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Sample records for live single red

  1. [Instant effect of temperature on the oxygen carrying capacity of single living intact red blood cell].

    PubMed

    Yao, Cheng-can; Li, Xiao-kun; Huang, Yao-xiong

    2005-04-01

    The instant effect of temperature on the absorption spectra of the hemoglobin in single living intact red blood cells was investigated, by employing a highly sensitive fast multi-channel micro-spectrophotometer system to perform non-invasive, in situ, real time measurements on the cells. It was found that both the heights and position of the specific peaks in the absorption spectra of intercellular hemoglobin were changed with temperature, indicating that the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells varies with temperature. The correlations of the structure and concentration as well as the function of hemoglobin, and the molecular mechanism were also discussed.

  2. Single-Molecule Specific Mislocalization of Red Fluorescent Proteins in Live Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, Harshad; Caldas, Victor E A; Punter, Christiaan M; van Oijen, Antoine M; Robinson, Andrew

    2016-07-12

    Tagging of individual proteins with genetically encoded fluorescent proteins (FPs) has been used extensively to study localization and interactions in live cells. Recent developments in single-molecule localization microscopy have enabled the dynamic visualization of individual tagged proteins inside living cells. However, tagging proteins with FPs is not without problems: formation of insoluble aggregates and inhibition of native functions of the protein are well-known issues. Previously reported artifacts manifest themselves at all expression levels of the FP-tagged proteins, making the design of control experiments relatively straightforward. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized mislocalization artifact of Entacmaea quadricolor red fluorescent protein variants that is detectable at the single-molecule level in live Escherichia coli cells. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Raman Tweezers Spectroscopy of Live, Single Red and White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Zachariah, Elsa; Chidangil, Santhosh; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm) is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW). Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip. PMID:20454686

  4. Living with a Single Parent

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray Living With a Single Parent KidsHealth > For Kids > Living With a Single Parent ... single parents can be a great idea, too. Single Parents and Work Single parents are often working parents ...

  5. Living with a Single Parent

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Living With a Single Parent KidsHealth > For Kids > Living With a Single Parent ... single parents can be a great idea, too. Single Parents and Work Single parents are often working parents ...

  6. A General Mechanism of Photoconversion of Green-to-Red Fluorescent Proteins Based on Blue and Infrared Light Reduces Phototoxicity in Live-Cell Single-Molecule Imaging.

    PubMed

    Turkowyd, Bartosz; Balinovic, Alexander; Virant, David; Carnero, Haruko G Gölz; Caldana, Fabienne; Endesfelder, Marc; Bourgeois, Dominique; Endesfelder, Ulrike

    2017-09-11

    Photoconversion of fluorescent proteins by blue and complementary near-infrared light, termed primed conversion (PC), is a mechanism recently discovered for Dendra2. We demonstrate that controlling the conformation of arginine at residue 66 by threonine at residue 69 of fluorescent proteins from Anthozoan families (Dendra2, mMaple, Eos, mKikGR, pcDronpa protein families) represents a general route to facilitate PC. Mutations of alanine 159 or serine 173, which are known to influence chromophore flexibility and allow for reversible photoswitching, prevent PC. In addition, we report enhanced photoconversion for pcDronpa variants with asparagine 116. We demonstrate live-cell single-molecule imaging with reduced phototoxicity using PC and record trajectories of RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli cells. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Family Life Education Resource Unit. Single Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hite, Joyce

    This resource unit, a supplement to the family life education curiculum guide (see related note), was designed to help secondary education home economics teachers provide students with learning experiences related to living as a single person. The unit covers two principle topics regarding single living, each including an overall objective,…

  8. Single Molecule Detection and Imaging in Single Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming

    2002-03-01

    Direct observation of single molecules and single molecular events inside living cells could dramatically improve our understanding of basic cellular processes (e.g., signal transduction and gene transcription) as well as improving our knowledge on the intracellular transport and fate of therapeutic agents (e.g., antisense RNA and gene therapy vectors). This talk will focus on using single-molecule fluorescence and luminescent quantum dots to examine the dynamics and spatial distribution of RNA and proteins inside living cells and on the surface membrane surface. These single-molecule studies yield a detailed description of molecular events and cellular structures under physiological conditions.

  9. The Red Queen lives: Epistasis between linked resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Metzger, César M J A; Luijckx, Pepijn; Bento, Gilberto; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A popular theory explaining the maintenance of genetic recombination (sex) is the Red Queen Theory. This theory revolves around the idea that time-lagged negative frequency-dependent selection by parasites favors rare host genotypes generated through recombination. Although the Red Queen has been studied for decades, one of its key assumptions has remained unsupported. The signature host-parasite specificity underlying the Red Queen, where infection depends on a match between host and parasite genotypes, relies on epistasis between linked resistance loci for which no empirical evidence exists. We performed 13 genetic crosses and tested over 7000 Daphnia magna genotypes for resistance to two strains of the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. Results reveal the presence of strong epistasis between three closely linked resistance loci. One locus masks the expression of the other two, while these two interact to produce a single resistance phenotype. Changing a single allele on one of these interacting loci can reverse resistance against the tested parasites. Such a genetic mechanism is consistent with host and parasite specificity assumed by the Red Queen Theory. These results thus provide evidence for a fundamental assumption of this theory and provide a genetic basis for understanding the Red Queen dynamics in the Daphnia-Pasteuria system.

  10. Trapping red blood cells in living animals using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min-Cheng; Wei, Xun-Bin; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Yin-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The recent development of non-invasive imaging techniques has enabled the visualization of molecular events underlying cellular processes in live cells. Although microscopic objects can be readily manipulated at the cellular level, additional physiological insight is likely to be gained by manipulation of cells in vivo, which has not been achieved so far. Here we use infrared optical tweezers to trap and manipulate red blood cells within subdermal capillaries in living mice. We realize a non-contact micro-operation that results in the clearing of a blocked microvessel. Furthermore, we estimate the optical trap stiffness in the capillary. Our work expands the application of optical tweezers to the study of live cell dynamics in animals.

  11. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-27

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  12. Live single-cell mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masujima, Tsutomu

    2009-08-01

    The history from bio-imaging to live single-cell mass spectrometry (MS) is herein reviewed. The limitation of the current bio-imaging method is probing only known molecules, and a method for finding new molecules is needed for cells which, however, show individual behaviors even in the same incubation dish. Single-cell MALDI-TOF/MS has been developed, but it can detect only molecules that can be easily ionized, and not be exhaustive. Recently, the contents of a single cell have been sucked out by a nano-electro spray tip, and directly introduced into MS by nano-spray ionization. Thousands of molecular peaks have been successfully and exhaustively detected, and an extraction method for key molecules was also developed. This new method is now being widely applied to explore site- or state-specific molecules in various aspects of cell dynamisms.

  13. Time-Resolved Imaging of Single HIV-1 Uncoating In Vitro and in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Ashwanth C.; Marin, Mariana; Shi, Jiong; Aiken, Christopher; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Disassembly of the cone-shaped HIV-1 capsid in target cells is a prerequisite for establishing a life-long infection. This step in HIV-1 entry, referred to as uncoating, is critical yet poorly understood. Here we report a novel strategy to visualize HIV-1 uncoating using a fluorescently tagged oligomeric form of a capsid-binding host protein cyclophilin A (CypA-DsRed), which is specifically packaged into virions through the high-avidity binding to capsid (CA). Single virus imaging reveals that CypA-DsRed remains associated with cores after permeabilization/removal of the viral membrane and that CypA-DsRed and CA are lost concomitantly from the cores in vitro and in living cells. The rate of loss is modulated by the core stability and is accelerated upon the initiation of reverse transcription. We show that the majority of single cores lose CypA-DsRed shortly after viral fusion, while a small fraction remains intact for several hours. Single particle tracking at late times post-infection reveals a gradual loss of CypA-DsRed which is dependent on reverse transcription. Uncoating occurs both in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear membrane. Our novel imaging assay thus enables time-resolved visualization of single HIV-1 uncoating in living cells, and reveals the previously unappreciated spatio-temporal features of this incompletely understood process. PMID:27322072

  14. Red photoluminescence of living systems at the room temperature : measurements and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, I. S.; Rud, V. Yu; Shpunt, V. Ch; Rud, Yu V.; Glinushkin, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    Presents results of a study of the red luminescence of living plants at room temperature. The analysis of obtained results allows to conclude that the photoluminescence spectra for green leaves in all cases represent the two closely spaced bands.

  15. The application of KillerRed for acute protein inactivation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jarvela, Timothy S.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2017-01-01

    Generating loss of protein function is a powerful investigatory tool particularly if carried out at a physiologically relevant timescale in a live-cell fluorescent imaging experiment. KillerRed mediated chromophore assisted light inactivation (CALI) uses genetic encoding for specificity and light for acute inactivation that can also be spatially restricted. This unit provides protocols for setting up and carrying out properly controlled KillerRed experiments during live-cell imaging of cultured cells. PMID:24984963

  16. Imaging Single Cells in the Living Retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A quarter century ago, we were limited to a macroscopic view of the retina inside the living eye. Since then, new imaging technologies, including confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and adaptive optics fundus imaging, transformed the eye into a microscope in which individual cells can now be resolved noninvasively. These technologies have enabled a wide range of studies of the retina that were previously impossible. PMID:21596053

  17. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging.

    PubMed

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2015-12-09

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M(-1)cm(-1), mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths.

  18. Creep function of a single living cell.

    PubMed

    Desprat, Nicolas; Richert, Alain; Simeon, Jacqueline; Asnacios, Atef

    2005-03-01

    We used a novel uniaxial stretching rheometer to measure the creep function J(t) of an isolated living cell. We show, for the first time at the scale of the whole cell, that J(t) behaves as a power-law J(t) = At(alpha). For N = 43 mice myoblasts (C2-7), we find alpha = 0.24 +/- 0.01 and A = (2.4 +/- 0.3) 10(-3) Pa(-1) s(-alpha). Using Laplace Transforms, we compare A and alpha to the parameters G(0) and beta of the complex modulus G*(omega) = G(0)omega(beta) measured by other authors using magnetic twisting cytometry and atomic force microscopy. Excellent agreement between A and G(0) on the one hand, and between alpha and beta on the other hand, indicated that the power-law is an intrinsic feature of cell mechanics and not the signature of a particular technique. Moreover, the agreement between measurements at very different size scales, going from a few tens of nanometers to the scale of the whole cell, suggests that self-similarity could be a central feature of cell mechanical structure. Finally, we show that the power-law behavior could explain previous results first interpreted as instantaneous elasticity. Thus, we think that the living cell must definitely be thought of as a material with a large and continuous distribution of relaxation time constants which cannot be described by models with a finite number of springs and dash-pots.

  19. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LIVING ROOM. SHOWING THE SINGLE PANEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LIVING ROOM. SHOWING THE SINGLE PANEL DOOR TO THE BEDROOM AND THE FRONT ENTRY DOOR WITH VISION PANEL. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Hickam Field, NCO Housing Type 6, 212 Eleventh Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Physical chemistry in a single live cell: confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amin, Md Asif; Nandi, Somen; Mondal, Prasenjit; Mahata, Tanushree; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2017-05-24

    A live cell is a complex, yet extremely important container. Understanding the dynamics in a selected intracellular component is a challenging task. We have recently made significant progress in this direction using a confocal microscope as a tool. The smallest size of the focused spot in a confocal microscope is ∼0.2 μm (200 nm). This is nearly one hundred times smaller than the size of a live cell. Thus, one can selectively study different intracellular components/organelles in a live cell. In this paper, we discuss how one can image different intracellular components/organelles, record fluorescence spectra and decay at different locations, ascertain local polarity and viscosity, and monitor the dynamics of solvation, proton transfer, red-ox and other phenomena at specified locations/organelles inside a cell. We will highlight how this knowledge enriched us in differentiating between cancer and non-cancer cells, 3D tumor spheroids and towards drug delivery.

  1. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single living cells: principle and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianliao; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuzhu; Li, Yong Qing

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the principle and applications of the combination technique of optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy for real-time analysis of single living cells. We demonstrate that the information of each substance inside a captured cell can be retrieved by the Raman spectrum of the cell. The effect of alcohol solution on single human Red Blood Cell (RBC) is investigated using near-infrared laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). The significant difference between the spectrum of fresh RBC and the spectrum of RBC exposed to alcohol is observed due to the degradation of RBC. We also present the preliminary study result on the diagnosis of colorectal cancer using LTRS system.

  2. Micro-photoluminescence of single living diatom cells.

    PubMed

    LeDuff, Paul; Roesijadi, Guritno; Rorrer, Gregory L

    2016-11-01

    Diatoms are single-celled microalgae that possess a nanostructured, porous biosilica shell called a frustule. This study characterized the micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) emission of single living cells of the photosynthetic marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana in response to UV laser irradiation at 325 nm using a confocal Raman microscope. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum had two primary peaks, one centered at 500-510 nm, which was attributed to the frustule biosilica, and a second peak at 680 nm, which was attributed to auto-fluorescence of photosynthetic pigments. The portion of the μ-PL emission spectrum associated with biosilica frustule in the single living diatom cell was similar to that from single biosilica frustules isolated from these diatom cells. The PL emission by the biosilica frustule in the living cell emerged only after cells were cultivated to silicon depletion. The discovery of the discovery of PL emission by the frustule biosilica within a single living diatom itself, not just its isolated frustule, opens up future possibilities for living biosensor applications, where the interaction of diatom cells with other molecules can be probed by μ-PL spectroscopy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Single exposure contacts are dead. Long live single exposure contacts!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, Henning; Ostermayr, Martin; Kanai, Hideki; Chang, Chan Sam; Morgenfeld, Bradley; An, Jujin; Luo, Meng; Zhuang, Haoren

    2011-04-01

    The paper describes a process/design co-optimization effort based on an SRAM design to enable a single exposure contact process for the 28nm technology half node. As a start, a change to the wiring concept of the standard SRAM design was implemented. The resulting individual contact layer elements may seem even more resolution critical to the casual observer. But in reality, the flexibility for source-mask optimization had been significantly improved. In a second step, wafer targets and mask dimension options (using various kinds of OPC methods and SRAF strategies) were run through several optimization iterations. This included interlevel considerations due to stringent overlap requirements. Several promising SRAM design as well as mask options were identified and experimentally verified to finally converge to an optimum mask and wafer target layout. Said optimum solution still supports an automated OPC approach using standard EDA tools and off the shelf OPC strategies. In a last step, a 1Mbit electrically testable SRAM was designed and manufactured together with alternative SRAM designs and process options. After explaining the changes to the wiring of the SRAM design, the paper discusses in great detail various mask optimization solutions and their consequences on wafer target and printability. Simulation and experimental results are compared and the concluding optimized solution is explained. Furthermore, some key lithography and etch process elements that became the single exposure process enabler are explained in more detail. Finally, the paper will take a look at electrical results of the 1Mbit electrically testable SRAM as the ultimate proof of concept.

  4. Single molecule methods with applications in living cells.

    PubMed

    Persson, Fredrik; Barkefors, Irmeli; Elf, Johan

    2013-08-01

    Our knowledge about dynamic processes in biological cells systems has been obtained roughly on two levels of detail; molecular level experiments with purified components in test tubes and system wide experiments with indirect readouts in living cells. However, with the development of single molecule methods for application in living cells, this partition has started to dissolve. It is now possible to perform detailed biophysical experiments at high temporal resolution and to directly observe processes at the level of molecules in living cells. In this review we present single molecule methods that can easily be implemented by readers interested to venture into this exciting and expanding field. We also review some recent studies where single molecule methods have been used successfully to answer biological questions as well as some of the most common pitfalls associated with these methods. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Tracking single molecules at work in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumi, Akihiro; Tsunoyama, Taka A; Hirosawa, Kohichiro M; Kasai, Rinshi S; Fujiwara, Takahiro K

    2014-07-01

    Methods for imaging and tracking single molecules conjugated with fluorescent probes, called single-molecule tracking (SMT), are now providing researchers with the unprecedented ability to directly observe molecular behaviors and interactions in living cells. Current SMT methods are achieving almost the ultimate spatial precision and time resolution for tracking single molecules, determined by the currently available dyes. In cells, various molecular interactions and reactions occur as stochastic and probabilistic processes. SMT provides an ideal way to directly track these processes by observing individual molecules at work in living cells, leading to totally new views of the biochemical and molecular processes used by cells whether in signal transduction, gene regulation or formation and disintegration of macromolecular complexes. Here we review SMT methods, summarize the recent results obtained by SMT, including related superresolution microscopy data, and describe the special concerns when SMT applications are shifted from the in vitro paradigms to living cells.

  6. Single-Molecule and Superresolution Imaging in Live Bacteria Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biteen, Julie S.; Moerner, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging enables biophysical measurements devoid of ensemble averaging, gives enhanced spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, and permits superresolution reconstructions. Here, single-molecule and superresolution imaging are applied to the study of proteins in live Caulobacter crescentus cells to illustrate the power of these methods in bacterial imaging. Based on these techniques, the diffusion coefficient and dynamics of the histidine protein kinase PleC, the localization behavior of the polar protein PopZ, and the treadmilling behavior and protein superstructure of the structural protein MreB are investigated with sub-40-nm spatial resolution, all in live cells. PMID:20300204

  7. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M−1cm−1, mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths. PMID:26648024

  8. Bone assessment of free-living red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) from the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Garriga, Rosa M; Sainsbury, Anthony W; Goodship, Allen E

    2004-07-01

    Metabolic bone disease has been reported in free-living red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in the United Kingdom but the prevalence of this disease is unknown. In this study the bone quality of free-living red squirrels in the UK was assessed by radiology and bone densitometry. The study comprised 20 red squirrels found dead and submitted to the Zoological Society of London (UK) between 1997 and 1998, 10 were from the Isle of Wight (IoW), where gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) are absent, and 10 were from Cumbria (Cu), where gray squirrels are present. Gray squirrels are considered potential competitors for red squirrels. Radiologic evaluation of humerus, femur, tibia, radius, and ilium revealed a slightly lower bone density and thinner cortices in red squirrels from the IoW when compared with those from Cu. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral content and density of the isolated right humerus and femur of 19 of the 20 red squirrels. The bone densitometry study reinforced the radiographic findings. The IoW specimens had lower bone mineral density values, although statistical significance (P<0.05) between animals from the IoW and Cu was only reached for the proximal epiphysis of the femur and between males from the IoW and males from Cu for the proximal epiphysis of the humerus. A highly positive correlation (r>0.94) was found when the bone mineral content and density between the femur and the humerus among groups and within each group were compared, showing a uniform level of mineralization between upper and lower limbs. These findings suggested generalized bone loss for the IoW red squirrels that may be compatible with some degree of osteopenia. Within the wide range of causes that lead to osteopenia, malnutrition (especially protein deficiency), calcium and copper deficiencies, and genetic factors remain as possible etiologies.

  9. Single-Molecule mRNA Detection in Live Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lenstra, Tineke L.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization of single RNA molecules in living cells has enabled the study of synthesis, movement, and localization of mRNAs and has provided insight into gene regulation with sub-second temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. Following transcription in single cells indicates that gene activity is heterogeneous between cells and also exhibits random variability over time even within single cells. Studies of mRNAs in yeast can take advantage of the powerful genetics available in this model organism and allow mechanistic questions to be addressed. In this chapter, we describe an approach for visualizing mRNA and transcription in live yeast cells. The method is based on binding of fluorescently labeled MS2 and PP7 coat proteins to stem loops sequences that are introduced into the gene of interest. We give detailed protocols for the construction of the necessary yeast strains, for image acquisition, and for validation. PMID:27110320

  10. Single-Molecule Ion Channel Conformational Dynamics in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic and inhomogeneous conformational changes regulate the function and dynamics of ion channels that are crucial for cell functions, neuronal signaling, and brain functions. Such complexity makes it difficult, if not impossible, to characterize ion channel dynamics using conventional electrical recording alone since that the measurement does not specifically interrogate the associated conformational changes but rather the consequences of the conformational changes. Recently, new technology developments on single-molecule spectroscopy, and especially, the combined approaches of using single ion channel patch-clamp electrical recording and single-molecule fluorescence imaging have provided us the capability of probing ion channel conformational changes simultaneously with the electrical single channel recording. By combining real-time single-molecule fluorescence imaging measurements with real-time single-channel electric current measurements in artificial lipid bilayers and in living cell membranes, we were able to probe single ion-channel-protein conformational changes simultaneously, and thus providing an understanding the dynamics and mechanism of ion-channel proteins at the molecular level. The function-regulating and site-specific conformational changes of ion channels are now measurable under physiological conditions in real-time, one molecule at a time. We will focus our discussion on the new development and results of real-time imaging of the dynamics of gramicidin, colicin, and NMDA receptor ion channels in lipid bilayers and living cells. Our results shed light on new perspectives of the intrinsic interplay of lipid membrane dynamics, solvation dynamics, and the ion channel functions.

  11. The Red Hat Society: Exploring the role of play, liminality, and communitas in older women's lives.

    PubMed

    Mackay Yarnal, Careen

    2006-01-01

    There is an extensive literature on play. Yet, the role of play in older adults' lives has received limited attention. Strikingly absent is research on play and older women. Missing from the literature is how older women use play as a liminal context for social interaction and communitas. This is odd because by 2030 one in four American women will be over the age of sixty-five. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the roles of play, liminality, and communitas in older women's lives. The focus is the Red Hat Society, a social group for women over age 50 that fosters play and fun. Using qualitative interviews with focus groups and participant observation of a regional Red Hat Society event, the study highlights some of the strengths and weaknesses of current conceptualizations of play, liminality, and communitas.

  12. Single-Molecule Tracking in Living Cells Using Single Quantum Dot Applications

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Koichi; Nishida, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Revealing the behavior of single molecules in living cells is very useful for understanding cellular events. Quantum dot probes are particularly promising tools for revealing how biological events occur at the single molecule level both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will introduce how single quantum dot applications are used for single molecule tracking. We will discuss how single quantum dot tracking has been used in several examples of complex biological processes, including membrane dynamics, neuronal function, selective transport mechanisms of the nuclear pore complex, and in vivo real-time observation. We also briefly discuss the prospects for single molecule tracking using advanced probes. PMID:22896768

  13. Multiphoton photochemistry of red fluorescent proteins in solution and live cells.

    PubMed

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Stoltzfus, Caleb; Topol, Igor; Collins, Jack; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Barnett, Lauren; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander

    2014-08-07

    Genetically encoded fluorescent proteins (FPs), and biosensors based on them, provide new insights into how living cells and tissues function. Ultimately, the goal of the bioimaging community is to use these probes deep in tissues and even in entire organisms, and this will require two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), with its greater tissue penetration, lower autofluorescence background, and minimum photodamage in the out-of-focus volume. However, the extremely high instantaneous light intensities of femtosecond pulses in the focal volume dramatically increase the probability of further stepwise resonant photon absorption, leading to highly excited, ionizable and reactive states, often resulting in fast bleaching of fluorescent proteins in TPLSM. Here, we show that the femtosecond multiphoton excitation of red FPs (DsRed2 and mFruits), both in solution and live cells, results in a chain of consecutive, partially reversible reactions, with individual rates driven by a high-order (3-5 photon) absorption. The first step of this process corresponds to a three- (DsRed2) or four-photon (mFruits) induced fast isomerization of the chromophore, yielding intermediate fluorescent forms, which then subsequently transform into nonfluorescent products. Our experimental data and model calculations are consistent with a mechanism in which ultrafast electron transfer from the chromophore to a neighboring positively charged amino acid residue triggers the first step of multiphoton chromophore transformations in DsRed2 and mFruits, consisting of decarboxylation of a nearby deprotonated glutamic acid residue.

  14. ARMCOM Red Team Role in The Single Integrated Development Test Cycle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    USADACS Tdv*c* Ubrtry RIA-76-U146 5 0712 01001238 0 AOA0ivi& ARMCOM RED TEAM ROLE IN THE SINGLE INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT TEST CYCLE THOMAS N...TITLE (and Subtitle) ARMCOM Red Team Role in The Single Integrated Development Test Cycle. 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Note...per year. In addition to the Red Team function, the Systems Analysis Directorate will also function in the Blue Team role to support the developer

  15. Flexibility of single microvilli on live neutrophils and lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2007-08-01

    We measured the flexural stiffness of single microvilli on live human neutrophils and lymphocytes using 40-nm fluorescent beads. The beads were bound to the tips of the microvilli by anti- L -selectin antibodies. Digital bead images were acquired with an exposure time of 3s at high magnification. Using a Gaussian point spread function, we obtained an analytical expression that relates the image profile to the flexural stiffness. We found that the flexural stiffnesses were 7 and 4pN/μm for single microvilli on human neutrophils and lymphocytes, respectively. We also verified with live cells that 75% of neutrophil L -selectin and 72% of lymphocyte L -selectin were on the microvillus tips. Our results indicate that the leukocyte microvilli in contact with the endothelium or other surfaces will bend easily under physiological shear stresses.

  16. Monitoring dopamine release from single living vesicles with nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Zhan; Huang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zong-Li; Cheng, Jie-Ke; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Rong-Ying; Chen, Yu; Liu, Jie

    2005-06-29

    Carbon fiber nanoelectrodes (tip diameter = ca. 100 nm) have been first used to monitor real-time dopamine release from single living vesicles of single rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The experiments show that active and inactive release sites exist on the surface of cells, and the spatial distributions have been differentiated even in the same active release zone. It is first demonstrated that multiple vesicles can sequentially release dopamine at the same site of the cell surface, which possibly plays the main role in the dopamine release from PC12 cells.

  17. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy in Living Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    van Krugten, Jaap; Peterman, Erwin J G

    2018-01-01

    Transportation of organelles and biomolecules is vital for many cellular processes. Single-molecule (SM) fluorescence microscopy can expose molecular aspects of the dynamics that remain unresolved in ensemble experiments. For example, trajectories of individual, moving biomolecules can reveal velocity and changes therein, including pauses. We use SM imaging to study the dynamics of motor proteins and their cargo in the cilia of living C. elegans. To this end, we employ standard fluorescent proteins, an epi-illuminated, wide-field fluorescence microscope and mostly open-source software. This chapter describes the setup we use, the preparation of samples, a protocol for single-molecule imaging in C. elegans and data analysis.

  18. Single-photon ultrashort-lived radionuclides: symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Paras, P.; Thiessen, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to define the current role and state-of-the-art regarding the development, clinical applications, and usefulness of generator-produced single-photon ultrashort-lived radionuclides (SPUSLR's) and to predict their future impact on medicine. Special emphasis was placed on the generator production of iridium-191, gold-195, and krypton-81. This report contains expanded summaries of the included papers. (ACR)

  19. Exploring dynamics in living cells by tracking single particles.

    PubMed

    Levi, Valeria; Gratton, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    In the last years, significant advances in microscopy techniques and the introduction of a novel technology to label living cells with genetically encoded fluorescent proteins revolutionized the field of Cell Biology. Our understanding on cell dynamics built from snapshots on fixed specimens has evolved thanks to our actual capability to monitor in real time the evolution of processes in living cells. Among these new tools, single particle tracking techniques were developed to observe and follow individual particles. Hence, we are starting to unravel the mechanisms driving the motion of a wide variety of cellular components ranging from organelles to protein molecules by following their way through the cell. In this review, we introduce the single particle tracking technology to new users. We briefly describe the instrumentation and explain some of the algorithms commonly used to locate and track particles. Also, we present some common tools used to analyze trajectories and illustrate with some examples the applications of single particle tracking to study dynamics in living cells.

  20. Single molecule spectroscopic characterization of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed) from the Anthozoa coral Heteractis crispa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi; Whitier, Jennifer E.; Werner, James H.; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the photophysical properties of a far-red intrinsic fluorescent protein by means of single molecule and ensemble spectroscopic methods. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria is a popular fluorescent marker with genetically encoded fluorescence and which can be fused to any biological structure without affecting its function. GFP and its variants provide emission colors from blue to yellowish green. Red intrinsic fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa species represent a recent addition to the emission color palette provided by GFPs. Red intrinsic fluorescent markers are on high demand in protein-protein interaction studies based on fluorescence-resonance energy transfer or in multicolor tracking studies or in cellular investigations where autofluorescence possesses a problem. Here we address the photophysical properties of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed), a mutant engineered from a chromoprotein cloned from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa, by using a combination of ensemble and single molecule spectroscopic methods. We show evidence for the presence of HcRed protein as an oligomer and for incomplete maturation of its chromophore. Incomplete maturation results in the presence of an immature (yellow) species absorbing/fluorescing at 490/530-nm. This yellow chromophore is involved in a fast resonance-energy transfer with the mature (purple) chromophore. The mature chromophore of HcRed is found to adopt two conformations, a Transoriented form absorbing and 565-nm and non-fluorescent in solution and a Cis-oriented form absorbing at 590-nm and emitting at 645-nm. These two forms co-exist in solution in thermal equilibrium. Excitation-power dependence fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of HcRed shows evidence for singlet-triplet transitions in the microseconds time scale and for cis-trans isomerization occurring in a time scale of tens of microseconds. Single molecule fluorescence data recorded from immobilized HcRed proteins, all

  1. Rational Design of Novel Red-Shifted BRET Pairs: Platforms for Real-Time Single Chain Protease Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, ST; Villalobos, VM; Roshal, M; Samrakandi, M; Piwnica-Worms, D

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) systems to date have been dominated by use of blue-green Renilla luciferase (Rluc) as the light donor. While effective in many cases, the expense and unfavorable biochemical attributes of the substrate (phenylcoelenterazine) limit utility of Rluc-based BRET systems. Herein we report a series of novel BRET pairs based on luciferases that utilize D-luciferin, resulting in red-shifted photonic outputs, favorable biochemical attributes and increased efficacy. We developed a modified Förster equation to predict optimal BRET luciferase donor-fluorophore pairs and identified tdTomato as the optimal red fluorophore acceptor for click beetle green luciferase (CBG). A prototypical single-chain protease biosensor, capable of reporting on executioner caspase activity in live cells and in real-time, was generated by inserting a DEVD linker between CBG and tdTomato and validated in vitro with recombinant caspases and in cellulo with apoptosis-sensitive and -resistant cell lines. High signal-to-noise ratios (~33) and Z′ factors (0.85) were observed in live cell longitudinal studies, sufficient for high-throughput screening. Thus, we illustrate a general methodology for the rational design of new BRET systems and provide a novel single chain BRET protease biosensor that is long lived, red-shifted, and utilizes D-luciferin. PMID:19330851

  2. Tracking single mRNA molecules in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hyungseok C.; Lee, Byung Hun; Lim, Kiseong; Son, Jae Seok; Song, Minho S.; Park, Hye Yoon

    2016-06-01

    mRNAs inside cells interact with numerous RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, and ribosomes that together compose a highly heterogeneous population of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles. Perhaps one of the best ways to investigate the complex regulation of mRNA is to observe individual molecules. Single molecule imaging allows the collection of quantitative and statistical data on subpopulations and transient states that are otherwise obscured by ensemble averaging. In addition, single particle tracking reveals the sequence of events that occur in the formation and remodeling of mRNPs in real time. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art techniques in tagging, delivery, and imaging to track single mRNAs in live cells. We also discuss how these techniques are applied to extract dynamic information on the transcription, transport, localization, and translation of mRNAs. These studies demonstrate how single molecule tracking is transforming the understanding of mRNA regulation in live cells.

  3. Automatic Detection of Single Fluorophores in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mashanov, G. I.; Molloy, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in light microscopy enable individual fluorophores to be observed in aqueous conditions. Biological molecules, labeled with a single fluorophore, can be localized as isolated spots of light when viewed by optical microscopy. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy greatly reduces background fluorescence and allows single fluorophores to be observed inside living cells. This advance in live-cell imaging means that the spatial and temporal dynamics of individual molecules can be measured directly. Because of the stochastic nature of single molecule behavior a statistically meaningful number of individual molecules must be detected and their separate trajectories in space and time stored and analyzed. Here, we describe digital image processing methods that we have devised for automatic detection and tracking of hundreds of molecules, observed simultaneously, in vitro and within living cells. Using this technique we have measured the diffusive behavior of pleckstrin homology domains bound to phosphoinositide phospholipids at the plasma membrane of live cultured mammalian cells. We found that mobility of these membrane-bound protein domains is dominated by mobility of the lipid molecule to which they are attached and is highly temperature dependent. Movement of PH domains isolated from the tail region of myosin-10 is consistent with a simple random walk, whereas, diffusion of intact PLC-δ1 shows behavior inconsistent with a simple random walk. Movement is rapid over short timescales but much slower at longer timescales. This anomalous behavior can be explained by movement being restricted to membrane regions of 0.7 μm diameter. PMID:17208981

  4. Single-molecule imaging in live cell using gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Cécile; Si, Satyabrata; Gautier, Jérémie J; Gao, Zhenghong; Shibu, Edakkattuparambil S; Gautreau, Alexis; Giannone, Grégory; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Optimal single particle tracking experiments in live cells requires small and photostable probes, which do not modify the behavior of the molecule of interest. Current fluorescence-based microscopy of single molecules and nanoparticles is often limited by bleaching and blinking or by the probe size. As an alternative, we present in this chapter the synthesis of a small and highly specific gold nanoprobe whose detection is based on its absorption properties. We first present a protocol to synthesize 5-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles and functionalize them with a nanobody, a single-domain antibody from camelid, targeting the widespread green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins with a high affinity. Then we describe how to detect and track these individual gold nanoparticles in live cell using photothermal imaging microscopy. The combination of a probe with small size, perfect photostability, high specificity, and versatility through the vast existing library of GFP-proteins, with a highly sensitive detection technique enables long-term tracking of proteins with minimal hindrance in confined and crowded environments such as intracellular space.

  5. Probing of multidrug ABC membrane transporters of single living cells using single plasmonic nanoparticle optical probes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kerry J.; Browning, Lauren M.; Huang, Tao; Ding, Feng; Nallathamby, Prakash D.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, molecular mechanisms of multidrug ABC (ATP-binding cassette) membrane transporters remain elusive. In this study, we synthesized and characterized purified spherically shaped silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) (11.8 ± 2.6 nm in diameter), which were stable (non-aggregation) in PBS buffer and inside single living cells. We used the size-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra of single Ag NPs to determine their sizes and to probe the size-dependent transport kinetics of the ABC (BmrA, BmrA-EGFP) transporters in single living cells (Bacillus subtilis) in real time at nanometer resolution using dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS). The results shows that the smaller NPs stayed longer inside the cells than larger NPs, suggesting size-dependent efflux kinetics of the membrane transporter. Notably, accumulation and efflux kinetics of intracellular NPs for single living cells depended upon the cellular expression level of BmrA, NP concentrations, and a pump inhibitor (25 µM, orthovanadate), suggesting that NPs are substrates of BmrA transporters and that passive diffusion driven by concentration gradients is the primary mechanism by which the NPs enter the cells. The accumulation and efflux kinetics of intracellular NPs for given cells are similar to those observed using a substrate (Hoechst dye) of BmrA, demonstrating that NPs are suitable probes for study of multidrug membrane transporters of single living cells in real-time. Unlike fluorescent probes, single Ag NPs exhibit size-dependent LSPR spectra and superior photostability, enabling them to probe the size-dependent efflux kinetics of membrane transporters of single living cells in real-time for better understanding of multidrug resistance. PMID:20544182

  6. Red fluorescent chitosan nanoparticles grafted with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Fan, Xingliang; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Xiqi; Chen, Yi; Wei, Yen

    2016-08-01

    Poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) conjugated red fluorescent chitosan nanoparticles (GCC-pMPC) were facilely fabricated by "grafting from" method via surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Firstly, glutaraldehyde crosslinked red fluorescent chitosan nanoparticles (GCC NPs) with many amino groups and hydroxyl groups on their surface were prepared, which were then reacted with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide to form GCC-Br; subsequently, poly(MPC) (pMPC) brushes were grafted onto GCC NPs surface using GCC-Br as initiator via ATRP. Compared with PEGylated nanoparticles, zwitterionic polymers modified nanoparticles demonstrated better performance in their cellular uptake. Moreover, the obtained GCC-pMPC demonstrated excellent water-dispersibility, biocompatibility, and photostability, which made them highly potential for long-term tracing applications. Importantly, the successful live cell imaging of GCC-pMPC would remarkably advance the research of their further bioapplications.

  7. Single-Molecule Imaging of RNA Splicing in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Rino, José; Martin, Robert M; Carvalho, Célia; de Jesus, Ana C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Expression of genetic information in eukaryotes involves a series of interconnected processes that ultimately determine the quality and amount of proteins in the cell. Many individual steps in gene expression are kinetically coupled, but tools are lacking to determine how temporal relationships between chemical reactions contribute to the output of the final gene product. Here, we describe a strategy that permits direct measurements of intron dynamics in single pre-mRNA molecules in live cells. This approach reveals that splicing can occur much faster than previously proposed and opens new avenues for studying how kinetic mechanisms impact on RNA biogenesis.

  8. Safety of red ginseng oil for single oral administration in Sprague–Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Min-Ji; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Jun, Mira; Jeong, Woo-Sik

    2013-01-01

    The single oral administration of red ginseng oil (5000 mg/kg) to Sprague–Dawley rats induced no changes in behavioral patterns, clinical signs, and body weight, and hepatotoxicity parameters such as aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase for 14 d. Therefore, these results suggest that the red ginseng oil is safe and nontoxic acutely. PMID:24558315

  9. Quantifying Protein-mRNA Interactions in Single Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Buxbaum, Adina R; Katz, Zachary B; Yoon, Young J; Singer, Robert H

    2015-07-02

    Specific binding proteins are crucial for the correct spatiotemporal expression of mRNA. To understand this process, a method is required to characterize RNA-protein interactions in single living cells with subcellular resolution. We combined endogenous single RNA and protein detection with two-photon fluorescence fluctuation analysis to measure the average number of proteins bound to mRNA at specific locations within live cells. We applied this to quantify the known binding of zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) and ribosomes to β-actin mRNA within subcellular compartments of primary fibroblasts and neurons. ZBP1-mRNA binding did not occur in nuclei, contrary to previous conclusions. ZBP1 interaction with β-actin mRNA was enhanced perinuclearly in neurons compared to fibroblasts. Cytoplasmic ZBP1 and ribosome binding to the mRNA were anti-correlated depending on their location in the cell. These measurements support a mechanism whereby ZBP1 inhibits translation of localizing mRNA until its release from the mRNA peripherally, allowing ribosome binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of gene expression in single live neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Eberwine, J; Yeh, H; Miyashiro, K; Cao, Y; Nair, S; Finnell, R; Zettel, M; Coleman, P

    1992-01-01

    We present here a method for broadly characterizing single cells at the molecular level beyond the more common morphological and transmitter/receptor classifications. The RNA from defined single cells is amplified by microinjecting primer, nucleotides, and enzyme into acutely dissociated cells from a defined region of rat brain. Further processing yields amplified antisense RNA. A second round of amplification results in greater than 10(6)-fold amplification of the original starting material, which is adequate for analysis--e.g., use as a probe, making of cDNA libraries, etc. We demonstrate this method by constructing expression profiles of single live cells from rat hippocampus. This profiling suggests that cells that appear to be morphologically similar may show marked differences in patterns of expression. In addition, we characterize several mRNAs from a single cell, some of which were previously undescribed, perhaps due to "rarity" when averaged over many cell types. Electrophysiological analysis coupled with molecular biology within the same cell will facilitate a better understanding of how changes at the molecular level are manifested in functional properties. This approach should be applicable to a wide variety of studies, including development, mutant models, aging, and neurodegenerative disease. Images PMID:1557406

  11. Determinants of Pair-Living in Red-Tailed Sportive Lemurs (Lepilemur ruficaudatus)

    PubMed Central

    Hilgartner, Roland; Fichtel, Claudia; Kappeler, Peter M; Zinner, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Pair-living and a monogamous mating strategy are rare and theoretically unexpected among mammals. Nevertheless, about 10% of primate species exhibit such a social system, which is difficult to explain in the absence of paternal care. In this study, we investigated the two major hypotheses proposed to explain the evolution of monogamy in mammals, the female defence hypothesis (FDH) and the resource defence hypothesis (RDH), in red-tailed sportive lemurs (Lepilemur ruficaudatus), a nocturnal primate from Madagascar. We analysed behavioural data from eight male–female pairs collected during a 24-mo field study to illuminate the determinants of pair-living in this species. Male and female L. ruficaudatus were found to live in dispersed pairs, which are characterised by low cohesion and low encounter rates within a common home range. Social interactions between pair partners were mainly agonistic and characterised by a complete absence of affiliative interactions – body contact was only observed during mating. During the short annual mating season, males exhibited elevated levels of aggression towards mates, as well as extensive mate guarding and increased locomotor activity. In addition, males were exclusively responsible for the maintenance of proximity between pair partners during this period, and they defended their territories against neighbouring males but not against females. Together, these results point towards the importance of female defence in explaining pair-living in L. ruficaudatus. We discuss the spatial and temporal distribution of receptive females in relation to the female defence strategies of males and suggest possible costs that prevent male red-tailed sportive lemurs from defending more than one female. PMID:23144523

  12. Inferring diffusion in single live cells at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Alex; Burrage, Kevin; Leake, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    The movement of molecules inside living cells is a fundamental feature of biological processes. The ability to both observe and analyse the details of molecular diffusion in vivo at the single-molecule and single-cell level can add significant insight into understanding molecular architectures of diffusing molecules and the nanoscale environment in which the molecules diffuse. The tool of choice for monitoring dynamic molecular localization in live cells is fluorescence microscopy, especially so combining total internal reflection fluorescence with the use of fluorescent protein (FP) reporters in offering exceptional imaging contrast for dynamic processes in the cell membrane under relatively physiological conditions compared with competing single-molecule techniques. There exist several different complex modes of diffusion, and discriminating these from each other is challenging at the molecular level owing to underlying stochastic behaviour. Analysis is traditionally performed using mean square displacements of tracked particles; however, this generally requires more data points than is typical for single FP tracks owing to photophysical instability. Presented here is a novel approach allowing robust Bayesian ranking of diffusion processes to discriminate multiple complex modes probabilistically. It is a computational approach that biologists can use to understand single-molecule features in live cells. PMID:23267182

  13. Quantifying the transcriptional output of single alleles in single living mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Yunger, Sharon; Rosenfeld, Liat; Garini, Yuval; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    Transcription kinetics of actively transcribing genes in vivo have generally been measured using tandem gene arrays. However, tandem arrays do not reflect the endogenous state of genome organization where genes appear as single alleles. We present here a robust technique for the quantification of mRNA synthesis from a single allele in real-time, in single living mammalian cells. The protocol describes how to generate cell clones harboring a tagged allele and how to detect in vivo transcription from this tagged allele at high spatial and temporal resolution throughout the cell cycle. Quantification of nascent mRNAs produced from the single tagged allele is performed using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and live-cell imaging. Subsequent analyses and data modeling detailed in the protocol include measurements of: transcription rates of RNA polymerase II; determining the number of polymerases recruited to the tagged allele; and measuring the spacing between polymerases. Generating the cells containing the single tagged alleles should take up to a month; RNA FISH or live-cell imaging will require an additional week. PMID:23424748

  14. The lived experience of pregnancy complications in single older women.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    To explore the lived experience of single older women (35 years or older at time of birth) who experienced complications in their planned pregnancy. Phenomenology, using semistructured interviews with 11 women between the ages of 35 to 48 years. Six themes emerged: (a) motherhood now or never, (b) the known and unknown, (c) importance of support, (d) the stigma of single motherhood, (e) changing priorities, and (f) long-term concerns for themselves and child/children. Nurses who work with pregnant women should understand as much as possible about the issues affecting older single women who choose pregnancy; this offers the best opportunity to provide comprehensive care. These women can be at increased risk for many pregnancy complications, and should receive counseling about their risks for both fetal and maternal complications. Nurses should also conduct a thorough psychosocial assessment to determine what support systems are in place and what resources are available if complications arise. In the intrapartum and postpartum settings, nurses can offer not only appropriate physical caregiving but also a supportive and caring attitude with women in this circumstance. Helping women maintain a sense of control by helping them to participate in their care planning is essential.

  15. Safety of Live Robotic Surgery: Results from a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Ogaya-Pinies, Gabriel; Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar; Palayapalayam-Ganapathi, Hariharan; Bonet, Xavier; Rogers, Travis; Rocco, Bernardo; Coelho, Rafael; Hernandez-Cardona, Eduardo; Jenson, Cathy; Patel, Vipul

    2017-08-28

    Live surgery events (LSEs) have become one of the most attended activities at surgical meetings and provide a unique opportunity for the audience to observe the decision-making process used by skilled and experienced surgeons in real time. However, there is an ongoing discussion on whether patients treated during LSE are at higher risk of complications. To examine LSE outcomes for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and establish patient safety and efficacy. From January 2008 to April 2016, >9000 patients underwent RARP at our institution, performed by a single surgeon. From this group, 36 patients underwent live RARP surgery (LS group) transmitted via video link from our institution to an external congress. A control group was obtained from our database to compare outcomes between the LS group and patients undergoing RARP under regular circumstances. The data were prospectively collected in a customized database and retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent RARP performed by a single surgeon at our institution. Postoperative outcomes were compared between the LS (n=36) and the control (n=108) groups using Student's t test and analysis of variance for continuous variables, and a two-tailed Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics (age, body mass index, comorbidities, preoperative Gleason score, Sexual Health Inventory for Men score and American Urological Association symptom score) between the groups. The median console time was shorter for the LS group (73min, interquartile range [IQR] 70-79) than for the control group (78min, IQR 75-87; p=0.0371). No major complications were reported in either group, and only four minor complications were observed in the control group (p=0.2415). After median follow-up of 31 mo (IQR 18-50), only one patient (2.77%) in the LS group experienced biochemical recurrence, compared to four (3.71%) in the

  16. Bioluminescence microscopy: application to ATP measurements in single living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, Frederic; Helle, Pierre; Bernengo, Jean C.

    1997-12-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy can be used to measure intracellular cofactors and ionic concentrations (Ca2+, K+, ATP, NADH), as an alternative to micro- spectrophotometry and micro-fluorimetry, due to the development of sensitive detectors (cooled photomultipliers tubes and CCD). The main limitation comes from the very small and brief intensity of the emitted light. Our instrumentation based on an inverted microscope, equipped with high aperture immersion lenses is presented. Light intensity measurements are carried out through a photomultiplier sorted for low dark current and cooled at -5 degree(s)C to reduce thermal noise. Our first aim is to quantify ATP on single living cells using the firefly luciferin-luciferase couple. Experimental and kinetic aspects are presented to emphasize the potentialities of the technique.

  17. Laser-induced microlesion of single dendrites in living mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, L.; Panteri, R.; Masi, A.; Diana, G.; Buffelli, M.; Keller, F.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-02-01

    Recently, two-photon microscopy has been used to perform high spatial resolution imaging of spine plasticity in the intact neocortex in living mice. In this work we study the in vivo spine rearrangements after an acute and selective damage. For this purpose, we have used a near-IR femtosecond pulsed laser to combine two-photon microscopy imaging with microdissection operation on fluorescently-labeled neurons. Three-dimensional reconstructions of dendrites expressing fluorescence protein have been performed in the cortex of YFP-H and GFP-M transgenic living mice. Afterwards, single dendrites have been laser-dissected irradiating the structure with a high femtosecond laser energy dose. By using a chronically implanted glass window we performed long-term imaging in the area of the dissected dendrite. We will show that laser ablation can be performed with micrometric precision and without visible collateral damage to nearby neuronal structures. Also, we will evidence the morphological changes of the dendritic branches and dendritic spines after this specific perturbation inside the intact neuronal network. Laser microdissection of selected structures of the neuronal branching in vivo represents a promising tool for neurobiological research.

  18. Microspectrofluorometric analysis of drug phototoxicity in single living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morliere, Patrice; Santus, Rene C.; Maziere, J. C.; Geze, Marc; Bazin, M.; Kohen, Elli

    1993-03-01

    The study of primary photobiological processes on the basis of structure-activity relationship is important for a better understanding of drug phototoxicity. An ideal approach for the understanding of the phototoxic response is provided by the study of drugs purposely used in photochemotherapeuties for which the determination of primary photochemical targets is a prerequisite for the investigation of the phototherapeutic action. For instance, in the so-called 'photodynamic therapy' of cancers, the photodynamic properties of porphyrins more or less specifically localized in tumors are responsible for their photocytotoxicity. Microfluorometry and particularly microspectrofluorometry are powerful non invasive techniques for carrying out quantitative photobiological investigations in real time in single living cells. This approach allows one to monitor the drug localization, to follow the drug fate, and to study photosensitized events in living cells. We illustrate some aspects of such investigations with photofrin II, a mixture of porphyrins currently used in phase III clinical trials, and other porphyrins including protoporphyrin which is encountered in genetic and drug-induced cutaneous porphyrias. To demonstrate the usefulness of microspectrofluorometry in such studies, we present data on the photosensitizer localization, on the photosensitizer photobleaching, and on structural or functional photosensitized damage to organelles.

