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Sample records for live cold-adapted flumist

  1. Demystifying FluMist, a new intranasal, live influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2003-09-01

    FluMist--a cold-adapted, live-attenuated, trivalent, intranasal influenza virus vaccine approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on June 17, 2003--has been shown to be safe and effective, but its role in the general prevention of influenza is yet to be defined. Intranasal administration is expected to be more acceptable than parenteral, particularly in children, but the potential for the shedding of live virus may pose a risk to anyone with a compromised immune system.

  2. Reversion of Cold-Adapted Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine into a Pathogenic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Meliopoulos, Victoria A.; Wang, Wei; Lin, Xudong; Stucker, Karla M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The only licensed live attenuated influenza A virus vaccines (LAIVs) in the United States (FluMist) are created using internal protein-coding gene segments from the cold-adapted temperature-sensitive master donor virus A/Ann Arbor/6/1960 and HA/NA gene segments from circulating viruses. During serial passage of A/Ann Arbor/6/1960 at low temperatures to select the desired attenuating phenotypes, multiple cold-adaptive mutations and temperature-sensitive mutations arose. A substantial amount of scientific and clinical evidence has proven that FluMist is safe and effective. Nevertheless, no study has been conducted specifically to determine if the attenuating temperature-sensitive phenotype can revert and, if so, the types of substitutions that will emerge (i.e., compensatory substitutions versus reversion of existing attenuating mutations). Serial passage of the monovalent FluMist 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccine at increasing temperatures in vitro generated a variant that replicated efficiently at higher temperatures. Sequencing of the variant identified seven nonsynonymous mutations, PB1-E51K, PB1-I171V, PA-N350K, PA-L366I, NP-N125Y, NP-V186I, and NS2-G63E. None occurred at positions previously reported to affect the temperature sensitivity of influenza A viruses. Synthetic genomics technology was used to synthesize the whole genome of the virus, and the roles of individual mutations were characterized by assessing their effects on RNA polymerase activity and virus replication kinetics at various temperatures. The revertant also regained virulence and caused significant disease in mice, with severity comparable to that caused by a wild-type 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus. IMPORTANCE The live attenuated influenza vaccine FluMist has been proven safe and effective and is widely used in the United States. The phenotype and genotype of the vaccine virus are believed to be very stable, and mutants that cause disease in animals or humans have never been reported. By

  3. The cold adapted and temperature sensitive influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus, the master donor virus for live attenuated influenza vaccines, has multiple defects in replication at the restrictive temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Winnie; Zhou, Helen; Kemble, George; Jin Hong

    2008-10-25

    We have previously determined that the temperature sensitive (ts) and attenuated (att) phenotypes of the cold adapted influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 strain (MDV-A), the master donor virus for the live attenuated influenza A vaccines (FluMist), are specified by the five amino acids in the PB1, PB2 and NP gene segments. To understand how these loci control the ts phenotype of MDV-A, replication of MDV-A at the non-permissive temperature (39 deg. C) was compared with recombinant wild-type A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (rWt). The mRNA and protein synthesis of MDV-A in the infected MDCK cells were not significantly reduced at 39 deg. C during a single-step replication, however, vRNA synthesis was reduced and the nuclear-cytoplasmic export of viral RNP (vRNP) was blocked. In addition, the virions released from MDV-A infected cells at 39 deg. C exhibited irregular morphology and had a greatly reduced amount of the M1 protein incorporated. The reduced M1 protein incorporation and vRNP export blockage correlated well with the virus ts phenotype because these defects could be partially alleviated by removing the three ts loci from the PB1 gene. The virions and vRNPs isolated from the MDV-A infected cells contained a higher level of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) than those of rWt, however, whether Hsp70 is involved in thermal inhibition of MDV-A replication remains to be determined. Our studies demonstrate that restrictive replication of MDV-A at the non-permissive temperature occurs in multiple steps of the virus replication cycle.

  4. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Jang, Yo Han; Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-04-15

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response. - Highlights: • Cold-adaptation process induced four amino acid mutations in the HA of X-31 virus. • The four mutations in the HA also contributed to attenuation of the X-31ca virus • N81K mutation was the most significant marker for the attenuation of X-31ca virus. • Introduction of N81K mutation into H3N2 LAIV further attenuated the vaccine. • This approach provides a useful guideline for enhancing the safety of the LAIVs.

  5. Efficacy and effectiveness of live attenuated influenza vaccine in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Coelingh, Kathleen; Olajide, Ifedapo Rosemary; MacDonald, Peter; Yogev, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of high efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) from randomized controlled trials is strong for children 2-6 years of age, but fewer data exist for older school-age children. We reviewed the published data on efficacy and effectiveness of LAIV in children ≥5 years. QUOSA (Elsevier database) was searched for articles published from January 1990 to June 2014 that included 'FluMist', 'LAIV', 'CAIV', 'cold adapted influenza vaccine', 'live attenuated influenza vaccine', 'live attenuated cold adapted' or 'flu mist'. Studies evaluated included randomized controlled trials, effectiveness and indirect protection studies. This review demonstrates that LAIV has considerable efficacy and effectiveness in school-age children.

  6. Influenza virus vaccine live intranasal--MedImmune vaccines: CAIV-T, influenza vaccine live intranasal.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    MedImmune Vaccines (formerly Aviron) has developed a cold-adapted live influenza virus vaccine [FluMist] that can be administered by nasal spray. FluMist is the first live virus influenza vaccine and also the first nasally administered vaccine to be marketed in the US. The vaccine will be formulated to contain live attenuated (att) influenza virus reassortants of the strains recommended by the US Public Health Service for each 'flu season. The vaccine is termed cold-adapted (ca) because the virus has been adapted to replicate efficiently at 25 degrees C in the nasal passages, which are below normal body temperature. The strains used in the seasonal vaccine will also be made temperature sensitive (ts) so that their replication is restricted at 37 degrees C (Type B strains) and 39 degrees C (Type A strains). The combined effect of the antigenic properties and the att, ca and ts phenotypes of the influenza strains contained in the vaccine enables the viruses to replicate in the nasopharynx to produce protective immunity. The original formulation of FluMist requires freezer storage throughout distribution. Because many international markets do not have distribution channels well suited to the sale of frozen vaccines, Wyeth and MedImmune are collaborating to develop a second generation, refrigerator-stable, liquid trivalent cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T), which is in phase III trials. Initially, the frozen formulation will only be available in the US. For the 2003-2004 season, FluMist will contain A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2) (A/Moscow/10/99-like) and B/Hong Kong/330/2001. Aviron was acquired by MedImmune on 15 January 2002. Aviron is now a wholly-owned subsidiary of MedImmune and is called MedImmune Vaccines. Aviron acquired FluMist in March 1995 through a Co-operative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the US NIAID, and a licensing agreement with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. In June 2000, the CRADA was

  7. Elucidation of the molecular basis for the attenuation of a live, attenuated influenza A H5N1 cold-adapted vaccine virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recombinant, live influenza A H5N1 vaccine candidate with the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from A/VietNam/1203/04 (H5N1) (H5N1 2004 wt) and the internal protein genes from A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA) (H2N2) cold-adapted (ca) virus has been previously shown to be attenuated in ...

  8. Evaluation of two live attenuated cold-adapted H5N1 influenza virus vaccines in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Karron, Ruth A.; Talaat, Kawsar; Luke, Catherine; Callahan, Karen; Thumar, Bhagvanji; DiLorenzo, Susan; McAuliffe, Josephine; Schappell, Elizabeth; Suguitan, Amorsolo; Mills, Kimberly; Chen, Grace; Lamirande, Elaine; Coelingh, Kathleen; Jin, Hong; Murphy, Brian R.; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    Background Development of live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) against avian viruses with pandemic potential is an important public health strategy. Methods and Findings We performed open-label trials to evaluate the safety, infectivity, and immunogenicity of H5N1 VN 2004 AA ca and H5N1 HK 2003 AA ca. Each of these vaccines contains a modified H5 hemagglutinin and unmodified N1 neuraminidase from the respective wild-type (wt) parent virus and the six internal protein gene segments of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-adapted (ca) master donor virus. The H5N1 VN 2004 AA ca vaccine virus was evaluated at dosages of 106.7 TCID50 and 107.5 TCID50, and the H5N1 HK 2003 AA ca vaccine was evaluated at a dosage of 107.5 TCID50. Two doses were administered intranasally to healthy adults in isolation at 4 to 8 week intervals. Vaccine safety was assessed through daily examinations and infectivity was assessed by viral culture and by realtime reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction testing of nasal wash (NW) specimens. Immunogenicity was assessed by measuring hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and IgG or IgA antibodies to recombinant (r)H5 VN 2004 hemagglutinin (HA) in serum or NW. Fifty-nine participants were enrolled: 21 received 106.7 TCID50 and 21 received 107.5 TCID50 of H5N1 VN 2004 AA ca and 17 received H5N1 HK 2003 AA ca. Shedding of vaccine virus was minimal, as were HI and neutralizing antibody responses. Fifty-two percent of recipients of 107.5 TCID50 of H5N1 VN 2004 AA ca developed a serum IgA response to rH5 VN 2004 HA. Conclusions The live attenuated H5N1 VN 2004 and HK 2003 AA ca vaccines bearing avian H5 HA antigens were very restricted in replication and were more attenuated than seasonal LAIV bearing human H1, H3 or B HA antigens. The H5N1 AA ca LAIV elicited serum ELISA antibody but not HI or neutralizing antibody responses in healthy adults. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00347672 and NCT00488046). PMID:19540952

  9. Study of live recombinant cold-adapted influenza bivalent vaccine of type A for use in children: an epidemiological control trial.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, G I; Budilovsky, G N; Koval, T A; Polezhaev, F I; Garmashova, L M; Ghendon YuZ; Romanova, Y R; Smorodintsev, A A

    1986-06-01

    Live cold-adapted recombinant bivalent vaccine of influenza type A was studied in a controlled field trial in 1982-1983 among nearly 30,000 children 3-15 years old. The bivalent vaccine consisted of recombinants 47/25/1 (H1N1) and 47/7/2 (H3N2) of wild-type viruses A/Brazil/11/78 (H1N1) and A/Bangkok/1/79 (H3N2) with cold-adapted donor A/Leningrad/134/47/57 (H2N2). The recombinants which received mutant nonglycoprotein genes from cold-adapted donor did not suppress each other after simultaneous inoculation of children and stimulated antibody response to both strains. The bivalent vaccine was completely attenuated for children. It caused less than 1% transient febrile reactions during five days after the first vaccination, including double seronegative individuals with low antibody titres to both vaccinal strains. The cold-adapted bivalent vaccine tested proved to be safe for children according to the analysis of morbidity studies among vaccines and a control group performed during the five days and the following six months after the first immunization. There is a similar distribution of non-influenza illnesses and a statistically significant decrease in influenza-like diseases among vaccines compared to the control group. In the four months after the immunization programme was completed, epidemics of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 occurred. The incidence of influenza-like diseases was approximately 50% less in the vaccinated than in the control groups. This is the first evidence of safety and protective efficacy of recombinant live influenza vaccine for children 3-15 years of age.

  10. Replication of live attenuated cold-adapted H2N2 influenza virus vaccine candidates in non human primates.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Andrew J; Santos, Celia P; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lu, Janine; Chen, Zhongying; Jin, Hong; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    The development of an H2N2 vaccine is a priority in pandemic preparedness planning. We previously showed that a single dose of a cold-adapted (ca) H2N2 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) based on the influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) virus was immunogenic and efficacious in mice and ferrets. However, in a Phase I clinical trial, viral replication was restricted and immunogenicity was poor. In this study, we compared the replication of four H2N2 LAIV candidate viruses, AA ca, A/Tecumseh/3/67 (TEC67 ca), and two variants of A/Japan/305/57 (JAP57 ca) in three non-human primate (NHP) species: African green monkeys (AGM), cynomolgus macaques (CM) and rhesus macaques (RM). One JAP57 ca virus had glutamine and glycine at HA amino acid positions 226 and 228 (Q-G) that binds to α2-3 linked sialic acids, and one had leucine and serine that binds to α2-3 and α2-6 linked residues (L-S). The replication of all ca viruses was restricted, with low titers detected in the upper respiratory tract of all NHP species, however replication was detected in significantly more CMs than AGMs. The JAP57 ca Q-G and TEC67 ca viruses replicated in a significantly higher percentage of NHPs than the AA ca virus, with the TEC67 ca virus recovered from the greatest percentage of animals. Altering the receptor specificity of the JAP57 ca virus from α2-3 to both α2-3 and α2-6 linked sialic acid residues did not significantly increase the number of animals infected or the titer to which the virus replicated. Taken together, our data show that in NHPs the AA ca virus more closely reflects the human experience than mice or ferret studies. We suggest that CMs and RMs may be the preferred species for evaluating H2N2 LAIV viruses, and the TEC67 ca virus may be the most promising H2N2 LAIV candidate for further evaluation.

  11. Replication of live attenuated cold-adapted H2N2 influenza virus vaccine candidates in non human primates

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Andrew J.; Santos, Celia P.; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lu, Janine; Chen, Zhongying; Jin, Hong; Subbarao, Kanta

    2014-01-01

    The development of an H2N2 vaccine is a priority in pandemic preparedness planning. We previously showed that a single dose of a cold-adapted (ca) H2N2 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) based on the influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) virus was immunogenic and efficacious in mice and ferrets. However, in a Phase I clinical trial, viral replication was restricted and immunogenicity was poor. In this study, we compared the replication of four H2N2 LAIV candidate viruses, AA ca, A/Tecumseh/3/67 (TEC67 ca), and two variants of A/Japan/305/57 (JAP57 ca) in three non-human primate (NHP) species: African green monkeys (AGM), cynomolgus macaques (CM) and rhesus macaques (RM). One JAP57 ca virus had glutamine and glycine at HA amino acid positions 226 and 228 (Q-G) that binds to α2-3 linked sialic acids, and one had leucine and serine that binds to α2-3 and α2-6 linked residues (L-S). The replication of all ca viruses was restricted, with low titers detected in the upper respiratory tract of all NHP species, however replication was detected in significantly more CMs than AGMs. The JAP57 ca Q-G and TEC67 ca viruses replicated in a significantly higher percentage of NHPs than the AA ca virus, with the TEC67 ca virus recovered from the greatest percentage of animals. Altering the receptor specificity of the JAP57 ca virus from α2-3 to both α2-3 and α2-6 linked sialic acid residues did not significantly increase the number of animals infected or the titer to which the virus replicated. Taken together, our data show that in NHPs the AA ca virus more closely reflects the human experience than mice or ferret studies. We suggest that CMs and RMs may be the preferred species for evaluating H2N2 LAIV viruses, and the TEC67 ca virus may be the most promising H2N2 LAIV candidate for further evaluation. PMID:25444799

  12. Advantage of live attenuated cold-adapted influenza A virus over inactivated vaccine for A/Washington/80 (H3N2) wild-type virus infection.

    PubMed

    Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Murphy, B R

    1984-03-31

    The efficacy of live attenuated cold-adapted (ca) reassortant influenza virus vaccine against experimental challenge with homologous wild-type virus 5 to 8 weeks after vaccination was compared with that of licensed inactivated vaccine in 81 seronegative (haemagglutination-inhibition antibody titre less than or equal to 1:8) college students. At a dose of 10(7.5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) (70 HID50, human 50% infectious doses) the live virus vaccine, given intranasally, completely protected against illness caused by wild-type virus, whereas the inactivated vaccine, administered intramuscularly, provided 72% protection. Wild-type virus was recovered from only 13% of live virus vaccinees (10(7.5) TCID50 dose of ca virus) compared with 63% of inactivated virus vaccinees and the few infected live virus vaccinees shed 1000 times less wild-type virus than did infected inactivated virus vaccinees or unvaccinated controls. This striking reduction in virus shedding suggests that influenza transmission may be more efficiently interrupted with live than with inactivated virus vaccination.

  13. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  14. A live attenuated cold-adapted influenza A H7N3 virus vaccine provides protection against homologous and heterologous H7 viruses in mice and ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Tomy; McAuliffe, Josephine; Lu, Bin; Vogel, Leatrice; Swayne, David; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2008-08-15

    The appearance of human infections caused by avian influenza A H7 subtype viruses underscores their pandemic potential and the need to develop vaccines to protect humans from viruses of this subtype. A live attenuated H7N3 virus vaccine was generated by reverse genetics using the HA and NA genes of a low pathogenicity A/chicken/BC/CN-6/04 (H7N3) virus and the six internal protein genes of the cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca (H2N2) virus. The reassortant H7N3 BC 04 ca vaccine virus was temperature sensitive and showed attenuation in mice and ferrets. Intranasal immunization with one dose of the vaccine protected mice and ferrets when challenged with homologous and heterologous H7 viruses. The reassortant H7N3 BC 04 ca vaccine virus showed comparable levels of attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy in mice and ferret models. The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this vaccine in mice and ferrets support the evaluation of this vaccine in clinical trials.

  15. Duration of the protective immune response after prime and booster vaccination of yearlings with a live modified cold-adapted viral vaccine against equine influenza.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, K; Kydyrbayev, Zh; Ryskeldinova, Sh; Assanzhanova, N; Sansyzbay, A

    2014-05-23

    We previously created a live vaccine against equine influenza based the new reassortant cold-adapted (Ca) strain A/HK/Otar/6:2/2010. The live vaccine contains surface proteins (HA, NA) from the wild-type virus A/equine/Otar/764/2007 (Н3N8; American Lineage Florida Clade 2), and internal proteins (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, NS) from the attenuated Ca donor virus A/Hong Kong/1/68/162/35CA (H3N2). To determine the safety and duration of the protective immune responses, 90 yearlings were intranasally vaccinated in single mode, double mode at an interval of 42 days (10(7.0) EID50/animal for both vaccinations), or with PBS (control group). Ten animals from each group were challenged with the homologous wild-type virus A/equine/Otar/764/07 (Н3N8) at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 12 months after vaccination. Similarly, 10 animals from each group were challenged with the heterologous wild-type virus A/equine/Sydney/2888-8/07 (Н3N8; American Lineage Florida Clade 1) 12 months after vaccination. The vaccine was completely safe, and single intranasal vaccination of yearlings was capable of inducing statistically significant (from P=0.03 to P<0.0001) clinical and virological protection against the homologous virus; however, only double mode vaccination generated significant (from P=0.02 to P<0.0001) protection against the heterologous virus at 12 months (observation period). Interestingly, this vaccine enables the differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. On this basis of this study, we recommend double intranasal administration of this vaccine at an interval of 42 days in veterinary practice.

  16. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of cold-adapted X-31 live attenuated pre-pandemic H5N1 influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Jung, Eun-Ju; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Eun-Young; Lee, Yoon Jae; Seong, Baik Lin

    2013-07-18

    Despite global efforts to control influenza viruses, they have taken a heavy toll on human public health worldwide. Among particular threats is highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza virus (HPAI) due to not only its high mortality in humans but also possible human-to-human transmission either through reassortment with other human influenza viruses such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, or by genetic mutations. With the aim of developing effective vaccines against the H5N1 viruses, we generated two live attenuated H5N1 vaccine candidates against A/Indonesia/05/2005 (clade 2.1) and A/chicken/Korea/ES/2003 (clade 2.5) strains, in the genetic background of the cold-adapted donor strain of X-31. In mice, a single dose of immunization with each of the two vaccines was highly immunogenic inducing high titers of serum viral-neutralizing and hemagglutinin-inhibiting antibodies against the homologous H5N1 strain. Furthermore, significant levels of cross-clade antibody responses were induced by the vaccines, suggesting a broad-spectrum cross-reactivity against the heterologous H5N1 strains. The immunizations provided solid protections against heterologous lethal challenges with H5N2 virus, significantly reducing the morbidity and challenge virus replications in the respiratory tracts. The robustness of the antibody responses against both the homologous and heterologous strains, together with efficient protection against the lethal H5N2 challenge, strongly support the protection against wild type H5N1 infections. These results could serve as an experimental basis for the development of safe and effective H5N1 pre-pandemic vaccines while further addressing the biosecurity concerns associated with H5N1 HPAI.

  17. The influence of the multi-basic cleavage site of the H5 hemagglutinin on the attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy of a live attenuated influenza A h5N1 cold-adapted vaccine virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recombinant live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) deltaH5N1 vaccine with a modified hemagglutinin (HA) and intact neuraminidase genes from A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) and the six remaining genome segments from A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) cold-adapted (AA ca) virus was attenuated in chickens, mice and fe...

  18. Safety of the trivalent, cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T) in children.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Pedro A

    2002-04-01

    The trivalent, cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T, FluMist, Aviron, Mountain View, CA) is a live attenuated influenza virus vaccine that is administered by nasal spray. CAIV-T is efficacious in preventing influenza virus infection. The vaccine was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for licensure in healthy children and adults. Universal immunization is being considered in children, and an effective vaccine with minimal adverse reactions is thus required. The published studies on the safety of CAIV-T in children reviewed in this article were clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conducted in children from 1975 to 1991, clinical trials from 1991 to 1993 sponsored by a cooperative agreement between NIH and Wyeth-Ayerst Research, and clinical trials from 1995 to the present sponsored by a cooperative agreement between NIH and Aviron. Safety assessments included the occurrence of: 1) specific influenza-like symptoms, unexpected symptoms, and use of medications within the first 10 days after vaccination; 2) acute illness and use of medication within 11 to 42 days postvaccination; 3) serious adverse events and rare events within 42 days after vaccination; 4) healthcare utilization within 14 days after vaccination; and 5) acute respiratory symptoms with annual sequential vaccine doses. CAIV-T was safe and well-tolerated. Transient, mild respiratory symptoms were observed in a minority (10%-15%) of children and primarily with the first CAIV-T dose. Vomiting and abdominal pain occurred in fewer than 2 percent of CAIV-T recipients. The gastrointestinal symptoms were mild and of short duration. An excess of illness or use of medication was not observed after the 10th day of vaccination. Sequential annual doses of CAIV-T were well-tolerated and not associated with increased reactogenicity. CAIV-T did not cause an increase in healthcare utilization. Thus CAIV-T is safe in healthy children and should complement the use of inactivated

  19. Comparison of live, attenuated H1N1 and H3N2 cold-adapted and avian-human influenza A reassortant viruses and inactivated virus vaccine in adults.

    PubMed

    Sears, S D; Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Maassab, H F; Murphy, B R; Snyder, M H

    1988-12-01

    The infectivity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of live, attenuated influenza A/Texas/1/85 (H1N1) and A/Bethesda/1/85 (H3N2) avian-human (ah) and cold-adapted (ca) reassortant vaccines were compared in 252 seronegative adult volunteers. The immunogenicity and efficacy of the H1N1 reassortant vaccine were also compared with those of the trivalent inactivated virus vaccine. Each reassortant vaccine was satisfactorily attenuated. The 50% human infectious dose was 10(4.9) for ca H1N1, 10(5.4) for ah H1N1, 10(6.4) for ca H3N2, and 10(6.5) TCID50 for ah H3N2 reassortant virus. Within a subtype, the immunogenicities of ah and ca vaccines were comparable. Five to seven weeks after vaccination, volunteers were challenged with homologous wild-type influenza A virus. The magnitude of shedding of virus after challenge was greater than 100-fold less in H1N1 vaccinees and greater than 10-fold less in H3N2 vaccinees compared with unimmunized controls. The vaccines were equally efficacious, as indicated by an 86%-100% reduction in illness. Thus, the ah A/Mallard/New York/6750/78 and the ca A/Ann Arbor/6/60 reassortant viruses are comparable.

  20. Different types of cold adaptation in humans.

    PubMed

    Makinen, Tiina Maria

    2010-06-01

    Human adaptation to cold may occur through acclimatization or acclimation and includes genetic, physiologic, morphological or behavioural responses. It has been studied in indigenous populations, during polar or ski expeditions, sporting activities, military training, in urban people, or under controlled conditions involving exposures to cold air or water. Although divergent results exist between the studies, the main cold adaptation responses are either insulative (circulatory adjustments, increase of fat layer) or metabolic (shivering or nonshivering thermogenesis) and may be positive (enhanced) or negative (blunted). The pattern of cold adaptation is dependent on the type (air, water) and intensity (continuous, intermittent) of the cold exposure. In addition, several individual factors like age, sex, body composition, exercise, diet, fitness and health modify the responses to cold. Habituation of thermal sensations to cold develops first, followed by cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrinological responses. If the repeated cold stimulus is discontinued, adaptation will gradually disappear. The functional significance of physiological cold adaptation is unclear, and some of the responses can even be harmful and predispose to cold injuries. The article summarises recent research information concerning with the thermoregulatory responses related to repeated exposures to cold (air or water), and also discusses the determinants of cold adaptation, as well as its functional significance.

  1. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cold-adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding how human cells in tissue culture adapt to hypothermia may aid in developing new clinical procedures for improved ischemic and hypothermic protection. Human coronary artery endothelial cells grown to confluence at 37°C and then transferred to 25°C become resistant over time to oxidative stress and injury induced by 0°C storage and rewarming. This protection correlates with an increase in intracellular glutathione at 25°C. To help understand the molecular basis of endothelial cold-adaptation, isolated proteins from cold-adapted (25°C/72 h) and pre-adapted cells were analyzed by quantitative proteomic methods and differentially expressed proteins were categorized using the DAVID Bioinformatics Resource. Results Cells adapted to 25°C expressed changes in the abundance of 219 unique proteins representing a broad range of categories such as translation, glycolysis, biosynthetic (anabolic) processes, NAD, cytoskeletal organization, RNA processing, oxidoreductase activity, response-to-stress and cell redox homeostasis. The number of proteins that decreased significantly with cold-adaptation exceeded the number that increased by 2:1. Almost half of the decreases were associated with protein metabolic processes and a third were related to anabolic processes including protein, DNA and fatty acid synthesis. Changes consistent with the suppression of cytoskeletal dynamics provided further evidence that cold-adapted cells are in an energy conserving state. Among the specific changes were increases in the abundance and activity of redox proteins glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which correlated with a decrease in oxidative stress, an increase in protein glutathionylation, and a recovery of reduced protein thiols during rewarming from 0°C. Increases in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase implicate a central role for the methionine-cysteine transulfuration pathway in increasing

  2. Comparative studies of infectivity, immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccines containing nucleoprotein from cold-adapted or wild-type influenza virus in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Korenkov, Daniil; Smolonogina, Tatiana; Tretiak, Tatiana; Donina, Svetlana; Rekstin, Andrey; Naykhin, Anatoly; Shcherbik, Svetlana; Pearce, Nicholas; Chen, Li-Mei; Bousse, Tatiana; Rudenko, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to improve an existing live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) by including nucleoprotein (NP) from wild-type virus rather than master donor virus (MDV). H7N9 LAIV reassortants with 6:2 (NP from MDV) and 5:3 (NP from wild-type virus) genome compositions were compared with regard to their growth characteristics, induction of humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and ability to protect mice against homologous and heterologous challenge viruses. Although, in general, the 6:2 reassortant induced greater cell-mediated immunity in C57BL6 mice than the 5:3 vaccine, mice immunized with the 5:3 LAIV were better protected against heterologous challenge. The 5:3 LAIV-induced CTLs also had better in vivo killing activity against target cells loaded with the NP366 epitope of recent influenza viruses. Modification of the genome of reassortant vaccine viruses by incorporating the NP gene from wild-type viruses represents a simple strategy to improve the immunogenicity and cross-protection of influenza vaccines. PMID:27829176

  3. Anti-Biofilm Activities from Marine Cold Adapted Bacteria Against Staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tilotta, Marco; Sannino, Filomena; Feller, Georges; Tutino, Maria L.; Artini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules. The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules. The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules and to test their

  4. Anti-Biofilm Activities from Marine Cold Adapted Bacteria Against Staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tilotta, Marco; Sannino, Filomena; Feller, Georges; Tutino, Maria L; Artini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world's economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules. The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules. The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules and to test their

  5. Highly phosphorylated core oligosaccharide structures from cold-adapted Psychromonas arctica.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Maria M; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Lindner, Buko; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tutino, Maria L; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2008-01-01

    Many cold habitats contain plenty of microorganisms that represent the most abundant cold-adapted life forms on earth. These organisms have developed a wide range of adaptations that involve the cell wall of the microorganism. In particular, bacteria enhance the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids of membrane lipids to maintain the membrane fluidity, but very little is known about the adaptational changes in the structure of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), the main constituent of the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical structure of these LPSs for insight into the temperature-adaptation mechanism. For this objective, the cold-adapted Psychromonas arctica bacterium, which lives in the arctic sea-water near Spitzbergen (Svalbard islands, Arctic) was cultivated at 4 degrees C. The lipooligosaccharides (LOSs) were isolated and analysed by means of chemical analysis and electrospray ionisation high-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The LOS was then degraded either by mild hydrazinolysis (O-deacylation) or with hot 4 M KOH (N-deacylation). Both products were investigated in detail by using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The core consists of a mixture of species that differ because of the presence of nonstoichiometric D-fructose and/or D-galacturonic acid units.

  6. Generation and protective efficacy of a cold-adapted attenuated avian H9N2 influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yandi; Qi, Lu; Gao, Huijie; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Sun, Yipeng; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    To prevent H9N2 avian influenza virus infection in chickens, a long-term vaccination program using inactivated vaccines has been implemented in China. However, the protective efficacy of inactivated vaccines against antigenic drift variants is limited, and H9N2 influenza virus continues to circulate in vaccinated chicken flocks in China. Therefore, developing a cross-reactive vaccine to control the impact of H9N2 influenza in the poultry industry remains a high priority. In the present study, we developed a live cold-adapted H9N2 influenza vaccine candidate (SD/01/10-ca) by serial passages in embryonated eggs at successively lower temperatures. A total of 13 amino acid mutations occurred during the cold-adaptation of this H9N2 virus. The candidate was safe in chickens and induced robust hemagglutination-inhibition antibody responses and influenza virus–specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune responses in chickens immunized intranasally. Importantly, the candidate could confer protection of chickens from homologous and heterogenous H9N2 viruses. These results demonstrated that the cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 virus would be selected as a vaccine to control the infection of prevalent H9N2 influenza viruses in chickens. PMID:27457755

  7. Selection of cold-adapted mutants of human rotaviruses that exhibit various degrees of growth restriction in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Y; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1994-01-01

    Group A human rotavirus strains D, Wa, DS-1, and P were originally recovered from children with diarrhea. In an attempt to attenuate virulent, wild-type human rotaviruses of major epidemiological importance for use in a live oral vaccine, two reference rotavirus strains, D and DS-1, and two laboratory-generated reassortants, Wa x DS-1 and Wa x P, were subjected to cold adaptation. Collectively, these viruses provide antigenic coverage for both of the clinically important rotavirus VP4 antigens and three of the four important rotavirus VP7 antigens. Mutants of each of these rotaviruses were selected during successive serial passage in primary African green monkey kidney cells at progressively lower suboptimal temperatures (30, 28, and 26 degrees C). The genotype of each mutant appeared to be indistinguishable from that of its wild-type, parental virus. The mutants recovered after 10 serial passages at 30 degrees C exhibited both temperature sensitivity of plaque formation (i.e., a ts phenotype) and the ability to form plaques efficiently at suboptimal temperature (i.e., a cold adaptation [ca] phenotype), in contrast to parental wild-type rotavirus. The succeeding set of 10 serial passages at 28 degrees C selected mutants that exhibited an increased degree of cold adaptation, and three of the mutants exhibited an associated increase in temperature sensitivity. Finally, in the case of three of the strains, the third successive serial passage series, which was performed at 26 degrees C, selected for mutants with an even greater degree of cold adaptation than the previous series and was associated with greater temperature sensitivity in one instance. It appeared that each of the viruses sustained a minimum of four to five mutations during the total selection procedure. The ultimate identification of candidate vaccine viruses that exhibit the desired level of attenuation, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy needed for immunoprophylaxis will require evaluation of

  8. Molecular and biological changes in the cold-adapted "master strain" A/AA/6/60 (H2N2) influenza virus.

    PubMed Central

    Herlocher, M L; Maassab, H F; Webster, R G

    1993-01-01

    The live cold-adapted (ca) A/AA/6/60 influenza vaccine is being commercially developed for worldwide use in children and is being used as a model for other live vaccines. Although it has been proven safe and immunogenic, the molecular basis of cold adaptation has never been determined. To identify sequence changes responsible for cold adaptation, we have compared the sequence of the master ca vaccine strain to its progenitor wild-type virus, wt A/AA/6/60 E2 (wt2). Only 4 nt differences encoding 2 aa differences were found in three gene segments. Computer-predicted RNA folds project different secondary structures between the ca and wt2 molecules based on the two silent differences between them. Genes coding for the acidic polymerase, matrix, and nonstructural proteins are identical between the two viruses. The few differences found in the ca A/AA/6/60 virus after its long stepwise passage at 25 degrees C in primary chicken kidney cells suggest that cold adaptation resulted in greater genetic stability for the highly variable RNA genome. PMID:8327480

  9. Anthranilate degradation by a cold-adapted Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Kim, Eungbin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-03-01

    An alpine soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25931 was characterized as eurypsychrophilic (both psychrophilic and mesotolerant) with a broad temperature range of 5-30 °C both for anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) degradation and concomitant cell growth. Two degradative gene clusters (antABC and catBCA) were detected from a fosmid clone in the PAMC 25931 genomic library; each cluster was confirmed to be specifically induced by anthranilate. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant AntABC (anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase, AntDO) converted anthranilate into catechol, exhibiting strict specificity toward anthranilate. Recombinant CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, C12O) from the organism was active over a broad temperature range (5-37 °C). However, CatA rapidly lost the enzyme activity when incubated at above 25 °C. For example, 1 h-preincubation at 37 °C resulted in 100% loss of enzyme activity, while a counterpart from mesophilic Pseudomonas putida mt-2 did not show any negative effect on the initial enzyme activity. These results suggest that CatA is a new cold-adapted thermolabile enzyme, which might be a product through the adaptation process of PAMC 25931 to naturally cold environments and contribute to its ability to grow on anthranilate there.

  10. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-12-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation.

  11. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-01-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation. PMID:27482926

  12. Genomic and Expression Analyses of Cold-Adapted Microorganisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakermans, Corien; Bergholz, Peter W.; Rodrigues, Debora F.; Vishnivetskaya, T.; Ayala-del-Río, Hector L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Contents 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Ecological evidence of bacterial adaptation to cold 7.2.1 Characteristics of cold environments and implications for microbial ecology 7.2.2 Ecological adaptation in Exiguobacterium spp. and Psychrobacter spp. 7.3 Gene Expression Responses to the Cold 7.3.1 Fundamentals of Gene Expression Responses to Cold 7.3.2 Acclimation for Life in Cold Habitats 7.3.2.1 Translation and Chaperone Proteins: Safeguarding the functional units of cellular physiology 7.3.2.2 Carbon and Energy metabolism: resource efficiency over long generation times 7.3.2.3 Amino Acid Biosynthesis: Species-specific responses to species-specific deficiencies 7.3.2.4 Compatible solutes: a concomitant response in cryoenvironments 7.3.2.5 Membrane fluidity: A major role in the overall metabolic rate at temperature 7.3.2.6 The cell wall at low temperature: A poorly understood growth rate determinant 7.3.2.7 Transporters: The balance between local nutrient uptake and depletion 7.3.2.8 Genome plasticity. The potential role of transposases and repeated sequences. 7.4 Protein adaptations to cold 7.4.1 The low temperature challenge 7.4.2 The stability activity relationship 7.4.3 Structural features of cold adapted enzymes. 7.4.4 Hydrophobic interactions 7.4.5 Electrostatic interactions 7.4.5.1 Arginine 7.4.5.2 Acidic residues 7.4.6 Structural elements 7.4.6.1 -helices and -sheets 7.4.6.2 Proline and Glycine 7.4.6.3 Disordered regions 7.5 Comparison of cold- and warm-adapted Exiguobacterium strains 7.5.1 Phylogeny reflects adaptations to environmental conditions 7.5.2 Genomic comparison of two strains 7.6 Summary and future directions

  13. Detection of cold-adapted vaccine-strain influenza virus using two commercial assays.

    PubMed

    Adam, E N; Morley, P S; Chmielewski, K E; Carman, J; Gonzales, G

    2002-07-01

    Because of the contagious nature of influenza virus it is necessary to identify infected individuals after the virus is introduced into a population. The aim of this study was to characterise influenza virus detection with commercially available assays after intranasal vaccinating horses with cold-adapted influenza virus. Seven horses were vaccinated and placed with 3 unvaccinated horses. Nasal secretion samples were evaluated using 2 antigen detection assays. All 10 horses were positive in the Flu OIA assay during the study period, but only one horse was positive on one sample using the Directigen Flu A assay. Horses were most likely to be positive during the first 3 days following vaccination, and several horses were intermittently positive for several days after this. Obtaining positive test results from nonvaccinated, incontact horses suggests they became infected with vaccine-strain virus that was shed by vaccinated horses. These results are important for the correct interpretation of influenza antigen detection tests in situations when this modified-live intranasal vaccine has been used.

  14. Efficacy of a cold-adapted, intranasal, equine influenza vaccine: challenge trials.

    PubMed

    Townsend, H G; Penner, S J; Watts, T C; Cook, A; Bogdan, J; Haines, D M; Griffin, S; Chambers, T; Holland, R E; Whitaker-Dowling, P; Youngner, J S; Sebring, R W

    2001-11-01

    A randomised, controlled, double-blind, influenza virus, aerosol challenge of horses was undertaken to determine the efficacy of a cold-adapted, temperature sensitive, modified-live virus, intranasal, equine influenza vaccine. Ninety 11-month-old influenza-naïve foals were assigned randomly to 3 groups (20 vaccinates and 10 controls per group) and challenged 5 weeks, 6 and 12 months after a single vaccination. Challenges were performed on Day 0 in a plastic-lined chamber. Between Days 1 and 10, animals were examined daily for evidence of clinical signs of influenza. Nasal swabs for virus isolation were obtained on Day 1 and Days 1 to 8 and blood samples for serology were collected on Days 1, 7 and 14. There was no adverse response to vaccination in any animal. Following challenge at 5 weeks and 6 months, vaccinates had significantly lower clinical scores (P = 0.0001 and 0.005, respectively), experienced smaller increases in rectal temperature (P = 0.0008 and 0.0007, respectively) and shed less virus (P<0.0001 and P = 0.03, respectively) over fewer days (P<0.0001 and P = 0.002, respectively) than did the controls. After the 12 month challenge, rectal temperatures (P = 0.006) as well as the duration (P = 0.03) and concentration of virus shed (P = 0.04) were significantly reduced among vaccinated animals. The results of this study showed that 6 months after a single dose of vaccine the duration and severity of clinical signs were markedly reduced amongst vaccinated animals exposed to a severe live-virus challenge. Appropriate use of this vaccine should lead to a marked reduction in the frequency, severity and duration of outbreaks of equine influenza in North America.

  15. Mechanism for stabilizing mRNAs involved in methanol-dependent methanogenesis of cold-adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2014-02-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5' UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5' UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5' UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5' UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15.

  16. Mechanism for Stabilizing mRNAs Involved in Methanol-Dependent Methanogenesis of Cold-Adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5′ UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5′ UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5′ UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5′ UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15. PMID:24317083

  17. Behavioral buffering of global warming in a cold-adapted lizard.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Zaida; Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-07-01

    Alpine lizards living in restricted areas might be particularly sensitive to climate change. We studied thermal biology of Iberolacerta cyreni in high mountains of central Spain. Our results suggest that I. cyreni is a cold-adapted thermal specialist and an effective thermoregulator. Among ectotherms, thermal specialists are more threatened by global warming than generalists. Alpine lizards have no chance to disperse to new suitable habitats. In addition, physiological plasticity is unlikely to keep pace with the expected rates of environmental warming. Thus, lizards might rely on their behavior in order to deal with ongoing climate warming. Plasticity of thermoregulatory behavior has been proposed to buffer the rise of environmental temperatures. Therefore, we studied the change in body and environmental temperatures, as well as their relationships, for I. cyreni between the 1980s and 2012. Air temperatures have increased more than 3.5°C and substrate temperatures have increased by 6°C in the habitat of I. cyreni over the last 25 years. However, body temperatures of lizards have increased less than 2°C in the same period, and the linear relationship between body and environmental temperatures remains similar. These results show that alpine lizards are buffering the potential impact of the increase in their environmental temperatures, most probably by means of their behavior. Body temperatures of I. cyreni are still cold enough to avoid any drop in fitness. Nonetheless, if warming continues, behavioral buffering might eventually become useless, as it would imply spending too much time in shelter, losing feeding, and mating opportunities. Eventually, if body temperature exceeds the thermal optimum in the near future, fitness would decrease abruptly.

  18. The lysozyme from insect (Manduca sexta) is a cold-adapted enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A.; Velazquez-Contreras, Enrique F.; Valenzuela-Soto, Elisa M.; Rojo-Dominguez, Arturo; Kanost, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymatic activity is dependent on temperature, although some proteins have evolved to retain activity at low temperatures at the expense of stability. Cold adapted enzymes are present in a variety of organisms and there is ample interest in their structure-function relationships. Lysozyme (E.C. 3.2.1.17) is one of the most studied enzymes due to its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria and is also a cold adapted protein. In this work the characterization of lysozyme from the insect Manduca sexta and its activity at low temperatures is presented. Both M. sexta lysozymes natural and recombinant showed a higher content of α-helix secondary structure compared to that of hen egg white lysozyme and a higher specific enzymatic activity in the range of 5−30 °C. These results together with measured thermodynamical activation parameters support the designation of M. sexta lysozyme as a cold adapted enzyme. Therefore, the insect recombinant lysozyme is feasible as a model for structure-function studies for cold-adapted proteins. PMID:17979817

  19. [Cloning and expression of endoglucanase of marine cold-adapted bacteria Pseudoalteromonas sp. MB-1].

    PubMed

    You, Yin-wei; Wang, Tian-hong

    2005-02-01

    The cold-adapted gram-negative rod bacterium MB-1 which could secret cellulase was screened from mud of the bottom of the Huanghai. According to the sequence of 16S rDNA, this bacterium screened was identified as one species of Pseudoalteromonas and was named as Pseudoalteromonas sp. MB-1. The gene celA encoding cold-adapted endogluanase was cloned and then jointed to pGEX-4T-1 to construct expression plasmid pGEX-celA which was expressed in E. coli BL21. Analysis to the supernatant of E. coli sonicate revealed that the concentration of GST-CelA was about 78.5 mg/L. Properties of the fusion enzyme of GST-CelA including the optimum temperature at 35 degrees C and the optimum pH about 7.2, showed that this fusion enzyme still belonged to cold-adapted enzyme and neutral enzyme. The result lays solid base for the fundamental theory and application research on cold-adapted cellulase from Pseudoalteromonas sp. MB-1.

  20. The Lysozyme from Insect (Manduca sexta) is a Cold-Adapted Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Sotelo-Mundo,R.; Lopez-Zavala, A.; Garcia-Orozco, K.; Arvizu-Flores, A.; Velazquez-Contreras, E.; Valenzuela-Soto, E.; Rojo-Dominguez, A.; Kanost, M.

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic activity is dependent on temperature, although some proteins have evolved to retain activity at low temperatures at the expense of stability. Cold adapted enzymes are present in a variety of organisms and there is ample interest in their structure-function relationships. Lysozyme (E.C. 3.2.1.17) is one of the most studied enzymes due to its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria and is also a cold adapted protein. In this work the characterization of lysozyme from the insect Manduca sexta and its activity at low temperatures is presented. Both M. sexta lysozymes natural and recombinant showed a higher content of {alpha}-helix secondary structure compared to that of hen egg white lysozyme and a higher specific enzymatic activity in the range of 5-30 {sup o}C. These results together with measured thermodynamic activation parameters support the designation of M. sexta lysozyme as a cold adapted enzyme. Therefore, the insect recombinant lysozyme is feasible as a model for structure-function studies for cold-adapted proteins.

  1. [Cold adaptation strategy in insects inhabiting central Yakutia].

    PubMed

    Li, N G; Averenskiĭ, A I

    2007-01-01

    Cold hardiness in 20 insect species living in extremely cold climate of Yakutia has been investigated for the first time. It was shown that the Yakutian insects prefer to use the strategy of freeze tolerance according to which they produce special substances initiating the freezing of hemolymph at high subzero temperatures. The presence of ice-nucleating agents in the haemolymph of insects belonging to the phylogenetic group of Lepidopteran was shown. We postulate that Pieris rapae may shift between the different cold hardiness strategies when they move from moderately cold regions to a more severe environment.

