them did not usually wear gloves, and less than 30% used oro-nasal masks. Failure to observe minimum intervals between pesticide application and sale is worrying because extremely hazardous (Carbofuran and Cadusaphos) or moderately toxic (Cypermethrin, Dimethoate, Endosulfan, Chlorpyrifos-ethyl, Fipronil) are the products currently used. The presented study indicates that pesticides application in the survey area represents a potential risk for the environment, farmers and consumers. More investigations are needed to quantify pesticides residues on the vegetables currently con,umed and moreover, to determine the potential effect of those products on human and animals health. PMID:24364441

  16. Discontinuous ammonia excretion and glutamine storage in littoral Oniscidea (Crustacea: Isopoda): testing tidal and circadian models.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maya; Wright, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    A key evolutionary development facilitating land colonization in terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) is the intermittent liberation of waste nitrogen as volatile ammonia. Intermittent ammonia release exploits glutamine (Gln) as an intermediary nitrogen store. Here, we explore the relationship between temporal patterns of ammonia release and Gln accumulation in three littoral oniscideans from Southern California. Results are interpreted in terms of water availability, habitat, activity patterns, and ancestry. A two-way experimental design was used to test whether ammonia excretion and Gln accumulation follow a tidal or diel periodicity. Ammonia excretion was studied in the laboratory using chambers with or without available seawater and using an acid trap to collect volatile ammonia. Ligia occidentalis releases ammonia directly into seawater and accumulates Gln during low tide (48.9 ± 6.5 μmol g⁻¹ at low tide, 24.1 ± 3.0 μmol g⁻¹ at high tide), indicating that excretion is tidally constrained. Alloniscus perconvexus and Tylos punctatus can excrete ammonia directly into seawater or utilize volatilization. Both species burrow in sand by day and show a diel excretory pattern, accumulating Gln nocturnally (31.8 ± 2.7 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 21.8 ± 2.3 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for A. perconvexus; 85.7 ± 15.1 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 25.4 ± 2.9 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for T. punctatus) and liberating ammonia diurnally. Glutaminase shows higher activity in terrestrial (0.54-0.86 U g⁻¹) compared to intertidal (0.25-0.31 U g⁻¹) species, consistent with the need to generate high PNH₃ for volatilization. The predominant isoform in Armadillidium vulgare is phosphate dependent and maleate independent; phosphate is a plausible regulator in vivo. PMID:22836297

  17. Medicinal plants used by women from Agnalazaha littoral forest (Southeastern Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The country of Madagascar is renowned for its high level of biodiversity and endemism, as well as the overwhelming pressures and threats placed on the natural resources by a growing population and climate change. Traditional medicine plays an important role in the daily lives of the Malagasy for various reasons including limited access to healthcare, limited markets and traditional values. The objective of this study was to assess the modern utitilization of the Agnalazaha Forest by the local population in Mahabo-Mananivo, Madagascar, for medicinal plants used by women, and to establish a list of medicinal plants used by women sourced from Agnalazaha Forest. Methods Ethnobotanical studies were conducted over a period of five months in 2010 to determine the diversity of medicinal plants used by women in the commune of Mahabo-Mananivo. In all, 498 people were interviewed, both male and female ranging age from 15 to over 60 years old. Results 152 medicinal plants used by local people were collected during the ethnobotanical studies. Among the recorded species, eight native species are widely used by women. These species are known for their therapeutic properties in treating placental apposition and complications during childbirth as well as tropical illnesses such as malaria, filariasis, and sexual diseases like gonorrhea and syphilis. Conclusions Littoral forests are rare ecosystems that are highly threatened on the island nation of Madagascar. Our investigation into the use of medicinal plants sourced from and around the Agnalazaha Forest by the women of Mahabo-Mananivo reinforces the need for this natural resource as a first line of health care for rural families. PMID:24188563

  18. Strong influence of the littoral zone on sedimentary lipid biomarkers in a meromictic lake.

    PubMed

    Bovee, R J; Pearson, A

    2014-11-01

    Planktonic sulfur bacteria growing in zones of photic zone euxinia (PZE) are important primary producers in stratified, sulfur-rich environments. The potential for export and burial of microbial biomass from anoxic photic zones remains relatively understudied, despite being of fundamental importance to interpreting the geologic record of bulk total organic carbon (TOC) and individual lipid biomarkers. Here we report the relative concentrations and carbon isotope ratios of lipid biomarkers from the water column and sediments of meromictic Mahoney Lake. The data show that organic matter in the central basin sediments is indistinguishable from material at the lake shoreline in both its lipid and carbon isotopic compositions. However, this material is not consistent with either the lipid profile or carbon isotope composition of biomass obtained directly from the region of PZE. Due to the strong density stratification and the intensive carbon and sulfur recycling pathways in the water column, there appears to be minimal direct export of the sulfur-oxidizing planktonic community to depth. The results instead suggest that basinal sediments are sourced via the littoral environment, a system that integrates an indigenous shoreline microbial community, the degraded remains of laterally rafted biomass from the PZE community, and detrital remains of terrigenous higher plants. Material from the lake margins appears to travel downslope, traverse the strong density gradient, and become deposited in the deep basin; its final composition may be largely heterotrophic in origin. This suggests an important role for clastic and/or authigenic minerals in aiding the burial of terrigenous and mat-derived organic matter in euxinic systems. Downslope or mineral-aided transport of anoxygenic, photoautotrophic microbial mats may have been a significant sedimentation process in early Earth history. PMID:25201322

  19. Effects of littoral habitat complexity and sunfish composition on fish production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, M.P.; Maloney, K.O.; Chipps, S.R.; Wahl, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Habitat complexity is a key driver of food web dynamics because physical structure dictates resource availability to a community. Changes in fish diversity can also alter trophic interactions and energy pathways in food webs. Few studies have examined the direct, indirect, and interactive effects of biodiversity and habitat complexity on fish production. We explored the effects of habitat complexity (simulated vegetation), sunfish diversity (intra- vs. inter-specific sunfish), and their interaction using a mesocosm experiment. Total fish production was examined across two levels of habitat complexity (low: 161 strands m-2 and high: 714 strands m-2) and two sunfish diversity treatments: bluegill only (Lepomis macrochirus) and bluegill, redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus), and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) combination. We also measured changes in total phosphorus, phytoplankton, periphyton, and invertebrates to explain patterns in fish production. Bluegill and total fish production were unaffected by the sunfish treatments. Habitat complexity had a large influence on food web structure by shifting primary productivity from pelagic to a more littoral pathway in the high habitat treatments. Periphyton was higher with dense vegetation, leading to reductions in total phosphorus, phytoplankton, cladoceran abundance and fish biomass. In tanks with low vegetation, bluegill exhibited increased growth. Habitat complexity can alter energy flow through food webs ultimately influencing higher trophic levels. The lack of an effect of sunfish diversity on fish production does not imply that conserving biodiversity is unimportant; rather, we suggest that understanding the context in which biodiversity is important to food web dynamics is critical to conservation planning. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Tree dispersal strategies in the littoral forest of Sainte Luce (SE-Madagascar).

    PubMed

    Bollen, An; Van Elsacker, Linda; Ganzhorn, Jorg U

    2004-05-01

    Zoochory is the most common mode of seed dispersal for the majority of plant species in the tropics. Based on the assumption of tight plant-animal interactions several hypotheses have been developed to investigate the origin of life history traits of plant diaspores and their dispersers, such as species-specific co-evolution, the low/high investment model (low investment in single fruits but massive fruiting to attract many different frugivores versus high investment in single fruits and fruit production for extended periods to provide food for few frugivores), and the evolution of syndromes which represent plant adaptations to disperser groups (e.g. birds, mammals, mixed). To test these hypotheses the dispersal strategies of 34 tree species were determined in the littoral forest of Sainte Luce (SE-Madagascar) with the help of fruit traps and tree watches. The impact of fruit consumers on the seeds was determined based on detailed behavioral observations. Phenological, morphological and biochemical fruit traits from tree species were measured to look for co-variation with different types of dispersal. No indication for species-specific co-evolution could be found nor any support for the low/high investment model. However dispersal syndromes could be distinguished as diaspores dispersed by birds, mammals or both groups (mixed) differ in the size of their fruits and seeds, fruit shape, and seed number, but not in biochemical traits. Five large-seeded tree species seem to depend critically on the largest lemur, Eulemur fulvus collaris, for seed dispersal. However, this does not represent a case of tight species-specific co-evolution. Rather it seems to be the consequence of the extinction of the larger frugivorous birds and lemurs which might also have fed on these large fruits. Nevertheless these interactions are of crucial importance to conserve the integrity of the forest.

  1. Effects of 4-nonylphenol on benthic macroinvertebrates and insect emergence in littoral enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Schmude, K.L.; Liber, K.; Corry, T.D.; Stay, F.S.

    1999-03-01

    The effect of 4-nonylphenol (NP) on benthic, freshwater macroinvertebrates in littoral enclosures was evaluated over a 2-year period. Enclosures received 11 NP applications, 48 h apart, with nominal rates of 3, 30, 100, and 300 {micro}g/L. Mean measured peak concentrations in integrated water column samples over the 20-d application period were 5 {+-} 4, 23 {+-} 11, 76 {+-} 21, and 243 {+-} 41 {micro}g/L NP. Concentrations of NP in the water column decreased rapidly after the last application. Maximum NP concentrations measured in sediments, pore water, and macrophytes of a 300-{micro}g/L enclosure were 27.4 mg/kg, 29.9 {micro}g/L, and 89.6 mg/kg, respectively. The most abundant macroinvertebrate groups, Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, and Mollusca, decreased in abundance after application. Effects on Mollusca were the most severe. Their numbers were significantly reduced at the highest treatment throughout most of the study. Oligochaetes and chironomids were also significantly reduced at the highest treatment, but populations recovered within 6 weeks. Snails and naidid oligochaetes were slightly affected at the second highest treatment (76 {+-} 21 {micro}g/L NP). Insect emergence was reduced during and immediately post-application, but the effects were likely caused or compounded by a surfactant sheen on the surface of the water that interfered with emergence and/or oviposition. The observed effects on the benthic community were most likely due to exposure from the water, although more persistent macrophyte-associated residues may have contributed to effects on Gastropoda, Naididae, and Tanytarsini. Macrophyte-associated NP residues may pose a small risk to benthic organisms, but it is probably minor compared to water exposures. The no-observed and lowest-observed-effect concentration for the benthic community was 23 {+-} 11 and 76 {+-} 21 {micro}g/L NP, respectively.

  2. Strategies of zooplanktivory shape the dynamics and diversity of littoral plankton communities: a mesocosm approach

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, Laura K; Aymà Padrós, Anna; Leskinen, Elina; Lehtonen, Hannu; Nurminen, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Planktivorous fish can exert strong top-down control on zooplankton communities. By incorporating different feeding strategies, from selective particulate feeding to cruising filter feeding, fish species target distinct prey. In this study, we investigated the effects of two species with different feeding strategies, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus (L.)) and roach (Rutilus rutilus (L.)), on a low-diversity brackish water zooplankton community using a 16-day mesocosm experiment. The experiment was conducted on a small-bodied spring zooplankton community in high-nutrient conditions, as well as a large-bodied summer community in low-nutrient conditions. Effects were highly dependent on the initial zooplankton community structure and hence seasonal variation. In a small-bodied community with high predation pressure and no dispersal or migration, the selective particulate-feeding stickleback depleted the zooplankton community and decreased its diversity more radically than the cruising filter-feeding roach. Cladocerans rather than copepods were efficiently removed by predation, and their removal caused altered patterns in rotifer abundance. In a large-bodied summer community with initial high taxonomic and functional diversity, predation pressure was lower and resource availability was high for omnivorous crustaceans preying on other zooplankton. In this community, predation maintained diversity, regardless of predator species. During both experimental periods, predation influenced the competitive relationship between the dominant calanoid copepods, and altered species composition and size structure of the zooplankton community. Changes also occurred to an extent at the level of nontarget prey, such as microzooplankton and rotifers, emphasizing the importance of subtle predation effects. We discuss our results in the context of the adaptive foraging mechanism and relate them to the natural littoral community. PMID:26045953

  3. Strong influence of the littoral zone on sedimentary lipid biomarkers in a meromictic lake.

    PubMed

    Bovee, R J; Pearson, A

    2014-11-01

    Planktonic sulfur bacteria growing in zones of photic zone euxinia (PZE) are important primary producers in stratified, sulfur-rich environments. The potential for export and burial of microbial biomass from anoxic photic zones remains relatively understudied, despite being of fundamental importance to interpreting the geologic record of bulk total organic carbon (TOC) and individual lipid biomarkers. Here we report the relative concentrations and carbon isotope ratios of lipid biomarkers from the water column and sediments of meromictic Mahoney Lake. The data show that organic matter in the central basin sediments is indistinguishable from material at the lake shoreline in both its lipid and carbon isotopic compositions. However, this material is not consistent with either the lipid profile or carbon isotope composition of biomass obtained directly from the region of PZE. Due to the strong density stratification and the intensive carbon and sulfur recycling pathways in the water column, there appears to be minimal direct export of the sulfur-oxidizing planktonic community to depth. The results instead suggest that basinal sediments are sourced via the littoral environment, a system that integrates an indigenous shoreline microbial community, the degraded remains of laterally rafted biomass from the PZE community, and detrital remains of terrigenous higher plants. Material from the lake margins appears to travel downslope, traverse the strong density gradient, and become deposited in the deep basin; its final composition may be largely heterotrophic in origin. This suggests an important role for clastic and/or authigenic minerals in aiding the burial of terrigenous and mat-derived organic matter in euxinic systems. Downslope or mineral-aided transport of anoxygenic, photoautotrophic microbial mats may have been a significant sedimentation process in early Earth history.

  4. Discontinuous ammonia excretion and glutamine storage in littoral Oniscidea (Crustacea: Isopoda): testing tidal and circadian models.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maya; Wright, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    A key evolutionary development facilitating land colonization in terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) is the intermittent liberation of waste nitrogen as volatile ammonia. Intermittent ammonia release exploits glutamine (Gln) as an intermediary nitrogen store. Here, we explore the relationship between temporal patterns of ammonia release and Gln accumulation in three littoral oniscideans from Southern California. Results are interpreted in terms of water availability, habitat, activity patterns, and ancestry. A two-way experimental design was used to test whether ammonia excretion and Gln accumulation follow a tidal or diel periodicity. Ammonia excretion was studied in the laboratory using chambers with or without available seawater and using an acid trap to collect volatile ammonia. Ligia occidentalis releases ammonia directly into seawater and accumulates Gln during low tide (48.9 ± 6.5 μmol g⁻¹ at low tide, 24.1 ± 3.0 μmol g⁻¹ at high tide), indicating that excretion is tidally constrained. Alloniscus perconvexus and Tylos punctatus can excrete ammonia directly into seawater or utilize volatilization. Both species burrow in sand by day and show a diel excretory pattern, accumulating Gln nocturnally (31.8 ± 2.7 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 21.8 ± 2.3 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for A. perconvexus; 85.7 ± 15.1 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 25.4 ± 2.9 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for T. punctatus) and liberating ammonia diurnally. Glutaminase shows higher activity in terrestrial (0.54-0.86 U g⁻¹) compared to intertidal (0.25-0.31 U g⁻¹) species, consistent with the need to generate high PNH₃ for volatilization. The predominant isoform in Armadillidium vulgare is phosphate dependent and maleate independent; phosphate is a plausible regulator in vivo.

  5. Survey of pesticide application on vegetables in the Littoral area of Togo.

    PubMed

    Adjrah, Yao; Dovlo, Agbéko; Karou, Simplice D; Eklu-Gadegbeku, Kwashie; Agbonon, Amégnona; de Souza, Comlan; Gbeassor, Messanvi

    2013-01-01

    Vegetable production in Togo is seriously affected by pests attack. To reduce damage, farmers indiscriminately use pesticides. Various studies have reported high concentrations of pesticide residues more than acceptable limits in vegetables and other edible food. The aim of the presented study is to study the attitudes and practices developed by vegetable growers about pesticides applications. A standardized questionnaires which included socio-professional factors, provisions and operations concerning the use of varieties of pesticides were addressed to 150 growers in vegetable farms along the Littoral of Togo. In order to complete data concerning pesticides, seven runoff private companies and agents of the 'Direction de la Protection des Végétaux' were interviewed. Data were statistical treated using Sphinx Plus. The survey showed that vegetable growers have an acceptable educational level (36% have more than 7 years of formal education) to exploit instructions concerning pesticide use, but more than 97% do not use recommended tools. Only 21% of them received training for pesticide use. Moreover, 84% of them did not usually wear gloves, and less than 30% used oro-nasal masks. Failure to observe minimum intervals between pesticide application and sale is worrying because extremely hazardous (Carbofuran and Cadusaphos) or moderately toxic (Cypermethrin, Dimethoate, Endosulfan, Chlorpyrifos-ethyl, Fipronil) are the products currently used. The presented study indicates that pesticides application in the survey area represents a potential risk for the environment, farmers and consumers. More investigations are needed to quantify pesticides residues on the vegetables currently con,umed and moreover, to determine the potential effect of those products on human and animals health.

  6. Exposure of juvenile green frogs (Lithobates clamitans) in littoral enclosures to a glyphosate-based herbicide.

    PubMed

    Edge, Christopher B; Gahl, Megan K; Pauli, Bruce D; Thompson, Dean G; Houlahan, Jeff E

    2011-07-01

    The majority of studies on the toxicity of glyphosate-based herbicides to amphibians have focused on larval life stages exposed in aqueous media. However, adult and juvenile amphibians may also be exposed directly or indirectly to herbicides. The potential for such exposures is of particular interest in the littoral zone surrounding wetlands as this is preferred habitat for many amphibian species. Moreover, it may be argued that potential herbicide effects on juvenile or adult amphibians could have comparatively greater influence on overall recruitment, reproductive potential and thus stability of local populations than effects on larvae. In this experiment, juvenile green frogs (Lithobates clamitans) were exposed to two concentrations (2.16 and 4.27 kg a.e./ha) of a glyphosate-based herbicide formulation (VisionMax®), which were based on typical application scenarios in Canadian forestry. The experimental design employed frogs inhabiting in situ enclosures established at the edge of small naturalized wetlands that were split in half using an impermeable plastic barrier. When analyzed using nominal target application rates, exposure to the glyphosate-based herbicide had no significant effect on survival, body condition, liver somatic index or the observed rate of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection. However, there were marginal trends in both ANOVA analysis and post-hoc regressions regarding B. dendrobatidis infection rates and liver somatic index in relation to measured exposure estimates. Results from this study highlight the importance of field research and the need to include multiple endpoints when examining potential effects of a contaminant on non-target organisms. PMID:21536331

  7. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Udder Pathogens Isolated from Dairy Herds in the West Littoral Region of Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    A total of 522 strains belonging to streptococci, enterococci and staphylococci isolated from sub-clinical and clinical cases of bovine mastitis from the west littoral region of Uruguay were analysed for their susceptibility to several antimicrobial agents. The susceptibility patterns were studied by agar disk diffusion methods (ADDM) and broth micro-dilution to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The concentration that inhibits 90% (MIC90) of the analysed strains reported in micrograms per millilitre, for Staphylococcus aureus were > 8, 8, ≤ 0.5, ≤ 4, ≤ 1, ≤ 0.5, > 64, ≤ 0.25, 0.5, ≤ 1 and ≤ 1 to penicillin, ampicillin, oxacillin, cephalotin, gentamicin, erythromycin, oxitetracycline, enrofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, neomycin, and clindamycin, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) had different values for penicillin (4) and ampicillin (2), while the other antimicrobial agents had the same MIC90 values as reported for S. aureus. The MIC90 values for streptococci were 0.12, 0.25, ≤ 4, 16, ≤ 0.25, 0.5, 0.25 for penicillin, ampicillin, cephalotin, gentamicin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, whereas MIC90 for enterococci were 4, 4, 4, ≤ 0.5, 2, > 8 for penicillin, ampicillin, gentamicin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, respectively. Of 336 strains of S. aureus, 160 (47.6%) were resistant to penicillin. For 41 CNS strains, 10 (27%) presented penicillin-resistance. All the streptococcal strains were susceptible to penicillin, while 3 (7%) of the 43 enteroccocal strains were resistant. Non significant statistical differences were found between the results obtained by ADDM and broth micro-dilution for classifying bacterial isolates as susceptible or resistant according to the National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standards. PMID:12071114

  8. Controlled angiogenesis in the heart by cell-based expression of specific vascular endothelial growth factor levels.

    PubMed

    Melly, Ludovic F; Marsano, Anna; Frobert, Aurelien; Boccardo, Stefano; Helmrich, Uta; Heberer, Michael; Eckstein, Friedrich S; Carrel, Thierry P; Giraud, Marie-Noëlle; Tevaearai, Hendrik T; Banfi, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can induce normal angiogenesis or the growth of angioma-like vascular tumors depending on the amount secreted by each producing cell because it remains localized in the microenvironment. In order to control the distribution of VEGF expression levels in vivo, we recently developed a high-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based technique to rapidly purify transduced progenitors that homogeneously express a specific VEGF dose from a heterogeneous primary population. Here we tested the hypothesis that cell-based delivery of a controlled VEGF level could induce normal angiogenesis in the heart, while preventing the development of angiomas. Freshly isolated human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) were transduced with retroviral vectors expressing either rat VEGF linked to a FACS-quantifiable cell-surface marker (a truncated form of CD8) or CD8 alone as control (CTR). VEGF-expressing cells were FACS-purified to generate populations producing either a specific VEGF level (SPEC) or uncontrolled heterogeneous levels (ALL). Fifteen nude rats underwent intramyocardial injection of 10(7) cells. Histology was performed after 4 weeks. Both the SPEC and ALL cells produced a similar total amount of VEGF, and both cell types induced a 50%-60% increase in both total and perfused vessel density compared to CTR cells, despite very limited stable engraftment. However, homogeneous VEGF expression by SPEC cells induced only normal and stable angiogenesis. Conversely, heterogeneous expression of a similar total amount by the ALL cells caused the growth of numerous angioma-like structures. These results suggest that controlled VEGF delivery by FACS-purified ASC may be a promising strategy to achieve safe therapeutic angiogenesis in the heart.

  9. Long-term trends in the structure of eastern Adriatic littoral fish assemblages: Consequences for fisheries management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagličić, N.; Matić-Skoko, S.; Pallaoro, A.; Grgičević, R.; Kraljević, M.; Tutman, P.; Dragičević, B.; Dulčić, J.

    2011-09-01

    Long-term interannual changes in abundance, biomass, diversity and structure of littoral fish assemblages were examined between 1993 and 2009 by experimental trammel net fishing up to six times per year, within the warm period - May to September, at multiple areas along the eastern Adriatic coast with the aim of testing for the consistency of patterns of change across a large spatial scale (˜600 km). The results revealed spatially consistent increasing trends of total fish abundance and biomass growing at an average rate of 15 and 14% per year, respectively. Of the diversity indices analysed, the same pattern of variability was observed for Shannon diversity, while Pielou evenness and average taxonomic distinctness measures Δ ∗ and Δ + showed spatial variability with no obvious temporal trends. Multivariate fish assemblage structure underwent a directional change displaying a similar pattern through time for all the areas. The structural change in fish assemblages generally involved most of the species present in trammel net catches. A large pool of fish species responsible for producing the temporal pattern of assemblage change was relatively different in each of the areas reflecting a large geographic range covered by the study. An analysis of 4 fish species ( Symphodus tinca, Pagellus erythrinus, Mullus surmuletus, Scorpaena porcus) common to each of the study areas as the ones driving the temporal change indicated that there were clear increasing trends of their mean catches across the years at all the study areas. A common pattern among time trajectories across the spatial scale studied implies that the factor affecting the littoral fish assemblages is not localised but regional in nature. As an underlying factor having the potential to induce such widespread and consistent improvements in littoral fish assemblages, a more restrictive artisanal fishery management that has progressively been put in place during the study period, is suggested and discussed.

  10. Qualité et comportement de l'aquifère crayeux sur le littoral Nord-Pas-de-Calais

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, Barbara; Crampon, Norbert; Bracq, Pierre

    1998-10-01

    Along the Nord-Pas-de-Calais coast, the chalk aquifer is in contact with the sea and the aquiferous Quaternary formations forming the coastal plain ('Bas-Champs' and sand-dunes). To obtain information on the behaviour of the chalk aquifer in the 'Bas-Champs' area, a hydrochemical analysis has been carried out on the available drillings and completed by a geophysical survey. The results thereby obtained provide a much clearer image of the phenomena governing the groundflows and their interactions around the littoral limit of the chalk aquifer.

  11. The Application of Seismic Array Techniques to Image UXO-Contaminated Littoral Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, R.; Korneev, V.; Nihei, K.; Johnson, L.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the application of seismic array techniques to increase the energy radiation and resolution of seismic waves in littoral areas to improve the success rate of detecting UXO in contaminated underwater sites. The investigation is carried out based on numerical modeling, including 2-D finite difference modeling and 3-D analytical solutions of the problem. In addition to various UXO orientations, we also modeled the presence of clutter in the subsurface. An array of 31 source and receiver elements was located floating in the water as well as sited on the seafloor, which allowed the comparison between single source-receiver combinations and beam-forming techniques. The numerical forward modeling involved noise-free and noisy data as well as interferences by free surface reflections (off the water-air interface), which produced the strongest phases on the seismograms. The inversion of the scattered seismic energy was performed using a 2-D eikonal solver (curved rays), which stacked and located the recorded amplitudes in space to determine the location of the UXO. The inversion also included the determination of the best fitting velocity model for the bay mud. The results of the 2-D modeling indicated that a single, horizontally oriented, UXO could be well detected as a function of depth and horizontal location. In the case of the source-receiver array being placed on the seafloor, the edges of the UXO were resolved indicating its horizontal extent, while the top of the UXO was correctly located. The cases of a second, vertically oriented, UXO and clutter located 0.1 m next to the first UXO, produced similar results. In each case the two objects produced slight interference in the backscattered seismic signal, yet the resolution of the seismic wave was still good enough to resolve the two objects from each other. The introduction of a rippled water-seafloor interface during the forward modeling didn't change the results for the case of a floating source

  12. Distribution of living larger benthic foraminifera in littoral environments of the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of larger benthic foraminifera in Recent littoral environment of the United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi and Western regions) was investigated with the aim of understanding the response of those foraminifera to an increase in water salinity. For this purpose, 100 sediment samples from nearshore shelf, beach-front, channel, lagoon, and intertidal environment were collected. Sampling was undertaken at a water depth shallower than 15 m in water with a temperature of 22 to 35˚C, a salinity ranging from 40 to 60‰ and a pH of 8. Samples were stained with rose Bengal at the moment of sample collection in order to identify living specimens. The most abundant epiphytic larger benthic foraminifera in the studied area were Peneroplis pertusus and P. planatus with less common Spirolina areatina, S. aciculate and Sorites marginalis. The living specimens of the above mentioned species with normal test growing were particularly abundant in the nearshore shelf and lagoonal samples collected on seaweed. Dead specimens were concentrated in the coarser sediments of the beach-front, probably transported from nearby environments. Shallow coastal ponds are located in the upper intertidal zone and have a maximum salinity of 60‰ and contain abundant detached seagrass. Samples collected from these ponds possess a living foraminifera assemblage dominated by Peneroplis pertusus and P. planatus. High percentages (up to 50% of the stained assemblage) of Peneroplis presented abnormality in test growth, such as the presence of multiple apertures with reduced size, deformation in the general shape of the test, irregular suture lines and abnormal coiling. The high percentage of abnormal tests reflects natural environmental stress mainly caused by high and variable salinity. The unique presence of living epiphytic species, suggests that epiphytic foraminifera may be transported into the pond together with seagrass and continued to live in the pond. This hypothesis is supported by

  13. Ecological speciation in postglacial European whitefish: rapid adaptive radiations into the littoral, pelagic, and profundal lake habitats

    PubMed Central

    Præbel, Kim; Knudsen, Rune; Siwertsson, Anna; Karhunen, Markku; Kahilainen, Kimmo K; Ovaskainen, Otso; Østbye, Kjartan; Peruzzi, Stefano; Fevolden, Svein-Erik; Amundsen, Per-Arne

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how a monophyletic lineage of a species diverges into several adaptive forms has received increased attention in recent years, but the underlying mechanisms in this process are still under debate. Postglacial fishes are excellent model organisms for exploring this process, especially the initial stages of ecological speciation, as postglacial lakes represent replicated discrete environments with variation in available niches. Here, we combine data of niche utilization, trophic morphology, and 17 microsatellite loci to investigate the diversification process of three sympatric European whitefish morphs from three northern Fennoscandian lakes. The morphological divergence in the gill raker number among the whitefish morphs was related to the utilization of different trophic niches and was associated with reproductive isolation within and across lakes. The intralacustrine comparison of whitefish morphs showed that these systems represent two levels of adaptive divergence: (1) a consistent littoral–pelagic resource axis; and (2) a more variable littoral–profundal resource axis. The results also indicate that the profundal whitefish morph has diverged repeatedly from the ancestral littoral whitefish morph in sympatry in two different watercourses. In contrast, all the analyses performed revealed clustering of the pelagic whitefish morphs across lakes suggesting parallel postglacial immigration with the littoral whitefish morph into each lake. Finally, the analyses strongly suggested that the trophic adaptive trait, number of gill rakers, was under diversifying selection in the different whitefish morphs. Together, the results support a complex evolutionary scenario where ecological speciation acts, but where both allopatric (colonization history) and sympatric (within watercourse divergence) processes are involved. PMID:24455129

  14. Determining littoral sediment transport paths adjacent to an eroding carbonate beach through net sediment grain-size trend analysis: Lanikai Beach, Hawaii.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, C. J.; Fletcher, C.; Vitousek, S.; Romine, B.; Smith, T.

    2007-12-01

    Identifying long-term trends of sediment transport in coastal environments is a fundamental goal shared by coastal scientists, engineers, and resource managers. Historical photographic analysis and predictive computer models have served as the primary approaches to charactering long-term trends in sediment flux. Net sediment grain-size trend analysis is an empirical, sedimentologically based technique that uses physical sediment samples to identify long-term sediment transport pathways. Originally developed by McLaren and Bowles (1985), net sediment grain-size trend analysis identifies progressive trends in grain-size parameters (mean size, sorting, and skewness) in sediment samples. Ultimately, the results give an indication of long-shore sediment transport, a visualization of individual littoral cells, and a better understanding of sediment processes in the near- shore region. We applied two methodologies put forth by Gao and Collins (1992) and Roux (1994) to 214 samples collected off Lanikai Beach, Hawaii; an excellent example of a coastal environment with chronic beach erosion. The Gao methodology searches point-to-point search for the two trend types used by McLaren. The Roux methodology simultaneously searches between five adjacent points for four trend types. Despite significant differences, similar trends dominate in both sets of results. The Gao methodology produces generalized trends while the Roux methodology shows finer details of sediment transport. Long-shore transport direction is shown to be northward for the majority of the study area, implying a sediment supply to the south. Therefore erosion is instigated if the sediment supply south of Lanikai Beach is cut off. A strong onshore sediment transport trend fails to accrete a beach in an armored section of the southern Lanikai coastline, demonstrating the erosive effect of increased wave refraction from coastal armoring. Results of the sediment trend analyses agree well with tidal current models

  15. Catastrophic erosion events on a littoral drift shore: development of washover fields and rates of shoreline retreat on the Atlantic side of Jupiter Island, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Parts of the eastern shore of Jupiter Island have retreated more than 140m since 1930. Although many of the low profile, dissipative beaches along the Atlantic coast of the Florida peninsula are in a critical state of erosion, the highest rates of shoreline retreat tend to occur less than 2-3 km downdrift from engineering structures used to stabilize tidal inlets. Compared to other eroding shorelines, Jupiter Island is unusual because 2/3 (20 km) of the eastern shore that extends downdrift of the St. Lucie inlet is severely affected. Decadal shoreline retreats in excess of 25m along this section have been punctuated by documented catastrophic episodes in 1960, 1965, and 1984. Because of the lack of hurricane impact for the past two decades, these accelerated erosional events have been associated with the passage of meteorological fronts or interior high pressure systems that bring about strong onshore northeasterly winds. During periods of extreme storm activity (high waves and wind surge), deep overwash penetration occurs. The 1984 Thanksgiving Day storm, for example, caused extensive shoreline erosion when, in the study area, approximately 6.25 million m/sup 3/ of sediment were shifted 100m inland from the foreshore and near-offshore bars. Some of the larger overwash fans were more than 1m in thickness and extended 150m inland. Possible causes of the catastrophic erosion that occurs along this coastal stretch are being investigated in relation to interactions between littoral drift systems, storm surge, sediment cells, bottom configuration, and engineering structures.