  19. Direct Visualization of De novo Lipogenesis in Single Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junjie; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Increased de novo lipogenesis is being increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Despite recent advances in fluorescence microscopy, autoradiography and mass spectrometry, direct observation of de novo lipogenesis in living systems remains to be challenging. Here, by coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy with isotope labeled glucose, we were able to trace the dynamic metabolism of glucose in single living cells with high spatial-temporal resolution. As the first direct visualization, we observed that glucose was largely utilized for lipid synthesis in pancreatic cancer cells, which occurs at a much lower rate in immortalized normal pancreatic epithelial cells. By inhibition of glycolysis and fatty acid synthase (FAS), the key enzyme for fatty acid synthesis, we confirmed the deuterium labeled lipids in cancer cells were from de novo lipid synthesis. Interestingly, we also found that prostate cancer cells exhibit relatively lower level of de novo lipogenesis, but higher fatty acid uptake compared to pancreatic cancer cells. Together, our results demonstrate a valuable tool to study dynamic lipid metabolism in cancer and other disorders.

  20. Block-Cell-Printing for live single-cell printing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Chou, Chao-Kai; Xia, Xiaofeng; Hung, Mien-Chie; Qin, Lidong

    2014-01-01

    A unique live-cell printing technique, termed “Block-Cell-Printing” (BloC-Printing), allows for convenient, precise, multiplexed, and high-throughput printing of functional single-cell arrays. Adapted from woodblock printing techniques, the approach employs microfluidic arrays of hook-shaped traps to hold cells at designated positions and directly transfer the anchored cells onto various substrates. BloC-Printing has a minimum turnaround time of 0.5 h, a maximum resolution of 5 µm, close to 100% cell viability, the ability to handle multiple cell types, and efficiently construct protrusion-connected single-cell arrays. The approach enables the large-scale formation of heterotypic cell pairs with controlled morphology and allows for material transport through gap junction intercellular communication. When six types of breast cancer cells are allowed to extend membrane protrusions in the BloC-Printing device for 3 h, multiple biophysical characteristics of cells—including the protrusion percentage, extension rate, and cell length—are easily quantified and found to correlate well with their migration levels. In light of this discovery, BloC-Printing may serve as a rapid and high-throughput cell protrusion characterization tool to measure the invasion and migration capability of cancer cells. Furthermore, primary neurons are also compatible with BloC-Printing. PMID:24516129

  1. Red, green, and blue lasing enabled by single-exciton gain in colloidal quantum dot films

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmikko, Arto V.; Dang, Cuong

    2016-06-21

    The methods and materials described herein contemplate the use films of colloidal quantum dots as a gain medium in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The present disclosure demonstrates a laser with single-exciton gain in the red, green, and blue wavelengths. Leveraging this nanocomposite gain, the results realize a significant step toward full-color single-material lasers.

  2. Live weight, conformation, carcass traits and economic values of ram lambs of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep and their crosses.

    PubMed

    Zonabend König, E; Ojango, J M K; Audho, J; Mirkena, T; Strandberg, E; Okeyo, A M; Philipsson, J

    2017-01-01

    Meat production is the most important trait in the breeding objectives of sheep production in East Africa. The aim of this study was to investigate breed differences in live weight, conformation, carcass traits and economic values for meat production among Red Maasai and Dorper sheep and their crosses. In total, 88 ram lambs, which were reared at the ILRI experimental station, Kapiti plains Estate in Central Kenya, were used for the study. The lambs were slaughtered at Kenya Meat Commission (KMC) at about 1 year of age. Prior to slaughter, the lambs were weighed, measured and assessed by experienced evaluators, and at the abattoir carcass traits were recorded. Large breed differences were found for most traits. Dorper lambs were heavier at delivery for slaughter and had better carcass grade but lower dressing percentage and fat levels than Red Maasai. Crossbreds were generally better than the parental breeds. Evaluators were willing to pay more for the Dorper lambs for slaughter although carcass weights later were shown not to be higher than for Red Maasai. Evaluators undervalued Red Maasai lambs by 8-13 % compared to Dorper lambs according to the prices quoted per kilogramme live or carcass weight by KMC. Live weight was better than any other live measure in predicting carcass weight. Due to the overall higher ranking of the crossbred lambs for meat production, Dorper may be useful as a terminal sire breed for crossing with Red Maasai ewes.

  3. Mechanochemistry of single red blood cells monitored using Raman tweezers.

    PubMed

    Raj, Saurabh; Marro, Mónica; Wojdyla, Michal; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-04-01

    Two microparticles were biochemically attached to a red blood cell at diametrically opposite parts and held by optical traps allowing to impose deformations. The cell deformation was monitored from the microscopy images. Raman spectra of the cell under tunable deformations were studied. Vibrational spectra analysis at different stretching states was supported with two statistical methods. Principal Component Analysis distinguishes the most prominent changes in spectra while 2D correlation technique monitors the evolution of Raman bands during stretching. The measurements show significant changes in the cell chemical structure with stretching however the changes saturate above 20% of cell deformation. Mechanical deformation of the cell mainly affects the bands corresponding to hemoglobin but contributions from spectrin and membrane proteins can not be excluded. The saturation of bands at higher deformations suggests some structural relaxation that RBC has to undergo to bear extra load. The results confirm widely accepted belief that spectrin released from membrane proteins allows for significant shape changes of the cells. We therefore tentatively suggest that interaction between membrane and cytoskeleton during deformation can be efficiently probed by confocal Raman spectroscopy, in particular via the peak around 1035 cm(-1).

  4. Interactions of hemoglobin in live red blood cells measured by the electrophoresis release test.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Gao, Lijun; Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Lishe; Qin, Liangyi; Han, Lihong; Qin, Wenbin

    2010-09-01

    To elucidate the protein-protein interactions of hemoglobin (Hb) variants A and A(2), HbA was first shown to bind with HbA(2) in live red blood cells (RBCs) by diagonal electrophoresis and then the interaction between HbA and HbA(2) outside the RBC was shown by cross electrophoresis. The starch-agarose gel electrophoresis of hemolysate, RBCs, freeze-thawed RBCs and the supernatant of freeze-thawed RBCs showed that the interaction between HbA and HbA(2) was affected by membrane integrity. To identify the proteins involved in the interaction, protein components located between HbA and HbA(2) in RBCs (RBC HbA-HbA(2)) and hemolysate (hemolysate HbA-HbA(2)) were isolated from the starch-agarose gel and separated by 5-12% SDS-PAGE. The results showed that there was a ≈22 kDa protein band located in the RBC HbA-HbA(2) but not in hemolysate HbA-HbA(2). Sequencing by LC/MS/MS showed that this band was a protein complex that included mainly thioredoxin peroxidase B, α-globin, δ-globin and β-globin. Thus, using our unique in vivo whole blood cell electrophoresis release test, Hbs were proven for the first time to interact with other proteins in the live RBC.

  5. Ex vivo Live Imaging of Single Cell Divisions in Mouse Neuroepithelium

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska-Nitsche, Karolina; Caspary, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    We developed a system that integrates live imaging of fluorescent markers and culturing slices of embryonic mouse neuroepithelium. We took advantage of existing mouse lines for genetic cell lineage tracing: a tamoxifen-inducible Cre line and a Cre reporter line expressing dsRed upon Cre-mediated recombination. By using a relatively low level of tamoxifen, we were able to induce recombination in a small number of cells, permitting us to follow individual cell divisions. Additionally, we observed the transcriptional response to Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling using an Olig2-eGFP transgenic line 1-3 and we monitored formation of cilia by infecting the cultured slice with virus expressing the cilia marker, Sstr3-GFP 4. In order to image the neuroepithelium, we harvested embryos at E8.5, isolated the neural tube, mounted the neural slice in proper culturing conditions into the imaging chamber and performed time-lapse confocal imaging. Our ex vivo live imaging method enables us to trace single cell divisions to assess the relative timing of primary cilia formation and Shh response in a physiologically relevant manner. This method can be easily adapted using distinct fluorescent markers and provides the field the tools with which to monitor cell behavior in situ and in real time. PMID:23666396

  6. Red antenna states of Photosystem I trimers from Arthrospira platensis revealed by single-molecule spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Marc; Hussels, Martin; Schlodder, Eberhard; Karapetyan, Navassard V

    2012-03-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy at 1.4K was used to investigate the spectral properties of red (long-wavelength) chlorophylls in trimeric Photosystem I (PSI) complexes from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis. Three distinct red antenna states could be identified in the fluorescence spectra of single PSI trimers from A. platensis in the presence of oxidized P700. Two of them are responsible for broad emission bands centered at 726 and 760nm. These bands are similar to those found in bulk fluorescence spectra measured at cryogenic temperatures. The broad fluorescence bands at ≅726 and ≅760nm belong to individual emitters that are broadened by strong electron-phonon coupling giving rise to a large Stokes-shift of about 20nm and rapid spectral diffusion. An almost perpendicular orientation of the transition dipole moments of F726 and F760 has to be assumed because direct excitation energy transfer does not occur between F726 and F760. For the first time a third red state assigned to the pool absorbing around 708nm could be detected by its zero-phonon lines. The center of the zero-phonon line distribution is found at ≅714nm. The spectral properties of the three red antenna states show a high similarity to the red antenna states found in trimeric PSI of Thermosynechoccocus elongatus. Based on these findings a similar organization of the red antenna states in PSI of these two cyanobacteria is discussed.

  7. Bilateral microphthalmia and aphakia associated with multiple eye abnormalities in a free-living European red deer calf (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Mutinelli, Franco; Vercelli, Antonella; Carminato, Antonio; Luchesa, Lucio; Pasolli, Claudio; Cova, Mariapia; Marchioro, Wendy; Melchiotti, Erica; Vascellari, Marta

    2012-04-01

    A free-living European red deer calf (Cervus elaphus) was euthanized due to bilateral microphthalmia. Lens was missing, replaced by proliferating squamous epithelial cells; hyperplastic squamous cells, sebaceous and mucinous glands were observed within the cornea with the characteristics of inclusion cyst. Findings were consistent with congenital microphthalmia/aphakia, with multiple eye abnormalities.

  8. Ultrasonic Scattering Measurements of a Live Single Cell at 86 MHz

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lam, Kwok Ho; Yoon, Changhan; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Cell separation and sorting techniques have been employed biomedical applications such as cancer diagnosis and cell gene expression analysis. The capability to accurately measure ultrasonic scattering properties from cells is crucial in making an ultrasonic cell sorter a reality if ultrasound scattering is to be used as the sensing mechanism as well. To assess the performance of sensing and identifying live single cells with high-frequency ultrasound, an 86-MHz lithium niobate press-focused single-element acoustic transducer was used in a high-frequency ultrasound scattering measurement system that was custom designed and developed for minimizing noise and allowing better mobility. Peak-to-peak echo amplitude, integrated backscatter (IB) coefficient, spectral parameters including spectral slope and intercept, and midband fit from spectral analysis of the backscattered echoes were measured and calculated from a live single cell of two different types on an agar surface: leukemia cells (K562 cells) and red blood cells (RBCs). The amplitudes of echo signals from K562 cells and RBCs were 48.25 ± 11.98 mVpp and 56.97 ± 7.53 mVpp, respectively. The IB coefficient was −89.39 ± 2.44 dB for K562 cells and −89.00 ± 1.19 dB for RBCs. The spectral slope and intercept were 0.30 ± 0.19 dB/MHz and −56.07 ± 17.17 dB, respectively, for K562 cells and 0.78 ± 0.092 dB/MHz and −98.18 ± 8.80 dB, respectively, for RBCs. Midband fits of K562 cells and RBCs were −31.02 ± 3.04 dB and −33.51 ± 1.55 dB, respectively. Acoustic cellular discrimination via these parameters was tested by Student’s t-test. Their values, except for the IB value, showed statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). This paper reports for the first time that ultrasonic scattering measurements can be made on a live single cell with a highly focused high-frequency ultrasound microbeam at 86 MHz. These results also suggest the feasibility of ultrasonic scattering as a sensing mechanism in

  9. Design and Synthesis of Single Nanoparticle Optical Biosensors for Imaging and Characterization of Single Receptor Molecules on Single Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Gillet, Daniel; Nancy Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2008-01-01

    At the cellular level, a small number of protein molecules (receptors) can induce significant cellular responses, emphasizing the importance of molecular detection of trace amounts of protein on single living cells. In this study, we designed and synthesized silver (Ag) nanoparticle biosensors (AgMMUA-IgG) by functionalizing (11.6 ± 3.5) nm Ag nanoparticles with a mixed monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) (1:3 mole ratio), and covalently conjugating IgG with MUA on the nanoparticle surface. We found that the nanoparticle biosensors preserve their biological activity and photostability and can be utilized to quantitatively detect individual receptor molecules (T-ZZ), map the distribution of receptors (0.21–0.37 molecule/µm2), and measure their binding affinity and kinetics at concentrations below their dissociation constant, on single living cells in real time over hrs. The dynamic range of detection is 0–50 molecules per cell. We also found that the binding rate (2–27 molecules/min) is highly dependent upon the coverage of receptors on living cells and their ligand concentration. The binding association and dissociation rate constants and affinity constant are k1 = (9.0 ± 2.6) × 103 M−1s−1, k−1 = (3.0 ± 0.4) × 10−4 s−1, and KB = (4.3 ± 1.1) × 107 M−1, respectively. PMID:17867652

  10. Grapevine red blotch-associated virus is Present in Free-Living Vitis spp. Proximal to Cultivated Grapevines.

    PubMed

    Perry, Keith L; McLane, Heather; Hyder, Muhammad Z; Dangl, Gerald S; Thompson, Jeremy R; Fuchs, Marc F

    2016-06-01

    Red blotch is an emerging disease of grapevine associated with grapevine red blotch-associated virus (GRBaV). The virus spreads with infected planting stocks but no vector of epidemiological significance has been conclusively identified. A vineyard block of red-blotch-affected Vitis vinifera 'Cabernet franc' clone 214 was observed in California, with a clustering of infected, symptomatic vines focused along one edge of the field proximal to a riparian habitat with free-living Vitis spp. No genetic heterogeneity was observed in a 587-nucleotide region of the GRBaV genome in a population of 44 Cabernet franc clone 214 isolates. By contrast, genetic differences were observed in isolates from other cultivars and clones growing in adjacent blocks. GRBaV was confirmed infecting four free-living vines, two of which were shown to be V. californica × V. vinifera hybrids. The genomes of three free-living GRBaV vine isolates and seven from V. vinifera cultivars were compared; free-living vine isolates were shown to be more similar to each other and a 'Merlot' isolate than to the other cultivated vine isolates. The finding that GRBaV is present in free-living Vitis spp. indicates the virus can be spread by natural (nonhuman-mediated) means, and we hypothesize that in-field spread of GRBaV is occurring.

  11. Photophysics of a Live-Cell-Marker, Red Silicon-Substituted Xanthene Dye.

    PubMed

    Crovetto, Luis; Orte, Angel; Paredes, Jose M; Resa, Sandra; Valverde, Javier; Castello, Fabio; Miguel, Delia; Cuerva, Juan M; Talavera, Eva M; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2015-11-05

    Dyes with near-red emission are of great interest because of their undoubted advantages for use as probes in living cells. In-depth knowledge of their photophysics is essential for employment of such dyes. In this article, the photophysical behavior of a new silicon-substituted xanthene, 7-hydroxy-5,5-dimethyl-10-(o-tolyl)dibenzo[b,e]silin-3(5H)-one (2-Me TM), was explored by means absorption, steady-state, and time-resolved fluorescence. First, the near-neutral pH, ground-state acidity constant of the dye, pKN-A, was determined by absorbance and steady-state fluorescence at very low buffer concentrations. Next, we determined whether the addition of phosphate buffer promoted the excited-state proton-transfer (ESPT) reaction among the neutral and anion form of 2-Me TM in aqueous solutions at near-neutral pH. For this analysis, both the steady-state fluorescence method and time-resolved emission spectroscopy (TRES) were employed. The TRES experiments demonstrated a remarkably favored conversion of the neutral form to the anion form. Then, the values of the excited-state rate constants were determined by global analysis of the fluorescence decay traces recorded as a function of pH, and buffer concentration. The revealed kinetic parameters were consistent with the TRES results, exhibiting a higher rate constant for deprotonation than for protonation, which implies an unusual low value of the excited-state acidity constant pK*N-A and therefore an enhanced photoacid behavior of the neutral form. Finally, we determined whether 2-Me TM could be used as a sensor inside live cells by measuring the intensity profile of the probe in different cellular compartments of HeLa 229 cells.

  12. Natural reproduction of shasta red fir from a single good cone crop.

    Treesearch

    William I. Stein

    1954-01-01

    The initiation and rapid increase in harvesting of Shasta red fir mountain hemlock stands in southwestern Oregon have emphasized the lack of information needed to manage these species intelligently. The most important single management practice for converting old growth to managed forests is the application of cutting methods that will assure prompt regeneration of...

  13. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A.; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N.; Nikitin, Mikhail A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Belousova, Anna; Reimer, James D.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts. PMID:26840497

  14. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N; Nikitin, Mikhail A; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Belousova, Anna; Reimer, James D; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts.

  15. Correlates of Living Alone among Single Elderly Chinese Immigrants in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Daniel W. L.; Leonenko, Wendy L.

    2007-01-01

    According to traditional Chinese culture, families will care for their elderly. Therefore, it appears to be uncommon for elderly Chinese to live alone. This study examines the correlates for single elderly Chinese immigrants in Canada to live alone. Using a probability sample of single elderly Chinese immigrants (N = 660) in seven urban centers,…

  16. Correlates of Living Alone among Single Elderly Chinese Immigrants in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Daniel W. L.; Leonenko, Wendy L.

    2007-01-01

    According to traditional Chinese culture, families will care for their elderly. Therefore, it appears to be uncommon for elderly Chinese to live alone. This study examines the correlates for single elderly Chinese immigrants in Canada to live alone. Using a probability sample of single elderly Chinese immigrants (N = 660) in seven urban centers,…

  17. In vivo mouse and live cell STED microscopy of neuronal actin plasticity using far-red emitting fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Waja; Ilgen, Peter; Gregor, Carola; van Dort, Joris; Mott, Alexander C; Steffens, Heinz; Willig, Katrin I

    2017-09-18

    The study of proteins in dendritic processes within the living brain is mainly hampered by the diffraction limit of light. STED microscopy is so far the only far-field light microscopy technique to overcome the diffraction limit and resolve dendritic spine plasticity at superresolution (nanoscopy) in the living mouse. After having tested several far-red fluorescent proteins in cell culture we report here STED microscopy of the far-red fluorescent protein mNeptune2, which showed best results for our application to superresolve actin filaments at a resolution of ~80 nm, and to observe morphological changes of actin in the cortex of a living mouse. We illustrate in vivo far-red neuronal actin imaging in the living mouse brain with superresolution for time periods of up to one hour. Actin was visualized by fusing mNeptune2 to the actin labels Lifeact or Actin-Chromobody. We evaluated the concentration dependent influence of both actin labels on the appearance of dendritic spines; spine number was significantly reduced at high expression levels whereas spine morphology was normal at low expression.

  18. Red-IR stimulated luminescence in K-feldspar: Single or multiple trap origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalbitzer Andersen, Martin; Jain, Mayank; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2012-08-01

    We investigate on the origins of the infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals in 3 potassium feldspars based on IR-red spectroscopy (˜700-1050 nm) using a fiber-coupled tunable Ti:Sapphire laser, in combination with different thermal and optical (pre)treatments of the samples. We also measure dose-response curves with different wavelengths and at different stimulation temperatures so as to be able to distinguish between traps based on their electron trapping cross-sections. Our data suggest that the dosimetric signals, IRSL, and the post IR-IRSL in K-feldspars arise from a single electron trapping centre.

  19. Experimental investigation of fire propagation in single live shrubs

    Treesearch

    Jing Li; Shankar Mahalingam; David R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses broadly on individual, live shrubs and, more specifically, it examines bulk density in chaparral and its combined effects with wind and ignition location on the resulting fire behaviour. Empirical functions to predict bulk density as a function of height for 4-year-old chaparral were developed for two typical species of shrub fuels in southern...

  20. Solvatochromic Nile Red probes with FRET quencher reveal lipid order heterogeneity in living and apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Kreder, Rémy; Pyrshev, Kyrylo A; Darwich, Zeinab; Kucherak, Oleksandr A; Mély, Yves; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2015-06-19

    Detecting and imaging lipid microdomains (rafts) in cell membranes remain a challenge despite intensive research in the field. Two types of fluorescent probes are used for this purpose: one specifically labels a given phase (liquid ordered, Lo, or liquid disordered, Ld), while the other, being environment-sensitive (solvatochromic), stains the two phases in different emission colors. Here, we combined the two approaches by designing a phase-sensitive probe of the Ld phase and a quencher of the Ld phase. The former is an analogue of the recently developed Nile Red-based probe NR12S, bearing a bulky hydrophobic chain (bNR10S), while the latter is based on Black Hole Quencher-2 designed as bNR10S (bQ10S). Fluorescence spectroscopy of large unilamellar vesicles and microscopy of giant vesicles showed that the bNR10S probe can partition specifically into the Ld phase, while bQ10S can specifically quench the NR12S probe in the Ld phase so that only its fraction in the Lo phase remains fluorescent. Thus, the toolkit of two probes with quencher can specifically target Ld and Lo phases and identify their lipid order from the emission color. Application of this toolkit in living cells (HeLa, CHO, and 293T cell lines) revealed heterogeneity in the cell plasma membranes, observed as distinct probe environments close to the Lo and Ld phases of model membranes. In HeLa cells undergoing apoptosis, our toolkit showed the formation of separate domains of the Ld-like phase in the form of blebs. The developed tools open new possibilities in lipid raft research.

  1. Green Synthesis of Red-Emitting Carbon Nanodots as a Novel "Turn-on" Nanothermometer in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanxi; Jiang, Kaili; Wu, Qian; Wu, Jiapeng; Zhang, Chi

    2016-10-04

    Temperature measurements in biology and medical diagnostics, along with sensitive temperature probing of living cells, is of great importance; however, it still faces significant challenges. Herein, a novel "turn-on" carbon-dot-based fluorescent nanothermometry device for spatially resolved temperature measurements in living cells is presented. The carbon nanodots (CNDs) are prepared by a green microwave-assisted method and exhibit red fluorescence (λem =615 nm) with high quantum yields (15 %). Then, an on-off fluorescent probe is prepared for detecting glutathione (GSH) based on aggregation-induced fluorescence quenching. Interestingly, the quenched fluorescence could be recovered by increasing temperature and the CNDs-GSH mixture could behave as an off-on fluorescent probe for temperature. Thus, red-emitting CNDs can be utilized for "turn-on" fluorescent nanothermometry through the fluorescence quenching and recovery processes, respectively. We employ MC3T3-E1 cells as an example model to demonstrate the red-emitting CNDs can function as "non-contact" tools for the accurate measurement of temperature and its gradient inside a living cell.

  2. Intimate Partner Violence: The Lived Experience of Single Women.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Laura; Scott-Tilley, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Research in intimate partner violence has focused on married, cohabiting, adolescents, or college aged women. The experience of intimate partner violence by single women has not been studied separately from other groups of women. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used with feminist inquiry to gain insight into the experience of intimate partner violence by single women. The overarching theme was control and manipulation by the abuser. Subthemes included not feeling safe, poor communication skills, and caretaking. Nurses need to be aware of the occurrence of intimate partner violence in male and female partnered relationships to provide comprehensive and nonjudgmental care.

  3. Living-unrelated kidney donation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Peters, T G; Jones, K W; Walker, G W; Charlton, R K; Antonucci, L E; Repper, S M; Hunter, R D

    1999-02-01

    For 140 consecutive renal transplants performed from January 1995 to October 1997, 25 (18%) were from living-unrelated donors (15 women, 10 men, aged 25-63, mean 43 yr). All donors had pre-transplant imaging evaluation of renal anatomy following renal function assessment (minimal creatinine clearance 75 cm3/min). Admission to the hospital on the day of donation preceded nephrectomy under general anesthesia using an anterior flank, extra-retroperitoneal approach (no rib resection). Post-operative epidural pain control was used for all but 1 donor. The 25 kidney donors were hospitalized for 2 (n = 1), 3 (n = 12), 4 (n = 7), or 5-8 d (n = 5) (average 3.9 d) and had a mean hospitalization charge of $15,501 (range $10,808-$29,579). One intra-operative hemorrhage required transfusion; 1 late neural-related pain syndrome required outpatient wound exploration. Two kidneys were lost: a husband recipient from repetitive acute rejections at 3 months; a friend recipient from chronic rejection at 2.5 yr; both await cadaver transplant. The other 23 kidneys are functioning with a mean serum creatinine of 1.8 (range 1.0-3.3) at 3-36 months (patient survival 100%; graft survival 92%). While most donors were spouses (8 husbands and 10 wives), friends, distant cousins, in-laws, and adoptive relatives did well as donors and recipients. Transplantation may increase by 20% or more at centers which encourage broad application of living donor nephrectomy.

  4. Blastocoele expansion degree predicts live birth after single blastocyst transfer for fresh and vitrified/warmed single blastocyst transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Du, Qing-Yun; Wang, En-Yin; Huang, Yan; Guo, Xiao-Yi; Xiong, Yu-Jing; Yu, Yi-Ping; Yao, Gui-Dong; Shi, Sen-Lin; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the independent effects of the degree of blastocoele expansion and re-expansion and the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) grades on predicting live birth after fresh and vitrified/warmed single blastocyst transfer. Retrospective study. Reproductive medical center. Women undergoing 844 fresh and 370 vitrified/warmed single blastocyst transfer cycles. None. Live-birth rate correlated with blastocyst morphology parameters by logistic regression analysis and Spearman correlations analysis. The degree of blastocoele expansion and re-expansion was the only blastocyst morphology parameter that exhibited a significant ability to predict live birth in both fresh and vitrified/warmed single blastocyst transfer cycles respectively by multivariate logistic regression and Spearman correlations analysis. Although the ICM grade was significantly related to live birth in fresh cycles according to the univariate model, its effect was not maintained in the multivariate logistic analysis. In vitrified/warmed cycles, neither ICM nor TE grade was correlated with live birth by logistic regression analysis. This study is the first to confirm that the degree of blastocoele expansion and re-expansion is a better predictor of live birth after both fresh and vitrified/warmed single blastocyst transfer cycles than ICM or TE grade. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Advanced optoelectronic nanodevices and nanomaterials for sensing inside single living cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Delong; Zhao, Xiangwei; Gu, Zhongze

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, much attention has been gained on the study of single living cell with the development of biology, physics, electrophysiology, and nanotechnology. Researchers from biological and medical sciences regard the cell as a basic unit of life and the work of quantifying, imaging, and modulating living cells has been studied for decades. The dynamic changes in single living cell can reflect the changes and abnormalities of the organism. As such, it is extremely important to analyze living cells on an individual basis so as to illustrate the roles they play in these systems as well as their changes. In addition, the development of highly sensitive measurements applied in the field of analyzing single living cells, may contribute to clinical diagnostics. We present a summary of nanotechnologies resulting from the advances of intracellular analysis based on optoelectronic nanodevices and nanomaterials.

  6. Efficient Red-Emissive Organic Crystals with Amplified Spontaneous Emissions Based on a Single Benzene Framework.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baolei; Wang, Chenguang; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Hongyu

    2017-10-02

    Red-emissive fluorophores generally consist of large π-extended systems and thus encounter the problem of serious fluorescence quenching in the solid state. A series of structurally simple compounds 2,5-bis(alkylamino)terephthalates 1 a-c are reported that consist of a very small π-system (only a single benzene) but display efficient red emission in crystals. Crystal 1 a having a molecular weight of only 252 g mol(-1) shows red emission with the maximum of 620 nm and a fluorescence quantum yield of 0.40. The unique emission property of crystal 1 a is mainly because of the planarization of skeleton dominated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds and the packing structure with negligible π-π interactions contributed by the mini π-system. Moreover, besides efficient red emission, high crystallinity with co-planar facets endows crystal 1 a with significant amplified spontaneous emission. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Evaluation of Fluorophores to Label SNAP-Tag Fused Proteins for Multicolor Single-Molecule Tracking Microscopy in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Peter J.; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Sonntag, Michael H.; Ibach, Jenny; Brunsveld, Luc; Kanger, Johannes S.; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule tracking has become a widely used technique for studying protein dynamics and their organization in the complex environment of the cell. In particular, the spatiotemporal distribution of membrane receptors is an active field of study due to its putative role in the regulation of signal transduction. The SNAP-tag is an intrinsically monovalent and highly specific genetic tag for attaching a fluorescent label to a protein of interest. Little information is currently available on the choice of optimal fluorescent dyes for single-molecule microscopy utilizing the SNAP-tag labeling system. We surveyed 6 green and 16 red excitable dyes for their suitability in single-molecule microscopy of SNAP-tag fusion proteins in live cells. We determined the nonspecific binding levels and photostability of these dye conjugates when bound to a SNAP-tag fused membrane protein in live cells. We found that only a limited subset of the dyes tested is suitable for single-molecule tracking microscopy. The results show that a careful choice of the dye to conjugate to the SNAP-substrate to label SNAP-tag fusion proteins is very important, as many dyes suffer from either rapid photobleaching or high nonspecific staining. These characteristics appear to be unpredictable, which motivated the need to perform the systematic survey presented here. We have developed a protocol for evaluating the best dyes, and for the conditions that we evaluated, we find that Dy 549 and CF 640 are the best choices tested for single-molecule tracking. Using an optimal dye pair, we also demonstrate the possibility of dual-color single-molecule imaging of SNAP-tag fusion proteins. This survey provides an overview of the photophysical and imaging properties of a range of SNAP-tag fluorescent substrates, enabling the selection of optimal dyes and conditions for single-molecule imaging of SNAP-tagged fusion proteins in eukaryotic cell lines. PMID:25140415

  8. Do Children in Single-Parent Households Fare Better Living with Same-Sex Parents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Douglas B.; Powell, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Used data from National Educational Longitudinal Study (with 3,483 and 409 eighth graders living in mother-only and father-only homes, respectively) to test whether children in single-parent homes fare better living with same-sex parent. Of 35 social psychological and educational outcomes studied, found none in which both males and females…

  9. Do Children in Single-Parent Households Fare Better Living with Same-Sex Parents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Douglas B.; Powell, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Used data from National Educational Longitudinal Study (with 3,483 and 409 eighth graders living in mother-only and father-only homes, respectively) to test whether children in single-parent homes fare better living with same-sex parent. Of 35 social psychological and educational outcomes studied, found none in which both males and females…

  10. Quantitative Probing of Cu(2+) Ions Naturally Present in Single Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junho; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Pyo, Jaeyeon; Jung, Youngseob; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Je, Jung Ho

    2016-06-01

    Quantitative probing of Cu(2+) ions naturally present in single living cells is realized by developing a quantum-dot-embedded nanowire-waveguide probe. The intracellular Cu(2+) ion concentration is quantified by direct monitoring of photoluminescence quenching during the insertion of the nanowire in a living neuron. The measured intracellular Cu(2+) ion concentration is 3.34 ± 1.04 × 10(-6) m (mean ± s.e.m.) in single hippocampal neurons.

  11. Multiplexing PKA and ERK1&2 kinases FRET biosensors in living cells using single excitation wavelength dual colour FLIM

    PubMed Central

    Demeautis, Claire; Sipieter, François; Roul, Julien; Chapuis, Catherine; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Riquet, Franck B.; Tramier, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of different signalling enzymes in a single assay using multiplex biosensing provides a multidimensional workspace to elucidate biological processes, signalling pathway crosstalk, and determine precise sequence of events at the single living cell level. In this study, we interrogate the complexity in cAMP/PKA-MAPK/ERK1&2 crosstalk by using multi-parameter biosensing experiments to correlate biochemical activities simultaneously in time and space. Using a single excitation wavelength dual colour FLIM method we are able to detect fluorescence lifetime images of two donors to simultaneously measure PKA and ERK1&2 kinase activities in the same cellular localization by using FRET biosensors. To this end, we excite two FRET donors mTFP1 and LSSmOrange with a 440 nm wavelength and we alleviate spectral bleed-through associated limitations with the very dim-fluorescent acceptor ShadowG for mTFP1 and the red-shifted mKate2 for LSSmOrange. The simultaneous recording of PKA and ERK1&2 kinase activities reveals concomitant EGF-mediated activations of both kinases in HeLa cells. Under these conditions the subsequent Forskolin-induced cAMP release reverses the transient increase of EGF-mediated ERK1&2 kinase activity while reinforcing PKA activation. Here we propose a validated methodology for multiparametric kinase biosensing in living cells using FRET-FLIM. PMID:28106114

  12. Red emission fluorescent probes for visualization of monoamine oxidase in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-Ling; Li, Kun; Liu, Yan-Hong; Xu, Hao-Ran; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report two novel red emission fluorescent probes for the highly sensitive and selective detection of monoamine oxidase (MAO) with large Stokes shift (227 nm). Both of the probes possess solid state fluorescence and can accomplish the identification of MAO on test papers. The probe MAO-Red-1 exhibited a detection limit down to 1.2 μg mL−1 towards MAO-B. Moreover, the cleavage product was unequivocally conformedby HPLC and LCMS and the result was in accordance with the proposed oxidative deamination mechanism. The excellent photostability of MAO-Red-1 was proved both in vitro and in vivo through fluorescent kinetic experiment and laser exposure experiment of confocal microscopy, respectively. Intracellular experiments also confirmed the low cytotoxity and exceptional cell imaging abilities of MAO-Red-1. It was validated both in HeLa and HepG2 cells that MAO-Red-1 was capable of reporting MAO activity through the variation of fluorescence intensity. PMID:27499031

  13. Studying the mechanism of CD47-SIRPα interactions on red blood cells by single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yangang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Jiang, Junguang; Yang, Yong-Guang; Wang, Hongda

    2014-09-07

    The interaction forces and binding kinetics between SIRPα and CD47 were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) on both fresh and experimentally aged human red blood cells (hRBCs). We found that CD47 experienced a conformation change after oxidation, which influenced the interaction force and the position of the energy barrier between SIRPα and CD47. Our results are significant for understanding the mechanism of phagocytosis of red blood cells at the single molecule level.

  14. Single-cell census of mechanosensitive channels in living bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bialecka-Fornal, Maja; Lee, Heun Jin; DeBerg, Hannah A; Gandhi, Chris S; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria are subjected to a host of different environmental stresses. One such insult occurs when cells encounter changes in the osmolarity of the surrounding media resulting in an osmotic shock. In recent years, a great deal has been learned about mechanosensitive (MS) channels which are thought to provide osmoprotection in these circumstances by opening emergency release valves in response to membrane tension. However, even the most elementary physiological parameters such as the number of MS channels per cell, how MS channel expression levels influence the physiological response of the cells, and how this mean number of channels varies from cell to cell remain unanswered. In this paper, we make a detailed quantitative study of the expression of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) in different media and at various stages in the growth history of bacterial cultures. Using both quantitative fluorescence microscopy and quantitative Western blots our study complements earlier electrophysiology-based estimates and results in the following key insights: i) the mean number of channels per cell is much higher than previously estimated, ii) measurement of the single-cell distributions of such channels reveals marked variability from cell to cell and iii) the mean number of channels varies under different environmental conditions. The regulation of MscL expression displays rich behaviors that depend strongly on culturing conditions and stress factors, which may give clues to the physiological role of MscL. The number of stress-induced MscL channels and the associated variability have far reaching implications for the in vivo response of the channels and for modeling of this response. As shown by numerous biophysical models, both the number of such channels and their variability can impact many physiological processes including osmoprotection, channel gating probability, and channel clustering.

  15. Living arrangement choices of elderly singles: Effects of income and disability

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    Logit regression is used to explain living arrangement choice of elderly single individuals. The propensity to live independently is found to increase with income and decrease with disability; an interaction effect for females suggests that income may lessen the impact of disability on the propensity to seek shared living arrangements. Independent living is less likely for people who are not white, foreign-born males, those with at least one adult child, and those in States with higher living costs; and more likely for the ever-married and those in States with high per capita nursing home use. If home care services are preferentially allocated to disabled elderly who live alone, resources may flow to higher income individuals who have been able to maintain independent households. PMID:10317709

  16. "Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century…

  17. "Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century…

  18. Translation dynamics of single mRNAs in live cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Eliscovich, Carolina; Yoon, Young J; Singer, Robert H

    2016-06-17

    Translation is the fundamental biological process converting mRNA information into proteins. Single-molecule imaging in live cells has illuminated the dynamics of RNA transcription; however, it is not yet applicable to translation. Here, we report single-molecule imaging of nascent peptides (SINAPS) to assess translation in live cells. The approach provides direct readout of initiation, elongation, and location of translation. We show that mRNAs coding for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins are translated when they encounter the ER membrane. Single-molecule fluorescence recovery after photobleaching provides direct measurement of elongation speed (5 amino acids per second). In primary neurons, mRNAs are translated in proximal dendrites but repressed in distal dendrites and display "bursting" translation. This technology provides a tool with which to address the spatiotemporal translation mechanism of single mRNAs in living cells.

  19. Return to Being Black, Living in the Red: a race gap in wealth that goes beyond social origins.

    PubMed

    Killewald, Alexandra

    2013-08-01

    In the United States, racial disparities in wealth are vast, yet their causes are only partially understood. In Being Black, Living in the Red, Conley (1999) argued that the sociodemographic traits of young blacks and their parents, particularly parental wealth, wholly explain their wealth disadvantage. Using data from the 1980-2009 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, I show that this conclusion hinges on the specific sample considered and the treatment of debtors in the sample. I further document that prior research has paid insufficient attention to the possibility of variation in the association between wealth and race at different points of the net worth distribution. Among wealth holders, blacks remain significantly disadvantaged in assets compared with otherwise similar whites. Among debtors, however, young whites hold more debt than otherwise similar blacks. The results suggest that, among young adults, debt may reflect increased access to credit, not simply the absence of assets. The asset disadvantage for black net wealth holders also indicates that research and policy attention should not be focused only on young blacks "living in the red."

  20. ENHANCED IMMUNE RESPONSE OF RED DEER (CERVUS ELAPHUS) TO LIVE RB51 VACCINE STRAIN USING COMPOSITE MICROSPHERES

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Davis, Donald S.; Elzer, Philip H.; Wong-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Rice-Ficht, Allison C.

    2012-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease of nearly worldwide distribution. The occurrence of the infection in humans is largely dependent on the prevalence of brucellosis in animal reservoirs, including wildlife. The current vaccine used for cattle Brucella abortus strain RB51, has proven ineffective in protecting bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus nelsoni) from infection and abortion. To test possible improvements in vaccine efficacy, a novel approach of immunization was examined from April 2004 to November 2006 using alginate composite microspheres containing a nonimmunogenic, eggshell-precursor protein of the parasite Fasciola hepatica (Vitelline protein B, VpB) to deliver live vaccine strain RB51. Red deer (Cervus elaphus), used as a model for elk, were vaccinated orally (PO) or subcutaneously (SC) with 1.5×1010 viable organisms per animal. Humoral responses postvaccination (immunoglobulin G [IgG] levels), assessed at different time points, indicated that capsules containing live RB51 elicited an anti-Brucella specific IgG response. Furthermore, the encapsulated vaccine elicited a cell-mediated response that the nonencapsulated vaccinates failed to produce. Finally, red deer were challenged with B. abortus strain 19 by conjunctival exposure. Only animals that received encapsulated RB51 vaccine by either route exhibited a significant reduction in bacterial counts in their spleens. These data suggest that alginate-VpB microspheres provide a method to enhance the RB51 vaccine performance in elk. PMID:19204345

  1. Single nanoparticle photothermal tracking (SNaPT) of 5-nm gold beads in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lasne, David; Blab, Gerhard A; Berciaud, Stéphane; Heine, Martin; Groc, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2006-12-15

    Tracking individual nano-objects in live cells during arbitrary long times is a ubiquitous need in modern biology. We present here a method for tracking individual 5-nm gold nanoparticles on live cells. It relies on the photothermal effect and the detection of the Laser Induced Scattering around a NanoAbsorber (LISNA). The key point for recording trajectories at video rate is the use of a triangulation procedure. The effectiveness of the method is tested against single fluorescent molecule tracking in live COS7 cells on subsecond timescales. We further demonstrate recordings for several minutes of AMPA receptors trajectories on the plasma membrane of live neurons. Single Nanoparticle Photothermal Tracking has the unique potential to record arbitrary long trajectory of membrane proteins using nonfluorescent nanometer-sized labels.

  2. Single Nanoparticle Photothermal Tracking (SNaPT) of 5-nm Gold Beads in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lasne, David; Blab, Gerhard A.; Berciaud, Stéphane; Heine, Martin; Groc, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2006-01-01

    Tracking individual nano-objects in live cells during arbitrary long times is a ubiquitous need in modern biology. We present here a method for tracking individual 5-nm gold nanoparticles on live cells. It relies on the photothermal effect and the detection of the Laser Induced Scattering around a NanoAbsorber (LISNA). The key point for recording trajectories at video rate is the use of a triangulation procedure. The effectiveness of the method is tested against single fluorescent molecule tracking in live COS7 cells on subsecond timescales. We further demonstrate recordings for several minutes of AMPA receptors trajectories on the plasma membrane of live neurons. Single Nanoparticle Photothermal Tracking has the unique potential to record arbitrary long trajectory of membrane proteins using nonfluorescent nanometer-sized labels. PMID:16997874

  3. Simulation of a single red blood cell flowing through a microvessel stenosis using dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, L L; Chen, S; Lin, C S; Liu, Y

    2014-03-01

    The motion and deformation of a single red blood cell flowing through a microvessel stenosis was investigated employing dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. The numerical model considers plasma, cytoplasm, the RBC membrane and the microvessel walls, in which a three dimensional coarse-grained spring RBC. The suspending plasma was modelled as an incompressible Newtonian fluid and the vessel walls were regarded as rigid body. The body force exerted on the free DPD particles was used to drive the flow. A modified bounce-back boundary condition was enforced on the membrane to guarantee the impenetrability. Adhesion of the cell to the stenosis vessel surface was mediated by the interactions between receptors and ligands. Firstly, the motion of a single RBC in a microfluidic channel was simulated and the results were found in agreement with the experimental data cited by [1]. Then the mechanical behavior of the RBC in the microvessel stenosis was studied. The effects of the bending rigidity of membrane, the size of the stenosis and the driven body force on the deformation and motion of red blood cell were discussed.

  4. Genetically engineered red cells expressing single domain camelid antibodies confer long-term protection against botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Pishesha, Novalia; Mukherjee, Jean; Zhang, Sicai; Deshycka, Rhogerry; Sudaryo, Valentino; Dong, Min; Shoemaker, Charles B; Lodish, Harvey F

    2017-09-04

    A short half-life in the circulation limits the application of therapeutics such as single-domain antibodies (VHHs). We utilize red blood cells to prolong the circulatory half-life of VHHs. Here we present VHHs against botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) on the surface of red blood cells by expressing chimeric proteins of VHHs with Glycophorin A or Kell. Mice whose red blood cells carry the chimeric proteins exhibit resistance to 10,000 times the lethal dose (LD50) of BoNT/A, and transfusion of these red blood cells into naive mice affords protection for up to 28 days. We further utilize an improved CD34+ culture system to engineer human red blood cells that express these chimeric proteins. Mice transfused with these red blood cells are resistant to highly lethal doses of BoNT/A. We demonstrate that engineered red blood cells expressing VHHs can provide prolonged prophylactic protection against bacterial toxins without inducing inhibitory immune responses and illustrates the potentially broad translatability of our strategy for therapeutic applications.The therapeutic use of single-chain antibodies (VHHs) is limited by their short half-life in the circulation. Here the authors engineer mouse and human red blood cells to express VHHs against botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) on their surface and show that an infusion of these cells into mice confers long lasting protection against a high dose of BoNT/A.

  5. Single-Molecule Live-Cell Visualization of Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert M; Rino, José; de Jesus, Ana C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Microscopy protocols that allow live-cell imaging of molecules and subcellular components tagged with fluorescent conjugates are indispensable in modern biological research. A breakthrough was recently introduced by the development of genetically encoded fluorescent tags that combined with fluorescence-based microscopic approaches of increasingly higher spatial and temporal resolution made it possible to detect single protein and nucleic acid molecules inside living cells. Here, we describe an approach to visualize single nascent pre-mRNA molecules and to measure in real time the dynamics of intron synthesis and excision.

  6. Long-term immunogenicity of single dose of live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine in Indian children.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Sheila; Sapru, Amita; Bavdekar, Ashish; Kapatkar, Vaibhavi; Mane, Amey

    2015-08-01

    To assess immunogenicity of a single dose of live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine in Indian children, ten years after immunization. Of 143 children vaccinated in 2004, 121 children were evaluated in 2014, clinically and for anti-HAV antibodies. 13 children were early vaccine failures who received two doses of HAV vaccine subsequently. 106 (98%) of 108 remaining children had seroprotective levels with a geometric mean titer of 100.5 mIU/mL. On analysis of all 121 children, the immunogenicity was 87.6%. Single dose of live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine provides long-term immunity in Indian children.

  7. [Fret-based single-molecule probes for monitoring induced activation of Rac, Cdc42 signaling pathways in living cells].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Ren, Dao Quan; Zhang, Qing Yan; Qiu, Yi Lan; Liu, Ru Shi; Guo, Xiang Rong

    2008-10-01

    Rho GTPases, including Rac1, Cdc42, play a critical role in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes such as cell morphology, cell migration, transcriptional activation and gene expression. We constructed several FRET-based single-molecule probes containing red fluorescent protein dsRed1, cyan fluorescent protein ECFP, the GTPase binding domain of the effector, Pak1 or N-WASP, and Rac1 or Cdc42. Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling pathways were activated in transfected cells by the inducer, insulin or bradykinin respectively. In vitro fluorescent spectroscopy assays showed that FRET phenomena were observed in transfected NIH3T3 and Hela cells. For all 3 signaling pathways in NIH3T3 cells, the values of FRET efficiency reached the highest after induction for 5 min, but the increasing extents of the values of FRET efficiency varied in 3 signaling pathways. The values of FRET efficiency decreased with the extention of the induction time, but differed significantly in the decreasing speed for the signaling pathways. Rac1 and Cdc42 activation assays indicated that Rac1 and Cdc42 were in the activated state (GTP-bound) in the induced cells. Their relative activated activities in the cells induced for different time were consistent with the values of FRET efficiency. The activated Rac1, Cdc42 signaling pathways led to the formation of lamelliopodia and filopodia in the transfected cells respectively. The results showed that these single-molecule probes could be used to directly monitor the spatial and temporal imaging of the induced activation of the signaling pathways in living cells. With these single-molecule probes, the GEF or GAP activities of putative regulatory proteins for Rac1 and Cdc42 were analyzed and judged, thus greatly simplifying the currently-used methods for identifying the regulatory proteins for Rho GTPases.

  8. Light sheet microscopy for tracking single molecules on the apical surface of living cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Hu, Ying; Cang, Hu

    2013-12-12

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool to study single molecule dynamics in living biological samples. However, current tracking techniques, which are based mainly on epifluorescence, confocal, or TIRF microscopy, have difficulties in tracking single molecules on the apical surface of a cell. We present here a three-dimensional (3D) single particle tracking technique that is based on prism coupled light-sheet microscopy (PCLSM). This novel design provides a signal-to-noise ratio comparable to confocal microscopy while it has the capability of illuminating at arbitrary depth. We demonstrate tracking of single EGF molcules on the apical surface of live cell membranes from their binding to EGF receptors until they are internalized or photobleached. We found that EGF exhibits multiple diffusion behaviors on live A549 cell membranes. At room temperature, the average diffusion coefficient of EGF on A549 cells was measured to be 0.13 μm(2)/s. Depletion of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin leads to a broader distribution of diffusion coefficients and an increase of the average diffusion coefficient at room temperature. This light-sheet based 3D single particle tracking technique solves the technique difficulty of tracking single particles on apical membranes and is able to document the whole "lifetime" of a particle from binding till photobleaching or internalization.

  9. The pharmacokinetics of a single intramuscular dose of amikacin in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, R B; Brooks, D; Vulliet, R

    1997-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of amikacin were determined in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) following the i.m. administration of a single 20 mg/kg dose. After a rapid absorption phase, mean amikacin serum concentrations peaked at 65 +/- 12 micrograms/ML 30-45 min following injection. The serum amikacin concentrations decreased to 2.3 +/- 2 micrograms/ml at 12 hr postinjection. Amikacin was eliminated with first-order kinetics characteristic of a single-compartment model with a half-life of 2.02 +/- 0.63 hr. The volume of distribution was estimated to be 0.28 +/- 0.03 L/kg. Forty-two isolates of gram-negative bacteria and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus species were cultured from birds of prey presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California-Davis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) of amikacin ranged from 0.5 to 8.0 micrograms/ml (mean = 2.5 micrograms/ml). The 20 mg/kg dose used in this study resulted in serum concentrations at or above the MICs for > 12 hr for most of the isolates examined. The heaviest birds had the lowest peak serum amikacin concentrations, and the lightest birds had the highest, despite exact volume replacement for each sample drawn. This observation suggests that doses should be based on factors other than weight alone. Amikacin administered at 15-20 mg/kg/day, either as a single dose or divided into two or three doses, is effective in treating sensitive pathogens of the red-tailed hawk.