  2. Comparative Immunogenicities of Frozen and Refrigerated Formulations of Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine in Healthy Subjects▿

    PubMed Central

    Block, Stan L.; Reisinger, Keith S.; Hultquist, Micki; Walker, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    The frozen version of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV; FluMist) was compared with a newly licensed, refrigerated formulation, the cold-adapted influenza vaccine, trivalent (CAIV-T), for their immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability in healthy subjects 5 to 49 years of age. Eligible subjects were randomized 1:1 to receive CAIV-T or frozen LAIV. Subjects 5 to 8 years of age received two doses of vaccine 46 to 60 days apart; subjects 9 to 49 years of age received one dose of vaccine. Equivalent immunogenicities were defined as serum hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) geometric mean titer (GMT) ratios >0.5 and <2.0 for each of the three vaccine-specific strains. A total of 376 subjects 5 to 8 years of age and 566 subjects 9 to 49 years of age were evaluable. Postvaccination HAI GMT ratios were equivalent for CAIV-T and LAIV. The GMT ratios of CAIV-T/LAIV for the H1N1, H3N2, and B strains were 1.24, 1.02, and 1.00, respectively, for the 5- to 8-year-old age group and 1.14, 1.12, and 0.96, respectively, for the 9- to 49-year-old age group. Seroresponse/seroconversion rates (fourfold or greater rise) were similar in both age groups for each of the three vaccine strains. Within 28 days, the most frequent reactogenicity event in the CAIV-T and LAIV groups was runny nose/nasal congestion, which occurred at higher rates after dose 1 (44% and 42%, respectively) than after dose 2 (41% and 29%, respectively) in the 5- to 8-year-old group. Otherwise, the rates of adverse events (AEs) were similar between the treatment groups and the two age cohorts, with no serious AEs related to the study vaccines. The immunogenicities, reactogenicity events, and AEs were comparable for refrigerated CAIV-T and frozen LAIV. PMID:17724151

  3. Protein cold adaptation: Role of physico-chemical parameters in adaptation of proteins to low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahzade, Soheila; Sharifi, Fatemeh; Vaseghi, Akbar; Faridounnia, Maryam; Jahandideh, Samad

    2015-10-21

    During years 2007 and 2008, we published three papers (Jahandideh, 2007a, JTB, 246, 159-166; Jahandideh, 2007b, JTB, 248, 721-726; Jahandideh, 2008, JTB, 255, 113-118) investigating sequence and structural parameters in adaptation of proteins to low temperatures. Our studies revealed important features in cold-adaptation of proteins. Here, we calculate values of a new set of physico-chemical parameters and perform a comparative systematic analysis on a more comprehensive database of psychrophilic-mesophilic homologous protein pairs. Our obtained results confirm that psychrophilicity rules are not merely the inverse rules of thermostability; for instance, although contact order is reported as a key feature in thermostability, our results have shown no significant difference between contact orders of psychrophilic proteins compared to mesophilic proteins. We are optimistic that these findings would help future efforts to propose a strategy for designing cold-adapted proteins.

  4. [Gene cloning, expression and characterization of two cold-adapted lipases from Penicillium sp. XMZ-9].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaomei; Wu, Ningfeng; Fan, Yunliu

    2012-04-01

    Cold-adapted lipases are attractive biocatalysts that can be used at low temperatures as additives in food products, laundry detergents, and the organic synthesis of chiral intermediates. Cold-adapted lipases are normally found in microorganisms that survive at low temperatures. A fungi strain XMZ-9 exhibiting lipolytic activity was isolated from the soil of glaciers in Xinjiang by the screening plates using 1% tributyrin as the substrate and Victoria blue as an indicator. Based on morphological characteristics and phylogenetic comparisons of its 18S rDNA, the strain was identified as Penicillium sp. The partial nucleotide sequences of these two lipase related genes, LipA and LipB, were obtained by touchdown PCR using the degenerate primers designed according to the conservative domains of lipase. The full-length sequences of two genes were obtained by genome walking. The gene lipA contained 1 014 nucleotides, without any intron, comprising one open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 337 amino acids. The gene lipB comprised two introns (61 bp and 49 bp) and a coding region sequence of 1 122 bp encoding a polypeptide of 373 amino acids, cDNA sequences of both lipA and lipB were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant LipA was mostly expressed as inclusion bodies, and recovered lipase activity at low temperature after in vitro refolded by dilution. Differently, the recombinant LipB was expressed in the soluble form and then purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography Column. It showed high lipase activity at low temperature. These results indicated that they were cold-adapted enzymes. This study paves the way for the further research of these cold-adapted lipases for application in the industry.

  5. Recombinant cold-adapted trypsin I from Atlantic cod-expression, purification, and identification.

    PubMed

    Jónsdóttir, Gudrún; Bjarnason, Jón Bragi; Gudmundsdóttir, Agústa

    2004-01-01

    Atlantic cod trypsin I is a cold-adapted proteolytic enzyme exhibiting approximately 20 times higher catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) than its mesophilic bovine counterpart for the simple amide substrate BAPNA. In general, cold-adapted proteolytic enzymes are sensitive to autolytic degradation, thermal inactivation as well as molecular aggregation, even at temperatures as low as 18-25 degrees C which may explain the problems observed with their expression, activation, and purification. Prior to the data presented here, there have been no reports in the literature on the expression of psychrophilic or cold-adapted proteolytic enzymes from fish. Nevertheless, numerous cold-adapted proteolytic microbial enzymes have been successfully expressed in bacteria and yeast. This report describes successful expression, activation, and purification of the recombinant cod trypsin I in the His-Patch ThioFusion Escherichia coli expression system. The E. coli pThioHis expression vector used in the study enabled the formation of a fusion protein between a highly soluble fraction of HP-thioredoxin contained in the vector and the N-terminal end of the precursor form of cod trypsin I. The HP-thioredoxin part of the fusion protein binds to a metal-chelating ProBond column, which facilitated its purification. The cod trypsin I part of the purified fusion protein was released by proteolytic cleavage, resulting in concomitant activation of the recombinant enzyme. The recombinant cod trypsin I was purified to homogeneity on a trypsin-specific benzamidine affinity column. The identity of the recombinant enzyme was demonstrated by electrophoresis and chromatography.

  6. Cold-adapted tubulins in the glacier ice worm, Mesenchytraeus solifugus.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Lawrence J; Shain, Daniel H

    2008-11-01

    Glacier ice worms, Mesenchytraeus solifugus and related species, are the only known annelids that survive obligately in glacier ice and snow. One fundamental component of cold temperature adaptation is the ability to polymerize tubulin, which typically depolymerizes at low physiological temperatures (e.g., <10 degrees C) in most temperate species. In this study, we isolated two alpha-tubulin (Msalpha1, Msalpha2) and two beta-tubulin (Msbeta1, Msbeta2) subunits from an ice worm cDNA library, and compared their predicted amino acid sequences with homologues from other cold-adapted organisms (e.g., Antarctic fish, ciliate) in an effort to identify species-specific amino acid substitutions that contribute to cold temperature-dependent tubulin polymerization. Our comparisons and predicted protein structures suggest that ice worm-specific amino acid substitutions stabilize lateral contact associations, particularly between beta-tubulin protofilaments, but these substitutions occur at different positions in comparison with other cold-adapted tubulins. The ice worm tubulin gene family appears relatively small, comprising one primary alpha- and one primary beta-tubulin monomers, though minor isoforms and pseudogenes were identified. Our analyses suggest that variation occurs in the strategies (i.e., species-specific amino acid substitutions, gene number) by which cold-adapted taxa have evolved the ability to polymerize tubulin at low physiological temperatures.

  7. Cold-adapted organic solvent tolerant alkalophilic family I.3 lipase from an Antarctic Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Ganasen, Menega; Yaacob, Norhayati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Leow, Adam Thean Chor; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    Lipolytic enzymes with cold adaptation are gaining increasing interest due to their biotechnological prospective. Previously, a cold adapted family I.3 lipase (AMS8 lipase) was isolated from an Antarctic Pseudomonas. AMS8 lipase was largely expressed in insoluble form. The refolded His-tagged recombinant AMS8 lipase was purified with 23.0% total recovery and purification factor of 9.7. The purified AMS8 lipase migrated as a single band with a molecular weight approximately 65kDa via electrophoresis. AMS8 lipase was highly active at 30°C at pH 10. The half-life of AMS8 lipase was reported at 4 and 2h under the incubation of 30 and 40°C, respectively. The lipase was stable over a broad range of pH. It showed enhancement effect in its relative activity under the presence of Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) after 30min treatment. Heavy metal ions such as Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+) inhibited AMS8 activity. This cold adapted alkalophilic AMS lipase was also active in various organic solvent of different polarity. These unique properties of this biological macromolecule will provide considerable potential for many biotechnological applications and organic synthesis at low temperature.

  8. Cold adaptation: structural and functional characterizations of psychrophilic and mesophilic acetate kinase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Md Abul Kashem; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    Acetate kinase catalyzes the reversible magnesium-dependent phosphoryl transfer from ATP to acetate to form acetyl phosphate and ADP. Here, we report functional and some structural properties of cold-adapted psychrotrophic enzyme; acetate kinase with those from mesophilic counterpart in Escherichia coli K-12. Recombinant acetate kinase from Shewanella sp. AS-11 (SAK) and E. coli K-12 (EAK) were purified to homogeneity following affinity chromatography and followed by Super Q column chromatography as reported before [44]. Both purified enzymes are shared some of the common properties such as (similar molecular mass, amino acid sequence and similar optimum pH), but characterized shift in the apparent optimum temperature of specific activity to lower temperature as well as by a lower thermal stability compared with EAK. The functional comparisons reveal that SAK is a cold adapted enzyme, having a higher affinity to acetate than EAK. In the acetyl phosphate and ADP-forming direction, the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) for acetate was 8.0 times higher for SAK than EAK at 10 °C. The activity ratio of SAK to EAK was increased with decreasing temperature in both of the forward and backward reactions. Furthermore, the activation energy, enthalpy and entropy in both reaction directions that catalyzed by SAK were lower than those catalyzed by EAK. The model structure of SAK showed the significantly reduced numbers of salt bridges and cation-pi interactions as compared with EAK. These results suggest that weakening of intramolecular electrostatic interactions of SAK is involved in a more flexible structure which is likely to be responsible for its cold adaptation.

  9. The Antarctic Chlamydomonas raudensis: an emerging model for cold adaptation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Maxwell, Denis P; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2013-09-01

    Permanently cold habitats dominate our planet and psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in cold environments. Environmental adaptations unique to psychrophilic microorganisms have been thoroughly described; however, the vast majority of studies to date have focused on cold-adapted bacteria. The combination of low temperatures in the presence of light is one of the most damaging environmental stresses for a photosynthetic organism: in order to survive, photopsychrophiles (i.e. photosynthetic organisms adapted to low temperatures) balance temperature-independent reactions of light energy capture/transduction with downstream temperature-dependent metabolic processes such as carbon fixation. Here, we review research on photopsychrophiles with a focus on an emerging model organism, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241 (UWO241). UWO241 is a psychrophilic green algal species and is a member of the photosynthetic microbial eukaryote community that provides the majority of fixed carbon for ice-covered lake ecosystems located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The water column exerts a range of environmental stressors on the phytoplankton community that inhabits this aquatic ecosystem, including low temperatures, extreme shade of an unusual spectral range (blue-green), high salinity, nutrient deprivation and extremes in seasonal photoperiod. More than two decades of work on UWO241 have produced one of our most comprehensive views of environmental adaptation in a cold-adapted, photosynthetic microbial eukaryote.

  10. Diversity and bioprospecting of fungal communities associated with endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Valéria M; Furbino, Laura E; Santiago, Iara F; Pellizzari, Franciane M; Yokoya, Nair S; Pupo, Diclá; Alves, Tânia M A; Junior, Policarpo A S; Romanha, Alvaro J; Zani, Carlos L; Cantrell, Charles L; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2013-07-01

    We surveyed the distribution and diversity of fungi associated with eight macroalgae from Antarctica and their capability to produce bioactive compounds. The collections yielded 148 fungal isolates, which were identified using molecular methods as belonging to 21 genera and 50 taxa. The most frequent taxa were Geomyces species (sp.), Penicillium sp. and Metschnikowia australis. Seven fungal isolates associated with the endemic Antarctic macroalgae Monostroma hariotii (Chlorophyte) displayed high internal transcribed spacer sequences similarities with the psychrophilic pathogenic fungus Geomyces destructans. Thirty-three fungal singletons (66%) were identified, representing rare components of the fungal communities. The fungal communities displayed high diversity, richness and dominance indices; however, rarefaction curves indicated that not all of the fungal diversity present was recovered. Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6034 and Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6120, recovered from the endemic species Palmaria decipiens (Rhodophyte) and M. hariotii, respectively, yielded extracts with high and selective antifungal and/or trypanocidal activities, in which a preliminary spectral analysis using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicated the presence of highly functionalised aromatic compounds. These results suggest that the endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae of Antarctica shelter a rich, diversity and complex fungal communities consisting of a few dominant indigenous or mesophilic cold-adapted species, and a large number of rare and/or endemic taxa, which may provide an interesting model of algal-fungal interactions under extreme conditions as well as a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  11. Testing phylogeographic hypotheses in a Euro-Siberian cold-adapted leaf beetle with coalescent simulations.

    PubMed

    Mardulyn, Patrick; Mikhailov, Yuri E; Pasteels, Jacques M

    2009-10-01

    Few studies to date have investigated the impact of Pleistocene climatic oscillations on the genetic diversity of cold-adapted species. We focus on the geographic distribution of genetic diversity in a Euro-Siberian boreo-montane leaf beetle, Gonioctena pallida. We present the molecular variation from three independent gene fragments over the entire geographic range of this insect. The observed sequence variation identifies a genetic diversity hot spot in the Carpathian Mountains, in central Europe, which reveals the presence of (1) an ancestral refuge population or (2) a secondary contact zone in this area. Modeling of population evolution in a coalescent framework allowed us to favor the ancestral refuge hypothesis. These analyses suggest that the Carpathian Mountains served as a refuge for G. pallida, whereas the rest of the species distribution, that spans a large portion of Europe and Asia, experienced a dramatic reduction in genetic variation probably associated to bottlenecks and/or founder events. We estimated the time of isolation of the ancestral refuge population, using an approximate Bayesian method, to be larger than 90,000 years. If true, the current pattern of genetic variation in this cold-adapted organism was shaped by a climatic event predating by far the end of the last ice age.

  12. Cold adaptation improves the growth of seasonal influenza B vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuh; Schoofs, Peter; Anderson, David A; Tannock, Gregory A; Rockman, Steven P

    2014-05-01

    Gene reassortment has proved useful in improving yields of influenza A antigens of egg-based inactivated vaccines, but similar approaches have been difficult with influenza B antigens. Current regulations for influenza vaccine seed viruses limit the number of egg passages and as a result resultant yields from influenza B vaccine seed viruses are frequently inconsistent. Therefore, reliable approaches to enhance yields of influenza B vaccine seed viruses are required for efficient vaccine manufacture. In the present study three stable cold-adapted (ca) mutants, caF, caM and caB derived from seasonal epidemic strains, B/Florida/4/2006, B/Malaysia/2506/2004 and B/Brisbane/60/2008 were prepared, which produced high hemagglutinin antigen yields and also increased viral yields of reassortants possessing the desired 6:2 gene constellation. The results demonstrate that consistent improvements in yields of influenza B viruses can be obtained by cold adaptation following extended passage. Taken together, the three ca viruses were shown to have potential as donor viruses for the preparation of high-yielding influenza B vaccine viruses by reassortment.

  13. Diversity and bioprospecting of fungal communities associated with endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Valéria M; Furbino, Laura E; Santiago, Iara F; Pellizzari, Franciane M; Yokoya, Nair S; Pupo, Diclá; Alves, Tânia MA; S Junior, Policarpo A; Romanha, Alvaro J; Zani, Carlos L; Cantrell, Charles L; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2013-01-01

    We surveyed the distribution and diversity of fungi associated with eight macroalgae from Antarctica and their capability to produce bioactive compounds. The collections yielded 148 fungal isolates, which were identified using molecular methods as belonging to 21 genera and 50 taxa. The most frequent taxa were Geomyces species (sp.), Penicillium sp. and Metschnikowia australis. Seven fungal isolates associated with the endemic Antarctic macroalgae Monostroma hariotii (Chlorophyte) displayed high internal transcribed spacer sequences similarities with the psychrophilic pathogenic fungus Geomyces destructans. Thirty-three fungal singletons (66%) were identified, representing rare components of the fungal communities. The fungal communities displayed high diversity, richness and dominance indices; however, rarefaction curves indicated that not all of the fungal diversity present was recovered. Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6034 and Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6120, recovered from the endemic species Palmaria decipiens (Rhodophyte) and M. hariotii, respectively, yielded extracts with high and selective antifungal and/or trypanocidal activities, in which a preliminary spectral analysis using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicated the presence of highly functionalised aromatic compounds. These results suggest that the endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae of Antarctica shelter a rich, diversity and complex fungal communities consisting of a few dominant indigenous or mesophilic cold-adapted species, and a large number of rare and/or endemic taxa, which may provide an interesting model of algal–fungal interactions under extreme conditions as well as a potential source of bioactive compounds. PMID:23702515

  14. Efficacy of trivalent, cold-adapted, influenza virus vaccine against influenza A (Fujian), a drift variant, during 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Halloran, M Elizabeth; Piedra, Pedro A; Longini, Ira M; Gaglani, Manjusha J; Schmotzer, Brian; Fewlass, Charles; Herschler, Gayla B; Glezen, W Paul

    2007-05-16

    In the 2003-2004 influenza season, the predominant circulating influenza A (H3N2) virus in the United States was similar antigenically to A/Fujian/411/2002 (H3N2), a drift variant of A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2), the vaccine strain. That year, a field study of trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV-T) was conducted in Temple-Belton, Texas, as part of a larger community-based, non-randomized, open-label study in three communities that began in August 1998 [Gaglani MJ, Piedra PA, Herschler GB, Griffith ME, Kozinetz CA, Riggs MW, et al. Direct effectiveness of the trivalent, cold-adapted, influenza virus vaccine (CAIV-T) against the 2000-2001 influenza A (H1N1) and B epidemic in healthy children. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2004;158:65-73; Piedra PA, Gaglani MJ, Kozinetz CA, Herschler G, Riggs M, Griffith M, et al. Herd immunity in adults against influenza-related illnesses with use of the trivalent-live attenuated influenza vaccine (CAIV-T) in children. Vaccine 2005;23:1540-8; Piedra PA, Gaglani MJ, Riggs M, Herschler G, Fewlass C, Watts M, et al. Live attenuated influenza vaccine, trivalent, is safe in healthy children 18 months to 4 years, 5 to 9 years, and 10 to 18 years of age in a community-based, nonrandomized, open-label trial. Pediatrics 2005;116:397-407]. Participants were healthy children aged 5-18 years. The analysis here concerns 6403 children in the Scott & White Health Plan (SWHP) database living within zip codes of the Temple-Belton area, of whom 1706 received LAIV-T and 548 received trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) in 2003, 983 had been previously vaccinated in 1998-2001, but not in 2002-2003 or 2003, and 3166 had never been vaccinated. The main outcome measure was medically-attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Surveillance culture results were incorporated into the analysis to estimate efficacy against culture-confirmed influenza illness. Vaccine effectiveness of LAIV-T against MAARI was 26% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11, 39). Vaccine

  15. The cold adaptability of microorganisms with different carbon source in activated sludge treating synthetical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chuan; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2012-11-01

    The cold adaptability of microorganisms with different carbon source under 5°C was studied in activated sludge for treating synthetical wastewater. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis indicated contents of unsaturated fatty acids in cell membrane at 5°C were 13.66% and 24.96% higher for glucose and sodium acetate source than that at 25°C. PLFA biomarkers showed more Gram-negative bacteria enriched than Gram-positive bacteria in low-temperature activated sludge. The Shannon-Wiener diversity analysis demonstrated glucose fed reactor in low temperature had lower PLFA diversity index (1.21-1.30) than that at 25°C and sodium acetate source was reverse (1.08-0.69). The 16S rRNA analysis manifested certain microbes were considerably suitable for existence under cold environment, most of which belong to Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Metabolic cold adaptation in fishes occurs at the level of whole animal, mitochondria and enzyme.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Alton, Lesley A; Frappell, Peter B

    2012-05-07

    Metabolic cold adaptation (MCA), the hypothesis that species from cold climates have relatively higher metabolic rates than those from warm climates, was first proposed nearly 100 years ago and remains one of the most controversial hypotheses in physiological ecology. In the present study, we test the MCA hypothesis in fishes at the level of whole animal, mitochondria and enzyme. In support of the MCA hypothesis, we find that when normalized to a common temperature, species with ranges that extend to high latitude (cooler climates) have high aerobic enzyme (citrate synthase) activity, high rates of mitochondrial respiration and high standard metabolic rates. Metabolic compensation for the global temperature gradient is not complete however, so when measured at their habitat temperature species from high latitude have lower absolute rates of metabolism than species from low latitudes. Evolutionary adaptation and thermal plasticity are therefore insufficient to completely overcome the acute thermodynamic effects of temperature, at least in fishes.

  17. [Structural and functional reorganization of photosynthetic apparatus in cold adaptation of wheat plants].

    PubMed

    Venzhik, Ju V; Titov, D F; Talanova, V V; Miroslavov, E D; Koteeva, N K

    2012-01-01

    The structural and functional characteristics of the photosynthetic apparatus (PSA) and the cold resistance of wheat seedlings were studied during low-temperature adaptation. It has been established that large chloroplasts with thylakoid system of "sun type" forme in the mesophyll cells in the early hours of plants hardening. At the same time the functional reorganization of the PSA in the leaves of wheat occurs: content of pigments changes, stabilization of the pigment-protein complexes is observed, non-photochemical quenching of excess energy increases. The stabilization of photosynthesis during cold adaptation occurs due to structural and functional reorganization of the PSA. It is assumed that the reorganization of the PSA is a prerequisite for formation of increased cold resistance of leaf cells, and this, along with other physiological and biochemical changes occurring in cells and tissues of plants, allows the plants to survive in chilling.

  18. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; Codd, Rachel

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cold-adapted phenotype of NapA from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein homology model of NapA from S. gelidimarina and mesophilic homologue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six amino acid residues identified as lead candidates governing NapA cold adaptation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular-level understanding of designing cool-temperature in situ oxyanion sensors. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo-MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap{sub Sgel}) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap{sub Sput}) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap{sub Sgel} and Nap{sub Sput} occurred at 54.5 and 65 Degree-Sign C, respectively. When Nap{sub Sgel} was preincubated at 21-70 Degree-Sign C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54 Degree-Sign C, which suggested that Nap{sub Sgel} was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap{sub Sput}, did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20 Degree-Sign C, Nap{sub Sgel} reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap{sub Sput} did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap{sub Sgel} that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap{sub Sgel} cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap{sub Sgel} using a

  19. Characterisation of a cold adapted esterase and mutants from a psychotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Jingtao; Liu, Wenyu; Wang, Mingming; Han, Liang; Yang, Ruijin

    2016-07-13

    A cold-adapted esterase-producing strain named T1-39 was isolated from Glacier No.1, Tianshan, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The esterase (EstT1-39) secreted by this strain preferentially hydrolyzed esters of glycerol with short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Mutants of T1-39 were generated by the atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) method and screened for enhanced esterase activity. Among all the mutants, strain TB11 had 4.45-fold higher esterase productivity than T1-39, with high genetic stability over 10 generations of continuous cultivation. Maximum activity of EstT1-39 and EstTB11 was observed at 30°C, pH 9.0 and 25°C, pH 8.5, respectively. EstTB11 was thermally more stable (50°C for 1 hour) and active over a broader pH range than EstT1-39. EstTB11 also retained 38% of its maximal activity at 0°C and was found to be able to hydrolyze milk fats into short- and medium-chain fatty acids at 4°C. The characteristics of EstT1-39 made it a cold-adapted enzyme and the EstTB11 from the mutant, with its higher activity at lower temperatures, may be suitable for the production of aromas and flavors in the dairy industry. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Cloning, expression and structural stability of a cold-adapted ß-Galactosidase from Rahnella sp.R3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel gene was isolated for the first time from a psychrophilic gram-negative bacterium Rahnella sp.R3. It encoded a cold-adapted ß-galactosidase (R-ß-Gal). Recombinant R-ß-Gal was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), purified, and characterized. R-ß-Gal belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase fami...

  1. Structural insights into the cold adaptation of the photosynthetic pigment-protein C-phycocyanin from an Arctic cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Su, Hai-Nan; Wang, Qian-Min; Li, Chun-Yang; Li, Kang; Luo, Wei; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Xie, Bin-Bin

    2017-04-01

    The cold adaptation mechanism of phycobiliproteins, the major photosynthetic pigment-proteins in cyanobacteria and red algae, has rarely been studied. Here we reported the biochemical, structural, and molecular dynamics simulation study of the C-phycocyanin from Arctic cyanobacterial strain Pseudanabaena sp. LW0831. We characterized the phycobilisome components of LW0831 and obtained their gene sequences. Compared to the mesophilic counterpart from Arthrospira platensis (Ar-C-PC), LW0831 C-phycocyanin (Ps-C-PC) has a decreased thermostability (∆Tm of -16°C), one of the typical features of cold-adapted enzymes. To uncover its structural basis, we resolved the crystal structure of Ps-C-PC 1 at 2.04Å. Consistent with the decrease in thermostability, comparative structural analyses revealed decreased intra-trimer and inter-trimer interactions in Ps-C-PC 1, compared to Ar-C-PC. However, comparative molecular dynamics simulations indicated that Ps-C-PC 1 shows similar flexibilities to Ar-C-PC for both the (αβ)3 trimer and (αβ)6 hexamer. Therefore, the optimization mode is clearly different from cold-adapted enzymes, which usually have increased flexibilities. Detailed analyses demonstrated different optimization modes for the α and β subunits and it was revealed that hydrophobic interactions are key to this difference, though salt bridges, hydrogen bonds, and surface hydrophobicity are also involved. This study is the first report of the structure of cold-adapted phycobiliproteins and provides insights into the cold-adaptation strategies of non-enzyme proteins.

  2. Hot experience for cold-adapted microorganisms: temperature sensitivity of soil enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shibin; Razavidezfuly, Baharsadat; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    The temperature sensitivity of enzymes responsible for organic matter decomposition in cold environment soil, where warming is expected to be greatest is crucial. Based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Arrhenius function, we hypothesized that cold-adapted microorganisms will produce high efficient enzymes at cold temperatures (enzymes with lower apparent activation energy (Ea) at cold temperature ranges). To test our hypothesis, 30 g soil of Tibetan Plateau (4100 m a.s.l., annual temperature 2.4 °C) in 4 replicates were incubated for one month over a temperature range of 0-40 °C (with 5 °C steps) and determined the kinetic parameters of six enzymes involved in decomposing organics: cellobiohydrolase and β-glucosidase, which are commonly measured as enzymes responsible for consecutive stages of cellulose degradation; xylanase, which is responsible for breaking down hemicelluloses; acid phosphatase, which mineralizes organic P to phosphate by hydrolyzing phosphoric (mono) ester bonds under acidic conditions. Activities of leucine aminopeptidase and tyrosine aminopeptidase were analyzed to assess the hydrolysis of L-peptide bonds. The apparent activation energy varied between enzymes from 42 (phosphatase) to 54 (cellobiohydrolase) kJ mol-1 corresponding to the Q10 values of the enzyme reactions of 1.8-2.3. The increase of substrate affinity (Km) with temperature was gradual for most tested enzymes from 0-20 °C (enzymes involved in C cycle), (proteases) and 0-40 °C (phosphatase). However, within a high range of temperatures (25-40 °C) the hydrolytic activity was governed by enzymes with nearly constant substrate affinity. Overall, for enzymes involved in C cycle and proteases, a strong increase (30-40%) in Km at high temperatures (25 °C) reflects an expression of multiple isoenzymes each with different temperature optima and probable shift of microbial community. The general trend of catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) demonstrated a gradual increase with

  3. Expression of a cold-adapted fish trypsin in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Macouzet, Martin; Simpson, Benjamin K; Lee, Byong H

    2005-06-01

    Trypsin is a highly valuable protease that has many industrial and biomedical applications. The growing demand for non-animal sources of the enzyme and for trypsins with special properties has driven the interest to clone and express this protease in microorganisms. Reports about expression of recombinant trypsins show wide differences in the degree of success and are contained mainly in patent applications, which disregard the difficulties associated with the developments. Although the yeast Pichia pastoris appears to be the microbial host with the greatest potential for the production of trypsin, it has shown problems when expressing cold-adapted fish trypsins (CAFTs). CAFTs are considered of immense value for their comparative advantage over other trypsins in a number of food-processing and biotechnological applications. Thus, to investigate potential obstacles related to the production of CAFTs in P. pastoris, the cunner fish trypsin (CFT) was cloned in different Pichia expression vectors. The vectors were constructed targeting both internal and secreted expression and keeping the CFT native signal peptide. Western-blotting analysis confirmed the expression with evident differences for each construct, observing a major effect of the leader peptide sequence on the expression patterns. Immobilized nickel affinity chromatography yielded a partially purified recombinant CFT, which exhibited trypsin-specific activity after activation with bovine enterokinase.

  4. Are mountain habitats becoming more suitable for generalist than cold-adapted lizards thermoregulation?

    PubMed

    Ortega, Zaida; Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Mountain lizards are highly vulnerable to climate change, and the continuous warming of their habitats could be seriously threatening their survival. We aim to compare the thermal ecology and microhabitat selection of a mountain lizard, Iberolacerta galani, and a widely distributed lizard, Podarcis bocagei, in a montane area. Both species are currently in close syntopy in the study area, at 1,400 m above the sea level. We determined the precision, accuracy and effectiveness of thermoregulation, and the thermal quality of habitat for both species. We also compared the selection of thermal microhabitats between both species. Results show that I. galani is a cold-adapted thermal specialist with a preferred temperature range of 27.9-29.7 °C, while P. bocagei would be a thermal generalist, with a broader and higher preferred temperature range (30.1-34.5 °C). In addition, I. galani selects rocky substrates while P. bocagei selects warmer soil and leaf litter substrates. The thermal quality of the habitat is higher for P. bocagei than for I. galani. Finally, P. bocagei achieves a significantly higher effectiveness of thermoregulation (0.87) than I. galani (0.80). Therefore, these mountain habitat conditions seem currently more suitable for performance of thermophilic generalist lizards than for cold-specialist lizards.

  5. Expression, purification, and characterization of cold-adapted inorganic pyrophosphatase from psychrophilic Shewanella sp. AS-11.

    PubMed

    Ginting, Elvy Like; Iwasaki, Syouhei; Maeganeku, Chihiro; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of divalent cations, inorganic pyrophosphatase is activated to hydrolyze inorganic pyrophosphate to inorganic phosphate. Here, we clone, express, purify, and characterize inorganic pyrophosphatase from the psychrophilic Shewanella sp. AS-11 (Sh-PPase). The recombinant Sh-PPase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) at 20°C using pET16b as an expression vector and purified from the cell extracts by a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation and anion-exchange chromatography. Sh-PPase was found to be a family II PPase with a subunit molecular mass of 34 kD that preferentially utilizes Mn²⁺ over Mg²⁺ ions for activity. The functional characteristics of Sh-PPase, such as activity, temperature dependency, and thermal inactivation, were greatly influenced by manganese ions. Manganese ion activation increased the enzyme's activity at low temperatures; therefore, it was required to gain the cold-adapted characteristics of Sh-PPase.

  6. Reciprocal Influence of Protein Domains in the Cold-Adapted Acyl Aminoacyl Peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila

    PubMed Central

    Parravicini, Federica; Natalello, Antonino; Papaleo, Elena; De Gioia, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Lotti, Marina; Brocca, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Acyl aminoacyl peptidases are two-domain proteins composed by a C-terminal catalytic α/β-hydrolase domain and by an N-terminal β-propeller domain connected through a structural element that is at the N-terminus in sequence but participates in the 3D structure of the C-domain. We investigated about the structural and functional interplay between the two domains and the bridge structure (in this case a single helix named α1-helix) in the cold-adapted enzyme from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) using both protein variants in which entire domains were deleted and proteins carrying substitutions in the α1-helix. We found that in this enzyme the inter-domain connection dramatically affects the stability of both the whole enzyme and the β-propeller. The α1-helix is required for the stability of the intact protein, as in other enzymes of the same family; however in this psychrophilic enzyme only, it destabilizes the isolated β-propeller. A single charged residue (E10) in the α1-helix plays a major role for the stability of the whole structure. Overall, a strict interaction of the SpAAP domains seems to be mandatory for the preservation of their reciprocal structural integrity and may witness their co-evolution. PMID:23457536

  7. Are mountain habitats becoming more suitable for generalist than cold-adapted lizards thermoregulation?

    PubMed Central

    Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Mountain lizards are highly vulnerable to climate change, and the continuous warming of their habitats could be seriously threatening their survival. We aim to compare the thermal ecology and microhabitat selection of a mountain lizard, Iberolacerta galani, and a widely distributed lizard, Podarcis bocagei, in a montane area. Both species are currently in close syntopy in the study area, at 1,400 m above the sea level. We determined the precision, accuracy and effectiveness of thermoregulation, and the thermal quality of habitat for both species. We also compared the selection of thermal microhabitats between both species. Results show that I. galani is a cold-adapted thermal specialist with a preferred temperature range of 27.9–29.7 °C, while P. bocagei would be a thermal generalist, with a broader and higher preferred temperature range (30.1–34.5 °C). In addition, I. galani selects rocky substrates while P. bocagei selects warmer soil and leaf litter substrates. The thermal quality of the habitat is higher for P. bocagei than for I. galani. Finally, P. bocagei achieves a significantly higher effectiveness of thermoregulation (0.87) than I. galani (0.80). Therefore, these mountain habitat conditions seem currently more suitable for performance of thermophilic generalist lizards than for cold-specialist lizards. PMID:27280076

  8. Cold adaptation of the Antarctic haloarchaea Halohasta litchfieldiae and Halorubrum lacusprofundi.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy J; Liao, Yan; Ye, Jun; Kuchel, Rhiannon P; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2017-02-20

    Halohasta litchfieldiae represents ∼ 44% and Halorubrum lacusprofundi ∼ 10% of the hypersaline, perennially cold (≥ -20°C) Deep Lake community in Antarctica. We used proteomics and microscopy to define physiological responses of these haloarchaea to growth at high (30°C) and low (10 and 4°C) temperatures. The proteomic data indicate that both species responded to low temperature by modifying their cell envelope including protein N-glycosylation, maintaining osmotic balance and translation initiation, and modifying RNA turnover and tRNA modification. Distinctions between the two species included DNA protection and repair strategies (e.g. roles of UspA and Rad50), and metabolism of glycerol and pyruvate. For Hrr. lacusprofundi, low temperature led to the formation of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) as a storage compound with the process of PHA granule formation occurring by an unknown mechanism. Hrr. lacusprofundi also formed biofilms and synthesized high levels of Hsp20 chaperones. Hht. litchfieldiae was characterized by an active CRISPR system, and elevated levels of the core gene expression machinery, which contrasted markedly to the decreased levels of Hrr. lacusprofundi. These findings greatly expand the understanding of cellular mechanisms of cold adaptation in psychrophilic archaea, and provide insight into how Hht. litchfieldiae gains dominance in Deep Lake. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Williams, CM; Watanabe, M; Guarracino, MR; Ferraro, MB; Edison, AS; Morgan, TJ; Boroujerdi, AFB; Hahn, DA

    2015-01-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using NMR spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations. PMID:25308124

  10. Expression and purification of a cold-adapted group III trypsin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pálsdóttir, Helga Margrét; Gudmundsdóttir, Agústa

    2007-02-01

    The recently classified group III trypsins include members like Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) trypsin Y as well as seven analogues from other cold-adapted fish species. The eight group III trypsins have been characterized from their cDNAs and deduced amino acid sequences but none of the enzymes have been isolated from their native sources. This study describes the successful expression and purification of a recombinant HP-thioredoxin-trypsin Y fusion protein in the His-Patch ThioFusion Escherichia coli expression system and its purification by chromatographic methods. The recombinant form of trypsin Y was previously expressed in Pichia pastoris making it the first biochemically characterized group III trypsin. It has dual substrate specificity towards trypsin and chymotrypsin substrates and demonstrates an increasing activity at temperatures between 2 and 21 degrees C with a complete inactivation at 30 degrees C. The aim of the study was to facilitate further studies of recombinant trypsin Y by finding an expression system yielding higher amounts of the enzyme than possible in our hands in the P. pastoris system. Also, commercial production of trypsin Y will require an efficient and inexpensive expression system like the His-Patch ThioFusion E. coli expression system described here as the enzyme is produced in very low amounts in the Atlantic cod.

  11. Structural characterization of metal binding to a cold-adapted frataxin.

    PubMed

    Noguera, Martín E; Roman, Ernesto A; Rigal, Juan B; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Frataxin is an evolutionary conserved protein that participates in iron metabolism. Deficiency of this small protein in humans causes a severe neurodegenerative disease known as Friedreich's ataxia. A number of studies indicate that frataxin binds iron and regulates Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Previous structural studies showed that metal binding occurs mainly in a region of high density of negative charge. However, a comprehensive characterization of the binding sites is required to gain further insights into the mechanistic details of frataxin function. In this work, we have solved the X-ray crystal structures of a cold-adapted frataxin from a psychrophilic bacterium in the presence of cobalt or europium ions. We have identified a number of metal-binding sites, mainly solvent exposed, several of which had not been observed in previous studies on mesophilic homologues. No major structural changes were detected upon metal binding, although the structures exhibit significant changes in crystallographic B-factors. The analysis of these B-factors, in combination with crystal packing and RMSD among structures, suggests the existence of localized changes in the internal motions. Based on these results, we propose that bacterial frataxins possess binding sites of moderate affinity for a quick capture and transfer of iron to other proteins and for the regulation of Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, modulating interactions with partner proteins.

  12. Purification and characterization of cold-adapted beta-agarase from an Antarctic psychrophilic strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang; Hu, Qiushi; Li, Yuquan; Xu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular β-agarase was purified from Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21, a Psychrophilic agar-degrading bacterium isolated from Antarctic Prydz Bay sediments. The purified agarase (Aga21) revealed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with an apparent molecular weight of 80 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature of the agarase were 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively. However, it maintained as much as 85% of the maximum activities at 10 °C. Significant activation of the agarase was observed in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, K+; Ca2+, Na+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Sr2+ and EDTA inhibited the enzyme activity. The enzymatic hydrolyzed product of agar was characterized as neoagarobiose. Furthermore, this work is the first evidence of cold-adapted agarase in Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria and these results indicate the potential for the Antarctic agarase as a catalyst in medicine, food and cosmetic industries. PMID:26413048

  13. Cultivation of a novel cold-adapted nitrite oxidizing betaproteobacterium from the Siberian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Alawi, Mashal; Lipski, André; Sanders, Tina; Pfeiffer, Eva Maria; Spieck, Eva

    2007-07-01

    Permafrost-affected soils of the Siberian Arctic were investigated with regard to identification of nitrite oxidizing bacteria active at low temperature. Analysis of the fatty acid profiles of enrichment cultures grown at 4 degrees C, 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C revealed a pattern that was different from that of known nitrite oxidizers but was similar to fatty acid profiles of Betaproteobacteria. Electron microscopy of two enrichment cultures grown at 10 degrees C showed prevalent cells with a conspicuous ultrastructure. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes allocated the organisms to a so far uncultivated cluster of the Betaproteobacteria, with Gallionella ferruginea as next related taxonomically described organism. The results demonstrate that a novel genus of chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizing bacteria is present in polygonal tundra soils and can be enriched at low temperatures up to 17 degrees C. Cloned sequences with high sequence similarities were previously reported from mesophilic habitats like activated sludge and therefore an involvement of this taxon in nitrite oxidation in nonarctic habitats is suggested. The presented culture will provide an opportunity to correlate nitrification with nonidentified environmental clones in moderate habitats and give insights into mechanisms of cold adaptation. We propose provisional classification of the novel nitrite oxidizing bacterium as 'Candidatus Nitrotoga arctica'.

  14. Purification and Characterization of a Cold-Adapted Lipase from Oceanobacillus Strain PT-11

    PubMed Central

    Jiewei, Tian; Zuchao, Lei; Peng, Qiu; Lei, Wang; Yongqiang, Tian

    2014-01-01

    We isolated a moderately halophilic lipase-producing bacterium from the saline soil. Based on the morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analysis, the isolate PT-11 was postulated to be a novel species identified as Oceanobacillus rekensis PT-11. The lipase was purified 2.50-fold by Q-Sepharose FF and SP-Sepharose FF chromatography and its molecular mass was estimated to be 23.5 kDa by SDS-PAGE. It was highly active over the broad temperature ranging from 10 to 35°C and showed up to 80% of the maximum activity at 10°C indicating the lipase to be a typical cold-adapted enzyme. The enzyme activity was slightly enhanced by Na+, Li+ and K+. Incubation with detergents, such as Tween-20 and Tween-80, slightly inhibited the enzyme activity; while Triton X-100decreased the enzyme activity. The enzyme was fairly stable in the presence of long-chain alcohols but was highly denatured in hydrophilic solvents such as acetone or short-chain alcohols (C1–C3). PMID:24984141

  15. Cold adaptation generates mutations associated with the growth of influenza B vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuh; Velkov, Tony; Camuglia, Sarina; Rockman, Steven P; Tannock, Gregory A

    2015-10-26

    Seasonal inactivated influenza vaccines are usually trivalent or quadrivalent and are prepared from accredited seed viruses. Yields of influenza A seed viruses can be enhanced by gene reassortment with high-yielding donor strains, but similar approaches for influenza B seed viruses have been largely unsuccessful. For vaccine manufacture influenza B seed viruses are usually adapted for high-growth by serial passage. Influenza B antigen yields so obtained are often unpredictable and selection of influenza B seed viruses by this method can be a rate-limiting step in seasonal influenza vaccine manufacture. We recently have shown that selection of stable cold-adapted mutants from seasonal epidemic influenza B viruses is associated with improved growth. In this study, specific mutations were identified that were responsible for growth enhancement as a consequence of adaptation to growth at lower temperatures. Molecular analysis revealed that the following mutations in the HA, NP and NA genes are required for enhanced viral growth: G156/N160 in the HA, E253, G375 in the NP and T146 in the NA genes. These results demonstrate that the growth of seasonal influenza B viruses can be optimized or improved significantly by specific gene modifications.

  16. Molecular determinants of enzyme cold adaptation: comparative structural and computational studies of cold- and warm-adapted enzymes.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena; Tiberti, Matteo; Invernizzi, Gaetano; Pasi, Marco; Ranzani, Valeria

    2011-11-01

    The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying enzyme cold adaptation is a hot-topic both for fundamental research and industrial applications. In the present contribution, we review the last decades of structural computational investigations on cold-adapted enzymes in comparison to their warm-adapted counterparts. Comparative sequence and structural studies allow the definition of a multitude of adaptation strategies. Different enzymes carried out diverse mechanisms to adapt to low temperatures, so that a general theory for enzyme cold adaptation cannot be formulated. However, some common features can be traced in dynamic and flexibility properties of these enzymes, as well as in their intra- and inter-molecular interaction networks. Interestingly, the current data suggest that a family-centered point of view is necessary in the comparative analyses of cold- and warm-adapted enzymes. In fact, enzymes belonging to the same family or superfamily, thus sharing at least the three-dimensional fold and common features of the functional sites, have evolved similar structural and dynamic patterns to overcome the detrimental effects of low temperatures.

  17. Novel cold-adaptive Penicillium strain FS010 secreting thermo-labile xylanase isolated from Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yun-Hua; Wang, Tian-Hong; Long, Hao; Zhu, Hui-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    A novel cold-adaptive xylanolytic Penicillium strain FS010 was isolated from Yellow sea sediments. The marine fungus grew well from 4 to 20 degrees; a lower (0 degrees) or higher (37 degrees) temperature limits its growth. The strain was identified as Penicillium chrysogenum. Compared with mesophilic P. chrysogenum, the cold-adaptive fungus secreted the cold-active xylanase (XYL) showing high hydrolytic activities at low temperature (2-15 degrees) and high sensitivity to high temperature (>50 degrees). The XYL gene was isolated from the cold-adaptive P. chrysogenum FS010 and designated as xyl. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by xyl showed high homology with the sequence of glycoside hydrolase family 10. The gene was subcloned into an expression vector pGEX-4T-1 and the encoded protein was overexpressed as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase in Escherichia coli BL21. The expression product was purified and subjected to enzymatic characterization. The optimal temperature and pH for recombinant XYL was 25 degrees and 5.5, respectively. Recombinant XYL showed nearly 80% of its maximal activity at 4 degrees and was active in the pH range 3.0-9.5.

  18. Metabolic cold adaptation contributes little to the interspecific variation in metabolic rates of 65 species of Drosophilidae.

    PubMed

    Messamah, Branwen; Kellermann, Vanessa; Malte, Hans; Loeschcke, Volker; Overgaard, Johannes

    2017-02-11

    Metabolic cold adaptation (MCA) is a controversial hypothesis suggesting that cold adapted species display an elevated metabolic rate (MR) compared to their warm climate relatives. Here we test for the presence of MCA in 65 species of drosophilid flies reared under common garden conditions. MR was measured at both 10 and 20°C for both sexes and data were analyzed in relation to the natural thermal environment of these species. We found considerable interspecific variation in MR ranging from 1.34 to 8.99µWmg(-1) at 10°C. As predicted by Bergmann's rule body mass of fly species correlated negatively with annual mean temperature (AMT), such that larger species were found in colder environments. Because larger flies have a higher total MR we found MR to vary with AMT, however, after inclusion of mass as a co-variate we found no significant effect of AMT. Furthermore, we did not find that thermal sensitivity of MR (Q10) varied with AMT. Based on this broad collection of species we therefore conclude that there is no adaptive pattern of metabolic cold adaptation within drosophilid species ranging from sub-arctic to tropical environments.