  16. Littoral sedimentation of rift lakes: an illustrated overview from the modern to Pliocene Lake Turkana (East African Rift System, Kenya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Mathieu; Nutz, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Existing depositional models for rift lakes can be summarized as clastics transported by axial and lateral rivers, then distributed by fan-deltas and/or deltas into a standing water body which is dominated by settling of fine particles, and experiencing occasional coarser underflows. Even if known from paleolakes and modern lakes, reworking of clastics by alongshore drift, waves and storms are rarely considered in depositional models. However, if we consider the lake Turkana Basin (East African Rift System, Kenya) it is obvious that this vision is incomplete. Three representative time slices are considered here: the modern Lake Turkana, the Megalake Turkana which developed thanks to the African Humid Period (Holocene), and the Plio-Pleistocene highstand episodes of paleolake Turkana (Nachukui, Shungura and Koobi Fora Formations, Omo Group). First, remarkable clastic morphosedimentary structures such as beach ridges, spits, washover fans, lagoons, or wave-dominated deltas are very well developed along the shoreline of modern lake Turkana, suggesting strong hydrodynamics responsible for a major reworking of the fluvial-derived clastics all along the littoral zone (longshore and cross-shore transport) of the lake. Similarly, past hydrodynamics are recorded from prominent raised beach ridges and spits, well-preserved all around the lake, above its present water-level (~360 m asl) and up to ~455 m. These large-scale clastic morphosedimentary structures also record the maximum extent of Megalake Turkana during the African Humid Period, as well as its subsequent regression forced by the end of the Holocene climatic optimum. Several hundreds of meters of fluvial-deltaic-lacustrine deposits spanning the Pliocene-Pleistocene are exposed in the Turkana basin thanks to tectonic faulting. These deposits are world famous for their paleontological and archeological content that documents the very early story of Mankind. They also preserve several paleolake highstand episodes with

  17. A new methodology based on littoral community cartography dominated by macroalgae for the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Enric; Torras, Xavier; Pinedo, Susana; García, María; Mangialajo, Luisa; de Torres, Mariona

    2007-01-01

    Macroalgae is a biological key element for the assessment of the ecological status in coastal waters in the frame of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD, 2000/60/EC). Here we propose a methodology for monitoring water quality based on the cartography of littoral and upper-sublittoral rocky-shore communities (CARLIT, in short). With the use of spatial databases, GIS, and available information about the value of rocky-shore communities as indicators of water quality, it is possible to obtain an environmental quality index representative of the ecological status of rocky coasts. This index, which completely fulfils the requirements of the WFD, is expressed as a ratio between the observed values in the sector of shore that is being assessed and the expected value in a reference condition zone with the same substrate and coastal morphology (Ecological Quality Ratio, EQR). The application of this index to the coast of Catalonia (North-Western Mediterranean) is presented.

  18. High Temperature Superconducting Degaussing-Cooling Two Hts Coils with One Cryocooler for the Littoral Combat Ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, B. K.; Golda, E. M.; Kephart, J. T.

    2008-03-01

    The concept of creating a high temperature superconducting degaussing system has previously been studied by the Navy and shown to provide significant weight savings over conventional copper based degaussing systems. Modeling efforts have shown that in a HTS Degaussing System (HTSDG) for the Littoral Combat Ship, the dominant costs are cryocoolers. In an effort to minimize the number of cryocoolers, a two coil demonstrator cooled by one cryocooler has been constructed at NSWCCD Philadelphia. The demonstration consists of two 22 m long sections of flexible cryostat that are electrically isolated but connected in series through two junction boxes for serial gas flow. Within each cryostat section, 12 turns of HTS represent a vertical and horizontal degaussing coil. Use of Helium as the working fluid reduces safety impacts and allows higher current density in the HTS conductor due to lower temperature operation. Design, testing results, and lessons learned from the installation and operation of this cable are presented in this paper.

  19. Distribution and Ecology of Cyanobacteria in the Rocky Littoral of an English Lake District Water Body, Devoke Water

    PubMed Central

    Pentecost, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria were sampled along two vertical and two horizontal transects in the littoral of Devoke Water, English Lake District. Profiles of cyanobacterium diversity and abundance showed that both attained a maximum close to the water line, but declined rapidly 20–40 cm above it. The distribution of individual species with height together with species and site ordinations showed that several taxa occurred in well-defined zones. A narrow “black zone” in the supralittoral was colonised mainly by species of Calothrix, Dichothrix and Gloeocapsa with pigmented sheaths. There was no evidence of lateral variation of species around the lake, but the height of the black zone correlated positively with wind exposure. The flora of Devoke Water is that of a base-poor mountain lake with some elements of a lowland, more alkaline water-body. PMID:25522253

  20. Influence of abiotic factors on cathemeral activity: the case of Eulemur fulvus collaris in the littoral forest of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Donati, Giuseppe; Borgognini-Tarli, Silvana M

    2006-01-01

    The role environmental factors play in influencing circadian rhythms in natural habitats is still poorly described in primates, especially for those taxa with an activity cycle extended over the 24-hour cycle. In this paper, we elucidate the importance of abiotic factors in entraining the activity of cathemeral primates, focussing on results from a long-term study of Eulemur fulvus collaris (collared brown lemur) in south-eastern Malagasy littoral forest. Two groups of lemurs were followed for 60 whole-day and 59 whole-night observation periods over 14 months. Diurnal and nocturnal observations were equally distributed among moon phases and seasons. Temperature and humidity were recorded hourly by automatic data loggers. The littoral forest has a climatic environment where rainfall and humidity are uncorrelated with temperature and photoperiod. Diurnal and nocturnal activity varied seasonally, with the former increasing significantly with extended day length and the latter increasing significantly with shortened day length. Dusk seemed to act as a primary zeitgeber for these lemurs, coordinating the onset of evening activity throughout the entire year. Lunar phase and the nocturnal luminosity index correlated positively with the duration of nocturnal activity and negatively with the length of diurnal activity. Temperature was positively associated with diurnal activity but did not seem to influence lemur rhythms at night. Finally, lemur nocturnal activity significantly decreased when levels of humidity and rainfall were high. Cathemeral biorhythm is triggered by zeitgebers and influenced by masking factors. The activity of collared brown lemurs appears to be seasonally influenced by photoperiod and directly modulated by nocturnal ambient luminosity. These results are discussed by comparing data from other cathemeral species living in various climatic situations.

  1. Characterization and sequence analysis of manganese superoxide dismutases from Brachyura (Crustacea: Decapoda): hydrothermal Bythograeidae versus littoral crabs.

    PubMed

    Marchand, J; Leignel, V; Moreau, B; Chénais, B

    2009-06-01

    Hydrothermal vent conditions are particular and organisms living in these environments may have developed detoxification mechanisms and/or genetic adaptations. In particular, physico-chemical conditions are thought to generate reactive oxygen species, highly toxic for organisms. The enzyme superoxide dismutase constitutes the first line of defense against oxidative damage. To improve our understanding of the environmental impacts exerted on the vent organisms, we have characterized the two manganese superoxide dismutase cDNAs (mitochondrial: mMnSOD and cytoplasmic: cMnSOD) of three members of the Bythograeidae (Bythograea thermydron, Cyanagraea praedator and Segonzacia mesatlantica), the only endemic crab family living in hydrothermal vents. In comparison, the isolation of manganese superoxide dismutase cDNAs was also carried out in several littoral crab families. MnSOD signatures were found in both sequences from each species studied, as well as different residues involved in metal coordination and protein activity. The phylogenetic analysis performed confirms the probable ancient duplication that gave rise to the two MnSODs (cMnSOD and mMnSOD). This study describes two potential distinct mMnSOD isoforms presenting particular peptide signals. Nevertheless, no sequence particularity that could support the hypothesis of a genetic adaptation was found in Bythograeidae's MnSODs compared to the other sequences. The mRNA expression analysis performed by real-time PCR on B. thermydron and S. mesatlantica compared to Cancer pagurus and Necora puber revealed a higher cMnSOD and mMnSOD mRNA expression in hydrothermal crabs compared to littoral crabs.

  2. From Kings Peak to the Delgado submarine canyon: Tracking littoral inputs to the deep sea at the Mendocino Triple Junction, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, C. J.; Di Fiori, R. V.; Smith, M. E.; Mueller, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    Gravel coarse enough to overcome viscous damping and impact bedrock underwater is thought prerequisite for incision of submarine canyons, yet with few exceptions, canyons off the California coast have headwalls >2 km offshore at the shelf edge and below storm wave base. This suggests effective disconnection from modern coarse littoral sediment fluxes, and implies they are relict Pleistocene features only actively incised during glacial periods. North of the Transverse Ranges only five submarine canyons approach shore closer than 500 m, and are coincident areas of rapid uplift. Although canyons occur adjacent to major upland-draining streams that transport coarse sediment, submarine canyon headwalls are often laterally offset from stream mouths by ~1-2 km. Coarse stream sediment thus requires littoral transport to enter canyon heads and induce incision. To better understand the evolution of coarse sediment through the littoral system, we measured the texture and composition of coarse sediment in streams and beaches directly onshore of the Delgado submarine canyon, which lies offshore of the fastest uplifting segment of the King Range and onshore the Mendocino Triple Junction. Adjacent to the Delgado Canyon inlet, coarse (d50 > 360 mm) sediment enters the littoral zone from three streams, and is transported alongshore in a predominantly southeast direction. Stream-derived alluvium is comprised of a poorly to moderately sorted mixture of angular to subrounded clasts of well-cemented sandstone (d50 = 256-725 mm) and fissile siliciclastic mudstone (d50 = 90-256 mm). Well sorted and rounded beach gravels adjacent to stream mouths are similarly coarse, and clasts larger than 1 m diameter extend 200-400 meters eastward from stream mouths. In contrast, sediment entering the littoral zone from hillslope erosion between streams is finer (d50 ~16 mm) and is exclusively comprised of pervasively-folded siliciclastic mudstone. Immediately adjacent the Delgado canyon headwall

  3. Spatial and Seasonal CH4 Flux in the Littoral Zone of Miyun Reservoir near Beijing: The Effects of Water Level and Its Fluctuation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Geng, Xuemeng; Grace, John; Lu, Cai; Zhu, Yi; Zhou, Yan; Lei, Guangchun

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands, and especially their littoral zones, are considered to be CH4 emissions hotspots. The recent creation of reservoirs has caused a rapid increase in the area of the world’s littoral zones. To investigate the effects of water depth and water level fluctuation on CH4 fluxes, and how these are coupled with vegetation and nutrients, we used static closed chamber and gas chromatography techniques to measure CH4 fluxes in the littoral zone of a large reservoir near Beijing, China, from November 2011 to October 2012. We found that CH4 flux decreased significantly along a transect from open water to dry land, from 3.1 mg m−2 h−1 at the deep water site to approximately 1.3 mg m−2 h−1 at the shallow water site, and less than 0.01 mg m−2 h−1 in the non-flooded area. Water level influenced CH4 flux by affecting soil properties including soil redox potential, soil carbon and nitrogen, and bulk density. The largest emission of all was from the seasonally flooded site after a flooding event (up to 21.1 mg m−2 h−1), which may have been caused by vegetation decomposition. Submerged sites had greater emissions, while the driest site had lower emissions. Immediately after the monthly measurements had been made, we removed the aboveground vegetation to enable an assessment of the gas transportation per unit of biomass. Removal of biomass decreased emissions by up to 53%. These results indicated the dominant effect of water depth on CH4 flux through effects of soil conditions, plant species composition and distribution. This study suggests that temporally flooded wetlands, including littoral zones, contribute significantly to the global CH4 burden. However, the current challenge is to capture their spatial extent and temporal variation in the fluxes. PMID:24710279

  4. Spatial and seasonal CH4 flux in the littoral zone of Miyun Reservoir near Beijing: the effects of water level and its fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Geng, Xuemeng; Grace, John; Lu, Cai; Zhu, Yi; Zhou, Yan; Lei, Guangchun

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands, and especially their littoral zones, are considered to be CH4 emissions hotspots. The recent creation of reservoirs has caused a rapid increase in the area of the world's littoral zones. To investigate the effects of water depth and water level fluctuation on CH4 fluxes, and how these are coupled with vegetation and nutrients, we used static closed chamber and gas chromatography techniques to measure CH4 fluxes in the littoral zone of a large reservoir near Beijing, China, from November 2011 to October 2012. We found that CH4 flux decreased significantly along a transect from open water to dry land, from 3.1 mg m(-2) h(-1) at the deep water site to approximately 1.3 mg m(-2) h(-1) at the shallow water site, and less than 0.01 mg m(-2) h(-1) in the non-flooded area. Water level influenced CH4 flux by affecting soil properties including soil redox potential, soil carbon and nitrogen, and bulk density. The largest emission of all was from the seasonally flooded site after a flooding event (up to 21.1 mg m(-2) h(-1)), which may have been caused by vegetation decomposition. Submerged sites had greater emissions, while the driest site had lower emissions. Immediately after the monthly measurements had been made, we removed the aboveground vegetation to enable an assessment of the gas transportation per unit of biomass. Removal of biomass decreased emissions by up to 53%. These results indicated the dominant effect of water depth on CH4 flux through effects of soil conditions, plant species composition and distribution. This study suggests that temporally flooded wetlands, including littoral zones, contribute significantly to the global CH4 burden. However, the current challenge is to capture their spatial extent and temporal variation in the fluxes. PMID:24710279

  5. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions in the littoral zone of a Chinese reservoir: environmental controls and implications for future designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Lei, Guangchun; Grace, John; Geng, Xuemeng; Lu, Cai; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Yi

    2015-04-01

    We report fluxes of CH4 and N2O using the static closed chamber and gas chromatography techniques from the littoral zone of Miyun Reservoir, a large reservoir providing water for Beijing. Seasonal and spatial variations of CH4 and N2O flux and environmental factors were monitored throughout the growing season including a flood event during summer rains. The littoral zone was divided into five areas based on water level. Sites were selected ranging from locations in open water to the dry area on higher ground, to provide five contrasting environments: deep water area, shallow water area, seasonal flooded area, 'seasonally flooded control' area and permanent non-flooded area. Our results showed that flooding increased CH4 emission sharply but did not influence N2O emission significantly. CH4 flux decreased along a transect from open water to dry land, from 3.1 mg m-2 h-1 at the deep water site to approximately 1.3 mg m-2 h-1 at the shallow water site, and less than 0.01 mg m-2 h-1 in the non-flooded area. The largest emission of all was from the seasonally flooded site after the flooding event (up to 21.1 mg m-2 h-1). N2O flux ranged from -2.97 μg m-2 h-1 to 180.06 μg m-2 h-1. Non flooded dry land emitted more N2O than flooded land, no matter whether it was permanently or seasonally flooded. No significant difference was observed between seasonally flooded sites (3.56±0.86 μg m-2 h-1) and their control sites (3.68±0.59 μg m-2 h-1). CH4 fluxes were correlated with air temperature, water depth, water dissolved oxygen, biomass and soil parameters including soil water content, bulk density, pH, total carbon, total nitrogen and NH4+. N2O fluxes were correlated with wind speed, air temperature, water dissolved oxygen, soil water content and soil NO3-. Thus the emissions of the two gases are controlled in different ways, and we discuss the possibilities of developing a spatio-temporal model to assist in the design and management of future reservoirs under a changing

  6. Effects of copper mine tailings disposal on littoral meiofaunal assemblages in the Atacama region of northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew R; Correa, Juan A

    2005-02-01

    The effects of the disposal of copper mine tailings on the littoral meiofaunal assemblages of the Chañaral area of northern Chile were studied. Of the metals data collected, only in the case of copper was there a clear association with the tailings distribution in both the seawater and porewater samples, and it is assumed that the tailings on the beaches was the source of copper in the adjacent seawater. When compared to the reference sites, the meiofaunal assemblages at the impacted sites had significantly lower densities and taxa diversities; at the northern sites only the densities were lower. Otoplanid turbellarians were identified as characteristic of those beaches impacted by tailings. The combination of porewater copper and the amount of tailings present were identified as mostly responsible for the observed structure of the meiofaunal assemblages. It was also established that the variation in natural sediment grain size from beach to beach was not a significant factor in the observed differences in the meiofaunal assemblages. The two groups of meiofauna that proved to be most sensitive to the effects of tailings dumping were the foraminiferans and the harpacticoid copepods.

  7. Estimation of canine Leishmania infection prevalence in six cities of the Algerian littoral zone using a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Adel, Amel; Abatih, Emmanuel; Speybroeck, Niko; Soukehal, Abdelkrim; Bouguedour, Rachid; Boughalem, Karim; Bouhbal, Abdelmalek; Djerbal, Mouloud; Saegerman, Claude; Berkvens, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    A large-scale study on canine Leishmania infection (CanL) was conducted in six localities along a west-east transect in the Algerian littoral zone (Tlemcen, Mostaganem, Tipaza, Boumerdes, Bejaia, Jijel) and covering two sampling periods. In total 2,184 dogs were tested with an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and a direct agglutination test (DAT). Combined multiple-testing and several statistical methods were compared to estimate the CanL true prevalence and tests characteristics (sensitivity and specificity). The Bayesian full model showed the best fit and yielded prevalence estimates between 11% (Mostaganem, first period) and 38% (Bejaia, second period). Sensitivity of IFAT varied (in function of locality) between 86% and 88% while its specificity varied between 65% and 87%. DAT was less sensitive than IFAT but showed a higher specificity (between 80% and 95% in function of locality or/and season). A general increasing trend of the CanL prevalence was noted from west to east. A concordance between the present results and the incidence of human cases of visceral leishmaniasis was observed, where also a maximum was recorded for Bejaia. The results of the present study highlight the dangers when using IFAT as a gold standard. PMID:25793942

  8. The influence of oceanographic fronts and early-life-history traits on connectivity among littoral fish species

    PubMed Central

    Galarza, Juan A.; Carreras-Carbonell, Josep; Macpherson, Enrique; Pascual, Marta; Roques, Severine; Turner, George F.; Rico, Ciro

    2009-01-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral genetic diversity is mainly influenced by barriers to dispersal. The nature of such barriers varies according to the dispersal means and capabilities of the organisms concerned. Although these barriers are often obvious on land, in the ocean they can be more difficult to identify. Determining the relative influence of physical and biotic factors on genetic connectivity remains a major challenge for marine ecologists. Here, we compare gene flow patterns of 7 littoral fish species from 6 families with a range of early-life-history traits sampled at the same geographic locations across common environmental discontinuities in the form of oceanic fronts in the Western Mediterranean. We show that these fronts represent major barriers to gene flow and have a strong influence on the population genetic structure of some fish species. We also found no significant relation between the early-life-history traits most commonly investigated (egg type, pelagic larval duration, and inshore-offshore spawning) and gene flow patterns, suggesting that other life-history factors should deserve attention. The fronts analyzed and the underlying physical mechanisms are not site-specific but common among the oceans, suggesting the generality of our findings. PMID:19164518

  9. Integrated Observations From Fixed and AUV Platforms in the Littoral Zone at the SFOMC Coastal Ocean Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanak, M. R.

    2001-12-01

    A 12-hour survey of the coastal waters off the east coast of Florida at the South Florida Ocean Measurement Center (SFOMC) coastal ocean observatory, during summer 1999, is described to illustrate the observatory's capabilities for ocean observation. The facility is located close to the Gulf Stream, the continental shelf break being only 3 miles from shore and is therefore influenced by the Gulf Stream meanders and the instability of the horizontal shear layer at its edge. As a result, both cross-shelf and along-shelf components of currents in the littoral zone can undergo dramatic +/- 0.5 m/s oscillations. Observations of surface currents from an OSCR, and of subsurface structure from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) platform, a bottom-mounted ADCP and CT-chain arrays during the survey will be described and compared. The AUV on-board sensors included upward and downward looking 1200kHz ADCP, a CTD package and a small-scale turbulence package, consisting of two shear probes and a fast-response thermistor. Prevailing atmospheric conditions were recorded at an on-site buoy. The combined observations depict flows over a range of scales. Acknowledgements: The observations from the OSCR are due to Nick Shay and Tom Cook (University of Miami), and from the bottom-mounted ADCP, CT chain arrays and the surface buoy are due to Alex Soloviev (Nova Southeastern University) and Mark Luther and Bob Weisberg (University of South Florida).

  10. Comparative ecotoxicity of interstitial waters in littoral ecosystems using Microtox{reg_sign} and the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis

    SciTech Connect

    Valls, T.A. Del; Forja, J.M.; Lubian, L.M.; Gomez-Parra, A.

    1997-11-01

    The toxic effects of sediment interstitial waters collected from seven littoral sites in the Gulf of Cadiz were tested with the Microtox assay and a 7-d Brachionus plicatilis (Rotifera) decline test. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrients (ammonia, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, and silicate), the heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cr, and Cd), and the linear alkylbenzensulfonate (LAS) concentrations in the interstitial water were measured. The results of assays were compared in a dose-response relationship between sites. This comparison has demonstrated a general agreement between toxicity values determined by Brachionus plicatilis and Photobacterium phosphoreum, except in the case of interstitial water toxicity from mixtures of heavy metals. Data derived from interstitial water chemistry and bioassays were assembled by multivariate statistical techniques (principal components analysis). Positive prevalence of these components in cases studied was used to establish those ranges in chemical concentrations associated with adverse effects. The interstitial water guidelines, in terms of concentrations at or below which biological effects have been shown to be minimal (mg/L), are: DOC, 12.8; phosphate, 0.28; LAS, 80.4; ammonia, 12.1: chromium, 0.0045.

  11. Acoustic backscatter measurements from littoral seabeds at shallow grazing angles at 4 and 8 kHz.

    PubMed

    Hines, Paul C; Osler, John C; MacDougald, Darcy J

    2005-06-01

    Direct measurement of acoustic scattering from the seabed at shallow grazing angles and low kilohertz frequencies presents a considerable challenge in littoral waters. Specifically, returns from the air-water interface typically contaminate the signals of interest. To address this issue, DRDC Atlantic has developed a sea-going research system for measuring acoustic scatter from the seabed in shallow-water environs. The system, known as the wideband sonar (WBS), consists of a parametric array transmitter and a superdirective receiver. In this paper, backscatter measurements obtained with the WBS at two sandy, shallow-water sites off North America's Atlantic coast are presented. Data were collected at 4 and 8 kHz at grazing angles from 3 degrees-15 degrees. The backscattering strength is similar at both sites and, below about 8 degrees, it appears to be independent of frequency within the statistical accuracy of the data. The measurements show reasonable agreement with model estimates of backscatter from sandy sediments. A small data set was collected at one of the sites to examine the feasibility of using the WBS to measure the azimuthal variability of acoustic scatter. The data set--although limited--indicates that the parametric array's narrow beamwidth makes the system well-suited to this task.

  12. Diagnosis and management of renal angioma.

    PubMed Central

    Abercrombie, J F; Holmes, S A; Ball, A J

    1992-01-01

    Five patients with symptomatic renal angiomata are described. All presented with heavy haematuria and unilateral ureteric obstruction without evidence of a mass distorting the renal architecture. Renal angiomata are most easily diagnosed by selective renal angiography. They may be treated by intraarterial embolization, avoiding the need for major ablative surgery. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:1433042

  13. Climate change reduces offspring fitness in littoral spawners: a study integrating organismic response and long-term time-series.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Fabrizio; Barausse, Alberto; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Giomi, Folco

    2013-02-01

    Integrating long-term ecological observations with experimental findings on species response and tolerance to environmental stress supports an understanding of climate effects on population dynamics. Here, we combine the two approaches, laboratory experiments and analysis of multi-decadal time-series, to understand the consequences of climate anomalies and ongoing change for the population dynamics of a eurythermal littoral species, Carcinus aestuarii. For the generation of cause and effect hypotheses we investigated the thermal response of crab embryos at four developmental stages. We first measured metabolic rate variations in embryos following acute warming (16-24 °C) and after incubation at 20 and 24 °C for limited periods. All experiments consistently revealed differential thermal responses depending on the developmental stage. Temperature-induced changes in metabolic activity of early embryonic stages of blastula and gastrula suggested the onset of abnormal development. In contrast, later developmental stages, characterized by tissue and organ differentiation, were marginally affected by temperature anomalies, indicating enhanced resilience to thermal stress. Then, we extended these findings to a larger, population scale, by analyzing a time-series of C. aestuarii landings in the Venice lagoon from 1945 to 2010 (ripe crabs were recorded separately) in relation to temperature. Landings and extreme climatic events showed marked long-term and short-term variations. We found negative relationships between landings and thermal stress indices on both timescales, with time lags consistent with an impact on crab early life stages. When quantitatively evaluating the influence of thermal stress on population dynamics, we found that it has a comparable effect to that of the biomass of spawners. This work provides strong evidence that physiological responses to climatic anomalies translate into population-level changes and that apparently tolerant species may be

  14. Long-term fate and bioavailability of sediment associated 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran in littoral enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, R.S.; Fairchild, W.L.; Holoka, M.H.; Muir, D.C.G.

    2000-06-01

    the fate and bioavailability of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF; 4,6-tritium labeled) was examined over a 3-year period in littoral enclosures in a small oligotrophic lake in the Experimental Lakes Area. Tetrachlorodibenzofuran was added as a single dose or as five small multiple additions over a 5-d period in a sediment slurry. Tetrachlorodibenzofuran was rapidly redistributed, mainly to bottom sediments reflecting removal on settling particles. Between 0 and 120 d. 80 to 90% of TCDF in the water column was associated with particles (>1 {micro}m). The highest concentration of TCDF in suspended particles was consistently observed in the smallest size fraction (0.22--1 {micro}m) at 326 to 464 d post treatment. Mode of addition had no effect on TCDF concentrations in water or surficial sediments or pore waters throughout the experiment. Mean TCDF concentrations in surficial sediment were 1.830 {+-} 1.180 pg/g whereas they averaged 1.260 {+-} 596 pg/g OC from 318 to 851 d post treatment. Increasing concentrations of TCDE in lower sediment layers at 952 d suggests that TCDF was either diffusing into the sediment or undergoing burial. Fugacity (f) calculations indicated that the TCDF in enclosures shifted from disequilibrium favoring the water column to a disequilibrium with respect to bottom sediments from day 21 onward. Initially, TCDF was more bioavailable to filtering and deposit feeders (mussels, Chironomidae, Hexagenia sp., and zooplankton) in enclosures receiving multiple additions; however, differences were rarely statistically significant. Concentrations of TCDF in all organisms were initially high, and they decreased in later sampling periods. Biota--sediment-accumulation factors (BSAFs) in mussels and crayfish were >1 in the early sampling periods, which reflected greater bioavailability of the added particle-borne TCDF. By 851 d, BSAFs had declined to 0.02 to 0.04, reflecting removal of TCDF from the water column and from surficial sediments.

  15. Diversity of larvae of littoral Chironomidae (Diptera: Insecta) and their role as bioindicators in urban reservoirs of different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Morais, S S; Molozzi, J; Viana, A L; Viana, T H; Callisto, M

    2010-11-01

    The Chironomidae (Diptera: Insecta) have a high species richness, with species adapted to live under widely different environmental conditions. The study of the taxonomic composition of chironomid larvae and the percentage of occurrence of deformities in mouthparts, mainly in the mentum, are used in biomonitoring programmes in order to obtain information on the levels of organic and chemical pollution of aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abundance of chironomid larvae and to quantify the occurrence of mentum deformities in the specimens collected in three urban reservoirs with different trophic levels. The reservoirs are located in the hydrographic basin of the Paraopeba River, an affluent of the São Francisco River basin (Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil). The Serra Azul Reservoir is oligotrophic, the Vargem das Flores Reservoir is mesotrophic, and the Ibirité Reservoir is eutrophic. Along the littoral zone of each reservoir, 30 samples were collected during each sampling campaign. Sampling was carried out every three months for one year, with two sampling campaigns during the wet season and two during the dry season in 2008. Physical and chemical parameters measured in the water column included the water depth, Secchi depth, air and water temperature, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, redox potential, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, Total-N, Total-P, P-ortho, and chlorophyll-a. The chironomid larvae were identified to the genus level. The structure of the chironomid assemblages was evaluated based on taxonomic richness (24 genera), density, equitability, and diversity. The potential indicator taxa for each reservoir were established through an Indicator Species Analysis. The values for taxonomic richness (20 taxa), equitability (0.737), and Shannon-Wiener diversity (2.215) were highest in the Serra Azul Reservoir. Fissimentum was the indicator taxon in Serra Azul, the oligotrophic reservoir; whereas

  16. Mavale project: Sensor techniques applied to macrozoning of the Paraiba Valley and littoral north of the State of Sao Paulo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-04-01

    This project was designed with two basic objectives in mind. The first is to support the Consortium for Integrated Development of the Paraiba Valley and the Northern Littoral (CODIVAP) for preparation of regulatory guidelines for use of the regional lands. The second is to place at the disposal of the country's technical/scientific community a regional planning method based on the use of Remote Orbital Sensor data. This project involved studies on the following areas: maps - geological, pedological, geomorphological, ground cover, land use, urban area and urban expansion in the last decade, areas favorable for replenishment and concentration of ground water; compartmentation of the region into sub-basins and study of the relationships of land use to surface water quality; generation of a map indicating the suitability of land for civil engineering and urban expansion projects and projects subject to geological risk; preparation of a map showing suitability for agricultural use of the land; and social/economic/demographic analysis. The region of the study encompasses 40 municipalities and portions of 4 others, in an overall region of 18.111 sq. km. Imagery from MSS/Landsat, TM/Landsat, and HRV/SPOT was interpreted, exploring the multispectral, multitemporal, synoptic characteristics as well as the detail (compatible with spatial resolutions of the sensor systems). As a function of the objectives of the different thematic studies involved in the environmental and physical diagnostics, images were interpreted visually or processed digitally in alternate scales of 1:250,000, 1:100,000, or 1:50,000. These studies were complemented with pre-existing bibliographical and cartographic information, and the final mapping products are presented to the scale of 1:250,000, compatible with decisions at the regional level. Thematic studies relative to the physical/territorial, and social/economical reality were integrated in the search for holistic understanding of the region and

  17. [Distribution and abundance of fish community in the littoral area of "Los Petenes" Biosphere Reserve, Campeche, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Rojas, Sandra; Ayala-Pérez, Luis Amado; Sosa-López, Atahualpa; Villalobos-Zapata, Guillermo Jorge

    2013-03-01

    "Los Petenes" Biosphere Reserve (RBLP) is a critical habitat for many aquatic and terrestrial species. It has the biggest and better conserved seagrass beds, and it represents an important habitat for food, protection and breeding of aquatic organisms, and a temporal refuge for migratory species. The objective of this study was to describe the ichthyofauna diversity in the littoral coastal area of the RBLP, to identify the ecological dominant species, and to analyze the abundance of the fish community and its temporal and spatial changes, and their relationship with some environmental variables. Monthly fish samples were obtained with the aid of trawl nets, from 24 samplings sites distributed along the reserve, between May 2009 and April 2010. The trawl net was operated 288 times and 21 795 individuals with 279.5kg of weight were collected. A total of 46 fish species grouped in 34 genera and 23 families were identified. In a spatial scale, the abundance showed the next ranges: 0.018-0.094ind./m2; 0.249-1.072 g/m2 and 9.75-19.32g/ind.; the diversity indexes obtained were: H'n=1.46-2.15, J'=0.45-0.71 and D'=2.08-3.92. In a temporal scale, the abundance and diversity ranged between: 0.026-0.066ind./m2; 0.342-0.764g/m2 and 6.49-22.98g/ind.; H'n=1.76-2.08; J'=0.52-0.64 and D'=3.07-4.18. Eleven dominant species were identified with a representation of the 94.39% in number of individuals, and 89.66% in weight of the total catch. From the total, eight species had economic or commercial importance, especially Lagodon rhomboides and Haemulon plumierii. The cluster analyses identified four fish associations; these results are discussed in order to identify relationships between habitat-species. Finally, the canonical correspondence analysis evidenced an association between H. plumierii with salinity and dissolved solids. The RBLP has high habitat diversity and its fish community has developed strategies to use all the spatial and temporal conditions and to satisfy the needs

  18. Lead isotopes in soils and groundwaters as tracers of the impact of human activities on the surface environment: The Domizio-Flegreo Littoral (Italy) case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grezzi, G.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.