  10. Label-Free Detection of Single Living Bacteria via Electrochemical Collision Event

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kang, Mijeong; Park, Jun Hui

    2016-01-01

    We detected single living bacterial cells on ultramicroelectrode (UME) using a single-particle collision method and optical microscopic methods. The number of collision events involving the bacterial cells indicated in current-time (i-t) curves corresponds to the number of bacterial cells (i.e., Escherichia coli) on the UME surface, as observed visually. Simulations were performed to determine the theoretical current response (75 pA) and frequency (0.47 pM−1 s−1) of single Escherichia coli collisions. The experimental current response (83 pA) and frequency (0.26 pM−1 s−1) were on the same order of magnitude as the theoretical values. This single-particle collision approach facilitates detecting living bacteria and determining their concentration in solution and could be widely applied to studying other bacteria and biomolecules. PMID:27435527

  11. Atomic force microscopy of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells: detecting and localizing single molecular recognition events.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Rénia, Laurent; Lim, Chwee Teck; Russell, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a powerful tool for exploring the interaction between ligands and receptors, as well as their exact locations on the red cell surface. Here we discuss current and future applications for AFM based single-molecule force spectroscopy to study adhesion of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. A protocol is provided for simultaneous topography and recognition imaging of the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected cells using CD36 functionalized tips.

  12. Living with a Red Dwarf: Rotation and X-Ray and Ultraviolet Properties of the Halo Population Kapteyn's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Durbin, Allyn

    2016-04-01

    As part of Villanova's Living with a Red Dwarf program, we have obtained UV, X-ray, and optical data of the Population II red dwarf -- Kapteyn's Star. Kapteyn's Star is noteworthy for its large proper motions and high radial velocity of ∼+245 km s-1. As the nearest Pop II red dwarf, it serves as an old age anchor for calibrating activity/irradiance-rotation-age relations, and an important test bed for stellar dynamos and the resulting X-ray-UV emissions of slowly rotating, near-fully convective red dwarf stars. Adding to the notoriety, Kapteyn's Star has recently been reported to host two super-Earth candidates, one of which (Kapteyn b) is orbiting within the habitable zone. However, Robertson et al. questioned the planet's existence since its orbital period may be an artifact of activity, related to the star's rotation period. Because of its large Doppler-shift, measures of the important, chromospheric H i Lyα 1215.67 Å emission line can be reliably made, because it is mostly displaced from ISM and geo-coronal sources. Lyα emission dominates the FUV region of cool stars. Our measures can help determine the X-ray-UV effects on planets hosted by Kapteyn's Star, and planets hosted by other old red dwarfs. Stellar X-ray and Lyα emissions have strong influences on the heating and ionization of upper planetary atmospheres and can (with stellar winds and flares) erode or even eliminate planetary atmospheres. Using our program stars, we have reconstructed the past exposures of Kapteyn's Star's planets to coronal - chromospheric XUV emissions over time. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13020. This work is also based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, a NASA science mission, program #13200633.

  13. Live single cell functional phenotyping in droplet nano-liter reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konry, Tania; Golberg, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin

    2013-11-01

    While single cell heterogeneity is present in all biological systems, most studies cannot address it due to technical limitations. Here we describe a nano-liter droplet microfluidic-based approach for stimulation and monitoring of surfaceand secreted markers of live single immune dendritic cells (DCs) as well as monitoring the live T cell/DC interaction. This nano-liter in vivo simulating microenvironment allows delivering various stimuli reagents to each cell and appropriate gas exchanges which are necessary to ensure functionality and viability of encapsulated cells. Labeling bioassay and microsphere sensors were integrated into nano-liter reaction volume of the droplet to monitor live single cell surface markers and secretion analysis in the time-dependent fashion. Thus live cell stimulation, secretion and surface monitoring can be obtained simultaneously in distinct microenvironment, which previously was possible using complicated and multi-step in vitro and in vivo live-cell microscopy, together with immunological studies of the outcome secretion of cellular function.

  14. Live single cell functional phenotyping in droplet nano-liter reactors.

    PubMed

    Konry, Tania; Golberg, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin

    2013-11-11

    While single cell heterogeneity is present in all biological systems, most studies cannot address it due to technical limitations. Here we describe a nano-liter droplet microfluidic-based approach for stimulation and monitoring of surface and secreted markers of live single immune dendritic cells (DCs) as well as monitoring the live T cell/DC interaction. This nano-liter in vivo simulating microenvironment allows delivering various stimuli reagents to each cell and appropriate gas exchanges which are necessary to ensure functionality and viability of encapsulated cells. Labeling bioassay and microsphere sensors were integrated into nano-liter reaction volume of the droplet to monitor live single cell surface markers and secretion analysis in the time-dependent fashion. Thus live cell stimulation, secretion and surface monitoring can be obtained simultaneously in distinct microenvironment, which previously was possible using complicated and multi-step in vitro and in vivo live-cell microscopy, together with immunological studies of the outcome secretion of cellular function.

  15. Live single cell functional phenotyping in droplet nano-liter reactors

    PubMed Central

    Konry, Tania; Golberg, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin

    2013-01-01

    While single cell heterogeneity is present in all biological systems, most studies cannot address it due to technical limitations. Here we describe a nano-liter droplet microfluidic-based approach for stimulation and monitoring of surfaceand secreted markers of live single immune dendritic cells (DCs) as well as monitoring the live T cell/DC interaction. This nano-liter in vivo simulating microenvironment allows delivering various stimuli reagents to each cell and appropriate gas exchanges which are necessary to ensure functionality and viability of encapsulated cells. Labeling bioassay and microsphere sensors were integrated into nano-liter reaction volume of the droplet to monitor live single cell surface markers and secretion analysis in the time-dependent fashion. Thus live cell stimulation, secretion and surface monitoring can be obtained simultaneously in distinct microenvironment, which previously was possible using complicated and multi-step in vitro and in vivo live-cell microscopy, together with immunological studies of the outcome secretion of cellular function. PMID:24212247

  16. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.

  17. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivón, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies. PMID:25313043

  18. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; ...

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of themore » intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.« less

  19. Imaging Single-mRNA Localization and Translation in Live Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Hun; Bae, Seong-Woo; Shim, Jaeyoun Jay; Park, Sung Young; Park, Hye Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Local protein synthesis mediates precise spatio-temporal regulation of gene expression for neuronal functions such as long-term plasticity, axon guidance and regeneration. To reveal the underlying mechanisms of local translation, it is crucial to understand mRNA transport, localization and translation in live neurons. Among various techniques for mRNA analysis, fluorescence microscopy has been widely used as the most direct method to study localization of mRNA. Live-cell imaging of single RNA molecules is particularly advantageous to dissect the highly heterogeneous and dynamic nature of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes in neurons. Here, we review recent advances in the study of mRNA localization and translation in live neurons using novel techniques for single-RNA imaging. PMID:28030897

  20. Single-shot slightly-off-axis interferometry based Hilbert phase microscopy of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Lai, Jiancheng; Wang, Shouyu; Li, Zhenhua

    2011-03-29

    A slightly-off-axis interferometry based Hilbert phase microscopy (HPM) method is developed to quantitatively obtain the phase distribution. Owing to its single-shot nature and details detection ability, HPM can be used to investigate rapid phenomena that take place in transparent structures such as biological cells. Moreover, the slightly-off-axis interferometry owns higher effective bandwidth and more sensitivity than traditional off-axis interferometry. The proposed method takes advantages of the above techniques to obtain the phase image of the red blood cells and compared with the traditional off-axis interferometry and phase retrieval algorithm based on the FFT. The experimental results show that the proposed method owns fine spatial details and real-time imaging ability. We are sure that the proposed method provides a breakthrough for real-time observing and quantitative analyzing of cells in vivo.

  1. Localized electroporation and molecular delivery into single living cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawarathna, D.; Unal, K.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2008-10-01

    We present an efficient and fast method for selective and localized electroporation of a single living cell from a population of millions to tens of cells using the modified tip of an atomic force microscope. Electroporation was observed in real time using an inverted microscope. This technique is proposed as a tool for efficient and controlled delivery of biomolecules, proteins, drugs, and genes.

  2. A model for oxygen-dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single red blood cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Hao F.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The oxygen-dependent absorption of hemoglobin provides the fundamental contrast for all label-free techniques measuring blood oxygenation. When hemoglobin is packaged into red blood cells (RBCs), the structure of the cells creates light scattering which also depends on the absorption based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship. Thus a proper characterization of the optical behaviors of blood has been a key to any accurate measurement of blood oxygenation, particularly at the capillary level where RBCs are dispersed individually in contrast to a densely packed whole blood. Here we provided a theoretical model under Born Approximation to characterize the oxygen dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single RBCs. Using this theoretical model, we conducted simulations on both oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs with different sizes for standard and possible deformed cell geometries in blood flow, all which suggested similar backscattering spectroscopic contrast and were confirmed by Mie Theory and experiments using visible Optical Coherence Tomography (visOCT). As long as the cell size satisfies Gaussian distribution with a coefficient variance (C.V.) large enough, there is clear absorption contrast between the backscattering spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs calculated by this model, so oxygen saturation can then be characterized. Thus, this theoretical model can be extended to extract absorption features of other scattering particles as long as they satisfy Born Approximation.

  3. Red Mud Catalytic Pyrolysis of Pinyon Juniper and Single-Stage Hydrotreatment of Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Agblevor, Foster A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Burton, Sarah D.; Swita, Marie; Beis, Sedat H.; Christian, Kyle; Sargent, Brandon

    2016-10-20

    Pinyon juniper biomass feedstocks, which cover a large acreage of rangeland in the western United States, are being eradicated and, therefore, considered as a convenient biomass feedstock for biofuel production. Pinyon juniper whole biomass (wood, bark, and leaves) were pyrolyzed in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidized-bed reactor at 450 °C, and the noncondensable gases were recycled to fluidize the reactor. Red mud was used as the in situ catalyst for the pyrolysis of the pinyon juniper biomass. The pyrolysis products were condensed in three stages, and products were analyzed for physicochemical properties. The condenser oil formed two phases with the aqueous fraction, whereas the electrostatic precipitator oils formed a single phase. The oil pH was 3.3; the higher heating value (HHV) was 28 MJ/kg; and the viscosity was less than 100 cP. There was a direct correlation between the viscosity of the oils and the alcohol/ether content of the oils, and this was also related to the aging rate of the oils. The catalytic pyrolysis oils were hydrotreated in a continuous single-stage benchtop hydrotreater to produce hydrocarbon fuels with a density of 0.80$-$0.82 cm3/g. The hydrotreater ran continuously for over 300 h with no significant catalyst deactivation or coke formation. This is the first time that such a long single-stage hydrotreatment has been demonstrated on biomass catalytic pyrolysis oils.

  4. Single-molecule FRET experiments with a red-enhanced custom technology SPAD

    PubMed Central

    Panzeri, Francesco; Ingargiola, Antonino; Lin, Ron R.; Sarkhosh, Niusha; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo; Cova, Sergio; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy of freely diffusing molecules in solution is a powerful tool used to investigate the properties of individual molecules. Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) are the detectors of choice for these applications. Recently a new type of SPAD detector was introduced, dubbed red-enhanced SPAD (RE-SPAD), with good sensitivity throughout the visible spectrum and with excellent timing performance. We report a characterization of this new detector for single-molecule fluorescence resonant energy transfer (smFRET) studies on freely diffusing molecules in a confocal geometry and alternating laser excitation (ALEX) scheme. We use a series of doubly-labeled DNA molecules with donor-to-acceptor distances covering the whole range of useful FRET values. Both intensity-based (μs-ALEX) and lifetime-based (ns-ALEX) measurements are presented and compared to identical measurements performed with standard thick SPADs. Our results demonstrate the great potential of this new detector for smFRET measurements and beyond. PMID:24371508

  5. Gas Exchange and Phytoluminography of Single Red Kidney Bean Leaves during Periods of Induced Stomatal Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ellenson, James L.; Raba, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    This report examines the capabilities of a new approach to the study of gas exchange and electron transport properties of single, intact leaves. The method combines conventional aspects of analysis with an image intensification system that records the spatial distribution of delayed light emission (DLE) over single leaf surfaces. The combined system was used to investigate physiological perturbations induced by exposure of single leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris cv `California Light Red' to a combination of SO2 (0.5 microliters per liter) and ozone (0.1 microliters per liter). Exposure of one-half of a leaf to this combination induced DLE and stomatal oscillations, but only in the half of the leaf exposed to the combined gases. Examination of phytoluminographs taken during these oscillations revealed distinct leaf patches where the greatest changes in DLE intensity occurred. This phenomenon is interpreted to be evidence that control of stomatal activity of intact plant leaves occurs within discrete leaf areas defined within the vascular network. Images Fig. 6 PMID:16662989

  6. Single-unit transfusions and hemoglobin trigger: relative impact on red cell utilization.

    PubMed

    Yang, William W; Thakkar, Rajiv N; Gehrie, Eric A; Chen, Weiyun; Frank, Steven M

    2017-05-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) programs can reduce unnecessary transfusions, but the optimal methods used to achieve this effect are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that encouraging single-unit red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in stable patients would have a greater impact on blood use than compliance with a specific hemoglobin (Hb) transfusion trigger alone. We analyzed blood utilization data at three community hospitals without previous PBM efforts before and after implementing a PBM program. Data were analyzed at monthly intervals to determine the relative impact of a "Why give 2 when 1 will do?" campaign promoting single-unit RBC transfusions and simultaneous efforts to promote evidence-based Hb triggers of 7 or 8 g/dL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify independent effects of these two interventions on overall RBC utilization. Univariate analysis revealed that both the increase in single-unit transfusions (from 38.0% to 70.9%; p < 0.0001) and the decrease in RBC orders with an Hb trigger of at least 8 g/dL (from 45.7% to 25.0%; p < 0.0001) were associated with decreasing RBC utilization. Multivariate analysis showed that the increase in single-unit transfusions was an independent predictor of decreased RBC utilization, but the Hb triggers of both 7 and 8 g/dL were not. Overall, our PBM efforts decreased RBC utilization from 0.254 to 0.185 units/patient (27.2%) across all three hospitals (p = 0.0009). A campaign promoting single-unit RBC transfusions had a greater impact on RBC utilization than did encouraging a restrictive transfusion trigger. © 2016 AABB.

  7. Quantitative Imaging of Single mRNA Splice Variants in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation via the precise control of the post-transcriptional step that occurs before mRNA translation. Errors in RNA splicing have been known to correlate with different diseases; however, a key limitation is the lack of technologies for live cell monitoring and quantification to understand the process of alternative splicing. Here, we report a spectroscopic strategy for quantitative imaging of mRNA splice variants in living cells, using nanoplasmonic dimer antennas. The spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 were monitored at single copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of nanoplasmonic antennas targeting complementary mRNA sequences in live cells. Our study provides valuable insights on RNA and its transport in living cells, which has the potential to enhance our understanding of cellular protein complex, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis, and gene therapies. PMID:24747838

  8. Use of Kaede and Kikume green-red fusions for live cell imaging of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Antje; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf; Teichmann, Anke

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of fluorescent proteins to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is an important tool to study, e.g., trafficking and protein interactions of these important drug targets. In the past, the green fluorescent protein and its derivatives have been widely used as fluorescent tags. More recently, it was reported that photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (PCFPs) such as Kaede or Kikume green-red protein could also be used as fluorescent tags for GPCRs. These proteins have the obvious advantage that their fluorescence can be switched once the GPCR of interest has reached a specific subcellular compartment. Here, we summarize the recent progress for live cell imaging of GPCRs using these PCFPs for trafficking, biosynthesis, and protein/protein interaction studies.

  9. Evaluation of fluorophores to label SNAP-tag fused proteins for multicolor single-molecule tracking microscopy in live cells.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Peter J; Corrêa, Ivan R; Sonntag, Michael H; Ibach, Jenny; Brunsveld, Luc; Kanger, Johannes S; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-08-19

    Single-molecule tracking has become a widely used technique for studying protein dynamics and their organization in the complex environment of the cell. In particular, the spatiotemporal distribution of membrane receptors is an active field of study due to its putative role in the regulation of signal transduction. The SNAP-tag is an intrinsically monovalent and highly specific genetic tag for attaching a fluorescent label to a protein of interest. Little information is currently available on the choice of optimal fluorescent dyes for single-molecule microscopy utilizing the SNAP-tag labeling system. We surveyed 6 green and 16 red excitable dyes for their suitability in single-molecule microscopy of SNAP-tag fusion proteins in live cells. We determined the nonspecific binding levels and photostability of these dye conjugates when bound to a SNAP-tag fused membrane protein in live cells. We found that only a limited subset of the dyes tested is suitable for single-molecule tracking microscopy. The results show that a careful choice of the dye to conjugate to the SNAP-substrate to label SNAP-tag fusion proteins is very important, as many dyes suffer from either rapid photobleaching or high nonspecific staining. These characteristics appear to be unpredictable, which motivated the need to perform the systematic survey presented here. We have developed a protocol for evaluating the best dyes, and for the conditions that we evaluated, we find that Dy 549 and CF 640 are the best choices tested for single-molecule tracking. Using an optimal dye pair, we also demonstrate the possibility of dual-color single-molecule imaging of SNAP-tag fusion proteins. This survey provides an overview of the photophysical and imaging properties of a range of SNAP-tag fluorescent substrates, enabling the selection of optimal dyes and conditions for single-molecule imaging of SNAP-tagged fusion proteins in eukaryotic cell lines. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier

  10. Optimized single-number quantity for rating the airborne sound insulation of constructions: Living sounds.

    PubMed

    Virjonen, Petra; Hongisto, Valtteri; Oliva, David

    2016-12-01

    ISO 717-1 [(1996). International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland] and ASTM 413 [(2010). American Society for Testing and Materials International] define various single-number quantities (SNQs) that are commonly used to rate objectively airborne sound insulation of constructions. Recent psychoacoustic evidence suggests that none of them is appropriate for a wide range of living sound stimuli. The purpose of the study was to develop an alternative compromising SNQ for the frequency range 50-5000 Hz that explains well the annoyance caused by various airborne living sounds transmitted from the neighboring dwelling. Optimal reference spectra for different living sounds were found by mathematical optimization. Experimental data from a psychoacoustic laboratory study [Hongisto, Oliva, and Keränen (2014). Acta Acust. Acust. 100, 848-863] were utilized. The subjects (n = 59) had evaluated the disturbance of living sounds that were electrically filtered to mimic transmission through commonly used wall structures. To find a high-performing reference spectrum for living sounds in general, the optimized reference spectra were averaged over all sound types. The resulting SNQ was called Rw + Copt. The related reference spectrum deviates significantly from the reference spectrum for living activities, C50-5000, below 315 Hz. The suggested SNQ correlates better with the subjective disturbance caused by living sounds than any of the present standardized SNQs of ISO 717-1 or ASTM 413.

  11. Iodine status and fish intake of Sudanese schoolchildren living in the Red Sea and White Nile regions.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Izzeldin S; Min, Yoeju; Ghebremeskel, Kebreab; Gaffar, Abdelrahim M

    2012-12-01

    To investigate iodine status and fish consumption of schoolchildren living in the Red Sea and White Nile regions of Sudan. Cross-sectional study to determine urinary iodine concentration, visible goitre rate, iodine content of salt and fish consumption. Port Sudan (Red Sea) and Jabal Awliya (White Nile), Sudan. Two hundred eighty (n 280) children aged 6-12 years (142 boys, 138 girls). The median urinary iodine concentration in children from Port Sudan and Jabal Awliya was 553 and 160 μg/l, respectively. Goitre was detected in 17.1 % of children from Port Sudan but only in 1.4 % from Jabal Awliya, The salt samples from Port Sudan contained 150-360 mg iodine (KOI3)/kg salt, whereas those from Jabal Awliya had levels below the detection limit. Despite consuming salt devoid of iodine, children from Jabal Awliya had optimal iodine status. It is plausible that consumption of Nile fish from Jabal Awliya Reservoir, which is a good source of iodine and favoured by the locals, might have provided sufficient iodine. In contrast, children from Port Sudan were at higher risk of iodine-induced hyperthyroidism resulting from consumption of excessively iodised salt. The findings of the study clearly demonstrated that (i) Sudan still has a problem with iodine nutrition and quality control and monitoring of salt iodisation and (ii) including fish in the diet could provide a sufficient amount of iodine for schoolchildren.

  12. Efficient two-photon fluorescent probe with red emission for imaging of thiophenols in living cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Qian-Qian; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Peng; Tan, Weihong

    2015-09-01

    Thiophenols, a class of highly toxic and pollutant compounds, are widely used in industrial production. Some aliphatic thiols play important roles in living organisms. Therefore, the development of efficient methods to discriminate thiophenols from aliphatic thiols is of great importance. Although several one-photon fluorescent probes have been reported for thiophenols, two-photon fluorescent probes are more favorable for biological imaging due to its low background fluorescence, deep penetration depth, and so on. In this work, a two-photon fluorescent probe for thiophenols, termed NpRb1, has been developed for the first time by employing 2,4-dinitrobenzene-sulfonate (DNBS) as a recognition unit (also a fluorescence quencher) and a naphthalene-BODIPY-based through-bond energy transfer (TBET) cassette as a fluorescent reporter. The TBET system consists of a D-π-A structured two-photon naphthalene fluorophore and a red-emitting BODIPY. It displayed highly energy transfer efficiency (93.5%), large pseudo-Stokes shifts upon one-photon excitation, and red fluorescence emission (λem = 586 nm), which is highly desirable for bioimaging applications. The probe exhibited a 163-fold thiophenol-triggered two-photon excited fluorescence enhancement at 586 nm. It showed a high selectivity and excellent sensitivity to thiophenols, with a detection limit of 4.9 nM. Moreover, it was successfully applied for practical detection of thiophenol in water samples with a good recovery, two-photon imaging of thiophenol in living cells, and tissues with tissue-imaging depths of 90-220 μm, demonstrating its practical application in environmental samples and biological systems.

  13. Red Emma. Excerpts from "Living My Life", the autobiography of Emma Goldman.

    PubMed

    Goldman, E

    1987-01-01

    The first excerpt (pp. 185-86 of the 1970 Dover edition of Living My Life) dates from 1896, shortly after Emma Goldman returned to New York City from a year abroad during which she studied at Vienna's famous Allgemeines Krankenhaus (General Hospital) and received two diplomas, one for midwifery and one for nursing. She was then 27 years old. The second excerpt (pp. 552-55) describes her women's health lectures some years later, as noted. Despite Goldman's use of the term "birth control" in these excerpts, that term was coined by Margaret Sanger only in 1915. Goldman wrote this autobiography during years 1928 to 1931.

  14. Experimental approaches for addressing fundamental biological questions in living, functioning cells with single molecule precision.

    PubMed

    Lenn, Tchern; Leake, Mark C

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, single molecule experimentation has allowed researchers to observe biological processes at the sensitivity level of single molecules in actual functioning, living cells, thereby allowing us to observe the molecular basis of the key mechanistic processes in question in a very direct way, rather than inferring these from ensemble average data gained from traditional molecular and biochemical techniques. In this short review, we demonstrate the impact that the application of single molecule bioscience experimentation has had on our understanding of various cellular systems and processes, and the potential that this approach has for the future to really address very challenging and fundamental questions in the life sciences.

  15. Rotation of single live mammalian cells using dynamic holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin Cao; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Chan, Samantha; Shetty, Rishabh M.; Smith, Dean; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2017-05-01

    We report on a method for rotating single mammalian cells about an axis perpendicular to the optical system axis through the imaging plane using dynamic holographic optical tweezers (HOTs). Two optical traps are created on the opposite edges of a mammalian cell and are continuously transitioned through the imaging plane along the circumference of the cell in opposite directions, thus providing the torque to rotate the cell in a controlled fashion. The method enables a complete 360° rotation of live single mammalian cells with spherical or near-to spherical shape in 3D space, and represents a useful tool suitable for the single cell analysis field, including tomographic imaging.

  16. High efficient white organic light-emitting diodes with single emissive layer using phosphorescent red, green, and blue dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, You-Hyun; Wai Cheah, Kok; Young Kim, Woo

    2013-07-01

    Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (PHWOLEDs) with single emissive layer were fabricated by co-doping phosphorescent blue, green, and red emitters with different concentrations. WOLEDs using Ir(piq)3 and Ir(ppy)3 as red and green dopants along with 8% of Firpic as blue dopant with host materials of 4CzPBP in the emissive layer were compared under various doping ratio between Ir(piq)3 and Ir(ppy)3. Triplet-triplet Dexter energy transfer in single emissive PHWOLEDs including three primary colors was saturated from higher triplet energy levels to lower triplet energy levels directly.

  17. Tracking living decapod larvae: mass staining of eggs with neutral red prior to hatching.

    PubMed

    Øresland, V; Horobin, R W

    2012-04-01

    Mass staining of decapod females carrying eggs, with subsequent identification of hatched larvae in the environment, is a research tool with great potential for field ecologists wishing to track the movements of larvae. For this to be achieved, however, numerous requirements must be met. These include adequate dye solubility, short staining time, dye penetration through different tissues, dye retention within the organism, absence of toxic and behavioral effects, low visibility to predators of stained larvae, no loss of staining owing to preservatives and low cost. The dye, neutral red, appears to meet most of these requirements. This dye was used in aliquots of 0.7 g/770 ml seawater applied to the females of Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) and European lobster (Homarus gammarus) for 10 min. This procedure stained lobster eggs and embryos so that hatched larvae could be distinguished easily by fluorescence microscopy from larvae that hatched from unstained eggs. Stained larvae that were preserved in 4% formaldehyde in seawater were still stained after 1 year. Larvae should not come in contact with ethanol, because it extracts the dye rapidly.

  18. Direct metabolomics for plant cells by live single-cell mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takashi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tejedor, Mónica Lorenzo; Esaki, Tsuyoshi; Sakane, Iwao; Mizuno, Hajime; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2015-09-01

    Live single-cell mass spectrometry (live MS) provides a mass spectrum that shows thousands of metabolite peaks from a single live plant cell within minutes. By using an optical microscope, a cell is chosen for analysis and a metal-coated nanospray microcapillary tip is used to remove the cell's contents. After adding a microliter of ionization solvent to the opposite end of the tip, the trapped contents are directly fed into the mass spectrometer by applying a high voltage between the tip and the inlet port of the spectrometer to induce nanospray ionization. Proteins are not detected because of insufficient sensitivity. Metabolite peaks are identified by exact mass or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis, and isomers can be separated by combining live MS with ion-mobility separation. By using this approach, spectra can be acquired in 10 min. In combination with metabolic maps and/or molecular databases, the data can be annotated into metabolic pathways; the data analysis takes 30 min to 4 h, depending on the MS/MS data availability from databases. This method enables the analysis of a number of metabolites from a single cell with rapid sampling at sub-attomolar-level sensitivity.

  19. Four-Dimensional Spatial Nanometry of Single Particles in Living Cells Using Polarized Quantum Rods

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujii, Fumihiko; Jin, Takashi; Umemoto, Eiji; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Fujita, Hideaki; Yanagida, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking is widely used to study protein movement with high spatiotemporal resolution both in vitro and in cells. Quantum dots, which are semiconductor nanoparticles, have recently been employed in single particle tracking because of their intense and stable fluorescence. Although single particles inside cells have been tracked in three spatial dimensions (X, Y, Z), measurement of the angular orientation of a molecule being tracked would significantly enhance our understanding of the molecule’s function. In this study, we synthesized highly polarized, rod-shaped quantum dots (Qrods) and developed a coating method that optimizes the Qrods for biological imaging. We describe a Qrod-based single particle tracking technique that blends optical nanometry with nanomaterial science to simultaneously measure the three-dimensional and angular movements of molecules. Using Qrods, we spatially tracked a membrane receptor in living cells in four dimensions with precision close to the single-digit range in nanometers and degrees. PMID:23931303

  20. Yb-fiber laser pumped high-power, broadly tunable, single-frequency red source based on a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Maji, Partha Sona; Das, Ritwick

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient and tunable source generating multi-watt single-frequency red radiation by intra-cavity frequency doubling of the signal in a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 (MgO:PPLN)-based singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO). By optimally designing the SRO cavity in a six-mirror configuration, we generate ≈276  nm tunable idler radiation in mid-infrared with a maximum power of Pi=2.05  W at a pump power of Pp=14.0  W. The resonant signal is frequency doubled using a 10 mm-long BiB3O6 (BiBO) crystal which resulted in tunability of a red beam from ≈753 to 780 nm band with maximum power Pr≈4.0  W recorded at λr≈756  nm. The deployment of a six-mirror SRO ensures single-frequency generation of red across the entire tuning range by inducing additional losses to Raman modes of LiNbO3 and, thus, inhibiting their oscillation. Using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), nominal linewidth of the red beam is measured to ≈3  MHz which changes marginally over the entire tuning range. Long-term (over 1 h) peak-to-peak frequency fluctuation of the generated red beam is estimated to be about 3.3 GHz under free-running conditions at Pp=14.0  W. The generated red beam is delivered in a TEM00 mode profile with M2≤1.32 at maximum power in a red beam.

  1. Efficient potassium gadolinium tungstate Raman lasers generating single or multiple wavelengths spanning the green to red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildren, Richard P.; Pask, H. M.; McKay, T.; Piper, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    We review our recent studies into external cavity and intracavity potassium gadolinium tungstate Raman lasers generating output wavelengths in the range 555 nm to 669 nm. We have characterised the performance external cavity Raman lasers pumped by Q-switched 532 nm pump lasers at 5-10 kHz pulse repetition rates generating either single output wavelengths or multiple wavelengths simultaneously. Single output wavelengths are obtained with slope efficiencies up to 68% and maximum output powers ~0.5 W. Simultaneous output at 5 wavelengths (eg., 532 nm, 559 nm, 589 nm, 622 nm and 658 nm) is demonstrated with ~100 mW output power for at least 3 lines. Using the intracavity Raman laser scheme, we demonstrate a 0.3-1.8 W laser that is "user switchable" amongst wavelengths spanning the green to red eg., 532 nm - 555 nm - 579 nm - 606 nm, the wavelengths corresponding to frequency sums and mixing of Stokes and fundamental intra-cavity fields.

  2. Red, green and blue lasing enabled by single-exciton gain in colloidal quantum dot films.

    PubMed

    Dang, Cuong; Lee, Joonhee; Breen, Craig; Steckel, Jonathan S; Coe-Sullivan, Seth; Nurmikko, Arto

    2012-04-29

    Colloidal quantum dots exhibit efficient photoluminescence with widely tunable bandgaps as a result of quantum confinement effects. Such quantum dots are emerging as an appealing complement to epitaxial semiconductor laser materials, which are ubiquitous and technologically mature, but unable to cover the full visible spectrum (red, green and blue; RGB). However, the requirement for high colloidal-quantum-dot packing density, and losses due to non-radiative multiexcitonic Auger recombination, have hindered the development of lasers based on colloidal quantum dots. Here, we engineer CdSe/ZnCdS core/shell colloidal quantum dots with aromatic ligands, which form densely packed films exhibiting optical gain across the visible spectrum with less than one exciton per colloidal quantum dot on average. This single-exciton gain allows the films to reach the threshold of amplified spontaneous emission at very low optical pump energy densities of 90 µJ cm(-2), more than one order of magnitude better than previously reported values. We leverage the low-threshold gain of these nanocomposite films to produce the first colloidal-quantum-dot vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (CQD-VCSEL). Our results represent a significant step towards full-colour single-material lasers.

  3. The motion of a single red blood cell in a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Thierry; Mahadevan, L.

    2009-11-01

    The collective vaso-occlusive event in sickle cell disease induced by multiple red blood cells (RBC's) has recently been evoked and controlled in vitro using a microfluidic platform [1]. The increase in the cells' stiffness in this disease is believed to be a predominant factor at the onset of the occlusion. We report here the motion of a single swollen RBC in a capillary. We use a tapered glass capillary with inner diameter as low as 3 microns, and track the squeezed cell driven by a controlled pressure drop. This allows us to simultaneously measure the variations of the RBC velocity as a function of the pressure gradient and of the local capillary diameter in a single experiment. We show that under certain regimes of confinement, the velocity increases with the pressure head with a characteristic power-law. We analyze our findings in terms of a elasto-hydrodynamical model for soft lubrication.[4pt] [1] Higgins et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104: 20496 (2007).

  4. Living on the edge: Space use of Eurasian red squirrels in marginal high-elevation habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A.; Preatoni, Damiano; Tosi, Guido; Martinoli, Adriano

    2010-11-01

    In marginal habitats located at the edge of a species' range, environmental conditions are frequently extreme and individuals may be subject to different selective pressures compared to central populations. These so-called edge or marginal populations tend to have lower densities and reproductive rates than populations located in more suitable habitats, but little is known about local adaptations in spacing behavior. We studied space use and social organization in a population of Eurasian red squirrels ( Sciurus vulgaris) in a high-elevation marginal habitat of dwarf mountain pine ( Pinus mugo) and compared it with spacing patterns in high-quality Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) forest at lower-elevation. Home ranges and core areas were larger in the marginal habitat. In both habitats, males used larger home ranges than females, but sex differences in core area size were significant only in the edge population. Patterns of core area overlap were similar in both habitats with intra-sexual territoriality among adult females and higher degrees of inter-sexual overlap, typical for the species throughout its range. However, low densities in the edge population resulted in higher female by males overlap in spring-summer, suggesting males increased home ranges and core areas during mating season to augment access to estrus females. Thus, in the marginal habitat, with low food abundance and low population densities, linked with extreme winter conditions, squirrels, especially males, used large home ranges. Finally, squirrels responded more strongly to variation in food availability (inverse relation between home range size and seed abundance), and even to fluctuations in density (inverse relation between core area size and density of animals of the same sex), in the marginal than in the high-quality habitat, suggesting high behavioral plasticity to respond to the ecological constraints in marginal habitats.

  5. Single Molecule Imaging of Transcription Factor Binding to DNA in Live Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, J Christof M; Suter, David M; Roy, Rahul; Zhao, Ziqing W; Chapman, Alec R; Basu, Srinjan; Maniatis, Tom; Xie, X Sunney

    2013-01-01

    Imaging single fluorescent proteins in living mammalian cells is challenging due to out-of-focus fluorescence excitation by common microscopy schemes. We report the development of a novel fluorescence microscopy method, reflected light sheet microscopy (RLSM), which allows selective plane illumination throughout the nucleus of living mammalian cells, for reducing out-of-focus fluorescence signal. Generation of a thin light sheet parallel to the imaging plane and close to the sample surface is achieved by reflecting an elliptical laser beam incident from the top by 45° with a small mirror. The thin light sheet allows for an increased signal-to-background ratio superior to previous illumination schemes and enables imaging of single fluorescent proteins with up to 100 Hz time resolution. We demonstrate the sensitivity of RLSM by measuring the DNA-bound fraction of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and determine the residence times on DNA of various oligomerization states and mutants of GR and estrogen receptor (ER), enabling us to resolve different modes of DNA binding of GR. Finally, we demonstrate two-color single molecule imaging by observing the spatio-temporal co-localization of two different protein pairs. The combination of our single molecule measurements and statistical analysis reveals dynamic properties of transcription factors in live mammalian cells. PMID:23524394

  6. Potential for a live red seabream iridovirus (RSIV) vaccine in rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus at a low rearing temperature.

    PubMed

    Oh, So-Young; Oh, Myung-Joo; Nishizawa, Toyohiko

    2014-01-09

    Serious economic losses have occurred in fingerlings and market-sized rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus in Korea due to red seabream iridovirus (RSIV) infection. We demonstrated previously that viral multiplication in fish is downregulated by maintaining fish at far from optimum temperatures at the onset of disease. We applied this concept to develop a live RSIV vaccine in rock bream. Mortalities in rock bream that were inoculated with RSIV and reared at 21-30°C were ≥90%, whereas no mortality was observed in fish that received an RSIV inoculation and were reared at ≤18°C. RSIV kinetics revealed that RSIV multiplied rapidly in fish reared at 24.3±1.3°C, and achieved the critical level for rock bream (approximately 10(9.0) genomes/mg) within 28 days. In contrast, the RSIV genome was detected on day 10 in fish that received an RSIV inoculation at 15.5°C, and peaked on day 28 at 10(5.91±0.54) genomes/mg, then decreasing gradually, and were then maintained under the detection level beginning on day 84 after RSIV inoculation. Furthermore, the fish surviving the RSIV infection at low rearing temperature were strongly protected from re-challenge with homologous RSIV; the threshold level of RSIV for rock bream to mount a protective immune response was ≤10(5.4) genomes/mg. Cohabitation experiments revealed that the spread of RSIV from rock bream vaccinated with a live RSIV could be low if it is limited to fish in the late stage (≥84 days of elapse) after vaccination. Thus, it was concluded that when rock bream are reared at ≤18°C and inoculated with RSIV, the survivors can mount a protective immune response against RSIV, suggesting a positive effect of a live RSIV vaccine for rock bream.

  7. Living Arrangements and the Well-being of Single Mothers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Raymo, James M.; Zhou, Yanfei

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to evaluate the extent to which the well-being of single mothers in Japan is related to coresidence with other adults. Using data from a representative survey of households headed by single mothers, we examine two measures of subjective well-being: perceived economic circumstances and self-rated health. One-fourth of the single mothers surveyed were coresiding with another adult(s) and it is clear that these women fare significantly better than their non-coresiding counterparts on both measures of well-being. Net of several theoretically relevant sociodemographic, family, and employment characteristics, single mothers living with others were significantly less likely to report somewhat difficult/difficult economic circumstances or fair/poor health. Efforts to account for potential endogeneity between well-being and living arrangements suggested that self-rated health, but not subjective economic well-being, is related to selection into coresidence. Single mothers in fair/poor health appear more likely to coreside with others and, accounting for this selection, intergenerational coresidence appears to be very beneficial for self-rated health. We discuss the implications of these findings for processes of stratification in Japan in light of the limited public income support available to single mothers. PMID:23144521

  8. Reducing the immediate availability of red blood cells in cardiac surgery, a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Haanschoten, M C; van Straten, A H M; Verstappen, F; van de Kerkhof, D; van Zundert, A A J; Soliman Hamad, M A

    2015-01-01

    In our institution, we have redefined our criteria for direct availability of red blood cell (RBC) units in the operation room. In this study, we sought to evaluate the safety of applying this new logistical policy of blood transfusion in the first preliminary group of patients. In March 2010, we started a new policy concerning the elective availability of RBC units in the operation room. This policy was called: No Elective Red Cells (NERC) program. The program was applied for patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or single valve surgery. No elective RBC units were preoperatively ordered for these patients. In case of urgent need, blood was delivered to the operating room within 20 min. The present study includes the first 500 patients who were managed according to this policy. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the impact of biomedical variables on fulfilling this NERC program. The majority of patients (n = 409, 81 %) did not receive any RBCs during the hospital stay. In patients who did receive RBCs (n = 91, 19 %), 11 patients (2.2 %) received RBCs after 24 h postoperatively. Female gender, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and EuroSCORE were significant predictors for the need of blood transfusion (OR = 3.12; 2.79; 1.17 respectively). In a selected group of patients, it is safe to perform cardiac surgery without the immediate availability of RBCs in the operating room. Transfusion was avoided in 81 % of these patients. Female gender, LVEF and EuroSCORE were associated with blood transfusion.

  9. Studying the mechanism of CD47-SIRPα interactions on red blood cells by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yangang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Jiang, Junguang; Yang, Yong-Guang; Wang, Hongda

    2014-08-01

    The interaction forces and binding kinetics between SIRPα and CD47 were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) on both fresh and experimentally aged human red blood cells (hRBCs). We found that CD47 experienced a conformation change after oxidation, which influenced the interaction force and the position of the energy barrier between SIRPα and CD47. Our results are significant for understanding the mechanism of phagocytosis of red blood cells at the single molecule level.The interaction forces and binding kinetics between SIRPα and CD47 were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) on both fresh and experimentally aged human red blood cells (hRBCs). We found that CD47 experienced a conformation change after oxidation, which influenced the interaction force and the position of the energy barrier between SIRPα and CD47. Our results are significant for understanding the mechanism of phagocytosis of red blood cells at the single molecule level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02889a

  10. Three-Dimensional Tracking of Single Granules in Living PC-12 Cells Employing TIRFM and WFFM.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jun; Li, Dongdong; Zhu, Dan; Qu, Anlian

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out on evaluating the performance of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and deconvolution wide-field fluorescence microscopy (WFFM) in tracking single secretory granules. Both techniques have been applied to follow the three-dimensional mobility of single secretory granules in living neuroendocrine PC-12 cells. Both techniques return the similar result that most acridine orange-labeled granules were found to travel in random and caged diffusion, and only a small fraction of granules traveled in directed diffusion. Furthermore, the size and 3-D diffusion coefficient of secretory granules, obtained by these two imaging techniques, yield the same value. Together, our results demonstrate the potential of the combination TIRFM and WFFM in tracking long-termed motion of granules throughout live whole cells.

  11. An automated tool for 3D tracking of single molecules in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardini, L.; Capitanio, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, tremendous improvements have been achieved in the precision of localization of single fluorescent molecules, allowing localization and tracking of biomolecules at the nm level. Since the behaviour of proteins and biological molecules is tightly influenced by the cell's environment, a growing number of microscopy techniques are moving from in vitro to live cell experiments. Looking at both diffusion and active transportation processes inside a cell requires three-dimensional localization over a few microns range, high SNR images and high temporal resolution (ms order of magnitude). To satisfy these requirements we developed an automated routine that allow 3D tracking of single fluorescent molecules in living cells with nanometer accuracy, by exploiting the properties of the point-spread-function of out-of-focus Quantum Dots bound to the protein of interest.

  12. Reduced dyes enhance single-molecule localization density for live superresolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Lina; Benke, Alexander; Reymond, Luc; Lukinavičius, Gražvydas; Manley, Suliana

    2014-03-17

    Cell-permeable rhodamine dyes are reductively quenched by NaBH4 into a non-fluorescent leuco-rhodamine form. Quenching is reversible, and their fluorescence is recovered when the dyes are oxidized. In living cells, oxidation occurs spontaneously, and can result in up to ten-fold higher densities of single molecule localizations, and more photons per localization as compared with unmodified dyes. These two parameters directly impact the achievable resolution, and we see a significant improvement in the quality of live-cell point-localization super-resolution images taken with reduced dyes. These improvements carry over to increase the density of trajectories for single-molecule tracking experiments.

  13. Image-guided transplantation of single cells in the bone marrow of live animals.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Alt, Clemens; Runnels, Judith M; Ito, Kyoko; Wu, Juwell W; Zaher, Walid; Mortensen, Luke J; Silberstein, Lev; Côté, Daniel C; Kung, Andrew L; Ito, Keisuke; Lin, Charles P

    2017-06-20

    Transplantation of a single hematopoietic stem cell is an important method for its functional characterization, but the standard transplantation protocol relies on cell homing to the bone marrow after intravenous injection. Here, we present a method to transplant single cells directly into the bone marrow of live mice. We developed an optical platform that integrates a multiphoton microscope with a laser ablation unit for microsurgery and an optical tweezer for cell micromanipulation. These tools allow image-guided single cell transplantation with high spatial control. The platform was used to deliver single hematopoietic stem cells. The engraftment of transplants was tracked over time, illustrating that the technique can be useful for studying both normal and malignant stem cells in vivo.

  14. Real-time visualization of intracellular hydrodynamics in single living cells.

    PubMed

    Potma, E; de Boeij, W P; van Haastert, P J; Wiersma, D A

    2001-02-13

    Intracellular water concentrations in single living cells were visualized by nonlinear coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In combination with isotopic exchange measurements, CARS microscopy allowed the real-time observation of transient intracellular hydrodynamics at a high spatial resolution. Studies of the hydrodynamics in the microorganism Dictyostelium discoideum indicated the presence of a microscopic region near the plasma membrane where the mobility of water molecules is severely restricted. Modeling the transient hydrodynamics eventuated in the determination of cell-specific cytosolic diffusion and plasma membrane permeability constants. Our experiments demonstrate that CARS microscopy offers an invaluable tool for probing single-cell water dynamics.

  15. Blurring the boundaries of space: shaping nursing lives at the Red Cross outposts in Ontario, 1922-1945.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jayne

    2004-01-01

    Historians and other scholars interested in the history of hospitals have investigated the links between medical architecture and the organization of space with the evolution of modern medicine. The transformation over time in the architectural for of medical institutions has tended to reflect developments in medical science and therapeutic efficiency as well as elements in the broader social climate. Some authors, however, have argued for the agency of structure and spatial organization, to consider that they are not just containers with which human activities take place, but which also actively construct or constitute social practices and relations. Most studies of this nature have centred on large medical buildings especially in urban areas, and have examined the impact of architectural arrangement in relation to administrators and architects, physicians and patients. Fe have considered the interconnections of form and space with nurses, despite the prominence of institutional nursing labour since the late 19th-century. The following discussion begins an exploration of these concepts within the rural environment. Between 1922 and 1984, the Ontario Division of the Canadian Red Cross Society administered an outpost program in which it operated small hospitals and nursing stations in isolated communities throughout the northern reaches of the province. This article will focus primarily o n the one-nurse stations that the Division managed during the interwar years and the nurses that it hired to staff them. The interior spatial organization of these outposts, which led in particular to their multiple functions as tiny hospitals, community health centres and nurses' homes, not only shaped both the professional practice and the social or private lives of the Red Cross nurses but also contributed to the diffusion of contemporary precepts in health and medical care throughout a remote population.

  16. Single-molecule imaging of transcription factor binding to DNA in live mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, J Christof M; Suter, David M; Roy, Rahul; Zhao, Ziqing W; Chapman, Alec R; Basu, Srinjan; Maniatis, Tom; Xie, X Sunney

    2013-05-01

    Imaging single fluorescent proteins in living mammalian cells is challenged by out-of-focus fluorescence excitation. To reduce out-of-focus fluorescence we developed reflected light-sheet microscopy (RLSM), a fluorescence microscopy method allowing selective plane illumination throughout the nuclei of living mammalian cells. A thin light sheet parallel to the imaging plane and close to the sample surface is generated by reflecting an elliptical laser beam incident from the top by 90° with a small mirror. The thin light sheet allows for an increased signal-to-background ratio superior to that in previous illumination schemes and enables imaging of single fluorescent proteins with up to 100-Hz time resolution. We demonstrated the single-molecule sensitivity of RLSM by measuring the DNA-bound fraction of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and determining the residence times on DNA of various oligomerization states and mutants of GR and estrogen receptor-α (ER), which permitted us to resolve different modes of DNA binding of GR. We demonstrated two-color single-molecule imaging by observing the spatiotemporal colocalization of two different protein pairs. Our single-molecule measurements and statistical analysis revealed dynamic properties of transcription factors.

  17. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Association between ABO blood type and live-birth outcomes in single embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nigel; Patel, Hency H; Stone, Logan D; Christos, Paul J; Elias, Rony T; Spandorfer, Steven D; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2017-09-15

    To investigate the association between ABO blood type and live-birth outcomes in patients undergoing IVF with day 5 single embryo transfer (SET). Retrospective cohort study. University-affiliated center. Normal responders, <40 years old, undergoing their first IVF cycle with fresh SET. None. Live-birth rate was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were birth weight and gestational age at delivery. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between blood type and live birth, while controlling for confounders. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for live birth were estimated. A total of 2,329 patients were included. The mean age of the study cohort was 34.6 ± 4.78 years. The distribution of blood types was as follows: A = 897 (38.5%); B = 397 (17.0%); AB = 120 (5.2%); and, O = 1,915 (39.3%) patients. There was no difference in the baseline demographics, ovarian stimulation, or embryo quality parameters between the blood types. The unadjusted ORs for live birth when comparing blood type A (referent) with blood types B, AB, and O were 0.96 (95% CI, 0.6-1.7), 0.72 (95% CI, 0.4-1.2), and 0.96 (95% CI. 0.6-1.7), respectively. The adjusted ORs for live birth remained not significant when comparing blood type A to blood types B, AB, and O individually. No difference in birth weight or gestational age at delivery was noted among the four blood types. Our findings suggest that ABO blood type is not associated with live-birth rate, birth weight, or gestational age at delivery in patients undergoing IVF with day 5 SET. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Wolf-Rayet, Yellow and Red Supergiant in the single massive stars perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Cyril; Hirschi, R.; Ekstrom, S.; Meynet, G.

    2013-06-01

    Rotation and mass loss are the key ingredients determining the fate of single massive stars. In recent years, a large effort has been made to compute whole grids of stellar models at different metallicities, including or not the effects of rotation, with the Geneva evolution code. In this talk, I will focus on the evolved stages of massive star evolution (red and yellow supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars), in the framework of these new grids of models. I will highlight the effects of rotation and mass loss on the post-main sequence evolution of massive stars at solar and lower metallicity. In particular, I will discuss their impact on the maximum mass for a star to end its life as a RSG (leading to a type IIP supernova), on the possibility for a star to finish as a YSG, and on the initial mass ranges leading to various WR star subtypes. I will then compare the results predicted by our code with observed populations of evolved massive stars, bringing constraints on our computations, as well as some indications on the binary star fraction needed to reproduce them.