  19. Structural and functional characterization of a cold adapted TPM-domain with ATPase/ADPase activity.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, María L; Otero, Lisandro H; Smal, Clara; Pellizza, Leonardo; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Klinke, Sebastián; Aran, Martín

    2016-11-01

    The Pfam PF04536 TPM_phosphatase family is a broadly conserved family of domains found across prokaryotes, plants and invertebrates. Despite having a similar protein fold, members of this family have been implicated in diverse cellular processes and found in varied subcellular localizations. Very recently, the biochemical characterization of two evolutionary divergent TPM domains has shown that they are able to hydrolyze phosphate groups from different substrates. However, there are still incorrect functional annotations and uncertain relationships between the structure and function of this family of domains. BA41 is an uncharacterized single-pass transmembrane protein from the Antarctic psychrotolerant bacterium Bizionia argentinensis with a predicted compact extracytoplasmic TPM domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic low complexity region. To shed light on the structural properties that enable TPM domains to adopt divergent roles, we here accomplish a comprehensive structural and functional characterization of the central TPM domain of BA41 (BA41-TPM). Contrary to its predicted function as a beta-propeller methanol dehydrogenase, light scattering and crystallographic studies showed that BA41-TPM behaves as a globular monomeric protein and adopts a conserved Rossmann fold, typically observed in other TPM domain structures. Although the crystal structure reveals the conservation of residues involved in substrate binding, no putative catalytic or intramolecular metal ions were detected. Most important, however, extensive biochemical studies demonstrated that BA41-TPM has hydrolase activity against ADP, ATP, and other di- and triphosphate nucleotides and shares properties of cold-adapted enzymes. The role of BA41 in extracellular ATP-mediated signaling pathways and its occurrence in environmental and pathogenic microorganisms is discussed.

  20. Elucidation of different cold-adapted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) trypsin X isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Bjarki; Sandholt, Gunnar B; Gudmundsdottir, Ágústa

    2017-01-01

    Trypsins from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), consisting of several isoenzymes, are highly active cold-adapted serine proteases. These trypsins are isolated for biomedical use in an eco-friendly manner from underutilized seafood by-products. Our group has explored the biochemical properties of trypsins and their high potential in biomedicine. For broader utilization of cod trypsins, further characterization of biochemical properties of the individual cod trypsin isoenzymes is of importance. For that purpose, a benzamidine purified trypsin isolate from Atlantic cod was analyzed. Anion exchange chromatography revealed eight peaks containing proteins around 24kDa with tryptic activity. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, one isoenzyme gave the best match to cod trypsin I and six isoenzymes gave the best match to cod trypsin X. Amino terminal sequencing of two of these six trypsin isoenzymes showed identity to cod trypsin X. Three sequence variants of trypsin X were identified by cDNA analysis demonstrating that various forms of this enzyme exist. One trypsin X isoenzyme was selected for further characterization based on abundance and stability. Stepwise increase in catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of this trypsin X isoenzyme was obtained with substrates containing one to three amino acid residues. The study demonstrates that the catalytic efficiency of this trypsin X isoenzyme is comparable to that of cod trypsin I, the most abundant and highly active isoenzyme in the benzamidine cod trypsin isolate. Differences in pH stability and sensitivity to inhibitors of the trypsin X isoenzyme compared to cod trypsin I were detected that may be important for practical use.

  1. Aerobic and Anaerobic Thiosulfate Oxidation by a Cold-Adapted, Subglacial Chemoautotroph

    PubMed Central

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Desch, Libby; Amada, Kirina; van Gelder, Will; Glover, Kevin; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical data indicate that protons released during pyrite (FeS2) oxidation are important drivers of mineral weathering in oxic and anoxic zones of many aquatic environments, including those beneath glaciers. Oxidation of FeS2 under oxic, circumneutral conditions proceeds through the metastable intermediate thiosulfate (S2O32−), which represents an electron donor capable of supporting microbial metabolism. Subglacial meltwaters sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canada, over a seasonal melt cycle revealed concentrations of S2O32− that were typically below the limit of detection, despite the presence of available pyrite and concentrations of the FeS2 oxidation product sulfate (SO42−) several orders of magnitude higher than those of S2O32−. Here we report on the physiological and genomic characterization of the chemolithoautotrophic facultative anaerobe Thiobacillus sp. strain RG5 isolated from the subglacial environment at RG. The RG5 genome encodes genes involved with pathways for the complete oxidation of S2O32−, CO2 fixation, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration with nitrite or nitrate. Growth experiments indicated that the energy required to synthesize a cell under oxygen- or nitrate-reducing conditions with S2O32− as the electron donor was lower at 5.1°C than 14.4°C, indicating that this organism is cold adapted. RG sediment-associated transcripts of soxB, which encodes a component of the S2O32−-oxidizing complex, were closely affiliated with soxB from RG5. Collectively, these results suggest an active sulfur cycle in the subglacial environment at RG mediated in part by populations closely affiliated with RG5. The consumption of S2O32− by RG5-like populations may accelerate abiotic FeS2 oxidation, thereby enhancing mineral weathering in the subglacial environment. PMID:26712544

  2. Genome-wide analysis of cold adaptation in indigenous Siberian populations.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Alexia; Pagani, Luca; Antao, Tiago; Lawson, Daniel J; Eichstaedt, Christina A; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Shwe, Ma Than Than; Wee, Joseph; Romero, Irene Gallego; Raj, Srilakshmi; Metspalu, Mait; Villems, Richard; Willerslev, Eske; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Kivisild, Toomas

    2014-01-01

    Following the dispersal out of Africa, where hominins evolved in warm environments for millions of years, our species has colonised different climate zones of the world, including high latitudes and cold environments. The extent to which human habitation in (sub-)Arctic regions has been enabled by cultural buffering, short-term acclimatization and genetic adaptations is not clearly understood. Present day indigenous populations of Siberia show a number of phenotypic features, such as increased basal metabolic rate, low serum lipid levels and increased blood pressure that have been attributed to adaptation to the extreme cold climate. In this study we introduce a dataset of 200 individuals from ten indigenous Siberian populations that were genotyped for 730,525 SNPs across the genome to identify genes and non-coding regions that have undergone unusually rapid allele frequency and long-range haplotype homozygosity change in the recent past. At least three distinct population clusters could be identified among the Siberians, each of which showed a number of unique signals of selection. A region on chromosome 11 (chr11:66-69 Mb) contained the largest amount of clustering of significant signals and also the strongest signals in all the different selection tests performed. We present a list of candidate cold adaption genes that showed significant signals of positive selection with our strongest signals associated with genes involved in energy regulation and metabolism (CPT1A, LRP5, THADA) and vascular smooth muscle contraction (PRKG1). By employing a new method that paints phased chromosome chunks by their ancestry we distinguish local Siberian-specific long-range haplotype signals from those introduced by admixture.

  3. Diversity and cold adaptation of microorganisms isolated from the Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojib, Nazia; Bej, Asim K.; Hoover, Richard

    2008-08-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of the PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from eubacteria and Archea on samples collected on Whatman FTA filters from Schirmacher Oasis for the study of culture-independent analysis of the microbial diversity. Both conventional PCR and real-time TaqmaTM PCR successfully amplified the targeted genes. A number of diverse groups of psychrotolerant microorganisms with various pigments have been isolated when cultured on agar medium. 16S rRNA gene analysis of these isolates helped us to identify closest taxonomic genus Pseudomonas, Frigoribacterium, Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, and Janthinobacterium. It is possible that the pigments play protective role from solar UV radiation, which is prevalent in Antarctic continent especially during Austral summer months. Study of the expression of cold adaptive protein CapB and ice-binding protein IBP using western blots showed positive detection of both or either of these proteins in 6 out of 8 isolates. Since the CapB and IBP protein structure greatly varies in microorganisms, it is possible that the 2 isolates with negative results could have a different class of these proteins. The expression of the CapB and the IBP in these isolates suggest that these proteins are essential for the survival in the Antarctic cold and subzero temperatures and protect themselves from freeze-damage. The current study provided sufficient data to further investigate the rich and diverse biota of psychrotolerant extremophiles in the Antarctic Schirmacher Oasis using both culture-independent and culture-based approaches; and understand the mechanisms of cold tolerance.

  4. Aerobic and Anaerobic Thiosulfate Oxidation by a Cold-Adapted, Subglacial Chemoautotroph.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Zoë R; Skidmore, Mark L; Hamilton, Trinity L; Desch, Libby; Amada, Kirina; van Gelder, Will; Glover, Kevin; Roden, Eric E; Boyd, Eric S

    2015-12-28

    Geochemical data indicate that protons released during pyrite (FeS2) oxidation are important drivers of mineral weathering in oxic and anoxic zones of many aquatic environments, including those beneath glaciers. Oxidation of FeS2 under oxic, circumneutral conditions proceeds through the metastable intermediate thiosulfate (S2O3 (2-)), which represents an electron donor capable of supporting microbial metabolism. Subglacial meltwaters sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canada, over a seasonal melt cycle revealed concentrations of S2O3 (2-) that were typically below the limit of detection, despite the presence of available pyrite and concentrations of the FeS2 oxidation product sulfate (SO4 (2-)) several orders of magnitude higher than those of S2O3 (2-). Here we report on the physiological and genomic characterization of the chemolithoautotrophic facultative anaerobe Thiobacillus sp. strain RG5 isolated from the subglacial environment at RG. The RG5 genome encodes genes involved with pathways for the complete oxidation of S2O3 (2-), CO2 fixation, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration with nitrite or nitrate. Growth experiments indicated that the energy required to synthesize a cell under oxygen- or nitrate-reducing conditions with S2O3 (2-) as the electron donor was lower at 5.1°C than 14.4°C, indicating that this organism is cold adapted. RG sediment-associated transcripts of soxB, which encodes a component of the S2O3 (2-)-oxidizing complex, were closely affiliated with soxB from RG5. Collectively, these results suggest an active sulfur cycle in the subglacial environment at RG mediated in part by populations closely affiliated with RG5. The consumption of S2O3 (2-) by RG5-like populations may accelerate abiotic FeS2 oxidation, thereby enhancing mineral weathering in the subglacial environment.

  5. Expression and biochemical characterization of cold-adapted lipases from Antarctic Bacillus pumilus strains.

    PubMed

    Litantra, Ribka; Lobionda, Stefani; Yim, Joung Han; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2013-09-28

    Two lipase genes (bpl1 and bpl3) from Antarctic Bacillus pumilus strains were expressed in Bacillus subtilis. Both recombinant lipases BPL1 and BPL2 were secreted to the culture medium and their activities reached 3.5 U/ml and 5.0 U/ml, respectively. Their molecular masses apparent using SDS-PAGE were 23 kDa for BPL1 and 19 kDa for BPL3. Both lipases were purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation and HiTrap SP FF column and Superose 12 column chromatographies. The final specific activities were estimated to be 328 U/mg for BPL1 and 310 U/mg for BPL3. Both lipases displayed an optimum temperature of 35°C, similar to other mesophilic enzymes. However, they maintained as much as 70% and 80% of the maximum activities at 10°C. Accordingly, their calculated activation energy at a temperature range of 10-35°C was 5.32 kcal/mol for BPL1 and 4.26 kcal/mol for BPL3, typical of cold-adapted enzymes. The optimum pH of BPL1 and BPL3 was 8.5 and 8.0, respectively, and they were quite stable at pH 7.0-11.0, showing their strong alkaline tolerance. Both lipases had a preference toward medium chain length (C6-C10) fatty acid substrates. These results indicate the potential for the two Antarctic B. pumilus lipases as catalysts in bioorganic synthesis, food, and detergent industries.

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Cold Adaptation in Indigenous Siberian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Alexia; Pagani, Luca; Antao, Tiago; Lawson, Daniel J.; Eichstaedt, Christina A.; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Shwe, Ma Than Than; Wee, Joseph; Romero, Irene Gallego; Raj, Srilakshmi; Metspalu, Mait; Villems, Richard; Willerslev, Eske; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Malyarchuk, Boris A.; Derenko, Miroslava V.; Kivisild, Toomas

    2014-01-01

    Following the dispersal out of Africa, where hominins evolved in warm environments for millions of years, our species has colonised different climate zones of the world, including high latitudes and cold environments. The extent to which human habitation in (sub-)Arctic regions has been enabled by cultural buffering, short-term acclimatization and genetic adaptations is not clearly understood. Present day indigenous populations of Siberia show a number of phenotypic features, such as increased basal metabolic rate, low serum lipid levels and increased blood pressure that have been attributed to adaptation to the extreme cold climate. In this study we introduce a dataset of 200 individuals from ten indigenous Siberian populations that were genotyped for 730,525 SNPs across the genome to identify genes and non-coding regions that have undergone unusually rapid allele frequency and long-range haplotype homozygosity change in the recent past. At least three distinct population clusters could be identified among the Siberians, each of which showed a number of unique signals of selection. A region on chromosome 11 (chr11:66–69 Mb) contained the largest amount of clustering of significant signals and also the strongest signals in all the different selection tests performed. We present a list of candidate cold adaption genes that showed significant signals of positive selection with our strongest signals associated with genes involved in energy regulation and metabolism (CPT1A, LRP5, THADA) and vascular smooth muscle contraction (PRKG1). By employing a new method that paints phased chromosome chunks by their ancestry we distinguish local Siberian-specific long-range haplotype signals from those introduced by admixture. PMID:24847810

  7. Cold adaptation mechanisms in the ghost moth Hepialus xiaojinensis: Metabolic regulation and thermal compensation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xuan; Meng, Qian; Shu, Ruihao; Wang, Menglong; Zhou, Guiling; Wang, Hongtuo; Miao, Lin; Zhang, Jihong; Qin, Qilian

    2016-02-01

    Ghost moths (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae) are cold-adapted stenothermal species inhabiting alpine meadows on the Tibetan Plateau. They have an optimal developmental temperature of 12-16 °C but can maintain feeding and growth at 0 °C. Their survival strategies have received little attention, but these insects are a promising model for environmental adaptation. Here, biochemical adaptations and energy metabolism in response to cold were investigated in larvae of the ghost moth Hepialus xiaojinensis. Metabolic rate and respiratory quotient decreased dramatically with decreasing temperature (15-4 °C), suggesting that the energy metabolism of ghost moths, especially glycometabolism, was sensitive to cold. However, the metabolic rate at 4 °C increased with the duration of cold exposure, indicating thermal compensation to sustain energy budgets under cold conditions. Underlying regulation strategies were studied by analyzing metabolic differences between cold-acclimated (4 °C for 48 h) and control larvae (15 °C). In cold-acclimated larvae, the energy generating pathways of carbohydrates, instead of the overall consumption of carbohydrates, was compensated in the fat body by improving the transcription of related enzymes. The mobilization of lipids was also promoted, with higher diacylglycerol, monoacylglycerol and free fatty acid content in hemolymph. These results indicated that cold acclimation induced a reorganization on metabolic structure to prioritise energy metabolism. Within the aerobic process, flux throughout the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was encouraged in the fat body, and the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase was the likely compensation target. Increased mitochondrial cristae density was observed in the midgut of cold-acclimated larvae. The thermal compensation strategies in this ghost moth span the entire process of energy metabolism, including degration of metabolic substrate, TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, and from an energy budget

  8. The ability of a cold-adapted Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain from Tibet to control blue mold in pear fruit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Yan, Fujie; Wilson, Charles; Shen, Qing; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Cold-adapted yeasts were isolated from soil samples collected in Tibet and evaluated as potential biocontrol agents against blue mold (Penicillium expansum) of pear fruit in cold storage. YC1, an isolate identified as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, was found to exhibit the greatest biocontrol activity among the different isolates that were screened. A washed cell suspension of YC1 exhibited the best biocontrol activity among three different preparations that were used in the current study. A concentration of 10(8) cells/ml reduced the incidence of decay to 35 %, compared to the control where decay incidence was 100 %. A higher intracellular level of trehalose and a higher proportion of polyunsaturated acids present in YC1, was associated with increased the tolerance of this strain to low temperatures, relative to the other strains that were evaluated. The increased tolerance to low temperature allowed the YC1 strain of yeast to more effectively compete for nutrients and space in wounded pear fruit that had been inoculated with spores of P. expansum and placed in cold storage. The present study demonstrated the ability to select cold-adapted yeasts from cold climates and use them as biocontrol agents of postharvest diseases of fruit placed in cold storage.

  9. Total lactate dehydrogenase activity of tail muscle is not cold-adapted in nocturnal lizards from cool-temperate habitats.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Miller, J H; Clark, A G; Daugherty, C H

    2005-12-01

    The dependence of metabolic processes on temperature constrains the behavior, physiology and ecology of many ectothermic animals. The evolution of nocturnality in lizards, especially in temperate regions, requires adaptations for activity at low temperatures when optimal body temperatures are unlikely to be obtained. We examined whether nocturnal lizards have cold-adapted lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH was chosen as a representative metabolic enzyme. We measured LDH activity of tail muscle in six lizard species (n=123: three nocturnal, two diurnal and one crepuscular) between 5 and 35 degrees C and found no differences in LDH-specific activity or thermal sensitivity among the species. Similarly, the specific activity and thermal sensitivity of LDH were similar between skinks and geckos. Similar enzyme activities among nocturnal and diurnal lizards indicate that there is no selection of temperature specific LDH enzyme activity at any temperature. As many nocturnal lizards actively thermoregulate during the day, LDH may be adapted for a broad range of temperatures rather than adapted specifically for the low temperatures encountered when the animals are active. The total activity of LDH in tropical and temperate lizards is not cold-adapted. More data are required on biochemical adaptations and whole animal thermal preferences before trends can be established.

  10. The peculiar heme pocket of the 2/2 hemoglobin of cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    PubMed

    Howes, Barry D; Giordano, Daniela; Boechi, Leonardo; Russo, Roberta; Mucciacciaro, Simona; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sinibaldi, Federica; Fittipaldi, Maria; Martí, Marcelo A; Estrin, Darío A; di Prisco, Guido; Coletta, Massimo; Verde, Cinzia; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2011-02-01

    The genome of the cold-adapted bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 contains multiple genes encoding three distinct monomeric hemoglobins exhibiting a 2/2 α-helical fold. In the present work, one of these hemoglobins is studied by resonance Raman, electronic absorption and electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies, kinetic measurements, and different bioinformatic approaches. It is the first cold-adapted bacterial hemoglobin to be characterized. The results indicate that this protein belongs to the 2/2 hemoglobin family, Group II, characterized by the presence of a tryptophanyl residue on the bottom of the heme distal pocket in position G8 and two tyrosyl residues (TyrCD1 and TyrB10). However, unlike other bacterial hemoglobins, the ferric state, in addition to the aquo hexacoordinated high-spin form, shows multiple hexacoordinated low-spin forms, where either TyrCD1 or TyrB10 can likely coordinate the iron. This is the first example in which both TyrCD1 and TyrB10 are proposed to be the residues that are alternatively involved in heme hexacoordination by endogenous ligands.

  11. Purification and characterization of an extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase produced by psychrotrophic bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiuling; Chen, Guiyuan; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Lianbing; Wei, Yunlin

    2015-06-01

    An extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase from the psychrotrophic Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1 was purified 26-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme was active over a broad range spanning 0-60 °C with an optimum activity at 37 °C, and it was found to be alkaline-preferring with an optimum activity at pH 9.0. The molecular weight was estimated to be 34.3 KDa and monomeric. The lipase could be activated by Ca(2+) and low concentration (10%) of ethanol, dimethyl sulphoxide, methanol, and acetonitrile, whereas it was strongly inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), SDS, EDTA, and PMSF. Using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as a substrate at 37 °C, the Km and Vmax of the enzyme were found to be 16.58 mM and 5.24 × 10(5)  μM · min(-1), respectively. This extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase may be a good candidate for detergents and biocatalysts at low temperature.

  12. Genomic, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Analysis Provide Insights Into the Cold Adaptation Mechanism of the Obligate Psychrophilic Fungus Mrakia psychrophila

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yao; Jiang, Xianzhi; Wu, Wenping; Wang, Manman; Hamid, M. Imran; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Mrakia psychrophila is an obligate psychrophilic fungus. The cold adaptation mechanism of psychrophilic fungi remains unknown. Comparative genomics analysis indicated that M. psychrophila had a specific codon usage preference, especially for codons of Gly and Arg and its major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter gene family was expanded. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that genes involved in ribosome and energy metabolism were upregulated at 4°, while genes involved in unfolded protein binding, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, proteasome, spliceosome, and mRNA surveillance were upregulated at 20°. In addition, genes related to unfolded protein binding were alternatively spliced. Consistent with other psychrophiles, desaturase and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are involved in biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acid and glycerol respectively, were upregulated at 4°. Cold adaptation of M. psychrophila is mediated by synthesizing unsaturated fatty acids to maintain membrane fluidity and accumulating glycerol as a cryoprotectant. The proteomic analysis indicated that the correlations between the dynamic patterns between transcript level changes and protein level changes for some pathways were positive at 4°, but negative at 20°. The death of M. psychrophila above 20° might be caused by an unfolded protein response. PMID:27633791

  13. Differential cold-adaptation among protein components of the thioredoxin system in the psychrophilic eubacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125.

    PubMed

    Cotugno, Roberta; Rosaria Ruocco, Maria; Marco, Salvatore; Falasca, Patrizia; Evangelista, Giovanna; Raimo, Gennaro; Chambery, Angela; Di Maro, Antimo; Masullo, Mariorosario; De Vendittis, Emmanuele

    2009-05-01

    Thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase from the psychrophilic eubacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis were obtained as recombinant His-tagged proteins (rPhTrx and rPhTrxR, respectively). rPhTrxR is organised as a homodimeric flavoenzyme, whereas rPhTrx is a small monomeric protein, both containing a functional disulfide bridge. However, three additional cysteines are present as free thiols in purified rPhTrxR. When individually tested in specific assays, rPhTrxR and rPhTrx display a full activity at low temperatures, an indispensable requirement for cold-adapted proteins. In particular, rPhTrxR catalyses the NADPH dependent reduction of DTNB and rPhTrx provokes the insulin precipitation in the presence of DTT. The analysis of the effect of temperature on these reactions indicates that rPhTrxR is more cold-adapted than rPhTrx, having a higher psychrophilicity. The combined activity of rPhTrxR and rPhTrx, tested in a reconstituted assay containing NADPH as electrons donor and human insulin as the thioredoxin substrate, demonstrates a direct functional interaction between the purified recombinant components of the thioredoxin system of P. haloplanktis. Furthermore, the NADPH-dependent reduction of rPhTrx catalysed by rPhTrxR is fully reversible and allows the determination of its redox potential, whose value is in the range of other bacterial and archaeal thioredoxins. The analysis of the thermostability of rPhTrxR points to its discrete heat resistance. However, rPhTrx is much more heat resistant, with a half inactivation time of about 4 h at 95 degrees C. This exceptional heat resistance for a psychrophilic protein is significantly decreased by the reduction of the disulfide bridge of rPhTrx. Functionality, thermodependence and thermostability of the P. haloplanktis thioredoxin system point to the relevance of this key mechanism for the preservation of the reduced state of cytoplasmic proteins even in a cold-adapted source.

  14. Molecular cloning, expression and biochemical characterisation of a cold-adapted novel recombinant chitinase from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cold-adapted enzymes are proteins produced by psychrophilic organisms that display a high catalytic efficiency at extremely low temperatures. Chitin consists of the insoluble homopolysaccharide β-(1, 4)-linked N-acetylglucosamine, which is the second most abundant biopolymer found in nature. Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) play an important role in chitin recycling in nature. Biodegradation of chitin by the action of cold-adapted chitinases offers significant advantages in industrial applications such as the treatment of chitin-rich waste at low temperatures, the biocontrol of phytopathogens in cold environments and the biocontrol of microbial spoilage of refrigerated food. Results A gene encoding a cold-adapted chitinase (CHI II) from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 was isolated using Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) and RT-PCR techniques. The isolated gene was successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris expression system. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed the presence of an open reading frame of 1,215 bp, which encodes a 404 amino acid protein. The recombinant chitinase was secreted into the medium when induced with 1% methanol in BMMY medium at 25°C. The purified recombinant chitinase exhibited two bands, corresponding to the non-glycosylated and glycosylated proteins, by SDS-PAGE with molecular masses of approximately 39 and 50 kDa, respectively. The enzyme displayed an acidic pH characteristic with an optimum pH at 4.0 and an optimum temperature at 15°C. The enzyme was stable between pH 3.0-4.5 and was able to retain its activity from 5 to 25°C. The presence of K+, Mn2+ and Co2+ ions increased the enzyme activity up to 20%. Analysis of the insoluble substrates showed that the purified recombinant chitinase had a strong affinity towards colloidal chitin and little effect on glycol chitosan. CHI II recombinant chitinase exhibited higher Vmax and Kcat values toward colloidal chitin than other substrates at low temperatures. Conclusion By

  15. Structural flexibility of the heme cavity in the cold-adapted truncated hemoglobin from the Antarctic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Daniela; Pesce, Alessandra; Boechi, Leonardo; Bustamante, Juan Pablo; Caldelli, Elena; Howes, Barry D; Riccio, Alessia; di Prisco, Guido; Nardini, Marco; Estrin, Dario; Smulevich, Giulietta; Bolognesi, Martino; Verde, Cinzia

    2015-08-01

    Truncated hemoglobins build one of the three branches of the globin protein superfamily. They display a characteristic two-on-two α-helical sandwich fold and are clustered into three groups (I, II and III) based on distinct structural features. Truncated hemoglobins are present in eubacteria, cyanobacteria, protozoa and plants. Here we present a structural, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics characterization of a group-II truncated hemoglobin, encoded by the PSHAa0030 gene from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 (Ph-2/2HbO), a cold-adapted Antarctic marine bacterium hosting one flavohemoglobin and three distinct truncated hemoglobins. The Ph-2/2HbO aquo-met crystal structure (at 2.21 Å resolution) shows typical features of group-II truncated hemoglobins, namely the two-on-two α-helical sandwich fold, a helix Φ preceding the proximal helix F, and a heme distal-site hydrogen-bonded network that includes water molecules and several distal-site residues, including His(58)CD1. Analysis of Ph-2/2HbO by electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra, under varied solution conditions, shows that Ph-2/2HbO can access diverse heme ligation states. Among these, detection of a low-spin heme hexa-coordinated species suggests that residue Tyr(42)B10 can undergo large conformational changes in order to act as the sixth heme-Fe ligand. Altogether, the results show that Ph-2/2HbO maintains the general structural features of group-II truncated hemoglobins but displays enhanced conformational flexibility in the proximity of the heme cavity, a property probably related to the functional challenges, such as low temperature, high O2 concentration and low kinetic energy of molecules, experienced by organisms living in the Antarctic environment.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-adapted catalase from Vibrio salmonicida

    SciTech Connect

    Riise, Ellen Kristin; Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Helland, Ronny; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2006-01-01

    Monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals of a His-tagged form of V. salmonicida catalase without cofactor diffract X-rays to 1.96 Å. Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) catalyses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen. Recombinant Vibrio salmonicida catalase (VSC) possesses typical cold-adapted features, with higher catalytic efficiency, lower thermal stability and a lower temperature optimum than its mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis. Crystals of VSC were produced by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.15, b = 217.76, c = 99.28 Å, β = 110.48°. Data were collected to 1.96 Å and a molecular-replacement solution was found with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  17. Cold adaptation overrides developmental regulation of sarcolipin expression in mice skeletal muscle: SOS for muscle-based thermogenesis?

    PubMed

    Pant, Meghna; Bal, Naresh C; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-08-01

    Neonatal mice have a greater thermogenic need than adult mice and may require additional means of heat production, other than the established mechanism of brown adipose tissue (BAT). We and others recently discovered a novel mediator of skeletal muscle-based thermogenesis called sarcolipin (SLN) that acts by uncoupling sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). In addition, we have shown that SLN expression is downregulated during neonatal development in rats. In this study we probed two questions: (1) is SLN expression developmentally regulated in neonatal mice?; and (2) if so, will cold adaptation override this? Our data show that SLN expression is higher during early neonatal stages and is gradually downregulated in fast twitch skeletal muscles. Interestingly, we demonstrate that cold acclimation of neonatal mice can prevent downregulation of SLN expression. This observation suggests that SLN-mediated thermogenesis can be recruited to a greater extent during extreme physiological need, in addition to BAT.

  18. Purification and characterization of novel raw-starch-digesting and cold-adapted alpha-amylases from Eisenia foetida.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Asano, Tomohiko; Nakazawa, Masami; Miyatake, Kazutaka; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2008-05-01

    Novel raw-starch-digesting and cold-adapted alpha-amylases (Amy I and Amy II) from the earthworm Eisenia foetida were purified to electrophoretically homogeneous states. The molecular weights of both purified enzymes were estimated to be 60,000 by SDS-PAGE. The enzymes were most active at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C and stable at pH 7.0-9.0 and 50-60 degrees C. Both Amy I and II exhibited activities at 10 degrees C. The enzymes were inhibited by metal ions Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Hg(2+), and hydrolyzed raw starch into glucose, maltose and maltotriose as end products.

  19. Exploring the Antarctic soil metagenome as a source of novel cold-adapted enzymes and genetic mobile elements.

    PubMed

    Berlemont, Renaud; Pipers, Delphine; Delsaute, Maud; Angiono, Federico; Feller, Georges; Galleni, Moreno; Power, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomic library PP1 was obtained from Antarctic soil samples. Both functional and genotypic metagenomic screening were used for the isolation of novel cold-adapted enzymes with potential applications, and for the detection of genetic elements associated with gene mobilization, respectively. Fourteen lipase/esterase-, 14 amylase-, 3 protease-, and 11 cellulase-producing clones were detected by activity-driven screening, with apparent maximum activities around 35 °C for both amylolytic and lipolytic enzymes, and 35-55 °C for cellulases, as observed for other cold-adapted enzymes. However, the behavior of at least one of the studied cellulases is more compatible to that observed for mesophilic enzymes. These enzymes are usually still active at temperatures above 60 °C, probably resulting in a psychrotolerant behavior in Antarctic soils. Metagenomics allows to access novel genes encoding for enzymatic and biophysic properties from almost every environment with potential benefits for biotechnological and industrial applications. Only intI- and tnp-like genes were detected by PCR, encoding for proteins with 58-86 %, and 58-73 % amino acid identity with known entries, respectively. Two clones, BAC 27A-9 and BAC 14A-5, seem to present unique syntenic organizations, suggesting the occurrence of gene rearrangements that were probably due to evolutionary divergences within the genus or facilitated by the association with transposable elements. The evidence for genetic elements related to recruitment and mobilization of genes (transposons/integrons) in an extreme environment like Antarctica reinforces the hypothesis of the origin of some of the genes disseminated by mobile elements among "human-associated" microorganisms.

  20. Identification and characterization of a novel cold-adapted esterase from a metagenomic library of mountain soil.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyong-Cheol; Rim, Soon-Ok; Han, Yunjon; Shin, Bong Seok; Kim, Geun-Joong; Choi, Jong Hyun; Song, Jae Jun

    2012-05-01

    A novel lipolytic enzyme was isolated from a metagenomic library after demonstration of lipolytic activity on an LB agar plate containing 1% (w/v) tributyrin. A novel esterase gene (estIM1), encoding a lipolytic enzyme (EstIM1), was cloned using a shotgun method from a pFosEstIM1 clone of the metagenomic library, and the enzyme was characterized. The estIM1 gene had an open reading frame (ORF) of 936 base pairs and encoded a protein of 311 amino acids with a molecular mass 34 kDa and a pI value of 4.32. The deduced amino acid sequence was 62% identical to that of an esterase from an uncultured bacterium (ABQ11271). The amino acid sequence indicated that EstIM1 was a member of the family IV of lipolytic enzymes, all of which contain a GDSAG motif shared with similar enzymes of lactic acid microorganisms. EstIM1 was active over a temperature range of 1-50°C, at alkaline pH. The activation energy for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl propionate was 1.04 kcal/mol, within a temperature range of 1-40°C. The activity of EstIM1 was about 60% of maximal even at 1°C, suggesting that EstIM1 is efficiently cold-adapted. Further characterization of this cold-adapted enzyme indicated that the esterase may be very valuable in industrial applications.

  1. Predictive modeling for growth of non- and cold-adapted Listeria Monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe at different storage temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes, with and without cold-adaption, on fresh-cut cantaloupe under different storage temperatures. Fresh-cut samples, spot inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (about 3.2 log CFU/g), were exposed t...

  2. Physical and molecular bases of protein thermal stability and cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2017-02-01

    The molecular bases of thermal and cold stability and adaptation, which allow proteins to remain folded and functional in the temperature ranges in which their host organisms live and grow, are still only partially elucidated. Indeed, both experimental and computational studies fail to yield a fully precise and global physical picture, essentially because all effects are context-dependent and thus quite intricate to unravel. We present a snapshot of the current state of knowledge of this highly complex and challenging issue, whose resolution would enable large-scale rational protein design.

  3. An exceptionally cold-adapted alpha-amylase from a metagenomic library of a cold and alkaline environment.

    PubMed

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A cold-active α-amylase, AmyI3C6, identified by a functional metagenomics approach was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Sequence analysis showed that the AmyI3C6 amylase was similar to α-amylases from the class Clostridia and revealed classical characteristics of cold-adapted enzymes, as did comparison of the kinetic parameters K m and k cat to a mesophilic α-amylase. AmyI3C6 was shown to be heat-labile. Temperature optimum was at 10-15 °C, and more than 70 % of the relative activity was retained at 1 °C. The pH optimum of AmyI3C6 was at pH 8-9, and the enzyme displayed activity in two commercial detergents tested, suggesting that the AmyI3C6 α-amylase may be useful as a detergent enzyme in environmentally friendly, low-temperature laundry processes.

  4. Growth promotory potential of the cold adapted diazotroph Pseudomonas migulae S10724 against native green gram (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek).

    PubMed

    Suyal, Deep Chandra; Shukla, Anjana; Goel, Reeta

    2014-12-01

    It is being confirmed previously the atmospheric nitrogen fixing ability of the cold adapted Pseudomonas migulae S10724 strain at the fluctuating temperatures. Therefore, net house bioinoculation experiment was performed to determine the effectiveness of inoculation of strain S10724 on the growth enhancement of native green gram (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). The strain significantly (p < 0.05) stimulated the growth of roots (45.3 %) and shoots (45.6 %) of green gram plants. Furthermore, other growth related parameters viz. fresh and dry weight was also found to be increased significantly. Treated plants typically showed more obvious modifications in their biochemical status also. The total chlorophyll and nitrate reductase activity was increased in S10724 inoculated plant as compared to the control one. Moreover, in vitro seed germination assay revealed that the germination was increased in S10724 strain treated seeds by 22 % at 25 °C while 25 % at 12 °C unlikely to respective controls. The results suggest that P.migulae S10724 strain is a potential plant growth promoting bacterium for legume under fluctuating temperature ranges and therefore, could be used effectively as a low cost bioinoculant in Himalayan agricultural belt successfully.

  5. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the cold adapted microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: a low temperature active enzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Florio, Rita; Consalvi, Valerio; Festa, Guido; Pascarella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  6. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of cold-adapted α-amylase from Pseudoalteromonas arctica GS230.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingsheng; Wang, Shujun; Fang, Yaowei; Li, Huangzhong; Liu, Shu; Liu, Hongfei

    2010-11-01

    A cold-adapted α-amylase (ParAmy) gene from Pseudoalteromonas arctica GS230 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed as an N-terminus His-tag fusion protein in E. coli. A recombinant protein was produced and purified with DEAE-sepherose ion exchange chromatography and Ni affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of ParAmy was estimated to be 55 KDa with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). With an optimum temperature for activity 30 °C, ParAmy showed 34.5% of maximum activity at 0 °C and its activity decreased sharply at above 40 °C. ParAmy was stable in the range of pH 7-8.5 at 30 °C for 1 h. ParAmy was activated by Mn(2+), K(+) and Na(+), and inhibited by Hg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+). N-Bromosuccinimid showed a significant repressive effect on enzyme activity. The K (m) and V (max) values of the α-amylase for soluble starch were 7.28 mg/mL and 13.07 mg/mL min, respectively. This research suggests that Paramy has a good potential to be a cold-stable and alkalitolerant amylase in detergent industry.

  7. Cold-adapted and rhizosphere-competent strain of Rahnella sp. with broad-spectrum plant growth-promotion potential.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pratibha; Joshi, Robin; Sharma, K C; Rahi, Praveen; Gulati, Ashu; Gulati, Arvind

    2010-12-01

    A phosphate-solubilizing bacterial strain isolated from Hippophae rhamnoides rhizosphere was identified as Rahnella sp. based on its phenotypic features and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The bacterial strain showed the growth characteristics of a cold-adapted psychrotroph, with the multiple plant growth-promoting traits of inorganic and organic phosphate solubilization, 1-aminocyclopropane-1- carboxylate-deaminase activity, ammonia generation, and siderophore production. The strain also produced indole- 3-acetic acid, indole-3-acetaldehyde, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-acetonitrile, indole-3-lactic acid, and indole-3- pyruvic acid in tryptophan-supplemented nutrient broth. Gluconic, citric and isocitric acids were the major organic acids detected during tricalcium phosphate solubilization. A rifampicin-resistant mutant of the strain exhibited high rhizosphere competence without disturbance to the resident microbial populations in pea rhizosphere. Seed bacterization with a charcoal-based inoculum significantly increased growth in barley, chickpea, pea, and maize under the controlled environment. Microplot testing of the inoculum at two different locations in pea also showed significant increase in growth and yield. The attributes of coldtolerance, high rhizosphere competence, and broad-spectrum plant growth-promoting activity exhibited the potential of Rahnella sp. BIHB 783 for increasing agriculture productivity.

  8. A novel cold-adapted and glucose-tolerant GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7.

    PubMed

    Crespim, Elaine; Zanphorlin, Letícia M; de Souza, Flavio H M; Diogo, José A; Gazolla, Alex C; Machado, Carla B; Figueiredo, Fernanda; Sousa, Amanda S; Nóbrega, Felipe; Pellizari, Vivian H; Murakami, Mário T; Ruller, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    A novel GH1 β-glucosidase (EaBgl1A) from a bacterium isolated from Antarctica soil samples was recombinantly overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and characterized. The enzyme showed unusual pH dependence with maximum activity at neutral pH and retention of high catalytic activity in the pH range 6 to 9, indicating a catalytic machinery compatible with alkaline conditions. EaBgl1A is also a cold-adapted enzyme, exhibiting activity in the temperature range from 10 to 40°C with optimal activity at 30°C, which allows its application in industrial processes using low temperatures. Kinetic characterization revealed an enzymatic turnover (Kcat) of 6.92s(-1) (cellobiose) and 32.98s(-1) (pNPG) and a high tolerance for product inhibition, which is an extremely desirable feature for biotechnological purposes. Interestingly, the enzyme was stimulated by up to 200 mM glucose, whereas the commercial cocktails tested were found fully inhibited at this concentration. These properties indicate EaBgl1A as a promising biocatalyst for biotechnological applications where low temperatures are required.

  9. Distribution of cold adaptation proteins in microbial mats in Lake Joyce, Antarctica: Analysis of metagenomic data by using two bioinformatics tools.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyunmin; Hakim, Joseph A; Fisher, Phillip R E; Grueneberg, Alexander; Andersen, Dale T; Bej, Asim K

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the distribution and abundance of cold-adaptation proteins in microbial mat communities in the perennially ice-covered Lake Joyce, located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. We have used MG-RAST and R code bioinformatics tools on Illumina HiSeq2000 shotgun metagenomic data and compared the filtering efficacy of these two methods on cold-adaptation proteins. Overall, the abundance of cold-shock DEAD-box protein A (CSDA), antifreeze proteins (AFPs), fatty acid desaturase (FAD), trehalose synthase (TS), and cold-shock family of proteins (CSPs) were present in all mat samples at high, moderate, or low levels, whereas the ice nucleation protein (INP) was present only in the ice and bulbous mat samples at insignificant levels. Considering the near homogeneous temperature profile of Lake Joyce (0.08-0.29 °C), the distribution and abundance of these proteins across various mat samples predictively correlated with known functional attributes necessary for microbial communities to thrive in this ecosystem. The comparison of the MG-RAST and the R code methods showed dissimilar occurrences of the cold-adaptation protein sequences, though with insignificant ANOSIM (R = 0.357; p-value = 0.012), ADONIS (R(2) = 0.274; p-value = 0.03) and STAMP (p-values = 0.521-0.984) statistical analyses. Furthermore, filtering targeted sequences using the R code accounted for taxonomic groups by avoiding sequence redundancies, whereas the MG-RAST provided total counts resulting in a higher sequence output. The results from this study revealed for the first time the distribution of cold-adaptation proteins in six different types of microbial mats in Lake Joyce, while suggesting a simpler and more manageable user-defined method of R code, as compared to a web-based MG-RAST pipeline.

  10. Oligomerization as a strategy for cold adaptation: Structure and dynamics of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7

    PubMed Central

    Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Fattori, Juliana; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2016-01-01

    Psychrophilic enzymes evolved from a plethora of structural scaffolds via multiple molecular pathways. Elucidating their adaptive strategies is instrumental to understand how life can thrive in cold ecosystems and to tailor enzymes for biotechnological applications at low temperatures. In this work, we used X-ray crystallography, in solution studies and molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the structural basis for cold adaptation of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7. We discovered that the selective pressure of low temperatures favored mutations that redesigned the protein surface, reduced the number of salt bridges, exposed more hydrophobic regions to the solvent and gave rise to a tetrameric arrangement not found in mesophilic and thermophilic homologues. As a result, some solvent-exposed regions became more flexible in the cold-adapted tetramer, likely contributing to enhance enzymatic activity at cold environments. The tetramer stabilizes the native conformation of the enzyme, leading to a 10-fold higher activity compared to the disassembled monomers. According to phylogenetic analysis, diverse adaptive strategies to cold environments emerged in the GH1 family, being tetramerization an alternative, not a rule. These findings reveal a novel strategy for enzyme cold adaptation and provide a framework for the semi-rational engineering of β-glucosidases aiming at cold industrial processes. PMID:27029646

  11. Oligomerization as a strategy for cold adaptation: Structure and dynamics of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Fattori, Juliana; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2016-03-01

    Psychrophilic enzymes evolved from a plethora of structural scaffolds via multiple molecular pathways. Elucidating their adaptive strategies is instrumental to understand how life can thrive in cold ecosystems and to tailor enzymes for biotechnological applications at low temperatures. In this work, we used X-ray crystallography, in solution studies and molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the structural basis for cold adaptation of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7. We discovered that the selective pressure of low temperatures favored mutations that redesigned the protein surface, reduced the number of salt bridges, exposed more hydrophobic regions to the solvent and gave rise to a tetrameric arrangement not found in mesophilic and thermophilic homologues. As a result, some solvent-exposed regions became more flexible in the cold-adapted tetramer, likely contributing to enhance enzymatic activity at cold environments. The tetramer stabilizes the native conformation of the enzyme, leading to a 10-fold higher activity compared to the disassembled monomers. According to phylogenetic analysis, diverse adaptive strategies to cold environments emerged in the GH1 family, being tetramerization an alternative, not a rule. These findings reveal a novel strategy for enzyme cold adaptation and provide a framework for the semi-rational engineering of β-glucosidases aiming at cold industrial processes.

  12. Oligomerization as a strategy for cold adaptation: Structure and dynamics of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7.

    PubMed

    Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Fattori, Juliana; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2016-03-31

    Psychrophilic enzymes evolved from a plethora of structural scaffolds via multiple molecular pathways. Elucidating their adaptive strategies is instrumental to understand how life can thrive in cold ecosystems and to tailor enzymes for biotechnological applications at low temperatures. In this work, we used X-ray crystallography, in solution studies and molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the structural basis for cold adaptation of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7. We discovered that the selective pressure of low temperatures favored mutations that redesigned the protein surface, reduced the number of salt bridges, exposed more hydrophobic regions to the solvent and gave rise to a tetrameric arrangement not found in mesophilic and thermophilic homologues. As a result, some solvent-exposed regions became more flexible in the cold-adapted tetramer, likely contributing to enhance enzymatic activity at cold environments. The tetramer stabilizes the native conformation of the enzyme, leading to a 10-fold higher activity compared to the disassembled monomers. According to phylogenetic analysis, diverse adaptive strategies to cold environments emerged in the GH1 family, being tetramerization an alternative, not a rule. These findings reveal a novel strategy for enzyme cold adaptation and provide a framework for the semi-rational engineering of β-glucosidases aiming at cold industrial processes.