    2011-01-01

    The isotopic signature of geogenic and anthropogenic materials, in combination with concentration data for pollutants, can help trace the origin and the extent of contamination in the environment. This approach is particularly effective if naturally occurring and anthropogenically introduced metals have different isotopic ratios. Lead isotope analysis on soils from 7 profiles (1. m depth) and on groundwaters from 8 wells have been used to determine the impact of human activities on the surface environment of Domizio-Flegreo Littoral. Result obtained show that in sub-rural areas the isotopic composition of the samples collected along the soil profiles of Domizio-Flegreo Littoral is likely mostly controlled by the nature of the parent geologic material (natural) while in more urbanized areas (Giugliano) Pb isotopic composition in superficial soils is mostly influenced by anthropic sources such as motor vehicles. Lead isotopic ratios in groundwaters also show that the use of pesticides and, probably, the influence of aerosols and the presence of illegal waste disposal can influence water quality. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. The remote sensing of aquatic macrophytes Part 1: Color-infrared aerial photography as a tool for identification and mapping of littoral vegetation. Part 2: Aerial photography as a quantitative tool for the investigation of aquatic ecosystems. [Lake Wingra, Wisconsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, T. D.; Adams, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Research was initiated to use aerial photography as an investigative tool in studies that are part of an intensive aquatic ecosystem research effort at Lake Wingra, Madison, Wisconsin. It is anticipated that photographic techniques would supply information about the growth and distribution of littoral macrophytes with efficiency and accuracy greater than conventional methods.

  20. Characterization of lake water and ground water movement in the littoral zone of Williams Lake, a closed-basin lake in North central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M.; LaBaugh, J.W.; Parkhurst, R.S.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Winter, T.C.; Antweiler, R.C.; Dean, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Williams Lake, Minnesota is a closed-basin lake that is a flow-through system with respect to ground water. Ground-water input represents half of the annual water input and most of the chemical input to the lake. Chemical budgets indicate that the lake is a sink for calcium, yet surficial sediments contain little calcium carbonate. Sediment pore-water samplers (peepers) were used to characterize solute fluxes at the lake-water-ground-water interface in the littoral zone and resolve the apparent disparity between the chemical budget and sediment data. Pore-water depth profiles of the stable isotopes ??18O and ??2H were non-linear where ground water seeped into the lake, with a sharp transition from lake-water values to ground-water values in the top 10 cm of sediment. These data indicate that advective inflow to the lake is the primary mechanism for solute flux from ground water. Linear interstitial velocities determined from ??2H profiles (316 to 528 cm/yr) were consistent with velocities determined independently from water budget data and sediment porosity (366 cm/yr). Stable isotope profiles were generally linear where water flowed out of the lake into ground water. However, calcium profiles were not linear in the same area and varied in response to input of calcium carbonate from the littoral zone and subsequent dissolution. The comparison of pore-water calcium profiles to pore-water stable isotope profiles indicate calcium is not conservative. Based on the previous understanding that 40-50 % of the calcium in Williams Lake is retained, the pore-water profiles indicate aquatic plants in the littoral zone are recycling the retained portion of calcium. The difference between the pore-water depth profiles of calcium and ??18O and ??2H demonstrate the importance of using stable isotopes to evaluate flow direction and source through the lake-water-ground-water interface and evaluate mechanisms controlling the chemical balance of lakes. Published in 2003 by John Wiley

  1. Littoral fish assemblages of the alien-dominated Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 1980-1983 and 2001-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.; Michniuk, D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed monthly boat electrofishing data to characterize the littoral fish assemblages of five regions of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (northern, southern, eastern, western, and central), California, during two sampling periods, 1980-1983 (1980s) and 2001-2003 (2000s), to provide information pertinent to the restoration of fish populations in this highly altered estuary. During the 1980s, almost 11,000 fish were captured, including 13 native species and 24 alien species. During the 2000s, just over 39,000 fish were captured, including 15 native species and 24 alien species. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) of total fish, alien fish, and centrarchid fish were greater in the 2000s compared with the 1980s, largely because of increased centrarchid fish CPUE. These differences in CPUE were associated with the spread of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), particularly an alien aquatic macrophyte Egeria densa. Native fish CPUE declined from the 1980s to the 2000s, but there was no single factor that could explain the decline. Native fish were most abundant in the northern region during both sampling periods. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling indicated similar patterns of fish assemblage composition during the two sampling periods, with the northern and western regions characterized by the presence of native species. The separation of the northern and western regions from the other regions was most distinct in the 2000s. Our results suggest that native fish restoration efforts will be most successful in the northern portion of the Delta. Management decisions on the Delta should include consideration of possible effects on SAV in littoral habitats and the associated fish assemblages and ecological processes. ?? 2007 Estuarine Research Federation.

  2. Le domaine margino-littoral du Bénin (Golfe de Guinée - Afrique de l'Ouest): âge holocène et mise en place marine des ``Sables jaunes''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, J.; Paradis, G.; Oyede, M.

    The formation "Sables jaunes" occurs along the littoral margin of the Benin. Their age, determined by means of Carbon 14, is comprised between 19573 ± 500 BP (DAK 207) and 2674 ± 120 BP (DAK 199). Their morphological and sedimentological characteristics lead to regard them as resulting from a marine sedimentation, then followed by an eolian reworking which affects only the upper part of the Sands.

  3. Aspects histo-épidémiologiques des cancers génitaux de la femme dans la région du Littoral, Cameroun

    PubMed Central

    Engbang, Jean Paul Ndamba; Koh, Valère Mve; Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Fewou, Amadou

    2015-01-01

    Décrire les caractéristiques épidémiologiques et histopathologiques des tumeurs malignes génitales de la femme dans la région du littoral du Cameroun. Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective descriptive et analytique portant sur les cancers des organes génitaux de la femme, histologiquement prouvés pendant une période de 10 ans (2004-2013), répertoriés dans les registres des trois laboratoires d'anatomopathologie de la région (Hôpital Laquintinie de Douala, Hôpital Général de Douala, laboratoire Anapathos) et des services d'oncologie de ces hôpitaux. Les variables étudiées étaient: la fréquence, l’âge, le sexe, la localisation de la tumeur et le type histopathologique. Au total, 802 cas de cancers génitaux de la femme ont été recensés, soit une fréquence annuelle de 80,2 cas en moyenne. Le col utérin avec 580 cas (72,32%) a été la localisation la plus fréquente; suivi de l'endomètre (corps utérin) avec 93 cas (11,60%), puis des ovaires 91 cas (11,35%). L’âge moyen des patientes était de 50, 30±12,67 ans, avec les extrêmes allant de 14 à 85 ans. Selon le type histologique, les tumeurs épithéliales ont été les plus fréquemment rencontrées, soit 758 patientes (94,51%), les lymphomes venaient en seconde position avec 29 cas (3, 62%), les autres variétés histologiques (sarcomes, tumeurs germinales, tumeurs du mésenchyme et du cordon) représentant moins chacune de 1%. Les tumeurs malignes des organes génitaux féminins sont fréquentes dans la région du littoral du Cameroun, elles sont dominées essentiellement par le cancer du col utérin. Les tumeurs épithéliales sont le type histologique le plus fréquent. PMID:26327953

  4. The influence of a toxic cyanobacterial bloom and water hydrology on algal populations and macroinvertebrate abundance in the upper littoral zone of Lake Krugersdrift, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Oberholster, Paul J; Botha, Anna-Maria; Ashton, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    The biological interactions and the physical and chemical properties of the littoral zone of Lake Krugersdrift were studied for a 4-month period when a dense, toxic cyanobacterial bloom dominated by Microcystis aeruginosa was present in the main lake basin. The presence of a toxic strain of M. aeruginosa was confirmed through the use of ELISA and molecular markers that detect the presence of the mcyB and mcyD genes of the mcy gene cluster that synthesizes microcystin. An increase in Microcystis toxicity at sites dominated by the cyanobacterial scum was accompanied by an increase in total abundance of the macroinvertebrate families Hirudinae, Chironomidae, and Tubificidae. Sites located away from the cyanobacterial scum had a lower abundance but a higher diversity of macroinvertebrates. The water quality under the Microcystis scum was characterized by low pH values, low concentrations of dissolved oxygen, and lower total alkalinity values. The periphytic alga Ulothrix zonata was absent in areas dominated by the cyanobacterial scum, possibly as a result of overshadowing by the scum or direct toxic allelopathic effects on growth and photosynthesis. The diatom Diatoma vulgare dominated the benthic algal flora beneath the cyanobacterial scum.

  5. Toxic metal (Pb, Cd, Cr, and Hg) levels in Rapana venosa (Valenciennes, 1846), Eriphia verrucosa (Forskal, 1775), and sediment samples from the Black Sea littoral (Thrace, Turkey).

    PubMed

    Mülayim, A; Balkıs, H

    2015-06-15

    Rapana venosa (Valenciennes, 1846) and Eriphia verrucosa (Forskal, 1775) are the dominant benthic invertebrate species along the Thrace Coast of the western Black Sea. The aim of this study was to determine toxic metal (Hg, Cr, Cd, and Pb) accumulation levels in these species, as well as within littoral sediments from this area. Our results showed that all of the metals, except for Cd, were below that in average shale. The measured accumulation levels were mostly within the range of what is naturally found within the earth's crust. However, some study stations did have increased concentrations, indicating anthropogenic pollution in these areas. The Cd contents of E. verrucosa collected from all our study stations were well above the limits set by the Turkish Food Codex, especially in Kıyıköy, whereas Pb content was close to the limit at all stations and exceeded the limit in Kıyıköy, but Hg content was below the limit at all stations. Cd content of R. venosa exceeded the limit only in Kumköy. Pb content was below the limit, and Hg was at or slightly above the limit at all stations. PMID:25913797

  6. Toxic metal (Pb, Cd, Cr, and Hg) levels in Rapana venosa (Valenciennes, 1846), Eriphia verrucosa (Forskal, 1775), and sediment samples from the Black Sea littoral (Thrace, Turkey).

    PubMed

    Mülayim, A; Balkıs, H

    2015-06-15

    Rapana venosa (Valenciennes, 1846) and Eriphia verrucosa (Forskal, 1775) are the dominant benthic invertebrate species along the Thrace Coast of the western Black Sea. The aim of this study was to determine toxic metal (Hg, Cr, Cd, and Pb) accumulation levels in these species, as well as within littoral sediments from this area. Our results showed that all of the metals, except for Cd, were below that in average shale. The measured accumulation levels were mostly within the range of what is naturally found within the earth's crust. However, some study stations did have increased concentrations, indicating anthropogenic pollution in these areas. The Cd contents of E. verrucosa collected from all our study stations were well above the limits set by the Turkish Food Codex, especially in Kıyıköy, whereas Pb content was close to the limit at all stations and exceeded the limit in Kıyıköy, but Hg content was below the limit at all stations. Cd content of R. venosa exceeded the limit only in Kumköy. Pb content was below the limit, and Hg was at or slightly above the limit at all stations.

  7. Effect of metal mixture (Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni) on cadmium partitioning in littoral sediments and its accumulation by the freshwater macrophyte Eriocaulon septangulare

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.R.; Malley, D.F.

    1999-03-01

    The effect of a metal mixture (Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni) on Cd fractionation in sediment and its accumulation by the freshwater macrophyte Eriocaulon septangulare was examined in an in situ experiment in the littoral zone at the Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario, Canada. Fresh sediment was spiked with Cd alone and together with the metal mixture at three concentration levels. Macrophytes were planted in the spiked sediment and placed at a water depth of 0.5 m. The distribution of Cd among sediment fractions (easily reducible [ER], reducible [R-ER], and organic [ORG]), pore water, and macrophytes was determined every 2 weeks for 10 weeks. Small differences among treatment levels in the recovery of Cd from the geochemical fractions were observed after 2 and 8 weeks but not after 10 weeks. At the highest concentration of the metal mixture, Cd repartitioned from the ER fraction onto the R-ER fraction after 2 weeks in situ. After 10 weeks, Cd was accumulated by the shoots and roots of E. septangulare and had not reached steady state. Significantly higher Cd concentrations were found in the shoots of plants in the treatment with Cd alone and the treatment with the highest concentration of the metal mixture than in treatments with intermediate levels of the mixture. Partitioning of Cd among geochemical fractions in sediment alone did not explain differences in tissue Cd concentrations related to treatment level.

  8. Neural organization of first optic neuropils in the littoral crab Hemigrapsus oregonensis and the semiterrestrial species Chasmagnathus granulatus

    PubMed Central

    Sztarker, Julieta; Strausfeld, Nicholas; Andrew, David; Tomsic, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Crustaceans are among the most extensively distributed arthropods, occupying many ecologies and manifesting a great variety of compound eye optics; but in comparison with insects, relatively little is known about the organization and neuronal morphologies of their underlying optic neuropils. Most studies, which have been limited to descriptions of the first neuropil - the lamina - suggest that different species have approximately comparable cell types. However, such studies have been limited with regard to the types of neurons they identify and most omit their topographic relationships. It is also uncertain whether similarities, such as they are, are independent of visual ecologies. The present account describes and compares the morphologies and dispositions of monopolar and other efferent neurons as well as the organization of tangential and smaller centrifugal neurons in two grapsoid crabs, one from the S. Atlantic, the other from the N. Pacific. Because these species occupy significantly disparate ecologies we ask whether this might be reflected in differences of cell arrangements within the most peripheral levels of the visual system. The present study identifies such differences with respect to the organization of centrifugal neurons to the lamina. We also identify in both species neurons in the lamina that have hitherto not been identified in crustaceans and we draw specific comparisons between the layered organization of the grapsoid lamina and layered laminas of insects. PMID:19123235

  9. Neural organization of first optic neuropils in the littoral crab Hemigrapsus oregonensis and the semiterrestrial species Chasmagnathus granulatus.

    PubMed

    Sztarker, Julieta; Strausfeld, Nicholas; Andrew, David; Tomsic, Daniel

    2009-03-10

    Crustaceans are among the most extensively distributed arthropods, occupying many ecologies and manifesting a great variety of compound eye optics; but in comparison with insects, relatively little is known about the organization and neuronal morphologies of their underlying optic neuropils. Most studies, which have been limited to descriptions of the first neuropil--the lamina--suggest that different species have approximately comparable cell types. However, such studies have been limited with regard to the types of neurons they identify and most omit their topographic relationships. It is also uncertain whether similarities, such as they are, are independent of visual ecologies. The present account describes and compares the morphologies and dispositions of monopolar and other efferent neurons as well as the organization of tangential and smaller centrifugal neurons in two grapsoid crabs, one from the South Atlantic, the other from the North Pacific. Because these species occupy significantly disparate ecologies we ask whether this might be reflected in differences of cell arrangements within the most peripheral levels of the visual system. The present study identifies such differences with respect to the organization of centrifugal neurons to the lamina. We also identify in both species neurons in the lamina that have hitherto not been identified in crustaceans and we draw specific comparisons between the layered organization of the grapsoid lamina and layered laminas of insects.

  10. Investigating Pliocene warm-water upwelling ("permanent El Niño condition") in littoral communities of Peru and southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, A. E.; Nesbitt, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Today the coast of Peru and northern Chile and the coast of southern California and Baja California Mexico are subject to intense cold-water upwelling, which results in very high productivity and distinct faunas. Previous studies on Mid-Pliocene upwelling have focused on geochemical proxies obtained from biogenic and authigenic carbonates obtained from deep-sea ocean cores to determine temperatures through the water column and associated paleoproductivity. The data indicated that the Pliocene was equably warm throughout and that oceanographic systems changed around 3 million years ago. Molnar and Cane (2002) suggested that along the eastern Pacific margin the Pliocene oceanographic system resembled a “permanent El Niño-like state” and the modern system began in the Pleistocene; this study tests this model on near-shore macrofaunal assemblages and how such a change would affect the long-term stability of the coastal ecosystem. The changes from the warm water, “permanent El Niño condition” of the Pliocene Epoch to the initiation of cold water upwelling along the eastern Pacific margin are tracked by studying the structures and geochemical record of rocky shore and beach communities. Data from Pliocene sections near Chala, Peru, an area currently influenced by cold water upwelling, indicate that the littoral communities were likely from the transition time period between permanent warm water and initiation of upwelling. The data reveal significant changes in barnacle assemblage diversity through time, concurrent with speciation events of the gastropod Acanthina triangularis to Acanthina unicornis (DeVries, 2003). Data from δ18O and δ13C from both mollusk and barnacle species from these sections provide a temperature curve and changes in productivity at several time slices through the early to late-Pliocene, integrating the faunal assemblage data with geochemical data to constrain temperature and productivity from each sample. These results will be compared

  11. Repeated landmass reformation limits diversification in the widespread littoral zone mosquito Anopheles sundaicus sensu lato in the Indo-Oriental Region.

    PubMed

    Zarowiecki, Magdalena; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Post, Rory J; Bangs, Michael J; Htun, Pe Than; Hlaing, Thaung; Seng, Chang Moh; Baimai, Visut; Ding, Trung Ho; Sochantha, Tho; Walton, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Southeast Asia harbours abundant biodiversity, hypothesized to have been generated by Pliocene and Pleistocene climatic and environmental change. Vicariance between the island of Borneo, the remaining Indonesian archipelago and mainland Southeast Asia caused by elevated sea levels during interglacial periods has been proposed to lead to diversification in the littoral zone mosquito Anopheles (Cellia) sundaicus (Rodenwaldt) sensu lato. To test this biogeographical hypothesis, we inferred the population history and assessed gene flow of A. sundaicus s.l. sampled from 18 populations across its pan-Asian species range, using sequences from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and the mannose phosphate isomerase (Mpi) gene. A hypothesis of ecological speciation for A. sundaicus involving divergent adaptation to brackish and freshwater larval habitats was also previously proposed, based on a deficiency of heterozygotes for Mpi allozyme alleles in sympatry. This hypothesis was not supported by Mpi sequence data, which exhibited no fixed differences between brackish and freshwater larval habitats. Mpi and CO1 supported the presence of up to eight genetically distinct population groupings. Counter to the hypothesis of three allopatric species, divergence was often no greater between Borneo, Sumatra/Java and the Southeast Asian mainland than it was between genetic groupings within these landmasses. An isolation-with-migration (IM) model indicates recurrent gene flow between the current major landmasses. Such gene flow would have been possible during glacial periods when the current landmasses merged, presenting opportunities for dispersal along expanding and contracting coastlines. Consequently, Pleistocene climatic variation has proved a homogenizing, rather than diversifying, force for A. sundaicus diversity. PMID:24750501

  12. Geochemical distribution of harmful elements in top soils of an Italian National Interest Area (S.I.N.): the Domizio-Flegreo Littoral and Agro Aversano case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, M.; Grezzi, G.; Albanese, S.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Domizio-Flegreo Littoral and Agro Aversano area has been classified by the Italian Ministry of Environment (Italian Ministero dell'Ambiente e della Tutela del Territorio e del Mare) as a S.I.N. (Sito di Interesse Nazionale, L. 426/98 - Decreto 10 Gennaio 2000 - G.U. 29/5/01). In this category have been included all those contaminated lands that, both for their extension and their historical and present land use, are considered to be particularly harmful for human health. In Italy have been selected a total of 54 S.I.N.; among all of these, the Domizio-Flegreo Littoral and Agro Aversano S.I.N. is one of the widest (1564 Km2). The study area is located in north-western Campania region, from the Avella Mountain to the coastline, and from the Campi Flegrei area to the northern boundaries between Campania and Latium Regions. It includes a total of 77 towns from both Naples and Caserta provinces. The Domizio-Flegreo Littoral and Agro Aversano S.I.N. is characterized by a strongly urbanization in its internal portions, and by intensive agricultural activities in its northern and coastal portions. During past years this wide area has been the set of an unknown number of illegal activities controlled by the organized crime, including toxic waste disposal of unknown sources from different Regions of Italy, unauthorized building, intensive uncontrolled agricultural practices and so on. Part of these environmental crimes have been and are under investigations by Italian Authorities. For a geochemical characterization of this contaminated land, between May 2006 and January 2008, a total of 292 (179 in the Litorale Domizio-Flegreo and 113 in the Agro Aversano) top soils (5-15 cm depth) have been collected, with a sampling density of about 1 sample/5 Km2. The <100 mesh soil fraction has been analyzed with ICP-MS to determine the concentration of the 39 elements: Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Sn

  13. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  14. Testing compound-specific δ13C of amino acids in mussels as a new approach to determine the average 13C values of primary production in littoral ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhshoori, N. L.; Larsen, T.; McCarthy, M.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids (CSI-AA) is a technique used to decouple trophic enrichment patterns from source changes at the base of the food web. With this new emerging tool, it is possible to precisely determine both trophic position and δ15N or δ13C source values in higher feeding organisms. While most work to date has focused on nitrogen (N) isotopic values, early work has suggested that δ13C CSI-AA has great potential as a new tracer both to a record δ13C values of primary production (unaltered by trophic transfers), and also to "fingerprint" specific carbon source organisms. Since essential amino acids (EAA) cannot be made de novo in metazoans but must be obtained from diet, the δ13C value of the primary producer is preserved through the food web. Therefore, the δ13C values of EAAs act as a unique signature of different primary producers and can be used to fingerprint the dominant carbon (C) source driving primary production at the base of the food web. In littoral ecosystems, such as the California Upwelling System (CUS), the likely dominant C sources of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) pool are kelp, upwelling phytoplankton or estuarine phytoplankton. While bulk isotopes of C and N are used extensively to resolve relative consumer hierarchy or shifting diet in a food web, we found that the δ13C bulk values in mussels cannot distinguish exact source in littoral ecosystems. Here we show 15 sites within the CUS, between Cape Blanco, OR and La Jolla, CA where mussels were sampled and analyzed for both bulk δ13C and CSI-AA. We found no latitudinal trends, but rather average bulk δ13C values for the entire coastal record were highly consistent (-15.7 ± 0.9‰). The bulk record would suggest either nutrient provisioning from kelp or upwelled phytoplankton, but 13C-AA fingerprinting confines these two sources to upwelling. This suggests that mussels are recording integrated coastal phytoplankton values, with the enriched

  15. Cerebral dysplastic vascular malformation: a developmental arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Sima, A.A.F.; Morley, T.P.

    1983-08-01

    A cryptic malformation of the brain was found to represent an arrest in vascular development. Microscopy showed plump endothelium of blood vessels, which did not have a normal lumen and consisted of solid cords of cells. The microscopic, angiographic, and computed tomographic appearance of this anomaly are discussed and compared with cavernous angiomas, arteriovenous malformations, and venous angiomas.

  16. Sources et impacts potentiels des micropolluants chimiques sur un écosystème littoral exploité: l'exemple des côtes des Charente-Maritime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramand, P.; Guyot, T.; Pigeot, J.

    2003-06-01

    Le littoral picto-charentais est une zone à fortes activités économiques liées à l'aquaculture, à la pêche et au tourisme. Toutes ces activités demandent une très bonne qualité des eaux et de l'environnement en général. Or, cette zone littorale est soumise à de nombreux apports de micropolluants: métaux lourds, phytosanitaires, hydrocarbures, organochlorés.... Les sources en sont nombreuses: apports fluviatiles et atmosphériques, rejets diffus et rejets directs. Les risques dus à cette pollution sont multiples que ce soit au niveau dcs organismes, au niveau des écosystèmes ou des consommateurs. De ce fait, les contaminants majeurs (métaux lourds, organochlorés. hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques) et leurs impacts éventuels sur les écosystèmes font l'objet de veille environnementale (réseaux de surveillance ou d'observatoires de l'environnement) et de mesures de prévention se traduisant par la définition de normes de rejets ou de contamination décidées à l'échelle européenne.

  17. Marine molluscs and fish as biomarkers of pollution stress in littoral regions of the Red Sea, Mediterranean Sea and North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Vladimir; Bissinger, Vera; Abelson, Avigdor; Dizer, Halim; Sturm, Armin; Kratke, Renate; Fishelson, Lev; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich

    1999-12-01

    The intensive development of industry and urban structures along the seashores of the world, as well as the immense increase in marine transportation and other activities, has resulted in the deposition of thousands of new chemicals and organic compounds, endangering the existence of organisms and ecosystems. The conventional single biomarker methods used in ecological assessment studies cannot provide an adequate base for environmental health assessment, management and sustainability planning. The present study uses a set of novel biochemical, physiological, cytogenetic and morphological methods to characterize the state of health of selected molluscs and fish along the shores of the German North Sea, as well as the Israeli Mediterranean and Red Sea. The methods include measurement of activity of multixenobiotic resistance-mediated transporter (MXRtr) and the system of active transport of organic anions (SATOA) as indicators of antixenobiotic defence; glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity as an indicator of biotransformation of xenobiotics; DNA unwinding as a marker of genotoxicity; micronucleus test for clastogenicity; levels of phagocytosis for immunotoxicity; cholinesterase (ChE) activity and level of catecholamines as indicators of neurotoxicity; permeability of external epithelia to anionic hydrophilic probe, intralysosomal accumulation of cationic amphiphilic probe and activity of non-specific esterases as indicators of cell/tissue viability. Complete histopathological examination was used for diagnostics of environmental pathology. The obtained data show that the activity of the defensive pumps, MXRtr and SATOA in the studied organisms was significantly higher in the surface epithelia of molluscs from a polluted site than that of the same species from control, unpolluted stations, providing clear evidence of response to stress. Enhanced frequency of DNA lesions (alkaline and acidic DNA unwinding) and micronucleus-containing cells was significantly higher

  18. Spatio-temporal distribution of cell-bound and dissolved geosmin in Wahnbach Reservoir: Causes and potential odour nuisances in raw water.

    PubMed

    Jähnichen, Sabine; Jäschke, Kathrin; Wieland, Falk; Packroff, Gabriele; Benndorf, Jürgen

    2011-10-15

    In many lakes and reservoirs, problems caused by off-flavours are known to be particularly associated with the occurrence of planktonic and benthic cyanobacteria. Frequently observed objectionable taste and odorous products of cyanobacteria are geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol. Investigations focused on the littoral zone of Wahnbach Reservoir (Germany) revealed that benthic cyanobacteria were present in this oligotrophic drinking water reservoir. Benthic cyanobacteria were found in the depth horizon between 1.75 m and 11 m, particularly on south-exposed slopes. This spatial distribution indicates a possible key role of the underwater light climate. Moreover, cell-bound and dissolved geosmin were detected in corresponding littoral samples. Both fractions were subjected to spatial and primarily temporal variations with maximum concentrations at the end of summer. However, a substantial lowering of the water level caused a diminution of cyanobacterial growth. Due to the drawdown of the water level concentrations of cell-bound geosmin and pigments (as a proxy of cyanobacterial biomass) were remarkably reduced, and dissolved geosmin was never detected during this phase. Except for the influence of water level fluctuation no other abiotic variables had a significant influence on pigment and geosmin concentrations. From geosmin concentrations detected in the littoral zone, the probability of serious episodes of odour events in the raw water of the Wahnbach Reservoir was estimated. Hence, the probability that the raw water was affected by geosmin was minor, which was supported by routine flavour profiles. Nevertheless, the study shows that odorous episodes caused by benthic cyanobacteria are likely to develop even in an oligotrophic lake or reservoir when these cyanobacteria, and consequently odorous production, proliferate. In principle, such a proliferation cannot be excluded as nutrients are available from the sediment pore water, and underwater light at the sediment

  19. Three novel germ-line VHL mutations in Hungarian von Hippel-Lindau patients, including a nonsense mutation in a fifteen-year-old boy with renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Von Hippel-Lindau disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited highly penetrant tumor syndrome predisposing to retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, renal cell carcinoma and phaeochromocytoma among other less frequent complications. Methods Molecular genetic testing of the VHL gene was performed in five unrelated families affetced with type I VHL disease, including seven patients and their available family members. Results Molecular genetic investigations detected three novel (c.163 G > T, c.232A > T and c.555C > A causing p.Glu55X, p.Asn78Tyr and p.Tyr185X protein changes, respectively) and two previously described (c.340 + 1 G > A and c.583C > T, resulting in p.Gly114AspfsX6 and p.195GlnX protein changes, respectively) germline point mutations in the VHL gene. Molecular modeling of the VHL-ElonginC-HIF-1alpha complex predicted that the p.Asn78Tyr amino acid exchange remarkably alters the 77-83 loop structure of VHL protein and destabilizes the VHL-HIF-1alpha complex suggesting that the mutation causes type I phenotype and has high risk to associate to renal cell carcinoma. The novel p.55X nonsense mutation associated to bilateral RCC and retinal angioma in a 15-year-old male patient. Conclusion We describe the earliest onset renal cell carcinoma in VHL disease reported so far in a 15-year-old boy with a nonsense VHL mutation. Individual tailoring of screening schedule based on molecular genetic status should be considered in order to diagnose serious complications as early as possible. Our observations add to the understanding of genotype-phenotype correlation in VHL disease and can be useful for genetic counseling and follow-up of VHL patients. PMID:23298237

  20. Glomeruloid hemangioma. A cutaneous marker of POEMS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, F; Gambini, C; Lerza, R

    1994-04-01

    Glomeruloid hemangioma is a histologically distinctive cutaneous hemangioma that recently has been associated with POEMS syndrome. We report a further case in which POEMS syndrome was signaled by multiple eruptive angiomas of the glomeruloid type. Histopathology showed multiple dilated vascular spaces containing a conglomerate of capillaries resulting in a structure resembling renal glomeruli. Eosinophilic globules, probably representing immunoglobulins, were found within the cytoplasm of some endothelial and stromal cells. The finding of focal histologic features of tufted angioma (angioblastoma) in the same lesion suggests that a spectrum of hemangiomatous lesions may be seen in POEMS syndrome. Alternatively, glomeruloid hemangioma may represent a reactive endothelial proliferation rather than a neoplastic lesion.

  1. Marshes and turbid waters in the French Atlantic littoral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verger, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The multispectral information provided by ERTS-1 is very rich for the coastal regions but the cloud cover, even when only partial, often cuts up the data, and lessens its practical value. The research by densitometric methods has thus far been the most fruitful. It consists of measuring densities along preferential axes. This method has enabled the investigators to perfect a system of computer cartography for the best image. Comparative study of microdensitometric transects in four MSS bands for carefully dilimited profiles on the ground, makes it possible to isolate and recognize various types of countryside: (1) countryside of coastal plains; (2) countryside of coastal sand dunes and beaches; and (3) forms and processes of offshore domains. This study shows the usefulness of the ERTS program in establishing a rapid cartography of the physiographic units of the coastal plains in the interest of a rational program of exploitation and development.

  2. Ecological state of the Romanian Black Sea littoral lacustrine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomoiu, M.-T.