  20. Adsorption of neutral red and malachite green onto grapefruit peel in single and binary systems.

    PubMed

    Zou, Weihua; Gao, Shuaipeng; Zou, Xiuli; Bai, Hongjuan

    2013-05-01

    This study characterized the properties of NaOH-modified grapefruit peel (MGP) and investigated its adsorption properties, specifically the adsorption of the synthetic dyes neutral red (NR) and malachite green (MG) onto MGP, in single and binary systems by means of batch techniques. The adsorption equilibrium data of NR onto MGP fit well with both the Langmuir and Koble-Corrigan models, while the Koble-Corrigan and Dubinin-Radushkevich models seemed to agree better with MG adsorption. The maximum equilibrium quantities of NR and MG from the Langmuir model were 640.3 and 314.9 mg/g at 298 K, respectively. The Elovich model was a better fit with the kinetic process, which suggested that ion exchange was one of the main mechanisms at work. The thermodynamic parameters of adsorption systems indicated spontaneous and endothermic processes. In the binary system experiments, NR and MG exhibited competitive adsorption. The quantity of MG adsorbed was more strongly influenced by NR, due to the higher affinity of MGP for the latter.

  1. Particle-based modeling effect of shape transform of single sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Karniadakis, George; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Sickle red blood cells often exhibit various sickled shapes as well as higher shear and bending stiffness. To study the membrane biomechanical properties related to cell morphology, we employed multiscale coarse grain models based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Through the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) we analyst the membrane fluctuation of a single cell which probe the membrane mechanical properties. In this work, the membrane mechanics alteration caused by cell volume and surface area variation are tested. We verified that with same ratio of surface area and volume, volume differences will not affect the membrane fluctuation. We also found that by expanding the whole cell the membrane fluctuation performance does not change. To further quantify the pure shape effects, we generate cells with different aspect ratio of major axis and minor axis at which membrane exhibit different fluctuation indicating the mechanical properties divergence. Through the spatial-temporal autocorrelation of membrane fluctuations characteristics, the membrane bending stiffness and shear modulus are carefully calibrated against QPI experimental data.

  2. Deformation of a single red blood cell in bounded Poiseuille flows.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Deformation of a red blood cell (RBC) in bounded two-dimensional Poiseuille flows is studied by using an immersed boundary method (IBM). An elastic spring model is applied to simulate the skeleton structure of a RBC membrane. As a benchmarking test, the dynamical behavior of a single RBC under a simple shear flow has been validated. Then we focus on investigating the motion and the deformation of a single RBC in Poiseuille flows by varying the swelling ratio (s*), the initial angle of the long axis of the cell at the centerline (ϕ), the maximum velocity at the centerline of fluid flow (umax), the membrane bending stiffness of a RBC (kb), and the height of the microchannel (H). Two motions of oscillation and vacillating breathing (swing) of a RBC are observed in both narrow and wide channels. The strength of the vacillating-breathing motion depends on the degree of confinement and the value of umax. A RBC exhibits a strong vacillating-breathing motion as the degree of confinement is larger or the value of umax is higher. For the same degree of confinement, the vacillating-breathing motion appears to be relatively weaker but persists longer as the value of umax is lower. The continuation of shape change from the slippery to the parachute by varying the value of umax is obtained for the biconcave shape cell in a narrower channel. In particular, parachute shape and bulletlike shape, depending on the angle ϕ, coexist for the elliptic shape cell given initially with lower umax in a narrower channel.

  3. Protein Structure-Function Correlation in Living Human Red Blood Cells Probed by Isotope Exchange-based Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sreekala; Mitra, Gopa; Muralidharan, Monita; Mathew, Boby; Mandal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms of various biological events, it is important to study the structure-function correlation of proteins within cells. Structural probes used in spectroscopic tools to investigate protein conformation are similar across all proteins. Therefore, structural studies are restricted to purified proteins in vitro and these findings are extrapolated in cells to correlate their functions in vivo. However, due to cellular complexity, in vivo and in vitro environments are radically different. Here, we show a novel way to monitor the structural transition of human hemoglobin upon oxygen binding in living red blood cells (RBCs), using hydrogen/deuterium exchange-based mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS). Exploiting permeability of D2O across cell membrane, the isotope exchange of polypeptide backbone amide hydrogens of hemoglobin was carried out inside RBCs and monitored using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). To explore the conformational transition associated with oxygenation of hemoglobin in vivo, the isotope exchange kinetics was simplified using the method of initial rates. RBC might be considered as an in vivo system of pure hemoglobin. Thus, as a proof-of-concept, the observed results were correlated with structural transition of hemoglobin associated with its function established in vitro. This is the first report on structural changes of a protein upon ligand binding in its endogenous environment. The proposed method might be applicable to proteins in their native state, irrespective of location, concentration, and size. The present in-cell approach opens a new avenue to unravel a plethora of biological processes like ligand binding, folding, and post-translational modification of proteins in living cells.

  4. Long-Lived Intracellular Single-Molecule Fluorescence Using Electroporated Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Robert; Torella, Joseph P.; Aigrain, Louise; Plochowietz, Anne; Gryte, Kristofer; Uphoff, Stephan; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of biomolecules in vivo are crucial to understand their function in a natural, biological context. One powerful approach involves fusing molecules of interest to fluorescent proteins to study their expression, localization, and action; however, the scope of such studies would be increased considerably by using organic fluorophores, which are smaller and more photostable than their fluorescent protein counterparts. Here, we describe a straightforward, versatile, and high-throughput method to internalize DNA fragments and proteins labeled with organic fluorophores into live Escherichia coli by employing electroporation. We studied the copy numbers, diffusion profiles, and structure of internalized molecules at the single-molecule level in vivo, and were able to extend single-molecule observation times by two orders of magnitude compared to green fluorescent protein, allowing continuous monitoring of molecular processes occurring from seconds to minutes. We also exploited the desirable properties of organic fluorophores to perform single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements in the cytoplasm of live bacteria, both for DNA and proteins. Finally, we demonstrate internalization of labeled proteins and DNA into yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryotic system. Our method should broaden the range of biological questions addressable in microbes by single-molecule fluorescence. PMID:24314075

  5. Reconstructing single hepatic artery with two arterial stumps: biliary complications in pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Julka, Karan D; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Chen, Chao-Long; Wang, Chih-Chi; Komorowski, Andrzej L

    2014-01-01

    Liver grafts can at times have two hepatic arterial stumps. This can result in a dilemma whether to reconstruct single or both the arteries. Hepatic artery (HA) thrombosis is the most dreaded complication in pediatric living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) as it can result in biliary complications and subsequent graft loss. We herein report the feasibility of reconstructing single hepatic artery in pediatric living donor liver transplantation having two arterial stumps in the liver graft. From 2008 to 2010, 87 pediatric patients undergoing LDLT were divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 20): two HA stumps with two HA reconstruction, Group 2 (n = 22): two HA stumps with one HA reconstruction and Group 3 (n = 45): one HA stump with one HA reconstruction. The decision regarding the reconstruction of single or multiple HAs was made depending on the pre-operative radiological and intraoperative assessments. The incidence of HA thrombosis (p = 0.126) and biliary complications (p = 0.617), was similar in the three groups. Single HA reconstruction does not increase the risk of biliary strictures in pediatric LDLT recipients having dual hepatic arterial stumps in the liver graft.

  6. Microscale consolidation analysis of relaxation behavior of single living chondrocytes subjected to varying strain-rates.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Oloyede, Adekunle; Singh, Sanjleena; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Besides the elastic stiffness, the relaxation behavior of single living cells is also of interest of various researchers when studying cell mechanics. It is hypothesized that the relaxation response of the cells is governed by both intrinsic viscoelasticity of the solid phase and fluid-solid interactions mechanisms. There are a number of mechanical models have been developed to investigate the relaxation behavior of single cells. However, there is lack of model enable to accurately capture both of the mechanisms. Therefore, in this study, the porohyperelastic (PHE) model, which is an extension of the consolidation theory, combined with inverse Finite Element Analysis (FEA) technique was used at the first time to investigate the relaxation response of living chondrocytes. This model was also utilized to study the dependence of relaxation behavior of the cells on strain-rates. The stress-relaxation experiments under the various strain-rates were conducted with the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The results have demonstrated that the PHE model could effectively capture the stress-relaxation behavior of the living chondrocytes, especially at intermediate to high strain-rates. Although this model gave some errors at lower strain-rates, its performance was acceptable. Therefore, the PHE model is properly a promising model for single cell mechanics studies. Moreover, it has been found that the hydraulic permeability of living chondrocytes reduced with decreasing of strain-rates. It might be due to the intracellular fluid volume fraction and the fluid pore pressure gradients of chondrocytes were higher when higher strain-rates applied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multicolor imaging of hydrogen peroxide level in living and apoptotic cells by a single fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ying; Xue, Fengfeng; Lan, Haichuang; Li, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuzhang; Yi, Tao

    2017-05-15

    To understand the entangled relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis, there is urgent need for simultaneous dynamic monitoring of these two important biological events. In this study, we have developed a fluorescent probe, pep4-NP1, which can simultaneously detect H2O2 and caspase 3, the respective markers of ROS and apoptosis. The probe contains a H2O2 fluorescence reporter (NP1) and Cy5 fluorescent chromophore connected by a caspase 3 specific recognition peptide. The detecting strategy was realized through a controllable fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process between NP1 and Cy5 of pep4-NP1, after reaction with H2O2, which was verified by molecular calculation and in vitro spectral studies. In the absent of caspase 3, the accumulation of H2O2 induces red fluorescence of pep4-NP1 centered at 663nm in living cells due to the existence of FRET. In contrast, FRET is inhibited in apoptotic cells due to cleavage of the peptide spacer of pep4-NP1 by over-expressed caspase 3. Consequently, green fluorescence (555nm) predominated when labelling production of H2O2 in apoptotic cells. Moreover, Pep4-NP1 shows excellent selectivity towards H2O2 and caspase 3 on their respective reaction sites. Therefore, pep4-NP1 can distinguish endogenously generated H2O2 between living cells and apoptotic cells with different fluorescence wavelengths, providing additional information on the ROS production pathways.

  8. Nile Blue-based nanosized pH sensors for simultaneous far-red and near-infrared live bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jeppe; Canton, Irene; Warren, Nicholas J; Themistou, Efrosyni; Blanazs, Adam; Ustbas, Burcin; Tian, Xiaohe; Pearson, Russell; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Lewis, Andrew L; Armes, Steven P

    2013-10-02

    Diblock copolymer vesicles are tagged with pH-responsive Nile Blue-based labels and used as a new type of pH-responsive colorimetric/fluorescent biosensor for far-red and near-infrared imaging of live cells. The diblock copolymer vesicles described herein are based on poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine-block-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) [PMPC-PDPA]: the biomimetic PMPC block is known to facilitate rapid cell uptake for a wide range of cell lines, while the PDPA block constitutes the pH-responsive component that enables facile vesicle self-assembly in aqueous solution. These biocompatible vesicles can be utilized to detect interstitial hypoxic/acidic regions in a tumor model via a pH-dependent colorimetric shift. In addition, they are also useful for selective intracellular staining of lysosomes and early endosomes via subtle changes in fluorescence emission. Such nanoparticles combine efficient cellular uptake with a pH-responsive Nile Blue dye label to produce a highly versatile dual capability probe. This is in marked contrast to small molecule dyes, which are usually poorly uptaken by cells, frequently exhibit cytotoxicity, and are characterized by intracellular distributions invariably dictated by their hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance.

  9. Nile Blue-Based Nanosized pH Sensors for Simultaneous Far-Red and Near-Infrared Live Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diblock copolymer vesicles are tagged with pH-responsive Nile Blue-based labels and used as a new type of pH-responsive colorimetric/fluorescent biosensor for far-red and near-infrared imaging of live cells. The diblock copolymer vesicles described herein are based on poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine-block-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) [PMPC-PDPA]: the biomimetic PMPC block is known to facilitate rapid cell uptake for a wide range of cell lines, while the PDPA block constitutes the pH-responsive component that enables facile vesicle self-assembly in aqueous solution. These biocompatible vesicles can be utilized to detect interstitial hypoxic/acidic regions in a tumor model via a pH-dependent colorimetric shift. In addition, they are also useful for selective intracellular staining of lysosomes and early endosomes via subtle changes in fluorescence emission. Such nanoparticles combine efficient cellular uptake with a pH-responsive Nile Blue dye label to produce a highly versatile dual capability probe. This is in marked contrast to small molecule dyes, which are usually poorly uptaken by cells, frequently exhibit cytotoxicity, and are characterized by intracellular distributions invariably dictated by their hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance. PMID:24001153

  10. Life situation and identity among single older home-living people: A phenomenological–hermeneutic study

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Ulrika; Söderhamn, Olle

    2012-01-01

    Being able to continue living in their own home as long as possible is the general preference for many older people, and this is also in line with the public policy in the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of self-care and health for perception of life situation and identity among single-living older individuals in rural areas in southern Norway. Eleven older persons with a mean age of 78 years were interviewed and encouraged to narrate their self-care and health experiences. The interviews were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a phenomenological–hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The findings are presented as a naïve reading, an inductive structural analysis characterized by two main themes; i.e., “being able to do” and “being able to be”, and a comprehensive interpretation. The life situation of the interviewed single-living older individuals in rural areas in southern Norway was interpreted as inevitable, appropriate and meaningful. Their identity was constituted by their freedom and self-chosen actions in their personal contexts. The overall impression was that independence and the ability to control and govern their own life in accordance with needs and preferences were ultimate goals for the study participants. PMID:22848230

  11. Miniature fiber optic spectrometer-based quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurement in single living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Liuying; Zhang, Jianwei; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Tongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Spectral measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), spFRET, is a widely used FRET quantification method in living cells today. We set up a spectrometer-microscope platform that consists of a miniature fiber optic spectrometer and a widefield fluorescence microscope for the spectral measurement of absolute FRET efficiency (E) and acceptor-to-donor concentration ratio (RC) in single living cells. The microscope was used for guiding cells and the spectra were simultaneously detected by the miniature fiber optic spectrometer. Moreover, our platform has independent excitation and emission controllers, so different excitations can share the same emission channel. In addition, we developed a modified spectral FRET quantification method (mlux-FRET) for the multiple donors and multiple acceptors FRET construct (mD˜nA) sample, and we also developed a spectra-based 2-channel acceptor-sensitized FRET quantification method (spE-FRET). We implemented these modified FRET quantification methods on our platform to measure the absolute E and RC values of tandem constructs with different acceptor/donor stoichiometries in single living Huh-7 cells.

  12. Two-Color STED Microscopy of Living Synapses Using A Single Laser-Beam Pair

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Nadrigny, Fabien; Willig, Katrin I.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Nägerl, U. Valentin

    2011-01-01

    The advent of superresolution microscopy has opened up new research opportunities into dynamic processes at the nanoscale inside living biological specimens. This is particularly true for synapses, which are very small, highly dynamic, and embedded in brain tissue. Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, a recently developed laser-scanning technique, has been shown to be well suited for imaging living synapses in brain slices using yellow fluorescent protein as a single label. However, it would be highly desirable to be able to image presynaptic boutons and postsynaptic spines, which together form synapses, using two different fluorophores. As STED microscopy uses separate laser beams for fluorescence excitation and quenching, incorporation of multicolor imaging for STED is more difficult than for conventional light microscopy. Although two-color schemes exist for STED microscopy, these approaches have several drawbacks due to their complexity, cost, and incompatibility with common labeling strategies and fluorophores. Therefore, we set out to develop a straightforward method for two-color STED microscopy that permits the use of popular green-yellow fluorescent labels such as green fluorescent protein, yellow fluorescent protein, Alexa Fluor 488, and calcein green. Our new (to our knowledge) method is based on a single-excitation/STED laser-beam pair to simultaneously excite and quench pairs of these fluorophores, whose signals can be separated by spectral detection and linear unmixing. We illustrate the potential of this approach by two-color superresolution time-lapse imaging of axonal boutons and dendritic spines in living organotypic brain slices. PMID:22098754

  13. Life situation and identity among single older home-living people: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study.

    PubMed

    Dale, Bjørg; Söderhamn, Ulrika; Söderhamn, Olle

    2012-01-01

    Being able to continue living in their own home as long as possible is the general preference for many older people, and this is also in line with the public policy in the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of self-care and health for perception of life situation and identity among single-living older individuals in rural areas in southern Norway. Eleven older persons with a mean age of 78 years were interviewed and encouraged to narrate their self-care and health experiences. The interviews were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The findings are presented as a naïve reading, an inductive structural analysis characterized by two main themes; i.e., "being able to do" and "being able to be", and a comprehensive interpretation. The life situation of the interviewed single-living older individuals in rural areas in southern Norway was interpreted as inevitable, appropriate and meaningful. Their identity was constituted by their freedom and self-chosen actions in their personal contexts. The overall impression was that independence and the ability to control and govern their own life in accordance with needs and preferences were ultimate goals for the study participants.

  14. Hepatic cavernous hemangioma: diagnosis with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red cells and single-photon emission CT

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, R.I.; Friedman, A.C.; Maurer, A.H.; Radecki, P.D.; Caroline, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    During the performance of high-resolution real-time abdominal sonography, small echogenic hepatic masses are frequently discovered. A second imaging test to confirm the suspected diagnosis of hemangioma is often required. Planar labeled red-cell imaging will often not detect hemangiomas smaller than 3 cm. We studied 14 patients with labeled red-cell scintigraphy and single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Six hemangiomas were diagnosed by SPECT that would have been missed by planar imaging alone. All six were smaller than 2.5 cm. With the addition of SPECT, labeled red-cell scintigraphy has specificity and sensitivity that make it at least as reliable as dynamic CT for the noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic cavernous hemangioma.

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging in Living Drosophila Embryos with Reflected Light-Sheet Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Greiss, Ferdinand; Deligiannaki, Myrto; Jung, Christophe; Gaul, Ulrike; Braun, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, single-fluorophore imaging is obstructed by high background. To achieve a signal/noise ratio conducive to single-molecule imaging, we adapted reflected light-sheet microscopy (RLSM) to image highly opaque late-stage Drosophila embryos. Alignment steps were modified by means of commercially available microprisms attached to standard coverslips. We imaged a member of the septate-junction complex that was used to outline the three-dimensional epidermal structures of Drosophila embryos. Furthermore, we show freely diffusing single 10 kDa Dextran molecules conjugated to one to two Alexa647 dyes inside living embryos. We demonstrate that Dextran diffuses quickly (∼6.4 μm2/s) in free space and obeys directional movement within the epidermal tissue (∼0.1 μm2/s). Our single-particle-tracking results are supplemented by imaging the endosomal marker Rab5-GFP and by earlier reports on the spreading of morphogens and vesicles in multicellular organisms. The single-molecule results suggest that RLSM will be helpful in studying single molecules or complexes in multicellular organisms. PMID:26910430

  16. The pregnancy rate and live birth rate after kidney transplantation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Santori, G; Fazio, F; Valente, U

    2012-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation recipients live longer and have better quality of life than patients on dialysis. Hypothalamic gonadal dysfunction in females who have ESRD may be reversed within the first few months after kidney transplantation, such as the ability to have children. Despite thousands of successful pregnancies in transplantation recipients, there is limited information about it. In this study, we evaluated the pregnancy rates and live birth rates in women (n = 133) who underwent kidney transplantation in our center from 1983 to 2010. Recipients of a second kidney transplantation and recipients of multiorgan transplantations were excluded. We observed 33 pregnancies with 11 live births (33.3%), 12 spontaneous abortions (36.36%), and 10 therapeutic abortions (30.3%). The pregnancy rate was 18%. The live birth rate was 33.3%. Therapeutic abortions were 36.3%, and the pregnancies resulting in fetal loss were 30.3%. The pregnancies were identified in 32 women. The majority of women (n = 32; 96.9%) had a single pregnancy, whereas 1 woman (3.1%) had two pregnancies. In our series, the pregnancy rates for kidney transplantation recipients were markedly lower and decreased more rapidly than those reported in the general population.

  17. Comparable clinical outcomes and live births after single vitrified-warmed and fresh blastocyst transfer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guixue; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Hong; Shu, Jinhui; Gan, Xianyou; Wu, Fangrong; Deng, Xihe

    2012-11-01

    Selective single-blastocyst transfer (SBT) in fresh cycles has been effective in reducing multiple pregnancies. However, we do not know whether this successful strategy of fresh transfer cycles is suitable for cryopreserved cycles. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility and value of SBT in vitrified-warmed cycles. Clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) was similar with vitrified and fresh SBT (46.61% versus 52.15% respectively). Of the pregnant patients, monozygotic twin, miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy rates were similar with vitrified and fresh SBT. For the newborns, no significant difference was observed in live birth, low birthweight, premature delivery and birth defects rates between vitrified and fresh SBT. With respect to the quality of transferred blastocysts (from BB to AA), a similar CPR and miscarriage rate was obtained for both vitrified and fresh SBT when a similar blastocyst cohort graded ≥ 3BB was transferred. The data show that vitrified SBT is an effective means of reducing multiple pregnancy and that comparable clinical outcomes and live births are achieved if single blastocysts graded ≥ 3BB are transferred for both vitrified and fresh SBT. These data should encourage clinics to evaluate their embryo transfer policy and adopt vitrified SBT as everyday practice. Selective single-blastocyst transfer in fresh cycles has been an effective method to reduce the multiple pregnancies. However, due to a lack of adequate studies, we do not know whether this successful strategy in fresh transfer cycles is suitable in cryopreserved cycles. The present study was undertaken to explore the feasibility and value of single-blastocyst transfer in vitrified-warmed cycles. We found that single-blastocyst transfer in vitrified-warmed cycles is an effective means of reducing multiple pregnancy, and comparable clinical outcomes and live births were achieved if single blastocysts graded ≥ 3BB were transferred for both vitrified-warmed and fresh

  18. Perception of color emotions for single colors in red-green defective observers.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiko; Inoue, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that inherited red-green color deficiency, which involves both the protan and deutan deficiency types, is common in men. For red-green defective observers, some reddish colors appear desaturated and brownish, unlike those seen by normal observers. Despite its prevalence, few studies have investigated the effects that red-green color deficiency has on the psychological properties of colors (color emotions). The current study investigated the influence of red-green color deficiency on the following six color emotions: cleanliness, freshness, hardness, preference, warmth, and weight. Specifically, this study aimed to: (1) reveal differences between normal and red-green defective observers in rating patterns of six color emotions; (2) examine differences in color emotions related to the three cardinal channels in human color vision; and (3) explore relationships between color emotions and color naming behavior. Thirteen men and 10 women with normal vision and 13 men who were red-green defective performed both a color naming task and an emotion rating task with 32 colors from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP). Results revealed noticeable differences in the cleanliness and hardness ratings between the normal vision observers, particularly in women, and red-green defective observers, which appeared mainly for colors in the orange to cyan range, and in the preference and warmth ratings for colors with cyan and purple hues. Similarly, naming errors also mainly occurred in the cyan colors. A regression analysis that included the three cone-contrasts (i.e., red-green, blue-yellow, and luminance) as predictors significantly accounted for variability in color emotion ratings for the red-green defective observers as much as the normal individuals. Expressly, for warmth ratings, the weight of the red-green opponent channel was significantly lower in color defective observers than in normal participants. In addition, the analyses for individual warmth ratings in

  19. Perception of color emotions for single colors in red-green defective observers

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that inherited red-green color deficiency, which involves both the protan and deutan deficiency types, is common in men. For red-green defective observers, some reddish colors appear desaturated and brownish, unlike those seen by normal observers. Despite its prevalence, few studies have investigated the effects that red-green color deficiency has on the psychological properties of colors (color emotions). The current study investigated the influence of red-green color deficiency on the following six color emotions: cleanliness, freshness, hardness, preference, warmth, and weight. Specifically, this study aimed to: (1) reveal differences between normal and red-green defective observers in rating patterns of six color emotions; (2) examine differences in color emotions related to the three cardinal channels in human color vision; and (3) explore relationships between color emotions and color naming behavior. Thirteen men and 10 women with normal vision and 13 men who were red-green defective performed both a color naming task and an emotion rating task with 32 colors from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP). Results revealed noticeable differences in the cleanliness and hardness ratings between the normal vision observers, particularly in women, and red-green defective observers, which appeared mainly for colors in the orange to cyan range, and in the preference and warmth ratings for colors with cyan and purple hues. Similarly, naming errors also mainly occurred in the cyan colors. A regression analysis that included the three cone-contrasts (i.e., red-green, blue-yellow, and luminance) as predictors significantly accounted for variability in color emotion ratings for the red-green defective observers as much as the normal individuals. Expressly, for warmth ratings, the weight of the red-green opponent channel was significantly lower in color defective observers than in normal participants. In addition, the analyses for individual warmth ratings in

  20. Live imaging of single nuclear pores reveals unique assembly kinetics and mechanism in interphase

    PubMed Central

    Dultz, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    In metazoa, new nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) form at two different cell cycle stages: at the end of mitosis concomitant with the reformation of the nuclear envelope and during interphase. However, the mechanisms of these assembly processes may differ. In this study, we apply high resolution live cell microscopy to analyze the dynamics of single NPCs in living mammalian cells during interphase. We show that nuclear growth and NPC assembly are correlated and occur at a constant rate throughout interphase. By analyzing the kinetics of individual NPC assembly events, we demonstrate that they are initiated by slow accumulation of the membrane nucleoporin Pom121 followed by the more rapid association of the soluble NPC subcomplex Nup107–160. This inverse order of recruitment and the overall much slower kinetics compared with postmitotic NPC assembly support the conclusion that the two processes occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. PMID:20876277

  1. Optical tweezers for measuring the interaction of the two single red blood cells in flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) is an intrinsic property of blood, which has direct effect on the blood viscosity and therefore affects overall the blood circulation throughout the body. It is attracting interest for the research in both fundamental science and clinical application. Despite of the intensive research, the aggregation mechanism is remaining not fully clear. Recent advances in methods allowed measuring the interaction between single RBCs in a well-defined configuration leading the better understanding of the mechanism of the process. However the most of the studies were made on the static cells. Thus, the measurements in flow mimicking conditions are missing. In this work, we aim to study the interaction of two RBCs in the flow conditions. We demonstrate the characterization of the cells interaction strength (or flow tolerance) by measuring the flow velocity to be applied to separate two aggregated cells trapped by double channel optical tweezers in a desired configuration. The age-separated cells were used for this study. The obtained values for the minimum flow velocities needed to separate the two cells were found to be 78.9 +/- 6.1 μm/s and 110 +/- 13 μm/s for old and young cells respectively. The data obtained is in agreement with the observations reported by other authors. The significance of our results is in ability for obtaining a comprehensible and absolute physical value characterizing the cells interaction in flow conditions (not like the Aggregation Index measured in whole blood suspensions by other techniques, which is some abstract parameter)

  2. Rapid measurement of molecular transport and interaction inside living cells using single plane illumination.

    PubMed

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Stakic, Milka; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-11-14

    The ability to measure biomolecular dynamics within cells and tissues is very important to understand fundamental physiological processes including cell adhesion, signalling, movement, division or metabolism. Usually, such information is obtained using particle tracking methods or single point fluctuation spectroscopy. We show that image mean square displacement analysis, applied to single plane illumination microscopy data, is a faster and more efficient way of unravelling rapid, three-dimensional molecular transport and interaction within living cells. From a stack of camera images recorded in seconds, the type of dynamics such as free diffusion, flow or binding can be identified and quantified without being limited by current camera frame rates. Also, light exposure levels are very low and the image mean square displacement method does not require calibration of the microscope point spread function. To demonstrate the advantages of our approach, we quantified the dynamics of several different proteins in the cyto- and nucleoplasm of living cells. For example, from a single measurement, we were able to determine the diffusion coefficient of free clathrin molecules as well as the transport velocity of clathrin-coated vesicles involved in endocytosis. Used in conjunction with dual view detection, we further show how protein-protein interactions can be quantified.

  3. A single-dose live-attenuated vaccine prevents Zika virus pregnancy transmission and testis damage.

    PubMed

    Shan, Chao; Muruato, Antonio E; Jagger, Brett W; Richner, Justin; Nunes, Bruno T D; Medeiros, Daniele B A; Xie, Xuping; Nunes, Jannyce G C; Morabito, Kaitlyn M; Kong, Wing-Pui; Pierson, Theodore C; Barrett, Alan D; Weaver, Scott C; Rossi, Shannan L; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Graham, Barney S; Diamond, Michael S; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2017-09-22

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause congenital abnormities or fetal demise. The persistence of Zika virus in the male reproductive system poses a risk of sexual transmission. Here we demonstrate that live-attenuated Zika virus vaccine candidates containing deletions in the 3' untranslated region of the Zika virus genome (ZIKV-3'UTR-LAV) prevent viral transmission during pregnancy and testis damage in mice, as well as infection of nonhuman primates. After a single-dose vaccination, pregnant mice challenged with Zika virus at embryonic day 6 and evaluated at embryonic day 13 show markedly diminished levels of viral RNA in maternal, placental, and fetal tissues. Vaccinated male mice challenged with Zika virus were protected against testis infection, injury, and oligospermia. A single immunization of rhesus macaques elicited a rapid and robust antibody response, conferring complete protection upon challenge. Furthermore, the ZIKV-3'UTR-LAV vaccine candidates have a desirable safety profile. These results suggest that further development of ZIKV-3'UTR-LAV is warranted for humans.Zika virus infection can result in congenital disorders and cause disease in adults, and there is currently no approved vaccine. Here Shan et al. show that a single dose of a live-attenuated Zika vaccine prevents infection, testis damage and transmission to the fetus during pregnancy in different animal models.

  4. Rapid Measurement of Molecular Transport and Interaction inside Living Cells Using Single Plane Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Stakic, Milka; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The ability to measure biomolecular dynamics within cells and tissues is very important to understand fundamental physiological processes including cell adhesion, signalling, movement, division or metabolism. Usually, such information is obtained using particle tracking methods or single point fluctuation spectroscopy. We show that image mean square displacement analysis, applied to single plane illumination microscopy data, is a faster and more efficient way of unravelling rapid, three-dimensional molecular transport and interaction within living cells. From a stack of camera images recorded in seconds, the type of dynamics such as free diffusion, flow or binding can be identified and quantified without being limited by current camera frame rates. Also, light exposure levels are very low and the image mean square displacement method does not require calibration of the microscope point spread function. To demonstrate the advantages of our approach, we quantified the dynamics of several different proteins in the cyto- and nucleoplasm of living cells. For example, from a single measurement, we were able to determine the diffusion coefficient of free clathrin molecules as well as the transport velocity of clathrin-coated vesicles involved in endocytosis. Used in conjunction with dual view detection, we further show how protein-protein interactions can be quantified. PMID:25394360

  5. Visualizing protein-DNA interactions in live bacterial cells using photoactivated single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Stephan; Sherratt, David J; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2014-03-10

    Protein-DNA interactions are at the heart of many fundamental cellular processes. For example, DNA replication, transcription, repair, and chromosome organization are governed by DNA-binding proteins that recognize specific DNA structures or sequences. In vitro experiments have helped to generate detailed models for the function of many types of DNA-binding proteins, yet, the exact mechanisms of these processes and their organization in the complex environment of the living cell remain far less understood. We recently introduced a method for quantifying DNA-repair activities in live Escherichia coli cells using Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) combined with single-molecule tracking. Our general approach identifies individual DNA-binding events by the change in the mobility of a single protein upon association with the chromosome. The fraction of bound molecules provides a direct quantitative measure for the protein activity and abundance of substrates or binding sites at the single-cell level. Here, we describe the concept of the method and demonstrate sample preparation, data acquisition, and data analysis procedures.

  6. Biliary complications after right lobe living donor liver transplantation: a single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Yaprak, Onur; Dayangac, Murat; Akyildiz, Murat; Demirbas, Tolga; Guler, Necdet; Bulutcu, Fisun; Bassullu, Nuray; Akun, Elif; Yuzer, Yildiray; Tokat, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Background Biliary complications that developed after right lobe liver transplantation from living donors were studied in a single centre. Methods From 2004 to 2010, 200 consecutive living donor right lobe liver transplantations were performed. The database was evaluated retrospectively. Biliary complications were diagnosed according to clinical, biochemical and radiological tests. The number of biliary ducts in the transplanted graft, the surgical techniques used for anastomosis, biliary strictures and bile leakage rates were analysed. Results Of a total of 200 grafts, 117 invloved a single bile duct, 77 had two bile ducts and in six grafts there were three bile ducts. In 166 transplants, the anastomosis was performed as a single duct to duct, in 21 transplants double duct to ducts, in one transplant, three duct to ducts and in 12 transplants as a Roux-en-Y reconstruction. In all, 40 bile leakages (20%) and 17 biliary strictures (8.5%) were observed in 49 patients resulting in a total of 57 biliary complications (28.5%). Seventeen patients were re-operated (12 as a result of bile leakages and five owing to biliary strictures). Conclusion Identification of more than one biliary orifice in the graft resulted in an increase in the complication rates. In grafts containing multiple orifices, performing multiple duct-to-duct (DD) or Roux-en-Y anastomoses led to a lower number of complications. PMID:22151451

  7. Red wine ingestion prevents microparticle formation after a single high-fat meal--a crossover study in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Daniel; Jelich, Uta; Dacanay-Schwarz, Roland; Mügge, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    : The postprandial state after a high-fat meal favors endothelial dysfunction and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Little is known about the course of circulating microparticles (MPs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) after the consumption of a high-fat meal. Both are important for the maintenance and function of endothelial cells. : Ten healthy males consumed a meal with French fries and hot pork sausage. In a crossover design (4 weeks, 1 meal per week) they coingested a drink (mineral water, coke, red wine, liquor). Before and 1 and 2 hours after the meal, blood samples were drawn and endothelial function (expressed as reactive hyperemia index) was measured by a peripheral arterial tone technology. Number of EPCs, total MPs, and endothelial-derived MPs were measured using flow cytometry. : Reactive hyperemia index decreased by about 5% in those tests drinking mineral water, and by about 20% in the coke group, but remained unaffected in the red wine and liquor group. The number of EPCs were not significantly affected. The number of total and endothelial-derived MPs increased after a single meal, most in the coke group (increase by about 62%), and less in the red wine group (by about 5%). : A single high-fat meal deteriorates endothelial function, associated with a significant increase in circulating MPs. These changes were modified by the drink coindigested to the meal. The postprandial state was getting worse when a cola was consumed, but less hazardous when red wine was consumed.

  8. Simultaneous Live Cell Imaging Using Dual FRET Sensors with a Single Excitation Light

    PubMed Central

    Niino, Yusuke; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins is a powerful tool for visualization of signal transduction in living cells, and recently, some strategies for imaging of dual FRET pairs in a single cell have been reported. However, these necessitate alteration of excitation light between two different wavelengths to avoid the spectral overlap, resulting in sequential detection with a lag time. Thus, to follow fast signal dynamics or signal changes in highly motile cells, a single-excitation dual-FRET method should be required. Here we reported this by using four-color imaging with a single excitation light and subsequent linear unmixing to distinguish fluorescent proteins. We constructed new FRET sensors with Sapphire/RFP to combine with CFP/YFP, and accomplished simultaneous imaging of cAMP and cGMP in single cells. We confirmed that signal amplitude of our dual FRET measurement is comparable to of conventional single FRET measurement. Finally, we demonstrated to monitor both intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in highly motile cardiac myocytes. To cancel out artifacts caused by the movement of the cell, this method expands the applicability of the combined use of dual FRET sensors for cell samples with high motility. PMID:19551140

  9. Live Single-Cell Plant Hormone Analysis by Video-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takafumi; Miyakawa, Shinya; Esaki, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Hajime; Masujima, Tsutomu; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Seo, Mitsunori

    2015-07-01

    Studies have indicated that endogenous concentrations of plant hormones are regulated very locally within plants. To understand the mechanisms underlying hormone-mediated physiological processes, it is indispensable to know the exact hormone concentrations at cellular levels. In the present study, we established a system to determine levels of ABA and jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) from single cells. Samples taken from a cell of Vicia faba leaves using nano-electrospray ionization (ESI) tips under a microscope were directly introduced into mass spectrometers by infusion and subjected to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. Stable isotope-labeled [D(6)]ABA or [(13)C(6)]JA-Ile was used as an internal standard to compensate ionization efficiencies, which determine the amount of ions introduced into mass spectrometers. We detected ABA and JA-Ile from single cells of water- and wound-stressed leaves, whereas they were almost undetectable in non-stressed single cells. The levels of ABA and JA-Ile found in the single-cell analysis were compared with levels found by analysis of purified extracts with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These results demonstrated that stress-induced accumulation of ABA and JA-Ile could be monitored from living single cells.

  10. Aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of insulin receptors in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Minhyeok; Kwon, Mijin; Kim, Sooran; Yunn, Na-Oh; Kim, Daehyung; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-05-01

    We present a single-molecule imaging platform that quantitatively explores the spatiotemporal dynamics of individual insulin receptors in living cells. Modified DNA aptamers that specifically recognize insulin receptors (IRs) with a high affinity were selected through the SELEX process. Using quantum dot-labeled aptamers, we successfully imaged and analyzed the diffusive motions of individual IRs in the plasma membranes of a variety of cell lines (HIR, HEK293, HepG2). We further explored the cholesterol-dependent movement of IRs to address whether cholesterol depletion interferes with IRs and found that cholesterol depletion of the plasma membrane by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduces the mobility of IRs. The aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of IRs will provide better understanding of insulin signal transduction through the dynamics study of IRs in the plasma membrane.

  11. The lived experiences of single Taiwanese mothers being resilient after divorce.

    PubMed

    Hong, Rei-Mei; Welch, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The lived experiences of being resilient as described by 13 single Taiwanese mothers after divorce was the focus of this study. A descriptive phenomenological approach to inquiry was the theoretical framework underpinning the study. Information was gathered through two in-depth face-to-face digitally recorded interviews with each participant. Each of the participants had suffered from depression. For the analysis of the participants' transcripts of interview the authors used Colaizzi's method. Four themes emerged from the analysis process: having faith in God, bending with the ebb and flow of daily life, finding strength in the support and friendship of others, and new found freedom and hope for the future. Findings of this study have the potential to enhance understanding of the mental health needs of single mothers and their children in the provision of holistic health care delivery.

  12. Living with an Old Red Dwarf: X-ray-UV Emissions of Kapteyn’s Star - Effects of X-UV radiation on Habitable Zone Planets hosted by old Red Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Durbin, Allyn J.; Engle, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Red dwarfs (dM) stars make up over 75% of the local stellar population and a significant fraction (~40-50%) are older than the Sun. Because of the high frequency of red dwarfs and their longevity (> 50 Gyr), there is a greater possibility of more advanced life in red dwarf-exoplanet systems. MEarths, UVES, SDSS-III, and the upcoming TESS mission are some surveys that are targeting red dwarfs in the search for hosted potentially habitalble planets. As part of Villanova's 'Living with a Red Dwarf' program, we have obtained HST-COS Ultraviolet spectra (1150-3000A) and Chandra X-ray observations of Kapteyn's star (GJ 191; M1 V, V = 8.85 mag , d = 12.76 +/- 0.05 ly). Kapyteyn's Star is important for the study of old red dwarfs because it is the nearest (Pop II) halo star with a radial velocity of +245.2 km/s and an estimated age of 11.2 +/-0.9 Gyrs. Recently Kapteyn's Star was found to host two super-Earth mass planets - one of these is orbiting inside the star's Habitable Zone (Anglada-Escude' 2014: MNRAS 443, L89). In our program, Kapteyn's star is the oldest red dwarf and as such serves as an anchor for our age, rotation, and activity relations. The spectra obtained from HST/COS provide one of the cleanest measurements of the important HI Lyman-alpha 1215.6 A emission flux for red dwarfs. This is due to the large Doppler shift from the high radial velocity, separating the stellar Ly-alpha emission from by the Ly-alpha ISM and local geo-coronal sources. These observations further provide calibrations at the old age/low rotation/low activity extremes for our relations. As the nearest and brightest old red dwarf star, Kapteyn's Star also provides insights into its magnetic properties to investigae coronal x-ray and UV emission for the large population of old, slowly rotating red dwarf stars. Kapteyn's star also serves as a proxy for the numerous metal-poor old disk - Pop II M dwarfs by providing information about X-UV emissions. This information is crucial for

  13. Use of co-loaded Fluo-3 and Fura Red fluorescent indicators for studying the cytosolic Ca(2+)concentrations distribution in living plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Walczysko, P; Wagner, E; Albrechtová, J T

    2000-07-01

    A method for visualisation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] distribution was applied to living plant tissue. A mixture of the fluorescent probes Fluo-3 and Fura Red was used. The emitted fluorescence was scanned simultaneously in two channels with a laser-scanning confocal microscope and rationing was performed. The homogeneity of the Fluo-3/Fura Red concentration ratio throughout the tissue after AM-ester loading was proven. In vitro calibration permitted conversion of Fluo-3/Fura Red fluorescence ratios to [Ca(2+)] values. Apparent K(D)of 286 nM, R(min)of 0.43 and R(max)of 18 were calculated. The in vivo determination of extreme ratio values was performed by permeabilizing the plasmalemma for Ca(2+)with a ionophore and manipulating the extracellular [Ca(2+)]. The resultant R(minv)of 1.33 and R(maxv)of 2.69 for vegetative apices, and R(mini)of 1.26 and R(maxi)of 3.45 for apices induced to flowering, suggested incomplete equalization of extra- and intracellular Ca(2+)levels in these experiments. In Chenopodium rubrum, the cytosolic [Ca(2+)] patterns of apical tissue obtained using Fluo-3 and Fura Red were significantly different between vegetative apices and apices after photoperiodic flower induction. This methodological approach may also be helpful for studying cytosolic [Ca(2+)] distribution in other living plant tissues. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  14. Regulation of RNA polymerase II activation by histone acetylation in single living cells.

    PubMed

    Stasevich, Timothy J; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Sato, Yuko; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Tokunaga, Makio; Nagase, Takahiro; Nozaki, Naohito; McNally, James G; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-12-11

    In eukaryotic cells, post-translational histone modifications have an important role in gene regulation. Starting with early work on histone acetylation, a variety of residue-specific modifications have now been linked to RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) activity, but it remains unclear if these markers are active regulators of transcription or just passive byproducts. This is because studies have traditionally relied on fixed cell populations, meaning temporal resolution is limited to minutes at best, and correlated factors may not actually be present in the same cell at the same time. Complementary approaches are therefore needed to probe the dynamic interplay of histone modifications and RNAP2 with higher temporal resolution in single living cells. Here we address this problem by developing a system to track residue-specific histone modifications and RNAP2 phosphorylation in living cells by fluorescence microscopy. This increases temporal resolution to the tens-of-seconds range. Our single-cell analysis reveals histone H3 lysine-27 acetylation at a gene locus can alter downstream transcription kinetics by as much as 50%, affecting two temporally separate events. First acetylation enhances the search kinetics of transcriptional activators, and later the acetylation accelerates the transition of RNAP2 from initiation to elongation. Signatures of the latter can be found genome-wide using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing. We argue that this regulation leads to a robust and potentially tunable transcriptional response.

  15. PaxVax CVD 103-HgR single-dose live oral cholera vaccine.

    PubMed

    Levine, Myron M; Chen, Wilbur H; Kaper, James B; Lock, Michael; Danzig, Lisa; Gurwith, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Cholera remains a problem in developing countries and a risk for travelers. Hypochlorhydria, blood group O, cardiac and renal disease increase the risk of developing cholera gravis. Oral vaccines containing inactivated Vibrio cholerae and requiring two doses are available in some countries. No cholera vaccine had been available for U.S. travelers for decades until 2016 when CVD 103-HgR (VAXCHORA™), an oral live attenuated vaccine, was licensed by the U.S. FDA. Areas covered: Enduring protection following wild-type cholera provided the rationale to develop a single-dose live oral vaccine. CVD 103-HgR is well-tolerated and protects against cholera caused by V. cholerae O1 of either serotype (Inaba, Ogawa) and biotype (El Tor, Classical). Since 90% vaccine efficacy is evident 10 days post-ingestion of a single dose, CVD 103-HgR can rapidly protect travelers. Vibriocidal antibody seroconversion correlates with protection; >90% of U.S. adult (including elderly) vaccinees seroconvert. The U.S. Public Health Service's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends CVD 103-HgR for U.S. travelers to areas of ongoing cholera transmission. Expert commentary: Next steps include evaluations in children, post-licensure safety and effectiveness monitoring, diminishing cold chain constraints, optimizing a 'high-dose' formulation for developing countries, and diminishing/eliminating the need for water to administer a dose.

  16. Live cell and immuno-labeling techniques to study gravitational effects on single plant cells.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The constant force of gravity plays a primordial role in the ontogeny of all living organisms. Plants, for example, develop their roots and shoots in accordance with the direction of the gravitational vector. Any change in the magnitude and/or the direction of gravity has an important impact on the development of tissues and cells. In order to understand how the gravitational force affects plant cell growth and differentiation, we established two complementary experimental procedures with which the effect of hyper-gravity on single plant cell development can be assessed. The single model cell system we used is the pollen tube or male gametophyte which, because of its rapid growth behavior, is known for its instant response to external stresses. The physiological response of the pollen tube can be assessed in a quantitative manner based on changes in the composition and spatial distribution of its cell wall components and in the precisely defined pattern of its very dynamic cytoplasmic streaming. Here, we provide a detailed description of the steps required for the immuno-localization of various cell wall components using microwave-assisted techniques and we explain how live imaging of the intracellular traffic can be achieved under hyper-gravity conditions.

  17. Successful comeback of the single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Effective and easy to administer cholera vaccines are in need more than ever, for at risk populations and travellers alike. In many parts of the world cholera is still endemic, causing outbreaks and constituting repeatedly serious public health problems. The oral live cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR (Orochol, Mutachol), the first genetically modified organism (GMO) used as vaccine, was in its time (launched 1993, Switzerland) the ideal cholera vaccine: single-dose, protective efficacy of 80-100% against moderate to severe cholera, acting within 8 days and exhibiting excellent safety, indiscernible from placebo. However, there were strong headwinds: In the 1990s the indication for cholera vaccines was generally downplayed by experts and in 1997 the European Commission called for a moratorium of GMOs which blocked the registration in the European Union. Thus, demand for this vaccine remained low and in 2003 it was taken off the market for economic reasons. After a decade in obscurity it (Vaxchora) has resurfaced again, now produced in the U.S. and equipped with a U.S. FDA license (June 10, 2016). What had happened? This commentary gives a critical account of an almost unbelievable string of misadventures, emerging adverse circumstances and man-made failures which nearly killed this single-dose live oral cholera vaccine. The good news is that patience and persistence lead to success in the end, allowing good science to prevail for the benefit of those in need.