  13. Hot spots in cold adaptation: Localized increases in conformational flexibility in lactate dehydrogenase A4 orthologs of Antarctic notothenioid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Peter A.; Somero, George N.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of enzymatic adaptation to extreme cold, we determined kinetic properties, thermal stabilities, and deduced amino acid sequences of lactate dehydrogenase A4 (A4-LDH) from nine Antarctic (−1.86 to 1°C) and three South American (4 to 10°C) notothenioid teleosts. Higher Michaelis–Menten constants (Km) and catalytic rate constants (kcat) distinguish orthologs of Antarctic from those of South American species, but no relationship exists between adaptation temperature and the rate at which activity is lost because of heat denaturation. In all species, active site residues are conserved fully, and differences in kcat and Km are caused by substitutions elsewhere in the molecule. Within geographic groups, identical kinetic properties are generated by different substitutions. By combining our data with A4-LDH sequences for other vertebrates and information on roles played by localized conformational changes in setting kcat, we conclude that notothenioid A4-LDHs have adapted to cold temperatures by increases in flexibility in small areas of the molecule that affect the mobility of adjacent active-site structures. Using these findings, we propose a model that explains linked temperature-adaptive variation in Km and kcat. Changes in sequence that increase flexibility of regions of the enzyme involved in catalytic conformational changes may reduce energy (enthalpy) barriers to these rate-governing shifts in conformation and, thereby, increase kcat. However, at a common temperature of measurement, the higher configurational entropy of a cold-adapted enzyme may foster conformations that bind ligands poorly, leading to high Km values relative to warm-adapted orthologs. PMID:9736762

  14. The genome sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the role of genome evolution in cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michele A; Lauro, Federico M; Williams, Timothy J; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S; DeFrancisci, Davide; Chong, Kevin WY; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain; Ivanova, N; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michele; Lapidus, Alla L.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five-tiered evidence rating (ER) system that ranked annotations from ER1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea, which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino-acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall, membrane, envelope biogenesis COG genes are overrepresented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are overrepresented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two overrepresented COG categories appear to have been acquired from - and -Proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they have an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the last several thousand years as it

  15. Purification and characterization of a novel cold-adapted phytase from Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain JMUY14 isolated from Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Wang, Xue-Ting; Liu, Jing-Wen

    2015-08-01

    A yeast producing a cold-adapted phytase was isolated from Antarctic deep-sea sediment and identified as a Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain JMUY14 of basidiomycetous yeasts. It was cultured in fermentation optimized by a response surface methodology based on the Box-Behnken design. The maximum activity of phytase reached 205.447 U ml(-1), which was close to the predicted value of 201.948 U ml(-1) and approximately 3.4 times higher than its initial activity. The extracellular phytase was purified by 15.2-fold to homogeneity with a specific activity of 31,635 U mg(-1) by (NH4 )2 SO4 precipitation, and a combination of DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow, SP Sepharose Fast Flow, and Sephadex G-100. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 63 kDa and its pI was 4.33. Its optimal temperature and pH were 50 °C and 5.0, respectively. Its activity was 85% at 37 °C, and showed good stability at pH 3.0 ∼ 7.0. When compared with mesophilic counterparts, the phytase not only exhibited a higher activity during 20 ∼ 30 °C but also had a low Km (247 µM) and high kcat (1394 s(-1)). The phytase activity was slightly stimulated in the presence of Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), EDTA, and EGTA and moderately inhibited by Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Ag(+), PMSF, SDS, and phenylgloxal hydrate. It was resistant to both pepsin and trypsin. Since the phytase produced by the R. mucilaginosa JMUY14 showed a high specific activity, good pH stability, strong protease resistance, and high activity at low temperature, it has great potential for feed applications, especially in aquaculture.

  16. A novel cold-adapted lipase from Sorangium cellulosum strain So0157-2: gene cloning, expression, and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Qian, Yun-Kai; Li, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Hong; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Genome sequencing of cellulolytic myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum reveals many open-reading frames (ORFs) encoding various degradation enzymes with low sequence similarity to those reported, but none of them has been characterized. In this paper, a predicted lipase gene (lipA) was cloned from S. cellulosum strain So0157-2 and characterized. lipA is 981-bp in size, encoding a polypeptide of 326 amino acids that contains the pentapeptide (GHSMG) and catalytic triad residues (Ser114, Asp250 and His284). Searching in the GenBank database shows that the LipA protein has only the 30% maximal identity to a human monoglyceride lipase. The novel lipA gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the recombinant protein (r-LipA) was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The enzyme hydrolyzed the p-nitrophenyl (pNP) esters of short or medium chain fatty acids (≤C(10)), and the maximal activity was on pNP acetate. The r- LipA is a cold-adapted lipase, with high enzymatic activity in a wide range of temperature and pH values. At 4 °C and 30 °C, the K(m) values of r-LipA on pNP acetate are 0.037 ± 0.001 and 0.174 ± 0.006 mM, respectively. Higher pH and temperature conditions promoted hydrolytic activity toward the pNP esters with longer chain fatty acids. Remarkably, this lipase retained much of its activity in the presence of commercial detergents and organic solvents. The results suggest that the r-LipA protein has some new characteristics potentially promising for industrial applications and S. cellulosum is an intriguing resource for lipase screening.

  17. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the

  18. Cloning, expression and characterization of a cold-adapted endo-1, 4-β-glucanase from Citrobacter farmeri A1, a symbiotic bacterium of Reticulitermes labralis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xi; Yuan, Xianjun; Wen, Aiyou; Li, Junfeng; Bai, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Many biotechnological and industrial applications can benefit from cold-adapted EglCs through increased efficiency of catalytic processes at low temperature. In our previous study, Citrobacter farmeri A1 which was isolated from a wood-inhabiting termite Reticulitermes labralis could secrete a cold-adapted EglC. However, its EglC was difficult to purify for enzymatic properties detection because of its low activity (0.8 U/ml). The objective of the present study was to clone and express the C. farmeri EglC gene in Escherichia coli to improve production level and determine the enzymatic properties of the recombinant enzyme. Methods The EglC gene was cloned from C. farmeri A1 by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. EglC was transformed into vector pET22b and functionally expressed in E. coli. The recombination protein EglC22b was purified for properties detection. Results SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular mass of the recombinant endoglucanase was approximately 42 kDa. The activity of the E. coli pET22b-EglC crude extract was 9.5 U/ml. Additionally, it was active at pH 6.5–8.0 with an optimum pH of 7.0. The recombinant enzyme had an optimal temperature of 30–40 °C and exhibited >50% relative activity even at 5 °C, whereas it lost approximately 90% of its activity after incubation at 60 °C for 30 min. Its activity was enhanced by Co2+ and Fe3+, but inhibited by Cd2+, Zn2+, Li+, Triton X-100, DMSO, acetonitrile, Tween 80, SDS, and EDTA. Conclusion These biochemical properties indicate that the recombinant enzyme is a cold-adapted endoglucanase that can be used for various industrial applications. PMID:27843715

  19. Citric acid production from partly deproteinized whey under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of lactose-positive and cold-adapted Yarrowia lipolytica B9.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut

    2016-08-10

    The present study was performed to produce citric acid (CA) from partly deproteinized cheese whey (DPCW) under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of the cold-adapted and lactose-positive yeast Yarrowia lipolytica B9. DPCW was prepared using the temperature treatment of 90°C for 15min. Sodium alginate was used as entrapping agent for cell immobilization. Optimum conditions for the maximum CA production (33.3g/L) in non-sterile DPCW medium were the temperature of 20°C, pH 5.5, additional lactose concentration of 20g/L, sodium alginate concentration of 2%, number of 150 beads/100mL and incubation time of 120h. Similarly, maximum citric acid/isocitric acid (CA/ICA) ratio (6.79) could be reached under these optimal conditions. Additional nitrogen and phosphorus sources decreased CA concentration and CA/ICA ratio. Immobilized cells were reused in three continuous reaction cycles without any loss in the maximum CA concentration. The unique combination of low pH and temperature values as well as cell immobilization procedure could prevent undesired microbial contaminants during CA production. This is the first work on CA production by cold-adapted microorganisms under non-sterile culture conditions. Besides, CA production using a lactose-positive strain of the yeast Y. lipolytica was investigated for the first time in the present study.

  20. Characterization of Reverse Genetics-Derived Cold-Adapted Master Donor Virus A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2) and Reassortants with H5N1 Surface Genes in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Chen, Li-Mei; Bourgeois, Melissa; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Voeten, J. Theo M.; Heldens, Jacco G. M.; van den Bosch, Han; Klimov, Alexander; Rudenko, Larisa; Cox, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) offer significant advantages over subunit or split inactivated vaccines to mitigate an eventual influenza pandemic, including simpler manufacturing processes and more cross-protective immune responses. Using an established reverse genetics (rg) system for wild-type (wt) A/Leningrad/134/1957 and cold-adapted (ca) A/Leningrad/134/17/1957 (Len17) master donor virus (MDV), we produced and characterized three rg H5N1 reassortant viruses carrying modified HA and intact NA genes from either A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1, VN1203, clade 1) or A/Egypt/321/2007 (H5N1, EG321, clade 2) virus. A mouse model of infection was used to determine the infectivity and tissue tropism of the parental wt viruses compared to the ca master donor viruses as well as the H5N1 reassortants. All ca viruses showed reduced replication in lungs and enhanced replication in nasal epithelium. In addition, the H5N1 HA and NA enhanced replication in lungs unless it was restricted by the internal genes of the ca MDV. Mice inoculated twice 4 weeks apart with the H5N1 reassortant LAIV candidate viruses developed serum hemagglutination inhibition HI and IgA antibody titers to the homologous and heterologous viruses consistent with protective immunity. These animals remained healthy after challenge inoculation with a lethal dose with homologous or heterologous wt H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The profiles of viral replication in respiratory tissues and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy characteristics of the two ca H5N1 candidate LAIV viruses warrant further development into a vaccine for human use. PMID:24648485

  1. Contributions of two-component regulatory systems, alternative sigma factors, and negative regulators to Listeria monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne C; Hu, Yuewei; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Files, Kali D; Bowen, Barbara M; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2008-02-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures is critical for transmission of this foodborne pathogen. We evaluated the contributions of different transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems to L. monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth. L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and selected isogenic null mutants in genes encoding four alternative sigma factors (sigB, sigH, sigC, and sigL), two regulators of sigmaB (rsbT and rsbV), two negative regulators (ctsR and hrcA), and 15 two-component response regulators were grown in brain heart infusion broth at 4 degrees C with (i) a high-concentration starting inoculum (10(8) CFU/ml), (ii) a low-concentration starting inoculum (102 CFU/ml), and (iii) a high-concentration starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells. With a starting inoculum of 10(8) CFU/ml, null mutants in genes encoding selected alternative sigma factors (DeltasigH, DeltasigC, and DeltasigL), a negative regulator (DeltactsR), regulators of sigmaB (DeltarsbT and DeltarsbV), and selected two-component response regulators (DeltalisR, Deltalmo1172, and Deltalmo1060) had significantly reduced growth (P < 0.05) compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4 degrees C. The growth defect for DeltasigL was limited and was not confirmed by optical density (OD600) measurement data. With a starting inoculum of 102 CFU/ml and after monitoring growth at 4 degrees C over 84 days, only the DeltactsR strain had a consistent but limited growth defect; the other mutant strains had either no growth defects or limited growth defects apparent at only one or two of the nine sampling points evaluated during the 84-day growth period (DeltasigB, DeltasigC, and Deltalmo1172). With a 10(8) CFU/ml starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells, none of the mutant strains that had a growth defect when inoculation was performed with cells pregrown at 37 degrees C had reduced growth as compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4

  2. Cold shock genes cspA and cspB from Caulobacter crescentus are posttranscriptionally regulated and important for cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Silva, Carolina A P T; Marques, Marilis V

    2012-12-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs) are nucleic acid binding chaperones, first described as being induced to solve the problem of mRNA stabilization after temperature downshift. Caulobacter crescentus has four CSPs: CspA and CspB, which are cold induced, and CspC and CspD, which are induced only in stationary phase. In this work we have determined that the synthesis of both CspA and CspB reaches the maximum levels early in the acclimation phase. The deletion of cspA causes a decrease in growth at low temperature, whereas the strain with a deletion of cspB has a very subtle and transient cold-related growth phenotype. The cspA cspB double mutant has a slightly more severe phenotype than that of the cspA mutant, suggesting that although CspA may be more important to cold adaptation than CspB, both proteins have a role in this process. Gene expression analyses were carried out using cspA and cspB regulatory fusions to the lacZ reporter gene and showed that both genes are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Deletion mapping of the long 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of each gene identified a common region important for cold induction, probably via translation enhancement. In contrast to what was reported for other bacteria, these cold shock genes have no regulatory regions downstream from ATG that are important for cold induction. This work shows that the importance of CspA and CspB to C. crescentus cold adaptation, mechanisms of regulation, and pattern of expression during the acclimation phase apparently differs in many aspects from what has been described so far for other bacteria.

  3. Cold adaptation of zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family from deep sea and arctic sea ice bacteria revealed by catalytic and structural properties and molecular dynamics: new insights into relationship between conformational flexibility and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Bian, Fei; Chen, Xiu-Lan; He, Hai-Lun; Guo, Jun; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Yin-Xin; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-04-03

    Increased conformational flexibility is the prevailing explanation for the high catalytic efficiency of cold-adapted enzymes at low temperatures. However, less is known about the structural determinants of flexibility. We reported two novel cold-adapted zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family, vibriolysin MCP-02 from a deep sea bacterium and vibriolysin E495 from an Arctic sea ice bacterium, and compared them with their mesophilic homolog, pseudolysin from a terrestrial bacterium. Their catalytic efficiencies, k(cat)/K(m) (10-40 degrees C), followed the order pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495 with a ratio of approximately 1:2:4. MCP-02 and E495 have the same optimal temperature (T(opt), 57 degrees C, 5 degrees C lower than pseudolysin) and apparent melting temperature (T(m) = 64 degrees C, approximately 10 degrees C lower than pseudolysin). Structural analysis showed that the slightly lower stabilities resulted from a decrease in the number of salt bridges. Fluorescence quenching experiments and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the flexibilities of the proteins were pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495, suggesting that optimization of flexibility is a strategy for cold adaptation. Molecular dynamics results showed that the ordinal increase in flexibility from pseudolysin to MCP-02 and E495, especially the increase from MCP-02 to E495, mainly resulted from the decrease of hydrogen-bond stability in the dynamic structure, which was due to the increase in asparagine, serine, and threonine residues. Finally, a model for the cold adaptation of MCP-02 and E495 was proposed. This is the first report of the optimization of hydrogen-bonding dynamics as a strategy for cold adaptation and provides new insights into the structural basis underlying conformational flexibility.

  4. A cold-adapted lipase of an Alaskan psychrotroph, Pseudomonas sp. strain B11-1: gene cloning and enzyme purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Choo, D W; Kurihara, T; Suzuki, T; Soda, K; Esaki, N

    1998-02-01

    A psychrotrophic bacterium producing a cold-adapted lipase upon growth at low temperatures was isolated from Alaskan soil and identified as a Pseudomonas strain. The lipase gene (lipP) was cloned from the strain and sequenced. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene (924 bp) corresponded to a protein of 308 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 33,714. LipP also has consensus motifs conserved in other cold-adapted lipases, i.e., Lipase 2 from Antarctic Moraxella TA144 (G. Feller, M. Thirty, J. L. Arpigny, and C. Gerday, DNA Cell Biol. 10:381-388, 1991) and the mammalian hormone-sensitive lipase (D. Langin, H. Laurell, L. S. Holst, P. Belfrage, and C. Holm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:4897-4901, 1993): a pentapeptide, GDSAG, containing the putative active-site serine and an HG dipeptide. LipP was purified from an extract of recombinant Escherichia coli C600 cells harboring a plasmid coding for the lipP gene. The enzyme showed a 1,3-positional specificity toward triolein. p-Nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids with short to medium chains (C4 and C6) served as good substrates. The enzyme was stable between pH 6 and 9, and the optimal pH for the enzymatic hydrolysis of tributyrin was around 8. The activation energies for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate and p-nitrophenyl laurate were determined to be 11.2 and 7.7 kcal/mol, respectively, in the temperature range 5 to 35 degrees C. The enzyme was unstable at temperatures higher than 45 degrees C. The Km of the enzyme for p-nitrophenyl butyrate increased with increases in the assay temperature. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe3+, and Hg2+ but was not affected by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and bisnitrophenyl phosphate. Various water-miscible organic solvents, such as methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide, at concentrations of 0 to 30% (vol/vol) activated the enzyme.

  5. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  6. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  7. Cloning, sequencing and expression analysis of the first cellulase gene encoding cellobiohydrolase 1 from a cold-adaptive Penicillium chrysogenum FS010.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yunhua; Wang, Tianhong; Long, Hao; Zhu, Huiyuan

    2007-02-01

    A cellobiohydrolase 1 gene (cbh1) was cloned from Penicillium chrysogenum FS010 by a modified thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR). DNA sequencing shows that cbh1 has an open reading frame of 1590 bp, encoding a putative protein of 529 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that CBHI has a modular structure with a predicted molecular mass of 56 kDa and consists of a fungal type carbohydrate binding module separated from a catalytic domain by a threonine rich linker region. The putative gene product is homologous to fungal cellobiohydrolases in Family 7 of the glycosyl hydrolases. A novel cbh1 promoter (1.3 kb) was also cloned and sequenced, which contains seven putative binding sites (5'-SYGGRG-3') for the carbon catabolite repressor CRE1. Effect of various carbon sources to the cbh1 transcription of P. chrysogenum was examined by Northern analysis, suggesting that the expression of cbh1 is regulated at transcriptional level. The cbh1 gene in cold-adaptive fungus P. chysogenum was expressed as an active enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae H158. The recombinant CBHI accumulated intracellularly and could not be secreted into the medium.

  8. Safety, immunogencity, and efficacy of a cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) vaccine in mice and ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Grace L.; Lamirande, Elaine W.; Jin Hong; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-03-01

    We studied the attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy of the cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) (H2N2) virus in mice and ferrets to evaluate its use in the event of an H2 influenza pandemic. The AA ca virus was restricted in replication in the respiratory tract of mice and ferrets. In mice, 2 doses of vaccine elicited a > 4-fold rise in hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) titer and resulted in complete inhibition of viral replication following lethal homologous wild-type virus challenge. In ferrets, a single dose of the vaccine elicited a > 4-fold rise in HAI titer and conferred complete protection against homologous wild-type virus challenge in the upper respiratory tract. In both mice and ferrets, the AA ca virus provided significant protection from challenge with heterologous H2 virus challenge in the respiratory tract. The AA ca vaccine is safe, immunogenic, and efficacious against homologous and heterologous challenge in mice and ferrets, supporting the evaluation of this vaccine in clinical trials.

  9. Range shifts or extinction? Ancient DNA and distribution modelling reveal past and future responses to climate warming in cold-adapted birds.

    PubMed

    Lagerholm, Vendela K; Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson; Vaniscotte, Amélie; Potapova, Olga R; Tomek, Teresa; Bochenski, Zbigniew M; Shepherd, Paul; Barton, Nick; Van Dyck, Marie-Claire; Miller, Rebecca; Höglund, Jacob; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Dalén, Love; Stewart, John R

    2017-04-01

    Global warming is predicted to cause substantial habitat rearrangements, with the most severe effects expected to occur in high-latitude biomes. However, one major uncertainty is whether species will be able to shift their ranges to keep pace with climate-driven environmental changes. Many recent studies on mammals have shown that past range contractions have been associated with local extinctions rather than survival by habitat tracking. Here, we have used an interdisciplinary approach that combines ancient DNA techniques, coalescent simulations and species distribution modelling, to investigate how two common cold-adapted bird species, willow and rock ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus and Lagopus muta), respond to long-term climate warming. Contrary to previous findings in mammals, we demonstrate a genetic continuity in Europe over the last 20 millennia. Results from back-casted species distribution models suggest that this continuity may have been facilitated by uninterrupted habitat availability and potentially also the greater dispersal ability of birds. However, our predictions show that in the near future, some isolated regions will have little suitable habitat left, implying a future decrease in local populations at a scale unprecedented since the last glacial maximum.

  10. Gene cloning and catalytic characterization of cold-adapted lipase of Photobacterium sp. MA1-3 isolated from blood clam.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Khosasih, Vivia; Nam, Bo-Hye; Lee, Sang-Jun; Suwanto, Antonius; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2012-12-01

    A lipase-producing Photobacterium strain (MA1-3) was isolated from the intestine of a blood clam caught at Namhae, Korea. The lipase gene was cloned by shotgun cloning and encoded 340 amino acids with a molecular mass of 38,015 Da. It had a very low sequence identity with other bacterial lipases, with the exception of that of Photobacterium lipolyticum M37 (83.2%). The MA1-3 lipase was produced in soluble form when Escherichia coli cells harboring the gene were cultured at 18°C. Its optimum temperature and pH were 45°C and pH 8.5, respectively. Its activation energy was calculated to be 2.69 kcal/mol, suggesting it to be a cold-adapted lipase. Its optimum temperature, temperature stability, and substrate specificity were quite different from those of M37 lipase, despite the considerable sequence similarities. Meanwhile, MA1-3 lipase performed a transesterification reaction using olive oil and various alcohols including methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. In the presence of t-butanol as a co-solvent, this lipase produced biodiesel using methanol and plant or waste oils. The highest biodiesel conversion yield (73%) was achieved using waste soybean oil and methanol at a molar ratio of 1:5 after 12 h using 5 units of lipase.

  11. Sequence and structural investigation of a novel psychrophilic α-amylase from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 for cold-adaptation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Aizi Nor Mazila; Azhar, Mohd Akmal; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Rabu, Amir; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md

    2013-08-01

    A novel α-amylase was isolated successfully from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 using DNA walking and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods. The structure of this psychrophilic α-amylase (AmyPI12) from G. antarctica PI12 has yet to be studied in detail. A 3D model of AmyPI12 was built using a homology modelling approach to search for a suitable template and to generate an optimum target-template alignment, followed by model building using MODELLER9.9. Analysis of the AmyPI12 model revealed the presence of binding sites for a conserved calcium ion (CaI), non-conserved calcium ions (CaII and CaIII) and a sodium ion (Na). Compared with its template-the thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BSTA)-the binding of CaII, CaIII and Na ions in AmyPI12 was observed to be looser, which suggests that the low stability of AmyPI12 allows the protein to work at different temperature scales. The AmyPI12 amino acid sequence and model were compared with thermophilic α-amylases from Bacillus species that provided the highest structural similarities with AmyPI12. These comparative studies will enable identification of possible determinants of cold adaptation.

  12. A novel cold-adapted and highly salt-tolerant esterase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3 from the sediment of a soda lake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guozeng; Wang, Qiaohuang; Lin, Xianju; Bun Ng, Tzi; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase gene (estSL3) was cloned from the Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, which was isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The 636-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino acid residues that is closely related with putative GDSL family lipases from Alkalibacterium and Enterococcus. The gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein (rEstSL3) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. rEstSL3 exhibited the highest activity towards pNP-acetate and had no activity towards pNP-esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme was highly cold-adapted, showing an apparent temperature optimum of 30 °C and remaining approximately 70% of the activity at 0 °C. It was active and stable over the pH range from 7 to 10, and highly salt-tolerant up to 5 M NaCl. Moreover, rEstSL3 was strongly resistant to most tested metal ions, chemical reagents, detergents and organic solvents. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that EstSL3 had fewer proline residues, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges than mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, but more acidic amino acids and less hydrophobic amino acids when compared with other salt-tolerant esterases. The cold active, salt-tolerant and chemical-resistant properties make it a promising enzyme for basic research and industrial applications. PMID:26915906

  13. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine and Live, Attenuated Influenza Vaccine in Preventing Influenza-Like Illness among US Service Members, 2006-2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-26

    controlled studies. Vaccine 2012; 30:886–92. 11. Piedra PA, Gaglani MJ, Kozinetz CA, et al. Trivalent live attenuated intranasal influenza vaccine...120:e553–64. 12. Halloran ME, Piedra PA, Longini IM Jr, et al. Efficacy of trivalent, cold-adapted, influenza virus vaccine against influenza A (Fujian

  14. Two cold-induced family 19 glycosyl hydrolases from cherimoya (Annona cherimola) fruit: an antifungal chitinase and a cold-adapted chitinase.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Oscar; Sanchez-Ballesta, María T; Merodio, Carmen; Escribano, María I

    2013-11-01

    Two cold-induced chitinases were isolated and purified from the mesocarp cherimoyas (Annona cherimola Mill.) and they were characterised as acidic endochitinases with a Mr of 24.79 and 47.77kDa (AChi24 and AChi48, respectively), both family 19 glycosyl hydrolases. These purified chitinases differed significantly in their biochemical and biophysical properties. While both enzymes had similar optimal acidic pH values, AChi24 was enzymatically active and stable at alkaline pH values, as well as displaying an optimal temperature of 45°C and moderate thermostability. Kinetic studies revealed a great catalytic efficiency of AChi24 for oligomeric and polymeric substrates. Conversely, AChi48 hydrolysis showed positive co-operativity that was associated to a mixture of different functional oligomeric states through weak transient protein interactions. The rise in the AChi48 kcat at increasing enzyme concentrations provided evidence of its oligomerisation. AChi48 chitinase was active and stable in a broad acidic pH range, and while it was relatively labile as temperatures increased, with an optimal temperature of 35°C, it retained about 50% of its maximal activity from 5 to 50°C. Thermodynamic characterisation reflected the high kcat of AChi48 and the remarkably lower ΔH(‡), ΔS(‡) and ΔG(‡) values at 5°C compared to AChi24, indicating that the hydrolytic activity of AChi48 was less thermodependent. In vitro functional studies revealed that AChi24 had a strong antifungal defence potential against Botrytis cinerea, whereas they displayed no cryoprotective or antifreeze activity. Hence, based on biochemical, thermodynamic and functional data, this study demonstrates that two acidic endochitinases are induced at low temperatures in a subtropical fruit, and that one of them acts in an oligomeric cold-adapted manner.

  15. Characterization of a New Cold-Adapted and Salt-Activated Polysaccharide Lyase Family 7 Alginate Lyase from Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM0524

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Lan; Dong, Sheng; Xu, Fei; Dong, Fang; Li, Ping-Yi; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Xie, Bin-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Marine bacterial alginate lyases play a role in marine alginate degradation and carbon cycling. Although a large number of alginate lyases have been characterized, reports on alginate lyases with special characteristics are still rather less. Here, a gene alyPM encoding an alginate lyase of polysaccharide lyase family 7 (PL7) was cloned from marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM0524 and expressed in Escherichia coli. AlyPM shows 41% sequence identity to characterized alginate lyases, indicating that AlyPM is a new PL7 enzyme. The optimal pH for AlyPM activity was 8.5. AlyPM showed the highest activity at 30°C and remained 19% of the highest activity at 5°C. AlyPM was unstable at temperatures above 30°C and had a low Tm of 37°C. These data indicate that AlyPM is a cold-adapted enzyme. Moreover, AlyPM is a salt-activated enzyme. AlyPM activity in 0.5–1.2 M NaCl was sixfolds higher than that in 0 M NaCl, probably caused by a significant increase in substrate affinity, because the Km of AlyPM in 0.5 M NaCl decreased more than 20-folds than that in 0 M NaCl. AlyPM preferably degraded polymannuronate and mainly released dimers and trimers. These data indicate that AlyPM is a new PL7 endo-alginate lyase with special characteristics. PMID:27486451

  16. Parallel N- and C-Terminal Truncations Facilitate Purification and Analysis of a 155-kDa Cold-Adapted Type-I Pullulanase.

    PubMed

    Elleuche, Skander; Krull, Alina; Lorenz, Ute; Antranikian, Garabed

    2017-02-01

    The cold-adapted pullulanase Pul13A is an industrial useful amylolytic enzyme, but its low solubility is the major bottleneck to produce the protein in recombinant form. In a previous approach, a complex and time-consuming purification strategy including a step-wise dialysis procedure using decreasing concentrations of urea to renature the insoluble protein from inclusion bodies had been established. In this study, a truncation strategy was developed to facilitate the purification and handling of the type-I pullulanase. Pul13A has a size of 155-kDa with a multidomain architecture that is composed of the following predicted modules: CBM41/E-set/Amy-Pul/DUF3372/E-set/E-set/E-set, with CBM and E-set domains being putative carbohydrate-binding modules, Amy-Pul is the catalytic region and DUF is a domain of unknown function. Consecutive N- and C-terminal deletions of domains were applied to construct minimized enzyme variants retaining pullulanase activity and exhibiting improved renaturation efficiencies. A total of seven truncation constructs were generated and tested, which still led to the production of inclusion bodies. However, the parallel deletion of the exterior CBM41 and E-set domain enabled the direct refolding of active enzymes during one-step dialysis in urea-free buffer. Catalytic properties of truncation construct Pul13A-N1/C1 were not impaired indicating that this enzyme variant may be superior for industrial applications over the full-length pullulanase.

  17. Seasonal variation in expression pattern of genes under HSP70 : Seasonal variation in expression pattern of genes under HSP70 family in heat- and cold-adapted goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Dipak; Upadhyay, Ramesh C; Chaudhary, Umesh B; Kumar, Ravindra; Singh, Sohanvir; Ashutosh; G, Jagan Mohanarao; Polley, Shamik; Mukherjee, Ayan; Das, Tapan K; De, Sachinandan

    2014-05-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is one of the most abundant and best characterized heat shock protein family that consists of highly conserved stress proteins, expressed in response to stress, and plays crucial roles in environmental stress tolerance and adaptation. The present study was conducted to identify major types of genes under the HSP70 family and to quantify their expression pattern in heat- and cold-adapted Indian goats (Capra hircus) with respect to different seasons. Five HSP70 gene homologues to HSPA8, HSPA6, HSPA1A, HSPA1L, and HSPA2 were identified by gene-specific primers. The cDNA sequences showed high similarity to other mammals, and proteins have an estimated molecular weight of around 70 kDa. The expression of HSP70 genes was observed during summer and winter. During summer, the higher expression of HSPA8, HSPA6, and HSPA1A was observed, whereas the expression levels of HSPA1L and HSPA2 were found to be lower. It was also observed that the expression of HSPA1A and HSPA8 was higher during winter in both heat- and cold-adapted goats but downregulates in case of other HSPs. Therefore, both heat and cold stress induced the overexpression of HSP70 genes. An interesting finding that emerged from the study is the higher expression of HSP70 genes in cold-adapted goats during summer and in heat-adapted goats during winter. Altogether, the results indicate that the expression pattern of HSP70 genes is species- and breed-specific, most likely due to variations in thermal tolerance and adaptation to different climatic conditions.

  18. [Phylogenetic diversity and cold-adaptive hydrolytic enzymes of culturable psychrophilic bacteria associated with sea ice from high latitude ocean, Artic].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Chen, Bo; Zeng, Yin-Xin; He, Jian-Feng

    2006-04-01

    showing 100% similarity each other are retrieved from the database, eleven from Antarctic seawater bacteria, three from Antarctic sea-ice bacteria, one from Spitzbergen sea-ice bacteria, two from Chukchi Sea sea-ice bacteria, two from Canadian Basin sea-ice bacteria (in this study) and one from uncultured bacterium clone PDA-OTU11 associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis from the Great Barrier Reef. These may indicate that the physiological and geographic barriers appear to be permeable and some bacterial species can survive in different environment. The majority of the bacterial strains are able to secrete diversity cold-adaptive hydrolytic enzymes into the medium at 4 degrees C. The isolates that are able to degrade Tween-80, glutin, and starch account for, respectively, 62.6%, 51.4% and 40.5%.

  19. [Advantages and disadvantages of inactivated and live influenza vaccine].

    PubMed

    Gendon, Iu Z

    2004-01-01

    Published data related with comparison studies of safety, efficiency and some other properties of cold-adapted live influenza vaccine (LIV) and of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) are analyzed. LIV and IIV do not differ by systemic reactions after administration; however, it is not ruled out that there can be unfavorable reactions in vaccination of persons with allergy to the chicken-embryo proteins as well as in cases of persistence/reversion of cold-adapted strain observed in vaccination of persons with primary impairments of the immune system. There are no convincing data, up to now, on that LIV is superior to IIV in coping with influenza pandemics. The efficiency of LIV and IIV for children aged 3 years and more and for healthy adults is virtually identical. Additional controllable field comparative studies of LIV and IIV efficiency in immunization of elderly persons are needed. Limited data on LIV efficiency for children aged 2 months and more were obtained. The need in a 2-stage vaccination of all age group with the aim of ensuring responses to all 3 LIV components is, certainly, a LIV disadvantage. In case of IIV, the 2-stage vaccination is needed only for persons who were not ill with influenza. The intranasal LIV administration has, from the practical and psychological standpoints, an advantage before the IIV administration by syringe. The ability of LIV to protect from the drift influenza-virus variations could be its advantage before IIV; still, more research is needed to verify it. Transplantable cell lines meeting the WHO requirements could be an optimal substrate for the production of LIV and IIV. Children are the optimal age group for influenza prevention by cold-adapted LIV, whereas, IIV fits better for vaccination of adults and elderly persons.

  20. A live attenuated H7N7 candidate vaccine virus induces neutralizing antibody that confers protection from challenge in mice, ferrets and monkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A live attenuated H7N7 candidate vaccine virus was generated by reverse genetics using the modified hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of HP A/Netherlands/219/03 (NL/03) (H7N7) wild-type (wt) virus and the six internal protein genes of the cold-adapted (ca) A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca (AA ca) (...

  1. Live Healthy, Live Longer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Services. More Health News on: Exercise and Physical Fitness Health Screening Healthy Living Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Exercise and Physical Fitness Health Screening Healthy Living About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  2. [Live attenuated and inactivated influenza vaccines: data from direct comparative studies].

    PubMed

    Kashirina, O S; Vasil'ev, Iu M

    2014-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of live attenuated and inactivated influenza vaccines based on data from direct comparative studies is necessary for ensuring the most effective and safe vaccination against influenza. Analysis of direct comparative preclinical and clinical studies of inactivated and live cold-adapted (ca) influenza vaccines showed that published data are inconsistent and limited for some population groups. Live ca vaccines may be promising as an alternative or addition to inactivated vaccines especially for mass vaccination against influenza in children as well as in the elderly when combined with inactivated vaccines. Further studies of inactivated and live ca influenza vaccines in direct comparative studies that control the administration route and vaccine strain production as well as development and confirmation of objective criteria of live attenuated influenza vaccine effectiveness evaluation are necessary.

  3. A live attenuated vaccine prevents replication and transmission of H7N9 virus in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Huihui; Zhang, Qianyi; Gu, Chunyang; Shi, Jianzhong; Deng, Guohua; Ma, Shujie; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Guan, Yuntao; Jiang, Yongping; Chen, Hualan

    2015-01-01

    The continued spread of the newly emerged H7N9 viruses among poultry in China, together with the emergence of drug-resistant variants and the possibility of human-to-human transmission, has spurred attempts to develop an effective vaccine. An MF59-adjuvant H7N9 inactivated vaccine is reported to be well-tolerated and immunogenic in humans; however a study in ferrets indicated that while a single dose of the inactivated H7N9 vaccine reduced disease severity, it did not prevent virus replication and transmission. In this study, we used reverse genetics to produce a cold-adapted, live attenuated H7N9 vaccine (H7N9/AAca) that contains wild-type HA and NA genes from AH/1, and the backbone of the cold-adapted influenza H2N2 A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus (AAca). H7N9/AAca was attenuated in mice and ferrets, and induced robust neutralizing antibody responses in rhesus mice, ferrets, and guinea pigs immunized once or twice intranasally. The animals immunized twice were completely protected from H7N9 virus challenge. Importantly, the animals vaccinated once were fully protected from transmission when exposed to or in contact with the H7N9 virus-inoculated animals. These results demonstrate that a cold-adapted H7N9 vaccine can prevent H7N9 virus transmission; they provide a compelling argument for further testing of this vaccine in human trials. PMID:26058711

  4. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... but they don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement ... change. Assisted living costs less than nursing home care. It is still fairly expensive. Older people or ...

  5. Healthy Living

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    ... Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games Brainteasers Puzzles Riddles Songs Activities Be a Scientist Coloring Science Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU ...

  6. Bachelor Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germer, Sondra

    1974-01-01

    Male high school students in a Bachelor Living Class observed methods of child care including bottle feeding, spoon feeding, changing diapers, and method of holding. The purpose was for the students to grasp a better understanding of child development. (EK)

  7. Living Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mules, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of various methods of keeping live animals, including scorpions, spiders, crabs, crayfish, shrimp, ants, fish, mice, and birds, as well as plants as a school science project/display. (SL)

  8. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transportation Back to top How to Choose a Facility? The following suggestions can help you get started ... for a safe, comfortable and appropriate assisted living facility: Think ahead. What will the resident’s future needs ...

  9. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recreational activities Security Transportation How to Choose a Facility A good match between a facility and a resident's needs depends as much on the philosophy and services of the assisted living facility as it does on the quality of care. ...

  10. Greener Living

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about how to live a more environmentally friendly life by reducing your environmental footprint, enhancing sustainability, using clean energy, water efficiency, composting, selecting a fuel efficient vehicle, and reducing waste.

  11. Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue of "OSERS" addresses the subject of independent living of individuals with disabilities. The issue includes a message from Judith E. Heumann, the Assistant Secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), and 10 papers. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Changes in the…

  12. Retiring Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnell, Eileen, Ed.; Lodge, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Retiring Lives" presents fourteen personal real life stories from people at various stages of retiring. Each author recounts their own story about retiring, bringing together many aspects of the experiences: the social, psychological and practical. These inspirational and illustrated stories will encourage the reader to hold up these…

  13. Living History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mark

    2005-01-01

    John Tinker and Mary Beth Tinker are back in a classroom in their hometown, once again wearing black armbands and drawing attention to a war. Now in their 50s, the siblings are living symbols of constitutional rights for secondary school students. In 1965, they and a handful of others were suspended for wearing black armbands to their public…

  14. ISS Live!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Jennifer; Harris, Philip; Hochstetler, Bruce; Guerra, Mark; Mendez, Israel; Healy, Matthew; Khan, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    International Space Station Live! (ISSLive!) is a Web application that uses a proprietary commercial technology called Lightstreamer to push data across the Internet using the standard http port (port 80). ISSLive! uses the push technology to display real-time telemetry and mission timeline data from the space station in any common Web browser or Internet- enabled mobile device. ISSLive! is designed to fill a unique niche in the education and outreach areas by providing access to real-time space station data without a physical presence in the mission control center. The technology conforms to Internet standards, supports the throughput needed for real-time space station data, and is flexible enough to work on a large number of Internet-enabled devices. ISSLive! consists of two custom components: (1) a series of data adapters that resides server-side in the mission control center at Johnson Space Center, and (2) a set of public html that renders the data pushed from the data adapters. A third component, the Lightstreamer server, is commercially available from a third party and acts as an intermediary between custom components (1) and (2). Lightstreamer also provides proprietary software libraries that are required to use the custom components. At the time of this reporting, this is the first usage of Web-based, push streaming technology in the aerospace industry.

  15. Living Nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, M.-F.; Helfer, E.; Wade, R.; Haraux, F.

    The living cell is a kind of factory on the microscopic scale, in which an assembly of modular machines carries out, in a spatially and temporally coordinated way, a whole range of activities internal to the cell, including the synthesis of substances essential to its survival, intracellular traffic, waste disposal, and cell division, but also activities related to intercellular communication and exchanges with the outside world, i.e., the ability of the cell to change shape, to move within a tissue, or to organise its own defence against attack by pathogens, injury, and so on. These nanomachines are made up of macromolecular assemblies with varying degrees of complexity, forged by evolution, within which work is done as a result of changes in interactions between proteins, or between proteins and nucleic acids, or between proteins and membrane components. All these cell components measure a few nanometers across, so the mechanical activity of these nanomachines all happens on the nanometric scale. The directional nature of the work carried out by biological nanomachines is associated with a dissipation of energy. As examples of protein assemblies, one could mention the proteasome, which is responsible for the degradation of proteins, and linear molecular motors such as actomyosin, responsible for muscle contraction, the dynein-microtubule system, responsible for flagellar motility, and the kinesin-microtubule system, responsible for transport of vesicles, which transform chemical energy into motion. Nucleic acid-protein assemblies include the ribosome, responsible for synthesising proteins, polymerases, helicases, elongation factors, and the machinery of DNA replication and repair; the mitotic spindle is an integrated system involving several of these activities which drive chromosome segregation. The machinery coupling membranes and proteins includes systems involved in the energy metabolism, such as the ATP synthase rotary motor, signalling cascades, endocytosis

  16. Living with an Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With an Arrhythmia Many arrhythmias are harmless. It's common to have an occasional ... heartbeat or mild palpitations . People who have harmless arrhythmias can live healthy lives. They usually don't ...

  17. A cold-adapted endo-arabinanase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, T; Ihara, H; Kozaki, S; Kawasaki, H

    2003-12-05

    Previously, three arabinan-degrading enzymes were isolated from Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. Here we describe another arabinan-degrading enzyme, termed Abnc, from the culture filtrate of the same organism. Analysis of the reaction products of debranched arabinan by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) revealed that Abnc cleaved the substrate in an endo manner and that the final major product was arabinotriose. The molecular mass of Abnc was estimated to be 35 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Enzyme activity of Abnc was highest at pH 6.0 to 7.0. The enzyme was stable up to 30 degrees C and showed optimum activity at 30 to 40 degrees C. Compared with a mesophilic counterpart from Aspergillus niger, Abnc exhibited a lower thermal stability and optimum enzyme activity at lower temperatures. Production of Abnc in P. chrysogenum was found to be strongly induced by arabinose-containing polymers and required a longer culture time than did other arabinanase isozymes in this strain.

  18. Biophysics of Cold Adaptation and Acclimatization: Microbial Decomposition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    L - A -I. 3 1983 Field Work Fall (pre abscission) leaf litter of seven vascular plant species native to Alaskan Arctic north slope tundra habitats was...Five hundred prepared litter bags were placed in the field at three sites near Barrow, Atquasuk and Driftwood, all within arctic tundra habitats . One...plateau marked with an expanse of obligotrophic lakes, ponds and aquatic habitats , which cover 50% to 85% of the land’s surface area and polygonally

  19. Engineering a substrate-specific cold-adapted subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Tindbaek, Nikolaj; Svendsen, Allan; Oestergaard, Peter Rahbek; Draborg, Henriette

    2004-02-01

    One region predicted to be highly flexible for a psychrophilic enzyme, TA39 subtilisin (S39), was transferred in silico to the mesophilic subtilisin, savinase (EC 3.4.21.62), from Bacillus lentus (clausii). The engineered hybrid and savinase were initially investigated by molecular dynamic simulations at 300 K to show binding region and global flexibility. The predicted S39 region consists of 12 residues, which due to homology between the subtilisins, results in a total change of eight residues. By site-directed modifications, the region was transferred to the binding region of savinase, thus a savinase-S39 hybrid, named H5, was constructed. The designed hybrid showed the same temperature optimum and pH profile as savinase, but H5 had higher specific activity on the synthetic substrate N-succinyl-L-Ala-L-Ala-L-Pro-L-Phe-p-nitroanilide (AAPF) at all temperatures measured and, at the same time, H5 showed a decrease in thermostability. The H5 hybrid showed broader substrate specificity, measured at room temperature, due to an increase in catalytic efficiency on AAPF, AAPA and FAAF compared with savinase (N-succinyl-XXXX-pNA; XXXX = AAPF, AAPA and FAAF). The H5 hybrid showed increased activity at low temperature, increased binding region and global flexibility, as investigated by molecular dynamic simulations, and global destabilization from differential scanning calorimetry measurements. These psychrophilic characteristics indicated an increase in binding site flexibility, probably due to the modifications P129S, S130G, P131E, and thus we show that it is possible to increase low temperature activity and global flexibility by engineered flexibility in the binding region.

  20. The transcriptome of the bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus reveals adaptations of the longest-lived mammal

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Inge; Ma, Siming; Zhou, Xuming; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Lee, Sang-Goo; Suydam, Robert; George, John C.; Bickham, John W.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals vary dramatically in lifespan, by at least two-orders of magnitude, but the molecular basis for this difference remains largely unknown. The bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus is the longest-lived mammal known, with an estimated maximal lifespan in excess of two hundred years. It is also one of the two largest animals and the most cold-adapted baleen whale species. Here, we report the first genome-wide gene expression analyses of the bowhead whale, based on the de novo assembly of its transcriptome. Bowhead whale or cetacean-specific changes in gene expression were identified in the liver, kidney and heart, and complemented with analyses of positively selected genes. Changes associated with altered insulin signaling and other gene expression patterns could help explain the remarkable longevity of bowhead whales as well as their adaptation to a lipid-rich diet. The data also reveal parallels in candidate longevity adaptations of the bowhead whale, naked mole rat and Brandt's bat. The bowhead whale transcriptome is a valuable resource for the study of this remarkable animal, including the evolution of longevity and its important correlates such as resistance to cancer and other diseases. PMID:25411232

  1. Living with Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Award Living With Kidney Cancer Living With Cancer Day to Day The impact of kidney cancer on your life ... least one half hour of exercise every other day. Vigorous walking, jogging, swimming, or other aerobic exercise ...

  2. Living with VHL

    MedlinePlus

    ... Videos Contact Us Search Patients & Caregivers / Living with VHL VHL disease is a lifelong condition. However, with appropriate measures, people can effectively manage the VHL and lead full and productive lives. Early diagnosis, ...

  3. Administration for Community Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for Current Grantees About ACL Organization Why Community Living? Authorizing Statutes Budget Mandatory Grant Allocations Strategic ... Final Rule Get ACL Updates OAA Reauthorization Why Community Living? FEATURES #InclusionWorks IL Final Rule Get ACL ...

  4. Living with hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000360.htm Living with hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you are living with hearing loss, you know that it takes extra effort to ...

  5. Strategies for Daily Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... and FASD FASD and the Law – Criminal Justice Expectant Mothers Addiction Treatment Weekly Roundup Archive Speakers ... Now VIDEOS CONTACT DONATE Living with FASD National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome / Living with FASD Go ...

  6. Administration for Community Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Competitive Grant Information for Current Grantees About ACL Organization Why Community Living? Authorizing Statutes Budget Mandatory ... FEATURES Older Americans Month DD Awareness Month Get ACL Updates OAA Reauthorization Why Community Living? FEATURES Older ...

  7. Living with Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Sarcoidosis Sarcoidosis has no cure, but you can take ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  8. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living Donation / Being a Living Donor / Risks Facts History Organs Frequently Asked Questions Discussing Living Donation Types Related Non-Related Non-Directed Paired Donation Blood Type Incompatible Positive Crossmatch Being a Living Donor ...

  9. Living with Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... smoking. Emotional Issues and Support Living with respiratory failure may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. Talk about how you feel with your health care team. Talking to a professional counselor also can ... to living with respiratory failure. You can see how other people who have ...