    2009-04-01

    The author uses the results of his own researches as well as data from specialty literature to assess the ecological state of some typical lacustrine ecosystems considered, about 50 years ago, of major importance by their functions, services and researches, for the human populations in the settlements nearby. Based on this assessment the author recommends a few criteria which can be taken into account when programs of integrated management of these coastal ecosystems are initiated. The paper focuses on the study cases regarding the following major ecosystems: 1. Razelm-Sinoie Lagoon Complex - tightly linked to the Danube River and Delta systems, 2. Taşaul Lake - interfered in the last two decades by a branch of the DanubeRiver - Black Sea Canal and 3. Techirghiol Lake - for a long time under the sea level, a hyperhaline lake with therapeutic, sapropelic mud, disturbed by huge quantities of freshwaters infiltrated from the irrigation system. At present, the state of the lacustrine ecosystems at the Romanian Black Sea Coast can be characterized, mainly, by the following aspects: · Increase in the quantities of nutrients and chemical toxicants; · Rise in the level and frequency of eutrophication and pollution phenomena; · Drastic reduction of specific diversity; · Simplification of communities' structure - biocoenosis homogeneity; · Decrease in numerical abundance and biomass of benthic populations and consequently, low biofilter power by the decrease of the filter-feeder populations; · Worsening of the qualitative and the quantitative state of the biological benthic resources; · Thriving opportunistic forms (e.g. the worms causing sediment bioturbation); · Invasion by some exotic species, with harmful, unexpected consequences; · All populations undergo quantitative fluctuations; · Decrease in the fish population and in the use values of lacustrine assets, with strong impact on the welfare of the human society. Almost all pressure forms associated with the relationship between the socio-economic systems and the other components of the hierarchy of ecological systems also existed, without exception, in the Romanian coastal part of the Black Sea causing manifest ecological effects on various types of para-marine lacustrine ecosystems. Generally, we consider that the following set of effects is typical of the ecological impact resulted from the dynamics of the socio-economic systems at different time and space scales: · Erosion of diversity as a result of the loss of species or reduction in the species abundance in the local ecosystems and complex of ecosystems or because of the habitat fragmentation, isolation of valuable natural systems, to which other causes may be added such as desertification and salinization or water freshening; · Erosion of biological diversity caused by: extinction of higher species and taxa, loss of genetic resources, increase in the number of rare species threatened with extinction and significant reduction in the ethno-cultural diversity; · Depletion or reduction in the stocks of renewable and non-renewable natural resources; · Changes in the biogeochemical cycles and in the climatic system, caused by the overloading of the surface waters and soils with nutrients, heavy metals, radio-nuclides, greenhouse gases, particulate or dissolved organic matter and by deterioration of other factors. These changes cause, in their turn, a series of processes similar to chain reactions, which lead to an increasing risk of natural disasters; · Decrease in the productive and supportive capacity of components which form the foundation of the socio-economic system in the reference zone. · An alarming increase in the „environmental debt" which endangers the chances of short-term and, especially, long-term development. The author recommends some solutions in solving the conflict of interest, which consist in a set of measures and actions, as follows: · identifying synergies or contradictions between actions resulting from various policies; · improving coordination, cooperation and consulta

  3. The French Atlantic Littoral and the Massif Armoricain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Monget, J. M.; Scanvic, J. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Diachronic use of LANDSAT data time series will in time allow statistical study of submersion frequencies in tidal areas. This is an essential element of coastal geomorphology and of coastal zone management being particularly useful in siting shellfish farms. Maps are being obtained at useable scales and simple, user oriented legends which can be used for coastal planning.

  4. The French Atlantic littoral and the Massif Armoricain, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Scanvic, J. Y.; Monget, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results: (1) An original map of lineaments of the Armorican Massif and the Vendean platform was prepared. (2) Validity of spatial information through comparison with maps of various kinds, such as geological, geophysical, morphological, etc., was verified. (3) It was confirmed that LANDSAT images, in many cases, reflect data on deep phenomena which were only accessible geophysically and by means of borings. Tectonic domains were outlined, and known lineaments were extended.

  5. High Resolution Marine Magnetic Survey of Shallow Water Littoral Area

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, Boris; Cohen, Tsuriel Ram; Zafrir, Hovav; Alimi, Roger; Salomonski, Nizan; Sharvit, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a system developed for detection and accurate mapping of ferro-metallic objects buried below the seabed in shallow waters. The system comprises a precise magnetic gradiometer and navigation subsystem, both installed on a non-magnetic catamaran towed by a low-magnetic interfering boat. In addition we present the results of a marine survey of a near-shore area in the vicinity of Atlit, a town situated on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about 15 km south of Haifa. The primary purpose of the survey was to search for a Harvard airplane that crashed into the sea in 1960. A magnetic map of the survey area (3.5 km2 on a 0.5 m grid) was created revealing the anomalies at sub-meter accuracy. For each investigated target location a corresponding ferro-metallic item was dug out, one of which turned to be very similar to a part of the crashed airplane. The accuracy of location was confirmed by matching the position of the actual dug artifacts with the magnetic map within a range of ± 1 m, in a water depth of 9 m.

  6. Seabird Guano Fertilizes Baltic Sea Littoral Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Karine; Rothäusler, Eva; Syrjänen, Anneli; Yli-Renko, Maria; Jormalainen, Veijo

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment in coastal marine systems can have profound impacts on trophic networks. In the Baltic Sea, the population of Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) has increased nearly exponentially since the mid-1990s, and colonies of these seabirds can be important sources of nitrogen enrichment for nearby benthic communities due to guano runoff. In this study we used stable isotope analyses and diet mixing models to determine the extent of nitrogen enrichment from cormorant colonies, as well as to examine any possible changes in herbivore diet preferences due to enrichment. We found significantly higher levels of δ15N in samples from colony islands than control islands for producers (the dominant macroalga Fucus vesiculosus, filamentous algae, and periphyton) and herbivores, as well as a positive correlation between enrichment and nest density in colony sites. We also found that enrichment increased over the breeding season of the cormorants, with higher enrichment in late summer than early summer. While the amount of total nitrogen did not differ between colony and control sites, the amount of guano-based nitrogen in algae was >50% in most sites, indicating high nitrogen enrichment from colonies. Herbivores (the isopod Idotea balthica and the gastropod Theodoxus fluviatilis) preferred feeding upon the dominant macroalga Fucus vesiculosus rather than on filamentous algae or periphyton in both control and colony, and there was a significant increase in periphyton consumption near colony sites. Overall, guano from cormorant colonies seems to have effects on both producers and herbivores, as well as the potential to modify algae-herbivore interactions. PMID:23593452

  7. Phylogeographical disjunction in abundant high-dispersal littoral gastropods.

    PubMed

    Waters, J M; King, T M; O'Loughlin, P M; Spencer, H G

    2005-08-01

    Abstract Phylogeographical disjunctions in high-dispersal marine taxa are variously ascribed to palaeogeographical conditions or contemporary ecological factors. Associated biogeographical studies, however, seldom incorporate the sampling design required to confidently discriminate among such competing hypotheses. In the current study, over 7800 gastropod specimens were examined for operculum colour, and 129 specimens genetically, to test ecological and historical biogeographical hypotheses relating to biogeographical disjunction in the Southern Hemisphere, and to southern Australia in particular. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of the high-dispersal intertidal gastropod Nerita atramentosa in southern Australia (88 specimens; 18 localities) revealed an east-west phylogeographical split involving two highly divergent clades (26.0 +/- 1.9%) exhibiting minimal geographical overlap in the southeast. The eastern clade of Nerita atramentosa is also widespread in northern New Zealand (43 specimens, 10 localities), but no significant genetic differentiation is explained by the Tasman Sea, a 2000-km-wide oceanic barrier. Spatial genetic structure was not detected within either clade, consistent with the species' dispersive planktotrophic phase lasting for 5-6 months. Digital analysis of operculum colouration revealed substantial differences between eastern (tan) and western (black) specimens. Genetic analysis and visual inspection of 88 Australian specimens revealed a completely nonrandom association between mtDNA data and operculum colouration. Independent examination of a further 7822 specimens from 14 sites in southern Australia revealed both colour morphs at all localities, but reinforced the phylogeographical data by indicating a marked turnover in colour morph abundance associated with a palaeogeographical barrier: Wilsons Promontory. This sharp biogeographical disjunction is in marked contrast to the species' high dispersal abilities. The genetic similarity of Nerita morio (Easter Island) and the eastern Australian + New Zealand lineage (1.1 +/- 0.3%) provides further evidence of long-distance dispersal in southern Nerita. Phylogenetic relationships of nine species (four genera) of Neritidae, an almost exclusively tropical gastropod family, are consistent with the hypothesis that southern temperate black nerites comprise a monophyletic radiation. PMID:16029478

  8. Phylogeographical disjunction in abundant high-dispersal littoral gastropods.

    PubMed

    Waters, J M; King, T M; O'Loughlin, P M; Spencer, H G

    2005-08-01

    Abstract Phylogeographical disjunctions in high-dispersal marine taxa are variously ascribed to palaeogeographical conditions or contemporary ecological factors. Associated biogeographical studies, however, seldom incorporate the sampling design required to confidently discriminate among such competing hypotheses. In the current study, over 7800 gastropod specimens were examined for operculum colour, and 129 specimens genetically, to test ecological and historical biogeographical hypotheses relating to biogeographical disjunction in the Southern Hemisphere, and to southern Australia in particular. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of the high-dispersal intertidal gastropod Nerita atramentosa in southern Australia (88 specimens; 18 localities) revealed an east-west phylogeographical split involving two highly divergent clades (26.0 +/- 1.9%) exhibiting minimal geographical overlap in the southeast. The eastern clade of Nerita atramentosa is also widespread in northern New Zealand (43 specimens, 10 localities), but no significant genetic differentiation is explained by the Tasman Sea, a 2000-km-wide oceanic barrier. Spatial genetic structure was not detected within either clade, consistent with the species' dispersive planktotrophic phase lasting for 5-6 months. Digital analysis of operculum colouration revealed substantial differences between eastern (tan) and western (black) specimens. Genetic analysis and visual inspection of 88 Australian specimens revealed a completely nonrandom association between mtDNA data and operculum colouration. Independent examination of a further 7822 specimens from 14 sites in southern Australia revealed both colour morphs at all localities, but reinforced the phylogeographical data by indicating a marked turnover in colour morph abundance associated with a palaeogeographical barrier: Wilsons Promontory. This sharp biogeographical disjunction is in marked contrast to the species' high dispersal abilities. The genetic similarity of Nerita morio (Easter Island) and the eastern Australian + New Zealand lineage (1.1 +/- 0.3%) provides further evidence of long-distance dispersal in southern Nerita. Phylogenetic relationships of nine species (four genera) of Neritidae, an almost exclusively tropical gastropod family, are consistent with the hypothesis that southern temperate black nerites comprise a monophyletic radiation.

  9. Seabird guano fertilizes Baltic Sea littoral food webs.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Karine; Rothäusler, Eva; Syrjänen, Anneli; Yli-Renko, Maria; Jormalainen, Veijo

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment in coastal marine systems can have profound impacts on trophic networks. In the Baltic Sea, the population of Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) has increased nearly exponentially since the mid-1990 s, and colonies of these seabirds can be important sources of nitrogen enrichment for nearby benthic communities due to guano runoff. In this study we used stable isotope analyses and diet mixing models to determine the extent of nitrogen enrichment from cormorant colonies, as well as to examine any possible changes in herbivore diet preferences due to enrichment. We found significantly higher levels of δ(15)N in samples from colony islands than control islands for producers (the dominant macroalga Fucus vesiculosus, filamentous algae, and periphyton) and herbivores, as well as a positive correlation between enrichment and nest density in colony sites. We also found that enrichment increased over the breeding season of the cormorants, with higher enrichment in late summer than early summer. While the amount of total nitrogen did not differ between colony and control sites, the amount of guano-based nitrogen in algae was >50% in most sites, indicating high nitrogen enrichment from colonies. Herbivores (the isopod Idotea balthica and the gastropod Theodoxus fluviatilis) preferred feeding upon the dominant macroalga Fucus vesiculosus rather than on filamentous algae or periphyton in both control and colony, and there was a significant increase in periphyton consumption near colony sites. Overall, guano from cormorant colonies seems to have effects on both producers and herbivores, as well as the potential to modify algae-herbivore interactions. PMID:23593452

  10. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. They serve as a repair ... body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  11. Cell Structure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... apparatus , and lysosomes . « Previous (Cell Structure & Function) Next (Cell Function) » Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Accessibility | FOIA | File Formats ...

  12. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... or turn off the immune response. Cytotoxic or “killer” T cells directly attack and destroy cells bearing ... involve selective activation of helper T cells and killer T cells, with a corresponding decrease in regulatory ...

  13. Cell division

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... hours after conception, the fertilized egg cell remains a single cell. After approximately 30 hours, it divides ... 3 days, the fertilized egg cell has become a berry-like structure made up of 16 cells. ...

  14. Cell counting.

    PubMed

    Phelan, M C; Lawler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents protocols for counting cells using either a hemacytometer or electronically using a Coulter counter. Cell counting with a hemacytometer permits effective discrimination of live from dead cells using trypan blue exclusion. In addition, the procedure is less subject to errors arising from cell clumping or size heterogeneity. Counting cells is more quickly and easily performed using an electronic counter, but live-dead discrimination is unreliable. Cell populations containing large numbers of dead cells and/or cell clumps are difficult to count accurately. In addition, electronic counting requires resetting of the instrument for cell populations of different sizes; heterogeneous populations can give rise to inaccurate counts, and resting and activated cells may require counting at separate settings. In general, electronic cell counting is best performed on fresh peripheral blood cells. PMID:18770655

  15. Galvanic Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, I. G.

    1973-01-01

    Many standard physical chemistry textbooks contain ambiguities which lead to confusion about standard electrode potentials, calculating cell voltages, and writing reactions for galvanic cells. This article shows how standard electrode potentials can be used to calculate cell voltages and deduce cell reactions. (Author/RH)

  16. Cell Biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioufle, B. Le; Picollet-D'Hahan, N.

    A cell biochip is a microsystem, equipped with electronic and microfluidic functions, designed to manipulate or analyse living cells. The first publications in this emerging area of research appeared toward the end of the 1980s. In 1989 Washizu described a biochip designed to fuse two cells by electropermeabilisation of the cytoplasmic membrane [1]. Research centers have devised a whole range of cell chip structures, for simultaneous or sequential analysis of single cells, cell groups, or cell tissues reconstituted on the chip. The cells are arranged in a square array on a parallel cell chip for parallel analysis, while they are examined and processed one by one in a microchannel in the case of a series cell chip. In contrast to these biochips for high-throughput analysis of a large number of cells, single-cell chips focus on the analysis of a single isolated cell. As in DNA microarrays, where a large number of oligonucleotides are ordered in a matrix array, parallel cell chips order living cells in a similar way. At each point of the array, the cells can be isolated, provided that the cell type allows this, e.g., blood cells, or cultivated in groups (most adhesion cells can only survive in groups). The aim is to allow massively parallel analysis or processing. Le Pioufle et al. describe a microdevice for the culture of single cells or small groups of cells in a micropit array [2]. Each pit is equipped to stimulate the cell or group of cells either electrically or fluidically. Among the applications envisaged are gene transfer, cell sorting, and screening in pharmacology. A complementary approach, combining the DNA microarray and cell biochip ideas, has been put forward by Bailey et al. [3]. Genes previously arrayed on the chip transfect the cultured cells on the substrate depending on their position in the array (see Fig. 19.1). This way of achieving differential lipofection on a chip was then taken up again by Yoshikawa et al. [4] with primary cells, more

  17. Engineering cell-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Blagovic, Katarina; Gong, Emily S; Milano, Daniel F; Natividad, Robert J; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2013-10-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling on the basis of quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilize synthetic cells, advanced 'chassis' and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues.

  18. Fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, has supported and managed a fuel cell research and development (R and D) program since 1976. Responsibility for implementing DOE's fuel cell program, which includes activities related to both fuel cells and fuel cell systems, has been assigned to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The total United States effort of the private and public sectors in developing fuel cell technology is referred to as the National Fuel Cell Program (NFCP). The goal of the NFCP is to develop fuel cell power plants for base-load and dispersed electric utility systems, industrial cogeneration, and on-site applications. To achieve this goal, the fuel cell developers, electric and gas utilities, research institutes, and Government agencies are working together. Four organized groups are coordinating the diversified activities of the NFCP. The status of the overall program is reviewed in detail.

  19. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... stem cells blog from the International Society for Stem Cell Research. Learn About Stem Cells From Lab to You ...

  20. Electrolytic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, J. S.; Hale, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    An apparatus is described for the separation of the anolyte and the catholyte during electrolysis. The electrolyte flows through an electrolytic cell between the oppositely charged electrodes. The cell is equipped with a wedge-shaped device, the tapered end is located between the electrodes on the effluent side of the cell. The wedge diverts the flow of the electrolyte to either side of the wedge, substantially separating the anolyte and the catholyte.

  1. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  2. Cell Chauvinism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Dolores Elaine

    1972-01-01

    Indicates that biological terminology, such as mother cell'' and labels of sex factors in bacteria, reflect discrimination against females by reinforcing perpetuation of stereotyped gender roles. (AL)

  3. Cell Trivision of Hyperploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gabor; Kiraly, Gabor; Turani, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Malignant transformation is likely to render cells hyperploid, primarily tetraploid. We have measured the frequency of division into three rather than two daughter cells as a function of ploidy. Such trivisions were followed in near-tetraploid uveal melanoma (UM), hypotetraploid HaCaT (<4 N), hypertriploid HeLa (>3 N), and in near-diploid (∼2 N) lung epithelial cell lines by time-lapse image analyses. A stepwise analysis of cytokinesis revealed higher frequency of cell trivisions relative to divisions in hyperploid HeLa (1:24, 4%), HaCaT (1:126, 8%), and UM (1:186, 0.5%) cells. The occurrence of trivision was significantly lower in near-diploid endothelial cells (1:1400, 0.07%). We have previously observed the phenomenon of trivision in HaCaT cells treated with heavy metal lead, and here we describe that trivision is a spontaneous process taking place without genotoxic treatment. Beside re-diploidization by trivision, the hyperploid state decreases the cell size of the daughter cells and is likely to increase the time of cytokinesis. On the basis of the results, it is hypothesized that among other cancer-related causes, hyperploidy could be related to cell trivision, could cause random aneuploidy, and could generate new cancer-specific karyotypes. PMID:24093497

  4. Unit Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert C.; Tobiason, Fred L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of unit cells using clear plastic cubes which can be disassembled, and one inch cork balls of various colors, which can be cut in halves, quarters, or eighths, and glued on the inside face of the cube, thus simulating a unit cell. (MLH)

  5. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein-Bonte, I.Y.; Fischer, A.B.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a product comprising a photovoltaic cell including a luminescent dye which will absorb radiation at a wavelength to which the cell is not significantly responsive and emit radiation at a higher wavelength at which it is responsive. The improvement described here is wherein the dye comprises a lepidopterene.

  6. Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  7. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  8. Fuel cells 101

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschenhofer, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the various types of fuel cells, the importance of cell voltage, fuel processing for natural gas, cell stacking, fuel cell plant description, advantages and disadvantages of the types of fuel cells, and applications. The types covered include: polymer electrolyte fuel cell, alkaline fuel cell, phosphoric acid fuel cell; molten carbonate fuel cell, and solid oxide fuel cell.

  9. 9. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL ACCESS ELEVATOR, CELLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL ACCESS ELEVATOR, CELLS 2 AND 4, BASEMENT LEVEL. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  10. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  11. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1996-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  12. Solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.I.; Kaplow, R.

    1980-08-26

    An improved solar cell designed for optimum efficiency is comprised of a plurality of series connected unit solar cells formed from a common substrate of semiconductor material. Each unit solar cell has spaced elongate sidewalls, and a ''dead space'' area between adjoining sidewalls of adjacent units is made substantially smaller than an active, light receiving area, extending between the opposite sidewalls of each individual unit. In addition, the width of the active area is concisely limited to ensure that radiation incident on the active area is incident at a point which is spaced from the p-n junction of each unit by no more than a predetermined optimum distance. Reducing the ''dead space'' area while concisely limiting the width of the active area provides improved solar cell performance without requiring focusing lenses.

  13. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-16

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

  14. [Cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Cipro, Simon; Groh, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Cell or tissue cultures (both terms are interchangeable) represent a complex process by which eukaryotic cells are maintained in vitro outside their natural environment. They have a broad usage covering not only scientific field but also diagnostic one since they represent the most important way of monoclonal antibodies production which are used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Cell cultures are also used as a "cultivation medium" in virology and for establishing proliferating cells in cytodiagnostics. They are well-established and easy-to-handle models in the area of research, e.g. as a precious source of nucleic acids or proteins. This paper briefly summarizes their importance and methods as well as the pitfalls of the cultivation and new trends in this field. PMID:24624984

  15. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  16. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a .beta." alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl.sub.4 or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose.

  17. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  18. Electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.E.

    1984-04-24

    A process and cell for electrolysis of alkali metal halides, especially sodium chloride, are described, wherein the anolyte and catholyte compartments are separated by a fluorinated ion-exchange membrane whose surface facing the catholyte compartment is of a polymer having carboxylic functionality and which has a roughness which does not exceed 1.5 microns. Such a cell and process operate at high current efficiency, low voltage and low power consumption.

  19. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  20. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  1. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  2. Electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, Hoydoo; Melendres, C.A.

    1991-04-23

    This invention is comprised of an electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 900 in either direction while maintaining the working-and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte.

  3. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Myles, Kevin M.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1996-01-01

    An electrochemical cell with a positive electrode having an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride. A negative electrode of an alkali metal and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at cell operating temperature is included in the cell. The electrolyte is present at least partially as a corrugated .beta." alumina tube surrounding the negative electrode interior to the positive electrode. The ratio of the volume of liquid electrolyte to the volume of the positive electrode is in the range of from about 0.1 to about 3. A plurality of stacked electrochemical cells is disclosed each having a positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal molten at cell operating temperature, and a compatible electrolyte. The electrolyte is at least partially present as a corrugated .beta." alumina sheet separating the negative electrode and interior to the positive electrodes. The alkali metal is retained in a porous electrically conductive ceramic, and seals for sealing the junctures of the electrolyte and the adjacent electrodes at the peripheries thereof.

  4. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, H.; Melendres, C.A.

    1992-08-25

    An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90[degree] in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte. 5 figs.

  5. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Zoltan; Yonco, Robert M.; You, Hoydoo; Melendres, Carlos A.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90.degree. in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte.

  6. Air cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Okiyoshi; Wakasa, Masayuki; Tamanoi, Yoshihito

    1991-04-01

    The present invention relates to an air cell. This air cell provides a compact light-weight power source for model aircraft permitting them to fly for an extended period so that they may be used for such practical purposes as crop dusting, surveying, and photographing. The cell is comprised of a current collector so disposed between a magnesium, zinc, or aluminum alloy cathode and a petroleum graphite anode that it is in contact with the anode. The anode is formed by adding polytetrafluoroethylene dispersion liquid in a mixture of active carbon and graphite powder, pouring the mixture into a mold and heating it to form the anode. It is fabricated by a plurality of anode sections and is formed with at least one hole so that it can provide a cell which is compact in size and light in weight yet is capable of generating a high output. The anode, the cathode, and a separator are wetted by an electrolytic liquid. The electrolyte is continuously supplied through the life of the cell.

  7. Cell sealant

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, C.; Book, R.J.; James, D.A.

    1988-04-26

    An electrochemical cell is described comprising an anode, a cathode and an electrolyte disposed within an open ended cylindrical metallic cell container, with an insulative cell top member being positioned within the open end of a sealant at the interface between the cell top member and the metallic cell container. The sealant is a mixture of a Type 2 BUR asphalt and an elastomeric material selected from the group consisting of (cis-1,4-polyisoprene), styrene-butadiene copolymer (SBR), cis-1,4-polybutadiene and styrene butadiene styrene (SBS), styrene isoprene styrene (SIS), neoprene (poly-chloprene), acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer (NBR), ethylene-propylene elastomers (EPR), butyl rubber (copolymers of isobutylene), urethane, nitrile (polymers of butadiene and acrylonitrile), polysulfide, polyacrylate, silicone, chlorosulfonated polyethylene, and EPDM (terpolymers of ethylene, propylene and diene monomers), and mixtures thereof, and wherein the elastomeric material is substantially inert to the electrolyte and is present in an amount between 0.5% to 10% by weight of the asphalt.

  8. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Myles, K.M.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-02

    An electrochemical cell is described with a positive electrode having an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride. A negative electrode of an alkali metal and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at cell operating temperature is included in the cell. The electrolyte is present at least partially as a corrugated {beta}{double_prime} alumina tube surrounding the negative electrode interior to the positive electrode. The ratio of the volume of liquid electrolyte to the volume of the positive electrode is in the range of from about 0.1 to about 3. A plurality of stacked electrochemical cells is disclosed each having a positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal molten at cell operating temperature, and a compatible electrolyte. The electrolyte is at least partially present as a corrugated {beta}{double_prime} alumina sheet separating the negative electrode and interior to the positive electrodes. The alkali metal is retained in a porous electrically conductive ceramic, and seals for sealing the junctures of the electrolyte and the adjacent electrodes at the peripheries thereof. 8 figs.

  9. Solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treble, F. C.

    1980-11-01

    The history, state of the art, and future prospects of solar cells are reviewed. Solar cells are already competitive in a wide range of low-power applications, and during the 1980's they are expected to become cheaper to run than diesel or gasoline generators, the present mainstay of isolated communities. At this stage they will become attractive for water pumping, irrigation, and rural electrification, particularly in developing countries. With further cost reduction, they may be used to augment grid supplies in domestic, commercial, institutional, and industrial premises. Cost reduction to the stage where photovoltaics becomes economic for large-scale power generation in central stations depends on a technological breakthrough in the development of thin-film cells. DOE aims to reach this goal by 1990, so that by the end of the century about 20% of the estimated annual additions to their electrical generating capacity will be photovoltaic.

  10. Cell Phones

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cell phones are a relatively novel and evolving technology. While the potential benefits of this technology continue to emerge, so do the potential psychosocial risks. For example, one psychosocial risk is user stress, which appears to be related to feeling compelled to promptly respond to cell-phone activity in order to maintain spontaneity and access with others. Other potential psychosocial risks include disruptions in sleep; the user’s risk of exposure to cyberbullying, particularly the unwanted exposure of photographs and/or videos of the victim; and overuse, particularly among adolescents. With regard to the latter phenomenon, the boundaries among overuse, misuse, dependence, and addiction are not scientifically clear. Therefore, while cell phones are a convenient and expedient technology, they are not without their potential psychosocial hazards. PMID:23439568

  11. Nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for the Yucatán littoral: An approach for groundwater management.

    PubMed

    Arandacirerol, Nancy; Comín, Francisco; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have altered the balance of ecosystems to the detriment of natural environments. Eutrophication is a serious risk in Yucatán, a state in the eastern peninsula of México where groundwater supplies the only freshwater to a karst shelf environment. While economic development in Yucatán is increasing, environmental awareness is lagging, and efficient waste treatment systems are lacking. To assess potential nitrogen and phosphorus inputs into the coastal zone of Yucatán, we analyzed government reports and the chemical composition of groundwater and aquaculture wastewater. Swine, poultry, and tourism are revealed as the main continental nutrient sources, while groundwater with high nitrate concentrations is the principal coastal nutrient source, a pattern similar to other river discharges around the world. This study demonstrates that environmental risk management practices must be implemented in the Yucatán region to protect groundwater quality.

  12. [Bacterial pollution of the littoral waters of the northern suburbs of Tunis].

    PubMed

    Capapé, C; Chadli, A

    1986-01-01

    The authors present in this paper a study of the bacterial pollution of inshore waters of northern suburbs of Tunis, on the basis of 180 sampled collected in 15 different stations, 15 monthly (one for each station). Three districts have been considered: Raouad-Gammarth, La Marsa-Carthage and La Goulette. This last district is mostly submitted to the bacterial pollution, caused by its neighbourhood of the lagoon of Tunis "reserve of pollution" and of the city of Tunis.

  13. Evidence for long-term uplift on the Canary Islands from emergent Mio Pliocene littoral deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meco, Joaquín; Scaillet, Stéphane; Guillou, Hervé; Lomoschitz, Alejandro; Carlos Carracedo, Juan; Ballester, Javier; Betancort, Juan-Francisco; Cilleros, Antonio

    2007-06-01

    Several islands in the Canarian archipelago show marine deposits with identical fossil faunas, which are generally assigned to different glacioeustatic marine episodes: mainly Pleistocene episodes in Lanzarote and Fuerteventura, and Mio-Pliocene ones in Gran Canaria. Three fossil species ( Saccostrea chili, Nerita emiliana and Strombus coronatus) characterize all the marine deposits from southern Lanzarote, to the west and south of Fuerteventura and northeast of Gran Canaria. Three other species ( Ancilla glandiformis, Rothpletzia rudista and Siderastraea miocenica) confirm the chronostratigraphic attribution of these deposits. Other more occasional fossils (as Chlamys latissima, Isognomon soldanii and Clypeaster aegyptiacus) fit an upper Miocene and lower Pliocene age. This agrees with new K/Ar ages obtained from pillow lavas emplaced into the marine deposits (ca. 4.1 Ma in Gran Canaria, ca. 4.8 Ma in Fuerteventura) and from underlying (ca. 9.3 Ma in Gran Canaria) or overlying (ca. 9.8 Ma in Lanzarote) lava flows. The marine deposits are eroded but large continuous segments are preserved sloping gently towards the coast. Variations in the highest and the lowest elevations of the deposits apsl (above present sea level) indicate post-depositional uplift movements. Glacioeustatic causes are unlikely to be responsible for these variations on the basis of the coastal location of the deposits and their equatorial fauna characteristic of Mio-Pliocene corals. Differential uplift of the deposits across the archipelago is argued to result from the progressive seaward tilting of the islands along the insular volcanic trail marking the westward migration of hot spot head since 20 Ma. Successive westward accretion of younger volcanic edifices resulted in increasing lithostatic load of the crust with progressive (diachronous) tilting of the older edifices and their palaeo-shorelines marked by past coastal deposits.

  14. Vitamin D Status among Older Adults Residing in the Littoral and Andes Mountains in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Orces, Carlos H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency and its determinants among older adults in Ecuador. Methods. 25(OH)D deficiency and insufficiency prevalence rates were examined among participants in the National Survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate demographic characteristics associated with 25(OH)D deficiency. Results. Of 2,374 participants with a mean age of 71.0 (8.3) years, 25(OH)D insufficiency and deficiency were present in 67.8% (95% CI, 65.3–70.2) and 21.6% (95% CI, 19.5–23.7) of older adults in Ecuador, respectively. Women (OR, 3.19; 95% CI, 3.15–3.22), self-reported race as Indigenous (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 2.70–2.80), and residents in rural (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 4.40–4.58) and urban (OR, 2.74; 95% CI, 2.69–2.80) areas of the Andes Mountains region were variables significantly associated with 25(OH)D deficiency among older adults. Conclusions. Despite abundant sunlight throughout the year in Ecuador, 25(OH)D deficiency was significantly prevalent among older women, Indigenous subjects, and subjects residing in the Andes Mountains region of the country. The present findings may assist public health authorities to implement policies of vitamin D supplementation among older adults at risk for this condition. PMID:26301259

  15. The French Atlantic Littoral and the Massif Armoricain. [Bay of Biscay, France and Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Monget, J. M.; Scanvic, J. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Diachronic use of LANDSAT data time series will in time allow study of statistically submerged frequencies in tidal areas. This is an essential element of coastal geomorphology and of coastal zone management, being particularly useful in siting shellfish farms. Maps at useable scales and simple user oriented legends should become an essential document for coastal planning agencies.

  16. Marine litter in Mediterranean sandy littorals: Spatial distribution patterns along central Italy coastal dunes.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Gianluca; Battisti, Corrado; Acosta, Alicia T R

    2014-12-15

    Sandy shores are generally considered important sinks for marine litter and the presence of this litter may represent a serious threat to biotic communities and dune integrity mostly due to cleaning activities carried out through mechanical equipment. In spring (April-May) 2012 we sampled 153 2×2m random plots to assess the spatial distribution patterns of litter on Central Italy sandy shores. We analysed the relationship between the presence of litter and coastal dune habitats along the sea-inland gradient. Our results showed that the most frequent litter items were plastic and polystyrene. Differences of marine litter spatial distribution were found between upper beach and fore dune habitats and fixed dune habitats: embryo dune and mobile dune habitats show the highest frequency of litter, but, surprisingly, marine litter did not impact fixed dune habitats, these possibly acting as a natural barrier protecting the inner part of the coast from marine litter dispersion. PMID:25455823

  17. Lake Shore and Littoral Habitat Structure: Precision and biological Relevance of a Field Survey Method.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently, lake physical habitat assessment has been an underemployed tool for assessing lake and reservoir ecological condition. We outline and evaluate a rapid field sampling and analytical approach for quantifying near-shore physical habitat. We quantified the repeatabil...