  18. Visualizing odorant receptor trafficking in living cells down to the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Jacquier, V.; Prummer, M.; Segura, J.-M.; Pick, H.; Vogel, H.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the importance of trafficking for regulating G protein-coupled receptor signaling, for many members of the seven transmembrane helix protein family, such as odorant receptors, little is known about this process in live cells. Here, the complete life cycle of the human odorant receptor OR17-40 was directly monitored in living cells by ensemble and single-molecule imaging, using a double-labeling strategy. While the overall, intracellular trafficking of the receptor was visualized continuously by using a GFP tag, selective imaging of cell surface receptors was achieved by pulse-labeling an acyl carrier protein tag. We found that OR17-40 efficiently translocated to the plasma membrane only at low expression, whereas at higher biosynthesis the receptor accumulated in intracellular compartments. Receptors in the plasma membrane showed high turnover resulting from constitutive internalization along the clathrin pathway, even in the absence of ligand. Single-molecule microscopy allowed monitoring of the early, dynamic processes in odorant receptor signaling. Although mobile receptors initially diffused either freely or within domains of various sizes, binding of an agonist or an antagonist increased partitioning of receptors into small domains of ≈190 nm, which likely are precursors of clathrin-coated pits. The binding of a ligand, therefore, resulted in modulation of the continuous, constitutive internalization. After endocytosis, receptors were directed to early endosomes for recycling. This unique mechanism of continuous internalization and recycling of OR17-40 might be instrumental in allowing rapid recovery of odor perception. PMID:16980412

  19. Ultrafast Tracking of a Single Live Virion During the Invagination of a Cell Membrane.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yangang; Wang, Shaowen; Shan, Yuping; Zhang, Dinglin; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Shuheng; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Li, Guohui; Qin, Qiwei; Wang, Hongda

    2015-06-01

    The first step in most viral infections is the penetration of the cell membrane via endocytosis. However, the underlying mechanism of this important process has not been quantitatively characterized; for example, the velocity and force of a single virion during invagination remain unknown. Here, the endocytosis of a single live virion (Singapore grouper iridovirus, SGIV) through the apical membranes of a host cell is monitored by developing and using a novel ultrafast (at the microsecond level) tracking technique: force tracing. For the first time, these results unambiguously reveal that the maximum velocity during the cell entry of a single SGIV by membrane invagination is approximately 200 nm s(-1), the endocytic force is approximately 60.8 ± 18.5 pN, and the binding energy density increases with the engulfment depth. This report utilizing high temporospatial resolution (subnanometer and microsecond levels) approaches provides new insight into the dynamic process of viral infection via endocytosis and the mechanism of membrane invagination at the single-particle level. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G.; Stone, Howard A.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA. Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli. PMID:27555592

  1. Nanowires: Quantitative Probing of Cu(2+) Ions Naturally Present in Single Living Cells (Adv. Mater. 21/2016).

    PubMed

    Lee, Junho; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Pyo, Jaeyeon; Jung, Youngseob; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Je, Jung Ho

    2016-06-01

    Quantitative probing of the Cu(2+) ions naturally present in single living cells is accomplished by a probe made from a quantum-dot-embedded-nanowire waveguide. After inserting the active nanowire-based waveguide probe into single living cells, J. H. Je and co-workers directly observe photoluminescence (PL) quenching of the embedded quantum dots by the Cu(2+) ions diffused into the probe as described on page 4071. This results in quantitative measurement of intracellular Cu(2+) ions.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of terbinafine after single oral dose administration in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Bechert, Ursula; Christensen, J Mark; Poppenga, Robert; Fahmy, Sahar A; Redig, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    To determine pharmacokinetic parameters of orally administered terbinafine hydrochloride for potential treatment of aspergillosis in raptors, 10 adult red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) were used in single dose trials by using 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg doses with a 2-week washout period between trials. After administration of 15 mg/kg terbinafine, mean (+/- SD) plasma concentration peaked in approximately 5 hours at 0.3 +/- 0.24 microg/mL, whereas a 30 mg/kg dose resulted in peak mean (+/- SD) plasma concentration of 1.2 +/- 0.40 microg/mL in 3 hours and a 60 mg/kg dose resulted in mean (+/- SD) concentration of 2.0 +/- 0.75 microg/mL in 5 hours. The volume of distribution decreased with increasing doses, averaging 76.8 +/- 38.06 mL/kg for the 15 mg/kg dose and falling to 55.2 +/- 17.4 mL/kg for the 30 mg/kg dose. This suggests that terbinafine accumulated in deep tissues, limiting further distribution at higher doses. The harmonic mean (+/- SD) half-life was biphasic, with initial values of 14.7 +/- 6.67 hours, 17.5 +/- 8.7 hours, and 13.3 +/- 5.03 hours for 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg doses, respectively. A rapid first-elimination phase was followed by a slower second phase, and final elimination was estimated to be 161 +/- 78.2 and 147 +/- 65.6 hours for 15 and 30 mg/kg doses, respectively. Linearity was demonstrated for the area under the curve but not for peak plasma concentrations for the 3 doses used. Calculations based on pharmacokinetic parameter values indicated that a dosage of 22 mg/kg terbinafine q24h would result in steady-state trough plasma concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration of terbinafine (0.8-1.6 microg/mL). This dosage is recommended as a potential treatment option for aspergillosis in raptors. However, additional research is required to determine both treatment efficacy and safety.

  3. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  4. Single Molecule Detection in Living Biological Cells using Carbon Nanotube Optical Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nanoscale sensing elements offer promise for single molecule analyte detection in physically or biologically constrained environments. Molecular adsorption can be amplified via modulation of sharp singularities in the electronic density of states that arise from 1D quantum confinement [1]. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), as single molecule optical sensors [2-3], offer unique advantages such as photostable near-infrared (n-IR) emission for prolonged detection through biological media, single-molecule sensitivity and, nearly orthogonal optical modes for signal transduction that can be used to identify distinct classes of analytes. Selective binding to the SWNT surface is difficult to engineer [4]. In this lecture, we will briefly review the immerging field of fluorescent diagnostics using band gap emission from SWNT. In recent work, we demonstrate that even a single pair of SWNT provides at least four optical modes that can be modulated to uniquely fingerprint chemical agents by the degree to which they alter either the emission band intensity or wavelength. We validate this identification method in vitro by demonstrating detection and identification of six genotoxic analytes, including chemotherapeutic drugs and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are spectroscopically differentiated into four distinct classes. We also demonstrate single-molecule sensitivity in detecting hydrogen peroxide, one of the most common genotoxins and an important cellular signal. Finally, we employ our sensing and fingerprinting method of these analytes in real time within live 3T3 cells, demonstrating the first multiplexed optical detection from a nanoscale biosensor and the first label-free tool to optically discriminate between genotoxins. We will also discuss our recent efforts to fabricate biomedical sensors for real time detection of glucose and other important physiologically relevant analytes in-vivo. The response of embedded SWNT in a swellable hydrogel construct to

  5. Three-dimensional tracking of single secretory granules in live PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Xiong, Jun; Qu, Anlian; Xu, Tao

    2004-09-01

    Deconvolution wide-field fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking were used to study the three-dimensional mobility of single secretory granules in live PC12 cells. Acridine orange-labeled granules were found to travel primarily in random and caged diffusion, whereas only a small fraction of granules traveled in directed fashion. High K(+) stimulation increased significantly the percentage of granules traveling in directed fashion. By dividing granules into the near-membrane group (within 1 microm from the plasma membrane) and cytosolic group, we have revealed significant differences between these two groups of granules in their mobility. The mobility of these two groups of granules is also differentially affected by disruption of F-actin, suggesting different mechanisms are involved in the motion of the two groups of granules. Our results demonstrate that combined deconvolution and single-particle tracking may find its application in three-dimensional tracking of long-term motion of granules and elucidating the underlying mechanisms.

  6. Manipulation and Motion of Organelles and Single Molecules in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Metzler, Ralf; Ritter, Christine M; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B

    2017-03-08

    The biomolecule is among the most important building blocks of biological systems, and a full understanding of its function forms the scaffold for describing the mechanisms of higher order structures as organelles and cells. Force is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of biomolecular interactions driving many cellular processes. The forces on a molecular scale are exactly in the range that can be manipulated and probed with single molecule force spectroscopy. The natural environment of a biomolecule is inside a living cell, hence, this is the most relevant environment for probing their function. In vivo studies are, however, challenged by the complexity of the cell. In this review, we start with presenting relevant theoretical tools for analyzing single molecule data obtained in intracellular environments followed by a description of state-of-the art visualization techniques. The most commonly used force spectroscopy techniques, namely optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy, are described in detail, and their strength and limitations related to in vivo experiments are discussed. Finally, recent exciting discoveries within the field of in vivo manipulation and dynamics of single molecule and organelles are reviewed.

  7. Single Molecule Tracking and Localization of Mitochondrial Protein Complexes in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, Timo; Busch, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are the power plant of most non-green eukaryotic cells. An understanding of their function and regulation is only possible with the knowledge of the spatiotemporal dynamics of their proteins. Mitochondrial membrane proteins involved in diverse functions like protein import, cell respiration, metabolite transport, and mitochondrial morphology are mobile within membranes. Here, we provide a protocol for a superresolution fluorescence microscopy technique named tracking and localization microscopy (TALM) that allows for localization and diffusion analysis of single mitochondrial membrane proteins in situ in cell cultures. This noninvasive imaging technique is a useful tool to reveal the spatiotemporal organization of proteins in diverse mitochondrial membrane compartments in living cells. Proteins of interest are tagged with the HaloTag(®) and specifically labeled with functionalized rhodamine dyes. The method profits from low abundance of proteins and therefore works better with substoichiometric labeling of HaloTag®-tagged proteins. In particular, the use of photostable bright rhodamine dyes enables the specific tagging and localization of single molecules with a calculated precision below 20 nm and the recording of single trajectories.

  8. Diffusion dynamics of the Keap1–Cullin3 interaction in single live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Liam; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► We developed a quantitative FRAP-based system to study the Keap1–Cul3 interaction. ► We show that Keap1–EGFP and mCherry–Cul3 interact in single live cells. ► We used inducers which target distinct cysteine sensors of Keap1 and differ 4000-fold in potency. ► Inducers cause Nrf2 stabilization, nuclear translocation, and target gene expression. ► Inducers of four different types do not dissociate the Keap1–EGFP:mCherry–Cul3 complex. -- Abstract: Transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the expression of a network of genes encoding drug-detoxification, anti-inflammatory, and metabolic enzymes, as well as proteins involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis. Under basal conditions, Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) targets Nrf2 for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation via association with Cullin3 (Cul3)-based Rbx1 E3 ubiquitin ligase. Various small molecules (inducers) activate Nrf2 leading to upregulation of cytoprotective gene expression. Inducers chemically modify specific cysteine residues of Keap1 which ultimately loses its ability to target Nrf2 for degradation. Dissociation of the Keap1–Cul3 complex by inducers is one possible mechanism, but evidence in single live cells is lacking. To investigate the diffusion dynamics of the Keap1–Cul3 interaction and the effect of inducers, we developed a quantitative fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)-based system using Keap1–EGFP and mCherry–Cul3 fusion proteins. We show that Keap1–EGFP and mCherry–Cul3 interact in single live cells. Exposure for 1 h to small-molecule inducers of 4 different types, the oleanane triterpenoid CDDO, the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, the sulfoxythiocarbamate STCA, and the oxidant hydrogen peroxide which target distinct cysteine sensors within Keap1 with potencies which differ by nearly 4000-fold, does not dissociate the Keap1–Cul3 complex. As inducers cause conformational changes

  9. [Incidence of low birth weight among single live birth neonates and influencing factors in Shaanxi].

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiping; Zhang, Ruo; Li, Zhaoqing; Qu, Pengfei; Zhao, Yaling; Yan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    To analyze the incidence of low birth weight among single live birth neonates and identify the influencing factors in Shaanxi province. A questionnaire survey was conducted among the childbearing aged women selected through multi stage stratified random sampling in Shaanxi during 2010-2013, all of these childbearing aged women were in pregnancy or had definite pregnancy outcomes. A total of 28 164 childbearing aged women and their infants were investigated. The overall incidence of low birth weight among the single live birth neonates surveyed was 3.4% during 2010-2013 (4.1% in 2010, 4.4% in 2011, 3.1% in 2012, 2.6% in 2013, respectively). The incidence of the low birth weight was 3.8% in southern Shaanxi, 3.4% in northern Shaanxi and 3.2% in central area of Shaanxi. The incidence of the low birth weight was 2.5% in urban area and 3.6% in rural area. Compared with the low birth weight incidence of 2.6% in full-term infant, the low birth weight incidence was 32.0% in preterm infants. The results of logistic regression analysis suggested that being female infant (OR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.36-1.81), preterm delivery (OR=18.28, 95% CI: 15.23-21.96), lower educational level of mothers (OR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.06-1.52), antenatal care times <4 (compared with 4-7, OR=1.36, 95% CI: 1.14-1.63), antenatal care times ≥ 8 (compared with 4-7, OR=1.84, 95% CI: 1.48-2.29), gestational hypertension (OR=3.07, 95% CI: 2.12-4.43), being multipara (OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.03-1.41), taking no folic acid during pregnancy (OR=1.30, 95% CI: 1.12-1.52) were risk factors for the low birth weight of neonate. The incidence of low birth weight among single live birth neonates was in decline in Shaanxi. The incidence of the low birth weight was higher in rural area than in urban area. The incidence of the low birth weight was lower than national level. Being female neonate, preterm delivery, lower education level of mothers, irregular antenatal care, gestational hypertension, being multipara, taking no folic

  10. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  11. Single-Cell, Time-Resolved Antimicrobial Effects of a Highly Cationic, Random Nylon-3 Copolymer on Live Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heejun; Chakraborty, Saswata; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H; Weisshaar, James C

    2016-01-15

    Synthetic random copolymers based on the nylon-3 (β-peptide) backbone show promise as inexpensive antimicrobial agents resistant to proteolysis. We present a time-resolved observational study of the attack of a particular copolymer MM63:CHx37 on single, live Escherichia coli cells. The composition and chain length of MM63:CHx37 (63% cationic subunits, 37% hydrophobic subunits, 35-subunit average length) were optimized to enhance antibacterial activity while minimizing lysis of human red blood cells. For E. coli cells that export GFP to the periplasm, we obtain alternating phase-contrast and green fluorescence images with a time resolution of 12 s over 60 min following initiation of copolymer flow. Within seconds, cells shrink and exhibit the same plasmolysis spaces that occur following abrupt external osmotic upshift. The osmoprotection machinery attempts to replenish cytoplasmic water, but recovery is interrupted by permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM) to GFP. Evidently, the highly cationic copolymer and its counterions rapidly translocate across the outer membrane without permeabilizing it to GFP. The CM permeabilization event is spatially localized. Cells whose CM has been permeabilized never recover growth. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for cells lacking the osmolyte importer ProP is 4-fold smaller than for normal cells, suggesting that osmoprotection is an important survival strategy. In addition, at the time of CM permeabilization, we observe evidence of oxidative stress. The MIC under anaerobic conditions is at least 8-fold larger than under aerobic conditions, further implicating oxidative damage as an important bacteriostatic effect. Once the copolymer reaches the periplasm, multiple growth-halting mechanisms proceed in parallel.

  12. Gastrointestinal parasites of free-living Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in the Northern Red Sea, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kleinertz, S; Hermosilla, C; Ziltener, A; Kreicker, S; Hirzmann, J; Abdel-Ghaffar, F; Taubert, A

    2014-04-01

    The present study represents the first report on the gastrointestinal parasite fauna infecting the free-living and alive Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) inhabiting waters of the Red Sea at Hurghada, Egypt. A total of 94 individual faecal samples of the examined bottlenose dolphins were collected during several diving expeditions within their natural habitats. Using classical parasitological techniques, such as sodium acetate acetic acid formalin method, carbol fuchsin-stained faecal smears, coproantigen ELISA, PCR and macroscopical analyses, the study revealed infections with 21 different parasite species belonging to protozoans and metazoans with some of them bearing zoonotic and/or pathogenic potential. Four identified parasite species are potential zoonotic species (Giardia spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Diphyllobothrium spp., Ascaridida indet.); three of them are known to have high pathogenic potential for the examined dolphin species (Nasitrema attenuata, Zalophotrema spp. and Pholeter gastrophilus) and some appear to be directly associated with stranding events. In detail, the study indicates stages of ten protozoan species (Giardia spp., Sarcocystis spp., Isospora (like) spp., Cystoisospora (like) spp., Ciliata indet. I and II, Holotricha indet., Dinoflagellata indet., Hexamita (like) spp., Cryptosporidium spp.), seven trematode species (N. attenuata, Nasitrema spp. I and II, Zalophotrema curilensis, Zalophotrema spp., Pholeter gastrophilus, Trematoda indet.), one cestode species (Diphyllobothrium spp.), two nematode species (Ascaridida indet, Capillaria spp.) and one crustacean parasite (Cymothoidae indet.). Additionally, we molecularly identified adult worms of Anisakis typica in individual dolphin vomitus samples by molecular analyses. A. typica is a common parasite of various dolphin species of warmer temperate and tropical waters and has not been attributed as food-borne parasitic zoonoses so far. Overall, these parasitological findings

  13. Efficient frequency downconversion at the single photon level from the red spectral range to the telecommunications C-band.

    PubMed

    Zaske, Sebastian; Lenhard, Andreas; Becher, Christoph

    2011-06-20

    We report on single photon frequency downconversion from the red part of the spectrum (738 nm) to the telecommunications C-band. By mixing attenuated laser pulses with an average photon number per pulse < 1 with a strong continuous light field at 1403 nm in a periodically poled Zn:LiNbO3 ridge waveguide an internal conversion efficiency of ∼ 73% is achieved. We further investigate the noise properties of the process by measuring the output spectrum. Our results indicate that by narrow spectral filtering a quantum interface should be feasible which bridges the wavelength gap between quantum emitters like color centers in diamond emitting in the red part of the spectrum and low-loss fiber-optic telecommunications wavelengths.

  14. In silico model-driven assessment of the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on human red blood cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Neema; Wiback, Sharon J; Palsson B, Bernhard Ø

    2002-11-01

    The completion of the human genome project and the construction of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) maps have lead to significant efforts to find SNPs that can be linked to pathophysiology. In silico models of complete biochemical reaction networks relate a cell's individual reactions to the function of the entire network. Sequence variations can in turn be related to kinetic properties of individual enzymes, thus allowing an in silico model-driven assessment of the effects of defined SNPs on overall cellular functions. This process is applied to defined SNPs in two key enzymes of human red blood cell metabolism: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase. The results demonstrate the utility of in silico models in providing insight into differences between red cell function in patients with chronic and nonchronic anemia. In silico models of complex cellular processes are thus likely to aid in defining and understanding key SNPs in human pathophysiology.

  15. Hydroxylated and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins in red alga and cyanobacteria living in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Malmvärn, Anna; Zebühr, Yngve; Kautsky, Lena; Bergman, Ke; Asplund, Lillemor

    2008-06-01

    Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) are present in the ecosystem of the Baltic Sea. OH-PBDEs are known to be both natural products from marine environments and metabolites of the anthropogenic polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), whereas, MeO-PBDEs appear to be solely natural in origin. Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs) are by-products formed in connection with the combustion of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), but are also indicated as natural products in a red alga (Ceramium tenuicorne) and blue mussels living in the Baltic Sea. The aims of the present investigation were to quantify the OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs present in C. tenuicorne; to verify the identities of PBDDs detected previously in this species of red alga and to investigate whether cyanobacteria living in this same region of the Baltic Sea contain OH-PBDEs, MeO-PBDEs and/or PBDDs. The red alga was confirmed to contain tribromodibenzo-p-dioxins (triBDDs), by accurate mass determination and additional PBDD congeners were also detected in this sample. This is the first time that PBDDs have been identified in a red alga. The SigmaOH-PBDEs and SigmaMeO-PBDEs concentrations, present in C. tenuicorne were 150 and 4.6 ng g(-1) dry weight, respectively. In the cyanobacteria 6 OH-PBDEs, 6 MeO-PBDEs and 4 PBDDs were detected by mass spectrometry (electron capture negative ionization (ECNI)). The PBDDs and OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs detected in the red alga and cyanobacteria are most likely of natural origin.

  16. Effect of West Nile virus DNA-plasmid vaccination on response to live virus challenge in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Redig, Patrick T; Tully, Thomas N; Ritchie, Branson W; Roy, Alma F; Baudena, M Alexandra; Chang, Gwong-Jen J

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an experimental adjuvanted DNA-plasmid vaccine against West Nile virus (WNV) in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). 19 permanently disabled but otherwise healthy red-tailed hawks of mixed ages and both sexes without detectable serum antibodies against WNV. Hawks were injected IM with an experimental WNV DNA-plasmid vaccine in an aluminum-phosphate adjuvant (n = 14) or with the adjuvant only (control group; 5). All birds received 2 injections at a 3-week interval. Blood samples for serologic evaluation were collected before the first injection and 4 weeks after the second injection (day 0). At day 0, hawks were injected SC with live WNV. Pre- and postchallenge blood samples were collected at intervals for 14 days for assessment of viremia and antibody determination; oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected for assessment of viral shedding. Vaccination was not associated with morbidity or deaths. Three of the vaccinated birds seroconverted after the second vaccine injection; all other birds seroconverted following the live virus injection. Vaccinated birds had significantly less severe viremia and shorter and less-intense shedding periods, compared with the control birds. Use of the WNV DNA-plasmid vaccine in red-tailed hawks was safe, and vaccination attenuated but did not eliminate both the viremia and the intensity of postchallenge shedding following live virus exposure. Further research is warranted to conclusively determine the efficacy of this vaccine preparation for protection of red-tailed hawks and other avian species against WNV-induced disease.

  17. Raman sorting and identification of single living micro-organisms with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changan; Chen, De; Li, Yong-Qing

    2005-07-01

    We report on a novel technique for sorting and identification of single biological cells and food-borne bacteria based on laser tweezers and Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). With this technique, biological cells of different physiological states in a sample chamber were identified by their Raman spectral signatures and then they were selectively manipulated into a clean collection chamber with optical tweezers through a microchannel. As an example, we sorted the live and dead yeast cells into the collection chamber and validated this with a standard staining technique. We also demonstrated that bacteria existing in spoiled foods could be discriminated from a variety of food particles based on their characteristic Raman spectra and then isolated with laser manipulation. This label-free LTRS sorting technique may find broad applications in microbiology and rapid examination of food-borne diseases.

  18. Duration of protective immunity after a single vaccination with a live attenuated bivalent bluetongue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhugunissov, Kuandyk; Yershebulov, Zakir; Barakbayev, Kainar; Bulatov, Yerbol; Taranov, Dmitriy; Amanova, Zhanat; Abduraimov, Yergali

    2015-12-01

    The prevention of bluetongue is typically achieved with mono- or polyvalent modified- live-attenuated virus (MLV) vaccines. MLV vaccines typically elicit a strong antibody response that correlates directly with their ability to replicate in the vaccinated animal. They are inexpensive, stimulate protective immunity after a single inoculation, and have been proven effective in preventing clinical bluetongue disease. In this study, we evaluated the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a bluetongue vaccine against Bluetongue virus serotypes 4 and 16 in sheep. All the animals remained clinically healthy during the observation period. The vaccinated animals showed no clinical signs except fever (>40.8 °C) for 2-4 days. Rapid seroconversion was observed in the sheep, with the accumulation of high antibody titers in the vaccinated animals. No animal became ill after the challenge, indicating that effective protection was achieved. Therefore, this vaccine, prepared from attenuated bluetongue virus strains, is safe, immunogenic, and efficacious.

  19. Dynamic three-dimensional tracking of single fluorescent nanoparticles deep inside living tissue.

    PubMed

    Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Kaminski, Tim; Königshoven, Heinz-Peter; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2012-08-27

    Three-dimensional (3D) spatial information can be encoded in two-dimensional images of fluorescent nanoparticles by astigmatic imaging. We combined this method with light sheet microscopy for high contrast single particle imaging up to 200 µm deep within living tissue and real-time image analysis to determine 3D particle localizations with nanometer precision and millisecond temporal resolution. Axial information was instantly directed to the sample stage to keep a moving particle within the focal plane in an active feedback loop. We demonstrated 3D tracking of nanoparticles at an unprecedented depth throughout large cell nuclei over several thousand frames and a range of more than 10 µm in each spatial dimension, while simultaneously acquiring optically sectioned wide field images. We conclude that this 3D particle tracking technique employing light sheet microscopy presents a valuable extension to the nanoscopy toolbox.

  20. Long-Lived, Coherent Acoustic Phonon Oscillations in GaN Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Geiser, P.; Jun, J.; Karpinski, J.; Park, J.-R.; Sobolewski, R.

    2006-01-31

    We report on coherent acoustic phonon (CAP) oscillations studied in high-quality bulk GaN single crystals with a two-color femtosecond optical pump-probe technique. Using a far-above-the-band gap ultraviolet excitation (~270 nm wavelength) and a near-infrared probe beam (~810 nm wavelength), the long-lived, CAP transients were observed within a 10 ns time-delay window between the pump and probe pulses, with a dispersionless (proportional to the probe-beam wave vector) frequency of ~45 GHz. The measured CAP attenuation corresponded directly to the absorption of the probe light in bulk GaN, indicating that the actual (intrinsic) phonon-wave attenuation in our crystals was significantly smaller than the measured 65.8 cm^-1 value. The velocity of the phonon propagation was equal to the velocity of sound in GaN.

  1. A general method to improve fluorophores for live-cell and single-molecule microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Jonathan B.; English, Brian P.; Chen, Jiji; Slaughter, Joel P.; Zhang, Zhengjian; Revyakin, Andrey; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J.; Normanno, Davide; Singer, Robert H.; Lionnet, Timothée; Lavis, Luke D.

    2014-01-01

    Specific labeling of biomolecules with bright fluorophores is the keystone of fluorescence microscopy. Genetically encoded self-labeling tag proteins can be coupled to synthetic dyes inside living cells, resulting in brighter reporters than fluorescent proteins. Intracellular labeling using these techniques requires cell-permeable fluorescent ligands, however, limiting utility to a small number of classic fluorophores. Here, we describe a simple structural modification that improves the brightness and photostability of dyes while preserving spectral properties and cell permeability. Inspired by molecular modeling, we replaced the N,N-dimethylamino substituents in tetramethylrhodamine with four-membered azetidine rings. This addition of two carbon atoms doubles the quantum efficiency and improves the photon yield of the dye in applications ranging from in vitro single-molecule measurements to super-resolution imaging. The novel substitution is generalizable, yielding a palette of chemical dyes with improved quantum efficiencies that spans the UV and visible range. PMID:25599551

  2. Single-molecule imaging reveals modulation of cell wall synthesis dynamics in live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timothy K.; Meng, Kevin; Shi, Handuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2016-01-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall is an integral organelle critical for bacterial cell shape and stability. Proper cell wall construction requires the interaction of synthesis enzymes and the cytoskeleton, but it is unclear how the activities of individual proteins are coordinated to preserve the morphology and integrity of the cell wall during growth. To elucidate this coordination, we used single-molecule imaging to follow the behaviours of the two major peptidoglycan synthases in live, elongating Escherichia coli cells and after perturbation. We observed heterogeneous localization dynamics of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 1A, the synthase predominantly associated with cell wall elongation, with individual PBP1A molecules distributed between mobile and immobile populations. Perturbations to PBP1A activity, either directly through antibiotics or indirectly through PBP1A's interaction with its lipoprotein activator or other synthases, shifted the fraction of mobile molecules. Our results suggest that multiple levels of regulation control the activity of enzymes to coordinate peptidoglycan synthesis. PMID:27774981

  3. Visualization of dynamics of single endogenous mRNA labeled in live mouse.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Yoon; Lim, Hyungsik; Yoon, Young J; Follenzi, Antonia; Nwokafor, Chiso; Lopez-Jones, Melissa; Meng, Xiuhua; Singer, Robert H

    2014-01-24

    The transcription and transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) are critical steps in regulating the spatial and temporal components of gene expression, but it has not been possible to observe the dynamics of endogenous mRNA in primary mammalian tissues. We have developed a transgenic mouse in which all β-actin mRNA is fluorescently labeled. We found that β-actin mRNA in primary fibroblasts localizes predominantly by diffusion and trapping as single mRNAs. In cultured neurons and acute brain slices, we found that multiple β-actin mRNAs can assemble together, travel by active transport, and disassemble upon depolarization by potassium chloride. Imaging of brain slices revealed immediate early induction of β-actin transcription after depolarization. Studying endogenous mRNA in live mouse tissues provides insight into its dynamic regulation within the context of the cellular and tissue microenvironment.

  4. Assessing light scattering of intracellular organelles in single intact living cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, Maxim; Choi, Wonshik; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Sung, Yongjin; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Badizadegan, Kamran; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a model-independent method of assessing contributions to the light scattering from individual organelles in single intact cells. We first measure the 3D index map of a living cell, and then modify the map in such a way so as to eliminate contrast due to a particular intracellular organelle. By calculating and comparing the light scattering distributions calculated from the original and modified index maps using the Rytov approximation, we extract the light scattering contribution from the particular organelle of interest. The relative contributions of the nucleus and nucleolus to the scattering of the entire cell are thus determined, and the applicability of the homogeneous spherical model to non-spherical and heterogeneous organelles in forward scattering is evaluated. PMID:19997187

  5. Multicolour nanoscopy of fixed and living cells with a single STED beam and hyperspectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Franziska R.; Loidolt, Maria; Westphal, Volker; Butkevich, Alexey N.; Gregor, Carola; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.

    2017-04-01

    The extension of fluorescence nanoscopy to larger numbers of molecular species concurrently visualized by distinct markers is of great importance for advanced biological applications. To date, up to four markers had been distinguished in STED experiments featuring comparatively elaborate imaging schemes and optical setups, and exploiting various properties of the fluorophores. Here we present a simple yet versatile STED design for multicolour imaging below the diffraction limit. A hyperspectral detection arrangement (hyperSTED) collects the fluorescence in four spectral channels, allowing the separation of four markers with only one excitation wavelength and a single STED beam. Unmixing of the different marker signals based on the simultaneous readout of all channels is performed with a non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. We illustrate the approach showing four-colour nanoscopy of fixed and living cellular samples.

  6. Multicolour nanoscopy of fixed and living cells with a single STED beam and hyperspectral detection.

    PubMed

    Winter, Franziska R; Loidolt, Maria; Westphal, Volker; Butkevich, Alexey N; Gregor, Carola; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W

    2017-04-18

    The extension of fluorescence nanoscopy to larger numbers of molecular species concurrently visualized by distinct markers is of great importance for advanced biological applications. To date, up to four markers had been distinguished in STED experiments featuring comparatively elaborate imaging schemes and optical setups, and exploiting various properties of the fluorophores. Here we present a simple yet versatile STED design for multicolour imaging below the diffraction limit. A hyperspectral detection arrangement (hyperSTED) collects the fluorescence in four spectral channels, allowing the separation of four markers with only one excitation wavelength and a single STED beam. Unmixing of the different marker signals based on the simultaneous readout of all channels is performed with a non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. We illustrate the approach showing four-colour nanoscopy of fixed and living cellular samples.

  7. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Wenjing; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Chen, Hao; Wei, Junzhe

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10-3 s-1 and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10-2 s-1.

  8. Presynaptic structure of Aplysia single live neuron by atomic force and confocal laser scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Aee-Young; Chae, Yeon-Su; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Seonghoon

    2013-05-02

    The structural and functional plasticity of Aplysia mechanosensory presynaptic neurons has been studied in relation with the mechanism underlying learning and memory. Long-term facilitation (LTF), which is a well-known cellular model for long-term memory in Aplysia, is accompanied by new synaptic structural growth or change. We developed a combined atomic force microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope (AFM-CLSM) system integrated with a MATLAB routine for image processing to concurrently obtain high-resolution 3-dimensional (3D) outer-surface morphological images and 3D interior fluorescence images. With our combined AFM-CLSM system, volumetric changes in the presynaptic structures (varicosities) of Aplysia live sensory-motor neuron cocultures were observed. The spatial distribution of synaptic vesicle molecules in the preexisting varicosities was monitored together with a volumetric change in the varicosities. Our combined AFM-CLSM system is successfully adapted for measuring learning-related structural changes and the movement of synaptic molecules in the single live neuron through interaction force and fluorescence imaging.

  9. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua Liu, Wenjing; Wu, Ruqun; Wei, Junzhe; Guo, Jinlong; Chen, Hao

    2016-03-15

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10{sup −2} s{sup −1}.

  10. Quantitative imaging of single mRNA splice variants in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi; Lee, Luke P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Alternative messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation, and errors in RNA splicing are known to be associated with a variety of different diseases. However, there is currently a lack of quantitative technologies for monitoring mRNA splice variants in cells. Here, we show that a combination of plasmonic dimer probes and hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect and quantify mRNA splice variants in living cells. The probes are made from gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides and can hybridize to specific mRNA sequences, forming nanoparticle dimers that exhibit distinct spectral shifts due to plasmonic coupling. With this approach, we show that the spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1, can be monitored at single-copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of the nanoplasmonic dimers. Our study provides insights into RNA and its transport in living cells, which could improve our understanding of cellular protein complexes, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis and gene therapies.

  11. Orientations between Red Antenna States of Photosystem I Monomers from Thermosynechococcus elongatus Revealed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Skandary, Sepideh; Konrad, Alexander; Hussels, Martin; Meixner, Alfred J; Brecht, Marc

    2015-10-29

    Single-molecule spectroscopy at low temperature was used to study the spectral properties, heterogeneities, and spectral dynamics of the chlorophyll a (Chl a) molecules responsible for the fluorescence emission of photosystem I monomers (PS I-M) from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The fluorescence spectra of single PS I-M are dominated by several red-shifted chlorophyll a molecules named C708 and C719. The emission spectra show broad spectral distributions and several zero-phonon lines (ZPLs). Compared with the spectra of the single PS I trimers, some contributions are missing due to the lower number of C719 Chl's in monomers. Polarization-dependent measurements show an almost perpendicular orientation between the emitters corresponding to C708 and C719. These contributions can be assigned to chlorophyll dimers B18B19, B31B32, and B32B33.

  12. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda V.; Albulescu, Irina C.; van Hemert, Martijn J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied previously using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by which CHIKV enters the cell: several studies suggest that CHIKV enters via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while others show that it enters independently of clathrin. Here we applied live-cell microscopy and monitored the cell entry behavior of single CHIKV particles in living cells transfected with fluorescent marker proteins. This approach allowed us to obtain detailed insight into the dynamic events that occur during CHIKV entry. We observed that almost all particles fused within 20 min after addition to the cells. Of the particles that fused, the vast majority first colocalized with clathrin. The average time from initial colocalization with clathrin to the moment of membrane fusion was 1.7 min, highlighting the rapidity of the cell entry process of CHIKV. Furthermore, these results show that the virus spends a relatively long time searching for a receptor. Membrane fusion was observed predominantly from within Rab5-positive endosomes and often occurred within 40 s after delivery to endosomes. Furthermore, we confirmed that a valine at position 226 of the E1 protein enhances the cholesterol-dependent membrane fusion properties of CHIKV. To conclude, our work confirms that CHIKV enters cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and shows that fusion occurs from within acidic early endosomes. IMPORTANCE Since its reemergence in 2004, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has spread rapidly around the world, leading to millions of infections. CHIKV often causes chikungunya fever, a self-limiting febrile illness with severe arthralgia. Currently, no vaccine or specific antiviral treatment against CHIKV is available. A potential antiviral strategy is to interfere with the cell

  13. A bright single-cell resolution live imaging reporter of Notch signaling in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Live imaging provides an essential methodology for understanding complex and dynamic cell behaviors and their underlying molecular mechanisms. Genetically-encoded reporter expressing mouse strains are an important tool for use in live imaging experiments. Such reporter strains can be engineered by placing cis-regulatory elements of interest to direct the expression of desired reporter genes. If these cis-regulatory elements are downstream targets, and thus activated as a consequence of signaling pathway activation, such reporters can provide read-outs of the signaling status of a cell. The Notch signaling pathway is an evolutionary conserved pathway operating in multiple developmental processes as well as being the basis for several congenital diseases. The transcription factor CBF1 is a central evolutionarily conserved component of the Notch signaling pathway. It binds the active form of the Notch receptor (NICD) and subsequently binds to cis-regulatory regions (CBF1 binding sites) in the promoters of Notch responsive genes. In this way, CBF1 binding sites represent a good target for the design of a Notch signaling reporter. Results To generate a single-cell resolution Notch signaling reporter, we used a CBF responsive element to direct the expression of a nuclear-localized fluorescent protein. To do this, we linked 4 copies of a consensus CBF1 binding site to the basal simian virus 40 (SV40) promoter, placed this cassette in front of a fluorescent protein fusion comprising human histone H2B linked to the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) Venus, one of the brightest available YFPs. We used the CBF:H2B-Venus construct to generate both transgenic embryonic mouse stem (ES) cell lines and a strain of transgenic mice that would report Notch signaling activity. Conclusion By using multiple CBF1 binding sites together with a subcellular-localized, genetically-encoded fluorescent protein, H2B-Venus, we have generated a transgenic strain of mice that faithfully

  14. Health Needs Instrument for hospitalized single-living Taiwanese elders with heart disease: triangulation research design.

    PubMed

    Shih, Shaw-Nin; Gau, Meei-Ling; Kao Lo, Chi-Hui; Shih, Fu-Jin

    2005-11-01

    medical support (r = 0.341, P = 0.012), with help in managing admissions and discharge procedures (r = 0.374, P = 0.05) and with help after an invasive examination or in the postsurgery period (r = 0.334, P = 0.013). Finally, a conceptual framework was developed to depict this phenomenon. With the help of this HNI, both Eastern and Western health care providers can be empowered to detect the complex health needs of this particular population earlier and more accurately in order to promote their well-being as well as their health-related quality of life. Empowering nurse clinicians to assess health needs of hospitalized single-living Taiwanese elders with heart disease.

  15. Mandibular osteomyelitis in red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) and fallow deer (Dama dama): occurrence and associated factors in free-living populations in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Azorit, Concepción; Oya, Antonia; Tellado, Sierra; Carrasco, Rafael; Moro, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of mandibular osteomyelitis, which results in a condition called lumpy jaw, and factors associated with its occurrence were investigated in syntopic free-living populations of red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) and fallow deer (Dama dama) in Spain. The study material consisted of 3,586 mandibles from 2,548 red deer and 1,038 fallow deer shot during sport hunting, herd management culls, and programs for population control between 1988 and 1997 (period 1) and 2002 and 2009 (period 2) in eastern Sierra Morena, southern Spain. Disease prevalence ranged from 0.36% to 10.91% among age groups. Older animals were significantly more likely to be affected than younger ones. Red deer stags had higher prevalence than other groups. There was a significantly higher prevalence in period 1, probably associated with differences in climatic and population conditions. High population densities of female red deer contributed significantly to occurrence of disease. Intensive herd management and poor environmental conditions were considered risk factors that increased susceptibility to disease. The study of this affliction could be useful for monitoring general herd welfare and ecologic changes in Mediterranean ecosystems.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of a single living cell in environmentally stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gajendra P.; Creely, Caitriona; Volpe, Giovanni; Grotsch, Helga; Petrov, Dmitri

    2005-08-01

    Living cells initiate a stress response in order to survive environmentally stressful conditions. We monitored changes in the Raman spectra of an optically trapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell under normal and hyperosmotic stress conditions. When the yeast cells were challenged with a high concentration of glucose so as to exert hyperosmotic stress, it was shown that two chemical substances - glycerol and ethanol - could be monitored in real time in a single cell. The volume of the detection area of our confocal microspectrometer is approximately 1 fL. The average quantities of detected glycerol and ethanol are about 300 attomol and 700 attomol respectively. This amounts to the detection of approximately 108 glycerol molecules and 4 X 108 ethanol molecules after 36 min of hyper osmotic stress. Besides this, we also optically trapped a single yeast cell for up to three hours under normal conditions and monitored the changes in the Raman spectra during the lag phase of its growth and the G1 phase of its cell cycle. During the lag phase the cell synthesises new proteins and the observed behavior of the peaks corresponding to these proteins as well as those of RNA served as a sensitive indicator of the adaptation of the cell to its changed environment. The changes observed in the Raman spectra of a trapped yeast cell in the late G1 phase or the beginning of S phase corresponded to the growth of a bud.

  17. Single-molecule imaging of electroporated dye-labelled CheY in live Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Diana; Afanzar, Oshri; Armitage, Judith P.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    For the past two decades, the use of genetically fused fluorescent proteins (FPs) has greatly contributed to the study of chemotactic signalling in Escherichia coli including the activation of the response regulator protein CheY and its interaction with the flagellar motor. However, this approach suffers from a number of limitations, both biological and biophysical: for example, not all fusions are fully functional when fused to a bulky FP, which can have a similar molecular weight to its fused counterpart; they may interfere with the native interactions of the protein and the chromophores of FPs have low brightness and photostability and fast photobleaching rates. A recently developed technique for the electroporation of fluorescently labelled proteins in live bacteria has enabled us to bypass these limitations and study the in vivo behaviour of CheY at the single-molecule level. Here we show that purified CheY proteins labelled with organic dyes can be internalized into E. coli cells in controllable concentrations and imaged with video fluorescence microscopy. The use of this approach is illustrated by showing single CheY molecules diffusing within cells and interacting with the sensory clusters and the flagellar motors in real time. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672145

  18. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Boccara, A Claude; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  19. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Claude Boccara, A.; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  20. SIDT2 mediates gymnosis, the uptake of naked single-stranded oligonucleotides into living cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Contu, Viorica Raluca; Kabuta, Chihana; Hase, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Yuuki; Wada, Keiji; Kabuta, Tomohiro

    2017-03-09

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssOligos) are efficiently taken up by living cells without the use of transfection reagents. This phenomenon called 'gymnosis' enables the sequence-specific silencing of target genes in various types of cells. Several antisense ssOligos are used for the treatment of human diseases. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the uptake of naked ssOligos into cells remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that systemic RNA interference deficient-1 (SID-1) transmembrane family 2 (SIDT2), a mammalian ortholog of the Caenorhabditis elegans double-stranded RNA channel SID-1, mediates gymnosis. We show that the uptake of naked ssOligos into cells is significantly downregulated by knockdown of SIDT2. Furthermore, knockdown of SIDT2 inhibited the effect of antisense RNA mediated by gymnosis. Overexpression of SIDT2 enhanced the uptake of naked ssOligos into cells, while a single amino acid mutation in SIDT2 abolished this effect. Our findings highlight the mechanism of extra- and intracellular RNA transport and may contribute to the further development of nucleic acid-based therapies.

  1. Opto-injection into single living cells by femtosecond near-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng

    This dissertation presents a novel technique to deliver membrane impermeable molecules into single living cells with the assistance of femtosecond (fs) near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. This approach merges ultrafast laser technology with key biological, biomedical, and medical applications, such as gene transfection, gene therapy and drug delivery. This technique promises several major advantages, namely, very high transfection efficiency, high cell survival rate (≈100%) and fully preserved cell viabilities. It is also a promising method to deliver molecules into cells that are difficult or even completely resistant to established physical methods, such as microinjection by glass pipettes, electroporation, and biolistics. In this work, the system for fs NIR opto-injection was designed and built. Successful fs NIR opto-injection has been performed on several cell systems including single mammalian cells (bovine aortic endothelial cells), marine animal eggs (Spisula solidissima oocytes), and human cancer cells (fibrosarcoma HT1080) cultured in a tissue-like environment. The connections between laser parameters and cell responses were explored through further experiments and in-depth analyses, especially the relationship between dye uptake rate and incident laser intensity, and the relationship between pore size created on cell membranes and incident laser intensity. Dye uptake rate of the target cells was observed to depend on incident laser intensity. Pore size was found dependent on incident laser intensity. The conclusion was made that laser-induced breakdown and plasma-induced ablation in cell membrane are the physical principles that govern the process of fs NIR opto-injection.

  2. Revealing nonergodic dynamics in living cells from a single particle trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanoiselée, Yann; Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-05-01

    We propose the improved ergodicity and mixing estimators to identify nonergodic dynamics from a single particle trajectory. The estimators are based on the time-averaged characteristic function of the increments and can thus capture additional information on the process as compared to the conventional time-averaged mean-square displacement. The estimators are first investigated and validated for several models of anomalous diffusion, such as ergodic fractional Brownian motion and diffusion on percolating clusters, and nonergodic continuous-time random walks and scaled Brownian motion. The estimators are then applied to two sets of earlier published trajectories of mRNA molecules inside live Escherichia coli cells and of Kv2.1 potassium channels in the plasma membrane. These statistical tests did not reveal nonergodic features in the former set, while some trajectories of the latter set could be classified as nonergodic. Time averages along such trajectories are thus not representative and may be strongly misleading. Since the estimators do not rely on ensemble averages, the nonergodic features can be revealed separately for each trajectory, providing a more flexible and reliable analysis of single-particle tracking experiments in microbiology.

  3. A nanoparticle-based ratiometric and self-calibrated fluorescent thermometer for single living cells.

    PubMed

    Takei, Yoshiaki; Arai, Satoshi; Murata, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masao; Oyama, Kotaro; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Takeoka, Shinji; Suzuki, Madoka

    2014-01-28

    The homeostasis of body temperature and energy balance is one of the major principles in biology. Nanoscale thermometry of aqueous solutions is a challenging but crucial technique to understand the molecular basis of this essential process. Here, we developed a ratiometric nanothermometer (RNT) for intracellular temperature measurement in real time. Both the thermosensitive fluorophore, β-diketonate chelate europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, and the thermoinsensitive fluorophore, rhodamine 101, which was used as a self-reference, are embedded in a polymeric particle that protects the fluorophores from intracellular conditions. The ratiometric measurement of single RNT spots is independent of the displacement of the RNT along the z-axis. The temperature is therefore determined at the location of each RNT under an optical microscope regardless of the dynamic movement of living cells. As a demonstration of the spot-by-spot intracellular thermometry, we successfully followed the temperature change in individual RNT spots in a single cell together with the Ca(2+) burst induced by the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin. The temperature increases differently among different spots, implying heterogeneous heat production in the cell. We then show that, in some spots, the temperature gradually decreases, while in others it remains high. The average temperature elevation within a cell is positively correlated to the increase in Ca(2+), suggesting that the activity and/or number of heat sources are dependent on the Ca(2+) concentration.

  4. Live attenuated B. pertussis as a single-dose nasal vaccine against whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Raze, Dominique; Bertout, Julie; Rouanet, Carine; Younes, Amena Ben; Creusy, Colette; Engle, Jacquelyn; Goldman, William E; Locht, Camille

    2006-07-01

    Pertussis is still among the principal causes of death worldwide, and its incidence is increasing even in countries with high vaccine coverage. Although all age groups are susceptible, it is most severe in infants too young to be protected by currently available vaccines. To induce strong protective immunity in neonates, we have developed BPZE1, a live attenuated Bordetella pertussis strain to be given as a single-dose nasal vaccine in early life. BPZE1 was developed by the genetic inactivation or removal of three major toxins. In mice, BPZE1 was highly attenuated, yet able to colonize the respiratory tract and to induce strong protective immunity after a single nasal administration. Protection against B. pertussis was comparable to that induced by two injections of acellular vaccine (aPV) in adult mice, but was significantly better than two administrations of aPV in infant mice. Moreover, BPZE1 protected against Bordetella parapertussis infection, whereas aPV did not. BPZE1 is thus an attractive vaccine candidate to protect against whooping cough by nasal, needle-free administration early in life, possibly at birth.

  5. Live Attenuated B. pertussis as a Single-Dose Nasal Vaccine against Whooping Cough

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Raze, Dominique; Bertout, Julie; Rouanet, Carine; Younes, Amena Ben; Creusy, Colette; Engle, Jacquelyn; Goldman, William E; Locht, Camille

    2006-01-01

    Pertussis is still among the principal causes of death worldwide, and its incidence is increasing even in countries with high vaccine coverage. Although all age groups are susceptible, it is most severe in infants too young to be protected by currently available vaccines. To induce strong protective immunity in neonates, we have developed BPZE1, a live attenuated Bordetella pertussis strain to be given as a single-dose nasal vaccine in early life. BPZE1 was developed by the genetic inactivation or removal of three major toxins. In mice, BPZE1 was highly attenuated, yet able to colonize the respiratory tract and to induce strong protective immunity after a single nasal administration. Protection against B. pertussis was comparable to that induced by two injections of acellular vaccine (aPV) in adult mice, but was significantly better than two administrations of aPV in infant mice. Moreover, BPZE1 protected against Bordetella parapertussis infection, whereas aPV did not. BPZE1 is thus an attractive vaccine candidate to protect against whooping cough by nasal, needle-free administration early in life, possibly at birth. PMID:16839199

  6. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  7. Resonance Raman study of the oxygenation cycle of optically trapped single red blood cells in a microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Logg, Katarina; Enger, Jonas; Goksor, Mattias; Kall, Mikael; Hanstorp, Dag

    2004-10-01

    The average environmental response of red blood cells (RBCs) is routinely measured in ensemble studies, but in such investigations valuable information on the single cell level is obscured. In order to elucidate this hidden information is is important to enable the selection of single cells with certain properties while subsequent dynamics triggered by environmental stimulation are recorded in real time. It is also desirable to manipulate and control the cells under phsyiological conditions. As shown here, this can be achieved by combining optical tweezers with a confocal Raman set-up equipped with a microfluidic system. A micro-Raman set-up is combined with an optical trap with separate optical paths, lasers and objectives, which enables the acquisition of resonance Raman profils of single RBCs. The microfluidic system, giving full control over the media surrounding the cell, consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs produced by electron beam lithography and moulded in PDMS. Fresh Hepes buffer or buffer containing sodium dithionite are transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the direct Raman response of the single optically trapped RBC is registered in another reservoir in the middle of the channel. Thus, it is possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle in a single cell and to study photo-induced chemistry. This experimental set-up has high potential for monitoring the drug response or conformational changes caused by other environmental stimuli for many types of single functional cells since "in vivo" conditions can be created.

  8. A practical approach for the detection of DNA nanostructures in single live human cells by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, C; Angelini, P; Rhoden, K J; Porcelli, A M; Fato, R; Zuccheri, G

    2014-05-15

    In the last decade, in vivo studies have revealed that even subtle differences in size, concentration of components, cell cycle stage, make the cells in a population respond differently to the same stimulus. In order to characterize such complexity of behavior and shed more light on the functioning and communication amongst cells, researchers are developing strategies to study single live cells in a population. In this paper, we describe the methods to design and prepare DNA-based fluorescent tetrahedral nanostructures, to deliver them to live cells and characterize such cells with epifluorescence microscopy. We report that HeLa cells internalize these nanostructures spontaneously with a higher efficiency with respect to single-stranded or double-stranded oligonucleotides. Our findings suggest that DNA tetrahedra could serve as a platform for the realization of a series of multifunctional intracellular biosensors for the analysis of single live cells.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of a single intramuscular injection of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Sadar, Miranda J; Hawkins, Michelle G; Byrne, Barbara A; Cartoceti, Andrew N; Keel, Kevin; Drazenovich, Tracy L; Tell, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects at the injection site of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) following IM administration of 1 dose to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). 7 adult nonreleasable healthy red-tailed hawks. In a randomized crossover study, CCFA (10 or 20 mg/kg) was administered IM to each hawk and blood samples were obtained. After a 2-month washout period, administration was repeated with the opposite dose. Muscle biopsy specimens were collected from the injection site 10 days after each sample collection period. Pharmacokinetic data were calculated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of ceftiofur for various bacterial isolates were assessed. Mean peak plasma concentrations of ceftiofur-free acid equivalent were 6.8 and 15.1 μg/mL for the 10 and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively. Mean times to maximum plasma concentration were 6.4 and 6.7 hours, and mean terminal half-lives were 29 and 50 hours, respectively. Little to no muscle inflammation was identified. On the basis of a target MIC of 1 μg/mL and target plasma ceftiofur concentration of 4 μg/mL, dose administration frequencies for infections with gram-negative and gram-positive organisms were estimated as every 36 and 45 hours for the 10 mg/kg dose and every 96 and 120 hours for the 20 mg/kg dose, respectively. Study results suggested that CCFA could be administered IM to red-tailed hawks at 10 or 20 mg/kg to treat infections with ceftiofur-susceptible bacteria. Administration resulted in little to no inflammation at the injection site. Additional studies are needed to evaluate effects of repeated CCFA administration.