  10. Living Willow Huts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Living Willow Huts are inexpensive to make, fun to plant, easy to grow, and make beautiful spaces for children. They involve planting dormant willow shoots in the ground and weaving them into shapes that will sprout and grow over time. People have been creating similar living architecture throughout the world for centuries in the forms of living…

  11. Immunization with live nonpathogenic H5N3 duck influenza virus protects chickens against highly pathogenic H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, A S; Boravleva, E Y; Lomakina, N F; Kropotkina, E A; Gordeychuk, I V; Chvala, I A; Drygin, V V; Klenk, H-D; Matrosovich, M N

    Development of an effective, broadly-active and safe vaccine for protection of poultry from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) remains an important practical goal. In this study we used a low pathogenic wild aquatic bird virus isolate А/duck/Moscow/4182/2010 (H5N3) (dk/4182) as a live candidate vaccine. We compared this virus with four live 1:7 reassortant anti-H5N1 candidate vaccine viruses with modified hemagglutinin from either A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) or A/Kurgan/3/05 (H5N1) and the rest of the genes from either H2N2 cold-adapted master strain A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (rVN-Len and rKu-Len) or H6N2 virus A/gull/Moscow/3100/2006 (rVN-gull and rKu-gull). The viruses were tested in parallel for pathogenicity, immunogenicity and protective effectiveness in chickens using aerosol, intranasal and oral routes of immunization. All five viruses showed zero pathogenicity indexes in chickens. Viruses rVN-gull and rKu-gull were immunogenic and protective, but they were insufficiently attenuated and caused significant mortality of 1-day-old chickens. The viruses with cold-adapted backbones (rVN-Len and rKu-Len) were completely nonpathogenic, but they were significantly less immunogenic and provided lower protection against lethal challenge with HPAIV A/Chicken/Kurgan/3/05 (H5N1) as compared with three other vaccine candidates. Unlike other four viruses, dk/4182 was both safe and highly immunogenic in chickens of any age regardless of inoculation route. Single administration of 106 TCID50 of dk/4182 virus via drinking water provided complete protection of 30-days-old chickens from 100 LD50 of the challenge virus. Our results suggest that low pathogenic viruses of wild aquatic birds can be used as safe and effective live poultry vaccines against highly pathogenic avian viruses.

  12. Engineering Living Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered ‘living functional materials’ and ‘living materials synthesis platforms’ that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater.13, 515–523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis–materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID

  13. Thalassemia: Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe anemia and possible organ damage from iron overload, respectively. Healthy Choices for People Living with Thalassemia ... Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Related Information UDC System About Us File Formats Help: How ...

  14. Living Better with Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoarthritis Living Better with Osteoarthritis Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table of Contents What Is Osteoarthritis? Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. ...

  15. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... the vaccinia virus. Who should NOT get the smallpox vaccine? People most likely to have side effects ...

  16. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  17. Living with Fanconi Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Fanconi Anemia Improvements in blood and marrow stem cell transplants ... November 1, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  18. Living with Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis You have questions. We have answers. Whether you ... caregivers > About the Paralysis Resource Center Explore our paralysis resources > Health > Causes of paralysis > Secondary conditions > Costs ...

  19. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Corner Stores Healthy Snacking in Philadelphia, PA Hidden Sodium Salt Matters Salt Matters: Preserving Choice, Protecting Health ( ... Health Easier: Active Living in Philadelphia, PA Hidden Sodium Hidden Sodium Me? Have a baby? Preconception Health ...

  20. Living with Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. Living With Pulmonary Embolism Pulmonary embolism (PE) usually is treated in a hospital. After leaving ... you're taking medicine. Medicines used to treat PE can thin your blood too much. This can ...

  1. Living with Advanced MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... more progressive disease course. Taking these factors into account can help you and your family plan more effectively for the future. Identifying options The key message to anyone living with advanced MS is ...

  2. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit the salt in your diet. Be Physically Active Physical activity is an important part of a ... right away. Emotional Issues and Support Living with PH may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. You ...

  3. Healthy Living after Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... look to maintain health and wellness. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  4. Living with Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Atherosclerosis Improved treatments have reduced the number of deaths ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  5. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  6. Living with Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Hemochromatosis The outlook for people who have hemochromatosis largely ... do to help you. Screening Family Members for Hemochromatosis Parents, grandparents, brothers and sisters, and children (blood ...

  7. Living with Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Living with Hearing Loss Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... the United States suffer some form of disordered communication. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication ...

  8. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Although CF can cause fertility problems, men and women who have the disease should still have protected sex to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. Emotional Issues Living with CF may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. Talk about how you feel ...

  9. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT ... to your doctor or pharmacist about the best flu vaccine option for you or your family.

  10. Living-cell microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yarmush, Martin L; King, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment.

  11. Living My Family's Story

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Lally, Robin M.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Murekeyisoni, Christine; Dickerson, Suzanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on known or suggested genetic risk factors, a growing number of women now live with knowledge of a potential cancer diagnosis that may never occur. Given this, it is important to understand the meaning of living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer (1) form self-identity, (2) apply self-care strategies toward risk, and (3) describe the meaning of care through a high-risk breast program. Methods Interpretive hermeneutic phenomenology guided the qualitative research method. Women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer were recruited from a high-risk breast program. Open-ended interview questions focused on experiences living as women managing high risk for breast cancer. Consistent with hermeneutic methodology, the principal investigator led a team to analyze the interview transcripts. Results Twenty women participated in in-depth interviews. Analysis revealed that women describe their own identity based on their family story and grieve over actual and potential familial loss. This experience influences self-care strategies, including seeking care from hereditary breast cancer risk experts for early detection and prevention, as well as maintaining a connection for early treatment “when” diagnosis occurs. Conclusions Healthy women living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer are living within the context of their family cancer story, which influences how they define themselves and engage in self-care. Implications for Practice Findings present important practical, research, and policy information regarding health promotion, psychosocial assessment, and support for women living with this risk. PMID:22544165

  12. Cryopreservation of Living Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Nagata, Shinichi; Kimura, Naohiro

    Cryopreservation is considered to be the most promising way of preserving living organs or tissues for a long period of time without casuing any damage to their biological functions. However, cryopreservation has been succeeded only for simple and small-size tissues such as spermatozoon, ovum, erythrocyte, bone marrow and cornea. Cryopreservation of more complex and large-scale organs are not yet succssful. The authors have attempted to establish a technique for cryopreservation of larger living organs. An experiment was carried out using daphnia (water flea). The optimum rates of freezing and thawing were determined together with the optimum selection of cryoprotectant. High recovery rate was achieved under these conditions.

  13. New Lives of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The work and lives of teachers have always been subject to external influence as those who are nearing the end of their careers will attest, but it is arguable that what is new over the last two decades is the pace, complexity, and intensity of change as governments have responded to the shrinking world of economic competitiveness and social…

  14. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  15. Native American Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Julie Anna

    1992-01-01

    Examines features of independent living philosophy with regard to compatibility with Native American cultures, including definition or conceptualization of disability; self-advocacy; systems advocacy; peer counseling; and consumer control and involvement. Discusses an actualizing process as one method of resolving cultural conflicts and…

  16. The living building

    SciTech Connect

    McLennan, J.F.

    1998-07-01

    If one is to increase the energy performance of buildings beyond what is now possible, one can no longer afford to think of a building's systems and components as independent of one another. With emerging trends in building technology, it is becoming possible to design buildings (or groups of buildings) that respond to their environments as naturally as do living organisms. The living building integrates advances in glazing technology, photovoltaics, daylight-integrated lighting controls, HVAC and ecological waste management in conjunction with direct digital controls to respond actively to temperature, humidity, heat gain, cooling, lighting levels, and ventilation. This revolutionary building is the building of the future; it maximizes energy savings due to the inherent efficiency of an intelligent, interconnected system in which the envelope, lighting, and HVAC are always aware of and responding to each other's needs. While some of the technologies for such a system are already in use and resulting energy savings documented, it is not until advances such as electrochromic glazing reach the market that the level of integration necessary to produce the living building will be possible. This paper explores the limits of the living building's capacity to learn from environmental forces and regulate itself; the paper then examines emerging technologies that have demonstrated the potential to make such systemic integration and unprecedented energy savings possible.

  17. Living or Nonliving?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legaspi, Britt; Straits, William

    2011-01-01

    Categorizing organisms as living or nonliving things may seem to be intuitive by nature. Yet, it is regulated by scientific criteria. Students come to school with rules already in place. Their categorizing criteria have already been influenced by their personal experiences, also known as observations and inferences. They believe that all things…

  18. Living with ARDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With ARDS Some people fully recover from ARDS. Others continue to have health problems. After you ... of breath. After treatment, many people who have ARDS recover close-to-normal lung function within 6 ...

  19. Live-cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Richard

    2014-01-01

    It would be hard to argue that live-cell imaging has not changed our view of biology. The past 10 years have seen an explosion of interest in imaging cellular processes, down to the molecular level. There are now many advanced techniques being applied to live cell imaging. However, cellular health is often under appreciated. For many researchers, if the cell at the end of the experiment has not gone into apoptosis or is blebbed beyond recognition, than all is well. This is simply incorrect. There are many factors that need to be considered when performing live-cell imaging in order to maintain cellular health such as: imaging modality, media, temperature, humidity, PH, osmolality, and photon dose. The wavelength of illuminating light, and the total photon dose that the cells are exposed to, comprise two of the most important and controllable parameters of live-cell imaging. The lowest photon dose that achieves a measureable metric for the experimental question should be used, not the dose that produces cover photo quality images. This is paramount to ensure that the cellular processes being investigated are in their in vitro state and not shifted to an alternate pathway due to environmental stress. The timing of the mitosis is an ideal canary in the gold mine, in that any stress induced from the imaging will result in the increased length of mitosis, thus providing a control model for the current imagining conditions. PMID:25482523

  20. Living the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cynthia; Lemay, Carol

    1991-01-01

    Describes one elementary school's "Living the Dream" award program named in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Students read and reviewed books and presented the award to the author of a recent picture book that focused on multicultural awareness. A list of suggested titles is included. (SM)

  1. Learning from Live Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.; Hitt, Collin; Kraybill, Anne; Bogulski, Cari A.

    2015-01-01

    Culturally enriching field trips matter. They produce significant benefits for students on a variety of educational outcomes that schools and communities care about. This experiment on the effects of field trips to see live theater demonstrates that seeing plays is an effective way to teach academic content; increases student tolerance by…

  2. Moab's Living Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Grand County Public Library (GCPL) which was awarded the 2007 Best Small Library in America, an award sponsored by "Library Journal" and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Some 4800 of Grand County, Utah's 8,826 people live in Moab and the rest in the adjacent Spanish Valley and environs. The locals are a…

  3. Living Systems Energy Module

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-26

    The Living Systems Energy Module, renamed Voyage from the Sun, is a twenty-lesson curriculum designed to introduce students to the major ways in which energy is important in living systems. Voyage from the Sun tells the story of energy, describing its solar origins, how it is incorporated into living terrestrial systems through photosynthesis, how it flows from plants to herbivorous animals, and from herbivores to carnivores. A significant part of the unit is devoted to examining how humans use energy, and how human impact on natural habitats affects ecosystems. As students proceed through the unit, they read chapters of Voyage from the Sun, a comic book that describes the flow of energy in story form (Appendix A). During the course of the unit, an ``Energy Pyramid`` is erected in the classroom. This three-dimensional structure serves as a classroom exhibit, reminding students daily of the importance of energy and of the fragile nature of our living planet. Interactive activities teach students about adaptations that allow plants and animals to acquire, to use and to conserve energy. A complete list of curricular materials and copies of all activity sheets appear in Appendix B.

  4. You Live, You Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesta, Gert

    2008-01-01

    The Learning Lives project, a four-year study into the learning biographies and trajectories of adults, was conducted by a team of researchers from the universities of Stirling, Exeter, Brighton and Leeds as part of the Teaching and Learning Research Programme (TLRP) of the Economic and Social Research Council, and has just been completed. Whereas…

  5. Living with HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Living With HIV Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  6. Design for Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Bringing a newborn home from the hospital can come with stress for any parent. Coming home with twins can be double the stress. This article shares the story of a couple faced with this situation 12 years ago with the birth of twins, one was born with complications. They lived in a Colonial until the twins were almost five years old, at which time…

  7. Family Living Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truitt, Debbie

    This family living supplement contains 125 supplemental ideas and strategies designed to help vocational home economics teachers increase student motivation and enrich the teaching process. Ideas and strategies are organized into seven sections. These are career planning, securing a job, and career success; managing financial resources, buying…

  8. The Living Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Mary

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan for a second-grade class project. Suggests that the students will learn to identify the word "famous," complete a timeline for a famous person, learn facts about the person, and express individual thoughts and feelings. Explains the steps involved in the presentation of a living museum where students portray famous…

  9. Watersheds: where we live

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandas, Stephen; Farrar, Frank

    1996-01-01

    We all live in a watershed. Animals and plants all live there with us. Everyone affects what happens in a watershed by how we treat the natural resources. So what is a watershed? It is the land area that drains water to a stream, river, lake, or ocean. Water travels over the Earth's surface across forest land, farm fields, pastures, suburban lawns, and city streets, or it seeps into the soil and makes its way to a stream as local ground water. Watersheds come in many different shapes and sizes. Some contain mountains and hills, and others are nearly flat. A watershed can be affected by many different activities and events. Construction of cities and towns, farming, logging, and the application and disposal of many garden and household chemicals can affect the quantity and quality of water flowing from a watershed.

  10. Improving assisted living care.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Nancy; Gesell, Sabina B; Widmer, Tom

    2007-01-01

    In the absence of a national measurement system, private vendors of satisfaction measurement and improvement services have played a crucial role in the quality movement in the assisted living industry. Survey responses from 175 resident-family dyads at 20 facilities were analyzed to identify priorities for service improvement from the customers' perspective. They include improving care provided by aides and management, meal service, and activities. Practical solutions for addressing these issues are presented.

  11. Generation and Characterization of Live Attenuated Influenza A(H7N9) Candidate Vaccine Virus Based on Russian Donor of Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbik, Svetlana; Pearce, Nicholas; Balish, Amanda; Jones, Joyce; Thor, Sharmi; Davis, Charles Todd; Pearce, Melissa; Tumpey, Terrence; Cureton, David; Chen, Li-Mei; Villanueva, Julie; Bousse, Tatiana L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Avian influenza A (H7N9) virus has emerged recently and continues to cause severe disease with a high mortality rate in humans prompting the development of candidate vaccine viruses. Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) are 6:2 reassortant viruses containing the HA and NA gene segments from wild type influenza viruses to induce protective immune responses and the six internal genes from Master Donor Viruses (MDV) to provide temperature sensitive, cold-adapted and attenuated phenotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings LAIV candidate A/Anhui/1/2013(H7N9)-CDC-LV7A (abbreviated as CDC-LV7A), based on the Russian MDV, A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2), was generated by classical reassortment in eggs and retained MDV temperature-sensitive and cold-adapted phenotypes. CDC-LV7A had two amino acid substitutions N123D and N149D (H7 numbering) in HA and one substitution T10I in NA. To evaluate the role of these mutations on the replication capacity of the reassortants in eggs, the recombinant viruses A(H7N9)RG-LV1 and A(H7N9)RG-LV2 were generated by reverse genetics. These changes did not alter virus antigenicity as ferret antiserum to CDC-LV7A vaccine candidate inhibited hemagglutination by homologous A(H7N9) virus efficiently. Safety studies in ferrets confirmed that CDC-LV7A was attenuated compared to wild-type A/Anhui/1/2013. In addition, the genetic stability of this vaccine candidate was examined in eggs and ferrets by monitoring sequence changes acquired during virus replication in the two host models. No changes in the viral genome were detected after five passages in eggs. However, after ten passages additional mutations were detected in the HA gene. The vaccine candidate was shown to be stable in the ferret model; post-vaccination sequence data analysis showed no changes in viruses collected in nasal washes present at day 5 or day 7. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that the A/Anhui/1/2013(H7N9)-CDC-LV7A reassortant virus is a safe and

  12. Interior view of former living porch, now living area extension, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of former living porch, now living area extension, facing east. - Albrook Air Force Station, Field Officer's Quarters, West side of Dargue Avenue Circle, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  13. Living Room Mantel Profile, Door Jamb, Window Sill, Baseboard, Living ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Living Room Mantel Profile, Door Jamb, Window Sill, Baseboard, Living Room Fireplace Details, Door Profile - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Governor's Quarters, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  14. Live from the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, W. K.; Haines-Stiles, G.; Warburton, J.; Sunwood, K.

    2003-12-01

    For reasons of geography and geophysics, the poles of our planet, the Arctic and Antarctica, are places where climate change appears first: they are global canaries in the mine shaft. But while Antarctica (its penguins and ozone hole, for example) has been relatively well-documented in recent books, TV programs and journalism, the far North has received somewhat less attention. This project builds on and advances what has been done to date to share the people, places, and stories of the North with all Americans through multiple media, over several years. In a collaborative project between the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) and PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, Live from the Arctic will bring the Arctic environment to the public through a series of primetime broadcasts, live and taped programming, interactive virtual field trips, and webcasts. The five-year project will culminate during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year (IPY). Live from the Arctic will: A. Promote global understanding about the value and world -wide significance of the Arctic, B. Bring cutting-edge research to both non-formal and formal education communities, C. Provide opportunities for collaboration between arctic scientists, arctic communities, and the general public. Content will focus on the following four themes. 1. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts on Land (i.e. snow cover; permafrost; glaciers; hydrology; species composition, distribution, and abundance; subsistence harvesting) 2. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts in the Sea (i.e. salinity, temperature, currents, nutrients, sea ice, marine ecosystems (including people, marine mammals and fisheries) 3. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts in the Atmosphere (i.e. precipitation and evaporation; effects on humans and their communities) 4. Global Perspectives (i.e. effects on humans and communities, impacts to rest of the world) In The Earth is Faster Now, a recent collection of comments by members of indigenous arctic peoples, arctic

  15. Living in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ray (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In this educational video from the 'Liftoff to Learning' series, astronauts from the STS-56 Mission (Ken Cockrell, Mike Foale, Ellen Ochoa, Steve Oswald, and Ken Cameron) explain and show through demonstrations how microgravity affects the way astronauts live onboard the Space Shuttle, and how these same daily habits or processes differ on Earth. A tour of the Space Shuttle is given, including the sleeping compartments, the kitchen area, the storage compartments, and the Waste Collection System (or WCS, as they call it). Daily habits (brushing teeth, shampooing hair and bathing, eating,...) are explained and actively illustrated, along with reasons of how these applications differ from their employment on Earth.

  16. Communication in Assisted Living*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristine N.; Warren, Carol A.B.

    2009-01-01

    This study of communication in an Assisted Living Facility (ALF) focuses on staff’s interpretive frameworks and situational tactics for managing elderly residents. It is based on interviews with staff and residents in an ALF together with ethnographic fieldwork. As in other quasi-total institutions, staff members engage in control as well as care, monitoring residents for compliance with rules and directives. Residents, aware of the threat of being moved to a nursing home, also monitor their own behavior and cognition in comparison to other residents. Other communication issues include the infantilization of the elderly by staff, and the race, class, and ethnic prejudices of residents. PMID:20107612

  17. "Living versus Dead":

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Semple antirabies vaccine was developed by David Semple in India in 1911. Semple introduced a peculiarly British approach within the Pasteurian tradition by using carbolized dead virus. This article studies this unique phase of vaccine research between 1910 and 1935 to show that in the debates and laboratory experiments around the potency and safety of vaccines, categories like "living" and "dead" were often used as ideological and moral denominations. These abstract and ideological debates were crucial in defining the final configuration of the Semple vaccine, the most popular antirabies vaccine used globally, and also in shaping international vaccination policies. PMID:21037397

  18. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  19. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  20. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  1. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  2. Microencapsulation Of Living Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium; Kendall, James M.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental technique, living cells and other biological materials encapsulated within submillimeter-diameter liquid-filled spheres. Sphere material biocompatible, tough, and compliant. Semipermeable, permitting relatively small molecules to move into and out of sphere core but preventing passage of large molecules. New technique promises to make such spherical capsules at high rates and in uniform, controllable sizes. Capsules injected into patient through ordinary hypodermic needle. Promising application for technique in treatment of diabetes. Also used to encapsulate pituitary cells and thyroid hormone adrenocortical cells for treatment of other hormonal disorders, to encapsulate other secreting cells for transplantation, and to package variety of pharmaceutical products and agricultural chemicals for controlled release.

  3. Living with a Single Parent

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Living With a Single Parent KidsHealth > For Kids > Living With a Single Parent ... single parents can be a great idea, too. Single Parents and Work Single parents are often working parents ...

  4. Living with Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Sickle Cell Disease If you or your child has sickle ... NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas) 09/02/2011 In this video— ...

  5. Living with a Single Parent

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray Living With a Single Parent KidsHealth > For Kids > Living With a Single Parent ... single parents can be a great idea, too. Single Parents and Work Single parents are often working parents ...

  6. Living Longer in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Aguila, Emma; Diaz, Claudia; Fu, Mary Manqing; Kapteyn, Arie; Pierson, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This analysis of aging and income security in Mexico establishes that the older population in Mexico is increasing quickly and that this population is especially vulnerable to poverty. Mexican citizens are living longer and overall have experienced an improvement in the quality of life compared to that of prior generations. However, this study demonstrates that social improvements are not affecting the daily lives of all persons equally. The authors attempt to uncover and highlight those differences. One of the primary challenges facing Mexico is a growing older population. The demographic transition in Mexico combined with the lack of formal sources of income in retirement place many older persons in a state of financial insecurity. The information contained in this study and the proposed policy research areas are intended to enlarge the portfolio of options for older Mexicans. The authors analyze wealth and sources of income during retirement, the relationship between health and wealth, urban and rural disparities, and the impact of migration spells to the United States on wealth accumulation and health insurance in Mexico. PMID:28083208

  7. RACE AS LIVED EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John A.; Sanchez, Gabriel R.; Sanchez-Youngman, Shannon; Vargas, Edward D.; Ybarra, Vickie D.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of social science research has sought to conceptualize race as a multidimensional concept in which context, societal relations, and institutional dynamics are key components. Utilizing a specially designed survey, we develop and use multiple measures of race (skin color, ascribed race, and discrimination experiences) to capture race as “lived experience” and assess their impact on Latinos’ self-rated health status. We model these measures of race as a lived experience to test the explanatory power of race, both independently and as an integrated scale with categorical regression, scaling, and dimensional analyses. Our analyses show that our multiple measures of race have significant and negative effects on Latinos’ self-reported health. Skin color is a dominant factor that impacts self-reported health both directly and indirectly. We then advocate for the utilization of multiple measures of race, adding to those used in our analysis, and their application to other health and social outcomes. Our analysis provides important contributions across a wide range of health, illness, social, and political outcomes for communities of color. PMID:26681972

  8. Live From the Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, C. A.; Kent, J.; Lippsett, L.

    2006-12-01

    International Polar Year presents an extraordinary opportunity to educate students and the public about science at the icy ends of the Earth. The goal of our proposal is to apply collaborative multimedia approaches to bring the story of four polar research expeditions to the general public and the classroom. The four expeditions (measurement of ice sheet dynamics in Greenland, a study of the McMurdo ecosystem over austral winter, installation of a buoy array in the Beaufort Gyre, and exploration of the Gakkel Ridge) were chosen based on their broad range of disciplines and relevance to the three primary IPY research emphasis areas defined by NSF. A science writer and a professional photographer will join each expedition and file dispatches for a daily Webcast. The posting will feature science updates, logistical challenges, team member profiles, and life at sea (or on the ice). The writer will also coordinate real-time phone patches from PIs in the field to audiences at the Museum of Science, Boston, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, The Field Museum, Chicago, the Houston Museum of Natural Science, the Birch Aquarium, San Diego, the Pacific Science Center, Seattle, National Public Radio "Talk of the Nation: Science Friday," CBS News, and to student "reporters" writing for Scholastic Online. At the museums, the "Live from the Ice" interactive phone calls will be preceded by a background presentation by a scientist, who will also moderate the live discussion between the public and researchers in the field. A 20-30 minute satellite phone call will allow the public to ask the researchers questions about their research while it's happening. In addition to building and promoting an online experience, a museum exhibit featuring models of Arctic instruments and informative kiosks will be developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Exhibit Center. Each of our partner museums will also provide a "leave-behind" component to continue to educate

  9. Living on the edge.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1989-01-01

    A brief update on the destruction of the environment is given. The concern is for the coastal waters and rivers which are polluted daily by raw sewage, industrial waste, and sedimentation, e.g., the Juru in Malaysia, the Pasig in the Philippines, and the Chao Phraya in Thailand are open sewers by the time the rivers reach the sea or bay. Metropolitan Manila's river is said to be biologically dead from pollution, and the bays of Manila and Jakarta suffer from oxygen depletion. Unfortunately, the coastal area maintains population as well as the wealth of marine life. In the US in 1990, 75% of the population will live within 50 miles of a shore including the Great Lakes. 30 southeast Asia's 50 largest cities are located on or near a coast. Over fishing, over population, over developing, and over exploitation are unacceptable; the alternative is for man to correct his mistakes.

  10. Gaia Live in School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, N. A.; Barnes, R.; Soubiran, C.; Vogt, S.

    2014-07-01

    Gaia is the European Space Agency's (ESA) next major astronomy telescope mission that was launched December 19, 2013. Gaia will measure accurate distances to about one billion stars across our Milky Way, allowing us to better understand how our galaxy formed and evolved. Gaia will have a profound impact on our understand ing of the Universe and the nature of dark matter, and provide a deeper understanding of how planets form around stars in our local neighbourhood. Gaia scientists and science education advisors are organising a Gaia post-launch event to link approximately forty schools across Europe. The event will include a live stream connection to ESA Gaia Mission Control and local Gaia research students to act as “explainers” and give practical demonstrations in each school. This paper describes the challenges in conducting this Europe-wide event.

  11. Freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Alternative live-attenuated influenza vaccines based on modifications in the polymerase genes protect against epidemic and pandemic flu.

    PubMed

    Solórzano, Alicia; Ye, Jianqiang; Pérez, Daniel R

    2010-05-01

    Human influenza is a seasonal disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Influenza vaccination is the most effective means for disease prevention. We have previously shown that mutations in the PB1 and PB2 genes of the live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) from the cold-adapted (ca) influenza virus A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) could be transferred to avian influenza viruses and produce partially attenuated viruses. We also demonstrated that avian influenza viruses carrying the PB1 and PB2 mutations could be further attenuated by stably introducing a hemagglutinin (HA) epitope tag in the PB1 gene. In this work, we wanted to determine whether these modifications would also result in attenuation of a so-called triple reassortant (TR) swine influenza virus (SIV). Thus, the TR influenza A/swine/Wisconsin/14094/99 (H3N2) virus was generated by reverse genetics and subsequently mutated in the PB1 and PB2 genes. Here we show that a combination of mutations in this TR backbone results in an attenuated virus in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we show the potential of our TR backbone as a vaccine that provides protection against the 2009 swine-origin pandemic influenza H1N1 virus (S-OIV) when carrying the surface of a classical swine strain. We propose that the availability of alternative backbones to the conventional ca A/Ann Arbor/6/60 LAIV strain could also be useful in epidemic and pandemic influenza and should be considered for influenza vaccine development. In addition, our data provide evidence that the use of these alternative backbones could potentially circumvent the effects of original antigenic sin (OAS) in certain circumstances.

  13. Creating living machines

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, Roger D.; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Development of increasingly complex integrated cellular systems will be a major challenge for the next decade and beyond, as we apply the knowledge gained from the sub-disciplines of tissue engineering, synthetic biology, micro-fabrication and nanotechnology, systems biology, and developmental biology. In this prospective, we describe the current state-of-the-art in the context of differentiating source cells from more primitive, pluripotent cells, and organizing these cells into populations of a single cell type to produce the components or building blocks of higher order systems and finally, combining multiple cell types, possibly in combination with scaffolds possessing specific physical or chemical properties, to produce greater functionality. As these “living machines” increase in capabilities, exhibit emergent behavior and potentially reveal the ability for self-assembly, self-repair, and even self-replication, questions arise regarding the ethical implications of this work. Future prospects as well as ways of addressing these complex ethical questions will be addressed. PMID:24006130

  14. Lives Worth Living: Religious Education and Social Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    When people of faith participate in movements for social change, how are their religious and moral identities formed, challenged, and transformed? Although they have explicit and tangible goals as they participate in advocacy, protest, and boycotts, religious social activists also, James Jasper argues, craft "lives worth living" (1997).…

  15. Probiotics: "living drugs".

    PubMed

    Elmer, G W

    2001-06-15

    The uses, mechanisms of action, and safety of probiotics are discussed. Probiotics are live microorganisms or microbial mixtures administered to improve the patient's microbial balance, particularly the environment of the gastrointestinal tract and the vagina. The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii and the bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus, strain GG, have shown efficacy in clinical trials for the prevention of antimicrobial-associated diarrhea. Other probiotics that have demonstrated at least some promise as prophylaxis for this type of diarrhea are Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium longum, and Enterococcus faecium. The use of S. boulardii as an adjunctive treatment to therapy with metronidazole or vancomycin has been found in controlled studies to decrease further recurrences of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Other gastrointestinal disorders for which probiotics have been studied include traveler's diarrhea, acute infantile diarrhea, and acute diarrhea in adults. Several Lactobacillus species given in yogurt or in tablet or suppository form have shown clinical efficacy as a treatment for vaginal infections. Lactobacillus strains have also been examined as a treatment for urinary-tract infections. Putative mechanisms of action of probiotics include production of pathogen-inhibitory substances, inhibition of pathogen attachment, inhibition of the action of microbial toxins, stimulation of immunoglobulin A, and trophic effects on intestinal mucosa. The available probiotics are considered nonpathogenic, but even benign microorganisms can be infective when a patient is severely debilitated or immunosuppressed. Probiotics have demonstrated an ability to prevent and treat some infections. Effective use of probiotics could decrease patients' exposure to antimicrobials. Additional controlled studies are needed to clearly define the safety and efficacy of these agents.

  16. The living publication

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2012-06-04

    Within the ICSTI Insights Series we offer three articles on the 'living publication' that is already available to practitioners in the important field of crystal structure determination and analysis. While the specific examples are drawn from this particular field, we invite readers to draw parallels in their own fields of interest. The first article describes the present state of the crystallographic living publication, already recognized by an ALPSP (Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers) Award for Publishing Innovation in 2006. The second article describes the potential impact on the record of science as greater post-publication analysis becomes more common within currently accepted data deposition practices, using processed diffraction data as the starting point. The third article outlines a vision for the further improvement of crystallographic structure reports within potentially achievable enhanced data deposition practices, based upon raw (unprocessed) diffraction data. The IUCr in its Commissions and Journals has for many years emphasized the importance of publications being accompanied by data and the interpretation of the data in terms of atomic models. This has been followed as policy by numerous other journals in the field and its cognate disciplines. This practice has been well served by databases and archiving institutions such as the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), and the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD). Normally the models that are archived are interpretations of the data, consisting of atomic coordinates with their displacement parameters, along with processed diffraction data from X-ray, neutron or electron diffraction studies. In our current online age, a reader can not only consult the printed word, but can display and explore the results with molecular graphics software of exceptional quality. Furthermore, the routine availability of processed diffraction data allows

  17. Community Living Skills Guide: Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Kathy

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Sexuality. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to…

  18. Connecting with assisted living consumers.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kathleen A; Pinkowitz, Jackie

    2009-01-01

    Connecting with residents and their family members should be considered an integral part of medication therapy management services that pharmacists provide to assisted living communities. This article provides suggestions on how pharmacists can better connect and communicate with current and future assisted-living consumers and staff to optimize medication use, maintain resident function, and help residents age in place.

  19. Framework for Healthful Living Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    The Healthful Living Education program promotes behaviors that contribute to a healthful lifestyle and improved quality of life for all students. The Framework for Healthy Living Education supports and reinforces the goals and objectives of its three major components: health education, physical education, and alcohol and other drugs. When the…

  20. SOLO: Self Organizing Live Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    mance needs can vary in use-dependent ways. For example in a content sharing system, the lag-tolerance for a live - streaming use may depend on the kind...USA, Octo- ber 2005. [15] Qi Huang, Hai Jin, and Xiaofei Liao, “P2P Live Streaming with Tree-Mesh based Hybrid Overlay”, In Pro- ceedings of ICPP

  1. Community Living Skills: Nutrition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreps, Alice Roelofs; Dreith, Rita Vallero

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Nutrition I. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to…

  2. Where Plumes Live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    From the perspective of fluid dynamics, `Plumes or not?' might be the wrong question. Let me begin by defining a few terms. Plume with a `P' is the well-known thermal structure with thin (order 100 km) tail and large, bulbous head that originates at the core-mantle boundary. The thin tail/large, bulbous-head morphology has been generated in a number of laboratory and numerical experiments. It can be seen, for example, on the cover of the famous fluid dynamics text by Batchelor. There is a clearly-defined range of parameters for which this structure is the preferred solution for instabilities arising from a bottom boundary layer in a convecting fluid. For example, a strong temperature-dependent rheology is needed. By contrast, plume with a `p' is any cylindrical or quasi-cylindrical instability originating from a thermal (or thermo-chemical) boundary layer. In fluid dynamics plume is sometimes used interchangeable with jet. Unless there is a very small temperature drop across the core-mantle boundary or a rather remarkable balance between temperature and composition at the base of the mantle, there are almost certainly plumes. (Note the little p.) Are these plumes the thermal structures with thin (order 100 km) tails and large bulbous heads or could they be broad, hot regions such as the degree 2 pattern seen in global seismic tomography images of the lower mantle, or the disconnected droplets seen in chaotic convection? To study this question, I will present a sequence of numerical `experiments' that illustrate the morphology of instabilities from a basal thermal boundary layer, i.e., plumes. Some of the aspects I will present include: spherical geometry, temperature-and pressure-dependence of rheology, internal heating, pressure-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, variable coefficient of thermal diffusivity, phase transformations, and compositional layering at the base of the mantle. The goal is to map out the parameters and conditions where Plumes live

  3. A Live Attenuated Equine H3N8 Influenza Vaccine Is Highly Immunogenic and Efficacious in Mice and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Baz, Mariana; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Zengel, James; Cheng, Xing; Treanor, John J.; Jin, Hong

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Equine influenza viruses (EIV) are responsible for rapidly spreading outbreaks of respiratory disease in horses. Although natural infections of humans with EIV have not been reported, experimental inoculation of humans with these viruses can lead to a productive infection and elicit a neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, EIV have crossed the species barrier to infect dogs, pigs, and camels and therefore may also pose a threat to humans. Based on serologic cross-reactivity of H3N8 EIV from different lineages and sublineages, A/equine/Georgia/1/1981 (eq/GA/81) was selected to produce a live attenuated candidate vaccine by reverse genetics with the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of the eq/GA/81 wild-type (wt) virus and the six internal protein genes of the cold-adapted (ca) A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) vaccine donor virus, which is the backbone of the licensed seasonal live attenuated influenza vaccine. In both mice and ferrets, intranasal administration of a single dose of the eq/GA/81 ca vaccine virus induced neutralizing antibodies and conferred complete protection from homologous wt virus challenge in the upper respiratory tract. One dose of the eq/GA/81 ca vaccine also induced neutralizing antibodies and conferred complete protection in mice and nearly complete protection in ferrets upon heterologous challenge with the H3N8 (eq/Newmarket/03) wt virus. These data support further evaluation of the eq/GA/81 ca vaccine in humans for use in the event of transmission of an equine H3N8 influenza virus to humans. IMPORTANCE Equine influenza viruses have crossed the species barrier to infect other mammals such as dogs, pigs, and camels and therefore may also pose a threat to humans. We believe that it is important to develop vaccines against equine influenza viruses in the event that an EIV evolves, adapts, and spreads in humans, causing disease. We generated a live attenuated H3N8 vaccine candidate and demonstrated that the vaccine was immunogenic and

  4. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  5. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Valve Disease Heart valve disease is a lifelong condition. However, ... all of your medicines as prescribed. Pregnancy and Heart Valve Disease Mild or moderate heart valve disease during pregnancy ...

  6. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... considered, plays a key role in diabetes care. Connecting with other people living with diabetes that understand ... affected by diabetes to find that support. Our Family Link program connects parents of children with type ...

  7. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  8. Technology for Independent Living: Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Alexandra, Ed.

    This sourcebook provides information for the practical implementation of independent living technology in the everyday rehabilitation process. "Information Services and Resources" lists databases, clearinghouses, networks, research and development programs, toll-free telephone numbers, consumer protection caveats, selected publications, and…

  9. Living with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Smoking and Your Heart Stroke Send ... D.), you’re more likely to also have coronary heart disease , heart attack , stroke , and transient ischemic attack ("mini- ...

  10. Living with von Willebrand Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With von Willebrand Disease If you have von Willebrand disease (VWD), you ... that they get tested too. Pregnancy and von Willebrand Disease Pregnancy can be a challenge for women who ...

  11. Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir When & How to Wash Hands: Key Times and Tips Show Me the Science: ...

  12. Parent and Child Living Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pushaw, David R.

    1978-01-01

    Parent and child living centers offer a program to improve parenting skills with areas of learning including child growth and development, family management, home care and repair, and personal growth and development. (MM)

  13. Living With Diabetes: Foot Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  14. Living with Diabetes: Foot Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  15. A Live Attenuated H7N3 Influenza Virus Vaccine is Well-tolerated and Immunogenic in a Phase I Trial in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Kawsar R.; Karron, Ruth A.; Callahan, Karen A.; Luke, Catherine J.; DiLorenzo, Susan C.; Chen, Grace L.; Lamirande, Elaine W.; Jin, Hong; Coelingh, Kathy L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2009-01-01

    Background Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) are being developed and tested against a variety of influenza viruses with pandemic potential. We describe the results of an open label Phase I trial of a live attenuated H7N3 virus vaccine. Methods and Findings The H7N3 BC 2004/AA ca virus is a live attenuated, cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive influenza virus derived by reverse genetics from the wild-type low pathogenicity avian influenza virus A/chicken/British Columbia/CN-6/2004 (H7N3) and the A/AA/6/60 ca (H2N2) virus that is the Master Donor Virus of the live, intranasal seasonal influenza vaccine. We evaluated the safety, infectivity, and immunogenicity of two doses of 107.5 TCID50 of the vaccine administered by nasal spray 5 weeks apart to normal healthy seronegative adult volunteers in an inpatient isolation unit. The subjects were followed for 2 months after 1 dose of vaccine or for 4 weeks after the second dose. Twenty-one subjects received the first dose of the vaccine, and 17 subjects received two doses. The vaccine was generally well tolerated. No serious adverse events occurred during the trial. The vaccine was highly restricted in replication: 6 (29%) subjects had virus recoverable by culture or by rRT-PCR after the first dose. Replication of vaccine virus was not detected following the second dose. Despite the restricted replication of the vaccine, 90% of the subjects developed an antibody response as measured by any assay: 62% by hemagglutination inhibition assay, 48% by microneutralization assay, 48% by ELISA for H7 HA-specific serum IgG or 71% by ELISA for H7 HA-specific serum IgA, after either one or two doses. Following the first dose, vaccine-specific IgG secreting cells as measured by ELISPOT increased from a mean of 0.1 to 41.6/106 PBMCs; vaccine specific IgA secreting cells increased from 2 to 16.4/106 PBMCs. The antibody secreting cell response after the second dose was less vigorous, which is consistent with the observed low

  16. Living Membranes as Environmental Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-19

    addition to the core results, we have explored important aspects of the system, including loading capacity, long-term stability, detection capacity, and...Oct-2011 30-Sep-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Living Membranes as Environmental Detectors The views, opinions...Report: Living Membranes as Environmental Detectors Report Title The work conducted over the course of this program has made significant progress

  17. Living Well with Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Living Well with Sickle Cell Disease Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir People with sickle cell disease can live full lives and enjoy most ...

  18. Video fingerprinting for live events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Mehmet; Haitsma, Jaap; Barvinko, Pavlo; Langelaar, Gerhard; Maas, Martijn

    2009-02-01

    Multimedia fingerprinting (robust hashing) as a content identification technology is emerging as an effective tool for preventing unauthorized distribution of commercial content through user generated content (UGC) sites. Research in the field has mainly considered content types with slow distribution cycles, e.g. feature films, for which reference fingerprint ingestion and database indexing can be performed offline. As a result, research focus has been on improving the robustness and search speed. Live events, such as live sports broadcasts, impose new challenges on a fingerprinting system. For instance, highlights from a soccer match are often available-and viewed-on UGC sites well before the end of the match. In this scenario, the fingerprinting system should be able to ingest and index live content online and offer continuous search capability, where new material is identifiable within minutes of broadcast. In this paper, we concentrate on algorithmic and architectural challenges we faced when developing a video fingerprinting solution for live events. In particular, we discuss how to effectively utilize fast sorting algorithms and a master-slave architecture for fast and continuous ingestion of live broadcasts.

  19. Bioprospection of cold-adapted yeasts with biotechnological potential from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Martorell, María Martha; Ruberto, Lucas Adolfo Mauro; Fernández, Pablo Marcelo; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía Inés; Mac Cormack, Walter Patricio

    2017-03-08

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes at low temperature of yeasts isolated from 25 de Mayo island, Antarctica, and to identify those exhibiting one or more of the evaluated enzymatic activities. A total of 105 yeast isolates were obtained from different samples and 66 were identified. They belonged to 12 basidiomycetous and four ascomycetous genera. Most of the isolates were ascribed to the genera Cryptococcus, Mrakia, Cystobasidium, Rhodotorula, Gueomyces, Phenoliferia, Leucosporidium, and Pichia. Results from enzymes production at low temperatures revealed that the Antarctic environment contains metabolically diverse cultivable yeasts, which represent potential tools for biotechnological applications. While most the isolates proved to produce 2-4 of the investigated exoenzymes, two of them evidenced the six evaluated enzymatic activities: Pichia caribbica and Guehomyces pullulans, which were characterized as psycrotolerant and psycrophilic, respectively. In addition, P. caribbica could assimilate several n-alkanes and diesel fuel. The enzyme production profile and hydrocarbons assimilation capacity, combined with its high level of biomass production and the extended exponential growth phase make P. caribbica a promising tool for cold environments biotechnological purposes in the field of cold-enzymes production and oil spills bioremediation as well.

  20. The genome of the polar eukaryotic microalga Coccomyxa subellipsoidea reveals traits of cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillaume; Agarkova, Irina; Grimwood, Jane; Kuo, Alan; Brueggeman, Andrew; Dunigan, David D.; Gurnon, James; Ladunga, Istvan; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Proschold, Thomas; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Weeks, Donald; Tamada, Takashi; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.

    2012-02-13

    Background Little is known about the mechanisms of adaptation of life to the extreme environmental conditions encountered in polar regions. Here we present the genome sequence of a unicellular green alga from the division chlorophyta, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C-169, which we will hereafter refer to as C-169. This is the first eukaryotic microorganism from a polar environment to have its genome sequenced. Results The 48.8 Mb genome contained in 20 chromosomes exhibits significant synteny conservation with the chromosomes of its relatives Chlorella variabilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The order of the genes is highly reshuffled within synteny blocks, suggesting that intra-chromosomal rearrangements were more prevalent than inter-chromosomal rearrangements. Remarkably, Zepp retrotransposons occur in clusters of nested elements with strictly one cluster per chromosome probably residing at the centromere. Several protein families overrepresented in C. subellipsoidae include proteins involved in lipid metabolism, transporters, cellulose synthases and short alcohol dehydrogenases. Conversely, C-169 lacks proteins that exist in all other sequenced chlorophytes, including components of the glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol anchoring system, pyruvate phosphate dikinase and the photosystem 1 reaction center subunit N (PsaN). Conclusions We suggest that some of these gene losses and gains could have contributed to adaptation to low temperatures. Comparison of these genomic features with the adaptive strategies of psychrophilic microbes suggests that prokaryotes and eukaryotes followed comparable evolutionary routes to adapt to cold environments.

  1. A novel cold-adapted lipase, LP28, from a mesophilic Streptomyces strain.

    PubMed

    Simkhada, Jaya Ram; Yoo, Hah Young; Cho, Seung Sik; Choi, Yun Hee; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Don Hee; Yoo, Jin Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Fossil fuel is limited but its usage has been growing rapidly, thus the fuel is predicted to be completely running out and causing an unbearable global energy crisis in the near future. To solve this potential crisis, incorporating with increasing environmental concerns, significant attentions have been given to biofuel production in the recent years. With the aim of isolating a microbial biocatalyst with potential application in the field of biofuel, a lipase from Streptomyces sp. CS628, LP28, was purified using hydroxyapatite column chromatography followed by a gel filtration. Molecular weight of LP28 was estimated to be 32,400 Da by SDS-PAGE. The activity was the highest at 30 °C and pH 8.0 and was stable at pH 6.0-8.0 and below 25 °C. The enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl decanoate (C10), a medium chain substrate. Furthermore, LP28 non-specifically hydrolyzed triolein releasing both 1,2- and 1,3-diolein. More importantly, LP28 manifestly catalyzed biodiesel production using palm oil and methanol; therefore, it can be a potential candidate in the field of biofuel.