  18. Seroprevalence and entomological study on Chikungunya virus at the Croatian littoral.

    PubMed

    Vilibic-Cavlek, Tatjana; Pem-Novosel, Iva; Kaic, Bernard; Babić-Erceg, Andrea; Kucinar, Jasmina; Klobucar, Ana; Medic, Alan; Pahor, Djana; Barac-Juretic, Katija; Gjenero-Margan, Ira

    2015-06-01

    During 2011-2012, a total of 1008 serum samples from randomly selected inhabitants of seven Croatian counties located on the Adriatic Coast were tested for the presence of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) IgG antibodies using indirect immunofluorescence assay. Nine participants (0.9%) from four counties were found to be seropositive to CHIKV. Seroprevalence varied from 0.5% to 1.8% between counties. Additionally, a total of 3,699 mosquitoes were captured in 126 localities from August 16 to September 24, 2011. Three mosquito species were found: Ae. albopictus (3010/81.4%), Cx. pipiens (688/18.6%) and only one specimen of the Cs. longiareolata. Female mosquitoes (N = 1,748) were pooled. All pools tested negative for CHIKV RNA using a real-time RT-PCR.

  19. Functional changes in littoral macroinvertebrate communities in response to watershed-level anthropogenic stress.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Katya E; Brady, Valerie J; Ciborowski, Jan J H; Ilyushkin, Sergey; Johnson, Lucinda B

    2014-01-01

    Watershed-scale anthropogenic stressors have profound effects on aquatic communities. Although several functional traits of stream macroinvertebrates change predictably in response to land development and urbanization, little is known about macroinvertebrate functional responses in lakes. We assessed functional community structure, functional diversity (Rao's quadratic entropy) and voltinism in macroinvertebrate communities sampled across the full gradient of anthropogenic stress in Laurentian Great Lakes coastal wetlands. Functional diversity and voltinism significantly decreased with increasing development, whereas agriculture had smaller or non-significant effects. Functional community structure was affected by watershed-scale development, as demonstrated by an ordination analysis followed by regression. Because functional community structure affects energy flow and ecosystem function, and functional diversity is known to have important implications for ecosystem resilience to further environmental change, these results highlight the necessity of finding ways to remediate or at least ameliorate these effects. PMID:25006811

  20. Parasite populations and communities from the shallow littoral of the Orther Bight (Fehmarn, SW Baltic Sea).

    PubMed

    Zander, C Dieter; Koçoglu, Ozen; Skroblies, Markus; Strohbach, Uwe

    2002-08-01

    Parasites of host guilds, such as mud snails (five species), benthic crustaceans (six species) and small-sized fishes ( Pomatoschistus microps, Gasterosteus aculeatus, Pungitius pungitius, young Pleuronectes flesus), were investigated in the Other Bight off West Fehmarn (Kiel Bight, German Baltic Sea). The hosts, especially the herbivorous Hydrobia spp, Gammarus spp and Idothea chelipes, attained extremely high densities in three habitats ( Enteromorpha belt, Fucus belt, sandy bottom), which may be a consequence of high eutrophication. Fish as carnivores and several helminths as parasites can profit from these massive appearances - more than 5,000 Hydrobia mud snails/m(2) or 282 I. chelipes/m(2). Prevalences of mud snails peaked in summer, by up to 30% extra, whereas species of benthic crustaceans attained increases of 47-100%, fish 57-100%. The most abundant helminths were the digeneans Maritrema subdolum, Microphallus claviformis and Asymphylodora demeli in Hydrobia spp, Maritrema subdolum, Microphallus papillorobustum, Levinseniella brachysoma and Podocotyle atomon in benthic crustaceans and Cryptocotyle concavum, Podocotyle atomon and Brachyphallus crenatus in fish. The copepod Thersitina gasterostei was also abundant in sticklebacks. The density of parasites (number/m(2)) peaked in summer, with more than 10,000 Maritrema subdolum metacercariae in I. chelipes from the Fucus belt and more than 1,000 in I. chelipes from the Enteromorpha belt or the sandy bottom. There was a clear seasonality in the appearance of digeneans in G. locusta, G. salinus and I. chelipes infected by M. subdolum and Gammarus spp infected by L. brachysoma and P. atomon. Therefore, the Orther Bight may be a epizootiotope for M. subdolum and C. concavum, i.e. a habitat with an extreme infection rate which can endanger the population of the host. Idothea chelipes also has a high infection potential to the final hosts of M. subdolum, crustacean-feeding birds. Similar relationships were found between the bird digenean C. concavum and the common goby Pomatoschistus microps. The infection mechanisms of both benthic crustaceans and small-sized fish follow the rule of predation in two steps: dispersion and accumulation.

  1. Functional Changes in Littoral Macroinvertebrate Communities in Response to Watershed-Level Anthropogenic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Katya E.; Brady, Valerie J.; Ciborowski, Jan J. H.; Ilyushkin, Sergey; Johnson, Lucinda B.

    2014-01-01

    Watershed-scale anthropogenic stressors have profound effects on aquatic communities. Although several functional traits of stream macroinvertebrates change predictably in response to land development and urbanization, little is known about macroinvertebrate functional responses in lakes. We assessed functional community structure, functional diversity (Rao’s quadratic entropy) and voltinism in macroinvertebrate communities sampled across the full gradient of anthropogenic stress in Laurentian Great Lakes coastal wetlands. Functional diversity and voltinism significantly decreased with increasing development, whereas agriculture had smaller or non-significant effects. Functional community structure was affected by watershed-scale development, as demonstrated by an ordination analysis followed by regression. Because functional community structure affects energy flow and ecosystem function, and functional diversity is known to have important implications for ecosystem resilience to further environmental change, these results highlight the necessity of finding ways to remediate or at least ameliorate these effects. PMID:25006811

  2. Mussels as ecosystem engineers: Their contribution to species richness in a rocky littoral community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthagaray, Ana Inés; Carranza, Alvar

    Mussels are important ecosystem engineers in marine benthic systems because they aggregate into beds, thus modifying the nature and complexity of the substrate. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of mussels ( Brachidontes rodriguezii, Mytilus edulis platensis, and Perna perna) to the benthic species richness of intertidal and shallow subtidal communities at Cerro Verde (Uruguay). We compared the richness of macro-benthic species between mussel-engineered patches and patches without mussels but dominated by algae or barnacles at a landscape scale (all samples), between tidal levels, and between sites distributed along a wave exposition gradient. Overall, we found a net increase in species richness in samples with mussels (35 species), in contrast to samples where mussels were naturally absent or scarce (27 species). The positive trend of the effect did not depend upon tidal level or wave exposition, but its magnitude varied between sites. Within sites, a significant positive effect was detected only at the protected site. Within the mussel-engineered patches, the richness of all macro-faunal groups (total, sessile and mobile) was positively correlated with mussel abundance. This evidence indicates that the mussel beds studied here were important in maintaining species richness at the landscape-level, and highlights that beds of shelled bivalves should not be neglected as conservation targets in marine benthic environments.

  3. Aquatic bacterial assemblage variability in the supra littoral zone of Appledore Island, Gulf of Maine.

    PubMed

    Simonis, Joseph L; Neuharth-Keusch, Dani; Hewson, Ian

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the abundance and assemblage variability of bacteria in 10 spatially distinct freshwater pools on Appledore Island, Gulf of Maine. Assemblages were strongly heterogeneous between pools separated by even short distances. To gain insight into factors that may lead to the establishment of novel assemblages, we conducted an ecosystem-open choromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) enrichment experiment within mesocosms inoculated with a standardized microbial community and observed patterns of their composition over time. Assemblages were strongly divergent from each other in composition after only 3 days of incubation. Divergence among mesocosms was significantly higher with increasing levels of CDOM. CDOM addition initially had a strong positive impact on bacterial operation taxonomic unit (OTU) richness and negative impact on bacterial OTU evenness, but no impact on total bacterial abundance, suggesting that factors controlling abundance are decoupled from those influencing overall composition.

  4. Effects of beach cast cleaning on beach quality, microbial food web, and littoral macrofaunal biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, Torleif; Råberg, Sonja; Fell, Sabine; Carlsson, Per

    2004-06-01

    At the end of the summer, drifting filamentous red algae cover shallow bottoms and accumulate in huge cast walls on the open shores of the non-tidal central Baltic Sea. The hypotheses that beach cleaning increases water clarity, decreases the organic content of the sand, and increases the species diversity in the shallow zone closest to the shore, were tested through field investigations and experiments. Cleaned shorelines were compared with un-cleaned shorelines at two sites with different intensity of beach cleaning in a rural area of SE Sweden. The results show that water clarity was significantly increased off the intensively cleaned beach but not off the moderately cleaned one. Similarly, the total leakage of nitrogenous compounds decreased off the intensively cleaned beach, but not off the moderately cleaned. The organic content of the sand was lower on both cleaned beaches compared with nearby un-cleaned beaches. The total animal biomass was significantly lower on the intensively cleaned beach compared with the un-cleaned beach, but the moderately cleaned beach gave no such effect. The difference in biodiversity and community structure between cleaned and un-cleaned beaches was insignificant. The most obvious difference in species composition was a much higher number of planktivore opossum shrimps of the genus Mysis and Praunus on the un-cleaned beaches. The bacterial production and the amount of ciliates larger than 20 mm were also higher on un-cleaned beaches, indicating that the microbial food web off the un-cleaned beaches is stimulated by the discharge of decomposing algal material. The conclusion of the study is that mechanical cleaning reduces the organic content of the beach sand and may change the water quality and microbial production, but the effect on the macrofaunal biodiversity is insignificant.

  5. Evaluating long-term trends in littoral benthic macroinvertebrate communities of lakes recovering from acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Lento, Jennifer; Dillon, Peter J; Somers, Keith M

    2012-12-01

    The Mann-Kendall test has been proposed as a nonparametric method to evaluate trends in long-term water quality datasets with missing values, serial correlation, and non-normality. However, this test has rarely been used to evaluate long-term trends in biological data. In this study, we used the Mann-Kendall test to evaluate trends in 15 years of data on benthic macroinvertebrate communities from 17 Precambrian Shield lakes. We also used the van Belle and Hughes test of trend homogeneity to assess whether common among-lake temporal trends existed. We assumed that evidence of a common regional trend among lakes would support the hypothesis of long-term biological recovery from past acidification. We found decreasing proportions of Chironomidae and increasing proportions of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) in both single-lake and multi-lake trend analysis. Moreover, six of the nine lakes with significant trends in more than one benthos metric displayed a significant decrease in Chironomidae and increase in EPT concurrently, indicating a shift towards more acid-sensitive taxa. Weak trends in several of the biological metrics indicated that recovery in these lakes has been impeded. Results of this study indicate that the Mann-Kendall and van Belle and Hughes trend tests are useful statistical tools to evaluate long-term patterns in biological data.

  6. Southwest Washington littoral drift restoration—Beach and nearshore morphological monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Ruggiero, Peter; Kaminsky, George M.

    2012-01-01

    A morphological monitoring program has documented the placement and initial dispersal of beach nourishment material (280,000 m3) placed between the Mouth of the Columbia River (MCR) North Jetty and North Head, at the southern end of the Long Beach Peninsula in southwestern Washington State. A total of 21 topographic surveys and 8 nearshore bathymetric surveys were performed between July 11, 2010, and November 4, 2011. During placement, southerly alongshore transport resulted in movement of nourishment material to the south towards the MCR North Jetty. Moderate wave conditions (significant wave height around 4 m) following the completion of the nourishment resulted in cross-shore sediment transport, with most of the nourishment material transported into the nearshore bars. The nourishment acted as a buffer to the more severe erosion, including dune overtopping and retreat, that was observed at the northern end of the study area throughout the winter. One year after placement of the nourishment, onshore transport and beach recovery were most pronounced within the permit area and to the south toward the MCR North Jetty. This suggests that there is some long-term benefit of the nourishment for reducing erosion rates locally, although the enhanced recovery also could be due to natural gradients in alongshore transport causing net movement of the sediment from north to south. Measurements made during the morphological monitoring program documented the seasonal movement and decay of nearshore sand bars. Low-energy conditions in late summer resulted in onshore bar migration early in the monitoring program. Moderate wave conditions in the autumn resulted in offshore movement of the middle bar and continued onshore migration of the outer bar. High-energy wave conditions early in the winter resulted in strong cross-shore transport and creation of a 3-bar system along portions of the coast. More southerly wave events occurred later in the winter and early spring and coincided with the complete loss of the outer bar and net loss of sediment from the study area. These data suggest that bar decay may be an important mechanism for exporting sediment from Benson Beach north to the Long Beach Peninsula. The measurements presented in this report represent one component of a broader monitoring program designed to track the movement of nourishment material on the beach and shoreface at this location, including continuous video monitoring (Argus), in situu measurements of hydrodynamics, and a physical tracer experiment. Field data from the monitoring program will be used to test numerical models of hydrodynamics and sediment transport and to improve the capability of numerical models to support regional sediment management.

  7. Synoptic patterns of meiofaunal and macrofaunal abundances and specific composition in littoral sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armonies, Werner; Hellwig-Armonies, Monika

    1987-03-01

    During recent years, many investigations on small zoobenthos have been performed at the island of Sylt. As these studies were carried out sporadically over many years and as different extraction methods were used, comparisons of the results have been hampered. Therefore, in August/September 1986, 24 sites were sampled and evaluated using one quantitative method throughout. Sites range from mud to exposed sand and from the sublittoral to the supralittoral. Macrofauna and the taxa Plathelminthes, Polychaeta, and Oligochaeta are determined to species level. Macrofaunal (>0.5 mm) abundance is highest in mud and continuously decreases with increasing exposure to wave action. Meiofaunal (<0.5 mm) abundance is less variable. Nematoda dominate in mud and muddy sand, Copepoda in sheltered and exposed sand, other taxa only intermittently. Related to surface area, no correlation between macro-and meiofaunal abundance is apparent. Plathelminthes and Copepoda reach highest abundance per surface area in sand but their per volume density is higher in mud and muddy sand. Related to sediment volume instead of surface area, the meiofaunal abundance pattern is very similar to the macrofaunal pattern. The faunal composition changes gradually along the tidal gradient without general faunal boundaries. On an averange, the faunal similarity of neighbouring sites is highest in Oligochaeta and lowest in Plathelminthes. Presumably, Oligochaeta tolerate wider ranges of environmental factors. This may explain the low number of oligochaete species. On the other hand, Plathelminthes seem to adapt to relatively narrow ranges of factors and their species richness is highest. Because of macrofaunameiofauna interaction it is suggested that the meiofaunal assemblage will be least stable in mud and muddy sand, and most stable in exposed sand.

  8. Evaluating long-term trends in littoral benthic macroinvertebrate communities of lakes recovering from acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Lento, Jennifer; Dillon, Peter J; Somers, Keith M

    2012-12-01

    The Mann-Kendall test has been proposed as a nonparametric method to evaluate trends in long-term water quality datasets with missing values, serial correlation, and non-normality. However, this test has rarely been used to evaluate long-term trends in biological data. In this study, we used the Mann-Kendall test to evaluate trends in 15 years of data on benthic macroinvertebrate communities from 17 Precambrian Shield lakes. We also used the van Belle and Hughes test of trend homogeneity to assess whether common among-lake temporal trends existed. We assumed that evidence of a common regional trend among lakes would support the hypothesis of long-term biological recovery from past acidification. We found decreasing proportions of Chironomidae and increasing proportions of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) in both single-lake and multi-lake trend analysis. Moreover, six of the nine lakes with significant trends in more than one benthos metric displayed a significant decrease in Chironomidae and increase in EPT concurrently, indicating a shift towards more acid-sensitive taxa. Weak trends in several of the biological metrics indicated that recovery in these lakes has been impeded. Results of this study indicate that the Mann-Kendall and van Belle and Hughes trend tests are useful statistical tools to evaluate long-term patterns in biological data. PMID:22193633

  9. Calcite-impregnated defluidization structures in littoral sands of Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloud, P.; Lajoie, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    Associated locally with well-known tufa mounds and towers of Mono Lake, California, are subvertical, concretionary sand structures through which fresh calcium-containing artesian waters moved up to sites of calcium carbonate precipitation beneath and adjacent to the lake. The structures include closely spaced calcite-impregnated columns, tubes, and other configurations with subcylindrical to bizarre cross sections and predominantly vertical orientation in coarse, barely coherent pumice sands along the south shore of the lake. Many structures terminate upward in extensive calcareous layers of caliche and tufa. Locally they enter the bases of tufa mounds and towers. A common form superficially resembles root casts and animal burrows except that branching is mostly up instead of down. Similar defluidization structures in ancient sedimentary rocks have been mistakenly interpreted as fossil burrows.

  10. Marine litter in Mediterranean sandy littorals: Spatial distribution patterns along central Italy coastal dunes.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Gianluca; Battisti, Corrado; Acosta, Alicia T R

    2014-12-15

    Sandy shores are generally considered important sinks for marine litter and the presence of this litter may represent a serious threat to biotic communities and dune integrity mostly due to cleaning activities carried out through mechanical equipment. In spring (April-May) 2012 we sampled 153 2×2m random plots to assess the spatial distribution patterns of litter on Central Italy sandy shores. We analysed the relationship between the presence of litter and coastal dune habitats along the sea-inland gradient. Our results showed that the most frequent litter items were plastic and polystyrene. Differences of marine litter spatial distribution were found between upper beach and fore dune habitats and fixed dune habitats: embryo dune and mobile dune habitats show the highest frequency of litter, but, surprisingly, marine litter did not impact fixed dune habitats, these possibly acting as a natural barrier protecting the inner part of the coast from marine litter dispersion.

  11. Biological structure and dynamics of littoral fish assemblages in the eastern Finger Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Fish assemblages from three of the New York Finger Lakes were examined for structure within and between lakes and over time. Species-area relationships indicated that local fish assemblages are the result of recent, lake-specific events that altered the regional species pool. Fish assemblages varied among seasons and those occupying eutrophic waters had different characteristics from those in oligotrophic waters. Bluntnose minnows (Pimephales notatus) were a persistent and important component of most assemblages, but abundance of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) was the most distinguishing feature. Species associations indicated that interactions among the fishes had little influence on assemblage structure. Correlations between community structure and abiotic factors were identified. Ten abiotic variables were strongly associated with the species assemblages, but could not fully explain differences between assemblages. Results indicate that the abundance and diversity of water column feeders was related to productivity of lake habitat. In general, fish populations were smaller in oligotrophic waters and water column feeders were poorly represented in those assemblages. Productivity at various trophic levels was implicated as a major factor determining lake fish assemblage structure.

  12. WaveQ3D: Fast and accurate acoustic transmission loss (TL) eigenrays, in littoral environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Sean M.

    This study defines a new 3D Gaussian ray bundling acoustic transmission loss model in geodetic coordinates: latitude, longitude, and altitude. This approach is designed to lower the computation burden of computing accurate environmental effects in sonar training application by eliminating the need to transform the ocean environment into a collection of Nx2D Cartesian radials. This approach also improves model accuracy by incorporating real world 3D effects, like horizontal refraction, into the model. This study starts with derivations for a 3D variant of Gaussian ray bundles in this coordinate system. To verify the accuracy of this approach, acoustic propagation predictions of transmission loss, time of arrival, and propagation direction are compared to analytic solutions and other models. To validate the model's ability to predict real world phenomena, predictions of transmission loss and propagation direction are compared to at-sea measurements, in an environment where strong horizontal refraction effect have been observed. This model has been integrated into U.S. Navy active sonar training system applications, where testing has demonstrated its ability to improve transmission loss calculation speed without sacrificing accuracy.

  13. Calcite-impregnated defluidization structures in littoral sands of mono lake, california.

    PubMed

    Cloud, P; Lajoie, K R

    1980-11-28

    Associated locally with well-known tufa mounds and towers of Mono Lake, California, are subvertical, concretionary sand structures through which fresh calcium-containing artesian waters moved up to sites of calcium carbonate precipitation beneath and adjacent to the lake. The structures include closely spaced calcite-impregnated columns, tubes, and other configurations with subcylindrical to bizarre cross sections and predominantly vertical orientation in coarse, barely coherent pumice sands along the south shore of the lake. Many structures terminate upward in extensive calcareous layers of caliche and tufa. Locally they enter the bases of tufa mounds and towers. A common form superficially resembles root casts and animal burrows except that branching is mostly up instead of down. Similar defluidization structures in ancient sedimentary rocks have been mistakenly interpreted as fossil burrows.

  14. Tide-associated biological rhythms of some white sea littoral invertebrates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, O. A.; Golubev, A. I.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results from two years of laboratory observations of the tide-associated rhythms of activity of White Sea intertidal invertebrates, Mya arenaria (Bivalvia) and Gammarus finmarchicus (Amphipoda). The tidal associated activity of these invertebrates could not be estimate as a clear circatidal clock. Gammarus activity could be phase shifted by a 0.5 h exposure to turbulent water twice a day for 2-3 days. Mya's rhythm could be changed by a single drainage of aquariums lasting about 15 min. This kind of timing system may be a relatively primitive evolution feature.

  15. Lake shore and littoral habitat structure: a field survey method and its precision

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently, lake physical habitat assessment has been and underemployed tool for assessing lake and reservoir ecological condition. Herein, we outline and evaluate a rapid (2 persons: 1.5-3.5 h) field sampling and analytical approach for quantifying near-shore physical habit...

  16. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-08-23

    An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

  17. Electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    An improved secondary electrochemical cell is disclosed having a negative electrode of lithium aluminum, a positive electrode of iron sulfide, a molten electrolyte of lithium chloride and potassium chloride, and the combination that the fully charged theoretical capacity of the negative electrode is in the range of 0.5-1.0 that of the positive electrode. The cell thus is negative electrode limiting during discharge cycling. Preferably, the negative electrode contains therein, in the approximate range of 1-10 volume % of the electrode, an additive from the materials of graphitized carbon, aluminum-iron alloy, and/or magnesium oxide.

  18. Cell Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA contract led to the development of faster and more energy efficient semiconductor materials for digital integrated circuits. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) conducts electrons 4-6 times faster than silicon and uses less power at frequencies above 100-150 megahertz. However, the material is expensive, brittle, fragile and has lacked computer automated engineering tools to solve this problem. Systems & Processes Engineering Corporation (SPEC) developed a series of GaAs cell libraries for cell layout, design rule checking, logic synthesis, placement and routing, simulation and chip assembly. The system is marketed by Compare Design Automation.

  19. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... stem cells? What are the potential uses of human stem cells and the obstacles that must be overcome before ... two kinds of stem cells from animals and humans: embryonic stem cells and non-embryonic "somatic" or "adult" stem cells . ...

  20. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... based therapies Cell culture Cell division Chromosome Clone Cloning Cord blood stem cells Culture medium Differentiation Directed ... Pluripotent Polar body Preimplantation Proliferation Regenerative medicine Reproductive cloning Signals Somatic cell Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) ...

  1. Learn About Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... ISSCR Get Involved Media © 2015 International Society for Stem Cell Research Terms of Use Disclaimer Privacy Policy

  2. Potent Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    It seems hard to believe that Dolly the cloned sheep was born 10 years ago, kindling furious arguments over the prospects and ethics of cloning a human. Today, the controversy over cloning is entwined, often confused, with concerns over the use of human embryonic stem cells. Most people are unclear what cloning is, and they know even less when it…

  3. Photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  4. Photoelectrodialytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, G.W.

    1983-09-13

    A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment. 3 figs.

  5. Photoelectrodialytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, George W.

    1983-01-01

    A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment.

  6. 19. Oblique, typical cell (south cells) from rear of cell; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Oblique, typical cell (south cells) from rear of cell; view to north, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  7. Stem Cells, Retinal Ganglion Cells, and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sluch, Valentin M.; Zack, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells represent an essential neuronal cell type for vision. These cells receive inputs from light-sensing photoreceptors via retinal interneurons and then relay these signals to the brain for further processing. Retinal ganglion cell diseases that result in cell death, e.g. glaucoma, often lead to permanent damage since mammalian nerves do not regenerate. Stem cell differentiation can generate cells needed for replacement or can be used to generate cells capable of secreting protective factors to promote survival. In addition, stem cell-derived cells can be used in drug screening research. Here, we discuss the current state of stem cell research potential for interference in glaucoma and other optic nerve diseases with a focus on stem cell differentiation to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:24732765

  8. Cell division intersects with cell geometry.

    PubMed

    Moseley, James B; Nurse, Paul

    2010-07-23

    Single-celled organisms monitor cell geometry and use this information to control cell division. Such geometry-sensing mechanisms control both the decision to enter into cell division and the physical orientation of the chromosome segregation machinery, suggesting that signals controlling cell division may be linked to the mechanisms that ensure proper chromosome segregation.

  9. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  10. Red blood cells, sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    These crescent or sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs) are present with Sickle cell anemia, and stand out clearly against the normal round RBCs. These abnormally shaped cells may become entangled and ...

  11. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  12. Sickle Cell Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... change Sickle Cell News from Around the Web Google Custom Search – sickle cell Cure for sickle cell ... from healthy, ... NYT, Nature, Wash Post, SciAm, CNN - Google Custom Search Genetic Treatments for Sickle Cell - Scientific ...

  13. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Florian, Christian; Langmann, Thomas; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Morsczeck, Christian

    2008-09-19

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture.

  14. T-cell count

    MedlinePlus

    Thymus derived lymphocyte count; T-lymphocyte count; T cell count ... T cells are a type of lymphocyte. Lymphocytes are white blood cells. They make up part of the immune system. T cells help the body fight diseases or harmful ...

  15. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  16. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  17. CORONAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P. E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-04-10

    We have recently noticed cellular features in Fe XII 193 A images of the 1.2 MK corona. They occur in regions bounded by a coronal hole and a filament channel, and are centered on flux elements of the photospheric magnetic network. Like their neighboring coronal holes, these regions have minority-polarity flux that is {approx}0.1-0.3 times their flux of majority polarity. Consequently, the minority-polarity flux is 'grabbed' by the majority-polarity flux to form low-lying loops, and the remainder of the network flux escapes to connect with its opposite-polarity counterpart in distant active regions of the Sun. As these regions are carried toward the limb by solar rotation, the cells disappear and are replaced by linear plumes projecting toward the limb. In simultaneous views from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, these plumes project in opposite directions, extending away from the coronal hole in one view and toward the hole in the other view, suggesting that they are sky-plane projections of the same radial structures. We conclude that these regions are composed of closely spaced radial plumes, extending upward like candles on a birthday cake and visible as cells when seen from above. We suppose that a coronal hole has this same discrete, cellular magnetic structure, but that it is not seen until the encroachment of opposite-polarity flux closes part or all of the hole.

  18. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  19. DNA-cell conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  20. Indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    The direction for InP solar cell research; reduction of cell cost; increase of cell efficiency; measurements needed to better understand cell performance; n/p versus p/n; radiation effects; major problems in cell contacting; and whether the present level of InP solar cell research in the USA should be maintained, decreased, or increased were considered.

  1. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.F.; Lampkin, C.M.

    1981-12-08

    A photovoltaic cell has: an electrically conductive substrate, which may be glass having a film of conductive tin oxide; a first layer containing a suitable semiconductor, which layer has a first component film with an amorphous structure and a second component film with a polycrystalline structure; a second layer forming a heterojunction with the first layer; and suitable electrodes where the heterojunction is formed from a solution containing copper, the amorphous film component is superposed above an electrically conductive substrate to resist permeation of the copper-containing material to shorting electrical contact with the substrate. The penetration resistant amporphous layer permits a variety of processes to be used in forming the heterojunction with even very thin layers (1-6 mu thick) of underlying polycrystalline semi-conductor materials. In some embodiments, the amorphous-like structure may be formed by the addition of aluminum or zirconium compounds to a solution of cadmium salts sprayed over a heated substrate.

  2. Photoelectrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Rauh, R. David; Boudreau, Robert A.

    1983-06-14

    A photoelectrochemical cell comprising a sealed container having a light-transmitting window for admitting light into the container across a light-admitting plane, an electrolyte in the container, a photoelectrode in the container having a light-absorbing surface arranged to receive light from the window and in contact with the electrolyte, the surface having a plurality of spaced portions oblique to the plane, each portion having dimensions at least an order of magnitude larger than the maximum wavelength of incident sunlight, the total surface area of the surface being larger than the area of the plane bounded by the container, and a counter electrode in the container in contact with the electrolyte.

  3. Fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1983-06-28

    An improved fuel cell comprising an anode section including an anode terminal, an anode fuel, and an anolyte electrolyte, a cathode section including a cathode terminal, an electron distributor and a catholyte electrolyte, an ion exchange section between the anode and cathode sections and including an ionolyte electrolyte, ion transfer membranes separating the ionolyte from the anolyte and the catholyte and an electric circuit connected with and between the terminals conducting free electrons from the anode section and delivering free electrons to the cathode section, said ionolyte receives ions of one polarity moving from the anolyte through the membrane related thereto preventing chemical equilibrium in the anode section and sustaining chemical reaction and the generating of free electrons therein, said ions received by the ionolyte from the anolyte release different ions from the ionolyte which move through the membrane between the ionolyte and catholyte and which add to the catholyte.

  4. Integrated circuit cell library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    According to the invention, an ASIC cell library for use in creation of custom integrated circuits is disclosed. The ASIC cell library includes some first cells and some second cells. Each of the second cells includes two or more kernel cells. The ASIC cell library is at least 5% comprised of second cells. In various embodiments, the ASIC cell library could be 10% or more, 20% or more, 30% or more, 40% or more, 50% or more, 60% or more, 70% or more, 80% or more, 90% or more, or 95% or more comprised of second cells.

  5. Monitoring cell growth.

    PubMed

    Strober, W

    2001-05-01

    This appendix provides two protocols for monitoring cell growth. Counting cells using a hemacytometer is tedious but it allows one to effectively distinguish live cells from dead cells (using Trypan Blue exclusion). In addition, this procedure is less subject to errors due to cell clumping or heterogeneity of cell size. The use of an electronic cell counter is quicker and easier than counting cells using a hemacytometer. However, an electronic cell counter as currently constructed does not distinguish live from dead cells in a reliable fashion and is subject to error due to the presence of cell clumps. Overall, the electronic cell counter is best reserved for repetitive and rapid counting of fresh peripheral blood cells and should be used with caution when counting cell populations derived from tissues. PMID:18432653

  6. Automated Cell-Cutting for Cell Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Akihiko; Tanikawa, Tamio; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya; Ohba, Kohtaro

    We develop an automated cell-cutting technique for cell cloning. Animal cells softened by the cytochalasin treatment are injected into a microfluidic chip. The microfluidic chip contains two orthogonal channels: one microchannel is wide, used to transport cells, and generates the cutting flow; the other is thin and used for aspiration, fixing, and stretching of the cell. The injected cell is aspirated and stretched in the thin microchannel. Simultaneously, the volumes of the cell before and after aspiration are calculated; the volumes are used to calculate the fluid flow required to aspirate half the volume of the cell into the thin microchannel. Finally, we apply a high-speed flow in the orthogonal microchannel to bisect the cell. This paper reports the cutting process, the cutting system, and the results of the experiment.

  7. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J. F.; Lampkin, C. M.

    1981-02-03

    A photovoltaic cell is disclosed having an electrically conductive substrate, which may be glass having a film of conductive tin oxide. A first layer contains a suitable semiconductor, which layer has a first component film with an amorphous structure and a second component film with a polycrystalline structure a second layer forms a heterojunction with the first layer suitable electrodes are provided where the heterojunction is formed from a solution containing copper, and the amorphous film component is superposed above an electrically conductive substrate to resist permeation of the copper-containing material to shorting electrical contact with the substrate. The penetration resistant amorphous layer permits a variety of processes to be used in forming the heterojunction with even very thin layers (1-6 mu thick) of underlying polycrystalline semi-conductor materials. In some embodiments, the amorphous-like structure may be formed by the addition of aluminum or zirconium compounds to a solution of cadmium salts sprayed over a heated substrate.

  8. Eukaryotic Cells and their Cell Bodies: Cell Theory Revised

    PubMed Central

    BALUŠKA, FRANTIŠEK; VOLKMANN, DIETER; BARLOW, PETER W.