  10. LIVING WITH A RED DWARF: ROTATION AND X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET PROPERTIES OF THE HALO POPULATION KAPTEYN’S STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Durbin, Allyn

    2016-04-20

    As part of Villanova’s Living with a Red Dwarf program, we have obtained UV, X-ray, and optical data of the Population II red dwarf—Kapteyn’s Star. Kapteyn’s Star is noteworthy for its large proper motions and high radial velocity of ∼+245 km s{sup −1}. As the nearest Pop II red dwarf, it serves as an old age anchor for calibrating activity/irradiance–rotation–age relations, and an important test bed for stellar dynamos and the resulting X-ray–UV emissions of slowly rotating, near-fully convective red dwarf stars. Adding to the notoriety, Kapteyn’s Star has recently been reported to host two super-Earth candidates, one of which (Kapteyn b) is orbiting within the habitable zone. However, Robertson et al. questioned the planet’s existence since its orbital period may be an artifact of activity, related to the star’s rotation period. Because of its large Doppler-shift, measures of the important, chromospheric H i Lyα 1215.67 Å emission line can be reliably made, because it is mostly displaced from ISM and geo-coronal sources. Lyα emission dominates the FUV region of cool stars. Our measures can help determine the X-ray–UV effects on planets hosted by Kapteyn’s Star, and planets hosted by other old red dwarfs. Stellar X-ray and Lyα emissions have strong influences on the heating and ionization of upper planetary atmospheres and can (with stellar winds and flares) erode or even eliminate planetary atmospheres. Using our program stars, we have reconstructed the past exposures of Kapteyn’s Star's planets to coronal—chromospheric XUV emissions over time.

  11. Photochromic conversion in a red/green cyanobacteriochrome from Synechocystis PCC6803: quantum yields in solution and photoswitching dynamics in living E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Pennacchietti, Francesca; Losi, Aba; Xu, Xiu-ling; Zhao, Kai-hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Viappiani, Cristiano; Cella, Francesca; Diaspro, Alberto; Abbruzzetti, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    The protein encoded by the gene slr1393 from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Slr1393) is composed of three GAF domains, a PAS domain, and a histidine kinase motif. The third GAF domain (referred to as GAF3) was previously characterized as the sole domain in this protein, being able to carry phycocyanobilin (PCB) as the chromophore and to accomplish photochemistry. GAF3 shows photochromicity, and is able to switch between a red-absorbing parental state (GAF3R, λmax = 649 nm) and a green-absorbing photoproduct state (GAF3G, λmax = 536 nm) upon appropriate irradiation. In this study we have determined the photochemical quantum yields for the interconversion between both forms using two methods: an "absolute" method and a reference-based control. The latter is a comparative procedure which exploits a well-characterized blue-light photoreceptor, YtvA from Bacillus subtilis, and the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 as actinometers. The former is an ad hoc developed, four laser-based setup where two cw lasers provide the pump beams to induce photoswitching (red to green and green to red, respectively) and two cw lasers simultaneously monitor the appearance and disappearance of the two species. Interestingly, fit analysis of the recorded transient absorbance changes provided a quantum yield for the green → red conversion (≈0.3) at least three times larger than for the red → green conversion (≈0.08). These data are in agreement with the results from the comparative method documenting the usefulness of the 'direct' method developed here for quantum yields' determination. The light-induced switching capability of this photochromic protein allowed measuring the kinetics of GAF3 immobilized on a glass plate, and within living, overexpressing Escherichia coli cells.

  12. Genome Sequences of Polyomaviruses from the Wild-Living Red Colobus (Piliocolobus badius) and Western Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus).

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2016-10-13

    We identified with PCR and sequencing the full genomes of the recently discovered Pan troglodytes verus polyomavirus 8 and Piliocolobus badius polyomavirus 2 in a western chimpanzee and a western red colobus free-ranging in Taï National Park of Côte d'Ivoire. Copyright © 2016 Ben Salem et al.

  13. Costs of achieving live birth from assisted reproductive technology: a comparison of sequential single and double embryo transfer approaches.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sara; Boulet, Sheree L; Mneimneh, Allison S; Perkins, Kiran M; Jamieson, Denise J; Zhang, Yujia; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2016-02-01

    To assess treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs and birth outcomes for assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles in a subset of patients using elective double embryo (ET) and to project the difference in costs and outcomes had the cycles instead been sequential single ETs (fresh followed by frozen if the fresh ET did not result in live birth). Retrospective cohort study using 2012 and 2013 data from the National ART Surveillance System. Infertility treatment centers. Fresh, autologous double ETs performed in 2012 among ART patients younger than 35 years of age with no prior ART use who cryopreserved at least one embryo. Sequential single and double ETs. Actual live birth rates and estimated ART treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs for double ET cycles started in 2012 and projected ART treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs if the double ET cycles had been performed as sequential single ETs. The estimated total ART treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs were $580.9 million for 10,001 double ETs started in 2012. If performed as sequential single ETs, estimated costs would have decreased by $195.0 million to $386.0 million, and live birth rates would have increased from 57.7%-68.0%. Sequential single ETs, when clinically appropriate, can reduce total ART treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs by reducing multiple births without lowering live birth rates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Single Adhesive Nanofibers from a Live Diatom Have the Signature Fingerprint of Modular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dugdale, T. M.; Dagastine, R.; Chiovitti, A.; Mulvaney, P.; Wetherbee, R.

    2005-01-01

    The adhesive and mechanical properties of a cell-substratum adhesive secreted by live diatom cells were examined in situ using atomic force microscopy. The resulting force curves have a regular saw-tooth pattern, the characteristic fingerprint of modular proteins, and when bridged between tip and surface can repeatedly be stretched and relaxed resulting in precisely overlaying saw-tooth curves (up to ∼600 successive cycles). The average rupture force of the peaks is 0.794 ± 0.007 (mean ± SE) nN at a loading rate of 0.8 μm/s and the average persistence length is 0.026 ± <0.001 (mean ± SE) nm (fit using the worm-like chain model). We propose that we are pulling on single adhesive nanofibers, each a cohesive unit composed of a set number of modular proteins aligned in register. Furthermore, we can observe and differentiate when up to three adhesive nanofibers are pulled based upon multimodal distributions of force and persistence length. The high force required for bond rupture, high extensibility (∼1.2 μm), and the accurate and rapid refolding upon relaxation, together provide strong and flexible properties ideally suited for the cell-substratum adhesion of this fouling diatom and allow us to understand the mechanism responsible for the strength of adhesion. PMID:16169972

  15. Quantitative Image Analysis of Single-Molecule mRNA Dynamics in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Rino, José; de Jesus, Ana C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Single mRNA molecules can be imaged in living cells by a method that consists in genetically inserting binding sites for a bacteriophage protein in the gene of interest. The resulting reporter transgene is then integrated in the genome of cells that express the phage protein fused to a fluorescent tag. Upon transcription, binding of the fluorescent protein to its target sequence makes the RNA visible. With this approach it is possible to track, in real time, the life cycle of a precursor mRNA at the site of transcription in the nucleus and transport of mature mRNA to the cytoplasm. In order to measure the fluorescence associated with individual RNA molecules over time, we developed a semi-automated quantitative image analysis tool termed STaQTool. We describe in detail the implementation and application of the STaQTool software package, which is a generic tool able to process large 4D datasets allowing quantitative studies of different steps in gene expression.

  16. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  17. Compact and Blinking-Suppressed Quantum Dots for Single-Particle Tracking in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) offer distinct advantages over organic dyes and fluorescent proteins for biological imaging applications because of their brightness, photostability, and tunability. However, a major limitation is that single QDs emit fluorescent light in an intermittent on-and-off fashion called “blinking”. Here we report the development of blinking-suppressed, relatively compact QDs that are able to maintain their favorable optical properties in aqueous solution. Specifically, we show that a linearly graded alloy shell can be grown on a small CdSe core via a precisely controlled layer-by-layer process, and that this graded shell leads to a dramatic suppression of QD blinking in both organic solvents and water. A substantial portion (>25%) of the resulting QDs does not blink (more than 99% of the time in the bright or “on” state). Theoretical modeling studies indicate that this type of linearly graded shell not only can minimize charge carrier access to surface traps but also can reduce lattice defects, both of which are believed to be responsible for carrier trapping and QD blinking. Further, we have evaluated the biological utility of blinking-suppressed QDs coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based ligands and multidentate ligands. The results demonstrate that their optical properties are largely independent of surface coatings and solvating media, and that the blinking-suppressed QDs can provide continuous trajectories in live-cell receptor tracking studies. PMID:25157589

  18. Imaging of single mRNA molecules moving within a living cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Tadakuma, Hisashi; Ishihama, Yo; Shibuya, Toshiharu; Tani, Tokio; Funatsu, Takashi . E-mail: funatsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-06-09

    In eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNAs are transcribed in the nucleus, processed by 5' capping, 3'-polyadenylation, and splicing, and exported to the cytoplasm for translation. To examine the nuclear mRNA transport mechanism, intron-deficient mRNAs of truncated {beta}-globin and EGFP were synthesized, fluorescently labeled in vitro, and injected into the nucleus of living Xenopus A6 cells. The trajectories of single mRNA molecules in the nucleus were visualized using video-rate confocal microscopy. Approximately half the mRNAs moved by Brownian motion in the nucleoplasm, except the nucleoli, with an apparent diffusion coefficient of 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2}/s, about 1/150 of that in water. The slow diffusion could not be explained by simple diffusion obeying the Stokes-Einstein equation, suggesting interactions of the mRNAs with nuclear components. The remaining mRNAs were stationary with an average residence time of about 30 s, comparable to the time required for mRNA diffusion from the site of synthesis to nuclear pores.

  19. Outcomes of pediatric living donor kidney transplantation: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bertólez, Sonia; Barrero, Rafael; Fijo, Julia; Alonso, Verónica; Ojha, Devicka; Fernández-Hurtado, Miguel Ángel; Martínez, Jerónimo; León, Eduardo; García-Merino, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for children with ESRD offering advantages of improved survival, growth potential, cognitive development, and quality of life. The aim of our study was to compare the outcomes of LDKT vs DDKT performed in children at a single center. Retrospective chart review of pediatric patients who underwent kidney transplantation from 2005 to 2014 was performed. Ninety-one renal transplants were accomplished, and 31 cases (38.27%) were LDKT, and in 96.7% of the cases, the graft was obtained through laparoscopy. Thirty-four receptors weighted <25 kg. LDKT group had statistically significant lower cold ischemia times than DDKT one. Complication rate was 9.67% for LDKT and 18.33% for DDKT. eGFR was better in LDKT. Patient survival rate was 100% for LDKT and 98.3% for DDKT, and graft survival rate was 96.7% for LDKT and 88.33%-80% for DDKT at a year and 5 years. Our program of pediatric kidney transplantation has achieved optimal patient and graft survival rates with low rate of complications. Living donor pediatric kidney transplants have higher patient and better graft survival rates than deceased donor kidney transplants.

  20. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  1. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Varela, Juan A; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  2. FORMING SELF-ASSEMBLED CELL ARRAYS AND MEASURING THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION RATE OF A SINGLE LIVE CELL.

    PubMed

    Etzkorn, James R; McQuaide, Sarah C; Anderson, Judy B; Meldrum, Deirdre R; Parviz, Babak A

    2009-06-01

    We report a method for forming arrays of live single cells on a chip using polymer micro-traps made of SU8. We have studied the toxicity of the microfabricated structures and the associated environment for two cell lines. We also report a method for measuring the oxygen consumption rate of a single cell using optical interrogation of molecular oxygen sensors placed in micromachined micro-wells by temporarily sealing the cells in the micro-traps. The new techniques presented here add to the collection of tools available for performing "single-cell" biology. A single-cell self-assembly yield of 61% was achieved with oxygen draw down rates of 0.83, 0.82, and 0.71 fmol/minute on three isolated live A549 cells.

  3. Relationship between resistance to Phytophthora ramorum and constitutive phenolic chemistry in coast live oaks and northern red oaks

    Treesearch

    Annemarie M. Nagle; Matteo Garbelotto; Brice McPherson; David L. Wood; Pierluigi. Bonello

    2010-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum causes lethal canker diseases and extensive mortality in coast live oak (CLO) (Quercus agrifolia) and tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus). No practical controls are available for this disease in non-urban environments. Therefore, characterization of natural resistance is highly...

  4. Theoretical model for optical oximetry at the capillary level: exploring hemoglobin oxygen saturation through backscattering of single red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Spicer, Graham; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Hao F.; Yi, Ji; Backman, Vadim

    2017-02-01

    Oxygen saturation (sO2) of red blood cells (RBCs) in capillaries can indirectly assess local tissue oxygenation and metabolic function. For example, the altered retinal oxygenation in diabetic retinopathy and local hypoxia during tumor development in cancer are reflected by abnormal sO2 of local capillary networks. However, it is far from clear whether accurate label-free optical oximetry (i.e., measuring hemoglobin sO2) is feasible from dispersed RBCs at the single capillary level. The sO2-dependent hemoglobin absorption contrast present in optical scattering signal is complicated by geometry-dependent scattering from RBCs. We present a numerical study of backscattering spectra from single RBCs based on the first-order Born approximation, considering practical factors: RBC orientations, size variation, and deformations. We show that the oscillatory spectral behavior of RBC geometries is smoothed by variations in cell size and orientation, resulting in clear sO2-dependent spectral contrast. In addition, this spectral contrast persists with different mean cellular hemoglobin content and different deformations of RBCs. This study shows for the first time the feasibility of, and provides a theoretical model for, label-free optical oximetry at the single capillary level using backscattering-based imaging modalities, challenging the popular view that such measurements are impossible at the single capillary level.

  5. Combining red and blue-detuned optical potentials to form a Lamb-Dicke trap for a single neutral atom.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaodong; Yu, Shi; Xu, Peng; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2012-02-13

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for strong radial confinement of a single 87 Rb atom by a bichromatic far-off resonance optical dipole trap (BFORT). The BFORT is composed of a blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian LG01 beam and a red-detuned Gaussian beam. The atomic oscillation frequency measurement shows that the effective trapping dimension is much sharper than that from a diffraction-limited microscopic objective. Theory shows that the added scattering rate due to imposing blue-detuned light is negligible when the temperature of the single atoms is close to ground state temperature. By carrying out sub-Doppler cooling, the mean energy of single atoms trapped in the BFORT is reduced to 15 ± 1 μK. The corresponding mean quantum number of radial vibration n is about 1.65, which satisfies the Lamb-Dicke regime. We conclude that the BFORT is a suitable Lamb-Dicke trap for further cooling a single neutral atom down to the ground state and for further application in quantum information processing.

  6. Amplified Fluorescence from Polyfluorene Nanoparticles with Dual State Emission and Aggregation Caused Red Shifted Emission for Live Cell Imaging and Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Muthuraj, Balakrishnan; Mukherjee, Sudip; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Iyer, Parameswar Krishnan

    2016-11-30

    A newly synthesized polyfluorene derivative with pendant di(2-picolyl)amine (PF-DPA) shows dual state emission and aggregation caused red shifted emission that was utilized for cell imaging and cancer theranostics. PF-DPA was nontoxic to normal cells but showed cytotoxicity against cancer cells, suggesting its utility for cancer therapy. PF-DPA exhibits a large and unique red shifted emission at 556 nm at higher water ratio of THF:H2O (10:90) due to the formation of polymer nanoparticles or PDots spontaneously by intra- and intermolecular self-assembly induced aggregation. Dual state emission and aggregation caused red shifted emission (>100 nm) in PF-DPA homopolymer nanoparticles is very unique and attributed to the combined effect of intramolecular planarization and J-type aggregate formation in the PDots (25 ± 5 nm). The PF-DPA PDots exhibit bright green and orange fluorescence with exceptional live cell imaging properties and potential applications in cancer theranostics due to their selective cytotoxic nature toward cancer cells.

  7. Duration of immunity in red wolves (Canis rufus) following vaccination with a modified live parvovirus and canine distemper vaccine.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kadie; Case, Allison; Woodie, Kathleen; Waddell, William; Reed, Holly H

    2014-09-01

    There is growing information available regarding duration of immunity for core vaccines in both domestic and nondomestic species. Vaccination protocols in nondomestic canids have frequently followed guidelines developed for the domestic dog; however, these protocols can be inappropriate for nondomestic canids such as the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus), leaving some animals susceptible to infectious disease and others at risk for contracting vaccine-induced disease. In this study, red wolves (Canis rufus) were vaccinated against canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) and vaccination titers were followed annually for 3 yr. One hundred percent of wolves developed and maintained a positive titer to CDV for 3 yr and 96.9% of wolves developed and maintained a positive titer to CPV for 3 yr. Seroconversion for canine adenovirus was sporadic. The results of this study support decreasing the frequency of vaccine administration in the red wolf population to a triennial basis.

  8. Development of a two-photon fluorescent turn-on probe with far-red emission for thiophenols and its bioimaging application in living tissues.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huiming; Chen, Hua; Tang, Yonghe; Ma, Yanyan; Lin, Weiying

    2017-09-15

    Thiophenol is a highly toxic compound which is essential in the field of organic synthesis and drug design. However, the accumulation of thiophenols in the environment may cause serious health problems for human bodies ultimately. Therefore, it is critical to develop efficient methods for visualization of thiophenol species in biological samples. In this work, an innovative two-photon fluorescent turn-on probe FR-TP with far-red emission for thiophenols based on FR-NH2 fluorophore and 2,4-dinitrophenylsulfonyl recognition site was reported. The new probe can be used for thiophenol detection with large far-red fluorescence enhancement (about 155-fold), rapid response (completed within 100s), excellent sensitivity (DL 0.363μM), high selectivity, and lower cellular auto-fluorescence interference. Importantly, the probe FR-TP can be successfully employed to visualize thiophenols not only in the living HeLa cells but also in living liver tissues. In addition, through two-photon tissue imaging, the probe was used to monitor and investigate biological thiophenol poisoning in the animal model of thiophenol inhalation for the first time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Real-time and quantitative fluorescent live-cell imaging with quadruplex-specific red-edge probe (G4-REP).

    PubMed

    Yang, Sunny Y; Amor, Souheila; Laguerre, Aurélien; Wong, Judy M Y; Monchaud, David

    2016-12-10

    The development of quadruplex-directed molecular diagnostic and therapy rely on mechanistic insights gained at both cellular and tissue levels by fluorescence imaging. This technique is based on fluorescent reporters that label cellular DNA and RNA quadruplexes to spatiotemporally address their complex cell biology. The photophysical characteristics of quadruplex probes usually dictate the modality of cell imaging by governing the selection of the light source (lamp, LED, laser), the optical light filters and the detection modality. Here, we report the characterizations of prototype from a new generation of quadruplex dye termed G4-REP (for quadruplex-specific red-edge probe) that provides fluorescence responses regardless of the excitation wavelength and modality (owing to the versatility gained through the red-edge effect), thus allowing for diverse applications and most imaging facilities. This is demonstrated by cell images (and associated quantifications) collected through confocal and multiphoton microscopy as well as through real-time live-cell imaging system over extended period, monitoring both non-cancerous and cancerous human cell lines. Our results promote a new way of designing versatile, efficient and convenient quadruplex-reporting dyes for tracking these higher-order nucleic acid structures in living human cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "G-quadruplex" Guest Editor: Dr. Concetta Giancola and Dr. Daniela Montesarchio.

  10. Biocompatible photoresistant far-red emitting, fluorescent polymer probes, with near-infrared two-photon absorption, for living cell and zebrafish embryo imaging.

    PubMed

    Adjili, Salim; Favier, Arnaud; Fargier, Guillaume; Thomas, Audrey; Massin, Julien; Monier, Karine; Favard, Cyril; Vanbelle, Christophe; Bruneau, Sylvia; Peyriéras, Nadine; Andraud, Chantal; Muriaux, Delphine; Charreyre, Marie-Thérèse

    2015-04-01

    Exogenous probes with far-red or near-infrared (NIR) two-photon absorption and fluorescence emission are highly desirable for deep tissue imaging while limiting autofluorescence. However, molecular probes exhibiting such properties are often hydrophobic. As an attractive alternative, we synthesized water-soluble polymer probes carrying multiple far-red fluorophores and demonstrated here their potential for live cell and zebrafish embryo imaging. First, at concentrations up to 10 μm, these polymer probes were not cytotoxic. They could efficiently label living HeLa cells, T lymphocytes and neurons at an optimal concentration of 0.5 μm. Moreover, they exhibited a high resistance to photobleaching in usual microscopy conditions. In addition, these polymer probes could be successfully used for in toto labeling and in vivo two-photon microscopy imaging of developing zebrafish embryos, with remarkable properties in terms of biocompatibility, internalization, diffusion, stability and wavelength emission range. The near-infrared two-photon absorption peak at 910 nm is particularly interesting since it does not excite the zebrafish endogenous fluorescence and is likely to enable long-term time-lapse imaging with limited photodamage.

  11. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting.

    PubMed

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Lam, Amy J; Kim, Bongjae B; Jacobs, Conor L; Howe, Elizabeth S; Davidson, Michael W; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-02-16

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude.

  12. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Lam, Amy J.; Kim, Bongjae B.; Jacobs, Conor L.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude. PMID:26879144

  13. Red light, green light: probing single molecules using alternating-laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Santoso, Yusdi; Hwang, Ling Chin; Le Reste, Ludovic; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2008-08-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence methods, particularly single-molecule FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer), have provided novel insights into the structure, interactions and dynamics of biological systems. ALEX (alternating-laser excitation) spectroscopy is a new method that extends single-molecule FRET by providing simultaneous information about structure and stoichiometry; this new information allows the detection of interactions in the absence of FRET and extends the dynamic range of distance measurements that are accessible through FRET. In the present article, we discuss combinations of ALEX with confocal microscopy for studying in-solution and in-gel molecules; we also discuss combining ALEX with TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) for studying surface-immobilized molecules. We also highlight applications of ALEX to the study of protein-nucleic acid interactions.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of a single dose of voriconazole administered orally with and without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus).

    PubMed

    Parsley, Ruth A; Tell, Lisa A; Gehring, Ronette

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole administered PO with or without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus) and whether any observed variability could be explained by measured covariates to inform dose adjustments. ANIMALS 7 adult red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES In a crossover study design, hawks were randomly assigned to first receive voriconazole (15 mg/kg, PO) injected into a dead mouse (n = 3; fed birds) or without food (4; unfed birds). Sixteen days later, treatments were reversed. Blood samples were collected at various points to measure plasma voriconazole concentrations by ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and fit to a compartmental model through nonlinear mixed-effects regression, with feeding status and body weight investigated as covariates. RESULTS Voriconazole was well absorbed, with quantifiable plasma concentrations up to 24 hours after administration. Mean plasma half-life was approximately 2 hours in fed and unfed birds. Administration of the voriconazole in food delayed absorption, resulting in a significant delay in time to maximum plasma concentration. The final compartmental model included a categorical covariate to account for this lag in absorption as well as body weight as a covariate of total body clearance (relative to unknown bioavailability). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A single dose of voriconazole (15 mg/kg) administered PO to red-tailed hawks resulted in mean plasma voriconazole concentrations greater than the targeted value (1 μg/mL). Additional studies with larger sample sizes and multidose regimens are required before the model developed here can be applied in clinical settings.

  15. Single-Beam Acoustic Trapping of Red Blood Cells and Polystyrene Microspheres in Flowing Red Blood Cell Saline and Plasma Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiao-Chuan; Li, Ying; Chen, Ruimin; Jung, Hayong; Shung, K Kirk

    2017-04-01

    Single-beam acoustic tweezers (SBATs) represent a new technology for particle and cell trapping. The advantages of SBATs are their deep penetration into tissues, reduction of tissue damage and ease of application to in vivo studies. The use of these tools for applications in drug delivery in vivo must meet the following conditions: large penetration depth, strong trapping force and tissue safety. A reasonable penetration depth for SBATs in the development of in vivo applications was established in a previous study conducted in water with zero velocity. However, capturing objects in flowing fluid can provide more meaningful results. In this study, we investigated the capability of SBATs to trap red blood cells (RBCs) and polystyrene microspheres in flowing RBC suspensions. Two different types of RBC suspension were prepared in this work: an RBC phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) suspension and an RBC plasma suspension. The results indicated that SBATs successfully trapped RBCs and polystyrene microspheres in a flowing RBC PBS suspension with an average steady velocity of 1.6 cm/s in a 2-mm-diameter polyimide. Furthermore, SBATs were found able to trap RBCs in a flowing RBC PBS suspension at speeds as high as 7.9 cm/s in a polyimide tube, which is higher than the velocity in capillaries (0.03 cm/s) and approaches the velocity in arterioles and venules. Moreover, the results also indicated that polystyrene microspheres can be trapped in an RBC plasma suspension, where aggregation is observed. This work represents a step forward in using this tool in actual in vivo experimentation.

  16. Progress of the Living with a Red Dwarf Program: Activity-Rotation-Age Relationships for M dwarfs and the Ages of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Edward Francis; Harper, Graham

    2015-08-01

    Red Dwarfs (M dwarfs or dM stars) make up over 75% of the local stellar population. This is among the reasons they are being targeted by an increasing number of planet-hunting programs. As such, developing a method to accurately estimate the age of a field M dwarf is of critical importance. However, due to their long lifetimes and very slow nuclear evolution, the best method for determining ages is likely through “magnetic tracers” such as X-UV activity levels and stellar rotation rates. The Living with a Red Dwarf program’s database of M dwarfs with photometrically determined rotation periods (via starspot modulations) is becoming substantial. Its expansion to include M dwarfs with well-detached WD companions - through which reliable ages can be determined - has had significant impacts on the reliability of the relations. When combined with M dwarfs possessing cluster/population memberships, or specific kinematics, a full range of “calibrators” is being realized. We report on our continuing efforts to build reliable Activity-Rotation-Age relationships for M dwarfs, utilizing X-UV measures obtained with HST, IUE Chandra and XMM (both proposed by us, and archival). Such relationships permit the assessment of the habitability of planets hosted by red dwarfs, by delineating the X-UV radiation environments these planets are exposed to, and have been exposed to in the past. After proper calibration, the relationships can also permit the age of a field red dwarf (and any hosted planets) to be determined through measures of either the stellar rotation period or X-UV activity level.We gratefully acknowledge the support from NSF/RUI Grant AST 1009903, Chandra Grant GO-13200633, HST Grants GO-12124X and GO-13020X.

  17. Dynamics of a single red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Kushal; Graham, Michael D.

    2015-10-01

    This work describes simulations of a red blood cell (RBC) in simple shear flow, focusing on the dependence of the cell dynamics on the spontaneous curvature of the membrane. The results show that an oblate spheroidal spontaneous curvature maintains the dimple of the RBC during tank-treading dynamics as well as exhibits off-shear-plane tumbling consistent with the experimental observations of Dupire et al. [J. Dupire, M. Socol, and A. Viallat, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 20808 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1210236109] and their hypothesis of an inhomogeneous spontaneous shape. As the flow strength (capillary number Ca ) is increased at a particular viscosity ratio between inner and outer fluid, the dynamics undergo transitions in the following sequence: tumbling, kayaking or rolling, tilted tank-treading, oscillating-swinging, swinging, and tank-treading. The tilted tank-treading (or spinning frisbee) regime has been previously observed in experiments but not in simulations. Two distinct classes of regime are identified: a membrane reorientation regime, where the part of membrane that is at the dimple at rest moves to the rim and vice versa, is observed in motions at high Ca such as tilted tank-treading, oscillating-swinging, swinging, and tank-treading, and a nonreorientation regime, where the part of the membrane starting from the dimple stays at the dimple, is observed in motions at low Ca such as rolling, tumbling, kayaking, and flip-flopping.

  18. Voriconazole Disposition After Single and Multiple, Oral Doses in Healthy, Adult Red-tailed Hawks ( Buteo jamaicensis ).

    PubMed

    Gentry, Jordan; Montgerard, Christy; Crandall, Elizabeth; Cruz-Espindola, Crisanta; Boothe, Dawn; Bellah, Jamie

    2014-09-01

    Voriconazole is effective for treatment of aspergillosis, a common disease in captive red-tailed hawks ( Buteo jamaicensis ). To determine the disposition and safety of voriconazole after single and multiple, oral doses, 12 adult red-tailed hawks were studied in 2 phases. In phase 1, each bird received a single dose of voriconazole solution (10 mg/kg) by gavage. Blood samples were collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 16, 24, and 36 hours after treatment. In phase 2, each of 8 birds received voriconazole oral solution at 10 mg/kg PO q12h for 14 days. Plasma samples were collected on days 0, 5, and 10 and after the final dose and were processed as in phase 1. Plasma samples were submitted for analysis of voriconazole levels by high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet spectrophotometry and for measurement of selected plasma biochemical parameters. After single dosing, voriconazole concentrations reached a (mean ± SD) peak (Cmax) of 4.7 ± 1.3 μg/mL at 2.0 ± 1.2 hours. The disappearance half-life (t1/2) was 2.8 ± 0.7 hours, and the mean residence time (MRT) was 4.6 ± 0.9 hours. After the last dose at 14 days, the mean Cmax of voriconazole was 4.5 ± 2.7 μg/mL at 2.4 ± 1.1 hours. The t1/2 was 2.1 ± 0.8 hours, and the MRT was 3.5 ± 1.1 hours. Although concentrations of several plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different at study end compared with prestudy concentrations, only plasma creatine kinase activity was outside the reference range. No adverse reactions were observed in any of the birds. After both single and multiple dosing at 10 mg/kg, voriconazole concentrations exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration to inhibit 90% (MIC90) of Aspergillus species (1 μg/mL) by at least fourfold and remained above the MIC90 for 8.8 ± 1.1 hours after single dosing versus 6.5 ± 1.5 hours after multiple dosing (P = .003). This difference suggests that more frequent dosing (eg, up to q8h) may be necessary to maintain target

  19. Intracellular Calcium Gradients in Single Living Cells: Measurement and Analysis by Optical and Digital Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelamarty, Rao Viswanadha

    Intracellular calcium (Ca^{2+ }) has been considered as a regulator of many cellular processes. In addition, Ca^{2+ } also plays a key role in mediating actions of many hormones, growth factors, and drugs. This thesis describes two general approaches, digital video and photomultiplier (PMT) based fluorescence microscopic systems, to measure such Ca^{2+} changes throughout the cell. They reveal the heterogeneous spatial and fast temporal changes of Ca^{2+} within a single isolated living cell. In order to measure spatial Ca^ {2+} in three dimensions (3-D), optical section microscopy (OSM) coupled to digital video imaging is introduced. With this approach, an increase in nuclear Ca^{2+} compared to cytosolic Ca^{2+} is detected in human erythroblasts and rat hepatocytes under the addition of growth factors: erythropoietin and epidermal growth factor respectively. In addition, the primary effect of non growth-promoting hormone vasopressin, raise in cytosolic Ca^{2+}, is also observed. These observations are the first to underscore the importance of nuclear Ca^{2+} increase in cell growth and differentiation. On the other hand, to track fast Ca^ {2+} transients (mesc) during excitation -contraction (EC) cycle and then examine alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in healthy and diseased (hypertensive) heart cells, a PMT based system is implemented. Significant alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in hypertensive heart cells were observed. This finding is compatible with the clinical finding that patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy suffer a lack of adequate relaxation. Finally, to correlate the Ca^{2+} dynamics in an EC cycle with mechanical activity, a hybrid optical digital processor was developed. The performance of the hybrid processor is analyzed and applied simultaneously with the PMT based system. The mechanical contraction and relaxation of a single cardiac cell closely paralleled that of Ca^{2+} dynamics during an EC cycle. In summary, this thesis illustrates

  20. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Céline M; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A

    2012-04-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall.

  1. Measurement of Separase Proteolytic Activity in Single Living Cells by a Fluorogenic Flow Cytometry Assay

    PubMed Central

    Haaß, Wiltrud; Kleiner, Helga; Müller, Martin C.; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fabarius, Alice; Seifarth, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110)-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110) as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90–180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic activity in leukemic

  2. Aquaporin-4 Dynamics in Orthogonal Arrays in Live Cells Visualized by Quantum Dot Single Particle Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Jonathan M.; Van Hoek, Alfred N.; Skach, William R.

    2008-01-01

    Freeze-fracture electron microscopy (FFEM) indicates that aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels can assemble in cell plasma membranes in orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs). We investigated the determinants and dynamics of AQP4 assembly in OAPs by tracking single AQP4 molecules labeled with quantum dots at an engineered external epitope. In several transfected cell types, including primary astrocyte cultures, the long N-terminal “M1” form of AQP4 diffused freely, with diffusion coefficient ∼5 × 10−10 cm2/s, covering ∼5 μm in 5 min. The short N-terminal “M23” form of AQP4, which by FFEM was found to form OAPs, was relatively immobile, moving only ∼0.4 μm in 5 min. Actin modulation by latrunculin or jasplakinolide did not affect AQP4-M23 diffusion, but deletion of its C-terminal postsynaptic density 95/disc-large/zona occludens (PDZ) binding domain increased its range by approximately twofold over minutes. Biophysical analysis of short-range AQP4-M23 diffusion within OAPs indicated a spring-like potential, with a restoring force of ∼6.5 pN/μm. These and additional experiments indicated that 1) AQP4-M1 and AQP4-M23 isoforms do not coassociate in OAPs; 2) OAPs can be imaged directly by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy; and 3) OAPs are relatively fixed, noninterconvertible assemblies that do not require cytoskeletal or PDZ-mediated interactions for formation. Our measurements are the first to visualize OAPs in live cells. PMID:18495865

  3. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Hayot, Céline M.; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  4. Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the bioeffects of nitroglycerin on Hb-O II in single red blood cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Huihua Kenny; Ruan, Hung-Shiang; Cheng, Hung-You; Fang, Tung-Ting

    2007-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been shown to have the potential for providing oxygenated ability of erythrocytes. Raman line at 1638 cm-1 has also been reported as one significant oxygenic indicator for erythrocytes. In this research, we develop the Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the bioeffects of Nitroglycerin on hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a single red blood cell (RBC). Nitroglycerin has been frequently used in the management of angina pectoris. Nitroglycerin liberates nitric oxide (NO) to blood vessels. NO is an oxidizer that easily converts hemoglobin to methemoglobin. The conversion may cause the decrease of oxygenated ability of erythrocytes. In this study, we observed the oxidize state of erythrocytes caused by the over dosage of Nitroglycerin. When the dose of Nitroglycerin exceeds 2x10 -4 M, the oxygenic state of erythrocytes decreases significantly. The Raman spectroscopic results demonstrate the observation of the bioeffects of Nitroglycerin on hemoglobin.

  5. Evaluation of naked eye single tube red cell osmotic fragility test in detecting beta-thalassemia trait.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, K; Lokeshwar, M R; Birewar, N; Nigam, V; Manglani, M V; Raju, N B

    1991-05-01

    The Naked Eye Single Tube Red Cell Osmotic Fragility Test (NESTROFT) was applied to 4 groups of subjects: (i) Normal; (ii) Proven beta-thalassemia trait carriers; (iii) Iron deficiency anemia; and (iv) other hemoglobinopathies, to evaluate its effectiveness as a screening test for beta-thalassemia minor. The test was successful in detecting 105/110 subjects with beta-thalassemia trait. The sensitivity of the test was 95.5% and specificity was 87%. The predictive value of the positive test was 70.5% and that of the negative test was 98.3%. NESTROFT was also positive in 9/17 subjects with HbS trait, in 3/3 subjects with HbD trait and in 1/1 subjects with HbE trait. The test proved to be simple, cheap, easy to perform and adaptable for field surveys, coming close to an ideal screening test for beta-thalassemia minor.

  6. Studying single red blood cells under a tunable external force by combining passive microrheology with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Raj, Saurabh; Wojdyla, Michal; Petrov, Dmitri

    2013-04-01

    The dynamic micromechanical and structural properties of single human red blood cells are studied using a combination of dual trap optical tweezers and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Such a combination permits us to show a direct relationship between the rheological properties and chemical structure conformation. The frequency dependence of the complex stiffness of the cells was measured using both one and two probe response functions under identical experimental conditions. Both the microrheology and Raman measurements were performed at different stretching forces applied to the cell. A detailed analysis of the auto- and cross-correlated probe motions allows exploring the local and overall viscoelastic properties of the cells over a controlled range of the deformations. The observed growth of the cell viscoelasticity with stretching was associated with structural changes in the cell membrane monitored via the Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Novel single-cell functional analysis of red blood cells using laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy: application for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Mao, Ziliang; Matthews, Dennis L; Li, Chin-Shang; Chan, James W; Satake, Noriko

    2013-07-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the oxygenation response of single normal adult, sickle, and cord blood red blood cells (RBCs) to an applied mechanical force. Individual cells were subjected to different forces by varying the laser power of a single-beam optical trap, and the intensities of several oxygenation-specific Raman spectral peaks were monitored to determine the oxygenation state of the cells. For all three cell types, an increase in laser power (or mechanical force) induced a greater deoxygenation of the cell. However, sickle RBCs deoxygenated more readily than normal RBCs when subjected to the same optical forces. Conversely, cord blood RBCs were able to maintain their oxygenation better than normal RBCs. These results suggest that differences in the chemical or mechanical properties of fetal, normal, and sickle cells affect the degree to which applied mechanical forces can deoxygenate the cell. Populations of normal, sickle, and cord RBCs were identified and discriminated based on this mechanochemical phenomenon. This study demonstrates the potential application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy as a single-cell, label-free analytical tool to characterize the functional (e.g., mechanical deformability, oxygen binding) properties of normal and diseased RBCs. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wear Fast, Die Young: More Worn Teeth and Shorter Lives in Iberian Compared to Scottish Red Deer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Barbería, F. J.; Carranza, J.; Sánchez-Prieto, C.

    2015-01-01

    Teeth in Cervidae are permanent structures that are not replaceable or repairable; consequently their rate of wear, due to the grinding effect of food and dental attrition, affects their duration and can determine an animal's lifespan. Tooth wear is also a useful indicator of accumulative life energy investment in intake and mastication and their interactions with diet. Little is known regarding how natural and sexual selection operate on dental structures within a species in contrasting environments and how these relate to life history traits to explain differences in population rates of tooth wear and longevity. We hypothesised that populations under harsh environmental conditions should be selected for more hypsodont teeth while sexual selection may maintain similar sex differences within different populations. We investigated the patterns of tooth wear in males and females of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) in Southern Spain and Scottish red deer (C. e. scoticus) across Scotland, that occur in very different environments, using 10343 samples from legal hunting activities. We found higher rates of both incisor and molar wear in the Spanish compared to Scottish populations. However, Scottish red deer had larger incisors at emergence than Iberian red deer, whilst molars emerged at a similar size in both populations and sexes. Iberian and Scottish males had earlier tooth depletion than females, in support of a similar sexual selection process in both populations. However, whilst average lifespan for Iberian males was 4 years shorter than that for Iberian females and Scottish males, Scottish males only showed a reduction of 1 year in average lifespan with respect to Scottish females. More worn molars were associated with larger mandibles in both populations, suggesting that higher intake and/or greater investment in food comminution may have favoured increased body growth, before later loss of tooth efficiency due to severe wear. These results

  9. Wear Fast, Die Young: More Worn Teeth and Shorter Lives in Iberian Compared to Scottish Red Deer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Barbería, F J; Carranza, J; Sánchez-Prieto, C

    2015-01-01

    Teeth in Cervidae are permanent structures that are not replaceable or repairable; consequently their rate of wear, due to the grinding effect of food and dental attrition, affects their duration and can determine an animal's lifespan. Tooth wear is also a useful indicator of accumulative life energy investment in intake and mastication and their interactions with diet. Little is known regarding how natural and sexual selection operate on dental structures within a species in contrasting environments and how these relate to life history traits to explain differences in population rates of tooth wear and longevity. We hypothesised that populations under harsh environmental conditions should be selected for more hypsodont teeth while sexual selection may maintain similar sex differences within different populations. We investigated the patterns of tooth wear in males and females of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) in Southern Spain and Scottish red deer (C. e. scoticus) across Scotland, that occur in very different environments, using 10343 samples from legal hunting activities. We found higher rates of both incisor and molar wear in the Spanish compared to Scottish populations. However, Scottish red deer had larger incisors at emergence than Iberian red deer, whilst molars emerged at a similar size in both populations and sexes. Iberian and Scottish males had earlier tooth depletion than females, in support of a similar sexual selection process in both populations. However, whilst average lifespan for Iberian males was 4 years shorter than that for Iberian females and Scottish males, Scottish males only showed a reduction of 1 year in average lifespan with respect to Scottish females. More worn molars were associated with larger mandibles in both populations, suggesting that higher intake and/or greater investment in food comminution may have favoured increased body growth, before later loss of tooth efficiency due to severe wear. These results

  10. A Single Enhancer Regulating the Differential Expression of Duplicated Red-Sensitive Opsin Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, Taro; Hosoya, Tomohiro; Kawamura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental step in the evolution of the visual system is the gene duplication of visual opsins and differentiation between the duplicates in absorption spectra and expression pattern in the retina. However, our understanding of the mechanism of expression differentiation is far behind that of spectral tuning of opsins. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have two red-sensitive cone opsin genes, LWS-1 and LWS-2. These genes are arrayed in a tail-to-head manner, in this order, and are both expressed in the long member of double cones (LDCs) in the retina. Expression of the longer-wave sensitive LWS-1 occurs later in development and is thus confined to the peripheral, especially ventral-nasal region of the adult retina, whereas expression of LWS-2 occurs earlier and is confined to the central region of the adult retina, shifted slightly to the dorsal-temporal region. In this study, we employed a transgenic reporter assay using fluorescent proteins and P1-artificial chromosome (PAC) clones encompassing the two genes and identified a 0.6-kb “LWS-activating region” (LAR) upstream of LWS-1, which regulates expression of both genes. Under the 2.6-kb flanking upstream region containing the LAR, the expression pattern of LWS-1 was recapitulated by the fluorescent reporter. On the other hand, when LAR was directly conjugated to the LWS-2 upstream region, the reporter was expressed in the LDCs but also across the entire outer nuclear layer. Deletion of LAR from the PAC clones drastically lowered the reporter expression of the two genes. These results suggest that LAR regulates both LWS-1 and LWS-2 by enhancing their expression and that interaction of LAR with the promoters is competitive between the two genes in a developmentally restricted manner. Sharing a regulatory region between duplicated genes could be a general way to facilitate the expression differentiation in duplicated visual opsins. PMID:21187910

  11. Humoral immune responses are maintained with age in a long-lived ectotherm, the red-eared slider turtle.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Laura M; Clairardin, Sandrine G; Paitz, Ryan T; Hicke, Justin W; LaMagdeleine, Katie A; Vogel, Laura A; Bowden, Rachel M

    2013-02-15

    Aging is typically associated with a decrease in immune function. However, aging does not affect each branch of the immune system equally. Because of these varying effects of age on immune responses, aging could affect taxa differently based on how the particular taxon employs its resources towards different components of immune defense. An example of this is found in the humoral immune system. Specific responses tend to decrease with age while non-specific, natural antibody responses increase with age. Compared with mammals, reptiles of all ages have a slower and less robust humoral immune system. Therefore, they may invest more in non-specific responses and thus avoid the negative consequences of age on the immune system. We examined how the humoral immune system of reptiles is affected by aging and investigated the roles of non-specific, natural antibody responses and specific responses by examining several characteristics of antibodies against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the red-eared slider turtle. We found very little evidence of immunosenescence in the humoral immune system of the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta, which supports the idea that non-specific, natural antibody responses are an important line of defense in reptiles. Overall, this demonstrates that a taxon's immune strategy can influence how the immune system is affected by age.

  12. Faecal egg counts provide a reliable measure of Trichostrongylus tenuis intensities in free-living red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus.

    PubMed

    Seivwright, L J; Redpath, S M; Mougeot, F; Watt, L; Hudson, P J

    2004-03-01

    The reliability of different egg counting methods for estimating the intensity of Trichostrongylus tenuis infections in red grouse, Lagopus lagopus scoticus, was investigated in the autumn, when grouse may harbour high parasite intensities. Possible limitations to the use of these methods were also examined. Faecal egg counts were found to accurately estimate T. tenuis worm intensities, at least up to an observed maximum of c. 8000 worms. Two egg counting methods (smear and McMaster) gave consistent results, although the exact relationship with worm intensity differed according to the method used. Faecal egg counts significantly decreased with increasing length of sample storage time, but egg counts were reliable for estimating worm intensity for three weeks. The concentration of eggs in the caecum was also found to reliably estimate worm intensity. However, egg counts from frozen gut samples cannot be used to estimate worm intensities. These results conclude that, despite some limitations, faecal and caecum egg counts provide useful and reliable ways of measuring T. tenuis intensities in red grouse.

  13. Live-cell imaging tool optimization to study gene expression levels and dynamics in single cells of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Eijlander, Robyn T; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2013-09-01

    Single-cell methods are a powerful application in microbial research to study the molecular mechanism underlying phenotypic heterogeneity and cell-to-cell variability. Here, we describe the optimization and application of single-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy for the food spoilage bacterium Bacillus cereus specifically. This technique is useful to study cellular development and adaptation, gene expression, protein localization, protein mobility, and cell-to-cell communication over time at the single-cell level. By adjusting existing protocols, we have enabled the visualization of growth and development of single B. cereus cells within a microcolony over time. Additionally, several different fluorescent reporter proteins were tested in order to select the most suitable green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) candidates for visualization of growth stage- and cell compartment-specific gene expression in B. cereus. With a case study concerning cotD expression during sporulation, we demonstrate the applicability of time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. It enables the assessment of gene expression levels, dynamics, and heterogeneity at the single-cell level. We show that cotD is not heterogeneously expressed among cells of a subpopulation. Furthermore, we discourage using plasmid-based reporter fusions for such studies, due to an introduced heterogeneity through copy number differences. This stresses the importance of using single-copy integrated reporter fusions for single-cell studies.

  14. Live-Cell Imaging Tool Optimization To Study Gene Expression Levels and Dynamics in Single Cells of Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Eijlander, Robyn T.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell methods are a powerful application in microbial research to study the molecular mechanism underlying phenotypic heterogeneity and cell-to-cell variability. Here, we describe the optimization and application of single-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy for the food spoilage bacterium Bacillus cereus specifically. This technique is useful to study cellular development and adaptation, gene expression, protein localization, protein mobility, and cell-to-cell communication over time at the single-cell level. By adjusting existing protocols, we have enabled the visualization of growth and development of single B. cereus cells within a microcolony over time. Additionally, several different fluorescent reporter proteins were tested in order to select the most suitable green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) candidates for visualization of growth stage- and cell compartment-specific gene expression in B. cereus. With a case study concerning cotD expression during sporulation, we demonstrate the applicability of time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. It enables the assessment of gene expression levels, dynamics, and heterogeneity at the single-cell level. We show that cotD is not heterogeneously expressed among cells of a subpopulation. Furthermore, we discourage using plasmid-based reporter fusions for such studies, due to an introduced heterogeneity through copy number differences. This stresses the importance of using single-copy integrated reporter fusions for single-cell studies. PMID:23851094

  15. Embryo quality is the main factor affecting cumulative live birth rate after elective single embryo transfer in fresh stimulation cycles.