  2. Comparative expression study to increase the solubility of cold adapted Vibrio proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niiranen, Laila; Espelid, Sigrun; Karlsen, Christian R; Mustonen, Milla; Paulsen, Steinar M; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Willassen, Nils P

    2007-03-01

    Functional and structural studies require gene overexpression and purification of soluble proteins. We wanted to express proteins from the psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio salmonicida in Escherichia coli, but encountered solubility problems. To improve the solubility of the proteins, we compared the effects of six N-terminal fusion proteins (Gb1, Z, thioredoxin, GST, MBP and NusA) and an N-terminal His6-tag. The selected test set included five proteins from the fish pathogen V. salmonicida and two related products from the mesophilic human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We tested the expression in two different expression strains and at three different temperatures (16, 23 and 37 degrees C). His6-tag was the least effective tag, and these vector constructs were also difficult to transform. MBP and NusA performed best, expressing soluble proteins with all fusion partners in at least one of the cell types. In some cases MBP, GST and thioredoxin fusions resulted in products of incorrect size. The effect of temperature is complex: in most cases level of expression increased with temperature, whereas the effect on solubility was opposite. We found no clear connection between the preferred expression temperature of the protein and the temperature of the original host organism's natural habitat.

  3. Extreme preconditioning: cold adaptation through sea swimming as a means to improving surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harper, C Mark

    2012-04-01

    The practice of sea bathing for its health benefits was popularised by Richard Russell in Regency Brighton during the 18th Century. Although the cures he claimed it could effect seem a little far-fetched today, as with many historical remedies, there is much to be gained from revisiting such theories in the light of modern medical research. In this paper I will draw parallels between the surgical stress response and the response to cold exposure and hypothesise how a programme of sea bathing may be used to enhance postoperative recovery and reduce preoperative complications.

  4. Dynamics of some parameters of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats during cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Yu.I.; Sedova, L.A.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Shorin, Yu.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper examines the combined behavior of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats at stages of long-term adaptation of the animals to moderate cold. After decapitation of male Wister rats, the corticosterone concentration in the blood plasma was determined by saturation analysis and serum levels of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The thymus was weighed and the structure of the popliteal lymph nodes (LN) was studied in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with azure II-eosin. Morphometry of the structural components of LN was undertaken and the numbers of the various cell forms per 1000 cells were counted in different zones of LN. The increase in activity of the lymphoid tissue in the phase of adaptation may be connected with intensification of the peripheral action of thyroid hormones. During long-term adaptation, in the phase of consistently increased specific resistance, a new type of endocrine-lymphoid relation is formed, and it differs significantly both in the original state and in the acute phase of stress.

  5. Rheological changes in mammalian egg cytoskeleton in response to cold adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prulière, Gérard; Nguyen, Eric; Nguyen Bui Xuan, Renard, Jean-Paul

    1991-05-01

    The ability of mammalian eggs to support freezing is shown to be related to a reversible reorganization of their cytoskeleton induced by organic compounds used as protectants. 1,2 propanediol which is very effective for the successful freezing of early embryonic stages induces the formation of a fairly homogeneous gel within the cytoplasm in which the cortical layer of highly entangled polymers is no longer apparent. In vitro, propanediol influences specifically interactions between actin and binding proteins and induces the formation of microporous and homogeneous gels able to retain a significant fraction of water within their pores. When eggs are first submitted to a partial dehydration at room temperature they become able to support rapid freezing and thawing in the presence of propanediol probably because the remaining cellular water becomes osmotically inactive. This indicates that the rheological changes of the cytoplasm that occur in the presence of propanediol make the cell able to support the physical and chemical modifications that affect their microenvironment at low temperature.

  6. Cold adaptive thermogenesis following consumption of certain pungent spice principles: A validation study.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Chaitanya; Anilakumar, K R

    2017-02-01

    Identifying a means to activate or potentiate thermogenic mechanisms through ingestion of dietary compounds have important implications in cold endurance and survival. Although many reports discuss the thermogenic potential of spices, it is surprising that none of the studies verify whether consumption of spices can improve cold endurance. In this study, we have attempted to evaluate if ingestion of certain spices can activate heat-generating mechanisms in the body such that a fall in. core body temperature (CBT) can be delayed or prevented when faced with a cold challenge. Ten commonly used spices in the Indian cuisine were chosen and 70% ethanol extract of the spices were fed orally to male Wistar rats at a dose of 250mg/kg for a period of 7 days. A change in CBT during cold exposure was recorded before and after treatment. At the end of the experiment, plasma norepinephrine and serum free fatty acid levels were estimated. We observed that among the ten spices, treatment with cinnamon and pepper extracts showed significant improvement in comparison to the control group. Based on evidence in literature and the HPLC-MS analysis from our lab, we hypothesized that the effects of the pepper and cinnamon extracts might be due to their piperine and cinnamaldehyde content respectively. However, no improved endurance was observed when they were administered alone. Poor endurance following depletion of endogenous norepinephrine levels using reserpine indicated its involvement in mediating the heat generating processes. However, it is noteworthy that green tea and spice treated animals exhibited a fall in CBT which was lower than their initial fall. In conclusion, our findings provide experimental evidence that ingestion of spices, viz., pepper and cinnamon, might elicit thermogenic responses such that hypothermia can be delayed or prevented upon cold exposure.

  7. Uncovering Mechanisms for Repair and Protection in Cold Environments Through Studies of Cold Adapted Archaea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-18

    a role in M. burtonii. Glycine betaine solute-binding protein (Mbur_0503): Given the ability of M. burtonii to grow is dependent upon the...stability of enzymes at low temperatures, this may be facilitated by the intracellular accumulation of osmolytes such as glycine betaine , which serve as

  8. The skin on the move but cold adapted: Fundamental misconceptions in the laboratory and clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Terence J.

    2010-01-01

    The skin is constantly on the move and at a temperature below 37ºC. The epidermis is a factory, and its blood supply and lymphatic drainage, as well as adipose tissue, are much dependent on movement and influenced by cooling. Neither histopathology (still pictures) nor in vitro studies at 37ºC reflect the true picture. Recent publications neglect older literature exploring these issues. PMID:23130182

  9. Cloning and Characterization of Cold-Adapted α-Amylase from Antarctic Arthrobacter agilis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Hyun; Choi, Jong-Il

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the gene encoding an α-amylase from a psychrophilic Arthrobacter agilis PAMC 27388 strain was cloned into a pET-28a(+) vector and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The recombinant α-amylase with a molecular mass of about 80 kDa was purified by using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. This recombinant α-amylase exhibited optimal activity at pH 3.0 and 30 °C and was highly stable at varying temperatures (30-60 °C) and within the pH range of 4.0-8.0. Furthermore, α-amylase activity was enhanced in the presence of FeCl3 (1 mM) and β-mercaptoethanol (5 mM), while CoCl2 (1 mM), ammonium persulfate (5 mM), SDS (10 %), Triton X-100 (10 %), and urea (1 %) inhibited the enzymatic activity. Importantly, the presence of Ca(2+) ions and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) did not affect enzymatic activity. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis showed that recombinant A. agilis α-amylase hydrolyzed starch, maltotetraose, and maltotriose, producing maltose as the major end product. These results make recombinant A. agilis α-amylase an attractive potential candidate for industrial applications in the textile, paper, detergent, and pharmaceutical industries.

  10. Engineering low-temperature expression systems for heterologous production of cold-adapted enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bjerga, Gro Elin Kjæreng; Lale, Rahmi; Williamson, Adele Kim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Production of psychrophilic enzymes in the commonly used mesophilic expression systems is hampered by low intrinsic stability of the recombinant enzymes at the optimal host growth temperatures. Unless strategies for low-temperature expression are advanced, research on psychrophilic enzymes may end up being biased toward those that can be stably produced in commonly used mesophilic host systems. Two main strategies are currently being explored for the development of low-temperature expression in bacterial hosts: (i) low-temperature adaption of existing mesophilic expression systems, and (ii) development of new psychrophilic hosts. These developments include genetic engineering of the expression cassettes to optimize the promoter/operator systems that regulate heterologous expression. In this addendum we present our efforts in the development of such low-temperature expression systems, and speculate about future advancements in the field and potential applications. PMID:26710170

  11. Legionella species diversity and dynamics from surface reservoir to tap water: from cold adaptation to thermophily.

    PubMed

    Lesnik, René; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2016-05-01

    Water samples of the Drinking Water Supply System (DWSS) of the city of Braunschweig were analysed for its Legionella species composition using genus-specific PCR amplicons and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprint analyses based on 16S rRNA genes. These analyses comprised the whole supply chain including raw water, treatment process and large-scale storage, and a seasonal study of finished drinking water sampled monthly from cold and hot tap water. Treatment of raw water had a major impact on Legionella species by reducing their diversity and abundances. The Legionella species composition of the tap water was highly distinct from that of both source waters. In cold water, 8-14 different phylotypes of Legionella (PTLs) were observed per sample with relative abundances ranging from >1% to 53%. In hot water, L. pneumophila was present during all seasons at high relative abundances (8-40%) accompanied by 5-14 other PTLs of which 6 PTLs were in common with cold water. This thermophilic Legionella community, including L. pneumophila, was able to grow in the hot water above 50 °C. Such thermophilic Legionella populations are of general relevance for drinking water management and public health, but also for the ecology and evolution of the genus Legionella.

  12. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by cold-adapted mixed and pure bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, G M; Uotila, J S; Häggblom, M M

    2007-04-01

    An aerobic mixed bacterial culture (CL-EMC-1) capable of utilizing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as the sole source of carbon and energy with a growth temperature range of 3 to 30 degrees C and optimum of 18 to 22 degrees C was enriched from activated sludge. Transient accumulation of tert-butanol (TBA) occurred during utilization of MTBE at temperatures from 3 degrees C to 14 degrees C, but TBA did not accumulate above 18 degrees C. The culture utilized MTBE at a concentration of up to 1.5 g l(-1) and TBA of up to 7 g l(-1). The culture grew on MTBE at a pH range of 5 to 9, with an optimum pH of 6.5 to 7.1. The specific growth rate of the CL-EMC-1 culture on 0.1 g l(-1) of MTBE at 22 degrees C and pH 7.1 was 0.012 h(-1), and the growth yield was 0.64 g (dry weight) g(-1). A new MTBE-utilizing bacterium, Variovorax paradoxus strain CL-8, isolated from the mixed culture utilized MTBE, TBA, 2-hydroxy isobutyrate, lactate, methacrylate, and acetate as sole sources of carbon and energy but not 2-propanol, acetone, methanol, formaldehyde, or formate. Two other isolates, Hyphomicrobium facilis strain CL-2 and Methylobacterium extorquens strain CL-4, isolated from the mixed culture were able to grow on C(1) compounds. The combined consortium could thus utilize all of the carbon of MTBE.

  13. Electronic Interfacing with Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, James T.

    The direct interfacing of living cells with inorganic electronic materials, components or systems has led to the development of two broad categories of devices that can (1) transduce biochemical signals generated by biological components into electrical signals and (2) transduce electronically generated signals into biochemical signals. The first category of devices permits the monitoring of living cells, the second, enables control of cellular processes. This review will survey this exciting area with emphasis on the fundamental issues and obstacles faced by researchers. Devices and applications that use both prokaryotic (microbial) and eukaryotic (mammalian) cells will be covered. Individual devices described include microbial biofuel cells that produce electricity, bioelectrical reactors that enable electronic control of cellular metabolism, living cell biosensors for the detection of chemicals and devices that permit monitoring and control of mammalian physiology.

  14. Live Imaging of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2015-01-01

    Live lung imaging has spanned the discovery of capillaries in the frog lung by Malpighi to the current use of single and multiphoton imaging of intravital and isolated perfused lung preparations incorporating fluorescent molecular probes and transgenic reporter mice. Along the way, much has been learned about the unique microcirculation of the lung, including immune cell migration and the mechanisms by which cells at the alveolar-capillary interface communicate with each other. In this review, we highlight live lung imaging techniques as applied to the role of mitochondria in lung immunity, mechanisms of signal transduction in lung compartments, studies on the composition of alveolar wall liquid, and neutrophil and platelet trafficking in the lung under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. New applications of live lung imaging and the limitations of current techniques are discussed. PMID:24245941

  15. [Health effects of living habits].

    PubMed

    Vuori, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    Single healthy living habits such as non-smoking and regular physical activity decrease the risk of common non-communicable diseases, unsuccessful aging and premature death to a small to moderate degree. Their cumulative effects are, however, large. Only a small minority of people adhere well to all healthy living habits or even the healthiest ones. Consequently, the population attributable fractions of major public health problems due to unhealthy lifestyles are large. Substantial improvement of public health calls for policies and programs to influence the root causes of the lifestyles in the multiple environments and systems where they are developed, maintained, and changed.

  16. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  17. Astronomy Cast Live: Live Blogging Today's Science to the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemrose-Fetter, Rebecca; Gay, P. L.; Astronomy Cast LIVE Team

    2008-05-01

    In today's digital, on-demand society, consumers of information both want to know exactly what is happening as it is happening, and to be able to subscribe to content of their choosing. Meeting the needs of these tech savvy individuals are bloggers, podcasters and vodcasters. Using text, audio, and video to reach their respective audiences, these communicators are the new face of public outreach and journalism, but even their communications means are starting to become passé in the face of live blogging. The idea behind live blogging is simple: Take any person - even an undergraduate - with an Internet connected device, put them someplace interesting, and have them report on what they are seeing and experiencing online in real-time. This new tool is bringing astronomy enthusiasts around the world the thrill of live astronomy announcements, attending talks in real, and being "in the room" with astronomers via an Internet connection. These audiences can be anyone, from any nation, with any age. Beyond the public communications benefits of this program, it is also a program that allows the participation of early undergraduate students in science conferences. To date, two undergraduate students and five E/PO professionals have live blogged text, audio, and video content from three science conferences and a shuttle launch. Together, they have produced over 200 hundred stories that have reached tens of thousands of people around the world. In this poster we describe how we have made astronomy live blogging a reality from both the technical and personal standpoint. This project is funded through NSF grant # 0744944.

  18. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them.

  19. Functional Literacy in People's Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabušicová, Milada; Oplatková, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a qualitative study into the lives of people with inadequate functional literacy skills. The data were collected through a biographical interview with a respondent whose characteristics correspond to those of a hypothetical person likely to exhibit signs of low functional literacy. The characteristics, such as…

  20. Chicanas: Their Voices, Their Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockert, Lucia Fox, Ed.

    This book is an oral history of ten Chicana women ranging in ages from 84 to 24. The collection of interviews reflects how their hard work and determination have significantly changed their lives for the better. The backgrounds of the women vary; some were born in Mexico and moved to the United States. Others were born in the Southwest and later…

  1. Living History: F. Eugene Yates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, John

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the American Physiological Society (APS) initiated the Living History of Physiology Archival Program to recognize senior members who have made significant contributions during their career to the advancement of the discipline and the profession of physiology. During 2008, the APS Cardiovascular Section selected Francis Eugene Yates to be…

  2. Living History: Clark M. Blatteis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan, Ning

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the American Physiological Society (APS) initiated the Living History Project to recognize senior members who have made extraordinary contributions during their career to the advancement of the discipline and profession of physiology. During 2007, the APS Section of Environmental and Exercise Physiology selected Clark M. Blatteis to be…

  3. Living History: Elsworth R. Buskirk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the American Physiological Society (APS) initiated the Living History of Physiology Archival Program to recognize senior members who have made significant contributions during their career to the advancement of the discipline and the profession of physiology. Subsequently, the leadership of the APS Section of Environmental and Exercise…

  4. Educating Lives for Christian Wisdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Darin H.; Wadell, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how educating lives for Christian wisdom might serve as an antidote to the vice of "acedia," a prominent feature of the culture of contemporary higher education. After suggesting that the capital vice of "acedia" seems to capture well various facets of our present age and how the pursuit of wisdom serves…

  5. Teen Living. 7015. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education Services.

    This curriculum guide was developed as a resource for teachers to use in planning and implementing a competency-based instructional program on teenage living at the high school level. It contains materials for a 2-semester consumer home economics course, based on the North Carolina Program of Studies (revised 1992); it is designed to help students…

  6. Investigating Evolution with Living Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlessman, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes two investigative labs that use live plants to illustrate important biological principles, include quantitative analysis, and require very little equipment. Each lab is adaptable to a variety of class sizes, course contents, and student backgrounds. Topics include the evolution of flower size in Mimulus and pollination of Brassicas. (DDR)

  7. Effective Communication. Successful Living Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This module on effective communication is one of a series of modules designed to help teach students to become more self-sufficient in their personal and professional lives. This module contains teacher and student materials that are planned to help students become more relaxed, prepared, and confident when using written and verbal communications.…

  8. I Know Where They Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worsley, Ed, Ed.

    This science-oriented reading readiness text is provided in two versions: English and Navajo. It consists of large black-and-white drawings of animals, birds, and insects familiar to the Southwestern U.S. One picture is provided on each page, labeled with the following simple sentences: "This is a [name of the animal]. He lives in [name of…

  9. Shakespeare Live! and Character Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Cathy A.

    This paper discusses a live production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" (in full costume but with no sets) for all public middle school and high school students in Harrisonburg and Rockingham, Virginia. The paper states that the "Character Counts" issues that are covered in the play are: decision making, responsibility and…

  10. Where You Live: Risk Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Where you live page shows visitors to the risk assessment website how to contact their local regional office by state. Since these link to pages maintained by the local offices they will have the most up-to-date contact information.

  11. Senior to Senior: Living Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Senior to Senior: Living Lessons is a program created to provide meaningful horticulture therapy activities for community minority elders (60 years of age and older) and senior college students (20 years of age and older) from an Historically Black University. The program's objectives were to promote positive intergenerational relationships and to…

  12. Finding a Place to Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information and student activities on bird habitats, how birds have adapted to living in these habitats, and bird migration. Each activity includes an objective, recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. Ready-to-copy student materials (puzzles and worksheets) are included. (JN)

  13. College for Living Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Robert G., Jr.; And Others

    This five-part manual was designed to help volunteer instructors in Northern Virginia Community College's College for Living Program to conduct survival and socialization courses for handicapped adults. After introductory material summarizing general principles and specific suggestions, Robert Templin provides information on the skills and…

  14. Living in the Gifted Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVries, Arlene R.

    2010-01-01

    Raising gifted children is both a joy and a challenge. How does one survive and thrive living in a gifted family? Parents play an essential role in helping children develop appreciation and respect for the world and their place in it. Intellectual development and emotional reactions begin at an early age, and many major behavioral patterns are set…

  15. Living Assessment Passes the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskind, Dorothy C.

    2015-01-01

    The author, a 5th-grade teacher at an independent boys' school, gives a first-person account of how her constant assessments and requirement that her students be active participants in their own learning gainsays the need for high-stakes, standardized testing. She posits a "living assessment" that is intertwined, interactive and…

  16. Teaching Activities of Daily Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, James E.

    Provided are strategies for teaching activities of daily living (ADL), which include dressing, eating, grooming, toileting, and basic homemakine, to severely retarded students. Reviewed are the steps necessary to teach ADL skills: ADL assessment, identification of appropriate strategies and tactics, and task analysis. Explained are four common…

  17. Epidemic Outbreak Surveillance (EOS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    protocol using the nucleic acid extraction protocol on normal nasal wash samples spiked with titered Influenza A vin~s from Virapur, LLC. FluMist Vaccine...determine specificity between FluMist and wild type influenza . The testing concluded that FluMist was undistinguishable from wild type influenza on the...wild type influenza in patients exhibiting influenza symptoms that had received the FluMist Vaccine. Gene Expression Automated Processing Training was

  18. Focusing light through living tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellekoop, I. M.; Aegerter, C. M.

    2010-02-01

    Tissues such as skin, fat or cuticle are non-transparent because inhomogeneities in the tissue scatter light. We demonstrate experimentally that light can be focused through turbid layers of living tissue, in spite of scattering. Our method is based on the fact that coherent light forms an interference pattern, even after hundreds of scattering events. By spatially shaping the wavefront of the incident laser beam, this interference pattern was modified to make the scattered light converge to a focus. In contrast to earlier experiments, where light was focused through solid objects, we focused light through living pupae of Drosophila melanogaster. We discuss a dynamic wavefront shaping algorithm that follows changes due to microscopic movements of scattering particles in real time. We relate the performance of the algorithm to the measured timescale of the changes in the speckle pattern and analyze our experiment in the light of Laser Doppler flowmetry. Applications in particle tracking, imaging, and optical manipulation are discussed.

  19. Steps to Independent Living Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This set of six activity books and a teacher's guide is designed to help students from eighth grade to adulthood with special needs to learn independent living skills. The activity books have a reading level of 2.5 and address: (1) "How to Get Well When You're Sick or Hurt," including how to take a temperature, see a doctor, and use medicines…

  20. Exact law of live nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbel, Mark Ya.

    2005-07-01

    Exact law of mortality dynamics in changing populations and environment is derived. It includes no explicit characteristics of animal- environment interactions (metabolism etc) which are a must for life; it is universal for all animals, from single cell yeast to humans, with their drastically different biology, evolutionary history, and complexity; it is rapidly (within few percent of life span) reversible. Such law is unique for live systems with their homeostatic self-adjustment to environment (cf. thermodynamics of liquids and glasses). The law which is valid for all live, and only live, systems is their specific natural law. Mortality is an instrument of natural selection and biological diversity. Its law, which is preserved in evolution of all species, is a conservation law of mortality, selection, evolution, biology. The law implies new kind of intrinsic mortality and adaptation which dominate in evolutionary unprecedented protected populations and, in contrast to species specific natural selection, proceed via universal stepwise rungs and reduce to universal cellular mechanism. The law demonstrates that intrinsic mortality and at least certain aspects of aging are disposable evolutionary byproducts, and directed genetic and/or biological changes may yield healthy and vital Methuselah lifespan. This is consistent with experiments. Universality implies that single cell yeast may provide a master key to the cellular mechanism of universal mortality, aging, selection, evolution, and its regulation in all animals. One may look for its manifestations in animal cells also, e.g., in their replicative senescence and cancer. Evolutionary origin and genetic nature of universality are suggested.

  1. Women living with environmental illness.

    PubMed

    Chircop, Andrea; Keddy, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    We used a case study approach to explore the experiences of 4 women who live with environmental illness (EI). From the unstructured interviews we found a variety of themes that pointed to the complexity of EI and its severe impact on the lives of these women, their families, and their significant others. The methodology was guided by an ecofeminist approach, which enabled a critical analysis of the data to move beyond the personal to the broader sociopolitical forces shaping society. We identified the following themes from the women's stories: indirect exposure to incitants through people with whom these women come in close physical contact; the phenomenon of burden of proof, meaning that these women are forced to explain and legitimize their illness on a continuous basis; taking refuge from a hostile environment in social isolation to a more controlled environment, not as a matter of choice, but because of the severity of the illness; and, finally, a change in value system was integral to the entire process of living with EI.

  2. Exact law of live nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbel‧, Mark Ya.

    2005-08-01

    The exact law of mortality dynamics in changing populations and environment is derived. It includes no explicit characteristics of animal-environment interactions (metabolism, etc.) which are a must for life; it is universal for all animals, from single-cell yeast to humans, with their drastically different biology, evolutionary history, and complexity; it is rapidly (within few percent of life span) reversible. Such a law is unique for live systems with their homeostatic self-adjustment to environment (cf. thermodynamics of liquids and glasses). The law which is valid for all live, and only live, systems is their specific natural law. Mortality is an instrument of natural selection and biological diversity. Its law, which is preserved in evolution of all species, is a conservation law of mortality, selection, evolution, biology. The law implies new kinds of intrinsic mortality and adaptation which dominate in evolutionary unprecedented protected populations and, in contrast to species-specific natural selection, proceed via universal stepwise rungs and reduce to universal cellular mechanism. The law demonstrates that intrinsic mortality and at least certain aspects of aging are disposable evolutionary byproducts, and directed genetic and/or biological changes may yield healthy and vital Methuselah lifespan. This is consistent with experiments. Universality implies that single-cell yeast may provide a master key to the cellular mechanism of universal mortality, aging, selection, evolution, and its regulation in all animals. One may look for its manifestations in animal cells also, e.g., in their replicative senescence and cancer. Evolutionary origin and genetic nature of universality are suggested.

  3. Short-Lived Climate Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2014-05-01

    Although carbon dioxide emissions are by far the most important mediator of anthropogenic climate disruption, a number of shorter-lived substances with atmospheric lifetimes of under a few decades also contribute significantly to the radiative forcing that drives climate change. In recent years, the argument that early and aggressive mitigation of the emission of these substances or their precursors forms an essential part of any climate protection strategy has gained a considerable following. There is often an implication that such control can in some way make up for the current inaction on carbon dioxide emissions. The prime targets for mitigation, known collectively as short-lived climate pollution (SLCP), are methane, hydrofluo-rocarbons, black carbon, and ozone. A re-examination of the issues shows that the benefits of early SLCP mitigation have been greatly exaggerated, largely because of inadequacies in the methodologies used to compare the climate effects of short-lived substances with those of CO2, which causes nearly irreversible climate change persisting millennia after emissions cease. Eventual mitigation of SLCP can make a useful contribution to climate protection, but there is little to be gained by implementing SLCP mitigation before stringent carbon dioxide controls are in place and have caused annual emissions to approach zero. Any earlier implementation of SLCP mitigation that substitutes to any significant extent for carbon dioxide mitigation will lead to a climate irreversibly warmer than will a strategy with delayed SLCP mitigation. SLCP mitigation does not buy time for implementation of stringent controls on CO2 emissions.

  4. Living and morking on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. P.

    When it becomes feasible to live and work on Mars, martian resources will be a critical part of the sustaining process. It will be necessary to drink water extracted from the martian environment, to make breathable air and fuel components from the martian atmosphere, and to shield or construct facilities using martian dirt. The ultimate use of martian resources may be the "terraforming" of that planet's global environment into an Earth-like biosphere for a population whose ancestors were born on a distant blue planet.

  5. Living and Working in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monserrate C.

    2000-01-01

    This document is a presentation about some of the challenges of living and working in space. The presentation shows slides of the Apollo 11 liftoff, Skylab in orbit, a Space Shuttle launch, and a slide of the International Space Station. It reviews the needs and effluents of the astronauts per day, and the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) systems. It shows a flow diagram of the Space Station Regenerative ECLS, which shows the various systems, and how they interact to control the environment and recycle the air, and water. There are other slides some of which show astronauts eating, brushing teeth, shaving, and sipping from a sip bottle while exercising.

  6. [Clinical evaluation of living donor].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Maria Piera; Comai, G; La Manna, G; Liviano D'Arcangelo, G; Monti, M; Feliciangeli, G; Stefoni, S

    2009-01-01

    When possible, living donor transplantation represents the best therapeutic strategy for patients suffering from chronic renal failure. Studying the donor allows a complete and thorough clinical, laboratory and instrumental assessment that guarantees good organ function whilst protecting the health of the donor. The main parameters considered within this framework are age, renal function, nephrological complications, comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, obesity, etc.), malignancies, and infection. Moreover, particular attention is paid to the sociopsychological aspects of the donation, particularly related to the donor, the recipient, and the entire family situation.

  7. Long-lived laser dye

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, A.N.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described of obtaining in a flashlamp pumped laser system, a long-lived flashpumped laser dye having a low threshold of lasing and a moderate output comprising the steps of: placing a dye solution comprising a laser dye, the N-methyl tosylate salt of 2-(4-pyridyl)-5-(4-methoxphenyl)oxazole, and a solvent into a laser dye cavity; screening the dye solution from ultraviolet light with an optical filter; flushing the dye solution with an inert gas; and optically pumping the dye solution with a flashlamp to produce laser emission.

  8. Living with Spina Bifida (at different ages)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Living With Spina Bifida Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the website provides information about living with spina bifida at different ages. Spina bifida affects the entire ...

  9. Live a Full Life with Fibro

    MedlinePlus

    ... Live a Full Life with Fibro Page Content Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain condition that affects 10 ... family, you can live an active life with fibromyalgia. Talking with Your Physician Take the first step ...

  10. Senior Living: Staying Positive and Moving Forward

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Feature: Senior Living Staying Positive and Moving Forward Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents ... page please turn Javascript on. For Juanita Kuhn, moving to an independent living facility is just the ...

  11. Gendered Living Arrangements among Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Philip N.; Petrescu-Prahova, Miruna

    2006-01-01

    Using data on disabilities from the 2000 Census, we found a consistent pattern of living arrangements that leaves children (aged 5-15 years) with disabilities living disproportionately with women. Children with disabilities are more likely to live with single parents, and especially their mothers, than are other children. Further, those who do not…

  12. Living Free: A Teacher Information Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Robin

    This workbook helps adolescents learn how to take charge of their own lives and happiness. The underlying idea is to teach them how to live responsibly. By learning to live responsibly, adolescents have the best chance of avoiding drugs, alcohol, and other addictive behaviors such as overeating and overspending. The workbook explains the steps to…

  13. Use of Live Supervision in Counselor Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubenzer, Donald L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated live supervision in counselor preparation programs by surveying 307 counselor preparation programs. Live supervision was used at 157 institutions and was used in preparing individual, group, and marriage and family counselors. At least 75 percent of programs provided live supervision weekly. Techniques of cotherapy and remote viewing…

  14. Magnetic Levitational Assembly for Living Material Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Liaudanskaya, Volha; Guven, Sinan; Migliaresi, Claudio; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-15

    Functional living materials with microscale compositional topographies are prevalent in nature. However, the creation of biomaterials composed of living micro building blocks, each programmed by composition, functionality, and shape, is still a challenge. A powerful yet simple approach to create living materials using a levitation-based magnetic method is presented.

  15. Inquiry and Living History, Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatney, Sharon; Smalley, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    This article, the first of a two-part series, introduces the living history program. This yearly, weeklong program features living portrayals of famous people, which becomes a catalyst for teaching curricular standards, as well as providing the spark for inquiry. Here, the authors describe how the yearly living history program was implemented and…

  16. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  17. Living well in the Neuropolis

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Des; Rose, Nikolas; Singh, Ilina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper is about the relationship between cities and brains: it charts the back‐and‐forth between the hectic, stressful lives of urban citizens, and a psychological and neurobiological literature that claims to make such stress both visible and knowable. But beyond such genealogical labour, the paper also asks: what can a sociology concerned with the effects of ‘biosocial’ agencies take from a scientific literature on the urban brain? What might sociology even contribute to that literature, in its turn? To investigate these possibilities, the paper centres on the emergence and description of what it calls ‘the Neuropolis’ – a term it deploys to hold together both an intellectual and scientific figure and a real, physical enclosure. The Neuropolis is an image of the city embedded in neuropsychological concepts and histories, but it also describes an embodied set of (sometimes pathological) relations and effects that take places between cities and the people who live in them. At the heart of the paper is an argument that finding a way to thread these phenomena together might open up new paths for thinking about ‘good’ life in the contemporary city. Pushing at this claim, the paper argues that mapping the relations, histories, spaces, and people held together by this term is a vital task for the future of urban sociology. PMID:27397945

  18. Mathematics for generative processes: Living and non-living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannantoni, Corrado

    2006-05-01

    The traditional Differential Calculus often shows its limits when describing living systems. These in fact present such a richness of characteristics that are, in the majority of cases, much wider than the description capabilities of the usual differential equations. Such an aspect became particularly evident during the research (completed in 2001) for an appropriate formulation of Odum's Maximum Em-Power Principle (proposed by the Author as a possible Fourth Thermodynamic Principle). In fact, in such a context, the particular non-conservative Algebra, adopted to account for both Quality and quantity of generative processes, suggested we introduce a faithfully corresponding concept of "derivative" (of both integer and fractional order) to describe dynamic conditions however variable. The new concept not only succeeded in pointing out the corresponding differential bases of all the rules of Emergy Algebra, but also represented the preferential guide in order to recognize the most profound physical nature of the basic processes which mostly characterize self-organizing Systems (co-production, co-injection, inter-action, feed-back, splits, etc.).From a mathematical point of view, the most important novelties introduced by such a new approach are: (i) the derivative of any integer or fractional order can be obtained independently from the evaluation of its lower order derivatives; (ii) the exponential function plays an extremely hinge role, much more marked than in the case of traditional differential equations; (iii) wide classes of differential equations, traditionally considered as being non-linear, become "intrinsically" linear when reconsidered in terms of "incipient" derivatives; (iv) their corresponding explicit solutions can be given in terms of new classes of functions (such as "binary" and "duet" functions); (v) every solution shows a sort of "persistence of form" when representing the product generated with respect to the agents of the generating process

  19. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Steven; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using digital signage software. The system is robust and flexible, utilizing scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intra-screen divisibility. Information is published via the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video tool. Authorisation is enforced at the level of the streaming and at the web portals, using the CERN SSO system.

  20. Molecular Spectroscopy of Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-06-01

    Molecular spectroscopy has been a powerful tool in the study of molecules in gas phase, condensed phase, and at interfaces. The transition from in vitro spectroscopy to spectroscopic imaging of living systems is opening new opportunities to reveal cellular machinery and to enable molecule-based diagnosis (Science 2015, 350: 1054). Such a transition involves more than a simple combination of spectrometry and microscopy. In this presentation, I will discuss the most recent efforts that have pushed the physical limits of spectroscopic imaging in terms of spectral acquisition speed, detection sensitivity, spatial resolution and imaging depth. I will further highlight significant applications in functional analysis of single cells and in label-free detection of diseases.

  1. Towards a living earth simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolucci, M.; Kossman, D.; Conte, R.; Lukowicz, P.; Argyrakis, P.; Blandford, A.; Bonelli, G.; Anderson, S.; de Freitas, S.; Edmonds, B.; Gilbert, N.; Gross, M.; Kohlhammer, J.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Krause, A.; Linnér, B.-O.; Slusallek, P.; Sorkine, O.; Sumner, R. W.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    The Living Earth Simulator (LES) is one of the core components of the FuturICT architecture. It will work as a federation of methods, tools, techniques and facilities supporting all of the FuturICT simulation-related activities to allow and encourage interactive exploration and understanding of societal issues. Society-relevant problems will be targeted by leaning on approaches based on complex systems theories and data science in tight interaction with the other components of FuturICT. The LES will evaluate and provide answers to real-world questions by taking into account multiple scenarios. It will build on present approaches such as agent-based simulation and modeling, multiscale modelling, statistical inference, and data mining, moving beyond disciplinary borders to achieve a new perspective on complex social systems.

  2. Living science: Science as an activity of living beings.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Bruce J

    2015-12-01

    The philosophy of science should accommodate itself to the facts of human existence, using all aspects of human experience to adapt more effectively, as individuals, species, and global ecosystem. This has several implications: (1) Our nature as sentient beings interacting with other sentient beings requires the use of phenomenological methods to investigate consciousness. (2) Our embodied, situated, purposeful physical interactions with the world are the foundation of scientific understanding. (3) Aristotle's four causes are essential for understanding living systems and, in particular, the final cause aids understanding the role of humankind, and especially science, in the global ecosystem. (4) In order to fulfill this role well, scientists need to employ the full panoply of human faculties. These include the consciousness faculties (thinking, sensation, feeling, intuition), and therefore, as advocated by many famous scientists, we should cultivate our aesthetic sense, emotions, imagination, and intuition. Our unconscious faculties include archetypal structures common to all humans, which can guide scientific discovery. By striving to engage the whole of human nature, science will fulfill better its function for humans and the global ecosystem.

  3. Dynamical Signatures of Living Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main challenges in modeling living systems is to distinguish a random walk of physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) from those of biological origin and that will constitute the starting point of the proposed approach. As conjectured, the biological random walk must be nonlinear. Indeed, any stochastic Markov process can be described by linear Fokker-Planck equation (or its discretized version), only that type of process has been observed in the inanimate world. However, all such processes always converge to a stable (ergodic or periodic) state, i.e., to the states of a lower complexity and high entropy. At the same time, the evolution of living systems directed toward a higher level of complexity if complexity is associated with a number of structural variations. The simplest way to mimic such a tendency is to incorporate a nonlinearity into the random walk; then the probability evolution will attain the features of diffusion equation: the formation and dissipation of shock waves initiated by small shallow wave disturbances. As a result, the evolution never "dies:" it produces new different configurations which are accompanied by an increase or decrease of entropy (the decrease takes place during formation of shock waves, the increase-during their dissipation). In other words, the evolution can be directed "against the second law of thermodynamics" by forming patterns outside of equilibrium in the probability space. Due to that, a specie is not locked up in a certain pattern of behavior: it still can perform a variety of motions, and only the statistics of these motions is constrained by this pattern. It should be emphasized that such a "twist" is based upon the concept of reflection, i.e., the existence of the self-image (adopted from psychology). The model consists of a generator of stochastic processes which represents the motor dynamics in the form of nonlinear random walks, and a simulator of the nonlinear version of the diffusion

  4. Face Liveness Detection Using Defocus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyeon; Ban, Yuseok; Lee, Sangyoun

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop security systems for identity authentication, face recognition (FR) technology has been applied. One of the main problems of applying FR technology is that the systems are especially vulnerable to attacks with spoofing faces (e.g., 2D pictures). To defend from these attacks and to enhance the reliability of FR systems, many anti-spoofing approaches have been recently developed. In this paper, we propose a method for face liveness detection using the effect of defocus. From two images sequentially taken at different focuses, three features, focus, power histogram and gradient location and orientation histogram (GLOH), are extracted. Afterwards, we detect forged faces through the feature-level fusion approach. For reliable performance verification, we develop two databases with a handheld digital camera and a webcam. The proposed method achieves a 3.29% half total error rate (HTER) at a given depth of field (DoF) and can be extended to camera-equipped devices, like smartphones. PMID:25594594

  5. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  6. Three dimensional living neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnenberger, Anna; McLeod, Robert R.; Basta, Tamara; Stowell, Michael H. B.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate holographic optical tweezing combined with step-and-repeat maskless projection micro-stereolithography for fine control of 3D positioning of living cells within a 3D microstructured hydrogel grid. Samples were fabricated using three different cell lines; PC12, NT2/D1 and iPSC. PC12 cells are a rat cell line capable of differentiation into neuron-like cells NT2/D1 cells are a human cell line that exhibit biochemical and developmental properties similar to that of an early embryo and when exposed to retinoic acid the cells differentiate into human neurons useful for studies of human neurological disease. Finally induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) were utilized with the goal of future studies of neural networks fabricated from human iPSC derived neurons. Cells are positioned in the monomer solution with holographic optical tweezers at 1064 nm and then are encapsulated by photopolymerization of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels formed by thiol-ene photo-click chemistry via projection of a 512x512 spatial light modulator (SLM) illuminated at 405 nm. Fabricated samples are incubated in differentiation media such that cells cease to divide and begin to form axons or axon-like structures. By controlling the position of the cells within the encapsulating hydrogel structure the formation of the neural circuits is controlled. The samples fabricated with this system are a useful model for future studies of neural circuit formation, neurological disease, cellular communication, plasticity, and repair mechanisms.

  7. Live Blogging Science News: The Rosetta Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.

    2016-03-01

    When one of the world's most popular online news websites decides to cover a space science event live, you know that something big is brewing. Stuart Clark reports on how live blogging can be used for science reporting and how an idea that was triggered by his observations during the Rosetta flyby of the asteroid Lutetia and the landing of the Curiosity rover on Mars led to him live blogging two of Rosetta's most memorable occasions for The Guardian newspaper.

  8. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO LIVE E. COLI ORGANISMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    shock and shock produced by injection of live E . coli organisms in dogs. A primary purpose of our research has been to determine the effects of...intravenous injections of living E . coli organisms in dogs and monkeys and compare them with responses produced by endotoxin. Hemodynamic changes...pathologic alterations, and metabolic abnormalities have been evaluated in animals receiving lethal and sublethal injections of live E . coli organisms and comparable dosages of purified endotoxin.

  9. Living musical instruments and inanimate body parts?

    PubMed

    Barbarotto, R; Capitani, E; Laiacona, M

    2001-01-01

    In the literature about category effects in semantic memory, body parts and musical instruments are often considered atypical, because in cases with a disproportionate impairment of living categories body parts are relatively spared, while musical instruments are often severely defective. In this study the performance of 57 subjects affected by diseases generally associated with lexical-semantic impairment, for the most part Alzheimer's disease and other forms of cortical degeneration, but also herpetic encephalitis and traumatic brain damage are analyzed. The subjects were given a picture naming task tapping eight categories: three living categories (animals, fruits and vegetables) and three non-living categories (tools, furniture and vehicles), plus body parts and musical instruments. On a preliminary analysis at the group level, body parts were the least impaired category and musical instruments the most severely impaired, the six living and non-living categories being intermediate. However, these differences disappeared after covariance for lexical frequency, name agreement and age of acquisition. The relationship between living categories, non-living categories, musical instruments and body parts was investigated by means of a Lisrel model of Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Two latent variables related to living and non-living categories respectively were defined, and it was found that both body parts and musical instruments were significantly related only with non-living categories. The results showed that the definition of the latent variable expressing the substrate of non-living categories was less satisfactory than that expressing the living categories. On this basis, the conclusions of this study appear statistically definite but their psychological interpretation is less straightforward.

  10. The lived experience of feeling misunderstood.

    PubMed

    Condon, Barbara Backer

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the structure of the lived experience of feeling misunderstood. Parse's phenomenological-hermeneutic research method was used to answer the research question: What is the structure of the lived experience of feeling misunderstood? Extraction-synthesis revealed four core concepts. The structure is the lived experience of feeling misunderstood is disheartening insignificance surfacing with discordant affiliations, as resignation with resiliency emerges with inventive endeavors. Implications for nursing research and practice are presented.

  11. Living in poverty in America today.

    PubMed

    Holosko, Michael J; Feit, Marvin D

    2005-01-01

    No statistician, social scientist or tarot card reader is needed to attest that the gap between the rich and poor in America is increasing. Further, most Americans don't care that much about it. There are also more rich people today living in the U.S. and there are more people living in poverty. Between 2000 and 2002, the number of Americans living in poverty increased by nearly 3 million to 34.6 million. Of these, 12% (or about one half a million persons) are living extreme poverty and many are children, with 16.7% likely to be poor (National Association of Social Workers, 2003).

  12. Only One Earth: Living for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timberlake, Lloyd

    Depicting how people in nine countries can improve their lives while living within their environmental means is the primary aim of this book. Chapter 1 highlights the division of earth's people into the haves and the have nots and describes the inequity of so few having so much of the available resources. Chapter 2 examines the problem of how…

  13. Living Citizenship: Transcending the Cultural Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Steven; Potts, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Living citizenship emerging from reflection on an international educational partnership makes a unique contribution to the field and importantly fulfils the British Educational Research Association aim of improving educational practice for the public benefit. This paper explores the conceptual framework of 'living citizenship' as a means for…

  14. Inquiry and Living History, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatney, Sharon; Smalley, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of this article, the authors introduced the living history program. This yearly, weeklong program features living portrayals of famous people, which becomes a catalyst for teaching curricular standards, as well as providing the spark for inquiry. Successful implementation of this program requires providing teachers with…

  15. Community Living Skills Guide: Beginning Woodworking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Steve; Smith, Don

    This is one of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series which provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Beginning Woodworking, Use of Basic Hand Tools and Shop Safety. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to…

  16. Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes a single word changes everything. In his groundbreaking book "Choice Words", Peter Johnston demonstrated how the things teachers say (and don't say) have surprising consequences for the literate lives of students. Now, in "Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives", Peter shows how the words teachers choose affect the worlds students…

  17. School on Probation: Teaching That Changes Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoehr, Taylor

    2006-01-01

    For the past dozen years the author has been teaching, along with other volunteers, in a program called "Changing Lives Through Literature," serving the Dorchester District Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Changing Lives began as a single experiment in New Bedford in 1991 and has spread entirely by word of mouth to a dozen…

  18. The Independent Living Behavior Checklist: Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, Richard T.; And Others

    The document describes independent living skills, and provides information on how they can be measured. It is explained in an introductory chapter that the checklist is an extensive list of 343 independent living skill objectives specified in terms of conditions (antecedents or givens), behaviors, and standards. Objectives are classified and…

  19. Techniques for Daily Living: Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooldridge, Lillian; And Others

    Presented are specific guides concerning techniques for daily living which were developed by the child care staff at the Illinois Braille and Sight Saving School. The guides are designed for cottage parents of the children, who may have both visual and other handicaps, and show what daily living skills are necessary and appropriate for the…

  20. Living with Learning Difficulties: Emma's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manners, Paula Jean; Carruthers, Emma

    2006-01-01

    This article is about Emma's experience of living with learning difficulties. Emma expresses a lot of anger, and talks about feelings of loss. This article is interesting to people with learning disabilities because they can see if their experience is like Emma's in any way. This paper presents Emma's story: her experience of living with learning…

  1. Environmental Living Program, Book 1: What's Happening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldi, Mary Lou

    This booklet documents, in words and pictures, the Environmental Living Program. This program, which has been in operation since 1969, provides overnight living experiences for elementary and secondary school students at cultural, historic, or prehistoric sites. The sites are National and State parks and private sites in California and Arizona.…

  2. The Experience of Living Kidney Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Judith Belle; Karley, Mary Lou; Boudville, Neil; Bullas, Ruth; Garg, Amit X.; Muirhead, Norman

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences, feelings, and ideas of living kidney donors. Using a phenomenological, qualitative research approach, the authors interviewed 12 purposefully selected living kidney donors (eight men and four women), who were between four and 29 years since donation. Interviews were audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim, and…

  3. Bush Blitz TeachLive 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In July 2015, the Bush Blitz TeachLive expedition took place on the Olkola people's traditional lands on Cape York Peninsula in Queensland. Five teachers joined more than a dozen scientists and the Olkola Indigenous rangers to act as research assistants, as part of the eight-day Bush Blitz TeachLive experience. As a team, they discovered new…

  4. Beauty in the Context of Particular Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautio, Pauliina

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on empirical research by the author into the everyday lives of people living in a small village. Everyday life is approached as a subjective process in time and space, experienced by particular people in a particular environmental and social context. The data of this research has been collected through correspondence in which…

  5. Grandparent Education for Assisted Living Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Robert D.; Strom, Paris S.