    2004-01-01

    • Background Cell Theory, also known as cell doctrine, states that all eukaryotic organisms are composed of cells, and that cells are the smallest independent units of life. This Cell Theory has been influential in shaping the biological sciences ever since, in 1838/1839, the botanist Matthias Schleiden and the zoologist Theodore Schwann stated the principle that cells represent the elements from which all plant and animal tissues are constructed. Some 20 years later, in a famous aphorism Omnis cellula e cellula, Rudolf Virchow annunciated that all cells arise only from pre‐existing cells. General acceptance of Cell Theory was finally possible only when the cellular nature of brain tissues was confirmed at the end of the 20th century. Cell Theory then rapidly turned into a more dogmatic cell doctrine, and in this form survives up to the present day. In its current version, however, the generalized Cell Theory developed for both animals and plants is unable to accommodate the supracellular nature of higher plants, which is founded upon a super‐symplasm of interconnected cells into which is woven apoplasm, symplasm and super‐apoplasm. Furthermore, there are numerous examples of multinucleate coenocytes and syncytia found throughout the eukaryote superkingdom posing serious problems for the current version of Cell Theory. • Scope To cope with these problems, we here review data which conform to the original proposal of Daniel Mazia that the eukaryotic cell is composed of an elemental Cell Body whose structure is smaller than the cell and which is endowed with all the basic attributes of a living entity. A complement to the Cell Body is the Cell Periphery Apparatus, which consists of the plasma membrane associated with other periphery structures. Importantly, boundary stuctures of the Cell Periphery Apparatus, although capable of some self‐assembly, are largely produced and maintained by Cell Body activities and can be produced from it de novo. These

  9. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1987-05-12

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

  10. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1987-05-12

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber.

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma —

    Cancer.gov

    The hallmarks of squamous cell carcinoma are the differentiation features of the squamous epithelium: keratinization and intercellular bridges. Large central masses of keratin, individual cell keratinization, and/or keratin pearls may form. Necrosis of tumor cell nests and accumulation of acute inflammatory cells are frequent features of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  13. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shengjuan; Bergen, Werner G.; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  14. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  15. Virus Cell-to-Cell Transmission▿

    PubMed Central

    Mothes, Walther; Sherer, Nathan M.; Jin, Jing; Zhong, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Viral infections spread based on the ability of viruses to overcome multiple barriers and move from cell to cell, tissue to tissue, and person to person and even across species. While there are fundamental differences between these types of transmissions, it has emerged that the ability of viruses to utilize and manipulate cell-cell contact contributes to the success of viral infections. Central to the excitement in the field of virus cell-to-cell transmission is the idea that cell-to-cell spread is more than the sum of the processes of virus release and entry. This implies that virus release and entry are efficiently coordinated to sites of cell-cell contact, resulting in a process that is distinct from its individual components. In this review, we will present support for this model, illustrate the ability of viruses to utilize and manipulate cell adhesion molecules, and discuss the mechanism and driving forces of directional spreading. An understanding of viral cell-to-cell spreading will enhance our ability to intervene in the efficient spreading of viral infections. PMID:20375157

  16. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  17. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  18. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  19. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as ...

  20. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... False: People with sickle cell disease cannot get malaria. A True B False 4. True or False: ... False: People with sickle cell disease cannot get malaria. False People with sickle cell disease can get ...

  1. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1980-01-01

    The following aspects of kidney cell electrophoresis are discussed: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characterization of kidney cells.

  2. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1979-01-01

    A kidney cell electrophoresis technique is described in four parts: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characteristics of kidney cells.

  3. Fuel cells: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of fuel cell technology and applications is presented. The operating principles, performance capabilities, and limitations of fuel cells are discussed. Diagrams of fuel cell construction and operating characteristics are provided. Photographs of typical installations are included.

  4. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  5. Closed Large Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Large Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. When the cell centers are cloudy and the main sinking motion is concentrated at cell ...

  6. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  7. Reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rajasingh, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of adult somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells may provide an attractive source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. It has emerged as an invaluable method for generating patient-specific stem cells of any cell lineage without the use of embryonic stem cells. A revolutionary study in 2006 showed that it is possible to convert adult somatic cells directly into pluripotent stem cells by using a limited number of pluripotent transcription factors and is called as iPS cells. Currently, both genomic integrating viral and nonintegrating nonviral methods are used to generate iPS cells. However, the viral-based technology poses increased risk of safety, and more studies are now focused on nonviral-based technology to obtain autologous stem cells for clinical therapy. In this review, the pros and cons of the present iPS cell technology and the future direction for the successful translation of this technology into the clinic are discussed.

  8. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  9. Cell rheology: Stressed-out stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holle, Andrew W.; Engler, Adam J.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the physical characteristics of the matrix surrounding a stem cell can affect its behaviour. This picture gets further complicated by studies of stem cells and their differentiated counterparts that show that the cells' own softness also has a clear role in how they respond to stress.

  10. Glial cells: Old cells with new twists

    PubMed Central

    Ndubaku, Ugo; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2008-01-01

    Summary Based on their characteristics and function – migration, neural protection, proliferation, axonal guidance and trophic effects – glial cells may be regarded as probably the most versatile cells in our body. For many years, these cells were considered as simply support cells for neurons. Recently, it has been shown that they are more versatile than previously believed – as true stem cells in the nervous system – and are important players in neural function and development. There are several glial cell types in the nervous system: the two most abundant are oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. Although both of these cells are responsible for myelination, their developmental origins are quite different. Oligodendrocytes originate from small niche populations from different regions of the central nervous system, while Schwann cells develop from a stem cell population (the neural crest) that gives rise to many cell derivatives besides glia and which is a highly migratory group of cells. PMID:18068219

  11. CellFinder: a cell data repository

    PubMed Central

    Stachelscheid, Harald; Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Mah, Nancy; Neves, Mariana; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Leser, Ulf; Kurtz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    CellFinder (http://www.cellfinder.org) is a comprehensive one-stop resource for molecular data characterizing mammalian cells in different tissues and in different development stages. It is built from carefully selected data sets stemming from other curated databases and the biomedical literature. To date, CellFinder describes 3394 cell types and 50 951 cell lines. The database currently contains 3055 microscopic and anatomical images, 205 whole-genome expression profiles of 194 cell/tissue types from RNA-seq and microarrays and 553 905 protein expressions for 535 cells/tissues. Text mining of a corpus of >2000 publications followed by manual curation confirmed expression information on ∼900 proteins and genes. CellFinder’s data model is capable to seamlessly represent entities from single cells to the organ level, to incorporate mappings between homologous entities in different species and to describe processes of cell development and differentiation. Its ontological backbone currently consists of 204 741 ontology terms incorporated from 10 different ontologies unified under the novel CELDA ontology. CellFinder’s web portal allows searching, browsing and comparing the stored data, interactive construction of developmental trees and navigating the partonomic hierarchy of cells and tissues through a unique body browser designed for life scientists and clinicians. PMID:24304896

  12. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Misako; Indo, Hiroko P.; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Iwashita, Yoichiro; Fukushige, Tomoko; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Kanekura, Takuro; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  13. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  14. IAPs and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Dubrez, Laurence; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) constitute a family of cell signaling regulators controlling several fundamental biological processes such as innate immunity, inflammation, cell death, cell proliferation, and cell differentiation. Increasing evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies indicate a function for IAPs in the modulation of invasive and migratory properties of cells. Here, we present and discuss the mechanisms whereby IAPs can control cell migration.

  15. Sertoli cells as biochambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Don F. (Inventor); Sanberg, Paul R. (Inventor); Saporta, Samuel (Inventor); Hushen, Joelle J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    According to the present invention, there is provided a biological chamber system having a biochamber defined by outer walls of Sertoli cells. Also provided is a transplantation facilitator including a biochamber. A method of making biochambers by co-culturing facilitator cells and therapeutic cells and then aggregating the facilitator celes is also provided. Also provided is a method of transplanting cells by incorporating transplant cells into a biochamber and transplanting the biochamber containing the transplant cells.

  16. Stem Cell Sciences plc.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Sebnem

    2006-09-01

    Stem Cell Sciences' core objective is to develop safe and effective stem cell-based therapies for currently incurable diseases. In order to achieve this goal, Stem Cell Sciences recognizes the need for multiple technologies and a globally integrated stem cell initiative. The key challenges for the successful application of stem cells in the clinic is the need for a reproducible supply of pure, fully characterized stem cells that have been grown in suitable conditions for use in the clinic.

  17. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  18. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2002-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  19. Gaucher cell, photomicrograph (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Gaucher's disease is called a "lipid storage disease" where abnormal amounts of lipids called "glycosphingolipids" are stored in special cells called reticuloendothelial cells. Classically, the nucleus is ...

  20. Pluripotent stem cells from germ cells.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Candace L; Shamblott, Michael J; Gearhart, John D

    2006-01-01

    To date, stem cells have been derived from three sources of germ cells. These include embryonic germ cells (EGCs), embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs), and multipotent germ line stem cells (GSCs). EGCs are derived from primordial germ cells that arise in the late embryonic and early fetal period of development. ECCs are derived from adult testicular tumors whereas GSCs have been derived by culturing spermatogonial stem cells from mouse neonates and adults. For each of these lines, their pluripotency has been demonstrated by their ability to differentiate into cell types derived from the three germ layers in vitro and in vivo and in chimeric animals, including germ line transmission. These germ line-derived stem cells have been generated from many species including human, mice, porcine, and chicken albeit with only slight modifications. This chapter describes general considerations regarding critical aspects of their derivation compared with their counterpart, embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Detailed protocols for EGC derivation and maintenance from human and mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) will be presented.

  1. Stem cells supporting other stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Leatherman, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cell therapies are increasingly prevalent for the treatment of damaged or diseased tissues, but most of the improvements observed to date are attributed to the ability of stem cells to produce paracrine factors that have a trophic effect on existing tissue cells, improving their functional capacity. It is now clear that this ability to produce trophic factors is a normal and necessary function for some stem cell populations. In vivo adult stem cells are thought to self-renew due to local signals from the microenvironment where they live, the niche. Several niches have now been identified which harbor multiple stem cell populations. In three of these niches – the Drosophila testis, the bulge of the mammalian hair follicle, and the mammalian bone marrow – one type of stem cell has been found to produce factors that contribute to the maintenance of a second stem cell population in the shared niche. In this review, I will examine the architecture of these three niches and discuss the molecular signals involved. Together, these examples establish a new paradigm for stem cell behavior, that stem cells can promote the maintenance of other stem cells. PMID:24348512

  2. Artificial cells for cell and organ replacements.

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2004-03-01

    The artificial cell is a Canadian invention (Chang, Science, 1964). This principle is being actively investigated for use in cell and organ replacements. The earliest routine clinical use of artificial cells is in the form of coated activated charcoal for hemoperfusion for use in the removal of drugs, and toxins and waste in uremia and liver failure. Encapsulated cells are being studied for the treatment of diabetes, liver failure, and kidney failure, and the use of encapsulated genetically-engineered cells is being investigated for gene therapy. Blood substitutes based on modified hemoglobin are already in Phase III clinical trials in patients, with as much as 20 units being infused into each patient during trauma surgery. Artificial cells containing enzymes are being developed for clinical trial in hereditary enzyme deficiency diseases and other diseases. The artificial cell is also being investigated for drug delivery and for other uses in biotechnology, chemical engineering, and medicine.

  3. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Felthaus, O.; Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O.; Brockhoff, G.; Reck, A.; Zeitler, K.; Hautmann, M.; Reichert, T.E.; Schmalz, G.; Morsczeck, C.

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  4. The offshore export of sand during exceptional discharge from California rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    Littoral cells along active tectonic margins receive large inputs of sand and gravel from coastal watersheds and commonly lose this sediment to submarine canyons. One hypothesis is that the majority of coarse (sand and gravel) river sediment discharge will be emplaced within and immediately “resupply” local littoral cells. A competing hypothesis is that the infrequent, large floods that supply the majority of littoral sediment may discharge water-sediment mixtures within negatively buoyant hyperpycnal plumes that transport sediment offshore of the littoral cell. Here we summarize pre- and post-flood surveys of two wave-dominated California (United States) river deltas during record to near-record floods to help evaluate these hypotheses: the 1982–1983 delta at the San Lorenzo River mouth and the 2005 delta at the Santa Clara River mouth. Flood sedimentation at both deltas resulted in several meters of aggradation and hundreds of meters of offshore displacement of isobaths. One substantial difference between these deltas was the thick (>2 m) aggradation of sand on the inner shelf of the Santa Clara River delta that contained substantial amounts (∼50%) of littoral-grade sediment. Once deposited on the inner shelf, only a fraction (∼20%) of this river sand was observed to migrate toward the beach over the following 5 yr. Furthermore, simple hypopycnal plume behavior could not explain deposition of this sand on the inner shelf. Thus, during an exceptional flood a substantial amount of littoral-grade sand was exported offshore of the littoral system at the Santa Clara River mouth—likely from hyperpycnal plume processes—and was deposited on the inner shelf.

  5. Dummy Cell Would Improve Performance Of Fuel-Cell Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suljak, G. T.

    1993-01-01

    Interposition of dummy cell between stack of alkaline fuel cells and accessory section of fuel-cell powerplant proposed to overcome operational deficiencies plaguing end-most active cell. Cell in combination with additional hydrogen/coolant separator plate keeps end cell warmer and drier. End cell 96th in stack of fuel cells.

  6. Stem cell therapy without the cells

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Greg

    2013-01-01

    As an example of the burgeoning importance of stem cell therapy, this past month the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved $70 million to create a new network of stem cell clinical trial centers. Much work in the last decade has been devoted to developing the use of autologous and allogeneic adult stem cell transplants to treat a number of conditions, including heart attack, dementia, wounds, and immune system-related diseases. The standard model teaches us that adult stem cells exists throughout most of the body and provide a means to regenerate and repair most tissues through replication and differentiation. Although we have often witnessed the medical cart placed in front of the scientific horse in the development of stem cell therapies outside of academic circles, great strides have been made, such as the use of purified stem cells1 instead of whole bone marrow transplants in cancer patients, where physicians avoid re-injecting the patients with their own cancer cells.2 We most often think of stem cell therapy acting to regenerate tissue through replication and then differentiation, but recent studies point to the dramatic effects adult stem cells exert in the repair of various tissues through the release of paracrine and autocrine substances, and not simply through differentiation. Indeed, up to 80% of the therapeutic effect of adult stem cells has been shown to be through paracrine mediated actions.3 That is, the collected types of molecules released by the stem cells, called the secretome, or stem cell released molecules (SRM), number in the 100s, including proteins, microRNA, growth factors, antioxidants, proteasomes, and exosomes, and target a multitude of biological pathways through paracrine actions. The composition of the different molecule types in SRM is state dependent, and varies with cell type and conditions such as age and environment. PMID:24567776

  7. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... or blocks blood and oxygen reaching nearby tissues. Sickle cell disease ... the whites of the eyes) Anemia (the decreased ability of the blood to carry ...

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  9. Nanocomposite Photoelectrochemical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Kindler, Andrew; Whitacre, Jay F.

    2007-01-01

    Improved, solid-state photoelectrochemical cells for converting solar radiation to electricity have been proposed. (In general, photoelectrochemical cells convert incident light to electricity through electrochemical reactions.) It is predicted that in comparison with state-of-the-art photoelectrochemical cells, these cells will be found to operate with greater solar-to-electric energy-conversion efficiencies.

  10. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  11. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  12. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Smith, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas, the cell enclosures collectively providing an enclosure for the array and effectively avoiding the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components, the fuel cell further including an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  13. Cytokinesis in animal cells.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Pier Paolo; Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Petronczki, Mark

    2015-02-13

    Cell division ends with the physical separation of the two daughter cells, a process known as cytokinesis. This final event ensures that nuclear and cytoplasmic contents are accurately partitioned between the two nascent cells. Cytokinesis is one of the most dramatic changes in cell shape and requires an extensive reorganization of the cell's cytoskeleton. Here, we describe the cytoskeletal structures, factors, and signaling pathways that orchestrate this robust and yet highly dynamic process in animal cells. Finally, we discuss possible future directions in this growing area of cell division research and its implications in human diseases, including cancer.

  14. Modeling collective cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    Eukaryotic cells often move in groups, a critical aspect of many biological and medical processes including wound healing, morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Modeling can provide useful insights into the fundamental mechanisms of collective cell motility. Constructing models that incorporate the physical properties of the cells, however, is challenging. Here, I discuss our efforts to build a comprehensive cell motility model that includes cell membrane properties, cell-substrate interactions, cell polarity, and cell-cell interaction. The model will be applied to a variety of systems, including motion on micropatterned substrates and the migration of border cells in Drosophila. This work was supported by NIH Grant No. P01 GM078586 and NSF Grant No. 1068869.

  15. Fuel cells seminar

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This year`s meeting highlights the fact that fuel cells for both stationary and transportation applications have reached the dawn of commercialization. Sales of stationary fuel cells have grown steadily over the past 2 years. Phosphoric acid fuel cell buses have been demonstrated in urban areas. Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are on the verge of revolutionizing the transportation industry. These activities and many more are discussed during this seminar, which provides a forum for people from the international fuel cell community engaged in a wide spectrum of fuel cell activities. Discussions addressing R&D of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing and marketing of fuel cells, and experiences of fuel cell users took place through oral and poster presentations. For the first time, the seminar included commercial exhibits, further evidence that commercial fuel cell technology has arrived. A total of 205 papers is included in this volume.

  16. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Tasks were undertaken in support of two objectives. They are: (1) to carry out electrophoresis experiments on cells in microgravity; and (2) assess the feasibility of using purified kidney cells from embryonic kidney cultures as a source of important cell products. Investigations were carried out in the following areas: (1) ground based electrophoresis technology; (2) cell culture technology; (3) electrophoresis of cells; (4) urokinase assay research; (5) zero-g electrophoresis; and (6) flow cytometry.

  17. Stem cell biobanks.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Silvana

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells contribute to innate healing and harbor a promising role for regenerative medicine. Stem cell banking through long-term storage of different stem cell platforms represents a fundamental source to preserve original features of stem cells for patient-specific clinical applications. Stem cell research and clinical translation constitute fundamental and indivisible modules catalyzed through biobanking activity, generating a return of investment. PMID:20560026

  18. Generation of iPS Cells from Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Various types of somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Somatic stem cells may generate iPS cells more efficiently than do differentiated cells. We show that granulosa cells exhibit characteristic of somatic stem cells and can be reprogrammed to iPS cells more efficiently or with few factors. Here, we describe generation of mouse and pig iPS cells from granulosa cells with high efficiency.

  19. Screening of solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  20. Screening of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  1. Analytical pyrolysis of cells and cell fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Faix, O.; Bertelt, E.

    1995-12-01

    Wood of spruce, beech and birch was disintegrated without chemical pretreatment after 10 minutes of steaming at 110{degrees}C in a laboratory defibrator. Fibers, vessels, and fragments of secondary wall were separated by wet screening. A hydrocylon was used for separation of middle lamellae. By using analytical pyrolysis-GC/MS, parenchymatic cells were found to be richer in lignin than the other cells. The lignin content of middle lamellae was 35% (beech, spruce) and 39% (birch). In agreement with the literature, the S/G ratios of the vessels and middle lamellae was lower than those of the other cells and cell fragments.

  2. The cell biology of planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the coordinated alignment of cell polarity across the tissue plane. Key to the establishment of PCP is asymmetric partitioning of cortical PCP components and intercellular communication to coordinate polarity between neighboring cells. Recent progress has been made toward understanding how protein transport, endocytosis, and intercellular interactions contribute to asymmetric PCP protein localization. Additionally, the functions of gradients and mechanical forces as global cues that bias PCP orientation are beginning to be elucidated. Together, these findings are shedding light on how global cues integrate with local cell interactions to organize cellular polarity at the tissue level. PMID:25349257

  3. Single cell mechanics of keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Lulevich, Valentin; Yang, Hsin-ya; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Liu, Gang-yu

    2010-11-01

    Keratinocytes represent the major cell type of the uppermost layer of human skin, the epidermis. Using AFM-based single cell compression, the ability of individual keratinocytes to resist external pressure and global rupturing forces is investigated and compared with various cell types. Keratinocytes are found to be 6-70 times stiffer than other cell types, such as white blood, breast epithelial, fibroblast, or neuronal cells, and in contrast to other cell types they retain high mechanic strength even after the cell's death. The absence of membrane rupturing peaks in the force-deformation profiles of keratinocytes and their high stiffness during a second load cycle suggests that their unique mechanical resistance is dictated by the cytoskeleton. A simple analytical model enables the quantification of Young's modulus of keratinocyte cytoskeleton, as high as 120-340 Pa. Selective disruption of the two major cytoskeletal networks, actin filaments and microtubules, does not significantly affect keratinocyte mechanics. F-actin is found to impact cell deformation under pressure. During keratinocyte compression, the plasma membrane stretches to form peripheral blebs. Instead of blebbing, cells with depolymerized F-actin respond to pressure by detaching the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton underneath. On the other hand, the compression force of keratinocytes expressing a mutated keratin (cell line, KEB-7) is 1.6-2.2 times less than that for the control cell line that has normal keratin networks. Therefore, we infer that the keratin intermediate filament network is responsible for the extremely high keratinocyte stiffness and resilience. This could manifest into the rugged protective nature of the human epidermis. PMID:20728993

  4. Microscale Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

    2005-11-03

    Perhaprs some of the most innovative work on fuel cells has been the research dedicated to applying silicon fabrication techniques to fuel cells technology creating low power microscale fuel cells applicable to microelectro mechanical systems (MEMS), microsensors, cell phones, PDA’s, and other low power (0.001 to 5 We) applications. In this small power range, fuel cells offer the decoupling of the energy converter from the energy storage which may enable longer operating times and instant or near instant charging. To date, most of the microscale fuel cells being developed have been based on proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. This section will discuss requirements and considerations that need to be addressed in the development of microscale fuel cells, as well as some proposed designs and fabrication strategies.

  5. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  6. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  7. Artificial Stem Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Lutolf, Matthias P.; Blau, Helen M.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their dual ability to reproduce themselves (self-renew) and specialize (differentiate), yielding a plethora of daughter cells that maintain and regenerate tissues. In contrast to their embryonic counterparts, adult stem cells retain their unique functions only if they are in intimate contact with an instructive microenvironment, termed stem cell niche. In these niches, stem cells integrate a complex array of molecular signals that, in concert with induced cell-intrinsic regulatory networks, control their function and balance their numbers in response to physiologic demands. This progress report provides a perspective on how advanced materials technologies could be used (i) to engineer and systematically analyze specific aspects of functional stem cells niches in a controlled fashion in vitro and (ii) to target stem cell niches in vivo. Such “artificial niches” constitute potent tools for elucidating stem cell regulatory mechanisms with the capacity to directly impact the development of novel therapeutic strategies for tissue regeneration. PMID:20882496

  8. Aquaporins and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, M C; Saadoun, S; Verkman, A S

    2008-07-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are expressed primarily in cell plasma membranes. In this paper, we review recent evidence that AQPs facilitate cell migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has been found in a variety of cell types in vitro and in mice in vivo. AQP1 deletion reduces endothelial cell migration, limiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. AQP4 deletion slows the migration of reactive astrocytes, impairing glial scarring after brain stab injury. AQP1-expressing tumor cells have enhanced metastatic potential and local infiltration. Impaired cell migration has also been seen in AQP1-deficient proximal tubule epithelial cells, and AQP3-deficient corneal epithelial cells, enterocytes, and skin keratinocytes. The mechanisms by which AQPs enhance cell migration are under investigation. We propose that, as a consequence of actin polymerization/depolymerization and transmembrane ionic fluxes, the cytoplasm adjacent to the leading edge of migrating cells undergoes rapid changes in osmolality. AQPs could thus facilitate osmotic water flow across the plasma membrane in cell protrusions that form during migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has potentially broad implications in angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, wound healing, glial scarring, and other events requiring rapid, directed cell movement. AQP inhibitors may thus have therapeutic potential in modulating these events, such as slowing tumor growth and spread, and reducing glial scarring after injury to allow neuronal regeneration. PMID:17968585

  9. Stem cells in urology.

    PubMed

    Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony

    2008-11-01

    The shortage of donors for organ transplantation has stimulated research on stem cells as a potential resource for cell-based therapy in all human tissues. Stem cells have been used for regenerative medicine applications in many organ systems, including the genitourinary system. The potential applications for stem cell therapy have, however, been restricted by the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cell research. Instead, scientists have explored other cell sources, including progenitor and stem cells derived from adult tissues and stem cells derived from the amniotic fluid and placenta. In addition, novel techniques for generating stem cells in the laboratory are being developed. These techniques include somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which the nucleus of an adult somatic cell is placed into an oocyte, and reprogramming of adult cells to induce stem-cell-like behavior. Such techniques are now being used in tissue engineering applications, and some of the most successful experiments have been in the field of urology. Techniques to regenerate bladder tissue have reached the clinic, and exciting progress is being made in other areas, such as regeneration of the kidney and urethra. Cell therapy as a treatment for incontinence and infertility might soon become a reality. Physicians should be optimistic that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will one day provide mainstream treatment options for urologic disorders.

  10. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanwen; Shen, Yi; Chen, Jiarong; Ding, Jie; Tang, Zihua; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Jianling; Li, Liang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment.

  11. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanwen; Shen, Yi; Chen, Jiarong; Ding, Jie; Tang, Zihua; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Jianling; Li, Liang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment. PMID:27057177

  12. Lithium cell test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

  13. Natural Killer Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-10-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity and can acquire immunological memory in a manner similar to that of T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence of NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes.

  14. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  15. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  16. Microfluidics for manipulating cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xuan; Zheng, Wenfu; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-14

    Microfluidics, a toolbox comprising methods for precise manipulation of fluids at small length scales (micrometers to millimeters), has become useful for manipulating cells. Its uses range from dynamic management of cellular interactions to high-throughput screening of cells, and to precise analysis of chemical contents in single cells. Microfluidics demonstrates a completely new perspective and an excellent practical way to manipulate cells for solving various needs in biology and medicine. This review introduces and comments on recent achievements and challenges of using microfluidics to manipulate and analyze cells. It is believed that microfluidics will assume an even greater role in the mechanistic understanding of cell biology and, eventually, in clinical applications.

  17. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  18. What Are Islet Cells?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Derived Stem Cells MichCanSka 2010 Benefits DRI Wounded Soldier Gets Standing Ovation Video New Website Launches Journal ... Derived Stem Cells MichCanSka 2010 Benefits DRI Wounded Soldier Gets Standing Ovation Video New Website Launches Journal ...

  19. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive than other types of basal ... to treat them early and with slightly more aggressive techniques. Excision – The basal cell carcinoma is cut ...

  20. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  1. Amphibia Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Sichel, Giovanni; Scalia, Marina; Corsaro, Concetta

    2002-06-15

    Amphibia Kupffer cells (i.e., liver resident macrophages) show many common characteristics when compared with Mammalia Kupffer cells: filopodia, microvillous-like structures, lamellipodia, fuzzy coat, coated vesicles, bristled vacuoles, nonspecific esterase activity, and pinocytotic and phagocytic activity are present both in Amphibia and Mammalia Kupffer cells. On the other hand, some differences are present between Kupffer cells of both zoological classes: phagocytosed red cells and their derivatives, iron-protein complexes, and lipofuscin bodies are normally present in Amphibia Kupffer cells, but absent in the same cells of healthy mammals. Worm-like structures are not seen in Amphibia and endogenous peroxidase activity is very weak in these animals compared with Mammalia. The most important difference lies in the ability of Amphibia Kupffer cells to produce melanins: in fact the tyrosinase gene is expressed, "melanosome centers" are present, and dopa oxidase activity is demonstrable.

  2. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  3. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body use glucose for energy. Islet cell transplantation transfers cells from an organ donor into the ... to make and release insulin. Researchers hope islet transplantation will help people with type 1 diabetes live ...

  4. Sickle Cell Trait

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Trait Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... the trait on to their children. How Sickle Cell Trait is Inherited If both parents have SCT, ...

  5. Galvanic cell separator

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Osawa, K.; Takeda, Y.; Yabumoto, T.

    1981-07-07

    A galvanic cell separator is disclosed that is composed of polyvinyl alcohol having a crystallinity of 0.4 or more to be used with a galvanic cell containing alkaline electrolyte, and a method of manufacturing the same.

  6. Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Squamous cell carcinoma typically develops in sun-damaged skin in fair-skinned patients. Overview Squamous ... skin cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially in light-skinned individuals with ...

  7. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  8. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview of CDC’s work. Advancements in Sickle Cell Disease New supplement from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine describes the state of sickle cell disease related care in the United States. Read Supplement ...

  9. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, K; Swiggard, W J; Steinman, R M; Romani, N; Schuler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  10. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kayo; Swiggard, William J; Steinman, Ralph M; Romani, Nikolaus; Schuler, Gerold; Brinster, Carine

    2009-08-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 x 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  11. Renal cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Renal cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 57. National Cancer Institute: PDQ renal cell cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. ...

  12. Diagram of Cell to Cell Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  13. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  14. Single cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Batoul Y; Horne, Steven D; Stevens, Joshua B; Liu, Guo; Ying, Andrew Y; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Krawetz, Stephen A; Gorelick, Root; Heng, Henry HQ

    2013-01-01

    Multi-level heterogeneity is a fundamental but underappreciated feature of cancer. Most technical and analytical methods either completely ignore heterogeneity or do not fully account for it, as heterogeneity has been considered noise that needs to be eliminated. We have used single-cell and population-based assays to describe an instability-mediated mechanism where genome heterogeneity drastically affects cell growth and cannot be accurately measured using conventional averages. First, we show that most unstable cancer cell populations exhibit high levels of karyotype heterogeneity, where it is difficult, if not impossible, to karyotypically clone cells. Second, by comparing stable and unstable cell populations, we show that instability-mediated karyotype heterogeneity leads to growth heterogeneity, where outliers dominantly contribute to population growth and exhibit shorter cell cycles. Predictability of population growth is more difficult for heterogeneous cell populations than for homogenous cell populations. Since “outliers” play an important role in cancer evolution, where genome instability is the key feature, averaging methods used to characterize cell populations are misleading. Variances quantify heterogeneity; means (averages) smooth heterogeneity, invariably hiding it. Cell populations of pathological conditions with high genome instability, like cancer, behave differently than karyotypically homogeneous cell populations. Single-cell analysis is thus needed when cells are not genomically identical. Despite increased attention given to single-cell variation mediated heterogeneity of cancer cells, continued use of average-based methods is not only inaccurate but deceptive, as the “average” cancer cell clearly does not exist. Genome-level heterogeneity also may explain population heterogeneity, drug resistance, and cancer evolution. PMID:24091732

  15. Fuel cells feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, D.; Charng, T.

    1981-01-01

    The technical and economic status of fuel cells is assessed with emphasis on their potential benefits to the Deep Space Network. The fuel cell, what it is, how it operates, and what its outputs are, is reviewed. Major technical problems of the fuel cell and its components are highlighted. Due to these problems and economic considerations it is concluded that fuel cells will not become commercially viable until the early 1990s.

  16. Fish stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  17. Kidney Cell Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and procedures for microgravity electrophoresis of living human embryonic kidney cells were evaluated, ground support in the form of analytical cell electrophoresis and flow cytometry was provided and cells returned from space flight were analyzed. Preflight culture media, electrophoresis buffer, fraction collection media, temperature profiles, and urokinase assay procedures were tested prior to flight. Electrophoretic mobility distributions of aliquots of the cell population to be fractionated in flight were obtained. The protocol established and utilized is given.

  18. Stem Cell Research.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan; Kolaja, Kyle; Petersen, Thomas; Weber, Klaus; McVean, Maralee; Funk, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have great potential in basic research and are being slowly integrated into toxicological research. This symposium provided an overview of the state of the field, stem cell models, described allogenic stem cell treatments and issues of immunogenicity associated with protein therapeutics, and tehn concentrated on stem cell uses in regenerative medicine focusing on lung and testing strategies on engineered tissues from a pathologist's perspective.