    PubMed

    Niinimäki, Maarit; Veleva, Zdravka; Martikainen, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate which factors affect the cumulative live birth rate after elective single embryo transfer in women younger than 36 years. Additionally, number of children in women with more than one delivery per ovum pick-up after fresh elective single embryo transfer and subsequent frozen embryo transfers was assessed. Retrospective cohort study analysing data of a university hospital's infertility clinic in 2001-2010. A total of 739 IVF/ICSI cycles with elective single embryo transfer were included. Analyses were made per ovum pick-up including fresh and subsequent frozen embryo transfers. Factors affecting cumulative live birth rates were examined in uni- and multivariate analyses. A secondary endpoint was the number of children born after all treatments. In the fresh cycles, the live birth rate was 29.2% and the cumulative live birth rate was 51.3%, with a twin rate of 3.4%. In the multivariate analysis, having two (odds ratio (OR) 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-2.67) or ≥3 top embryos (OR 2.66; 95% CI 1.79-3.95) was associated with higher odds for live birth after fresh and frozen embryo cycles. Age, body mass index, duration of infertility, diagnosis or total gonadotropin dose were not associated with the cumulative live birth rate. In cycles with one top embryo, the cumulative live birth rate was 40.2%, whereas it was 64.1% in those with at least three top embryos. Of women who had a live birth in the fresh cycle, 20.4% had more than one child after all frozen embryo transfers. Among women with three or more top embryos after ovum pick-up, 16.1% gave birth to more than one child. The cumulative live birth rate in this age group varies from 40% to 64% and is dependent on the quality of embryos. Women with three or more top embryos have good chance of having more than one child per ovum pick-up without elevated risk of multiple pregnancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Barriers to live donor kidney transplants in the pediatric population: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Shibany P; Galloway, Matthew P; Jain, Amrish

    2017-03-01

    A decrease in live donor pediatric kidney transplants has occurred in the United States. This study investigates barriers that may influence access to live donor kidney transplants in children. Retrospective chart review was conducted for 91 children (69% male, mean age 11.9 years) who underwent pretransplant workup from 2005 to 2015 at an urban pediatric hospital. Fifty-four percent were African American, 32% Caucasian, 8% Arabic, 3% Hispanic, and 3% Others. Government-sponsored insurance (Medicaid/Medicare) was utilized by 73%, and 54% had dual caregivers. Only nine of 68 kidney transplants were live donor transplants. Live donor transplants (11%) were significantly (P=.008) lower than deceased donor transplants (59%) in African Americans. Private insurance was reported by 56% of live donor recipients and 25% of deceased donor recipients. Among live donor recipients, 78% were from dual caregiver families. Caregiver, health-related, financial, and religious/cultural barriers to live donor transplants were reported, several of which may be amenable to positive intervention.

  17. Compact high-power red-green-blue laser light source generation from a single lithium tantalate with cascaded domain modulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, P; Zhao, L N; Lv, X J; Lu, J; Yuan, Y; Zhao, G; Zhu, S N

    2009-06-08

    1W quasi-white-light source has been generated from a single lithium tantalate with cascaded domain modulation. The quasi-white-light is combined by proper proportion of the red, green and blue laser light. The red and the blue result from a compact self-sum frequency optical parametric oscillation when pumped by a single green laser. The efficiency of quasi-white-light from the green pump reaches 27%. This compact design can be employed not only as a stable and powerful RGB light source but also an effective blue laser generator.

  18. Alterations in Red Blood Cells and Plasma Properties after Acute Single Bout of Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gwozdzinski, Krzysztof; Pieniazek, Anna; Brzeszczynska, Joanna; Jegier, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate alterations in haemoglobin conformation and parameters related to oxidative stress in whole erythrocytes, membranes, and plasma after a single bout of exercise in a group of young untrained men. Venous blood samples from eleven healthy young untrained males (age = 22 ± 2 years, BMI = 23 ± 2.5 kg/m2) were taken from the antecubital vein before an incremental cycling exercise test, immediately after exercise, and 1 hour after exercise. Individual heart rate response to this exercise was 195 ± 12 beats/min and the maximum wattage was 292 ± 27 W. Immediately after exercise, significant increase in standard parameters (haemoglobin, haematocrit, lactate levels, and plasma volume) of blood was observed as well as plasma antioxidant capacity one hour after exercise. Reversible conformational changes in haemoglobin, measured using a maleimide spin label, were found immediately following exercise. The concentration of ascorbic acid inside erythrocytes significantly decreased after exercise. A significant decline in membrane thiols was observed one hour after exercise, but simultaneously an increase in plasma thiols immediately after and 1 h after exercise was also observed. This study shows that a single bout of exercise can lead to mobilization of defensive antioxidant systems in blood against oxidative stress in young untrained men. PMID:24453803

  19. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Ng, Tien Khee; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture. PMID:27659906

  20. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Ng, Tien Khee; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-09-23

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture.

  1. Single-cell force spectroscopy as a technique to quantify human red blood cell adhesion to subendothelial laminin.

    PubMed

    Maciaszek, Jamie L; Partola, Kostyantyn; Zhang, Jing; Andemariam, Biree; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-12-18

    Single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assay, enables quantitative study of cell adhesion while maintaining the native state of surface receptors in physiological conditions. Human healthy and pathological red blood cells (RBCs) express a large number of surface proteins which mediate cell-cell interactions, or cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In particular, RBCs adhere with high affinity to subendothelial matrix laminin via the basal cell adhesion molecule and Lutheran protein (BCAM/Lu). Here, we established SCFS as an in vitro technique to study human RBC adhesion at baseline and following biochemical treatment. Using blood obtained from healthy human subjects, we recorded adhesion forces from single RBCs attached to AFM cantilevers as the cell was pulled-off of substrates coated with laminin protein. We found that an increase in the overall cell adhesion measured via SCFS is correlated with an increase in the resultant total force measured on 1 µm(2) areas of the RBC membrane. Further, we showed that SCFS can detect significant changes in the adhesive response of RBCs to modulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Lastly, we identified variability in the RBC adhesion force to laminin amongst the human subjects, suggesting that RBCs maintain diverse levels of active BCAM/Lu adhesion receptors. By using single-cell measurements, we established a powerful new method for the quantitative measurement of single RBC adhesion with specific receptor-mediated binding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Costs of achieving live birth from assisted reproductive technology: a comparison of sequential single and double embryo transfer approaches

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Sara; Boulet, Sheree L.; Mneimneh, Allison S.; Perkins, Kiran M.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Zhang, Yujia; Kissin, Dmitry M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs and birth outcomes for assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles in a subset of patients using elective double embryo (ET) and to project the difference in costs and outcomes had the cycles instead been sequential single ETs (fresh followed by frozen if the fresh ET did not result in live birth). Design Retrospective cohort study using 2012 and 2013 data from the National ART Surveillance System. Setting Infertility treatment centers. Patient(s) Fresh, autologous double ETs performed in 2012 among ART patients younger than 35 years of age with no prior ART use who cryopreserved at least one embryo. Intervention(s) Sequential single and double ETs. Main Outcome Measure(s) Actual live birth rates and estimated ART treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs for double ET cycles started in 2012 and projected ART treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs if the double ET cycles had been performed as sequential single ETs. Result(s) The estimated total ART treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs were $580.9 million for 10,001 double ETs started in 2012. If performed as sequential single ETs, estimated costs would have decreased by $195.0 million to $386.0 million, and live birth rates would have increased from 57.7%–68.0%. Conclusion(s) Sequential single ETs, when clinically appropriate, can reduce total ART treatment and pregnancy/infant-associated medical costs by reducing multiple births without lowering live birth rates. PMID:26604068

  3. Experimental analysis of Hb oxy-deoxy transition in single optically stretched red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Rusciano, G

    2010-10-01

    Raman confocal microscopy, combined with an optical stretcher, is used to study the spatial distribution and the oxidation state of hemoglobin in erythrocytes under stretching condition. In particular, a near infrared laser (λ = 1064 nm) is used to generate multiple time-sharing Optical Tweezers to trap and stretch a single erythrocyte, while a second laser (λ = 532 nm) acts as Raman probe. Our study demonstrates that stretching induces hemoglobin transition to the deoxygenated state. Moreover, by using Principal Component Analysis we prove the reversibility of the oxy ↦ deoxy hemoglobin transition after application of the optically induced mechanical stress. Copyright © 2010 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement of ethanol formation in single living cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using synchrotron Fourier Transform Infrared spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, Kira L.; Quaroni, Luca; Pedersen, Tor; Wilson, Kenneth E.

    2010-02-03

    We demonstrate the capability of Fourier-Transform Infra-Red (FITR) spectroscopy to detect metabolite formation by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in solution. We show that using a synchrotron source in the microscopy configuration provides a sufficient s/n ratio to detect small molecular species accumulating at a single cell, allowing an increased sensitivity relative to measurements of bulk cultures. The formation of small molecular species, including ethanol and at least one carbonyl containing compound, can be detected with a time resolution of the order of one minute.

  5. Understanding subcellular function on the nanometer scale in real time: Single-molecule imaging in living bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biteen, Julie

    It has long been recognized that microorganisms play a central role in our lives. By beating the diffraction limit that restricts traditional light microscopy, single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a precise, noninvasive way to sensitively probe position and dynamics, even in living cells. We are pioneering this super-resolution imaging method for unraveling important biological processes in live bacteria, and I will discuss how we infer function from subcellular dynamics (Tuson and Biteen, Analytical Chemistry 2015). In particular, we have understood the mechanism of membrane-bound transcription regulation in the pathogenic Vibrio cholerae, revealed an intimate and dynamic coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and DNA replication, and measured starch utilization in an important member of the human gut microbiome.

  6. Essential Role of an Unusually Long-lived Tyrosyl Radical in the Response to Red Light of the Animal-like Cryptochrome aCRY*

    PubMed Central

    Oldemeyer, Sabine; Franz, Sophie; Wenzel, Sandra; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Mittag, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes constitute a group of flavin-binding blue light receptors in bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects. Recently, the response of cryptochromes to light was extended to nearly the entire visible spectral region on the basis of the activity of the animal-like cryptochrome aCRY in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This finding was explained by the absorption of red light by the flavin neutral radical as the dark state of the receptor, which then forms the anionic fully reduced state. In this study, time-resolved UV-visible spectroscopy on the full-length aCRY revealed an unusually long-lived tyrosyl radical with a lifetime of 2.6 s, which is present already 1 μs after red light illumination of the flavin radical. Mutational studies disclosed the tyrosine 373 close to the surface to form the long-lived radical and to be essential for photoreduction. This residue is conserved exclusively in the sequences of other putative aCRY proteins distinguishing them from conventional (6–4) photolyases. Size exclusion chromatography showed the full-length aCRY to be a dimer in the dark at 0.5 mm injected concentration with the C-terminal extension as the dimerization site. Upon illumination, partial oligomerization was observed via disulfide bridge formation at cysteine 482 in close proximity to tyrosine 373. The lack of any light response in the C-terminal extension as evidenced by FTIR spectroscopy differentiates aCRY from plant and Drosophila cryptochromes. These findings imply that aCRY might have evolved a different signaling mechanism via a light-triggered redox cascade culminating in photooxidation of a yet unknown substrate or binding partner. PMID:27189948

  7. Essential Role of an Unusually Long-lived Tyrosyl Radical in the Response to Red Light of the Animal-like Cryptochrome aCRY.

    PubMed

    Oldemeyer, Sabine; Franz, Sophie; Wenzel, Sandra; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Mittag, Maria; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-07-01

    Cryptochromes constitute a group of flavin-binding blue light receptors in bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects. Recently, the response of cryptochromes to light was extended to nearly the entire visible spectral region on the basis of the activity of the animal-like cryptochrome aCRY in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii This finding was explained by the absorption of red light by the flavin neutral radical as the dark state of the receptor, which then forms the anionic fully reduced state. In this study, time-resolved UV-visible spectroscopy on the full-length aCRY revealed an unusually long-lived tyrosyl radical with a lifetime of 2.6 s, which is present already 1 μs after red light illumination of the flavin radical. Mutational studies disclosed the tyrosine 373 close to the surface to form the long-lived radical and to be essential for photoreduction. This residue is conserved exclusively in the sequences of other putative aCRY proteins distinguishing them from conventional (6-4) photolyases. Size exclusion chromatography showed the full-length aCRY to be a dimer in the dark at 0.5 mm injected concentration with the C-terminal extension as the dimerization site. Upon illumination, partial oligomerization was observed via disulfide bridge formation at cysteine 482 in close proximity to tyrosine 373. The lack of any light response in the C-terminal extension as evidenced by FTIR spectroscopy differentiates aCRY from plant and Drosophila cryptochromes. These findings imply that aCRY might have evolved a different signaling mechanism via a light-triggered redox cascade culminating in photooxidation of a yet unknown substrate or binding partner.

  8. Phase diagram and breathing dynamics of a single red blood cell and a biconcave capsule in dilute shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza Z. K.; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2011-08-01

    We present phase diagrams of the single red blood cell and biconcave capsule dynamics in dilute suspension using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The computational geometry replicates an in vitro linear shear flow apparatus. Our model includes all essential properties of the cell membrane, namely, the resistance against shear deformation, area dilatation, and bending, as well as the viscosity difference between the cell interior and suspending fluids. By considering a wide range of shear rate and interior-to-exterior fluid viscosity ratio, it is shown that the cell dynamics is often more complex than the well-known tank-treading, tumbling, and swinging motion and is characterized by an extreme variation of the cell shape. As a result, it is often difficult to clearly establish whether the cell is swinging or tumbling. Identifying such complex shape dynamics, termed here as “breathing” dynamics, is the focus of this article. During the breathing motion at moderate bending rigidity, the cell either completely aligns with the flow direction and the membrane folds inward, forming two cusps, or it undergoes large swinging motion while deep, craterlike dimples periodically emerge and disappear. At lower bending rigidity, the breathing motion occurs over a wider range of shear rates, and is often characterized by the emergence of a quad-concave shape. The effect of the breathing dynamics on the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition is illustrated by detailed phase diagrams which appear to be more complex and richer than those of vesicles. In a remarkable departure from the vesicle dynamics, and from the classical theory of nondeformable cells, we find that there exists a critical viscosity ratio below which the transition is independent of the viscosity ratio, and dependent on shear rate only. Further, unlike the reduced-order models, the present simulations do not predict any intermittent dynamics of the red blood cells.

  9. Video-Rate Confocal Microscopy for Single-Molecule Imaging in Live Cells and Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinwoo; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro; Hohng, Sungchul

    2012-01-01

    There is no confocal microscope optimized for single-molecule imaging in live cells and superresolution fluorescence imaging. By combining the swiftness of the line-scanning method and the high sensitivity of wide-field detection, we have developed a, to our knowledge, novel confocal fluorescence microscope with a good optical-sectioning capability (1.0 μm), fast frame rates (<33 fps), and superior fluorescence detection efficiency. Full compatibility of the microscope with conventional cell-imaging techniques allowed us to do single-molecule imaging with a great ease at arbitrary depths of live cells. With the new microscope, we monitored diffusion motion of fluorescently labeled cAMP receptors of Dictyostelium discoideum at both the basal and apical surfaces and obtained superresolution fluorescence images of microtubules of COS-7 cells at depths in the range 0–85 μm from the surface of a coverglass. PMID:23083712

  10. Mechanical Trap Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Three-Dimensional Surface Molecular Imaging of Single Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qianru; Li, Ming; Polat, Beril; Paidi, Santosh K; Dai, Aimee; Zhang, Amy; Pagaduan, Jayson V; Barman, Ishan; Gracias, David H

    2017-03-27

    Reported is a new shell-based spectroscopic platform, named mechanical trap surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (MTSERS), for simultaneous capture, profiling, and 3D microscopic mapping of the intrinsic molecular signatures on the membrane of single live cells. By leveraging the functionalization of the inner surfaces of the MTs with plasmonic gold nanostars, and conformal contact of the cell membrane, MTSERS permits excellent signal enhancement, reliably detects molecular signatures, and allows non-perturbative, multiplex 3D surface imaging of analytes, such as lipids and proteins on the surface of single cells. The demonstrated ability underscores the potential of MTSERS to perform 3D spectroscopic microimaging and to furnish biologically interpretable, quantitative, and dynamic molecular maps in live cell populations.

  11. Imaging Live Cells at the Nanometer-Scale with Single-Molecule Microscopy: Obstacles and Achievements in Experiment Optimization for Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Beth L.; Matson, Jyl S.; DiRita, Victor J.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane. PMID:25123183

  12. Imaging live cells at the nanometer-scale with single-molecule microscopy: obstacles and achievements in experiment optimization for microbiology.

    PubMed

    Haas, Beth L; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J; Biteen, Julie S

    2014-08-13

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane.

  13. In vivo single-RNA tracking shows that most tRNA diffuses freely in live bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plochowietz, Anne; Farrell, Ian; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2017-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) links messenger RNA nucleotide sequence with amino acid sequence during protein synthesis. Despite the importance of tRNA for translation, its subcellular distribution and diffusion properties in live cells are poorly understood. Here, we provide the first direct report on tRNA diffusion localization in live bacteria. We internalized tRNA labeled with organic fluorophores into live bacteria, applied single-molecule fluorescence imaging with single-particle tracking and localized and tracked single tRNA molecules over seconds. We observed two diffusive species: fast (with a diffusion coefficient of ∼8 μm2/s, consistent with free tRNA) and slow (consistent with tRNA bound to larger complexes). Our data indicate that a large fraction of internalized fluorescent tRNA (>70%) appears to diffuse freely in the bacterial cell. We also obtained the subcellular distribution of fast and slow diffusing tRNA molecules in multiple cells by normalizing for cell morphology. While fast diffusing tRNA is not excluded from the bacterial nucleoid, slow diffusing tRNA is localized to the cell periphery (showing a 30% enrichment versus a uniform distribution), similar to non-uniform localizations previously observed for mRNA and ribosomes. PMID:27625389

  14. Exploring transduction mechanisms of protein transduction domains (PTDs) in living cells utilizing single-quantum dot tracking (SQT) technology.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs) can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs), we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP) in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT), to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  15. Transverse mechanical properties of cell walls of single living plant cells probed by laser-generated acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, Atef; Dehoux, Thomas; Audoin, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of plant cell wall is crucial to understand tissue dynamics. However, the exact symmetry of the mechanical properties of this anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite remains uncertain. For this reason, biologically relevant measurements of the stiffness coefficients on individual living cells are a challenge. For this purpose, we have developed the single-cell optoacoustic nanoprobe (SCOPE) technique, which uses laser-generated acoustic waves to probe the stiffness, thickness and viscosity of live single-cell subcompartments. This all-optical technique offers a sub-micrometer lateral resolution, nanometer in-depth resolution, and allows the non-contact measurement of the mechanical properties of live turgid tissues without any assumption of mechanical symmetry. SCOPE experiments reveal that single-cell wall transverse stiffness in the direction perpendicular to the epidermis layer of onion cells is close to that of cellulose. This observation demonstrates that cellulose microfibrils are the main load-bearing structure in this direction, and suggests strong bonding of microfibrils by hemicelluloses. Altogether our measurement of the viscosity at high frequencies suggests that the rheology of the wall is dominated by glass-like dynamics. From a comparison with literature, we attribute this behavior to the influence of the pectin matrix. SCOPE's ability to unravel cell rheology and cell anisotropy defines a new class of experiments to enlighten cell nano-mechanics.

  16. Novel method of laparoendoscopic single-site and natural orifice specimen extraction for live donor nephrectomy: single-port laparoscopic donor nephrectomy and transvaginal graft extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Won Jun; Choi, Byung Jo; Hwang, Jeong Kye; Yuk, Seung Mo; Song, Min Jong

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy (DN) has been established as a useful alternative to the traditional open methods of procuring kidneys. To maximize the advantages of the laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) method, we applied natural orifice specimen extraction to LESS-DN. A 46-year-old woman with no previous abdominal surgery history volunteered to donate her left kidney to her husband and underwent single-port laparoscopic DN with transvaginal extraction. The procedure was completed without intraoperative complications. The kidney functioned well immediately after transplantation, and the donor and recipient were respectively discharged 2 days and 2 weeks postoperatively. Single-port laparoscopic DN and transvaginal graft extraction is feasible and safe. PMID:26878020

  17. Impact of Donor Source on the Outcome of Live Donor Kidney Transplantation: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Yasser Elsayed; Nagib, Ayman M; Lotfy, Omar E; Alsayed, Ahmed Maher; Donia, Ahmed F; Refaie, Ayman F; Akl, Ahmed I; Abbas, Mohamed Hamed; Abuelmagd, Mohammed M; Shaeashaa, Hussein A; Shokeir, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal transplantation is the ideal method for management of end-stage renal disease. The use of living donors for renal transplantation was critical for early development in the field and preceded the use of cadaveric donors. Most donors are related genetically to the recipients, like a parent, a child, or a sibling of the recipient, but there are an increasing percentage of cases where donors are genetically unrelated like spouses, friends, or altruistic individuals. Donor shortages constitute the major barrier for kidney transplantation, and much effort has been made to increase the supply of living donors. The impact of donor source on the outcome of renal transplantation is not adequately studied in our country. Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of donor source on the outcome of live donor kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods From March 1976 to December 2013, the number of patients that underwent living renal transplantation sharing at least one HLA haplotype with their donors was 2,485. We divided these patients into two groups: (1) 2,075 kidney transplant recipients (1,554 or 74.9% male and 521 or 25.1% female) for whom the donors were living related, (2) 410 kidney transplant recipients (297 or 72.4% male and 113 or 27.6% female) for whom the donors were living unrelated. All patients received immunosuppressive therapy, consisting of a calcineurin inhibitor, mycophenolate mofetil, or azathioprine and prednisolone. We compared acute rejection and complication rates, as well as long-term graft and patient survival of both groups. Demographic characteristics were compared using the chi-square test. Graft survival and patient survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The percentages of patients with acute vascular rejection were significantly higher in the unrelated group, while percentages of patients with no rejection were significantly higher in the related group, but there were no significant

  18. Surface Shear Stress Around a Single Flexible Live Plant and a Rigid Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Gromke, C.; Leonard, K. C.; Clifton, A.; Lehning, M.

    2010-12-01

    The sheltering effect of vegetation against soil erosion and snow transport has direct implications on land degradation and local water storage as snow in many arid and semi arid regions. Plants influence the erosion, transport and redeposition of soil and snow by the wind through momentum absorption, local stress concentration, trapping particles in motion and reducing the area of sediment exposed to the wind. The shear stress distributions on the ground beneath plant canopies determine the onset and magnitude of differential soil and snow erosion on rough or vegetated surfaces, but this has been studied exclusively with artificial and rigid vegetation elements thus far. Real plants have highly irregular structures that can be extremely flexible and porous. They align with the flow at higher wind speeds, resulting in considerable changes to the drag and flow regimes relative to rigid imitations of comparable size. We present measurements in the SLF atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel of the surface shear stress distribution around a live grass plant (Lolium Perenne) and a solid cylinder of comparable size. Irwin sensors are used to measure pressure differences close to the surface which can be calibrated with surface shear stress velocities. The basal to frontal area index of the plant and the cylinder as well as the Reynolds number of the two experimental setups have been checked for similarity and show good agreement. Distinctive differences between the shear stress pattern around the plant and the cylinder can be attributed to the influence of the plant’s porosity and flexibility. The sheltered zone behind the plant is narrower in cross-stream and longer in streamwise direction than that of the cylinder. For the plant, the lowest shear stresses in the sheltered zone are 50% lower than the mean surface shear stress (τ = 0.15 N/m2) in the undisturbed flow. The sheltering was higher behind the cylinder with values reduced by 70% relative to background.

  19. Al3+-induced far-red fluorescence enhancement of conjugated polymer nanoparticles and its application in live cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LiuH. Liu, X. Hao, C. H. Duan,; H. Yang Contributed Equally To This Work., Heng; Hao, Xian; Duan, Chunhui; Yang, Hui; Lv, Yi; Xu, Haijiao; Wang, Hongda; Huang, Fei; Xiao, Debao; Tian, Zhiyuan

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for Al3+ sensing with high selectivity were developed from a type of carbazole-based conjugated polymer with a two-dimensional donor-π bridge-acceptor (D-π-A) structure. These NPs are characterized by their small particle diameter (~18 nm), far-red fluorescence emission (centered ~710 nm), and Al3+-induced fluorescence enhancement with high selectivity owing to an Al3+-triggered inhibition on the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) processes between the conjugated backbone and the pendant acceptors. This type of nanoparticle is easily suspended in aqueous solutions, indicating their practical applicability in physiological media, and their ability for intracellular Al3+ sensing was confirmed. As compared to other types of conjugated polymer based probes showing metal ion mediated fluorescence quenching, these as-prepared NPs possess analyte-enhanced fluorescence emission, which is analytically favored in terms of sensitivity and selectivity. Fluorescence emission with wavelengths in the biological window of maximum optical transparency (~700 to 1000 nm) is expected to impart a salient advantage for biological detection applications to these as-prepared probes. The superior features of merit of this new type of fluorescent probe, together with the validation of practicability for intracellular Al3+ ion sensing, are indicative of their potential for application in fluorescence-based imaging and sensing, such as investigations on Al3+-related physiological and pathological processes.Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for Al3+ sensing with high selectivity were developed from a type of carbazole-based conjugated polymer with a two-dimensional donor-π bridge-acceptor (D-π-A) structure. These NPs are characterized by their small particle diameter (~18 nm), far-red fluorescence emission (centered ~710 nm), and Al3+-induced fluorescence enhancement with high selectivity owing to an Al3+-triggered inhibition on the intramolecular charge

  20. The impact of reproduction on the stress axis of free-living male northern red backed voles (Myodes rutilus).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Quinn E; Dantzer, Ben; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-12-01

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis culminates in the release of glucocorticoids (henceforth CORT), which have wide-reaching physiological effects. Three hypotheses potentially explain seasonal variation in CORT. The enabling hypothesis predicts that reproductive season CORT exceeds post-reproductive season CORT because CORT enables reproductive investment. The inhibitory hypothesis predicts the opposite because CORT can negatively affect reproductive function. The costs of reproduction hypothesis predicts that HPA axis condition declines over and following the reproductive season. We tested these hypotheses in wild male red-backed voles (Myodes rutilus) during the reproductive and post-reproductive seasons. We quantified CORT levels in response to restraint stress tests consisting of three blood samples (initial, stress-induced, and recovery). Mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptor mRNA levels in the brain were also quantified over the reproductive season. Total CORT (tCORT) in the initial and stress-induced samples were greater in the post-reproductive than in the reproductive season, which supported the inhibitory hypothesis. Conversely, free CORT (fCORT) did not differ between the reproductive and post-reproductive seasons, which was counter to both the enabling and inhibitory hypotheses. Evidence for HPA axis condition decline in CORT as well as GR and MR mRNA over the reproductive season (i.e. costs of reproduction hypothesis) was mixed. Moreover, all of the parameters that showed signs of declining condition over the reproductive season did not also show signs of declining condition over the post-reproductive season suggesting that the costs resulting from reproductive investment had subsided. In conclusion, our results suggest that different aspects of the HPA axis respond differently to seasonal changes and reproductive investment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Is life span extension in single gene long-lived Caenorhabditis elegans mutants due to hypometabolism?

    PubMed

    Van Voorhies, Wayne A

    2003-06-01

    The nematode C. elegans is widely used in aging research largely because of the identification of numerous gene mutations that significantly increase worm longevity. While model organisms such as C. elegans can provide important insights into aging it is also important to consider the limitations of these systems. For example, ectothermic (poikilothermic) organisms are able to tolerate a much larger metabolic depression than humans and considering only chronological longevity when assaying for long-lived mutants provides a limited perspective on the mechanisms by which longevity is increased. In order to provide true insight into the aging process additional physiological processes, such as metabolic rate, must also be assayed. Currently it is controversial when long-lived C. elegans mutants retain normal metabolic function. Resolving this issue requires accurately measuring the metabolic rate of C. elegans under conditions that minimize environmental stress. Comparisons of metabolic rate between long-lived and wild-type C. elegans under more optimized conditions indicate that the extended longevity of at least some long-lived C. elegans mutants may be due to a reduction in metabolic rate, rather than an alteration of a metabolically-independent genetic mechanism specific to aging. Consistent with this assertion are studies showing that the disruption of mitochondrial function in C. elegans can extend worm's longevity, but typically causes worms to grow and develop more slowly than wild-type animals.

  2. Donor safety in living donor liver transplantation: a single-center analysis of 300 cases.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jianyong; Yan, Lunan; Wang, Wentao

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the safety to donors of living-donor liver transplantation. This study included 300 consecutive living liver tissue donors who underwent operations at our center from July 2002 to December 2012. We evaluated the safety of donors with regard to three aspects complications were recorded prospectively and stratified by grade according to Clavien's classification, and the data were compared in two stages (the first 5 years' experience (pre-January 2008) and the latter 5 years' experience (post-January 2008); laboratory tests such as liver function and blood biochemistry were performed; and the health-related quality of life was evaluated. There was no donor mortality at our center, and the overall morbidity rate was 25.3%. Most of the complications of living donors were either grade I or II. There were significantly fewer complications in the latter period of our study than in the initial period (19.9% vs 32.6%, P<0.001), and biliary complications were the most common complications, with an incidence of 9%. All of the liver dysfunction was temporary; however, the post-operative suppression of platelet count lasted for years. Although within the normal range, eight years after operation, 22 donors showed lower platelet levels (189 × 10(9)/L) compared with the pre-operative levels (267 × 10(9)/L) (P<0.05). A total of 98.4% of donors had returned to their previous levels of social activity and work, and 99.2% of donors would donate again if it was required and feasible. With the exception of two donors who experienced grade III complications (whose recipients died) and a few cases of abdominal discomfort, fatigue, chronic pain and scar itching, none of the living donors were affected by physical problems. With careful donor selection and specialized patient care, low morbidity rates and satisfactory long-term recovery can be achieved after hepatectomy for living-donor liver transplantation.

  3. In Situ Pressure Probe Sampling and UV-MALDI MS for Profiling Metabolites in Living Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Yousef; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe the use of a combination of a cell pressure probe and a UV-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (UV-MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer for the in situ picoliter sampling and shotgun metabolite profiling of living single cells of plants. In addition to quantifiable sampling, the pressure probe has some unique features which differentiate it from other single-cell analytical tools. Cell wall and plasma membrane properties and water relations of in situ living single cells can be analyzed before sampling the cell sap. In addition, the fully-controlled sampling of cells located at different depths in plant tissues, measurement of the sample volume, and the addition of internal standards are facilitated by the pressure probe. Using a variety of organic compounds and nanoparticles as UV-MALDI matrices, metabolites from neutral carbohydrates to amino acids and other metabolites can be detected through UV-MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analyses of picoliter-sized, single-cell samples. PMID:24349904

  4. Photo-induced droop in blue to red light emitting InGaN/GaN single quantum wells structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Damilano, Benjamin; Valvin, Pierre; Courville, Aimeric; de Mierry, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    The variation of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of single InGaN quantum well structures emitting from blue to red is studied as a function of the excitation power density and the temperature. By changing the well width, the indium content, and adding a strain compensation AlGaN layer, we could tune the intrinsic radiative recombination rate by changing the quantum confined Stark effect, and we could modify the carrier localization. Strong quantum confined Stark effect and carrier localization induce an increase in the carrier density and then favor Auger non-radiative recombination in the high excitation range. In such high excitation conditions with efficient Auger recombination, the variation of the IQE with the photo-excitation density P is ruled by a universal power law independent of the design: IQE = IQEMAX - a log10P with a close to 1/3. The temperature dependences of the different recombination mechanisms are determined. At low temperature, both quantum confined Stark effect and carrier localization trigger electron-electron repulsions and therefore the onset of the Auger effect. The increase in the value of coefficient C with changing temperature reveals indirect Auger recombination that relates to the interactions of the carriers with other phonons than the longitudinal optical one.

  5. A microfluidic system enabling Raman measurements of the oxygenation cycle in single optically trapped red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ramser, Kerstin; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias; Hanstorp, Dag; Logg, Katarina; Käll, Mikael

    2005-04-01

    Using a lab-on-a-chip approach we demonstrate the possibility of selecting a single cell with certain properties and following its dynamics after an environmental stimulation in real time using Raman spectroscopy. This is accomplished by combining a micro Raman set-up with optical tweezers and a microfluidic system. The latter gives full control over the media surrounding the cell, and it consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs defined by electron beam lithography that is moulded into rubber silicon (PDMS). Different buffers can be transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the resonance Raman response of an optically trapped red blood cell (RBC) is simultaneously registered. This makes it possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle of the cell in real time and to investigate effects like photo-induced chemistry caused by the illumination. The experimental set-up has high potential for in vivo monitoring of cellular drug response using a variety of spectroscopic probes.

  6. Gene targeting in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae: single- and multi-copy insertion using authentic and chimeric selection markers.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ohnuma, Mio; Yoshida, Masaki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae is an emerging model organism for studying organelle division and inheritance: the cell is composed of an extremely simple set of organelles (one nucleus, one mitochondrion and one chloroplast), and their genomes are completely sequenced. Although a fruitful set of cytological and biochemical methods have now been developed, gene targeting techniques remain to be fully established in this organism. Thus far, only a single selection marker, URA Cm-Gs , has been available that complements the uracil-auxotrophic mutant M4. URA Cm-Gs , a chimeric URA5.3 gene of C. merolae and the related alga Galdieria sulphuraria, was originally designed to avoid gene conversion of the mutated URA5.3 allele in the parental strain M4. Although an early example of targeted gene disruption by homologous recombination was reported using this marker, the genome structure of the resultant transformants had never been fully characterized. In the current study, we showed that the use of the chimeric URA Cm-Gs selection marker caused multicopy insertion at high frequencies, accompanied by undesired recombination events at the targeted loci. The copy number of the inserted fragments was variable among the transformants, resulting in high yet uneven levels of transgene expression. In striking contrast, when the authentic URA5.3 gene (URA Cm-Cm ) was used as a selection marker, efficient single-copy insertion was observed at the targeted locus. Thus, we have successfully established a highly reliable and reproducible method for gene targeting in C. merolae. Our method will be applicable to a number of genetic manipulations in this organism, including targeted gene disruption, replacement and tagging.

  7. Gene Targeting in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae: Single- and Multi-Copy Insertion Using Authentic and Chimeric Selection Markers

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ohnuma, Mio; Yoshida, Masaki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae is an emerging model organism for studying organelle division and inheritance: the cell is composed of an extremely simple set of organelles (one nucleus, one mitochondrion and one chloroplast), and their genomes are completely sequenced. Although a fruitful set of cytological and biochemical methods have now been developed, gene targeting techniques remain to be fully established in this organism. Thus far, only a single selection marker, URACm-Gs, has been available that complements the uracil-auxotrophic mutant M4. URACm-Gs, a chimeric URA5.3 gene of C. merolae and the related alga Galdieria sulphuraria, was originally designed to avoid gene conversion of the mutated URA5.3 allele in the parental strain M4. Although an early example of targeted gene disruption by homologous recombination was reported using this marker, the genome structure of the resultant transformants had never been fully characterized. In the current study, we showed that the use of the chimeric URACm-Gs selection marker caused multicopy insertion at high frequencies, accompanied by undesired recombination events at the targeted loci. The copy number of the inserted fragments was variable among the transformants, resulting in high yet uneven levels of transgene expression. In striking contrast, when the authentic URA5.3 gene (URACm-Cm) was used as a selection marker, efficient single-copy insertion was observed at the targeted locus. Thus, we have successfully established a highly reliable and reproducible method for gene targeting in C. merolae. Our method will be applicable to a number of genetic manipulations in this organism, including targeted gene disruption, replacement and tagging. PMID:24039997

  8. Lateral migration and equilibrium shape and position of a single red blood cell in bounded Poiseuille flows.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2012-11-01

    Lateral migration and equilibrium shape and position of a single red blood cell (RBC) in bounded two-dimensional Poiseuille flows are investigated by using an immersed boundary method. An elastic spring model is applied to simulate the skeleton structure of a RBC membrane. We focus on studying the properties of lateral migration of a single RBC in Poiseuille flows by varying the initial position, the initial angle, the swelling ratio (s), the membrane bending stiffness of RBC (k{b}), the maximum velocity of fluid flow (u{max}), and the degree of confinement. The combined effect of the deformability, the degree of confinement, and the shear gradient of the Poiseuille flow make the RBCs migrate toward a certain cross-sectional equilibrium position, which lies either on the center line of the channel or off center line. For s>0.8, the speed of the migration at the beginning decreases as one increases the swelling ratio s. But for s<0.8, the speed of the migration at the beginning is an increasing function of the swelling ratio s. Two motions of oscillation and vacillating breathing (swing) of RBCs are observed. The distance Y{d} between the cell mass center of the equilibrium position and the center line of the channel increases with increasing the Reynolds number Re and reaches a peak, then decreases with increasing Re. The peak of Re is a decreasing function of the swelling ratio (s<1.0). The cell membrane energy of the equilibrium position is an increasing function as Re increases. The slipper-shaped cell is more stable than the parachute-shaped one in the sense that the energy stored in the former is lower than that in the latter. For a given Re, the bigger the swelling ratio (s<1.0), the lower the cell membrane energy.

  9. Lateral migration and equilibrium shape and position of a single red blood cell in bounded Poiseuille flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2012-11-01

    Lateral migration and equilibrium shape and position of a single red blood cell (RBC) in bounded two-dimensional Poiseuille flows are investigated by using an immersed boundary method. An elastic spring model is applied to simulate the skeleton structure of a RBC membrane. We focus on studying the properties of lateral migration of a single RBC in Poiseuille flows by varying the initial position, the initial angle, the swelling ratio (s*), the membrane bending stiffness of RBC (kb), the maximum velocity of fluid flow (umax), and the degree of confinement. The combined effect of the deformability, the degree of confinement, and the shear gradient of the Poiseuille flow make the RBCs migrate toward a certain cross-sectional equilibrium position, which lies either on the center line of the channel or off center line. For s*>0.8, the speed of the migration at the beginning decreases as one increases the swelling ratio s*. But for s*<0.8, the speed of the migration at the beginning is an increasing function of the swelling ratio s*. Two motions of oscillation and vacillating breathing (swing) of RBCs are observed. The distance Yd between the cell mass center of the equilibrium position and the center line of the channel increases with increasing the Reynolds number Re and reaches a peak, then decreases with increasing Re. The peak of Re is a decreasing function of the swelling ratio (s*<1.0). The cell membrane energy of the equilibrium position is an increasing function as Re increases. The slipper-shaped cell is more stable than the parachute-shaped one in the sense that the energy stored in the former is lower than that in the latter. For a given Re, the bigger the swelling ratio (s*<1.0), the lower the cell membrane energy.

  10. Determination of in vivo dissociation constant, KD, of Cdc42-effector complexes in live mammalian cells using single wavelength fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Liu, Ping; Foo, Yong Hwee; Bu, Wenyu; Lim, Kim Buay; Wohland, Thorsten; Ahmed, Sohail

    2009-05-15

    The RhoGTPase Cdc42 coordinates cell morphogenesis, cell cycle, and cell polarity decisions downstream of membrane-bound receptors through distinct effector pathways. Cdc42-effector protein interactions represent important elements of cell signaling pathways that regulate cell biology in systems as diverse as yeast and humans. To derive mechanistic insights into cell signaling pathways, it is vital that we generate quantitative data from in vivo systems. We need to be able to measure parameters such as protein concentrations, rates of diffusion, and dissociation constants (K(D)) of protein-protein interactions in vivo. Here we show how single wavelength fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer analysis can be used to determine K(D) of Cdc42-effector interactions in live mammalian cells. Constructs encoding green fluorescent protein or monomeric red fluorescent protein fusion proteins of Cdc42, an effector domain (CRIB), and two effectors, neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and insulin receptor substrate protein (IRSp53), were expressed as pairs in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and concentrations of free protein as well as complexed protein were determined. The measured K(D) for Cdc42V12-N-WASP, Cdc42V12-CRIB, and Cdc42V12-IRSp53 was 27, 250, and 391 nm, respectively. The determination of K(D) for Cdc42-effector interactions opens the way to describe cell signaling pathways quantitatively in vivo in mammalian cells.

  11. Monolithic integration of InGaN segments emitting in the blue, green, and red spectral range in single ordered nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.

    2013-05-06

    This work reports on the selective area growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InGaN/GaN nanocolumnar heterostructures. The optimization of the In/Ga and total III/V ratios, as well as the growth temperature, provides control on the emission wavelength, either in the blue, green, or red spectral range. An adequate structure tailoring and monolithic integration in a single nanocolumnar heterostructure of three InGaN portions emitting in the red-green-blue colors lead to white light emission.

  12. Detecting infrared luminescence and non-chemical signaling of living cells: single cell mid-IR spectroscopy in cryogenic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Sergey

    2017-02-01

    Many life-relevant interaction energies are in IR range, and it is reasonable to believe that some biochemical reactions inside cells can results in emission of IR photons. Cells can use this emission for non-chemical and non-electrical signaling. Detecting weak infrared radiation from live cells is complicated because of strong thermal radiation background and absorption of radiation by tissues. A microfluidic device with live cells inside a vacuum cryogenic environment should suppress this background, and thereby permit observation of live cell auto-luminescence or signaling in the IR regime. One can make IR-transparent windows not emitting in this range, so only the cell and a small amount of liquid around it will emit infrared radiation. Currently mid-IR spectroscopy of single cells requires the use of a synchrotron source to measure absorption or reflection spectra. Decreasing of thermal radiation background will allow absorption and reflection spectroscopy of cells without using synchrotron light. Moreover, cell auto-luminescence can be directly measured. The complete absence of thermal background radiation for cryogenically cooled samples allows the use IR photon-sensitive detectors and obtaining single molecule sensitivity in IR photo-luminescence measurements. Due to low photon energies, photo-luminescence measurements will be non-distractive for pressures samples. The technique described here is based upon US patent 9366574.

  13. Real-Time Imaging of Translation on Single mRNA Transcripts in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Han, Boran; Zhou, Ruobo; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-05-05

    Translation is under tight spatial and temporal controls to ensure protein production in the right time and place in cells. Methods that allow real-time, high-resolution visualization of translation in live cells are essential for understanding the spatiotemporal dynamics of translation regulation. Based on multivalent fluorescence amplification of the nascent polypeptide signal, we develop a method to image translation on individual mRNA molecules in real time in live cells, allowing direct visualization of translation events at the translation sites. Using this approach, we monitor transient changes of translation dynamics in responses to environmental stresses, capture distinct mobilities of individual polysomes in different subcellular compartments, and detect 3' UTR-dependent local translation and active transport of polysomes in dendrites of primary neurons.

  14. Grade of the inner cell mass, but not trophectoderm, predicts live birth in fresh blastocyst single transfers.

    PubMed

    Subira, Jessica; Craig, Jo; Turner, Karen; Bevan, Aysha; Ohuma, Eric; McVeigh, Enda; Child, Tim; Fatum, Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    Debate continues over which morphological parameter is most important in selecting blastocysts for transfer. We aimed to investigate which parameter more accurately predicts the occurrence of a live birth by designing a retrospective cohort study of 1084 fresh elective single blastocyst transfers. Primary outcome was live birth rate (LBR) and secondary outcomes were implantation, clinical pregnancy and early pregnancy loss rates. Blastocyst expansion and inner cell mass (ICM), but not trophoectoderm, were associated with LBR in the definitive multivariable regression analysis. When ICM grade dropped from A to C the likelihood of achieving a live birth was reduced by 55% (OR= 0.45, 95% CI 0.26-0.79, p = .005). These results were similar for clinical pregnancy rates. Early pregnancy loss rates of embryos with ICM grade C were more than double (38.0%) compared to those of grades A (15.95%) and B (17.17%, p = .002). The transfer of an embryo with an optimal inner cell mass reduces early pregnancy loss and increases the likelihood of a live birth. We did not find any significant association between trophectoderm and LBR in the multivariable analysis in contrast with recent studies.

  15. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hantke, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Seibert, M Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Westphal, Daniel; Almeida, F Nunes; Odic, Dusko; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H; Larsson, Daniel S D; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Duane Loh, Ne-Te; Chapman, Henry N; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2015-02-11

    There exists a conspicuous gap of knowledge about the organization of life at mesoscopic levels. Ultra-fast coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers can probe structures at the relevant length scales and may reach sub-nanometer resolution on micron-sized living cells. Here we show that we can introduce a beam of aerosolised cyanobacteria into the focus of the Linac Coherent Light Source and record diffraction patterns from individual living cells at very low noise levels and at high hit ratios. We obtain two-dimensional projection images directly from the diffraction patterns, and present the results as synthetic X-ray Nomarski images calculated from the complex-valued reconstructions. We further demonstrate that it is possible to record diffraction data to nanometer resolution on live cells with X-ray lasers. Extension to sub-nanometer resolution is within reach, although improvements in pulse parameters and X-ray area detectors will be necessary to unlock this potential.

  16. Ultrafast nanolaser device for detecting cancer in a single live cell.

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, Paul Lee; McDonald, Anthony Eugene

    2007-11-01

    Emerging BioMicroNanotechnologies have the potential to provide accurate, realtime, high throughput screening of live tumor cells without invasive chemical reagents when coupled with ultrafast laser methods. These optically based methods are critical to advancing early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. The first year goals of this project are to develop a laser-based imaging system integrated with an in- vitro, live-cell, micro-culture to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions. In the second year, the system will be used to elucidate the morphology and distribution of mitochondria in the normal cell respiration state and in the disease state for normal and disease states of the cell. In this work we designed and built an in-vitro, live-cell culture microsystem to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions of pH, temp, CO2, Ox, humidity, on engineered material surfaces. We demonstrated viability of cell culture in the microsystem by showing that cells retain healthy growth rates, exhibit normal morphology, and grow to confluence without blebbing or other adverse influences of the material surfaces. We also demonstrated the feasibility of integrating the culture microsystem with laser-imaging and performed nanolaser flow spectrocytometry to carry out analysis of the cells isolated mitochondria.

  17. Post-Operative Complications in Living Liver Donors: A Single-Center Experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songfeng; Chen, Jihao; Wang, Jingqiao; Yang, Cheng; Jin, Mengmeng; Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Mangli; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    The gap between the growing demand for available organs and the cadaveric organs facilitates the adoption of living donor liver transplantation. We retrospectively identified and evaluated the post-operative complications as per the modified Clavien classification system in 152 living liver donors at at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University between December, 2006 and June, 2014. Post-operative complications were observed in 61 patients (40.1%) in the present study, but no mortality was reported. Complications developed in 58 (40.0%) right, 1 (33.3%) left, and 2 (66.7%) lateral left hepatectomy donors. The prevalence of re-operation was 1.3%. Grade I and II complications were observed in 38 (25.0%) and 11 (7.2%) donors, respectively. Grade IIIa complications developed in 9 (5.9%) donors and only 3 (2.0%) patients reported grade IIIb complications. The most common complication was pleural effusion that occurred in 31 (20.4%) donors. No significant prognostic baseline factor was identified in this study. In conclusion, living donors experienced various complications, which were usually mild and had a good prognosis. PMID:26270475

  18. Characteristics of Living and Deceased Suicidal Military Personnel Based on Single Versus Multiple Suicide Attempt Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    8217 > - ;\\..,’ ·. Kristen Kochanski MEDICAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Uniformed Services University Date 05/10/2012 Running head: MILITARY SINGLE...greater risk for death by suicide than those with a single suicide attempt ( Christiansen & Jensen, 2007; Hawton & Fagg, 1988; Nordentoft et al., 1993...individuals identified in the suicide attempt registry died by suicide within four years ( Christiansen & Jensen, 2007). In England, individuals who

  19. Pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) after single intravenous and intramuscular injections.

    PubMed

    Uney, Kamil; Altan, Feray; Aboubakr, Mohammed; Cetin, Gul; Dik, Burak

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of meloxicam after single IV and IM injections in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans). ANIMALS 8 healthy red-eared slider turtles. PROCEDURES Turtles received 1 dose of meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg) IV or IM (4 turtles/route), a 30-day washout period was provided, and then turtles received the same dose by the opposite route. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times for measurement of plasma meloxicam concentration. Pharmacokinetic values for each administration route were determined with a 2-compartment open model approach. RESULTS For IV administration, mean ± SD values of major pharmacokinetic variables were 1.02 ± 0.41 hours for distribution half-life, 9.78 ± 2.23 hours for elimination half-life, 215 ± 32 mL/kg for volume of distribution at steady state, 11.27 ± 1.44 μg•h/mL for area under the plasma concentration versus time curve, and 18.00 ± 2.32 mL/h/kg for total body clearance. For IM administration, mean values were 0.35 ± 0.06 hours for absorption half-life, 0.72 ± 0.06 μg/mL for peak plasma concentration, 1.5 ± 0.0 hours for time to peak concentration, 3.73 ± 2.41 hours for distribution half-life, 13.53 ± 1.95 hours for elimination half-life, 11.33 ± 0.92 μg•h/mL for area under the plasma concentration versus time curve, and 101 ± 6% for bioavailability. No adverse reactions were detected. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Long half-life, high bioavailability, and lack of immediate adverse reactions of meloxicam administered IM at 0.2 mg/kg suggested the possibility of safe and effective clinical use in turtles. Additional studies are needed to establish appropriate administration frequency and clinical efficacy.

  20. Donor Safety in Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Analysis of 300 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jianyong; Yan, Lunan; Wang, Wentao

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the safety to donors of living-donor liver transplantation. Methods This study included 300 consecutive living liver tissue donors who underwent operations at our center from July 2002 to December 2012. We evaluated the safety of donors with regard to three aspects complications were recorded prospectively and stratified by grade according to Clavien’s classification, and the data were compared in two stages (the first 5 years’ experience (pre-January 2008) and the latter 5 years’ experience (post-January 2008); laboratory tests such as liver function and blood biochemistry were performed; and the health-related quality of life was evaluated. Results There was no donor mortality at our center, and the overall morbidity rate was 25.3%. Most of the complications of living donors were either grade I or II. There were significantly fewer complications in the latter period of our study than in the initial period (19.9% vs 32.6%, P<0.001), and biliary complications were the most common complications, with an incidence of 9%. All of the liver dysfunction was temporary; however, the post-operative suppression of platelet count lasted for years. Although within the normal range, eight years after operation, 22 donors showed lower platelet levels (189×109/L) compared with the pre-operative levels (267×109/L) (P<0.05). A total of 98.4% of donors had returned to their previous levels of social activity and work, and 99.2% of donors would donate again if it was required and feasible. With the exception of two donors who experienced grade III complications (whose recipients died) and a few cases of abdominal discomfort, fatigue, chronic pain and scar itching, none of the living donors were affected by physical problems. Conclusion With careful donor selection and specialized patient care, low morbidity rates and satisfactory long-term recovery can be achieved after hepatectomy for living-donor liver transplantation. PMID:23637904

  1. In Situ Microprobe Single-Cell Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry: Metabolic Reorganization in Single Differentiating Cells in the Live Vertebrate (Xenopus laevis) Embryo.