    2017-01-01

    The assisted living population is forecast to increase at a rapid rate. Quality of life for residents should be improved by giving greater attention to their cognitive, emotional, and social needs. A university lifespan development team provided a grandparent education course at a large assisted living facility with the assistance of 20 resident…

  6. Community Living Skills Guide: Looking Good: Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreps, Alice Roelofs; Dreith, Rita Vallero

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Looking Good: Hygiene. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized…

  7. Community Living Skills Guide: Beginning Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Martha; Kreps, Alice Roelofs, Ed.

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Beginning Spanish. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons…

  8. Women's Guide to Overseas Living. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piet-Pelon, Nancy J.; Hornby, Barbara

    This book examines issues critical to women and their families who go abroad to live. In advising how to cope effectively with the problems that arise, the book illuminates the advantages of living overseas and offers practical suggestions and guidelines that help women take advantage of the opportunity to share in another culture. Divided into 13…

  9. Reflection on Lived Experience in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn

    2004-01-01

    While debate about the meaning of hermeneutics and phenomenology for educational research continues, the notion of lived experience, and its application to reflective practice, has become a feature of much that goes by the name of phenomenological within this area. The prevalence of the lived experience model can be attributed in large part to the…

  10. NASA LIVE Creating a Global Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townes-Young, Katrina L.; Ewing, Virginia R.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes NASA LIVE (Learning through Interactive Videoconferencing Experiences), a free series of videoconferencing programs produced by NASA's Langley Center for Distance Learning in Hampton, Virginia. NASA LIVE is designed for K-12 educators and students, allowing teachers and students to interact with NASA experts in a virtual…

  11. Oncology patients and the living will.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R L

    1992-05-01

    The Patient Self-Determination Act now requires hospitals, nursing homes, and health maintenance organizations to ask patients if they have executed and are in possession of a living will. This article provides a brief historical perspective of what living wills are, how patient autonomy has contributed to their existence, and what distinguishes a living will from a durable power of attorney for health care. Included are working examples of these advance directives and a description of the University of Kansas Cancer Unit's positive experience with living wills. The final section discusses the meaning of certain pivotal terms, looks at the current under-utilization of living wills, and closes with an examination of the Blackhall thesis of futility.

  12. Peeling the onion: understanding others' lived experience.

    PubMed

    Miles, Maureen; Chapman, Ysanne; Francis, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Society and some healthcare professionals often marginalise pregnant women who take illicit substances. Midwives who care for these women are often viewed as working on the edge of society. This research aimed to examine the lived experiences of midwives who care for pregnant women who take illicit drugs. A phenomenological study informed by Heidegger, Gadamer and Merleau-Ponty was chosen to frame these lived experiences. Using face-to-face interviews, data were collected from 12 midwives making a difference, establishing partnerships and letting go and refining practice. Lived experiences are unique and can be difficult, intangible and couched in metaphor and difficult to grasp. This paper aims to discuss lived experience and suggests that like an onion, several layers have to be peeled away before meaning can be exposed; each cover reveals another layer beneath that is different from before and different from the next. The study provides exemplars that explain lived experiences.

  13. Understanding Pennsylvania living wills: the 5 Ws.

    PubMed

    Pina, Linda L

    2009-12-01

    The working world of nurses is often filled with deep-running emotions and physical exhaustion as we care for our dying patients. We feel the need to step back and gain perspective when faced with a dying patient, or more appropriately, a dying person. We must also keep in mind the family of the dying who may have similar feelings. It is nearly impossible to be a nurse and not have to care for a dying patient; thus, we often find ourselves dealing with living wills. The living will is the more common of the two forms of an advance directive; the other is the durable power of attorney for healthcare. Since living wills are so common, and laws about them vary from state-to-state, it is important for the professional nurse in Pennsylvania to understand how living wills work in our state. This may best be approached by considering the 5 Ws related to living wills.

  14. Nanobiomechanics of living cells: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinju

    2014-01-01

    Nanobiomechanics of living cells is very important to understand cell–materials interactions. This would potentially help to optimize the surface design of the implanted materials and scaffold materials for tissue engineering. The nanoindentation techniques enable quantifying nanobiomechanics of living cells, with flexibility of using indenters of different geometries. However, the data interpretation for nanoindentation of living cells is often difficult. Despite abundant experimental data reported on nanobiomechanics of living cells, there is a lack of comprehensive discussion on testing with different tip geometries, and the associated mechanical models that enable extracting the mechanical properties of living cells. Therefore, this paper discusses the strategy of selecting the right type of indenter tips and the corresponding mechanical models at given test conditions. PMID:24748952

  15. The living will: legal and ethical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wold, J L

    1992-02-01

    Problems surrounding issues of dying and death are many. Health professionals, families and individuals all must cope with different aspects of these problems. The living will has been discussed as one way people can alleviate many of the problems associated with the decision to die with dignity. Nurses are in the perfect position to educate people concerning the benefits of having a living will. As patient advocate, it is imperative nurses be apprised of the laws in their states regarding living wills. By initiating a living will, individuals can make their wishes known to both family and the medical establishment. Increased public education concerning state living will legislation and concomitant rights under these laws is needed. Through education, many of the legal and ethical issues that arise from ignorance of the law may be avoided before they become problems.

  16. Development of a High-Yield Live Attenuated H7N9 Influenza Virus Vaccine That Provides Protection against Homologous and Heterologous H7 Wild-Type Viruses in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Baz, Mariana; Lu, Janine; Paskel, Myeisha; Santos, Celia; Subbarao, Kanta; Jin, Hong; Matsuoka, Yumiko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Live attenuated H7N9 influenza vaccine viruses that possess the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene segments from the newly emerged wild-type (wt) A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) and six internal protein gene segments from the cold-adapted influenza virus A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) were generated by reverse genetics. The reassortant virus containing the original wt A/Anhui/1/2013 HA and NA sequences replicated poorly in eggs. Multiple variants with amino acid substitutions in the HA head domain that improved viral growth were identified by viral passage in eggs and MDCK cells. The selected vaccine virus containing two amino acid changes (N133D/G198E) in the HA improved viral titer by more than 10-fold (reached a titer of 108.6 fluorescent focus units/ml) without affecting viral antigenicity. Introduction of these amino acid changes into an H7N9 PR8 reassortant virus also significantly improved viral titers and HA protein yield in eggs. The H7N9 ca vaccine virus was immunogenic in ferrets. A single dose of vaccine conferred complete protection of ferrets from homologous wt A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) and nearly complete protection from heterologous wt A/Netherlands/219/2003 (H7N7) challenge infection. Therefore, this H7N9 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) candidate has been selected for vaccine manufacture and clinical evaluation to protect humans from wt H7N9 virus infection. IMPORTANCE In response to the recent avian H7N9 influenza virus infection in humans, we developed a live attenuated H7N9 influenza vaccine (LAIV) with two amino acid substitutions in the viral HA protein that improved vaccine yield by 10-fold in chicken embryonated eggs, the substrate for vaccine manufacture. The two amino acids also improved the antigen yield for inactivated H7N9 vaccines, demonstrating that this finding could great facilitate the efficiency of H7N9 vaccine manufacture. The candidate H7N9 LAIV was immunogenic and protected ferrets against homologous and heterologous

  17. Living will status and desire for living will help among rural Alabama veterans.

    PubMed

    Mahaney-Price, Ann F; Hilgeman, Michelle M; Davis, Lori L; McNeal, Sandre F; Conner, Charles M; Allen, Rebecca S

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis of data from an earlier intervention study to increase Veterans Administration health care enrollment in rural Alabama veterans was to determine the veterans' living will status, desire for help completing a living will, and relationships between these and demographic, health insurance, health self-report, cumulative illness, disability, and trust characteristics. Baseline data for 201 rural Alabama veterans were extracted from the larger study. Chi-square and t tests were used to analyze group differences in categorical and continuous variables. Logistic regression models were used to determine multivariate associations of variables with living will status and desire for help. Only 13% of participants had living wills. Of those without living wills, 40% expressed a desire for help completing a living will. African Americans were less likely to have living wills than were Caucasians. Participants with more than high school education were more likely to desire help completing living wills than were those with less education. With the exception of moderate-severe respiratory illness, moderate-severe illness was not associated with having a living will. With the exception of moderate-severe vascular illness, moderate-severe illness was not associated with desire for help completing a living will. The racial and educational disparities in living will status and desire for help and the number of participants who desired help completing a living will suggests a need for action to increase advance care planning among rural veterans.

  18. Living with diabetes: issues for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, D; Williams, A

    1994-07-01

    Discussion in this paper is based on findings drawn from research undertaken within a qualitative framework of analysis, and with the purpose of exploring people's perceptions of living with diabetes, including the nursing care they receive. A major theoretical concern is to demonstrate the importance of placing patients' and clients' experiences at the centre of nursing interest and practice. It is argued that understanding a disease process should of necessity include an understanding of the concerns of those who live with it. Findings related to the following research questions are discussed: first, what are the challenges of living with diabetes? and second, what are people's perceptions of the nursing care they receive?

  19. Space Station Live: EarthKAM

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space Station Live commentator Pat Ryan interviews Brion Au, EarthKAM Payload Developer. The NASA education program enables middle school students to take pictures of the Earth from the Internation...

  20. Live birth in an archosauromorph reptile

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Organ, Chris L.; Benton, Michael J.; Brandley, Matthew C.; Aitchison, Jonathan C.

    2017-01-01

    Live birth has evolved many times independently in vertebrates, such as mammals and diverse groups of lizards and snakes. However, live birth is unknown in the major clade Archosauromorpha, a group that first evolved some 260 million years ago and is represented today by birds and crocodilians. Here we report the discovery of a pregnant long-necked marine reptile (Dinocephalosaurus) from the Middle Triassic (∼245 million years ago) of southwest China showing live birth in archosauromorphs. Our discovery pushes back evidence of reproductive biology in the clade by roughly 50 million years, and shows that there is no fundamental reason that archosauromorphs could not achieve live birth. Our phylogenetic models indicate that Dinocephalosaurus determined the sex of their offspring by sex chromosomes rather than by environmental temperature like crocodilians. Our results provide crucial evidence for genotypic sex determination facilitating land-water transitions in amniotes. PMID:28195584

  1. A Live Specimen Cell for the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Provides background and instructions for the assembly of a microaquarium, or specimen cell, in which the dynamic world of living microorganisms can be viewed through a microscope overextended periods of time utilizing the simplest of materials in the process. (JJK)

  2. Prompting Sequences in Teaching Independent Living Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, Richard T.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The effects of three prompting sequences on the acquisition of independent living skills with 14 mild and moderately mentally retarded vocational rehabilitation clients (16 to 50 years old) are examined. (Author)

  3. Living with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... information about the benefits of physical activity. Reduce Stress Learning how to manage stress, relax, and cope with problems can improve your ... and muscle relaxation—can help you cope with stress. Emotional Issues and Support Living with AAT deficiency ...

  4. Feeling unsure: a universal lived experience.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Mary R

    2010-10-01

    Feeling unsure is a universal experience of health and quality of life. The purposes of this research study were to discover the structure of the lived experience of feeling unsure, to add to the body of knowledge on the phenomenon of feeling unsure, and expand the humanbecoming school of thought. The Parse research method was used to guide this study and answer the question, What is the structure of the lived experience of feeling unsure? Participants were 10 individuals living with chronic heart failure in the community. The processes of dialogical engagement, extraction-synthesis, and heuristic interpretation were used. The central finding of this study was the following structure: The lived experience of feeling unsure is discomforting trepidation with unassuredness-assuredness, as vigilantly anticipating possibles with treasured alliances arises with moments of acquiescence. New knowledge extended the theory of humanbecoming and enhanced understanding of the experience of feeling unsure.

  5. Rural Active Living: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Umstattd Meyer, M Renée; Moore, Justin B; Abildso, Christiaan; Edwards, Michael B; Gamble, Abigail; Baskin, Monica L

    2016-01-01

    Rural residents are less physically active than their urban counterparts and disproportionately affected by chronic diseases and conditions associated with insufficient activity. While the ecological model has been successful in promoting and translating active living research in urban settings, relatively little research has been conducted in rural settings. The resulting research gap prohibits a comprehensive understanding and application of solutions for active living in rural America. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to assess the evidence base for an ecological model of active living for rural populations and outline key scientific gaps that inhibit the development and application of solutions. Specifically, we reexamined the 4 domains conceptualized by the model and suggest that there is a dearth of research specific to rural communities across all areas of the framework. Considering the limited rural-specific efforts, we propose areas that need addressing to mobilize rural active living researchers and practitioners into action.

  6. Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms

    DOEpatents

    Wong; Pak C. , Wong; Kwong K. , Foote; Harlan P.

    2006-06-06

    Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

  7. Senior Living: There's No Place Like Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living There's No Place Like Home Past Issues / ... state offices on aging; social services organizations; nearby senior centers; and civic, tribal, and religious organizations. They ...

  8. NES Live Video Chat: Dr. Tara Ruttley

    NASA Video Gallery

    The NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations program sends groups of NASA employees and contractors to live in Aquarius, an underwater laboratory, for up to three weeks at a time. NEEMO crew mem...

  9. Primary students' conceptions of living things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legaspi, Britt Anne

    Elementary school teachers are pressed for time throughout the instructional day to teach all curricular areas as expected by states and districts because of the current focus on reading and mathematics. Thus, foundational science concepts may be overlooked. For example, students' understandings of living and nonliving things may be overlooked by teachers, yet is useful in understanding the nature of living things. In this qualitative study, K-3 grade students were asked to sort objects as either living or nonliving and to give rationales for their choices. It was found that K-3 students readily used physical characteristics, such as having body parts, and physical abilities, such as being able to move, as criteria for living things. Students in grades 1 through 3 were able to articulate their reasons with more adult-like logic based on Jean Piaget' s research on developmental stages.

  10. Care services ecosystem for ambient assisted living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarinha-Matos, Luis M.; Rosas, Joao; Ines Oliveira, Ana; Ferrada, Filipa

    2015-08-01

    Effective provision of care and assistance services in ambient assisted living requires the involvement and collaboration of multiple stakeholders. To support such collaboration, the development of an ecosystem of products and services for active ageing plays an important role. This article introduces a conceptual architecture that supports such care ecosystem. In order to facilitate understanding and better interrelate concepts, a 3-layered model is adopted: Infrastructure layer, Care and assistance services layer and Ambient Assisted Living ecosystem layer. A holistic perspective of ambient assisted living, namely considering four important life settings is adopted: (1) independent living; (2) health and care in life; (3) occupation in life and (4) recreation in life. The proposed architecture is designed in the context of a national Portuguese project and in accordance with the findings of a large European road mapping initiative on ICT and ageing.

  11. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member’s physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists’ performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists’ via speakers. We recorded the audience members’ electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience’s heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience’s sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience’s physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience’s superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance. PMID:27104377

  12. Just love in live organ donation.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Kristin

    2009-08-01

    Emotionally-related live organ donation is different from almost all other medical treatments in that a family member or, in some countries, a friend contributes with an organ or parts of an organ to the recipient. Furthermore, there is a long-acknowledged but not well-understood gender-imbalance in emotionally-related live kidney donation. This article argues for the benefit of the concept of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are engaged in a love relation. The concept of just love is helpful in the analysis of these live organ donations even if no statistical gender-imbalance prevails. It is particularly helpful, however, in the analysis of the gender-imbalance in live kidney donations if these donations are seen as a specific kind of care-work, if care-work is experienced as a labour one should perform out of love and if women still experience stronger pressures to engage in care-work than do men. The aim of the article is to present arguments for the need of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are engaged in a love relation. The aim is also to elaborate two criteria that need to be met in order for love to qualify as just and to highlight certain clinical implications.

  13. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member's physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists' performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists' via speakers. We recorded the audience members' electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience's heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience's sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience's physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience's superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance.

  14. Educating Prospective Kidney Transplant Recipients and Living Donors about Living Donation: Practical and Theoretical Recommendations for Increasing Living Donation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Amy D.; Robbins, Mark L.; Peipert, John D.

    2016-01-01

    A promising strategy for increasing living donor kidney transplant (LDKT) rates is improving education about living donation for both prospective kidney transplant recipients and living donors to help overcome the proven knowledge, psychological, and socioeconomic barriers to LDKT. A recent Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation recommended that comprehensive LDKT education be made available to patients at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, in considering how to implement this recommendation across different healthcare learning environments, the current lack of available guidance regarding how to design, deliver, and measure the efficacy of LDKT education programs is notable. In the current article, we provide an overview of how one behavior change theory, the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change, can guide the delivery of LDKT education for patients at various stages of CKD and readiness for LDKT. We also discuss the importance of creating educational programs for both potential kidney transplant recipients and living donors, and identify key priorities for educational research to reduce racial disparities in LDKT and increase LDKT rates. PMID:27347475

  15. Infected Lives: Lived Experiences of Young African American HIV-Positive Women.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Jill N; Domian, Elaine W; Teel, Cynthia S

    2016-02-01

    This hermeneutic phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of young African American HIV-infected women. Eleven women between the ages of 21 and 35 participated. One pattern, Infected Lives, and three themes--Living Alone With HIV, Living With Unresolved Conflicts, and Living With Multiple Layers of Betrayal--emerged. The pattern and themes portray the very complex and challenging experiences faced by these young women living with HIV infection. They have experienced isolation, abandonment, betrayal, and discrimination in their interpersonal and social systems. They often dealt with conflicts of hope and anguish in the relationships with their children, and portraying strength, while feeling fragile. These complexities negatively influence the ability to fully engage in self-care activities. Implications for future research include further investigation about the experiences of psychological distress experienced post-diagnosis, development and evaluation of holistic nursing interventions, and evaluative research on mass media educational campaigns to reduce HIV-related stigma.

  16. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy of Live Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, V.; Mason, A.; Saliev, T.; Smith, F. J. D.; McLean, W. H. I.; Campbell, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is perhaps the least well known technique from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) family of instruments. As with its more familiar counterpart, atomic force microscopy (AFM), the technique provides high-resolution topographic imaging, with the caveat that target structures must be immersed in a conducting solution so that a controllable ion current may be utilised as the basis for feedback. In operation, this non-contact characteristic of SICM makes it ideal for the study of delicate structures, such as live cells. Moreover, the intrinsic architecture of the instrument, incorporating as it does, a scanned micropipette, lends itself to combination approaches with complementary techniques such as patch-clamp electrophysiology: SICM therefore boasts the capability for both structural and functional imaging. For the present observations, an ICnano S system (Ionscope Ltd., Melbourn, UK) operating in 'hopping mode' was used, with the objective of assessing the instrument's utility for imaging live keratinocytes under physiological buffers. In scans employing cultured HaCaT cells (spontaneously immortalised, human keratinocytes), we compared the qualitative differences of live cells imaged with SICM and AFM, and also with their respective counterparts after chemical fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde. Characteristic surface microvilli were particularly prominent in live cell imaging by SICM. Moreover, time lapse SICM imaging on live cells revealed that changes in the pattern of microvilli could be tracked over time. By comparison, AFM imaging on live cells, even at very low contact forces (

  17. Living and non-living categories. Is there a "normal" asymmetry?

    PubMed

    Capitani, E; Laiacona, M; Barbarotto, R; Trivelli, C

    1994-12-01

    A picture naming task and a semantic memory verbal questionnaire were given to normal subjects to assess the possible asymmetry between knowledge for non-living and living things. We first examined 60 elderly subjects with low education. Asymmetry between non-living and living things was found in the semantic knowledge questionnaire and living things fared worse. This difference was not explained by discrepancy in item frequency, familiarity or prototypicality. Using the same questionnaire, we analysed difficulty judgements given by younger, better-educated subjects: questions about living things were slightly, but significantly more difficult than questions regarding non-living things. In order to check for a possible sample bias, we submitted another verbal questionnaire with an analogous structure to different judges and replicated the previous results. These findings are discussed with regard to the selective semantic memory deficit for living things observed in patients. We suggest that the cognitive pattern presented by these cases may be linked to, but not fully explained by the greater difficulty living things present for normal subjects.

  18. Comparison of egg and high yielding MDCK cell-derived live attenuated influenza virus for commercial production of trivalent influenza vaccine: in vitro cell susceptibility and influenza virus replication kinetics in permissive and semi-permissive cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Althaf I; Cordeiro, Melissa; Sevilla, Elizabeth; Liu, Jonathan

    2010-05-14

    Currently MedImmune manufactures cold-adapted (ca) live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) from specific-pathogen free (SPF) chicken eggs. Difficulties in production scale-up and potential exposure of chicken flocks to avian influenza viruses especially in the event of a pandemic influenza outbreak have prompted evaluation and development of alternative non-egg based influenza vaccine manufacturing technologies. As part of MedImmune's effort to develop the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) using cell culture production technologies we have investigated the use of high yielding, cloned MDCK cells as a substrate for vaccine production by assessing host range and virus replication of influenza virus produced from both SPF egg and MDCK cell production technologies. In addition to cloned MDCK cells the indicator cell lines used to evaluate the impact of producing LAIV in cells on host range and replication included two human cell lines: human lung carcinoma (A549) cells and human muco-epidermoid bronchiolar carcinoma (NCI H292) cells. The influenza viruses used to infect the indicators cell lines represented both the egg and cell culture manufacturing processes and included virus strains that composed the 2006-2007 influenza seasonal trivalent vaccine (A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), A/Wisconsin/67/05 (H3N2) and B/Malaysia/2506/04). Results from this study demonstrate remarkable similarity between influenza viruses representing the current commercial egg produced and developmental MDCK cell produced vaccine production platforms. MedImmune's high yielding cloned MDCK cells used for the cell culture based vaccine production were highly permissive to both egg and cell produced ca attenuated influenza viruses. Both the A549 and NCI H292 cells regardless of production system were less permissive to influenza A and B viruses than the MDCK cells. Irrespective of the indicator cell line used the replication properties were similar between egg and the cell produced

  19. Living with migraine headache: a phenomenological study of women's experiences.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Anthony R

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lived experience of women who had migraine headache. The guiding framework was phenomenological inquiry and story theory. The transcripts of audiotaped stories gathered from 8 women living with migraine headache were analyzed. Seven interrelated themes comprised the findings of the study. Implications for holistic nursing practice emphasizing assessment of lived time, lived body, lived space, and lived relations in the context of the findings of the study are discussed.

  20. Microorganisms resistant to free-living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Greub, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2004-04-01

    Free-living amoebae feed on bacteria, fungi, and algae. However, some microorganisms have evolved to become resistant to these protists. These amoeba-resistant microorganisms include established pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Legionella spp., Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycobacterium avium, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Francisella tularensis, and emerging pathogens, such as Bosea spp., Simkania negevensis, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, and Legionella-like amoebal pathogens. Some of these amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB) are lytic for their amoebal host, while others are considered endosymbionts, since a stable host-parasite ratio is maintained. Free-living amoebae represent an important reservoir of ARB and may, while encysted, protect the internalized bacteria from chlorine and other biocides. Free-living amoebae may act as a Trojan horse, bringing hidden ARB within the human "Troy," and may produce vesicles filled with ARB, increasing their transmission potential. Free-living amoebae may also play a role in the selection of virulence traits and in adaptation to survival in macrophages. Thus, intra-amoebal growth was found to enhance virulence, and similar mechanisms seem to be implicated in the survival of ARB in response to both amoebae and macrophages. Moreover, free-living amoebae represent a useful tool for the culture of some intracellular bacteria and new bacterial species that might be potential emerging pathogens.

  1. Live ultrasound volume reconstruction using scout scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Amelie; Lasso, Andras; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided interventions often necessitate scanning of deep-seated anatomical structures that may be hard to visualize. Visualization can be improved using reconstructed 3D ultrasound volumes. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of a large area during clinical interventions is challenging if the region of interest is unknown. We propose a two-stage scanning method allowing the user to perform quick low-resolution scouting followed by high-resolution live volume reconstruction. Scout scanning is accomplished by stacking 2D tracked ultrasound images into a low-resolution volume. Then, within a region of interest defined in the scout scan, live volume reconstruction can be performed by continuous scanning until sufficient image density is achieved. We implemented the workflow as a module of the open-source 3D Slicer application, within the SlicerIGT extension and building on the PLUS toolkit. Scout scanning is performed in a few seconds using 3 mm spacing to allow region of interest definition. Live reconstruction parameters are set to provide good image quality (0.5 mm spacing, hole filling enabled) and feedback is given during live scanning by regularly updated display of the reconstructed volume. Use of scout scanning may allow the physician to identify anatomical structures. Subsequent live volume reconstruction in a region of interest may assist in procedures such as targeting needle interventions or estimating brain shift during surgery.

  2. Microorganisms Resistant to Free-Living Amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Greub, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Free-living amoebae feed on bacteria, fungi, and algae. However, some microorganisms have evolved to become resistant to these protists. These amoeba-resistant microorganisms include established pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Legionella spp., Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycobacterium avium, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Francisella tularensis, and emerging pathogens, such as Bosea spp., Simkania negevensis, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, and Legionella-like amoebal pathogens. Some of these amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB) are lytic for their amoebal host, while others are considered endosymbionts, since a stable host-parasite ratio is maintained. Free-living amoebae represent an important reservoir of ARB and may, while encysted, protect the internalized bacteria from chlorine and other biocides. Free-living amoebae may act as a Trojan horse, bringing hidden ARB within the human “Troy,” and may produce vesicles filled with ARB, increasing their transmission potential. Free-living amoebae may also play a role in the selection of virulence traits and in adaptation to survival in macrophages. Thus, intra-amoebal growth was found to enhance virulence, and similar mechanisms seem to be implicated in the survival of ARB in response to both amoebae and macrophages. Moreover, free-living amoebae represent a useful tool for the culture of some intracellular bacteria and new bacterial species that might be potential emerging pathogens. PMID:15084508

  3. 38 CFR 21.6160 - Independent living services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... independent living services which may be furnished include: (1) Training in independent living skills; (2) Health management programs; (3) Identification of appropriate housing accommodations; and (4)...

  4. Purification and characterization of the cold-active alkaline protease from marine cold-adaptive Penicillium chrysogenum FS010.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-Yuan; Tian, Yong; Hou, Yun-Hua; Wang, Tian-Hong

    2009-11-01

    An extracellular cold-active alkaline serine protease from Penicillium chrysogenum FS010 has been purified. The purification procedure involved: ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE ion-exchange chromatography and sephadex G-100 gel chromatography. SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme indicated a molecular weight of 41,000 +/- 1,000 Da. The protease is stable in a pH range of 7.0-9.0 and has a maximum activity at pH 9.0. Compared with other industrial proteases, the enzyme shows a high hydrolytic activities at lower temperatures and a high sensitivity at a temperature over 50 degrees C. The isoelectric point of the enzyme is approximate to 6.0. Enzymatic activity is enhanced by the addition of divalent cations such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) and inhibited by addition of Cu(2+)and Co(2+). PMSF and DFP are its specific inhibitors. The application of the cold-active alkaline protease is extremely extensive, and widely used in detergents, feed, food, leather and many other industries.

  5. Structural analysis of a glycosides hydrolase family 42 cold-adapted ß-galactosidase from Rahnella sp. R3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ß-galactosidase isolated from a psychrotrophic bacterium, Rahnella sp. R3 (R-ß-Gal), exhibits high activity at low temperature. R-ß-Gal is a member of the glycoside hydrolases family 42 (GH42), and forms a 225 kDa trimeric structure in solution. The X-ray crystal structure of R-ß-Gal was determi...

  6. Stereochemical course of hydrolytic reaction catalyzed by alpha-galactosidase from cold adaptable marine bacterium of genus Pseudoalteromonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunina, Irina; Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasiliy; Slepchenko, Lyubov; Isakov, Vladimir; Rasskazov, Valeriy

    2014-10-01

    The recombinant α-galactosidase of the marine bacterium (α-PsGal) was synthesized with the use of the plasmid 40Gal, consisting of plasmid pET-40b (+) (Novagen) and the gene corresponding to the open reading frame of the mature α-galactosidase of marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. KMM 701, transformed into the E. coli Rosetta(DE3) cells. In order to understand the mechanism of action, the stereochemistry of hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl α-D-galactopyranoside (4-NPGP) by α-PsGal was measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The kinetics of formation of α- and β-anomer of galactose showed that α-anomer initially formed and accumulated, and then an appreciable amount of β-anomer appeared as a result of mutarotation. The data clearly show that the enzymatic hydrolysis of 4-NPGP proceeds with the retention of anomeric configuration, probably, due to a double displacement mechanism of reaction.

  7. Cold adaptation of fungi obtained from soil and lake sediment in the Skarvsnes ice-free area, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Masaharu; Fujiu, Seiichi; Xiao, Nan; Hanada, Yuichi; Kudoh, Sakae; Kondo, Hidemasa; Tsuda, Sakae; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-09-01

    A total of 71 isolates were collected from lake sediment and soil surrounding lakes in the Skarvsnes area, Antarctica. Based on ITS region sequence similarity, these isolates were classified to 10 genera. Twenty-three isolates were categorized as ascomycetous fungi from five genera (Embellisia, Phoma, Geomyces, Tetracladium or Thelebolus) and 48 isolates were categorized as basidiomycetous fungi in five genera (Mrakia, Cryptococcus, Dioszegia, Rhodotorula or Leucosporidium). Thirty-five percent of culturable fungi were of the genus Mrakia. Eighteen isolates from eight genera were selected and tested for both antifreeze activity and capacity for growth under temperatures ranging from -1 to 25 °C. Rhodotorula sp. NHT-2 possessed a high degree of sequence homology with R. gracialis, while Leucosporidium sp. BSS-1 possessed a high degree of sequence homology with Leu. antarcticum (Glaciozyma antarctica), and these two isolates demonstrated antifreeze activity. All isolates examined were capable of growth at -1 °C. Mrakia spp., while capable of growth at -1 °C, did not demonstrate any antifreeze activity and exhibited only limited secretion of extracellular polysaccharides. Species of the genus Mrakia possessed high amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, suggesting that members of this genus have adapted to cold environments by increasing their membrane fluidity.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Cold-Adapted Esterase, MtEst45, from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Suk

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase, MtEst45, was isolated from a fosmid genomic library of Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221. The encoding gene is predicted to have a mass of 45,564 Da and encodes 495 amino acids, excluding a 21 amino acid signal peptide. MtEst45 showed a low amino acid identity (approximately 23-24%) compared with other lipolytic enzymes belonging to Family III, a closely related bacterial lipolytic enzyme family. MtEst45 also showed a conserved GXSXG motif, G131IS133YG135, which was reported as active site of known lipolytic enzymes, and the putative catalytic triad composed of D237 and H265. Because these mutants of MtEst45, which was S133A, D237N, and H265L, had no activity, these catalytic triad is deemed essential for the enzyme catalysis. MtEst45 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified via His-tag affinity chromatography. The optimal pH and temperature of MtEst45 were estimated to be 8.17 and 46.27°C by response surface methodology, respectively. Additionally, MtEst45 was also active between 1 and 15°C. The optimal hydrolysis substrate for MtEst45 among p-nitrophenyl esters (C2-C18) was p-nitrophenyl butyrate, and the K m and V max values were 0.0998 mM and 550 μmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. MtEst45 was strongly inhibited by Hg(2+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) ions; by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride; and by β-mercaptoethanol. Ca(2+) did not affect the enzyme's activity. These biochemical properties, sequence identity, and phylogenetic analysis suggest that MtEst45 represents a novel and valuable bacterial lipolytic enzyme family and is useful for biotechnological applications.

  9. A cold-adapted esterase of a novel marine isolate, Pseudoalteromonas arctica: gene cloning, enzyme purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Al Khudary, Rami; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Katzer, Moritz; Elleuche, Skander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2010-05-01

    A gene encoding an esterase (estO) was identified and sequenced from a gene library screen of the psychrotolerant bacterium Pseudoalteromonas arctica. Analysis of the 1,203 bp coding region revealed that the deduced peptide sequence is composed of 400 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 44.1 kDa. EstO contains a N-terminal esterase domain and an additional OsmC domain at the C-terminus (osmotically induced family of proteins). The highly conserved five-residue motif typical for all alpha/beta hydrolases (G x S x G) was detected from position 104 to 108 together with a putative catalytic triad consisting of Ser(106), Asp(196), and His(225). Sequence comparison showed that EstO exhibits 90% amino acid identity with hypothetical proteins containing similar esterase and OsmC domains but only around 10% identity to the amino acid sequences of known esterases. EstO variants with and without the OsmC domain were produced and purified as His-tag fusion proteins in E. coli. EstO displayed an optimum pH of 7.5 and optimum temperature of 25 degrees C with more than 50% retained activity at the freezing point of water. The thermostability of EstO (50% activity after 5 h at 40 degrees C) dramatically increased in the truncated variant (50% activity after 2.5 h at 90 degrees C). Furthermore, the esterase displays broad substrate specificity for esters of short-chain fatty acids (C(2)-C(8)).

  10. Amino Acid Substitutions in Cold-Adapted Proteins from Halorubrum lacusprofundi, an Extremely Halophilic Microbe from Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; Capes, Melinda D.; Karan, Ram; DasSarma, Priya

    2013-01-01

    The halophilic Archaeon Halorubrum lacusprofundi, isolated from the perennially cold and hypersaline Deep Lake in Antarctica, was recently sequenced and compared to 12 Haloarchaea from temperate climates by comparative genomics. Amino acid substitutions for 604 H. lacusprofundi proteins belonging to conserved haloarchaeal orthologous groups (cHOGs) were determined and found to occur at 7.85% of positions invariant in proteins from mesophilic Haloarchaea. The following substitutions were observed most frequently: (a) glutamic acid with aspartic acid or alanine; (b) small polar residues with other small polar or non-polar amino acids; (c) small non-polar residues with other small non-polar residues; (d) aromatic residues, especially tryptophan, with other aromatic residues; and (e) some larger polar residues with other similar residues. Amino acid substitutions for a cold-active H. lacusprofundi β-galactosidase were then examined in the context of a homology modeled structure at residues invariant in homologous enzymes from mesophilic Haloarchaea. Similar substitutions were observed as in the genome-wide approach, with the surface accessible regions of β-galactosidase displaying reduced acidity and increased hydrophobicity, and internal regions displaying mainly subtle changes among smaller non-polar and polar residues. These findings are consistent with H. lacusprofundi proteins displaying amino acid substitutions that increase structural flexibility and protein function at low temperature. We discuss the likely mechanisms of protein adaptation to a cold, hypersaline environment on Earth, with possible relevance to life elsewhere. PMID:23536799

  11. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Cold-Adapted Esterase, MtEst45, from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Suk

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase, MtEst45, was isolated from a fosmid genomic library of Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221. The encoding gene is predicted to have a mass of 45,564 Da and encodes 495 amino acids, excluding a 21 amino acid signal peptide. MtEst45 showed a low amino acid identity (approximately 23–24%) compared with other lipolytic enzymes belonging to Family III, a closely related bacterial lipolytic enzyme family. MtEst45 also showed a conserved GXSXG motif, G131IS133YG135, which was reported as active site of known lipolytic enzymes, and the putative catalytic triad composed of D237 and H265. Because these mutants of MtEst45, which was S133A, D237N, and H265L, had no activity, these catalytic triad is deemed essential for the enzyme catalysis. MtEst45 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified via His-tag affinity chromatography. The optimal pH and temperature of MtEst45 were estimated to be 8.17 and 46.27°C by response surface methodology, respectively. Additionally, MtEst45 was also active between 1 and 15°C. The optimal hydrolysis substrate for MtEst45 among p-nitrophenyl esters (C2–C18) was p-nitrophenyl butyrate, and the Km and Vmax values were 0.0998 mM and 550 μmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. MtEst45 was strongly inhibited by Hg2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ions; by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride; and by β-mercaptoethanol. Ca2+ did not affect the enzyme's activity. These biochemical properties, sequence identity, and phylogenetic analysis suggest that MtEst45 represents a novel and valuable bacterial lipolytic enzyme family and is useful for biotechnological applications. PMID:26973604

  12. Diversity and cold adaptation of culturable endophytic fungi from bryophytes in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Li, Hai-Long; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-04-01

    Endophytic fungi associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, that is, the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata, were studied by culture-dependent method. A total of 128 endophytic fungi were isolated from 1329 tissue segments of 14 samples. The colonization rate of endophytic fungi in three bryophytes species were 12.3%, 12.1%, and 8.7%, respectively. These isolates were identified to 21 taxa, with 15 Ascomycota, 5 Basidiomycota, and 1 unidentified fungus, based on morphological characteristics and sequence analyses of ITS region and D1/D2 domain. The dominant fungal endophyte was Hyaloscyphaceae sp. in B. hatcheri, Rhizoscyphus sp. in C. aciphyllum, and one unidentified fungus in S. uncinata; and their relative frequencies were 33.3%, 32.1%, and 80.0%, respectively. Furthermore, different Shannon-Weiner diversity indices (0.91-1.99) for endophytic fungi and low endophytic fungal composition similarities (0.19-0.40) were found in three bryophyte species. Growth temperature tests indicated that 21 taxa belong to psychrophiles (9), psychrotrophs (11), and mesophile (1). The results herein demonstrate that the Antarctic bryophytes are an interesting source of fungal endophytes and the endophytic fungal composition is different among the bryophyte species, and suggest that these fungal endophytes are adapted to cold stress in Antarctica.

  13. Expression and enzymatic characterization of a cold-adapted β-agarase from Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang; Sha, Yujie

    2015-03-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium, designated as Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21, was isolated from an Antarctic sediment sample. The agarase gene aga1161 from Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21 consisting of a 2 382-bp coding region was cloned. The gene encodes a 793-amino acids protein and was found to possess characteristic features of the Glyco_hydro_42 family. The recombinant agarase (rAga1161) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a fusion protein. Enzyme activity analysis revealed that the optimum temperature and pH for the purified recombinant agarase were 30-40°C and 8.0, respectively. rAga1161 was found to maintain as much as 80% of its maximum activity at 10°C, which is typical of a coldadapted enzyme. The pattern of agar hydrolysis demonstrated that the enzyme is an β-agarase, producing neoagarobiose (NA2) as the final main product. Furthermore, this work is the first proof of an agarolytic activity in Antarctic bacteria and these results indicate the potential for the Antarctic agarase as a catalyst in medicine, food and cosmetic industries.

  14. The two-component system CBO2306/CBO2307 is important for cold adaptation of Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Derman, Yağmur; Isokallio, Marita; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a notorious foodborne pathogen. Its ability to adapt to and grow at low temperatures is of interest for food safety. Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to be involved in cold-shock and growth at low temperatures. Here we show the importance of TCS CBO2306/CBO2307 in the cold-shock response of C. botulinum ATCC 3502. The relative expression levels of the cbo2306 and cbo2307 were up to 4.4-fold induced in the cold-shocked cultures but negatively regulated in the late-log and stationary growth phase in relation to early logarithmic growth phase in non-shocked cultures. Importance of the CBO2306/CBO2307 in the cold stress was further demonstrated by impaired growth of insertional cbo2306 or cbo2307 knockout mutants in relation to the wild-type strain ATCC 3502. The results suggest that the TCS CBO2306/CBO2307 is important for cold-shock response and adaptation of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 to low temperature.

  15. Translation during cold adaptation does not involve mRNA-rRNA base pairing through the downstream box.

    PubMed Central

    La Teana, A; Brandi, A; O'Connor, M; Freddi, S; Pon, C L

    2000-01-01

    The downstream box (DB) has been proposed to enhance translation of several mRNAs and to be a key element controlling the expression of cold-shocked mRNAs. However, the proposal that the DB exerts its effects through a base pairing interaction with the complementary anti-downstream box (antiDB) sequence (nt 1469-1483) located in the penultimate stem (helix 44) of 16S rRNA remains controversial. The existence of this interaction during initiation of protein synthesis under cold-shock conditions has been investigated in the present work using an Escherichia coli strain whose ribosomes lack the potential to base pair with mRNA because of a 12 bp inversion of the antiDB sequence in helix 44. Our results show that this strain is capable of cold acclimation, withstands cold shock, and its ribosomes translate mRNAs that contain or lack DB sequences with similar efficiency, comparable to that of the wild type. The structure of helix 44 in 30S ribosomal subunits from cells grown at 37 degrees C and from cells subjected to cold shock was also analyzed by binding a 32P-labeled oligonucleotide complementary to the antiDB region and by chemical probing with DMS and kethoxal. Both approaches clearly indicate that this region is in a double-stranded conformation and therefore not available for base pairing with mRNA. PMID:11073215

  16. A cryoprotective and cold-adapted 1,3-β-endoglucanase from cherimoya (Annona cherimola) fruit.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Oscar; Sanchez-Ballesta, María T; Merodio, Carmen; Escribano, María I

    2011-06-01

    A 1,3-β-glucanase with potent cryoprotective activity was purified to homogeneity from the mesocarp of CO2-treated cherimoya fruit (Annona cherimola Mill.) stored at low temperature using anion exchange and chromatofocusing chromatography. This protein was characterized as a glycosylated endo-1,3-β-glucanase with a Mr of 22.07kDa and a pI of 5.25. The hydrolase was active and stable in a broad acidic pH range and it exhibited maximum activity at pH 5.0. It had a low optimum temperature of 35°C and it retained 40% maximum activity at 5°C. The purified 1,3-β-glucanase was relatively heat unstable and its activity declined progressively at temperatures above 50°C. Kinetic studies revealed low k(cat) (3.10±0.04 s(-1)) and Km (0.32±0.03 mg ml(-1)) values, reflecting the intermediate efficiency of the protein in hydrolyzing laminarin. Moreover, a thermodynamic characterization revealed that the purified enzyme displayed a high k(cat) at both 37 and 5°C, and a low Ea (6.99 kJ mol(-1)) within this range of temperatures. In vitro functional studies indicated that the purified 1,3-β-glucanase had no inhibitory effects on Botrytis cinerea hyphal growth and no antifreeze activity, as determined by thermal hysteresis analysis using differential scanning calorimetry. However, a strong cryoprotective activity was observed against freeze-thaw inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase. Indeed, the PD50 was 8.7 μg ml(-1) (394 nM), 9.2-fold higher (3.1 on a molar basis) than that of the cryoprotective protein BSA. Together with the observed accumulation of glycine-betaine in CO2-treated cherimoya tissues, these results suggest that 1,3-β-glucanase could be functionally implicated in low temperature-defense mechanism activated by CO2.

  17. Effect of bait in live trapping Peromyscus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1948-01-01

    SUMMARY: Evidence from live trapping tests indicated that Peromyscus leucopus did not leave their home ranges because of the attraction of trap bait in nearby areas. A trap line down the center of a heavily live-trapped area caught as many mice before the area trapping as afterward. Thus, there was reason to believe that the area trapping did not serve to pre-bait the mice. Two unbaited lines of live traps caught an equal number of Peromyscus. When one line was baited with rolled oats and peanut butter the efficiency of the traps was improved to the extent that the baited line captured more than twice as many mice as the unbaited line. It is concluded that for the species and habitat tested it is safe to make population calculations based on the assumption that the animals remain within their home ranges and do not tend to move into the trapped area because of the attraction of the trap bait.

  18. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila.

  19. Lived religion: implications for nursing ethics.

    PubMed

    Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl

    2009-07-01

    This article explores how ethics and religion interface in everyday life by drawing on a study examining the negotiation of religious and spiritual plurality in health care. Employing methods of critical ethnography, namely, interviews and participant observation, data were collected from patients, health care providers, administrators and spiritual care providers. The findings revealed the degree to which 'lived religion' was intertwined with 'lived ethics' for many participants; particularly for people from the Sikh faith. For these participants, religion was woven into everyday life, making distinctions between public and private, secular and sacred spaces improbable. Individual interactions, institutional resource allocation, and social discourses are all embedded in social relationships of power that prevent religion from being a solely personal or private matter. Strategies for the reintegration of religion into nursing ethics are: adjusting professional codes and theories of ethics to reflect the influence of religion; and the contribution of critical perspectives, such as postcolonial feminism, to the understanding of lived ethics.

  20. [Kidney donation by living donors. Surgical procedure].

    PubMed

    Baier, P K; Pisarski, P; Wimmenauer, S; Kirste, G

    1999-01-01

    The living donation of kidneys is gaining importance as a possible way to give a transplant to patients with terminal renal insufficiency. However we do not yet have experience with all the possibilities arising from this method. In particular, there is caution caused by the risks of the donor operation. In this context, the method is discussed according to the literature and our own experience of 89 living kidney donations. In our own practice with living donations, we have a success rate with 96% after 4 years and 82% after 16 years. We observed complications including wound infections (10.7%), haemorrhage, hernia and neurological complications (each 2.7%). When performed by specialists, the donor operation is safe and is a responsible alternative to the transplantation of cadaver kidneys, which opens up new possibilities in these times of organ shortage.

  1. [Escherichia coli R live vaccine Suicolplex "Dessau"].

    PubMed

    Michael-Meese, M; Klie, H; Schöll, W

    1980-01-01

    Immunisation of pregnant sows prior to parturition has long proved to be a good method to forestall coli dysentery in piglets before weaning. Inactivated vaccines of the pathogenetically important E. coli serogroups with and without adjuvant so far were primarily used at international level. A vaccine of that kind has become available in the GDR more than eight years ago. Its name is Coliporc "Dessau". A live vaccine has been developed from two R-mutants at the authors' institute. The effectiveness of that live vaccine on laboratory animals and in field experiments is reported in this paper together with possibilities of differential diagnosis to distinguish wild strains from the mutants. The live vaccine was commercially registered under the name of Suicolpex "Dessau", in spring 1976.