  19. Cross Cell Sandwich Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich core comprises two faceplates separated by a plurality of cells. The cells are comprised of walls positioned at oblique angles relative to a perpendicular axis extending through the faceplates. The walls preferably form open cells and are constructed from open cells and are constructed from rows of ribbons. The walls may be obliquely angled relative to more than one plane extending through the perpendicular axis.

  20. Endothelial cells enhance migration of meniscus cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoning; Eng, George M.; Arkonac, Derya E.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the interactions between vascular endothelial cells and meniscal fibrochondrocytes from the inner avascular and outer vascular regions of the meniscus, and identify angiogenic factors that enhance cell migration and integrative repair. Methods Bovine meniscal fibrochondrocytes (bMFCs) from the inner and outer regions of meniscus were cultured for seven days with and without human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a micropatterned three-dimensional hydrogel system for cell migration. Angiogenic factors secreted by HUVECs were probed for their role in paracrine mechanisms governing bMFC migration, and applied to a full-thickness defect model of meniscal repair in explants from the inner and outer regions over four weeks. Results Endothelial cells enhanced migration of inner and outer bMFCs in the micropatterned system via endothelin-1 (ET-1) signaling. Supplementation of ET-1 significantly enhanced integration strength of full-thickness defects in inner and outer explants, and cell migration at the macro-scale, compared to controls without ET-1 treatment. Conclusion We report for the first time that bMFCs from both the avascular and vascular regions respond to the presence of endothelial cells with increased migration. Paracrine signaling by endothelial cells regulates the bMFCs differentially by region, but we identify ET-1 as an angiogenic factor that stimulates migration of inner and outer cells at the micro-scale, and integrative repair of inner and outer explants at the macro-scale. These findings reveal the regional interactions between vasculature and MFCs, and suggest ET-1 as a potential new treatment modality for avascular meniscal injuries, in order to prevent the development of osteoarthritis. PMID:25307081

  1. Solar cell device

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M.; Haruki, H.; Miyagi, M.; Sakai, H.; Uchida, Y.

    1984-06-26

    A solar cell array is equipped with serially or parallel connected reverse polarity diodes formed simultaneously with the array. The diodes are constituted by one or more solar cells of the array which may be shaded to prevent photoelectric conversion, and which are electrically connected in reverse polarity with respect to the remaining cells.

  2. The Langerhans cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, K.; Stingl, G.

    1983-06-01

    Langerhans cells are the bone-marrow-derived immune cells of the epidermis; they express Ia antigens and receptors for the Fc portion of IgG and complement components and are required for epidermal-cell-induced antigen-specific, syngeneic and allogeneic T-cell activitation and the generation of epidermal-cell-induced cytotoxic T cells. Their presence within the epidermis and functional integrity determine whether topical application of haptens leads to specific sensitization or unresponsiveness, and in skin grafts of only I region disparate donors, they represent the cells responsible for the critical allosensitizing signal. UV radiation abrogates most of Langerhans cell functions in vitro; under certain conditions in vivo, it prevents contact sensitization favoring the development of specific unresponsiveness. UV radiation abrogates antigen-presenting capacities of epidermal cells by interfering both with the processing of antigen by Langerhans cells and the production of the epidermal-cell-derived thymocyte activating factor required for optimal T-cell responses.

  3. Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, John T.

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells reviews topics pertaining to solar energy conversion and demonstrates the ease with which a working PEC cell can be prepared with n-type silicon as the photoanode and a platinum counter electrode (both immersed in ethanolic ferrocene/ferricenium solutions). Experiments using the cell are…

  4. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dirmi, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  5. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dimri, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1998-08-18

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  6. Advanced Cell Technology, Inc.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, William M

    2007-03-01

    Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. (OTCBB: ACTC) is a biotechnology company applying novel human embryonic stem cell technologies in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. We believe that regenerative medicine has the potential to revolutionize the field by enabling scientists to produce human cells of any kind for use in a wide array of therapies.

  7. Adventures with Cell Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Teachers are finding creative ways to turn the basic cell phone from a digital distraction into a versatile learning tool. In this article, the author explains why cell phones are important in learning and suggests rather than banning them that they be integrated into learning. She presents activities that can be done on a basic cell phone with a…

  8. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  9. Plasma Cell Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... microorganisms to which the body is exposed. In plasma cell disorders, one clone of plasma cells multiplies uncontrollably. As a result, this clone ... a light chain and heavy chain). These abnormal plasma cells and the ... produce are limited to one type, and levels of other types of antibodies ...

  10. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  11. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  12. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Campisi, Judith; Peacocke, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

  13. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dirmi, Goberdhan P.; Campisi, Judith; Peacocke, Monica

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

  14. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  15. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Joy, Richard W.

    1983-01-01

    This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

  16. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K.

    2016-01-01

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation. PMID:27005656

  18. Microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeang, Erik

    Microfluidic fuel cell architectures are presented in this thesis. This work represents the mechanical and microfluidic portion of a microfluidic biofuel cell project. While the microfluidic fuel cells developed here are targeted to eventual integration with biocatalysts, the contributions of this thesis have more general applicability. The cell architectures are developed and evaluated based on conventional non-biological electrocatalysts. The fuel cells employ co-laminar flow of fuel and oxidant streams that do not require a membrane for physical separation, and comprise carbon or gold electrodes compatible with most enzyme immobilization schemes developed to date. The demonstrated microfluidic fuel cell architectures include the following: a single cell with planar gold electrodes and a grooved channel architecture that accommodates gaseous product evolution while preventing crossover effects; a single cell with planar carbon electrodes based on graphite rods; a three-dimensional hexagonal array cell based on multiple graphite rod electrodes with unique scale-up opportunities; a single cell with porous carbon electrodes that provides enhanced power output mainly attributed to the increased active area; a single cell with flow-through porous carbon electrodes that provides improved performance and overall energy conversion efficiency; and a single cell with flow-through porous gold electrodes with similar capabilities and reduced ohmic resistance. As compared to previous results, the microfluidic fuel cells developed in this work show improved fuel cell performance (both in terms of power density and efficiency). In addition, this dissertation includes the development of an integrated electrochemical velocimetry approach for microfluidic devices, and a computational modeling study of strategic enzyme patterning for microfluidic biofuel cells with consecutive reactions.

  19. Regulation of Th2 Cell Immunity by Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyeongjin; Cho, Minkyoung; Chung, Yeonseok

    2016-02-01

    Th2 cell immunity is required for host defense against helminths, but it is detrimental in allergic diseases in humans. Unlike Th1 cell and Th17 cell subsets, the mechanism by which dendritic cells modulate Th2 cell responses has been obscure, in part because of the inability of dendritic cells to provide IL-4, which is indispensable for Th2 cell lineage commitment. In this regard, immune cells other than dendritic cells, such as basophils and innate lymphoid cells, have been suggested as Th2 cell inducers. More recently, multiple independent researchers have shown that specialized subsets of dendritic cells mediate Th2 cell responses. This review will discuss the current understanding related to the regulation of Th2 cell responses by dendritic cells and other immune cells. PMID:26937227

  20. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future. PMID:26872163

  1. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  2. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  3. Fuel Cell Handbook update

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

  4. Making Ultrathin Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, George W.; Christel, Lee A.; Merchant, J. Thomas; Gibbons, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Process produces extremely thin silicon solar cells - only 50 micrometers or less in thickness. Electrons and holes have less opportunity to recombine before collected at cell surfaces. Efficiency higher and because volume of silicon small, less chance of radiation damage in new cells. Initial steps carried out at normal thickness to reduce breakage and avoid extra cost of special handling. Cells then thinned mechanically and chemically. Final cell includes reflective layer on back surface. Layer bounces unabsorbed light back into bulk silicon so it absorbs and produces useful electrical output.

  5. Fuel Cell/Electrochemical Cell Voltage Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a new fuel cell individual-cell-voltage monitor that can be directly connected to a multi-cell fuel cell stack for direct substack power provisioning. It can also provide voltage isolation for applications in high-voltage fuel cell stacks. The technology consists of basic modules, each with an 8- to 16-cell input electrical measurement connection port. For each basic module, a power input connection would be provided for direct connection to a sub-stack of fuel cells in series within the larger stack. This power connection would allow for module power to be available in the range of 9-15 volts DC. The relatively low voltage differences that the module would encounter from the input electrical measurement connection port, coupled with the fact that the module's operating power is supplied by the same substack voltage input (and so will be at similar voltage), provides for elimination of high-commonmode voltage issues within each module. Within each module, there would be options for analog-to-digital conversion and data transfer schemes. Each module would also include a data-output/communication port. Each of these ports would be required to be either non-electrical (e.g., optically isolated) or electrically isolated. This is necessary to account for the fact that the plurality of modules attached to the stack will normally be at a range of voltages approaching the full range of the fuel cell stack operating voltages. A communications/ data bus could interface with the several basic modules. Options have been identified for command inputs from the spacecraft vehicle controller, and for output-status/data feeds to the vehicle.

  6. Schwann cells promote endothelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Tiago; Ahmed, Maqsood; Wieringa, Paul; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration is a crucial orchestrated process in embryonic development, wound healing, and immune response. The underlying substrate can provide physical and/or chemical cues that promote directed cell migration. Here, using electrospinning we developed substrates of aligned poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanofibres to study the influence of glial cells on endothelial cells (ECs) in a 3-dimensional (3D) co-culture model. ECs build blood vessels and regulate their plasticity in coordination with neurons. Likewise, neurons construct nerves and regulate their circuits in coordination with ECs. In our model, the neuro-vascular cross-talk was assessed using a direct co-culture model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat Schwann cells (rSCs). The effect of rSCs on ECs behavior was demonstrated by earlier and higher velocity values and genetic expression profiles different of those of HUVECs when seeded alone. We observed 2 different gene expression trends in the co-culture models: (i) a later gene expression of angiogenic factors, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and (ii) an higher gene expression of genes involved in actin filaments rearrangement, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 13 (MAPKAPK13), Vinculin (VCL), and Profilin (PROF). These results suggested that the higher ECs migration is mainly due to proteins involved in the actin filaments rearrangement and in the directed cell migration rather than the effect of angiogenic factors. This co-culture model provides an approach to enlighten the neurovascular interactions, with particular focus on endothelial cell migration. PMID:26491999

  7. Parameterization of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.

    1992-10-01

    The aggregation (sorting) of the individual solar cells into an array is commonly based on a single operating point on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve. An alternative approach for cell performance prediction and cell screening is provided by modeling the cell using an equivalent electrical circuit, in which the parameters involved are related to the physical phenomena in the device. These analytical models may be represented by a double exponential I-V characteristic with seven parameters, by a double exponential model with five parameters, or by a single exponential equation with four or five parameters. In this article we address issues concerning methodologies for the determination of solar cell parameters based on measured data points of the I-V characteristic, and introduce a procedure for screening of solar cells for arrays. We show that common curve fitting techniques, e.g., least squares, may produce many combinations of parameter values while maintaining a good fit between the fitted and measured I-V characteristics of the cell. Therefore, techniques relying on curve fitting criteria alone cannot be directly used for cell parameterization. We propose a consistent procedure which takes into account the entire set of parameter values for a batch of cells. This procedure is based on a definition of a mean cell representing the batch, and takes into account the relative contribution of each parameter to the overall goodness of fit. The procedure is demonstrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells for Space Station Freedom.

  8. Mast cells and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Theoharides, Theoharis C.; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Delivanis, Danae-Anastasia; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Zhang, Bodi; Asadi, Shahrzad; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Weng, Zuyi; Miniati, Alexandra; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are well known for their role in allergic and anaphylactic reactions, as well as their involvement in acquired and innate immunity. Increasing evidence now implicates mast cells in inflammatory diseases where they are activated by non-allergic triggers, such as neuropeptides and cytokines, often exerting synergistic effects as in the case of IL-33. Mast cells can also release pro-inflammatory mediators selectively without degranulation. In particular, IL-1 induces selective release of IL-6, while corticotropin-releasing hormone secreted under stress induces the release of vascular endothelial growth factor. Many inflammatory diseases involve mast cells in cross-talk with T cells, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, which all worsen by stress. How mast cell differential responses are regulated is still unresolved. Preliminary evidence suggests that mitochondrial function and dynamics control mast cell degranulation, but not selective release. Recent findings also indicate that mast cells have immunomodulatory properties. Understanding selective release of mediators could explain how mast cells participate in numerous diverse biologic processes, and how they exert both immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive actions. Unraveling selective mast cell secretion could also help develop unique mast cell inhibitors with novel therapeutic applications. PMID:21185371

  9. Parameterization of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.

    1992-01-01

    The aggregation (sorting) of the individual solar cells into an array is commonly based on a single operating point on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve. An alternative approach for cell performance prediction and cell screening is provided by modeling the cell using an equivalent electrical circuit, in which the parameters involved are related to the physical phenomena in the device. These analytical models may be represented by a double exponential I-V characteristic with seven parameters, by a double exponential model with five parameters, or by a single exponential equation with four or five parameters. In this article we address issues concerning methodologies for the determination of solar cell parameters based on measured data points of the I-V characteristic, and introduce a procedure for screening of solar cells for arrays. We show that common curve fitting techniques, e.g., least squares, may produce many combinations of parameter values while maintaining a good fit between the fitted and measured I-V characteristics of the cell. Therefore, techniques relying on curve fitting criteria alone cannot be directly used for cell parameterization. We propose a consistent procedure which takes into account the entire set of parameter values for a batch of cells. This procedure is based on a definition of a mean cell representing the batch, and takes into account the relative contribution of each parameter to the overall goodness of fit. The procedure is demonstrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells for Space Station Freedom.

  10. Stem cells and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongling; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the latest developments in reproductive tract stem cell biology. Recent findings In 2004, two studies indicated that ovaries contain stem cells which form oocytes in adults and that can be cultured in vitro into mature oocytes. A live birth after orthotopic transplantation of cyropreserved ovarian tissue in a woman whose ovaries were damaged by chemotherapy demonstrates the clinical potential of these cells. In the same year, another study provided novel evidence of endometrial regeneration by stem cells in women who received bone marrow transplants. This finding has potential for the use in treatment of uterine disorders. It also supports a new theory for the cause of endometriosis, which may have its origin in ectopic transdifferentiation of stem cells. Several recent studies have demonstrated that fetal cells enter the maternal circulation and generate microchimerism in the mother. The uterus is a dynamic organ permeable to fetal stem cells, capable of transdifferentiation and an end organ in which bone marrow stem cells may differentiate. Finally stem cell transformation can be an underlying cause of ovarian cancer. Summary Whereas we are just beginning to understand stem cells, the potential implications of stem cells to reproductive biology and medicine are apparent. PMID:20305558

  11. Synchronization of cells.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Eiichiro

    2006-01-01

    Synchronization of cells is essential to study cell cycle specific events. If, for example, one suspects that a given DNA repair pathway is used in a particular cell cycle phase, the protocol can be used to enrich cells in each phase of the cell cycle and analyze the cellular response to DNA damage. Synchronization is also useful, when a gene is essential for a particular phase of the cell cycle. If a gene is, for example, essential for mitosis, synchronization of the cells in G1 phase with concomitant inactivation of the gene enables us to study the function of the gene in interphase, and to follow synchronous cell cycle progression to M phase. Two synchronization methods: centrifugal elutriation to enrich G1, S or G2 phase cells and nocodazole-mimocine sequential treatment to enrich cells at the G1/S boundary are described. Centrifugal elutriation can be achieved in less time (0.5-2 h) and with very little physiological stress to the cells whereas synchronization by drugs, such as nocodazole and mimocine, may result in unfavorable side effects.

  12. Cell(s) of Origin of LCH

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia; McClain, Kenneth L; Allen, Carl E

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a diagnosis encompassing a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, characterized by the common finding of inflammatory lesions containing clonal CD1a+ Langerin+ (CD207) histiocytes or LCH cells. Based on phenotypic similarity of LCH cells and epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), models of pathogenesis have focused on aberrations in the differentiation of epidermal LCs. Recently, activating somatic mutations in the MAPK pathway have been discovered in the majority of cases of LCH and ERK phosphorylation appears to be universal in LCH cells. Using the BRAF V600E mutation as a lineage marker, emerging data support a model in which MAPK activation in self-renewing hematopoietic progenitors may drive disseminated high-risk disease, whereas MAPK activation in more differentiated committed myeloid precursors or peripheral tissue myeloid populations may induce multifocal or unifocal low-risk LCH. The heterogeneous clinical manifestations with shared histology may therefore represent the final common pathway of an acquired defect of differentiation, initiated at more than one point. Implications of this model include re-definition of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and re-focusing therapeutic strategies on the cells and lineages of origin. PMID:26461145

  13. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  14. Biosensing with cell phones.

    PubMed

    Preechaburana, Pakorn; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Continued progress in cell-phone devices has made them powerful mobile computers, equipped with sophisticated, permanent physical sensors embedded as the default configuration. By contrast, the incorporation of permanent biosensors in cell-phone units has been prevented by the multivocal nature of the stimuli and the reactions involved in biosensing and chemical sensing. Biosensing with cell phones entails the complementation of biosensing devices with the physical sensors and communication and processing capabilities of modern cell phones. Biosensing, chemical-sensing, environmental-sensing, and diagnostic capabilities would thus be supported and run on the residual capacity of existing cell-phone infrastructure. The technologies necessary to materialize such a scenario have emerged in different fields and applications. This article addresses the progress on cell-phone biosensing, the specific compromises, and the blend of technologies required to craft biosensing on cell phones.

  15. Cell wall integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The plant cell wall, a dynamic network of polysaccharides and glycoproteins of significant compositional and structural complexity, functions in plant growth, development and stress responses. In recent years, the existence of plant cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance mechanisms has been demonstrated, but little is known about the signaling pathways involved, or their components. Examination of key mutants has shed light on the relationships between cell wall remodeling and plant cell responses, indicating a central role for the regulatory network that monitors and controls cell wall performance and integrity. In this review, we present a short overview of cell wall composition and discuss post-synthetic cell wall modification as a valuable approach for studying CWI perception and signaling pathways. PMID:23857352

  16. Cell sorting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Polymeric functional microspheres containing metal or metal compounds are formed by addition polymerization of a covalently bondable olefinic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate in the presence of finely divided metal or metal oxide particles, such as iron, gold, platinum or magnetite, which are embedded in the resulting microspheres. The microspheres can be covalently bonded to chemotherapeutic agents, antibodies, or other proteins providing a means for labeling or separating labeled cells. Labeled cells or microspheres can be concentrated at a specific body location such as in the vicinity of a malignant tumor by applying a magnetic field to the location and then introducing the magnetically attractable microspheres or cells into the circulatory system of the subject. Labeled cells can be separated from a cell mixture by applying a predetermined magnetic field to a tube in which the mixture is flowing. After collection of the labeled cells, the magnetic field is discontinued and the labeled sub-cell population recovered.

  17. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  18. Live cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Freedberg, Darón I; Selenko, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since scientists realized that cells are the basic building blocks of all life, they have been developing tools to look inside them to reveal the architectures and mechanisms that define their biological functions. Whereas "looking into cells" is typically said in reference to optical microscopy, high-resolution in-cell and on-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful method that offers exciting new possibilities for structural and functional studies in and on live cells. In contrast to conventional imaging techniques, in- and on-cell NMR methods do not provide spatial information on cellular biomolecules. Instead, they enable atomic-resolution insights into the native cell states of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. Here we review recent advances and developments in both fields and discuss emerging concepts that have been delineated with these methods.

  19. Tuning cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Kami, Daisuke; Gojo, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic interventions are required to induce reprogramming from one cell type to another. At present, various cellular reprogramming methods such as somatic cell nuclear transfer, cell fusion, and direct reprogramming using transcription factors have been reported. In particular, direct reprogramming from somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been achieved using defined factors that play important epigenetic roles. Although the mechanisms underlying cellular reprogramming and vertebrate regeneration, including appendage regeneration, remain unknown, dedifferentiation occurs at an early phase in both the events, and both events are contrasting with regard to cell death. We compared the current status of changes in cell fate of iPSCs with that of vertebrate regeneration and suggested that substantial insights into vertebrate regeneration should be helpful for safe applications of iPSCs to medicine. PMID:24736602

  20. Cell(s) of Origin of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia; McClain, Kenneth L; Allen, Carl E

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is heterogeneous disease characterized by common histology of inflammatory lesions containing Langerin(+) (CD207) histiocytes. Emerging data support a model in which MAPK activation in self-renewing hematopoietic progenitors may drive disseminated high-risk disease, whereas MAPK activation in more differentiated committed myeloid populations may induce low-risk LCH. The heterogeneous clinical manifestations with shared histology may represent the final common pathway of an acquired defect of differentiation, initiated at more than one point. Implications of this model include re-definition of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and re-focusing therapeutic strategies on the cells and lineages of origin. PMID:26461145

  1. Cell(s) of Origin of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia; McClain, Kenneth L; Allen, Carl E

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is heterogeneous disease characterized by common histology of inflammatory lesions containing Langerin(+) (CD207) histiocytes. Emerging data support a model in which MAPK activation in self-renewing hematopoietic progenitors may drive disseminated high-risk disease, whereas MAPK activation in more differentiated committed myeloid populations may induce low-risk LCH. The heterogeneous clinical manifestations with shared histology may represent the final common pathway of an acquired defect of differentiation, initiated at more than one point. Implications of this model include re-definition of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and re-focusing therapeutic strategies on the cells and lineages of origin.

  2. Involvement of Plant Stem Cells or Stem Cell-Like Cells in Dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fangwei; Feng, Zhenhua; Liu, Hailiang; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells) are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation. PMID:26635851

  3. Invertebrate communities associated with Bangia atropurpurea and Cladophora glomerata in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chilton, E.W.; Lowe, R.L.; Schurr, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The appearance of the marine alga Bangia atropurpurea (Rhodophyta) in Lake Erie has been followed by its rapid dispersal throughout the eulittoral zone of the lake. Bangia was extensively sampled to determine its suitability as a habitat for littoral organisms. Present data indicate that the only organisms capable of maintaining populations on Bangia filaments are larval Chironomidae. Cladophora supports a larger and more diverse community. It is concluded that the mucilaginous cell wall of Bangia provides a less stable substrate for attached or clinging organisms than does the cellulose cell wall of Cladophora. The presence of Bangia in the littoral zone of Lake Erie results in a reduction of the quantity and diversity of algal epiphytes and may negatively impact the littoral food web.

  4. Membrane Cells for Brine Electrolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingle, M.

    1982-01-01

    Membrane cells were developed as alternatives to mercury and diaphragm cells for the electrolysis of brine. Compares the three types of cells, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of membrane cells. (JN)

  5. Information on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Information on Stem Cell Research Research @ NINDS Stem Cell Highlights Submit a hESC ... found here: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells NINDS Stem Cell Research on Campus The Intramural Research Program of NINDS ...

  6. Influence of bioturbation on the biogeochemistry of the sediment in the littoral zone of an acidic mine pit lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagauzère, S.; Moreira, S.; Koschorreck, M.

    2010-10-01

    In the last decades, the mining exploitation of large areas in Lusatia (South-eastern Germany) but also in other mining areas worldwide has led to the formation of hundreds of pit lakes. Pyrite oxidation in the surrounding dumps makes many such lakes extremely acidic (pH < 3). The biogeochemical functioning of these lakes is mainly governed by cycling of iron. This represents a relevant ecological problem and intensive research has been conducted to understand the involved biogeochemical processes and develop bioremediation strategies. Despite some studies reporting the presence of living organisms (mostly bacteria, algae, and macro-invertebrates) under such acidic conditions, and their trophic interactions, their potential impact on the ecosystem functioning was poorly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the influence of chironomid larvae on oxygen dynamics and iron cycle in the sediment of acidic pit lakes. In the Mining Lake 111, used as a study case since 1996, Chironomus crassimanus (Insecta, Diptera) is the dominant benthic macro-invertebrate species and occurs at relatively high abundances in shallow water. A 16-day laboratory experiment using microcosms combined with high resolution measurements (DET gel probes and O2 microsensors) was carried out. The burrowing activity of C. crassimanus larvae induced a 3-fold increase of the oxygen consumption by sediment, and stimulated the mineralization of organic matter in the upper layers of the sediment. The iron cycle was also impacted (e.g. lower rates of reduction and oxidation, increase of iron-oxidizing bacteria abundance, stimulation of mineral formation) but with no significant effect on the iron flux at the sediment-water interface, and thus on the water acidity budget. This work provides the first assessment of bioturbation in an acidic mining lake and shows that its influence on biogeochemistry cannot be neglected.

  7. Influence of bioturbation on the biogeochemistry of littoral sediments of an acidic post-mining pit lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagauzère, S.; Moreira, S.; Koschorreck, M.

    2011-02-01

    In the last decades, the mining exploitation of large areas in Lusatia (Eastern Germany) but also in other mining areas worldwide has led to the formation of hundreds of pit lakes. Pyrite oxidation in the surrounding dumps makes many such lakes extremely acidic (pH < 3). The biogeochemical functioning of these lakes is mainly governed by cycling of iron. This represents a relevant ecological problem and intensive research has been conducted to understand the involved biogeochemical processes and develop bioremediation strategies. Despite some studies reporting the presence of living organisms (mostly bacteria, algae, and macro-invertebrates) under such acidic conditions, and their trophic interactions, their potential impact on the ecosystem functioning was poorly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the influence of chironomid larvae on oxygen dynamics and iron cycle in the sediment of acidic pit lakes. In the Mining Lake 111, used as a study case since 1996, Chironomus crassimanus (Insecta, Diptera) is the dominant benthic macro-invertebrate species and occurs at relatively high abundances in shallow water. A 16-day laboratory experiment using microcosms combined with high resolution measurements (DET gel probes and O2 microsensors) was carried out. The burrowing activity of C. crassimanus larvae induced a 3-fold increase of the diffusive oxygen uptake by sediment, indicating a stimulation of the mineralization of organic matter in the upper layers of the sediment. The iron cycle was also impacted (e.g. lower rates of reduction and oxidation, increase of iron-oxidizing bacteria abundance, stimulation of mineral formation) but with no significant effect on the iron flux at the sediment-water interface, and thus on the water acidity budget. This work provides the first assessment of bioturbation in an acidic mining lake and shows that its influence on biogeochemistry cannot be neglected.

  8. Synthesis of the quaternary in the almeria littoral neotectonic activity and its morphologic features, western betics, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goy, J. L.; Zazo, C.

    1986-11-01

    A sequence of marine and continental Quaternary episodes is established, as are their interrelationships. The zone's tectonics have, in most cases, remained active to the present and control the factors All the Tyrrhenian levels containing Strombus bubonius are affected by the many faults that cross the lateral fringe and continue onto the shelf. Among these are: the Loma del Viento Fault, (N120°E. a normal fault with certain leftward characteristics): the El Alquian faults (N140°, 160°E, which coincide, according to several authors (Bousquet, 1979), with the surface feature of a great dextral deep accident); and the Carboneras Fault, or the Serrata Fault, (N40°, 45°E, left strike-slip fault). Given the varying behaviour of the shoreline, we have chosen to divide it into four sectors: Campo de Dalias, El-Alquian-Cabo de Gata, Mojacar—Garrucha. and Campo de Nijar-Serrata. Due to its geographical location, no marine-continental relationships exist in the latter. A chart has been made in an attempt to synthesize the most significant stratigraphic, genetic and tectonic characteristics of each sector. Lastly, the influence of tectonics on the distribution and heights of the Quaternary shorelines is clearly shown in a chart of the transgressive maxima of the Tyrrhenian episodes.

  9. [Nutrient Characteristics and Nitrogen Forms of Rhizosphere Soils Under Four Typical Plants in the Littoral Zone of TGR].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-feng; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Jian-jun; Yue, Jun-sheng

    2015-10-01

    The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), which is the largest water conservancy project ever built in tne world, produced a drawdown area of about 348.93 km2 because of water level control. The biological geochemical cycle of the soil in the drawdown zone has been changed as the result of long-term winter flooding and summer drought and vegetation covering. The loss of soil nitrogen in the drawdown zone poses a threat to the water environmental in TGR. Pengxi river, is an important anabranch, which has the largest drawdown area has been selected in the present study. The four typical vegetation, contained Cynodon dactylon, Cyperus rotundus, Anthium sibiricum and Zea mays L. as the control, were studied to measure nutrient characteristics and nitrogen forms of rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils in three distribution areas with different soil types (paddy soil, purple soil and fluvo-aquic soils). The variables measured included organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total potassium (TK), hydrolysis N, available P and available K, pH, ion-exchangeable N (IEE-N), weak acid extractable N (CF-N) , iron-manganese oxides N (IMOF-N), organic matter sulfide N (OSF-N), added up four N forms for total transferable N (TF-N) and TN minus TF-N for non-transferable N (NTF-N). The results showed: (1) pH of rhizosphere soil was generally lower than that of non-rhizosphere soil under different vegetation in different type soils because the possible organic acid and H+ released form plant roots and cation absorption differences, and the OM, TP, TN and hydrolysis N of rhizosphere soil were generally higher than those of non-rhizosphere soil, and that the enrichment ratio (ER) of all the four nutrient indicators showed Cyperus rotundus > Cynodon dactylon > Zea mays L. > Anthium sibiricum. Available P showed enrichment in the rhizosphere of three natural vegetations but lose under corn, and available K, TK showed different ER in different conditions. (2) IEF-N CF-N, IMOF-N, OSF-N and TF-N of rhizosphere soil were generally higher than those of non-rhizosphere soil, but the TF-N to TN ratio in rhizosphere of Cyperus rotundus and Cynodon dactylon were lower than those of non-rhizosphere soil, and in rhizosphere of Anthium sibiricum and Zea mays L. were higher, the rhizosphere effect of different vegetations on the N cycle was significant difference. (3) the correlation between nutrient characteristics and nitrogen forms was evaluated to explore the influence factor for the N forms changing. There was a significant correlation between soil OM and four N forms, TP was significantly correlated with CF-N, OSF-N, TF-N, and soil available P content was significantly negatively correlated with IMOF-N, OSF-N, TF-N and TN. Our research could provide that the drawdown zone covered with Cyperus rotundus and Cynodon dactylon was better than Anthium sibiricum and Zea mays L. to improve soil N holding and fixation. The vegetation recovery in the drawdown zone should consider the rhizosphere effect of different vegetations on N cycle.

  10. Beach litter occurrence in sandy littorals: The potential role of urban areas, rivers and beach users in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeta, Gianluca; Conti, Luisa; Malavasi, Marco; Battisti, Corrado; Acosta, Alicia Teresa Rosario

    2016-11-01

    Litter washed ashore on the coastline, also called beach litter, constitutes one of the most obvious signs of marine litter pollution. Surveys of beach litter represent a fundamental tool for monitoring pollution in the marine environment and have been used world-wide to classify and quantify marine litter. Identifying the sources of marine and beach litter is, together with education, the prime weapon in combating this type of pollution. This work investigates the impact of three main potential land sources on litter occurrence: urban areas, rivers and beach users. Three sources were analyzed simultaneously on a broad scale (Lazio region, central Italy) using a random sampling design and fitting a generalized linear mixed-effect model. The results show that urban areas are the main drivers for the occurrence of marine litter along central Italy's coastal ecosystems, suggesting that the presence of such litter on Lazio beaches could be effectively reduced by identifying failings in recycling and waste collection procedures and by improving waste processing systems and sewage treatment in urban areas.

  11. Impacts of fishing and environmental factors driving changes on littoral fish assemblages in a subtropical oceanic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangil, Carlos; Martín-García, Laura; Hernández, José Carlos; Concepción, Laura; Fernández, Raúl; Clemente, Sabrina

    2013-08-01

    The structure of demersal fish assemblages of commercial interest was studied at 51 sites on La Palma Island (Canary Islands, northeastern Atlantic). On this island, demersal fish populations are limited and independent from other islands. As deep water separates the islands and the shallow sublittoral platforms are not continuous, adult inter-island migrations are not possible except between the islands of Lanzarote and Fuerteventura. Otherwise, each island functions as a closed system, and the status of an island fish assemblage depends on local environmental conditions and activities performed in situ by the islanders. These circumstances provide a unique opportunity to test the intrainsular variability of fish assemblages. With this background, environmental parameters, fishing pressure and distance to the MPA were considered to identify the main factors explaining the spatial variation of fish assemblages off La Palma Island. Twenty-six fish species were recorded, but 60% of the total fish biomass was represented by only five species (Sparisoma cretense, Pomadasys incisus, Canthidermis sufflamen, Diplodus cervinus cervinus and Bodianus scrofa). However, the structure of assemblages was heterogeneous in response to different variables and showed substantial spatial variation. The assemblages were strongly modified by the presence of upright seaweed cover, fishing activities, and certain environmental variables. Differences were more pronounced in species that occupied the higher trophic levels. The most disturbed assemblages were those located in areas with lower upright seaweed cover and with higher fishing pressure, whereas the best-preserved assemblages corresponded to sites with controlled fishing activities, located within the MPA.

  12. Nationally consistent and easily-implemented approach to evaluate littoral-riparian habitat quality in lakes and reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Lakes Assessment (NLA) and other lake survey and monitoring efforts increasingly rely upon biological assemblage data to define lake condition. Information concerning the multiple dimensions of physical and chemical habitat is necessary to interpret this biological ...

  13. New Acotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) from the east coast of the North Atlantic Ocean with special mention of the Iberian littoral.

    PubMed

    Noreña, Carolina; Rodríguez, Jorge; Pérez, Jacinto; Almon, Bruno

    2015-11-03

    Polyclad species diversity, although generally well known for European North Atlantic waters, is nearly unknown for the Iberian Peninsula. The "Ría de Arousa", located on the Atlantic coast of Galicia (Spain), is a place where many positive biological factors for species biodiversity converge. Therefore, it is an ideal location to study polyclad diversity. This research, which describes new records and new species, contributes to the knowledge of the distribution of Polycladida (Platyhelminthes), particularly of the suborder Acotylea, in the Atlantic waters of the Iberian Peninsula. The new records include the re-descriptions of Cryptocelis compacta Lang, 1884, Stylochus neapolitanus (Delle Chiaje, 1841-1844) and Discocelis tigrina (Blanchard, 1847), while the two newly described species are Hoploplana elisabelloi n. sp. and Armatoplana celta n. sp.

  14. Screening of antimicrobials from Caribbean sea animals and isolation of bactericidal proteins from the littoral mollusk Cenchritis muricatus.

    PubMed

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; Alba, Annia; Lima, Loiane A; Maria-Neto, Simone; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Jose T A; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J; Franco, Octavio L

    2012-05-01

    Marine organisms represent approximately half of the world's biodiversity by virtue of the sea being an immense reservoir of bioactive molecules. Here, antimicrobial crude extract activities of different marine invertebrates from the Caribbean Sea were evaluated. One of the most active, crude extracts was that marine snail Cenchritis muricatus, it was capable of totally inhibiting the development of Staphylococcus aureus and also showed a growth inhibition of 95.9% in Escherichia coli. Aiming to isolate molecules that confirm antimicrobial activity, the crude extract was purified by reversed-phase HPLC C-18 chromatography. Thereafter, one of the obtained fractions preserved this antibacterial activity. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE analysis (15%) showed the presence of two proteins of molecular masses with approximately 10 and 15 kDa, respectively. The first 19 amino acids of both proteins were sequenced by using Edman degradation, yielding unidentified primary structures compared against sequences deposited at NCBI databank. This is the first report of antibacterial proteins isolated from the mollusk Cenchritis muricatus and these proteins could be used as antibiotic alternatives in the aquacultural industry, as well as in agricultural or biomedical research.

  15. Trophic structure of macrobenthic communities on the Portuguese coast. A review of lagoonal, estuarine and rocky littoral habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaventura, Diana; Cancela da Fonseca, Luís; Teles-Ferreira, Carla

    1999-07-01

    This work is based on a compilation and treatment of data obtained on several studies regarding the macrobenthos trophic structure, carried out in different habitats of the Portuguese coast: a lagoon, rocky subtidal shores and estuarine eelgrass beds. Macrobenthic organisms were assigned to four distinct trophic groups (filter feeders, detritivores, herbivores and carnivores). Detritivores were the dominant trophic group in soft-bottom communities. Filter feeders dominated in subtidal rocky shores while eelgrass communities were equally represented by detritivores and herbivores. Current intensity and sediment deposition are discussed as factors affecting the observed distribution. Nevertheless, different sampling methods used in these studies and the lack of information on feeding habits of some species can also influence the results obtained.

  16. [Nutrient Characteristics and Nitrogen Forms of Rhizosphere Soils Under Four Typical Plants in the Littoral Zone of TGR].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-feng; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Jian-jun; Yue, Jun-sheng

    2015-10-01

    The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), which is the largest water conservancy project ever built in tne world, produced a drawdown area of about 348.93 km2 because of water level control. The biological geochemical cycle of the soil in the drawdown zone has been changed as the result of long-term winter flooding and summer drought and vegetation covering. The loss of soil nitrogen in the drawdown zone poses a threat to the water environmental in TGR. Pengxi river, is an important anabranch, which has the largest drawdown area has been selected in the present study. The four typical vegetation, contained Cynodon dactylon, Cyperus rotundus, Anthium sibiricum and Zea mays L. as the control, were studied to measure nutrient characteristics and nitrogen forms of rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils in three distribution areas with different soil types (paddy soil, purple soil and fluvo-aquic soils). The variables measured included organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total potassium (TK), hydrolysis N, available P and available K, pH, ion-exchangeable N (IEE-N), weak acid extractable N (CF-N) , iron-manganese oxides N (IMOF-N), organic matter sulfide N (OSF-N), added up four N forms for total transferable N (TF-N) and TN minus TF-N for non-transferable N (NTF-N). The results showed: (1) pH of rhizosphere soil was generally lower than that of non-rhizosphere soil under different vegetation in different type soils because the possible organic acid and H+ released form plant roots and cation absorption differences, and the OM, TP, TN and hydrolysis N of rhizosphere soil were generally higher than those of non-rhizosphere soil, and that the enrichment ratio (ER) of all the four nutrient indicators showed Cyperus rotundus > Cynodon dactylon > Zea mays L. > Anthium sibiricum. Available P showed enrichment in the rhizosphere of three natural vegetations but lose under corn, and available K, TK showed different ER in different conditions. (2) IEF-N CF-N, IMOF-N, OSF-N and TF-N of rhizosphere soil were generally higher than those of non-rhizosphere soil, but the TF-N to TN ratio in rhizosphere of Cyperus rotundus and Cynodon dactylon were lower than those of non-rhizosphere soil, and in rhizosphere of Anthium sibiricum and Zea mays L. were higher, the rhizosphere effect of different vegetations on the N cycle was significant difference. (3) the correlation between nutrient characteristics and nitrogen forms was evaluated to explore the influence factor for the N forms changing. There was a significant correlation between soil OM and four N forms, TP was significantly correlated with CF-N, OSF-N, TF-N, and soil available P content was significantly negatively correlated with IMOF-N, OSF-N, TF-N and TN. Our research could provide that the drawdown zone covered with Cyperus rotundus and Cynodon dactylon was better than Anthium sibiricum and Zea mays L. to improve soil N holding and fixation. The vegetation recovery in the drawdown zone should consider the rhizosphere effect of different vegetations on N cycle. PMID:26841597

  17. Long-term effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the life cycle and productivity of the littoral oligochaete lumbricillus lineatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschildt-Lillge, D.

    Cultures of Lumbricillus lineatus, a dominant inhabitant of sandy shore lines, have been exposed to water-soluble fractions of crude oil (Arabian Light) through 5 generations (15 months). Although, in short-term tests very resistant to high hydrocarbon concentrations, long-term exposure of the worms considerably reduced the fertility of eggs and hatching success of embryos. However, the depressed reproduction and general viability was in part compensated by an increased cocoon production Mixtures of oil and the dispersants Corexit 7664 and Finasol OSR-5 proved to be drastically more toxic than oil per se, diminishing cocoon production and fertility of eggs markedly.

  18. [Population state of Echinometra lucunter (Echinoida: Echinometridae) and its accompanying fauna on Caribbean rocky littoral from Colombia].

    PubMed

    López, Mario Monroy; Solano, Oscar David

    2005-12-01

    In order to know the current condition of the Echinometra lucunter population in the Colombian Caribbean, ten zones of the most representative rocky-shore were selected for sampling between November 2002 and May 2003. In each zone, four transects of 10.25 m2 were located parallel to the coast, and measured with a 0.25 m2 quadrant under the tide level. Two subsamples of 0.01 m2 were chosen from each quadrant, in order to determine the sea urchin heights and its associated fauna. This species was found in nine of the selected zones where the rocky-shore was of sedimentary origin and was absent in Punta Gloria because of the igneous origin of the rock, that the sea urchins cannot bore. The greatest average densities were obtained in Zapsurro and Inca Inca with 69 and 65 ind/m2 respectively; these are high values for the Caribbean Sea, whereas Acandi and Punta Betin had the lowest because of continental water discharges. The most frequent test diameter was between 25 and 40 mm (smaller on the western zones). The density of E. lucunter and of its associated fauna (including the endemic Ophiothrix synoecina) in the Santa Marta area decreased in the last decade.

  19. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  20. Energetics of cell-cell and cell-biopolymer interactions.

    PubMed

    van Oss, C J

    1989-02-01

    The energy vs distance balance of cell suspensions (in the presence and in the absence of extracellular biopolymer solutions) is studied, not only in the light of the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory (which considered just the electrostatic (EL) and Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) interactions), but also by taking electron-acceptor/electron-donor, or Lewis acid-base (AB) and osmotic (OS) interactions into account. Since cell surfaces, as well as many biopolymers tend to have strong monopolar electron-donor properties, they are able to engage in a strong mutual AB repulsion when immersed in a polar liquid such as water. The effects of that repulsion have been observed earlier in the guise of hydration pressure. The AB repulsion is, at close range, typically one or two orders of magnitude stronger than the EL repulsion, but its rate of decay is much steeper. In most cases, AB interactions are quantitatively the dominant factor in cell stability (when repulsive) and in "hydrophobic interactions" (when attractive). OS interactions exerted by extracellularly dissolved biopolymers are weak, but their rate of decay is very gradual, so OS repulsions engendered by biopolymer solutions may be of importance in certain long-range interactions. OS interactions exerted by biopolymers attached to cells or particles (e.g., by glycocalix glycoproteins), are very short-ranged and usually are negligibly small in comparison with the other interaction forces, in aqueous media.

  1. T follicular regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Sage, Peter T; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2016-05-01

    Pathogen exposure elicits production of high-affinity antibodies stimulated by T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the germinal center reaction. Tfh cells provide both costimulation and stimulatory cytokines to B cells to facilitate affinity maturation, class switch recombination, and plasma cell differentiation within the germinal center. Under normal circumstances, the germinal center reaction results in antibodies that precisely target foreign pathogens while limiting autoimmunity and excessive inflammation. In order to have this degree of control, the immune system ensures Tfh-mediated B-cell help is regulated locally in the germinal center. The recently identified T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cell subset can migrate to the germinal center and inhibit Tfh-mediated B-cell activation and antibody production. Although many aspects of Tfr cell biology are still unclear, recent data have begun to delineate the specialized roles of Tfr cells in controlling the germinal center reaction. Here we discuss the current understanding of Tfr-cell differentiation and function and how this knowledge is providing new insights into the dynamic regulation of germinal centers, and suggesting more efficacious vaccine strategies and ways to treat antibody-mediated diseases.

  2. T Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4+ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α+, CD4+ T-cells and sIgM+ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells. PMID:26426066

  3. Fragmentation of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Kamyabi, Nabiollah

    Tumor cells have to travel through blood capillaries to be able to metastasize and colonize in distant organs. Among the numerous cells that are shed by the primary tumor, very few survive in circulation. In vivo studies have shown that tumor cells can undergo breakup at microcapillary junctions affecting their survival. It is currently unclear what hydrodynamic and biomechanical factors contribute to fragmentation and moreover how different are the breakup dynamics of highly and weakly metastatic cells. In this study, we use microfluidics to investigate flow-induced breakup of prostate and breast cancer cells. We observe several different modes of breakup of cancer cells, which have striking similarities with breakup of viscous drops. We quantify the breakup time and find that highly metastatic cancer cells take longer to breakup than lowly metastatic cells suggesting that tumor cells may dynamically modify their deformability to avoid fragmentation. We also identify the role that cytoskeleton and membrane plays in the breakup process. Our study highlights the important role that tumor cell fragmentation plays in cancer metastasis. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  4. Simple Cell Balance Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven D.; Byers, Jerry W.; Martin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed for continuous cell voltage balancing for rechargeable batteries (e.g. lithium ion batteries). A resistor divider chain is provided that generates a set of voltages representing the ideal cell voltage (the voltage of each cell should be as if the cells were perfectly balanced). An operational amplifier circuit with an added current buffer stage generates the ideal voltage with a very high degree of accuracy, using the concept of negative feedback. The ideal voltages are each connected to the corresponding cell through a current- limiting resistance. Over time, having the cell connected to the ideal voltage provides a balancing current that moves the cell voltage very close to that ideal level. In effect, it adjusts the current of each cell during charging, discharging, and standby periods to force the cell voltages to be equal to the ideal voltages generated by the resistor divider. The device also includes solid-state switches that disconnect the circuit from the battery so that it will not discharge the battery during storage. This solution requires relatively few parts and is, therefore, of lower cost and of increased reliability due to the fewer failure modes. Additionally, this design uses very little power. A preliminary model predicts a power usage of 0.18 W for an 8-cell battery. This approach is applicable to a wide range of battery capacities and voltages.

  5. Mast Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  6. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies.

  7. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Cross, Frederick R; Umen, James G

    2015-05-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants; and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that has been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. Its cell biology has been studied for many decades and it has well-developed experimental genetic tools, both classical (Mendelian) and molecular. Unlike land plants, it is a haploid with very few gene duplicates, making it ideal for loss-of-function genetic studies. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle has a striking temporal and functional separation between cell growth and rapid cell division, probably connected to the interplay between diurnal cycles that drive photosynthetic cell growth and the cell division cycle; it also exhibits a highly choreographed interaction between the cell cycle and its centriole-basal body-flagellar cycle. Here, we review the current status of studies of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. We begin with an overview of cell-cycle control in the well-studied yeast and animal systems, which has yielded a canonical, well-supported model. We discuss briefly what is known about similarities and differences in plant cell-cycle control, compared with this model. We next review the cytology and cell biology of the multiple-fission cell cycle of Chlamydomonas. Lastly, we review recent genetic approaches and insights into Chlamydomonas cell-cycle regulation that have been enabled by a new generation of genomics-based tools.

  8. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage. PMID:21135032

  9. New cell sources for T cell engineering and adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Themeli, Maria; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The promising clinical results obtained with engineered T cells, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy, call for further advancements to facilitate and broaden their applicability. One potentially beneficial innovation is to exploit new T cell sources that reduce the need for autologous cell manufacturing and enable cell transfer across histocompatibility barriers. Here we review emerging T cell engineering approaches that utilize alternative T cell sources, which include virus-specific or T cell receptor-less allogeneic T cells, expanded lymphoid progenitors, and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived T lymphocytes. The latter offer the prospect for true off-the-shelf, genetically enhanced, histocompatible cell therapy products.

  10. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  11. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Concentrator silicon cell research

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  13. Solar cell shingle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Sidorak, L. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A solar cell shingle was made of an array of solar cells on a lower portion of a substantially rectangular shingle substrate made of fiberglass cloth or the like. The solar cells may be encapsulated in flourinated ethylene propylene or some other weatherproof translucent or transparent encapsulant to form a combined electrical module and a roof shingle. The interconnected solar cells were connected to connectors at the edge of the substrate through a connection to a common electrical bus or busses. An overlap area was arranged to receive the overlap of a cooperating similar shingle so that the cell portion of the cooperating shingle may overlie the overlap area of the roof shingle. Accordingly, the same shingle serves the double function of an ordinary roof shingle which may be applied in the usual way and an array of cooperating solar cells from which electrical energy may be collected.

  14. Mechanical plasticity of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Navid; Gerum, Richard; Kuhn, Michael; Spörrer, Marina; Lippert, Anna; Schneider, Werner; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Under mechanical loading, most living cells show a viscoelastic deformation that follows a power law in time. After removal of the mechanical load, the cell shape recovers only incompletely to its original undeformed configuration. Here, we show that incomplete shape recovery is due to an additive plastic deformation that displays the same power-law dynamics as the fully reversible viscoelastic deformation response. Moreover, the plastic deformation is a constant fraction of the total cell deformation and originates from bond ruptures within the cytoskeleton. A simple extension of the prevailing viscoelastic power-law response theory with a plastic element correctly predicts the cell behaviour under cyclic loading. Our findings show that plastic energy dissipation during cell deformation is tightly linked to elastic cytoskeletal stresses, which suggests the existence of an adaptive mechanism that protects the cell against mechanical damage.

  15. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  16. [Stem cells and cancer].

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Cotte, Carlos; Sojo, Felipe

    2014-12-01

    Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of the cells that form the tumor. The discovery of these human cancer cells opens a perspective for understanding tumor recurrence, drug resistance and metastasis; and opens up new research directions on how cancer cells are capable of switching from dormancy to malignancy. Therapeutic alternatives emerge from a better understanding of the biology and the environment of tumor stem cells. The present paper aims to summarize the characteristics and properties of cancer stem cells, the ongoing research, as well as the best strategies for prevention and control of the mechanisms of tumor recurrence.

  17. Integral diode solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, W.; Gillanders, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    To achieve high power at minimum weight, innovative array designs are needed. In the case where shadows fall across a series element in a simple circuit, the effective power will be reduced or eliminated. The conventional method of eliminating this loss is the introduction of bypass diodes. This method increases cost and weight and reduces available surface area. An alternative solution to the shadowing problem is to use integral diode solar cells. The integral diode cell has a built-in diode on the back that protects the adjacent cell and passes the current if it is shadowed. This paper will describe the effort to produce the integral diode cells in a production facility with a minimum cost impact. The electrical characterization of the cell as well as the diode will be presented. These cells can be readily manufactured in a production facility using photoresist defined contacting process.

  18. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to reality. However, as somatic cells might have accumulated various chromosomal abnormalities, including aneuploidies throughout their lives, the resulting IPSCs might no longer carry the perfect blueprint for the tissue to be generated, or worse, become at risk of adopting a malignant fate. In this review, we discuss the contribution of aneuploidy to healthy tissues and how aneuploidy can lead to disease. Furthermore, we review the differences between how somatic cells and stem cells respond to aneuploidy. PMID:27354891

  19. Myoepithelial cells in pathology.

    PubMed

    Balachander, N; Masthan, K M K; Babu, N Aravindha; Anbazhagan, V

    2015-04-01

    Myoepithelial cells are a normal constituent of the salivary acini and ducts and are found between the epithelial cells and the basement membrane. Microscopically myoepithelial cells are thin and spindle-shaped and ultrastructurally they possess a number of Cytoplasmic processes that extend between and over the acinar and ductal-lining cells, and they show features of both smooth muscle and epithelium. They play a vital role during expulsion of saliva and regulates the electrolytic exchange. They also perform as tumor suppressors and are considered to play a very important role in differentiation of various salivary gland tumors and help in the diagnosis of tumors. Neoplastic myoepithelial cells in both benign and malignant tumors can take numerous forms including epithelioid, plasmacytoid, spindle and clear cell variant, and this variability largely accounts for difficulties in histopathological diagnosis.

  20. Entosis and Related Forms of Cell Death within Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wang, X-D

    2015-01-01

    By eliminating the unneeded or mutant cells, programmed cell death actively participates in a wide range of biological processes from embryonic development to homeostasis maintenance in adult. Continuing efforts have identified multiple cell death pathways, with apoptosis, necrosis and autophage the mostly studied. Recently a unique cell death pathway called "cell-in-cell death" has been defined. Unlike traditional cell death pathways, cell-in-cell death, characterized by cell death within another cell, is triggered by the invasion of one cell into its neighbor and executed by either lysosome-dependent degradation or caspase-dependent apoptosis. With remarkable progresses on cell-in-cell over past few years, multiple mechanisms, including entosis, cannibalism and emperitosis, are found to be responsible for cell-in-cell death. Some key questions, such as specific biochemical markers to distinguish precisely the properties of different cell-in-cell structures and the physiological and pathological relevance, remain to be addressed. In light of this situation and a surge of interests, leading scientists in this field intend to share with readers current research progresses on cell-in-cell structures from different model systems through this special edition on cell-in-cell. The mechanistic advances will be highlighted while the future researches be speculated. PMID:26511710

  1. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  2. Quantitative methods for analyzing cell-cell adhesion in development.

    PubMed

    Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-05-01

    During development cell-cell adhesion is not only crucial to maintain tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, it also activates signalling pathways important for the regulation of different cellular processes including cell survival, gene expression, collective cell migration and differentiation. Importantly, gene mutations of adhesion receptors can cause developmental disorders and different diseases. Quantitative methods to measure cell adhesion are therefore necessary to understand how cells regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and how aberrations in cell-cell adhesion contribute to disease. Different in vitro adhesion assays have been developed in the past, but not all of them are suitable to study developmentally-related cell-cell adhesion processes, which usually requires working with low numbers of primary cells. In this review, we provide an overview of different in vitro techniques to study cell-cell adhesion during development, including a semi-quantitative cell flipping assay, and quantitative single-cell methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) or dual micropipette aspiration (DPA). Furthermore, we review applications of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors to visualize intracellular mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion sites. Finally, we describe a recently introduced method to quantitate cell-generated forces directly in living tissues based on the deformation of oil microdroplets functionalized with adhesion receptor ligands. Together, these techniques provide a comprehensive toolbox to characterize different cell-cell adhesion phenomena during development.

  3. NK cell depletion diminish tumour-specific B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Markus; Tawadros, Samir; Sedlacek, Hans-Harald; Schultze, Joachim L; Berthold, Frank

    2004-05-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells can exercise immediate cytotoxicity against malignant cells and thus far modulate the development of tumour directed T cell immunity. To investigate the impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell immunity mice were immunised with IMR5-75 human neuroblastoma cells with or without prior in vivo NK cell depletion. Flow cytometry analyses gave evidence for an impaired IgG response against the cells immunised with. Dissection of Th1 (IgG2a) and Th2 (IgG1) oriented B cell responses revealed Th1 responses as primarily affected, while Th2 oriented B cell responses as measured by flow cytometry and GD2 ganglioside-specific ELISA were enforced. The data reveal an unexpected impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell responses. Consequently, NK cell function has also to be taken into account when developing B cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin+ cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin+ cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin+ cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin+ stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin+ cells—but not in endothelial cells only— increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  5. Improving Cell Engraftment in Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) affects millions of people worldwide. MI causes massive cardiac cell death and heart function decrease. However, heart tissue cannot effectively regenerate by itself. While stem cell therapy has been considered an effective approach for regeneration, the efficacy of cardiac stem cell therapy remains low due to inferior cell engraftment in the infarcted region. This is mainly a result of low cell retention in the tissue and poor cell survival under ischemic, immune rejection and inflammatory conditions. Various approaches have been explored to improve cell engraftment: increase of cell retention using biomaterials as cell carriers; augmentation of cell survival under ischemic conditions by preconditioning cells, genetic modification of cells, and controlled release of growth factors and oxygen; and enhancement of cell survival by protecting cells from excessive inflammation and immune surveillance. In this paper, we review current progress, advantages, disadvantages, and potential solutions of these approaches. PMID:26783405

  6. Rechargeable Magnesium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Orsini, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Rechargeable power cells based on magnesium anodes developed as safer alternatives to high-energy-density cells like those based on lithium and sodium anodes. At cost of some reduction in energy density, magnesium-based cells safer because less susceptible to catastrophic meltdown followed by flames and venting of toxic fumes. Other advantages include ease of handling, machining, and disposal, and relatively low cost.

  7. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  8. Insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Insa S; Kania, Gabriela; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Wobus, Anna M

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells offer great potential for cell replacement and tissue engineering therapies because of their almost unlimited proliferation capacity and the potential to differentiate into cellular derivatives of all three primary germ layers. This chapter describes a strategy for the in vitro differentiation of mouse ES cells into insulin-producing cells. The three-step protocol does not select for nestin-expressing cells as performed in previous differentiation systems. It includes (1) the spontaneous differentiation of ES cells via embryoid bodies and (2) the formation of progenitor cells of all three primary germ layers (multilineage progenitors) followed by (3) directed differentiation into the pancreatic lineage. The application of growth and extracellular matrix factors, including laminin, nicotinamide, and insulin, leads to the development of committed pancreatic progenitors, which subsequently differentiate into islet-like clusters that release insulin in response to glucose. During differentiation, transcript levels of pancreas-specific transcription factors (i.e., Pdx1, Pax4) and of genes specific for early and mature beta cells, including insulin, islet amyloid pancreatic peptide, somatostatin, and glucagon, are upregulated. C-peptide/insulin-positive islet-like clusters are formed, which release insulin in response to high glucose concentrations at terminal stages. The differentiated cells reveal functional properties with respect to voltage-activated Na+ and ATP-modulated K+ channels and normalize blood glucose levels in streptozotocin-treated diabetic mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate the efficient differentiation of murine ES cells into insulin-producing cells, which may help in the future to establish ES cell-based therapies in diabetes mellitus.

  9. Systems cell biology.

    PubMed

    Mast, Fred D; Ratushny, Alexander V; Aitchison, John D

    2014-09-15

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology.

  10. Solar cell encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A polymer syrup for encapsulating solar cell assemblies. The syrup includes uncrosslinked poly(n-butyl)acrylate dissolved in n-butyl acrylate monomer. Preparation of the poly(n-butyl)acrylate and preparation of the polymer syrup is disclosed. Methods for applying the polymer syrup to solar cell assemblies as an encapsulating pottant are described. Also included is a method for solar cell construction utilizing the polymer syrup as a dual purpose adhesive and encapsulating material.

  11. Systems cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Fred D.; Ratushny, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology. PMID:25225336

  12. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.

    1994-08-30

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

  13. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

  14. Characterization of amniotic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koike, Chika; Zhou, Kaixuan; Takeda, Yuji; Fathy, Moustafa; Okabe, Motonori; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nakamura, Yukio; Kato, Yukio; Nikaido, Toshio

    2014-08-01

    The amnion membrane is developed from embryo-derived cells, and amniotic cells have been shown to exhibit multidifferentiation potential. These cells represent a desirable source for stem cells for a variety of reasons. However, to date very few molecular analyses of amnion-derived cells have been reported, and efficient markers for isolating the stem cells remain unclear. This paper assesses the characterization of amnion-derived cells as stem cells by examining stemness marker expressions for amnion-derived epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative PCR. Flow cytometry revealed that amnion epithelial cells expressed CD133, CD 271, and TRA-1-60, whereas mecenchymal cells expressed CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105. Immunohistochemistry showed that both cells expressed the stemness markers Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and SSEA4. Stemness genes' expression in amnion epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, fibroblast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Amnion-derived epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Klf4 more than bone marrow-derived MSCs. The sorted TRA1-60-positive cells expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Klf4 more than unsorted cells or TRA1-60-negative cells. TRA1-60 can be a marker for isolating amnion epithelial stem cells.

  15. The mast cell: a multifunctional effector cell.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico; Mallardi, Franco; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are recognized key cells of type I hypersensitivity reactions. Several lines of evidence, however, indicate that MC not only express critical effector functions in classic IgE-associated allergic disorders, but also play important roles in host defence against parasites, bacteria and perhaps even viruses. Indeed, it is now clear that MC can contribute to host defence in the context of either acquired or innate immune responses through the release of a myriad of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory molecules and the expression of a wide spectrum of surface receptors for cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, there is growing evidence that MC exert distinct nonimmunological functions, playing a relevant role in tissue homeostasis, remodeling and fibrosis as well as in the processes of tissue angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a small insight into the biology of mast cells and their potential implications in human pathology.

  16. Cell-in-cell structures are involved in the competition between cells in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Huang, Hongyan; Overholtzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The engulfment of live cells may represent a mechanism of cell death. We reported that E-cadherin (epithelial cadherin) expression in human cancer cells favors the formation of cell-in-cell structures through the mechanism known as entosis, and that entosis contributes to a form of cellular competition in heterogeneous cancer cell populations. PMID:27308493

  17. Electron tomography of cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Jensen, Grant J

    2012-02-01

    The electron microscope has contributed deep insights into biological structure since its invention nearly 80 years ago. Advances in instrumentation and methodology in recent decades have now enabled electron tomography to become the highest resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique available for unique objects such as cells. Cells can be imaged either plastic-embedded or frozen-hydrated. Then the series of projection images are aligned and back-projected to generate a 3D reconstruction or 'tomogram'. Here, we review how electron tomography has begun to reveal the molecular organization of cells and how the existing and upcoming technologies promise even greater insights into structural cell biology. PMID:22082691

  18. Red cell enzymes.

    PubMed

    Paniker, N V

    1975-03-01

    As compared to other cells of the body, the mammalian red cell has one of the simplest structural organizations. As a result, this cell has been extensively used in studies involving the structure, function, and integrity of cell membranes as well as cytoplasmic events. Additionally, the metabolic activities of the red blood cell are also relatively simple. During the past quarter century or so, an ocean of knowledge has been gathered on various aspects of red cell metabolism and function. The fields of enzymes, hemoglobin, membrane, and metabolic products comprise the major portion of this knowledge. These advances have made valuable contributions to biochemistry and medicine. Despite these favorable aspects of this simple, anucleated cell, it must be conceded that our knowledge about the red cell is far from complete. We are still in the dark concerning the mechanism involved in several aspects of its membrane, hemoglobin, enzymes, and a large number of other constituents. For example, a large number of enzymes with known catalytic activity but with unknown function have eluded investigators despite active pursuit. This review will be a consolidation of our present knowledge of human red cell enzymes, with particular reference to their usefulness in the diagnosis and therapy of disease. Owing to the multitude of publications by prominent investigators on each of the approximately 50 enzymes discussed in this review, it was impossible to cite a majority of them.

  19. Stem cells in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huei-Wen; Lin, Chun-Che; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic techniques have been recently developed for cell-based assays. In microfluidic systems, the objective is for these microenvironments to mimic in vivo surroundings. With advantageous characteristics such as optical transparency and the capability for automating protocols, different types of cells can be cultured, screened, and monitored in real time to systematically investigate their morphology and functions under well-controlled microenvironments in response to various stimuli. Recently, the study of stem cells using microfluidic platforms has attracted considerable interest. Even though stem cells have been studied extensively using bench-top systems, an understanding of their behavior in in vivo-like microenvironments which stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation is still lacking. In this paper, recent cell studies using microfluidic systems are first introduced. The various miniature systems for cell culture, sorting and isolation, and stimulation are then systematically reviewed. The main focus of this review is on papers published in recent years studying stem cells by using microfluidic technology. This review aims to provide experts in microfluidics an overview of various microfluidic systems for stem cell research. PMID:21522491

  20. Single cell dynamic phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Katherin; Chiu, Chi-Li; Engeln, Mark; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Ruderman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging has improved our ability to measure phenotypic heterogeneity. However, bottlenecks in imaging and image processing often make it difficult to differentiate interesting biological behavior from technical artifact. Thus there is a need for new methods that improve data quality without sacrificing throughput. Here we present a 3-step workflow to improve dynamic phenotype measurements of heterogeneous cell populations. We provide guidelines for image acquisition, phenotype tracking, and data filtering to remove erroneous cell tracks using the novel Tracking Aberration Measure (TrAM). Our workflow is broadly applicable across imaging platforms and analysis software. By applying this workflow to cancer cell assays, we reduced aberrant cell track prevalence from 17% to 2%. The cost of this improvement was removing 15% of the well-tracked cells. This enabled detection of significant motility differences between cell lines. Similarly, we avoided detecting a false change in translocation kinetics by eliminating the true cause: varied proportions of unresponsive cells. Finally, by systematically seeking heterogeneous behaviors, we detected subpopulations that otherwise could have been missed, including early apoptotic events and pre-mitotic cells. We provide optimized protocols for specific applications and step-by-step guidelines for adapting them to a variety of biological systems. PMID:27708391