  2. Chlamydial infections in free-living birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Most studies of chlamydial infections in free-living wild birds have been limited to surveys for the presence of Chlamydia psittaci or antibody to C psittaci and have largely been done in association with the identification of chlamydiosis in human beings, commercial fowl, or pet birds. The emphasis of these studies has been to determine the prevalence of infection and the potential role of wild birds in the spread of chlamydiae to domestic birds and human beings. Little is known about the epizootiology of chlamydiosis in free-living birds or its affect on their population dynamics. The following article is a summary of reported studies of chlamydiosis in free-living wild birds in relation to host range, ecologic aspects of transmission and maintenance, and the prevalence of disease.

  3. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment.

  4. The Vernacular Landscape of Assisted Living.

    PubMed

    Roth, Erin G; Eckert, J Kevin

    2011-08-01

    This article is an exploration into the vernacular landscape of Assisted Living (AL), a conceptual idea borrowed from cultural geographer J.B. Jackson, which distinguishes formalized, planned space from those spaces which are unintended and often created spontaneously--vernacular. Based upon three large-scale, multi-year ethnographic studies in Maryland, we consider some of the ways people who live in AL relate to and respond to the built environment, at times subverting the intended purpose of design to make it their own. The conflict that often ensues over both planned and vernacular public and private space, we propose is ultimately the product of living within an environment that is both someone's home as well as a place of business, whose job it is to keep people safe. Within this physical context of vernacular private and public spaces, this article enriches understandings about the way autonomy and privacy expresses itself.

  5. Recent synchronous radiation of a living fossil.

    PubMed

    Nagalingum, N S; Marshall, C R; Quental, T B; Rai, H S; Little, D P; Mathews, S

    2011-11-11

    Modern survivors of previously more diverse lineages are regarded as living fossils, particularly when characterized by morphological stasis. Cycads are often cited as a classic example, reaching their greatest diversity during the Jurassic-Cretaceous (199.6 to 65.5 million years ago) then dwindling to their present diversity of ~300 species as flowering plants rose to dominance. Using fossil-calibrated molecular phylogenies, we show that cycads underwent a near synchronous global rediversification beginning in the late Miocene, followed by a slowdown toward the Recent. Although the cycad lineage is ancient, our timetrees indicate that living cycad species are not much older than ~12 million years. These data reject the hypothesized role of dinosaurs in generating extant diversity and the designation of today's cycad species as living fossils.

  6. Blurriness in Live Forensics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoldi, Antonio; Gubian, Paolo

    The Live Forensics discipline aims at answering basic questions related to a digital crime, which usually involves a computer-based system. The investigation should be carried out with the very goal to establish which processes were running, when they were started and by whom, what specific activities those processes were doing and the state of active network connections. Besides, a set of tools needs to be launched on the running system by altering, as a consequence of the Locard’s exchange principle [2], the system’s memory. All the methodologies for the live forensics field proposed until now have a basic, albeit important, weakness, which is the inability to quantify the perturbation, or blurriness, of the system’s memory of the investigated computer. This is the very last goal of this paper: to provide a set of guidelines which can be effectively used for measuring the uncertainty of the collected volatile memory on a live system being investigated.

  7. Producing a Live HDTV Program from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grubbs, Rodney; Fontanot, Carlos; Hames, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    By the year 2000, NASA had flown HDTV camcorders on three Space Shuttle missions: STS-95, STS-93 and STS-99. All three flights of these camcorders were accomplished with cooperation from the Japanese space agency (then known as NASDA and now known as JAXA). The cameras were large broadcast-standard cameras provided by NASDA and flight certified by both NASA and NASDA. The high-definition video shot during these missions was spectacular. Waiting for the return of the tapes to Earth emphasized the next logical step: finding a way to downlink the HDTV live from space. Both the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS) programs were interested in live HDTV from space, but neither had the resources to fully fund the technology. Technically, downlinking from the ISS was the most effective approach. Only when the Japanese broadcaster NHK and the Japanese space agency expressed interest in covering a Japanese astronaut's journey to the ISS did the project become possible. Together, JAXA and NHK offered equipment, technology, and funding toward the project. In return, NHK asked for a live HDTV downlink during one of its broadcast programs. NASA and the ISS Program sought a US partner to broadcast a live HDTV program and approached the Discovery Channel. The Discovery Channel had proposed a live HDTV project in response to NASA's previous call for offers. The Discovery Channel agreed to provide addItional resources. With the final partner in place, the project was under way. Engineers in the Avionics Systems Division at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) had already studied the various options for downlinking HDTV from the ISS. They concluded that the easiest way was to compress the HDTV so that the resulting data stream would "look" like a payload data stream. The flight system would consist of a professional HDTV camcorder with live HD-SDI output, an HDTV MPEG-2 encoder, and a packetizer/protocol converter.

  8. Optical nanoscopy of a living cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.; Wolfson, Deanna L.; Chuang, Frank Y. S.; Huser, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Optical nanoscopy allows to study biological and functional processes of sub-cellular organelles. In structured illumination microscopy (SIM) the sample is illuminated with a grid-like interference pattern to encode higher spatial frequency information into observable Moiré patterns. By acquiring multiple images and a computation trick a superresolved image is obtained. SIM provides resolution enhancement of 2X in each axis as compared to conventional microscopes. For a visible light, SIM provides an optical resolution of 100 nm. The challenges associated with optical nanoscopy of a living cell are photo-toxicity, special dye requirements and artifacts due to cell movement. SIM works with conventional dyes and is a wide-field technique making it suitable for imaging living cells. In this work, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges of imaging living cells using SIM. Two applications of optical nanoscopy of living cells will be discussed; a) imaging of mitochondria in a keratinocyte cell and Optical microscopy based on fluorescence has emerged as a vital tool in modern bio-medical imaging and diagnosis. Super-resolution bio-imaging allows gathering information from sub-cellular organelles. In structured illumination microscopy (SIM) the sample is illuminated with a grid-like interference patterns to encode higher spatial frequencies information into observable images (Moiré fringes). A super-resolved image is then decoded using computational trick. In this work, we used SIM to acquired super-resolved optical images of mitochondria from a live keratinocyte cell (see Fig 1). SIM provides resolution enhancement of 2X in each axis and contrast enhancement of 8X on a projected image. Time-lapsed imaging was used to study the dynamics of mitochondria in a live cell.

  9. The Concept of Living and Non-Living Things in the World of Primary School Students in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topsakal, Unsal Umdu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to reveal how the concepts of living and non-living things are in the world of the primary school (4th and 5th classes) students, what they remember when they are told about living and non-living things and what the characteristics of living and non-living things are according to them. The research is a descriptive…

  10. Arts Integration: An Exploration of the Dis/Connect between Policy and Live(d) Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaJevic, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the dis/connect between arts integration policy (i.e. written texts and curriculum documents) and the live(d) practice of teachers working with arts integration. Although previous studies have examined how arts integration is implemented in schools and how it affects student achievement, particularly standardized test…

  11. Black Lives, White Lives. Three Decades of Race Relations in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blauner, Bob

    This book explores the racial experience and consciousness of black and white Americans within the context of their lives over the course of 20 years. The subjects of this book, 16 blacks and 12 whites, were interviewed in 1968, again in 1978-79, and for a third time in 1986. They speak in their own words about how their lives unfolded, how their…

  12. The Organization of the Living: A Theory of the Living Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maturana, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Article presents a theory of the organization of living systems as autonomous entities, and a theory of the organization of the nervous system as a closed network of interacting neurons structurally coupled to the living system to whose realization it contributes. (Author)

  13. NCCN: 20 Years of Improving Patients' Lives.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W

    2015-05-01

    In his Keynote Address at the NCCN 20th Annual Conference, Robert W. Carlson, MD, reflected on the achievements of NCCN and described how the organization will continue to grow under his leadership. Recognizing that the founding of NCCN was by a group of visionary leaders who came together 20 years ago to assure access of patients to high-quality cancer care, Dr. Carlson said "All our efforts within NCCN are focused on improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of patient care, so that our patients can live better lives."

  14. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  15. Live confocal imaging of Arabidopsis flower buds.

    PubMed

    Prunet, Nathanaël; Jack, Thomas P; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in confocal microscopy, coupled with the development of numerous fluorescent reporters, provide us with a powerful tool to study the development of plants. Live confocal imaging has been used extensively to further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the formation of roots, shoots and leaves. However, it has not been widely applied to flowers, partly because of specific challenges associated with the imaging of flower buds. Here, we describe how to prepare and grow shoot apices of Arabidopsis in vitro, to perform both single-point and time-lapse imaging of live, developing flower buds with either an upright or an inverted confocal microscope.

  16. Imaging hallmarks of cancer in living mice.

    PubMed

    Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-06-01

    To comprehend the complexity of cancer, the biological characteristics acquired during the initiation and progression of tumours were classified as the 'hallmarks of cancer'. Intravital microscopy techniques have been developed to study individual cells that acquire these crucial traits, by visualizing tissues with cellular or subcellular resolution in living animals. In this Review, we highlight the latest intravital microscopy techniques that have been used in living animals (predominantly mice) to unravel fundamental and dynamic aspects of various hallmarks of cancer. In addition, we discuss the application of intravital microscopy techniques to cancer therapy, as well as limitations and future perspectives for these techniques.

  17. Multispectral imaging fluorescence microscopy for living cells.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yasushi; Shimi, Takeshi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2002-10-01

    Multispectral imaging technologies have been widely used in fields of astronomy and remote sensing. Interdisciplinary approaches developed in, for example, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA, USA), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, USA), or the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL, Japan) have extended the application areas of these technologies from planetary systems to cellular systems. Here we overview multispectral imaging systems that have been devised for microscope applications. We introduce these systems with particular interest in live cell imaging. Finally we demonstrate examples of spectral imaging of living cells using commercially available systems with no need for user engineering.

  18. [Multifaceted body. 2. The lived body].

    PubMed

    Wykretowicz, H; Saraga, M; Bourquin, C; Stiefel, F

    2015-02-11

    The human body is the object upon which medicine is acting, but also lived reality, image, symbol, representation and the object of elaboration and theory. All these elements which constitute the body influence the way medicine is treating it. In this series of three articles, we address the human body from various perspectives: medical (1), phenomenological (2), psychosomatic and socio-anthropological (3). This second article distinguishes between the body as an object of knowledge or representation and the way the body is lived. This distinction which originates in phenomenological psychiatry aims to understand how the patient experiences his body and to surpass the classical somatic and psychiatric classifications.

  19. An information typology for understanding living systems.

    PubMed

    Banathy, B A

    1998-04-01

    It is argued that we can improve our understanding of living systems by focusing on their informational processes. Recent developments, primarily in evolutionary biology, cybernetics and systems theory, suggest that informational processes are of at least two, and probably three, different types; and that the interaction of these types can be seen as a basis for the self-construction of living systems. Following the work of Csanyi and Kampis, a distinction is drawn between referential and nonreferential information. This typology is further extended to include statereferential information. The statereferential type serves to lend stability to informational arrangements (organization) that are viable so that they may be propagated in space and time.

  20. Conservation: can we live better on less

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.

    1981-02-01

    Americans are looking for more-efficient ways to live and conduct their business without lowering their living standard. New building designs, intensive gardening, new energy sources, and vanpooling are among the pioneering efforts. Conservation also requires innovative ways to raise capital to handle nontraditional projects. A new industry of house doctors audits the energy efficiency of buildings and creates more-conserving designs and materials. Other industries will develop renewable and synthetic energy sources. Reports of changing attitudes and a growing interest in decentralized energy management are signs that conservation can become a way of life. (DCK)

  1. Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Malgorzata Urbanska, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastrointestinal (GI) tract that has been proposed to be an oral targeted site. The main objective of these oral therapy procedures is to deliver live cells not only to treat diseases like colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and other GI tract diseases like intestinal obstruction and gastritis, but also to deliver therapeutic molecules for overall therapy in various diseases such as renal failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and others. This review provides a comprehensive summary of recent advancement in colon targeted live bacterial cell biotherapeutics. Current status of bacterial cell therapy, principles of artificial cells and its potentials in oral delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics for clinical applications as well as biotherapeutic future perspectives are also discussed in our review. PMID:19707368

  2. Products to Aid in Daily Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... for an update to this message. Product List Product/Services Topics Care Services Information and Referral Service (800) 782-4747 alsinfo@alsa-national.org For People with ALS and ... Videos Factsheets Products to Aid in Daily Living Informative Web Links ...

  3. Living the Research: Stories from Homeless Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norum, Karen E.

    There is an alarming trend in homelessness: children aged 17 and younger are the most rapidly growing group of the homeless; families continue to be a growing group of the homeless; and many people who are homeless were raised or have lived in the suburbs. Homelessness is no longer an inner-city phenomenon. Three homeless youth were interviewed…

  4. Music Is Key to Active, Happy Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Encapsulates a series of verbatim statements made by young musicians about the joy music has brought to their lives. The musicians, all students at Black Mountain Middle School in San Diego, California, exhibit a wide range of responses discussing their commitment, hard work, and sense of accomplishment. (MJP)

  5. Exploring the Living Planet with David Attenborough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Jacquelin; Unwin, David

    1984-01-01

    In this interview David Attenborough, the celebrated natural history film maker and writer, talks about his highly successful television series, "The Living Planet." Devoted to the exposition of the world's ecosystems, the film represents a significant example of popular geographic education. (RM)

  6. Researching Graduates' Lived Experiences of Vocational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Tony

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to exemplify the value of using a phenomenological approach when investigating graduates' lived experiences of vocational learning. For this study, qualitative data was obtained during a series of email interviews with 35 participants. As a group they are highly aspirational and, during their graduate studies, were…

  7. Building Resilient Lives: New Zealand Health Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Sometimes it takes a child to raise a whole village. Young people have the gifts and talents to raise their villages. They lack only the confidence of their villages in them to do it. At Te Puna Whaiora Children's Health Camps in New Zealand, the approach to helping families reach their potential is radically changing the lives of many children…

  8. Fatherhood and Men's Lives at Middle Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggebeen, David J.; Dew, Jeffrey; Knoester, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This article uses data on 2,024 men who were followed through the third wave of the National Survey of Families and Households to examine the implications of fatherhood experiences for men's involvement in altruistic social activities at middle age. We find that middle-aged men (ages 45-65) who at some point in their lives become fathers are…

  9. Live Site Demonstrations - Massachusetts Military Reservation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    MetalMapper Sensor; Advanced electromagnetic induction ; UXO; Classification; Live Site Demonstration; Massachusetts Military Reservation 16. SECURITY...Berkeley UXO Discriminator CD cultural debris CIA Central Impact Area cm centimeter DAQ data acquisition computer EMI electromagnetic induction ...advanced electromagnetic induction sensors developed specifically for discrimination on real sites under operational conditions. • Investigate in

  10. Children's Conceptions of Plants as Living Things.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wax, Naomi; Stavy, Ruth

    In this study, the attitudes of Israeli children aged 6 to 15 years were surveyed regarding their conceptions of plants as living things. It was desired to find out whether children consider plants to be alive, the knowledge differences between the different age groups in the study, how children classify plants according to biological criteria and…

  11. Living the Work: Meditations on a Lark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    It is widely assumed that there is a blanket norm requiring the performer to present the work "in the best light possible," and that the performer "make the ends of the work his own" or "live the work" in performance. Through careful consideration of a particular performance, I suggest that this is an inadequate conception of a performer's…

  12. Developing a Research Agenda for Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Rosalie A.; Wilson, Keren Brown; Spector, William

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We describe an approach to identifying knowledge gaps, research questions, and methodological issues for assisted living (AL) research. Design and Methods: We undertook an inventory of AL literature and research in progress and commissioned background papers critiquing knowledge on selected subtopics. With an advisory committee, we…

  13. Classroom Diversity: Connecting Curriculum to Students' Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Ellen, Ed.; Rosebery, Ann, Ed.; Gonzalez, Norma, Ed.

    These papers examine the sociocultural approach to curriculum design, which provides minority and working class students with the same privileges that middle class students have (instruction that puts their knowledge and experiences at the heart of learning). It presents the theoretical framework for linking students' lives with curriculum and…

  14. Adult and Family Living. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide for teachers is designed for use with 11th- and 12th-grade students who have had no more than 1 year of vocational home economics. It focuses on providing young adults with the knowledge and skills they need for healthy and positive adult and family lives. It includes 27 units in 8 sections as follows: (1) personal…

  15. Mycoplasma gallisepticum: Control by live attenuated vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  16. Developing a Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bow, Catherine; Christie, Michael; Devlin, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The fluctuating fortunes of Northern Territory bilingual education programs in Australian languages and English have put at risk thousands of books developed for these programs in remote schools. In an effort to preserve such a rich cultural and linguistic heritage, the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages project is establishing an open access,…

  17. Adaptive Dialogue Systems for Assistive Living Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papangelis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive Dialogue Systems (ADS) are intelligent systems, able to interact with users via multiple modalities, such as speech, gestures, facial expressions and others. Such systems are able to make conversation with their users, usually on a specific, narrow topic. Assistive Living Environments are environments where the users are by definition not…

  18. Bubbles in live-stranded dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, S.; Moore, M. J.; Fahlman, A.; Moore, K.; Sharp, S.; Harry, C. T.; Hoppe, J.; Niemeyer, M.; Lentell, B.; Wells, R. S.

    2012-01-01

    Bubbles in supersaturated tissues and blood occur in beaked whales stranded near sonar exercises, and post-mortem in dolphins bycaught at depth and then hauled to the surface. To evaluate live dolphins for bubbles, liver, kidneys, eyes and blubber–muscle interface of live-stranded and capture-release dolphins were scanned with B-mode ultrasound. Gas was identified in kidneys of 21 of 22 live-stranded dolphins and in the hepatic portal vasculature of 2 of 22. Nine then died or were euthanized and bubble presence corroborated by computer tomography and necropsy, 13 were released of which all but two did not re-strand. Bubbles were not detected in 20 live wild dolphins examined during health assessments in shallow water. Off-gassing of supersaturated blood and tissues was the most probable origin for the gas bubbles. In contrast to marine mammals repeatedly diving in the wild, stranded animals are unable to recompress by diving, and thus may retain bubbles. Since the majority of beached dolphins released did not re-strand it also suggests that minor bubble formation is tolerated and will not lead to clinically significant decompression sickness. PMID:21993505

  19. Going Prime Time with Live Chat Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoag, Tara J.; Cichanowicz, Edana McCaffrey

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of the Suffolk Cooperative Library System's live, online chat reference service, a pilot project for public libraries in Suffolk County (New York). Topics include chat software selection; a virtual reference collection; marketing; funding; staffing; evaluation; expanded hours of service; email; and extracting data from…

  20. Why do turtles live so long

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, J.W.

    1987-04-01

    Turtles appear to live longer than most other species of vertebrates, according to both maximal lifespans from zoo records and survivorship patterns in natural populations. Turtle longevity may reflect low metabolic activity, an absence of physiological and anatomical senility, a large investment in the adult's protective shell, and a life history with a long maturation period.

  1. The Musical Lives of Babies and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three" is a single focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that knowledge of childrens musical experiences in context is central to understanding childrens lives, and that reciprocally,…

  2. School Safety: Saving Lives with AEDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusser, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) on school and university campuses have saved many lives. Students, teachers and community members have been among the fortunate ones pulled from the brink of death. Medical studies validating the effectiveness of AEDs in schools and other public settings have been published in numerous medical journals.…

  3. Grandma, Mommy, and Me: Intergenerational Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn

    2008-01-01

    Intergenerational living has become common. Single adults move back into the family home, due to finances or perhaps the need for child care. A 24-hour workforce, from nurses to grocery clerks to military deployment has turned "day"care needs into both "night and day" care crises. Unemployment, lack of health care or home foreclosures, as well as…

  4. Living with Paraplegia: Tensions and Contradictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Deborah L.; Young, Jenny M.; Saul, Megan Johnston

    2004-01-01

    Although it is well established that paraplegia results in dramatic lifestyle changes, little is understood about living in the community with paraplegia, especially from the perspective of the person with paraplegia. To develop insight into this experience, in-depth, personal interviews were conducted with seven individuals with paraplegia who…

  5. Intraocular live male filarial Loa loa worm.

    PubMed

    Eballe, André Omgbwa; Epée, Emillienne; Koki, Godefroy; Owono, Didier; Mvogo, Côme Ebana; Bella, Assumpta Lucienne

    2008-12-01

    We report a case of Loa loa filariasis in an 8-month-old child who presented with a 3-month history of irritated acute red eye and insomnia. Examination revealed a living and active adult Loa loa worm in the anterior chamber of the left eye. The worm was extracted under general anesthetic.

  6. Teen Living 7015. Work and Family Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education Services.

    This supplement to the Teen Living curriculum contains materials to help teachers integrate family skills and tech prep skills into consumer home economics programs. It is keyed to a 2-semester consumer home economics course, based on the North Carolina Program of Studies (revised 1992); it is designed to help students focus on the relationship…

  7. Inquiry and Living History: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatney, Sharon; Smalley, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    The third article in this series featuring the Living History Program (see December 2005 and January 2006) looks at the life of Phillis Wheatley, the first published African American woman poet. Though little is known of her life as a slave in Boston, her published poetry is available today for people to read and enjoy. This study of Phillis…

  8. General Music and Children Living in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnally, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-01-01

    A review of recent writing makes the case that children living in poverty (urban, rural, or other) are more in jeopardy now than ever. As teachers attest and research asserts, poverty affects children in profound, complicated, and lasting ways. However, the general music program is uniquely positioned to meet children’s needs, especially those…

  9. Sustainable Living on the Tiwi Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burne, Cris; McKaige, Barbie

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on how the people of the Tiwi Islands (which lie in the Arafura Sea located off the coast of Darwin in Australia's Northern Territory) have carefully observed the rhythms and patterns of their country, developing a complex and precise way of living sustainably in their island environment. In 2015, the Tiwi people shared their…

  10. Live Scale Active Shooter Exercise: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Randy

    2008-01-01

    On October 23, 2007, the Lake Land College Public Safety Department conducted a full-scale live exercise that simulated an active shooter and barricaded hostage. In this article, the author will emphasize what they learned, and how they intend to benefit from it. He will list the law enforcement issues and general issues they encountered, and then…

  11. Biosynthesis: Imaging cell-wall biosynthesis live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is an important step in bacterial cell division and cell-wall maturation. Now it has been shown that fluorescent D-amino acids can be used to label the peptidoglycan cell wall of living bacteria, providing a new tool to study this important process.

  12. Living Arrangements: A Closer Look at Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Inst.

    This Kids Count pamphlet provides information on the living arrangements of Florida's children, focusing on family types. Drawing on information from the 1997 National Survey of America's Families, the Current Population Survey, and the National Center for Health Statistics, the pamphlet presents information on changes in America's families,…

  13. Living Lightly: Energy Conservation in Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Tom

    This publication contains a series of papers which promote the concepts of energy conservation and offer safe and convenient ways of handling all aspects of our lives affected by energy without having to depend in any way on fossil fuels or nuclear power. These changes, which can be brought about in homes and in energy flows affected by the…

  14. Definition and Classification of Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Sloane, Philip D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the benefits and limitations of, and considerations in, developing a typology of assisted living (AL). Design and Methods: We conducted a review and comparison of nine AL typologies drawn from the literature. Results: Typologies addressed matters related to the structure, process, population, and…

  15. A Taxonomy of Community Living Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Described is the "Taxonomy of Community Living Skills," a guide for curriculum developers. Experts (n=59) in mental retardation were surveyed to assess the taxonomy's coherence, appropriateness, completeness, etc. Responses to the model's five domains (personal maintenance and development, homemaking and community life, vocational,…

  16. Middle School Science Education for Sustainable Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses Science Education for Sustainable Living (SESL) and how SESL can empower middle school students. SESL implies educating people through scientific evidence toward justifiably potential solutions for sustaining life. In a school context, SESL may require students to understand current environmental issues, and this involves…

  17. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  18. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kagmeni, G.; Cheuteu, R.; Bilong, Y.; Wiedemann, P.

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis. PMID:27441005

  19. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kagmeni, G; Cheuteu, R; Bilong, Y; Wiedemann, P

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis.

  20. Bubbles in live-stranded dolphins.

    PubMed

    Dennison, S; Moore, M J; Fahlman, A; Moore, K; Sharp, S; Harry, C T; Hoppe, J; Niemeyer, M; Lentell, B; Wells, R S

    2012-04-07

    Bubbles in supersaturated tissues and blood occur in beaked whales stranded near sonar exercises, and post-mortem in dolphins bycaught at depth and then hauled to the surface. To evaluate live dolphins for bubbles, liver, kidneys, eyes and blubber-muscle interface of live-stranded and capture-release dolphins were scanned with B-mode ultrasound. Gas was identified in kidneys of 21 of 22 live-stranded dolphins and in the hepatic portal vasculature of 2 of 22. Nine then died or were euthanized and bubble presence corroborated by computer tomography and necropsy, 13 were released of which all but two did not re-strand. Bubbles were not detected in 20 live wild dolphins examined during health assessments in shallow water. Off-gassing of supersaturated blood and tissues was the most probable origin for the gas bubbles. In contrast to marine mammals repeatedly diving in the wild, stranded animals are unable to recompress by diving, and thus may retain bubbles. Since the majority of beached dolphins released did not re-strand it also suggests that minor bubble formation is tolerated and will not lead to clinically significant decompression sickness.

  1. Living Effectively in the 70's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexis I. DuPont School District, Greenville, DE.

    GRADES OR AGES: Unspecified. SUBJECT MATTER: Effective living. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: Most of the pages are divided into three columns: concept, some activities, and teacher comments. The guide is offset printed and spiral bound with a soft cover. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES: The guide is divided into eight units: human growth and…

  2. Community College Students Truly Live the Magic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shook, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about the Disney Theme Parks & Resorts College Program. The program attracts a variety of students each year from different backgrounds, major and career goals to the Walt Disney World Resort outside of Orlando, Florida, for a semester of living, learning and earning. The program has provided a foundation for thousands of…

  3. Allgemeinbildung: Readiness for Living in Risk Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmose, Steffen; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2005-01-01

    Sociologists increasingly note that one lives in a risk society, characterized by the unpredictable consequences of techno-scientific innovation and production and by increasing complexity. Life in risk society, particularly in truly democratic societies, increasingly requires competencies not only to understand and change one's own circumstances…

  4. Living Sculptures: Performance Art in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pembleton, Matthew; LaJevic, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    What does an introduction to and engagement in performance art offer K-12 students? In this article, we respond to this question by proposing a lesson inspired by the artmaking practices of the contemporary artist Erwin Wurm. Performance art can be defined as any form of work that combines the artist's body and a live-action event with or…

  5. Live Reference: Too Much, Too Fast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janes, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Considers the current trend in libraries toward live, or digital, reference services. Highlights include models for reference, including synchronous versus asynchronous; benefits for users; software packages; user expectations; suitability of the technology; and determining the best service for users and their information needs. (LRW)

  6. Living with Epilepsy--Not around It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview on Kevin Eggers, a 19-year-old college student from Seattle, Washington, who was diagnosed with epilepsy but had not let it prevent him from accomplishing his goals. As an Epilepsy Advocate, Kevin helps other teens and young adults realize that having a disability does not mean not living a normal and fulfilling…

  7. Living Green: Examining Sustainable Dorms and Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Lesley; Johnson, Cathryn; Hegtvedt, Karen A.; Parris, Christie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of living in "green" dorms on students' environmentally responsible behaviors (ERBs), in concert with other factors, including individual identity and social context in the form of behavior modeling by peers. Design/methodology/approach: The sample of 243 consists of students…

  8. Living Organisms for the Elementary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Carolyn H.; Hampton, Carol D.

    This publication was prepared for elementary teachers and other local personnel responsible for providing, maintaining and using living organisms to enhance elementary science programs. The manual contains a foreword, general information, and an appendix. It gives information concerning equipment and supplies, establishing and maintaining an…

  9. The "Lived Experience" of Political Engagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, R. W.

    For faculty members who incorporate experiential or service learning pedagogies into their courses, student experiences in the field can be difficult, emotionally charged, and full of unexpected outcomes. This paper presents the findings from a qualitative study of student lived experiences in the political science course "Democracy and…

  10. Focus on Form in Live Chats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wen-Chun; Eslami, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of incidental focus on form in promoting second language development in text-based live chats. Sixteen college-level Taiwanese English language learners were partnered with American college students to complete two communicative tasks via synchronous chats on Instant Messenger. Language-related episodes…

  11. Good Ideas for Teaching Daily Adult Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Robert K.

    Intended for practicing Adult Basic Education teachers, this handbook provides materials for teaching specific coping skills in the area of daily adult living. Three areas of study are explored: (1) community, which includes organizations, health, nutrition, safety, money management, and media; (2) government and law, which includes citizenship,…

  12. Long lived microbubbles for oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Frédéric; Waton, Gilles; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2007-01-01

    Exceptionally long lived microbubbles containing a fluorocarbon as part of their filling gas have been obtained by using a fluorinated phospholipid instead of a standard phospholipid as shell component. An unexpected, strong synergistic effect between the fluorocarbon gas and the fluorinated phospholipid has been discovered. Such bubbles could be used for in vivo oxygen delivery, ultrasound contrast imaging and drug delivery.

  13. What If We Lived in Flatland?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Rick; Princko, Jamie A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors wanted their students to consider mathematical notions of space and dimension, which are typically not part of the middle school curriculum. They developed a two-week lesson that was drawn from the curriculum unit "Exploring the Shape of Space" (Weeks 2001). They began by considering implications of living in a two-dimensional…

  14. Metro College for Living. Workshop Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreps, Alice Roelofs

    This packet contains information and materials for conducting a training workshop for working with adults who are developmentally disabled. The materials are specifically designed to train volunteer teachers in the College for Living (CFL) program, which supplements residential programs in and around Denver and aids institutions in orienting…

  15. Live from Westminster: Broadcasting the British Parliament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Peter Hardiman

    1978-01-01

    Describes live radio broadcasting from the chambers of the British Parliament. After 55 years of campaigning by broadcasters and Members of Parliament, and following experimental broadcasting by the BBC and Independent Local Radio, service was installed in April 1978. Initial experimentation, current procedures, and implications for television…

  16. Southern Identity in "Southern Living" Magazine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauder, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    A fantasy-theme analysis of the editors' letters in "Southern Living" magazine shows an editorial vision of valuing the past and showcasing unique regional qualities. In addition, a content analysis of the visual representation of race in the magazine's formative years and recent past validates that inhabitants of the region were portrayed…

  17. Living history: G. Edgar Folk, Jr.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Charles M

    2008-06-01

    In 2005, the American Physiological Society (APS) initiated the Living History Project to recognize senior members who have made significant contributions during their career to the advancement of the discipline and profession of physiology. During 2007, the APS Section of Environmental and Exercise Physiology selected Prof. G. Edgar Folk, Jr., of the University of Iowa to be profiled in Advances in Physiology Education.

  18. Transitional Living Programs for Homeless Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Sara V.; Robertson, Robert M., Jr.

    This report presents a conceptual framework for developing, reviewing, and evaluating transitional living programs (TLPs) for homeless adolescents. It is designed to be used by those in the field who are or will be developing such programs. All TLPs share basic elements and each of these is described so that TLP providers can understand what their…

  19. ESTCP Live Site Demonstrations Former Camp Beale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Demonstration Report ESTCP Live Site Demonstrations Former Camp Beale ESTCP Project MR-201163 March 2012 Mr. Tamir Klaff CH2MHill... Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1...including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson

  20. Fermions Living in a Flat World

    SciTech Connect

    Jesus Anguiano-Galicia, Ma. de; Bashir, A.

    2006-09-25

    In a plane, parity transformation, which changes the sign of only one spatial coordinate, swaps the fermion fields living in two inequivalent representations. A parity invariant Lagrangian thus contains fields corresponding to both the representations. For such a Lagrangian, we show that we can also define a chiral symmetry.

  1. Poor Americans: How the Poor White Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilisuk, Marc; Pilisuk, Phyllis

    Contents of this book include the following essays which originally appeared in "Transaction" magazine: (1) "Poor Americans: an introduction," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (2) "How the white poor live," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (3) "The culture of poverty," Oscar Lewis; (4) "Life in Appalachia--the case of Hugh McCaslin," Robert…

  2. Resilience among asylum seekers living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A small body of evidence demonstrates the challenges faced by migrant communities living with HIV but has yet to consider in-depth the experience of asylum seekers whose residency status is undetermined. The overall aim of our study was to explore the experiences of those who are both living with HIV and seeking asylum. This paper focuses on the stressors precipitated by the HIV diagnosis and by going through the asylum system; as well as participants’ resilience in responding to these stressors and the consequences for their health and wellbeing. Methods We conducted an ethnographic study. Fieldwork took place in the UK between 2008–2009 and included: 350 hours of observation at voluntary services providing support to black and minority ethnic groups living with HIV; 29 interviews and four focus group discussions with those who were seeking asylum and living with HIV; and 15 interviews with their health and social care providers. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. Results There were three main stressors that threatened participants’ resilience. First, migration caused them to leave behind many resources (including social support). Second, stigmatising attitudes led their HIV diagnosis to be a taboo subject furthering their isolation. Third, they found themselves trapped in the asylum system, unable to influence the outcome of their case and reliant on HIV treatment to stay alive. Participants were, however, very resourceful in dealing with these experiences. Resilience processes included: staying busy, drawing on personal faith, and the support received through HIV care providers and voluntary organisations. Even so, their isolated existence meant participants had limited access to social resources, and their treatment in the asylum system had a profound impact on perceived health and wellbeing. Conclusions Asylum seekers living with HIV in the UK show immense resilience. However, their isolation means they are often unable

  3. Age, Gender, and Reasons for Living among Australian Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaren, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Reasons for living have been identified as protective factors in relation to suicide, and much research has documented gender differences in reasons for living. In contrast, little research has investigated age differences in reasons for living. In the current study, the relationship of age to reasons for living was investigated, as was whether…

  4. Study on data acquisition system for living environmental information for biofication of living spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, Norihisa; Mita, Akira

    2008-03-01

    In Japan's rapidly aging society, the number of elderly people living alone increases every year. Theses elderly people require more and more to maintain as independent a life as possible in their own homes. It is necessary to make living spaces that assist in providing safe and comfortable lives. "Biofication of Living Spaces" is proposed with the concept of creating save and pleasant living environments. It implies learning from biological systems, and applying to living spaces features such as high adaptability and excellent tolerance to environmental changes. As a first step towards realizing "Biofied Spaces", a system for acquisition and storing information must be developed. This system is similar to the five human senses. The information acquired includes environmental information such as temperature, human behavior, psychological state and location of furniture. This study addresses human behavior as it is the most important factor in design of a living space. In the present study, pyroelectric infrared sensors were chosen for human behavior recognition. The pyroelectric infrared sensor is advantageous in that it has no limitation on the number of sensors put in a single space because sensors do not interfere with each other. Wavelet analysis was applied to the output time histories of the pyroelectric infrared sensors. The system successfully classified walking patterns with 99.5% accuracy of walking direction (from right or left) and 85.7% accuracy of distance for 440 patterns pre-learned and an accuracy of over 80% accuracy of walking direction for 720 non-learned patterns.

  5. Outcomes of shipped live donor kidney transplants compared with traditional living donor kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Treat, Eric G; Miller, Eric T; Kwan, Lorna; Connor, Sarah E; Maliski, Sally L; Hicks, Elisabeth M; Williams, Kristen C; Whitted, Lauren A; Gritsch, Hans A; McGuire, Suzanne M; Mone, Thomas D; Veale, Jeffrey L

    2014-11-01

    The disparity between kidney transplant candidates and donors necessitates innovations to increase organ availability. Transporting kidneys allows for living donors and recipients to undergo surgery with a familiar transplant team, city, friends, and family. The effect of shipping kidneys and prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT) with living donor transplantation outcomes is not clearly known. This retrospective matched (age, gender, race, and year of procedure) cohort study compared allograft outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants and nonshipped living donor kidney transplants. Fifty-seven shipped live donor kidneys were transplanted from 31 institutions in 26 cities. The mean shipping distance was 1634 miles (range 123-2811) with mean CIT of 12.1 ± 2.8 h. The incidence of delayed graft function in the shipped cohort was 1.8% (1/57) compared to 0% (0/57) in the nonshipped cohort. The 1-year allograft survival was 98% in both cohorts. There were no significant differences between the mean serum creatinine values or the rates of serum creatinine decline in the immediate postoperative period even after adjusted for gender and differences in recipient and donor BMI. Despite prolonged CITs, outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants were similar when compared to matched nonshipped living donor kidney transplants.

  6. Lifetime Induced Abortion: A Comparison between Women Living and Not Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Pilecco, Flávia Bulegon; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; Vigo, Álvaro; Dewey, Michael E.; Knauth, Daniela Riva

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies aimed at understanding the association between induced abortion and HIV are scarce and differ on the direction of the association. This paper aims to show the prevalence of induced abortion in a sample of pregnancies of women living and not living with HIV/Aids, determining variables associated with pregnancy termination and linked to the life course of women and to the specific context of the pregnancy. Methods Data came from a cross-sectional study, using interviewer-administered questionnaire, developed with women that attended public health services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. A generalized estimating equation model with logit link measured the association between determinants and abortion. Findings The final sample was composed of 684 women living with HIV/Aids (2,039 pregnancies) and 639 women not living with HIV/Aids (1,539 pregnancies). The prevalence of induced abortion among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids was 6.5%, while in women not living with HIV/Aids was 2.9%. Among women living with HIV/Aids, the following were associated with induced abortion in the multivariable analysis: being older, having a higher education level, having had more sexual partners (i.e., variables linked to the life course of women), having had children prior to the index pregnancy and living with a sexual partner during pregnancy (i.e., variables linked to the context of each pregnancy). On the other hand, among women not living with HIV/Aids, only having a higher education level and having had more sexual partners (i.e., determinants linked to the life course of women) were associated with voluntary pregnancy termination in multivariable analysis. Conclusion Although determinants are similar between women living and not living with HIV/Aids, prevalence of induced abortion is higher among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids, pointing to their greater social vulnerability and to the need for public policy to address prevention and treatment of HIV

  7. How Do Young Children Deal with Hybrids of Living and Non-Living Things: The Case of Humanoid Robots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saylor, Megan M.; Somanader, Mark; Levin, Daniel T.; Kawamura, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    In this experiment, we tested children's intuitions about entities that bridge the contrast between living and non-living things. Three- and four-year-olds were asked to attribute a range of properties associated with living things and machines to novel category-defying complex artifacts (humanoid robots), a familiar living thing (a girl), and a…

  8. RESEMBLANCES BETWEEN THE ELECTROMOTOR VARIATIONS OF RHYTHMICALLY REACTING LIVING AND NON-LIVING SYSTEMS.

    PubMed

    Lillie, R S

    1929-09-20

    1. The electromotor variations of pure iron wires, arranged to react rhythmically with nitric acid, are recorded and described. 2. Resemblances between these variations and those of rhythmically reacting living tissues (especially the heart) are pointed out and discussed.

  9. Together We Can Live and Learn. Living-Learning Communities as Integrated Curricular Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Merrily S.; Dean, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    This article briefly outlines the history of living-learning communities (LLC) in colleges and universities. It details conceptualization, design, implementation and assessment of such programs. Model recreation and leisure LLC are highlighted and discussed.

  10. Super-resolution imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Over the last twenty years super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has gone from proof-of-concept experiments to commercial systems being available in many labs, improving the resolution achievable by up to a factor of 10 or more. There are three major approaches to super-resolution, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, structured illumination microscopy, and localisation microscopy, which have all produced stunning images of cellular structures. A major current challenge is optimising performance of each technique so that the same sort of data can be routinely taken in live cells. There are several major challenges, particularly phototoxicity and the speed with which images of whole cells, or groups of cells, can be acquired. In this review we discuss the various approaches which can be successfully used in live cells, the tradeoffs in resolution, speed, and ease of implementation which one must make for each approach, and the quality of results that one might expect from each technique.

  11. A living wage for research subjects.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Trisha B

    2011-01-01

    Offering cash payments to research subjects is a common recruiting method, but this practice continues to be controversial because of its potential to compromise the protection of human subjects. Federal regulations and guidelines currently allow researchers to pay subjects for participation, but they say very little about how much researchers can pay their subjects. This paper argues that the federal regulations and guidelines should implement a standard payment formula. It argues for a wage payment model, and critically examines three candidates for a base wage: the nonfarm production wage, the FLSA minimum wage, and a living wage. After showing that the nonfarm production wage is too high to satisfy ethical criteria, and the minimum wage is too low, this paper concludes that the wage payment model with a base wage equivalent to a living wage is the best candidate for a standard payment formula in human subjects research.

  12. Imaging neurotransmitter release kinetics in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Weihong; Yeung, E.S.; Haydon, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    A new UV-laser based optical microscope and CCD detection system has been developed to image neurotransmitter in living biological cells. We demonstrate the detection of serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual living glial cells (astrocytes) based on its native fluorescence. The detection methodology has high sensitivity, low limit of detection and does not require coupling to fluorescence dyes. We have studied serotonin uptake kinetics and its release dynamics in single glial cells. Different regions of a glial cell have taken up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of kinetics. Similarly, different serotonin release mechanisms have been observed in different astrocyte cell regions. The temporal resolution of this detection system is as fast as 50 ms, and the spatial resolution is diffraction limited. We will also report on single enzyme molecule reaction studies and single metal ion detection based on CCD imaging of pL reaction vials formed by micromachining on fused silica.

  13. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  14. Discerning lived spirituality: the reception of otherness.

    PubMed

    Walton, Martin Neal

    2013-06-01

    A previous article focused on an analysis of prominent conceptualizations of spirituality in health care. The encompassing character of those approaches was viewed as problematic because too little attention is paid to the distinctiveness and particularities of spiritual experience. This article argues that the criteria gleaned from the prior analysis provide an impetus for a constructive discernment proposal of lived spirituality. The experience of otherness is provides a central clue to an understanding of spirituality particularly by two key terms, receptivity and transformation, as central characterizations of lived spirituality. These terms are investigated as they embrace operational potential for chaplaincy care. The article concludes with a reflection on chaplaincy care as it relates to spiritual practice.

  15. Modularizing Spatial Ontologies for Assisted Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hois, Joana

    Assisted living systems are intended to support daily-life activities in user homes by automatizing and monitoring behavior of the environment while interacting with the user in a non-intrusive way. The knowledge base of such systems therefore has to define thematically different aspects of the environment mostly related to space, such as basic spatial floor plan information, pieces of technical equipment in the environment and their functions and spatial ranges, activities users can perform, entities that occur in the environment, etc. In this paper, we present thematically different ontologies, each of which describing environmental aspects from a particular perspective. The resulting modular structure allows the selection of application-specific ontologies as necessary. This hides information and reduces complexity in terms of the represented spatial knowledge and reasoning practicability. We motivate and present the different spatial ontologies applied to an ambient assisted living application.

  16. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed.

  17. [Distant mental influence on living organisms].

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews studies of distant mental influence on living organisms, including mental suggestions of sleeping and awakening, mental influence at long distances, mental interactions with remote biological systems, mental effects on physiological activity and the sense of being stared at. Significant effects of distant mental influence have been shown in several randomized controlled trials in humans, animals, plants, bacteria and cells in the laboratory. Although distant mental influence on living organisms appears to contradict our ordinary sense of reality and the laws defined by conventional science, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the observed effects; they include skeptical, signal transfer, field, multidimensional space/time and quantum mechanics hypotheses. In conclusion, as the progress of physics continues to expand our comprehension of reality, a rational explanation for distant mind-matter interaction will emerge and, as history has shown repeatedly, the supernatural events will evolve into paranormal and then, into normal ones, as the scientific frontiers expand.

  18. Potency of Melatonin in Living Beings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Donchan

    2013-01-01

    Living beings are surrounded by various changes exhibiting periodical rhythms in environment. The environmental changes are imprinted in organisms in various pattern. The phenomena are believed to match the external signal with organisms in order to increase their survival rate. The signals are categorized into circadian, seasonal, and annual cycles. Among the cycles, the circadian rhythm is regarded as the most important factor because its periodicity is in harmony with the levels of melatonin secreted from pineal gland. Melatonin is produced by the absence of light and its presence displays darkness. Melatonin plays various roles in creatures. Therefore, this review is to introduce the diverse potential ability of melatonin in manifold aspects in living organism. PMID:25949131

  19. A living systems perspective on health.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Christopher B

    2014-02-01

    Absence of a theoretical basis for defining health has made it an elusive concept and problematic to measure. This deficiency has precluded a clear delineation of the content of health science as a field. In this manuscript I use a living systems theoretical perspective to distinguish the parts and emergent properties of health. I term the parts of health, "assets," which include the dimensions of energetics, restoration, mind, reproduction, and capabilities. Health assets interact at the level of the whole person to form integrated and emergent capacities that enable adaptation to environmental challenges, satisfaction of needs, attainment of life goals, and survival. Healthy individuals live long and adapt to and thrive within their environments. As more is learned about the interrelationships among health assets, their influences, their consequences, and how they interact to produce integrated functional capacities, a theoretically grounded and empirically informed ontology of health will emerge.

  20. High resolution imaging of live mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classically, mitochondria have been studied by biochemical, genetic and electron microscopic approaches. In the last two decades, it became evident that mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that are frequently dividing and fusing, changing size and shape and traveling long distances throughout the life of a cell. The study of the complex structural changes of mitochondria in vivo became possible with the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques in combination with live cell imaging microscopy. This review aims to provide an overview on novel fluorescent markers that are used in combination with mitochondrial fusion assays and various live cell microscopy techniques to study mitochondrial dynamics. In particular, approaches to study the movement of mitochondrial proteins and novel imaging techniques (FRET imaging-, 4Pi- and STED-microscopy) that provide high spatial resolution are considered.