    PubMed

    Onjiko, Rosemary M; Portero, Erika P; Moody, Sally A; Nemes, Peter

    2017-07-05

    Knowledge of single-cell metabolism would provide a powerful look into cell activity changes as cells differentiate to all the tissues of the vertebrate embryo. However, single-cell mass spectrometry technologies have not yet been made compatible with complex three-dimensional changes and rapidly decreasing cell sizes during early development of the embryo. Here, we bridge this technological gap by integrating capillary microsampling, microscale metabolite extraction, and capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) to enable direct metabolic analysis of identified cells in the live frog embryo (Xenopus laevis). Microprobe CE-ESI-MS of <0.02% of the single-cell content allowed us to detect ∼230 different molecular features (positive ion mode), including 70 known metabolites, in single dorsal and ventral cells in 8-to-32-cell embryos. Relative quantification followed by multivariate and statistical analysis of the data found that microsampling enhanced detection sensitivity compared to whole-cell dissection by minimizing chemical interferences and ion suppression effects from the culture media. In addition, higher glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratios suggested that microprobed cells exhibited significantly lower oxidative stress than those dissected from the embryo. Fast (5 s/cell) and scalable microsampling with minimal damage to cells in the 8-cell embryo enabled duplicate and triplicate metabolic analysis of the same cell, which surprisingly continued to divide to the 16-cell stage. Last, we used microprobe single-cell CE-ESI-MS to uncover previously unknown reorganization of the single-cell metabolome as the dorsal progenitor cell from the 8-cell embryo formed the neural tissue fated clone through divisions to the 32-cell embryo, peering, for the first time, into the formation of metabolic single-cell heterogeneity during early development of a vertebrate embryo.

  2. Single-unit analysis of the human posterior hypothalamus and red nucleus during deep brain stimulation for aggressivity.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Robert; Rios, Adriana Lucia Lopez; Aguilar, Ricardo Plata; Posada, Luis Fernando Botero; Hutchison, William D

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the posterior hypothalamus (PH) has been reported to be effective for aggressive behavior in a number of isolated cases. Few of these case studies have analyzed single-unit recordings in the human PH and none have quantitatively analyzed single units in the red nucleus (RN). The authors report on the properties of ongoing neuronal discharges in bilateral trajectories targeting the PH and the effectiveness of DBS of the PH as a treatment for aggressive behavior. METHODS DBS electrodes were surgically implanted in the PH of 1 awake patient with Sotos syndrome and 3 other anesthetized patients with treatment-resistant aggressivity. Intraoperative extracellular recordings were obtained from the ventral thalamus, PH, and RN and analyzed offline to discriminate single units and measure firing rates and firing patterns. Target location was based on the stereotactic coordinates used by Sano et al. in their 1970 study and the location of the dorsal border of the RN. RESULTS A total of 138 units were analyzed from the 4 patients. Most of the PH units had a slow, irregular discharge (mean [± SD] 4.5 ± 2.7 Hz, n = 68) but some units also had a higher discharge rate (16.7 ± 4.7 Hz, n = 15). Two populations of neurons were observed in the ventral thalamic region as well, one with a high firing rate (mean 16.5 ± 6.5 Hz, n = 5) and one with a low firing rate (mean 4.6 ± 2.8 Hz, n = 6). RN units had a regular firing rate with a mean of 20.4 ± 9.9 Hz and displayed periods of oscillatory activity in the beta range. PH units displayed a prolonged period of inhibition following microstimulation compared with RN units that were not inhibited. Patients under anesthesia showed a trend for lower firing rates in the PH but not in the RN. All 4 patients displayed a reduction in their aggressive behavior after surgery. CONCLUSIONS During PH DBS, microelectrode recordings can provide an additional mechanism to help identify the PH target and

  3. Single molecule experimentation in biological physics: exploring the living component of soft condensed matter one molecule at a time.

    PubMed

    Harriman, O L J; Leake, M C

    2011-12-21

    The soft matter of biological systems consists of mesoscopic length scale building blocks, composed of a variety of different types of biological molecules. Most single biological molecules are so small that 1 billion would fit on the full-stop at the end of this sentence, but collectively they carry out the vital activities in living cells whose length scale is at least three orders of magnitude greater. Typically, the number of molecules involved in any given cellular process at any one time is relatively small, and so real physiological events may often be dominated by stochastics and fluctuation behaviour at levels comparable to thermal noise, and are generally heterogeneous in nature. This challenging combination of heterogeneity and stochasticity is best investigated experimentally at the level of single molecules, as opposed to more conventional bulk ensemble-average techniques. In recent years, the use of such molecular experimental approaches has become significantly more widespread in research laboratories around the world. In this review we discuss recent experimental approaches in biological physics which can be applied to investigate the living component of soft condensed matter to a precision of a single molecule. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK & the USA

  4. Real-time Imaging and Tuning Subcellular Structures and Membrane Transport Kinetics of Single Live Cells at Nanosecond Regime

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongwu; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2009-01-01

    We developed an electric-field exposure microchannel system with 230-nanometer thin-layer gold electrodes, and interfaced it with a single living cell imaging station and a 10-nanosecond-electric-pulse (10nsEP) generator. This design allows us to image intracellular molecules and structures, membrane transport and viability of single leukemic cells (HL60) while the cells are exposed to 10nsEPs of 0–179 kV/cm, permitting the study of subcellular responses at nanosecond regime. The electrodes confine a thin-layer section of the cells exposed to 10nsEPs, offering unprecedented high spatial resolution (230-nm at z-direction of E and imaging plane) for imaging intracellular molecules of single cells affected by 10nsEPs. We found that nucleic acids, membrane transport rates and viability of single cells depend on the number and electric-field-strength (E) of 10nsEPs, showing the cumulative effect of 10nsEPs on intracellular molecules and structures and suggesting the possibility of tuning them one-pulse-at-a-time. Using lower E (51 kV/cm) of 10nsEPs, we could manipulate nucleic acids of single living cells without disrupting their cellular membrane and viability. As E increases to 80, 124 and 179 kV/cm, membrane integrity and viability of cells exhibit higher dependence on the number of 10nsEPs in a non-linear fashion, showing that critical E and pulse number are needed to surmount cellular transport barriers and membrane integrity. PMID:19795898

  5. Role of apheresis and dialysis in pediatric living donor liver transplantation: a single center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yukihiro; Mizuta, Koichi; Urahashi, Taizen; Ihara, Yoshiyuki; Wakiya, Taiichi; Okada, Noriki; Yamada, Naoya; Koinuma, Toshitaka; Koyama, Kansuke; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Misawa, Kazuhide; Wada, Masahiko; Nunomiya, Shin; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Kawarasaki, Hideo

    2012-08-01

    In the field of pediatric living donor liver transplantation, the indications for apheresis and dialysis, and its efficacy and safety are still a matter of debate. In this study, we performed a retrospective investigation of these aspects, and considered its roles. Between January 2008 and December 2010, 73 living donor liver transplantations were performed in our department. Twenty seven courses of apheresis and dialysis were performed for 19 of those patients (19/73; 26.0%). The indications were ABO incompatible-liver transplantation in 11 courses, fluid management in seven, acute liver failure in three, renal replacement therapy in two, endotoxin removal in two, cytokine removal in one, and liver allograft dysfunction in one. Sixteen courses of apheresis and dialysis were performed prior to liver transplantation for 14 patients. The median IgM antibody titers before and after apheresis for ABO blood type-incompatible liver transplantation was 128 and eight, respectively (P < 0.05). Eleven courses of apheresis and dialysis were performed post liver transplantation for 10 patients. The median PaO2/FiO2 ratio before and after dialysis for fluid overload was 159 and 339, respectively (P < 0.05). No bleeding or technical complications attributable to apheresis and dialysis occurred. The 1-year survival rate of the patients was 100%. Apheresis and dialysis in pediatric living donor liver transplantation are effective for antibody removal in ABO-incompatible liver transplantation, and fluid management for acute respiratory failure. © 2012 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2012 International Society for Apheresis.

  6. Long-term safety in living kidney donors for paediatric transplantation. Single-centre prospective study.

    PubMed

    Martin Benlloch, J; Román Ortiz, E; Mendizabal Oteiza, S

    There is enough evidence concerning the short-term safety of living donors after kidney transplantation. However, long-term complications continue to be studied, with a particular interest in young donors. Previous studies have been conducted in older donors for adult renal patients. We present a study of long-term complications in kidney donors for our paediatric population. We carried out a long-term donor study for the 54 living kidney-donor transplantations performed at our department from 1979 to June 2014. We monitored the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) on the basis of 24-hour urine creatinine clearance, 24-hour proteinuria and the development of arterial hypertension in the 48 donors who were followed up for more than one year. Only the 39 patients who were exclusively followed up by our department have been included in the results analysis. GFR through creatinine clearance was stable after an initial decrease. No proteinuria was observed in any of the cases. One patient developed chronic kidney disease (CKD), which resulted in a cumulative incidence of 2%. GFR below 60mL/min/1.73 m(2) was not reported in any other patients. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed in 25% of donors, 90% of which were treated with antihypertensives. Risk of CKD and hypertension in living kidney donors for paediatric recipients, who are carefully monitored throughout their evolution, is similar to that of the general population. Therefore, this technique appears to be safe in both the short and long term. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct observation of a long-lived single-atom catalyst chiseling atomic structures in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Li; Santos, Elton J G; Jiang, Bin; Cubuk, Ekin Dogus; Ophus, Colin; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Ciston, Jim; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-02-12

    Fabricating stable functional devices at the atomic scale is an ultimate goal of nanotechnology. In biological processes, such high-precision operations are accomplished by enzymes. A counterpart molecular catalyst that binds to a solid-state substrate would be highly desirable. Here, we report the direct observation of single Si adatoms catalyzing the dissociation of carbon atoms from graphene in an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The single Si atom provides a catalytic wedge for energetic electrons to chisel off the graphene lattice, atom by atom, while the Si atom itself is not consumed. The products of the chiseling process are atomic-scale features including graphene pores and clean edges. Our experimental observations and first-principles calculations demonstrated the dynamics, stability, and selectivity of such a single-atom chisel, which opens up the possibility of fabricating certain stable molecular devices by precise modification of materials at the atomic scale.

  8. Using microdispensing to manufacture a customized cell dish for microbeam irradiation of single, living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E. J. C.; Olsson, M. G.; Nilsson, J.; Pallon, J.; Masternak, A.; Paczesny, J.; Arteaga-Marrero, N.; Elfman, M.; Kristiansson, P.; Nilsson, C.; Åkerström, B.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper is described the preparation of patterned cell dishes to be used in studies of low dose irradiation effects on living cells. Using a droplet microdispenser, an 8 μm thick polypropylene cell substrate, to which cells do not naturally adhere, was coated in a matrix pattern with the cell adhesive mussel protein Cell-Tak. Cells were shown to adhere and grow on the protein-coated spots, but not on the uncoated parts, providing for guided cell growth. Cultivation of isolated cell colonies provides an opportunity to study how low doses of ionizing radiation affect neighbouring un-irradiated cell colonies.

  9. A single-cell scraper based on an atomic force microscope for detaching a living cell from a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Futoshi; Adachi, Makoto; Hashimoto, Shigetaka

    2015-10-07

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulator that can detach a single, living adhesion cell from its substrate without compromising the cell's viability. The micrometer-scale cell scraper designed for this purpose was fabricated from an AFM micro cantilever using focused ion beam milling. The homemade AFM equipped with the scraper was compact and standalone and could be mounted on a sample stage of an inverted optical microscope. It was possible to move the scraper using selectable modes of operation, either a manual mode with a haptic device or a computer-controlled mode. The viability of the scraped single cells was evaluated using a fluorescence dye of calcein-acetoxymethl ester. Single cells detached from the substrate were collected by aspiration into a micropipette capillary glass using an electro-osmotic pump. As a demonstration, single HeLa cells were selectively detached from the substrate and collected by the micropipette. It was possible to recultivate HeLa cells from the single cells collected using the system.

  10. A single-cell scraper based on an atomic force microscope for detaching a living cell from a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Futoshi; Adachi, Makoto; Hashimoto, Shigetaka

    2015-10-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulator that can detach a single, living adhesion cell from its substrate without compromising the cell's viability. The micrometer-scale cell scraper designed for this purpose was fabricated from an AFM micro cantilever using focused ion beam milling. The homemade AFM equipped with the scraper was compact and standalone and could be mounted on a sample stage of an inverted optical microscope. It was possible to move the scraper using selectable modes of operation, either a manual mode with a haptic device or a computer-controlled mode. The viability of the scraped single cells was evaluated using a fluorescence dye of calcein-acetoxymethl ester. Single cells detached from the substrate were collected by aspiration into a micropipette capillary glass using an electro-osmotic pump. As a demonstration, single HeLa cells were selectively detached from the substrate and collected by the micropipette. It was possible to recultivate HeLa cells from the single cells collected using the system.

  11. Transient state imaging of live cells using single plane illumination and arbitrary duty cycle excitation pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Mücksch, Jonas; Spielmann, Thiemo; Sisamakis, Evangelos; Widengren, Jerker

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of Single Plane Illumination Microscopy to Transient State Imaging (TRAST), offering sensitive microenvironmental information together with optical sectioning and reduced overall excitation light exposure of the specimen. The concept is verified by showing that transition rates can be determined accurately for free dye in solution and that fluorophore transition rates can be resolved pixel-wise in live cells. Furthermore, we derive a new theoretical framework for analyzing TRAST data acquired with arbitrary duty cycle pulse trains. By this analysis it is possible to reduce the overall measurement time and thereby enhance the frame rates in TRAST imaging.

  12. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation with ABO-Incompatible Grafts: A German Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Goralczyk, Armin D.; Obed, Aiman; Schnitzbauer, Andreas; Doenecke, Axel; Tsui, Tung Yu; Scherer, Marcus N.; Ramadori, Giuliano; Lorf, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Adult living donor liver transplantations (ALDLTs) across the ABO blood group barrier have been reported in Asia, North Americas, and Europe, but not yet in Germany. Several strategies have been established to overcome the detrimental effects that are attached with such a disparity between donor and host, but no gold standard has yet emerged. Here, we present the first experiences with three ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantations in Germany applying different immunosuppressive strategies. Four patient-donor couples were considered for ABO-incompatible ALDLT. In these patients, resident ABO blood group antibodies (isoagglutinins) were depleted by plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption and replenishment was inhibited by splenectomy and/or B-cell-targeted immunosuppression. Despite different treatments ALDLT could safely be performed in three patients and all patients had good initial graft function without signs for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Two patients had long-term graft survival with stable graft function. We thus propose the feasibility of ABO-incompatible ALDLT with these protocols and advocate further expansion of ABO incompatible ALDLT in multicenter trials to improve efficacy and safety. PMID:20148072

  13. Tracking epigenetic histone modifications in single cells using Fab-based live endogenous modification labeling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Stasevich, Timothy J; Kainuma, Takashi; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Histone modifications play an important role in epigenetic gene regulation and genome integrity. It remains largely unknown, however, how these modifications dynamically change in individual cells. By using fluorescently labeled specific antigen binding fragments (Fabs), we have developed a general method to monitor the distribution and global level of endogenous histone H3 lysine modifications in living cells without disturbing cell growth and embryo development. Fabs produce distinct nuclear patterns that are characteristic of their target modifications. H3K27 trimethylation-specific Fabs, for example, are concentrated on inactive X chromosomes. As Fabs bind their targets transiently, the ratio of bound and free molecules depends on the target concentration, allowing us to measure changes in global modification levels. High-affinity Fabs are suitable for mouse embryo imaging, so we have used them to monitor H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation levels in mouse preimplantation embryos produced by in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer. The data suggest that a high level of H3K27 acetylation is important for normal embryo development. As Fab-based live endogenous modification labeling (FabLEM) is broadly useful for visualizing any modification, it should be a powerful tool for studying cell signaling and diagnosis in the future.

  14. Noninvasive Pigment Identification in Single Cells from Living Phototrophic Biofilms by Confocal Imaging Spectrofluorometry

    PubMed Central

    Roldán, M.; Thomas, F.; Castel, S.; Quesada, A.; Hernández-Mariné, M.

    2004-01-01

    A new imaging technique for the analysis of fluorescent pigments from a single cell is reported. It is based on confocal scanning laser microscopy coupled with spectrofluorometric methods. The setup allows simultaneous establishment of the relationships among pigment analysis in vivo, morphology, and three-dimensional localization inside thick intact microbial assemblages. PMID:15184183

  15. Energy, water and space use by free-living red kangaroos Macropus rufus and domestic sheep Ovis aries in an Australian rangeland.

    PubMed

    Munn, A J; Dawson, T J; McLeod, S R; Dennis, T; Maloney, S K

    2013-08-01

    We used doubly labelled water to measure field metabolic rates (FMR) and water turnover rates (WTR) in one of Australia's largest native herbivores, the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and one of Australia's dominant livestock species, the wool-breed Merino sheep, under free-living conditions in a typical Australian rangeland. Also, we used GPS technology to examine animal space use, along with the comparisons of urine concentration, diet, diet digestibility, and subsequent grazing pressures. We found smaller space-use patterns than previously reported for kangaroos, which were between 14 and 25 % those of sheep. The FMR of a 25-kg kangaroo was 30 % that of a 45-kg sheep, while WTR was 15 % and both were associated with smaller travel distances, lower salt intakes, and higher urine concentration in kangaroos than sheep. After accounting for differences in dry matter digestibility of food eaten by kangaroos (51 %) and sheep (58 %), the relative grazing pressure of a standard (mature, non-reproductive) 25-kg kangaroo was 35 % that of a 45-kg sheep. Even for animals of the same body mass (35 kg), the relative grazing pressure of the kangaroo was estimated to be only 44 % that of the sheep. After accounting for the energetic costs of wool growth by sheep, the FMRs of our sheep and kangaroos were 2-3 times their expected BMRs, which is typical for mammalian FMR:BMRs generally. Notably, data collected from our free-living animals were practically identical to those from animals confined to a semi-natural enclosure (collected in an earlier study under comparable environmental conditions), supporting the idea that FMRs are relatively constrained within species.

  16. Biochemical measurements on single erythroid progenitor cells shed light on the combinatorial regulation of red blood cell production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijia; Akbarian, Vahe; Audet, Julie

    2013-02-02

    Adult bone marrow (BM) erythrocyte colony-forming units (CFU-Es) are important cellular targets for the treatment of anemia and also for the manufacture of red blood cells (RBCs) ex vivo. We obtained quantitative biochemical measurements from single and small numbers of CFU-Es by isolating and analyzing c-Kit(+)CD71(high)Ter119(-) cells from adult mouse BM and this allowed us to identify two mechanisms that can be manipulated to increase RBC production. As expected, maximum RBC output was obtained when CFU-Es were stimulated with a combination of Stem Cell Factor (SCF) and Erythropoietin (EPO) mainly because SCF supports a transient CFU-E expansion and EPO promotes the survival and terminal differentiation of erythroid progenitors. However, we found that one of the main factors limiting the output in RBCs was that EPO induces a downregulation of c-Kit expression which limits the transient expansion of CFU-Es. In the presence of SCF, the EPO-mediated downregulation of c-Kit on CFU-Es is delayed but still significant. Moreover, treatment of CFU-Es with 1-Naphthyl PP1 could partially inhibit the downregulation of c-Kit induced by EPO, suggesting that this process is dependent on a Src family kinase, v-Src and/or c-Fyn. We also found that CFU-E survival and proliferation was dependent on the level of time-integrated extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in these cells, all of which could be significantly increased when SCF and EPO were combined with mouse fetal liver-derived factors. Taken together, these results suggest two novel molecular strategies to increase RBC production and regeneration.

  17. Microspectrophotometry of nitric oxide-dependent changes in hemoglobin in single red blood cells incubated with stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, K; Shiraishi, T; Kakinuma, K

    1997-08-01

    A highly sensitive microspectrophotometer was developed to measure spectral changes of oxyhemoglobin (oxy Hb) in single red blood cells (RBC) incubated with stimulated macrophages as a model of nitric oxide (NO) dependent cytotoxicity. Our microspectrophotometer, using a modified acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a 2-dimensional CCD array, allows fast spectrophotometric data acquisition. Human RBC treated with various concentrations of NO showed spectral changes due to the conversion of oxy Hb to methemoglobin (met Hb), in which the change in absorption differences at alpha (557 590 nm) and beta (542-525 nm) bands showed a linear relationship with the concentration of NO up to 100 microM. In contrast to highly diffusible NO, nitrite ions (NO2-) seem to enter RBC very slowly, resulting in negligible formation of met Hb in the presence of 5 mM glucose even during a prolonged incubation period. RBC were incubated with murine macrophages with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence of glucose for 24 and 40 h and subjected to the microspectrophotometric assay. The RBC incubated with LPS-stimulated macrophages showed significant changes in the spectrum due to NO-dependent conversion of oxy Hb to met Hb, which corresponded to the spectral changes of RBC treated with a several times higher concentration of NO than that in the culture medium. The trapping efficiency was calculated from the amounts of the NO released from macrophages and of the met Hb formed in the RBC, which gave a high efficiency (43%). The results suggest that RBC trap NO directly by cell cell interaction with macrophages. This spectrophotometric system is available for use with just a few drops of samples to study NO-specific cytotoxicity as a model of RBC without the use of any chemical reagent, in parallel with microscopic observations on changes of the cellular morphology under physiological conditions, such as membrane damage leading to hemolysis, adherence, and phagocytosis.

  18. Morphometric and biochemical characterization of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hairy roots obtained after single and double transformations.

    PubMed

    Thimmaraju, R; Venkatachalam, L; Bhagyalakshmi, N

    2008-06-01

    It is known that T-DNA of Agrobacterium rhizogenes affects processes of plant development and activates the synthesis of secondary metabolites in transformed plant cells. In the present investigation, we provide evidence that different strains of A. rhizogenes significantly affect morphometric, morphological and functional characteristics of hairy roots of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.). Infection with four strains of A. rhizogenes (A4, A 2/83, A 20/83 and LMG-150) resulted in ten clones of hairy roots, which were named accordingly as A4(1), A4(2), A4(3), A 2/83(1), A 2/83(2), A 2/83(3), A 20/83(1), A 20/83(2), A 20/83(3) and LMG-150. Their growth characteristics, pigment content, levels of endogenous auxin and T-DNA copy number showed significant differences probably due to the physiological status of the host cell rather than the T-DNA copy number. Although A 2/83 showed highest hairy root induction capacity, the best hairy root clone was obtained with strain LMG-150 that produced highest biomass and pigments. In this root clone, the enzyme peroxidase was found involved in altering the endogenous auxin pool. When root clone LMG-150 was re-transformed to insert additional individual rol genes, two double transformed clones were obtained, one for rolABC and the other for rolC gene where the former produced higher biomass and betalaine than the latter. Despite the established fact that rol genes of T-DNA influence endogenous phytohormones, no direct correlation among the single transformants and the double transformants was found. This is the first report, in our knowledge, where a hairy root clone has been used to obtain double transformants.

  19. Spatiotemporal Mapping Of Fluorescence Paramaters In Single Living Cells The Cell's Detoxification Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohen, Elli; Prince, Jeffrey; Kohen, Cahide; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Fried, Marek

    1988-06-01

    Our studies with quinacrine and benzo(a)pyrene suggest the formation of a multiorganelle detoxification complex (MODC) involving the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus, the lysosomes and the nuclear membrane. We have indications that not only is there a trapping of xenobiotics in the cytoplasmic components of the MODC, but there may also be a "nuclear pump" powered by postulated nuclear bioenergetic pathways involved in the ejection of these chemicals from the nucleus. We are using the microspectrofluorometric approach to study the extranuclear/nuclear energy metabolism related to these processes, and we have extended this method to investigate, in situ, within different components of the MODC, the blue/red spectral shifts associated with metabolites of fluorescent xenobiotics. Recording of fluorescence emission spectra, at different excitation wavelengths in L cells, allows the application of multivariate statistical methods to analyze complex (multicomponent spectra). Eluciadation of mechanisms, involved in the organization and activity of the MODC, can result in better targeting of gene modifiers and DNA-intercalating cancer chemotherapeutics towards their expected sites of action.

  20. Multiparametric atomic force microscopy imaging of single bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Trabelsi, Heykel; Soumillion, Patrice; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy is a valuable tool to simultaneously image the structure and map the biophysical properties of biological samples at the nanoscale. Traditionally, FD-based atomic force microscopy has been severely limited by its poor temporal and lateral resolutions. Here we report the use of advanced FD-based technology combined with biochemically sensitive tips to image filamentous bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria at unprecedented speed and resolution. Directly correlated multiparametric images of the structure, adhesion and elasticity of infected bacteria demonstrate that the sites of assembly and extrusion localize at the bacterial septum in the form of soft nanodomains surrounded by stiff cell wall material. The quantitative nano-bio-imaging method presented here offers a wealth of opportunities for mapping the physical properties and molecular interactions of complex biosystems, from viruses to tissues.

  1. Real-time visualization of prion transport in single live cells using quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Kan; Li, Shu; Xie, Min; Wu, Di; Wang, WenXi; Chen, Rui; Huang, Liqin; Huang, Tao; Pang, Daiwen; Xiao, Gengfu

    2010-04-09

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders resulting from structural conversion of the cellular isoform of PrP{sup C} to the infectious scrapie isoform PrP{sup Sc}. It is believed that such structural alteration may occur within the internalization pathway. However, there is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. Employing quantum dots (QDs) as a probe, we have recorded a real-time movie demonstrating the process of prion internalization in a living cell for the first time. The entire internalization process can be divided into four discrete but connected stages. In addition, using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin to disrupt cell membrane cholesterol, we show that lipid rafts play an important role in locating cellular PrP{sup C} to the cell membrane and in initiating PrP{sup C} endocytosis.

  2. Kidney transplantation from related and unrelated living donors in a single German centre.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Adina; Ivens, Katrin; Hetzel, Gerd Rüdiger; Hollenbeck, Markus; Sandmann, Wilhelm; Grabitz, Klaus; Balzer, Kai; Schneider, Frank; Grabensee, Bernd

    2003-02-01

    Organ transplantation began in 1954 with living related donation (LRD). Because of organ shortage from cadavers, unrelated kidney donation (LURD) has been proposed and shown to have good results despite complete HLA mismatching. This study aims to look at differences and similarities comparing LRD and LURD performed in our centre since the implementation of the German transplant law in 1997. Between January 1997 and July 2001, 62 out of 112 potential living donors and their recipients were accepted. Immunosuppression consisted of triple therapy (steroids, cyclosporin, mycophenolate) in patients with three or fewer mismatches, or quadruple therapy including mono- or polyclonal antibody treatment in patients with four or more mismatches or cytotoxic antibodies. LRD and LURD groups were compared for number and type of rejections, complications and kidney function at the end of observation (median 15.5 months, range 1-50 months). Out of 112 pairs presenting, transplantation was performed in only 62 cases (55.4%). Reasons to deny transplantation were medical problems of the potential donors in 19, psychological problems in 13, recipient problems in seven and other reasons in 11 pairs. In 38 cases LRD transplantation and in 24 cases LURD transplantation was carried out. Recipient age was significantly lower in the LRD group (37.7+/-12.1 years) compared with the LURD group (53.6+/-7.8 years). Mean donor age was 49.7+/-9.2 years in the LRD group and 50.3+/-9.1 years in the LURD group (ns). The number of mismatches was lower in LRD (2.1+/-1) than in LURD (4.4+/-0.9) (P=0.001) transplantation. The acute rejection rate was similar in both groups (52.2 vs 54.2%). OKT3 and tacrolimus rescue therapy for more severe rejections was more often applied in the LRD group but the difference did not reach the level of significance. There were more infectious complications in LURD transplantation (66.7 vs 36.4%, P=0.036) and a trend towards more surgical complications in LRD

  3. Hematologic and Total Plasma Protein Values in Free-Living Red-tailed Amazon Parrot Nestlings (Amazona brasiliensis) in Paraná State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Frederico F; Locatelli-Dittrich, Rosangela; Sipinski, Elenise A B; Abbud, Maria C; Sezerban, Rafael M; Schmidt, Elizabeth M S; Dittrich, Jaqueline; Cavalheiro, Maria L

    2015-09-01

    The red-tailed Amazon parrot (Amazona brasiliensis) is an endangered psittacid species that is endemic in the south and southeast Brazilian Atlantic coastal region. Hematologic evaluation is important to monitor the health of these birds, and information about laboratory values for this species is scarce. Hematologic and total plasma protein profiles were determined for 33 free-living nestling parrots in Paraná state, Brazil. Parrots were temporarily removed from the nest and manually restrained to record body weight and collect blood samples. Mean body weight was <400 g in 13 birds (group 1) and >400 g in 20 birds (group 2). Significantly higher levels of mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations, white blood cell counts, monocytes, and basophils were observed in younger birds (group 1). A stress leukogram (high white blood cell and heterophil count) was found in all nestlings, suggesting stress induced by capture and restraint. Parameters obtained in this study will be essential to assess the physiologic and pathologic condition of wild parrots, to evaluate the effects of environmental changes on their health, and to contribute to conservation efforts of this endangered species.

  4. Strategies for safe living among lung transplant recipients: a single-center survey.

    PubMed

    Jain, A; Humar, A; Lien, D; Weinkauf, J; Kumar, D

    2015-04-01

    Lung transplant (LT) recipients are at high risk for infection owing to lifelong immunosuppression and direct communication of the graft with the environment. Guidelines have been established for safe-living strategies after transplantation. We conducted a survey of LT patients to determine compliance with these strategies. Adult LT outpatients completed a survey consisting of questions on a 5-point Likert scale with the following categories: hand washing, gardening, respiratory infections, food and water safety, animal contact, travel, and occupation. A total of 194 LT recipients completed the survey (age 54.4 ± 13.3 years; time post transplant 4.76 ± 3.5 years). Regular hand washing was practiced usually or always by 87.6%. Of those who worked with soil/gardened, 70/99 (70.7%) never wore a mask and 15.7% never wore gloves. Pet ownership was common (52%), but most patients used specific precautions during handling. Over one-third of patients continued employment after transplant but, of these, 56% had modified their occupation often because of perceived infectious risks. Most patients were fully compliant with influenza vaccination (92.3%). Patients <40 years of age were less likely to wear long-sleeved clothing in mosquito season (P = 0.002), more likely to handle pet feces (P = 0.005), and less likely to wear a mask with sick contacts (P = 0.021). We provide important insight into safe-living practices following lung transplantation and identify specific areas and subgroups of patients that could be targeted for enhanced education, with potential significant clinical benefit. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A focused scanning vertical beam for charged particle irradiation of living cells with single counted particles.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Michael J; Jeynes, Jonathan C G; Grime, Geoffrey W; Palitsin, Vladimir; Tullis, Iain D W; Barber, Paul R; Vojnovic, Boris; Webb, Roger P; Kirkby, Karen J

    2012-09-01

    The Surrey vertical beam is a new facility for targeted irradiation of cells in medium with singly counted ions. A duo-plasmatron ion source and a 2 MV Tandem™ accelerator supply a range of ions from protons to calcium for this beamline and microscope endstation, with energy ranges from 0.5 to 12 MeV. A magnetic quadrupole triplet lens is used to focus the beam of ions. We present the design of this beamline, and early results showing the capability to count single ions with 98% certainty on CR-39 track etch. We also show that the beam targeting accuracy is within 5 μm and selectively target human fibroblasts with a <5 μm carbon beam, using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence to demonstrate which cell nuclei were irradiated. We discuss future commissioning steps necessary to achieve submicron targeting accuracy with this beamline.

  6. Molecular extraction in single live cells by sneaking in and out magnetic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Deng, Liangzi; Lan, Yucheng; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Gao, Zhonghong; Chu, Ching-Wu; Cai, Dong; Ren, Zhifeng

    2014-07-29

    Extraction of intracellular molecules is crucial to the study of cellular signal pathways. Disruption of the cellular membrane remains the established method to release intracellular contents, which inevitably terminates the time course of biological processes. Also, conventional laboratory extractions mostly use bulky materials that ignore the heterogeneity of each cell. In this work, we developed magnetized carbon nanotubes that can be sneaked into and out of cell bodies under a magnetic force. Using a testing model with overexpression of GFP, the nanotubes successfully transported the intracellular GFP out at the single-cell level. The confined nanoscale invasiveness did not change cell viability or proliferation. This study presents the proof of concept of a previously unidentified real-time and single-cell approach to investigate cellular biology, signal messengers, and therapeutic effects with nanomaterials.

  7. Real-time quantification of single RNA translation dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Tatsuya; Lyon, Kenneth; DeLuca, Keith F; DeLuca, Jennifer G; English, Brian P; Zhang, Zhengjian; Lavis, Luke D; Grimm, Jonathan B; Viswanathan, Sarada; Looger, Loren L; Lionnet, Timothee; Stasevich, Timothy J

    2016-06-17

    Although messenger RNA (mRNA) translation is a fundamental biological process, it has never been imaged in real time in vivo with single-molecule precision. To achieve this, we developed nascent chain tracking (NCT), a technique that uses multi-epitope tags and antibody-based fluorescent probes to quantify protein synthesis dynamics at the single-mRNA level. NCT reveals an elongation rate of ~10 amino acids per second, with initiation occurring stochastically every ~30 seconds. Polysomes contain ~1 ribosome every 200 to 900 nucleotides and are globular rather than elongated in shape. By developing multicolor probes, we showed that most polysomes act independently; however, a small fraction (~5%) form complexes in which two distinct mRNAs can be translated simultaneously. The sensitivity and versatility of NCT make it a powerful new tool for quantifying mRNA translation kinetics.

  8. Hematologic and biochemical reference intervals of free-living Red-Tailed Amazon parrot (Amazona brasiliensis) nestlings on Rasa Island, Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Frederico F; Locatelli-Dittrich, Rosangela; Beltrame, Olair C; Sipinski, Elenise A B; Abbud, Maria C; Sezerban, Rafael M

    2016-12-01

    The Red-Tailed Amazon parrot (Amazona brasiliensis) is an endangered species of the Psittaciformes. There is little information about hematologic and biochemical variables of this species. The purpose of this study was to determine hematologic and biochemical RIs for free-living A brasiliensis nestlings on Rasa Island, Paraná, Brazil, and to compare the results between sexes. Thirty-seven parrots were taken from their nests and physically restrained for clinical examination and blood collection. The sex was diagnosed by PCR using the blood samples collected. Reference intervals were determined as recommended by the ASVCP guidelines in healthy nestlings. The difference between groups was analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test or Student's t-test. Sexing revealed 12 females and 25 males. The RIs for the measured variables were as follows: RBC 1.1-2.6 × 10(6) /μL, PCV 29.1-50.3%, HGB 7.2-12.9 g/dL, MCV 152-293 fL, MCHC 22.2-28.4 g/dL, WBC 4.9-28.5 × 10(3) /μL, 1.2-16 × 10(3) /μL, lymphocytes 2.4-18.7 × 10(3) /μL, monocytes 0.0-1.0 × 10(3) /μL, eosinophils 0.0-0.9 × 10(3) /μL, 0.0-1.3 × 10(3) /μL, heterophil:lymphocyte ratio 0.0-2.2, plasma total solids 2.1-3.7 g/dL, uric acid 0.5-2.0 mg/dL, glucose 184.9-284.3 mg/dL, AST 100.3-226.6 U/L, LDH 178.1-927.7 U/L, CK 149.8-1144.0 U/L, cholesterol 137.5-256.9 mg/dL, total protein 1.8-3.0 g/dL, calcium 7.0-8.6 mg/dL, and phosphorus 2.9-6.1 mg/dL. Increased concentrations of cholesterol (P < .05) were observed in females. This is the first study to establish hematologic and biochemical RIs for free-living A brasiliensis nestlings on Rasa Island. Hematologic and biochemical variables are important tools for evaluating the health status of free-living birds, and also support conservation planning for endangered species. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  9. Direct observation of single amyloid-β(1-40) oligomers on live cells: binding and growth at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robin D; Schauerte, Joseph A; Wisser, Kathleen C; Gafni, Ari; Steel, Duncan G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how amyloid-β peptide interacts with living cells on a molecular level is critical to development of targeted treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Evidence that oligomeric Aβ interacts with neuronal cell membranes has been provided, but the mechanism by which membrane binding occurs and the exact stoichiometry of the neurotoxic aggregates remain elusive. Physiologically relevant experimentation is hindered by the high Aβ concentrations required for most biochemical analyses, the metastable nature of Aβ aggregates, and the complex variety of Aβ species present under physiological conditions. Here we use single molecule microscopy to overcome these challenges, presenting direct optical evidence that small Aβ(1-40) oligomers bind to living neuroblastoma cells at physiological Aβ concentrations. Single particle fluorescence intensity measurements indicate that cell-bound Aβ species range in size from monomers to hexamers and greater, with the majority of bound oligomers falling in the dimer-to-tetramer range. Furthermore, while low-molecular weight oligomeric species do form in solution, the membrane-bound oligomer size distribution is shifted towards larger aggregates, indicating either that bound Aβ oligomers can rapidly increase in size or that these oligomers cluster at specific sites on the membrane. Calcium indicator studies demonstrate that small oligomer binding at physiological concentrations induces only mild, sporadic calcium leakage. These findings support the hypothesis that small oligomers are the primary Aβ species that interact with neurons at physiological concentrations.

  10. Direct single molecule measurement of TCR triggering by agonist pMHC in living primary T cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Geoff P; Pielak, Rafal M; Smoligovets, Alexander A; Lin, Jenny J; Groves, Jay T

    2013-07-03

    T cells discriminate between self and foreign antigenic peptides, displayed on antigen presenting cell surfaces, via the TCR. While the molecular interactions between TCR and its ligands are well characterized in vitro, quantitative measurements of these interactions in living cells are required to accurately resolve the physical mechanisms of TCR signaling. We report direct single molecule measurements of TCR triggering by agonist pMHC in hybrid junctions between live primary T cells and supported lipid membranes. Every pMHC:TCR complex over the entire cell is tracked while simultaneously monitoring the local membrane recruitment of ZAP70, as a readout of TCR triggering. Mean dwell times for pMHC:TCR molecular binding of 5 and 54 s were measured for two different pMHC:TCR systems. Single molecule measurements of the pMHC:TCR:ZAP70 complex indicate that TCR triggering is stoichiometric with agonist pMHC in a 1:1 ratio. Thus any signal amplification must occur downstream of TCR triggering. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00778.001.

  11. Single Particle Tracking reveals two distinct environments for CD4 receptors at the surface of living T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mascalchi, Patrice; Lamort, Anne Sophie; Salome, Laurence; Dumas, Fabrice

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the diffusion of single CD4 receptors on living lymphocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study reveals that CD4 receptors have either a random or confined diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamics of unconfined CD4 receptors was accelerated by a temperature raise. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamics of confined CD4 receptors was unchanged by a temperature raise. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results suggest the existence of two different environments for CD4 receptors. -- Abstract: We investigated the lateral diffusion of the HIV receptor CD4 at the surface of T lymphocytes at 20 Degree-Sign C and 37 Degree-Sign C by Single Particle Tracking using Quantum Dots. We found that the receptors presented two major distinct behaviors that were not equally affected by temperature changes. About half of the receptors showed a random diffusion with a diffusion coefficient increasing upon raising the temperature. The other half of the receptors was permanently or transiently confined with unchanged dynamics on raising the temperature. These observations suggest that two distinct subpopulations of CD4 receptors with different environments are present at the surface of living T lymphocytes.

  12. Diffusion properties of single FoF1-ATP synthases in a living bacterium unraveled by localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Marc; Rendler, Torsten; Börsch, Michael

    2012-03-01

    FoF1-ATP synthases in Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria are membrane-bound enzymes which use an internal protondriven rotary double motor to catalyze the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). According to the 'chemiosmotic hypothesis', a series of proton pumps generate the necessary pH difference plus an electric potential across the bacterial plasma membrane. These proton pumps are redox-coupled membrane enzymes which are possibly organized in supercomplexes, as shown for the related enzymes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We report diffusion measurements of single fluorescent FoF1-ATP synthases in living E. coli by localization microscopy and single enzyme tracking to distinguish a monomeric enzyme from a supercomplex-associated form in the bacterial membrane. For quantitative mean square displacement (MSD) analysis, the limited size of the observation area in the membrane with a significant membrane curvature had to be considered. The E. coli cells had a diameter of about 500 nm and a length of about 2 to 3 μm. Because the surface coordinate system yielded different localization precision, we applied a sliding observation window approach to obtain the diffusion coefficient D = 0.072 μm2/s of FoF1-ATP synthase in living E. coli cells.

  13. Fluorescence molecule counting for single-molecule studies in crowded environment of living cells without and with broken ergodicity.

    PubMed

    Földes-Papp, Zeno; Baumann, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    We present a new approach to distinguish between non-ergodic and ergodic behavior. Performing ensemble averaging in a subpopulation of individual molecules leads to a mean value that can be similar to the mean value obtained in an ergodic system. The averaging is carried out by minimizing the variation between the sum of the temporal averaged mean square deviation of the simulated data with respect to the logarithmic scaling behavior of the subpopulation. For this reason, we first introduce a kind of Continuous Time Random Walks (CTRW), which we call Limited Continuous Time Random Walks (LCTRW) on fractal support. The random waiting time distributions are sampled at points which fulfill the condition N <1, where N is the Poisson probability of finding a single molecule in the femtoliter-sized observation volume ΔV at the single-molecule level. Given a subpopulation of different single molecules of the same kind, the ratio T/ T(m) between the measurement time T and the meaningful time T(m), which is the time for observing just one and the same single molecule, is the experimentally accessible quantity that allows to compare different molecule numbers in the subpopulation. In addition, the mean square displacement traveled by the molecule during the time t is determined by an upper limit of the geometric dimension of the living cell or its nucleus.

  14. Functioning Nanomachines Seen in Real-Time in Living Bacteria Using Single-Molecule and Super-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Sheng-Wen; Leake, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular machines are examples of “pre-established” nanotechnology, driving the basic biochemistry of living cells. They encompass an enormous range of function, including fuel generation for chemical processes, transport of molecular components within the cell, cellular mobility, signal transduction and the replication of the genetic code, amongst many others. Much of our understanding of such nanometer length scale machines has come from in vitro studies performed in isolated, artificial conditions. Researchers are now tackling the challenges of studying nanomachines in their native environments. In this review, we outline recent in vivo investigations on nanomachines in model bacterial systems using state-of-the-art genetics technology combined with cutting-edge single-molecule and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that single-molecule and super-resolution fluorescence imaging provide powerful tools for the biochemical, structural and functional characterization of biological nanomachines. The integrative spatial, temporal, and single-molecule data obtained simultaneously from fluorescence imaging open an avenue for systems-level single-molecule cellular biophysics and in vivo biochemistry. PMID:21731456

  15. Living together: behavior and welfare in single and mixed species groups of capuchin (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Rebecca; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; Dufour, Valérie; MacDonald, Charlotte; Whiten, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    There are potential advantages of housing primates in mixed species exhibits for both the visiting public and the primates themselves. If the primates naturally associate in the wild, it may be more educational and enjoyable for the public to view. Increases in social complexity and stimulation may be enriching for the primates. However, mixed species exhibits might also create welfare problems such as stress from interspecific aggression. We present data on the behavior of single and mixed species groups of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre in the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland's Edinburgh Zoo. These species associate in the wild, gaining foraging benefits and decreased predation. But Cebus are also predators themselves with potential risks for the smaller Saimiri. To study their living together we took scan samples at > or =15 min intervals on single (n=109) and mixed species groups (n=152), and all occurrences of intraspecific aggression and interspecific interactions were recorded. We found no evidence of chronic stress and Saimiri actively chose to associate with Cebus. On 79% of scans, the two species simultaneously occupied the same part of their enclosure. No vertical displacement was observed. Interspecific interactions were common (>2.5/hr), and equally divided among mildly aggressive, neutral, and affiliative interactions such as play. Only one aggressive interaction involved physical contact and was non-injurious. Aggressive interactions were mostly (65%) displacements and vocal exchanges, initiated almost equally by Cebus and Saimiri. Modifications to the enclosure were successful in reducing these mildly aggressive interactions with affiliative interactions increasing in frequency and diversity. Our data suggest that in carefully designed, large enclosures, naturally associating monkeys are able to live harmoniously and are enriched by each other

  16. Subunit rotation in a single FoF1-ATP synthase in a living bacterium monitored by FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfert, K.; Oosaka, T.; Yaginuma, H.; Ernst, S.; Noji, H.; Iino, R.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is the ubiquitous membrane-bound enzyme in mitochondria, chloroplasts and bacteria which provides the 'chemical energy currency' adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for cellular processes. In Escherichia coli ATP synthesis is driven by a proton motive force (PMF) comprising a proton concentration difference ΔpH plus an electric potential ΔΨ across the lipid membrane. Single-molecule in vitro experiments have confirmed that proton-driven subunit rotation within FoF1-ATP synthase is associated with ATP synthesis. Based on intramolecular distance measurements by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) the kinetics of subunit rotation and the step sizes of the different rotor parts have been unraveled. However, these experiments were accomplished in the presence of a PMF consisting of a maximum ΔpH ~ 4 and an unknown ΔΨ. In contrast, in living bacteria the maximum ΔpH across the plasma membrane is likely 0.75, and ΔΨ has been measured between -80 and -140 mV. Thus the problem of in vivo catalytic turnover rates, or the in vivo rotational speed in single FoF1-ATP synthases, respectively, has to be solved. In addition, the absolute number of functional enzymes in a single bacterium required to maintain the high ATP levels has to be determined. We report our progress of measuring subunit rotation in single FoF1-ATP synthases in vitro and in vivo, which was enabled by a new labeling approach for single-molecule FRET measurements.

  17. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Combined Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma: Experience of a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chih; Chen, Ying-Ju; Huang, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Chun-Han; Kuo, Fang-Ying; Eng, Hock-Liew; Yong, Chee-Chien; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Lin, Ting-Lung; Li, Wei-Feng; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Che; Wang, Chih-Chi; Chen, Chao-Long

    2017-02-28

    BACKGROUND Because the outcome of liver transplantation for cholangiocarcinoma is often poor, cholangiocarcinoma is a contraindication for liver transplantation in most centers. Combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma is a rare type of primary hepatic malignancy containing features of hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. Diagnosing combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma pre-operatively is difficult. Because of sparse research presentations worldwide, we report our experience with living donor liver transplantation for combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 710 patients underwent living donor liver transplantation at our institution from April 2006 to June 2014; 377 of them received transplantation because of hepatocellular carcinoma with University of California San Francisco (UCSF) staging criteria fulfilled pre-operatively. Eleven patients (2.92%) were diagnosed with combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma confirmed pathologically from explant livers; we reviewed these cases retrospectively. Long-term survival was compared between patients diagnosed with combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma and patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. RESULTS The mean age of the patients in our series was 60.2 years, and the median follow-up period was 23.9 months. Four patients were diagnosed with a recurrence during the follow-up period, including one intra-hepatic and three extra-hepatic recurrences. Four patients died due to tumor recurrence. Except for patients with advanced-stage cancer, disease-free survival of patients with combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma compared with that of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma was 80% versus 97.2% in 1 year, and 46.7% versus 92.5% in 3 years (p<0.001), and overall survival was 90% versus 97.2% in 1 year, and 61.7% versus 95.1% in 3 years (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS

  18. Real-Time Visualization and Quantification of Contractile Ring Proteins in Single Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Reshma; Liu, Yajun; Gerien, Kenneth S.; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Single-cell microscopy provides a powerful tool to visualize cellular and subcellular processes in wild-type and mutant cells by observing fluorescently tagged proteins. Here, we describe three simple methods to visualize fission yeast cells: gelatin slides, coverslip-bottom dishes, and tetrad fluorescence microscopy. These imaging methods and data analysis using free software make it possible to quantify protein localization, dynamics, and concentration with high spatial and temporal resolution. In fission yeast, the actomyosin contractile ring is essential for cytokinesis. We use the visualization and quantification of contractile ring proteins as an example to demonstrate how to use these methods. PMID:26519302

  19. Tuberculosis screening among homeless persons with AIDS living in single-room-occupancy hotels.

    PubMed

    Layton, M C; Cantwell, M F; Dorsinville, G J; Valway, S E; Onorato, I M; Frieden, T R

    1995-11-01

    Congregate facilities for homeless persons with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are often endemic for tuberculosis. We evaluated tuberculosis screening methods at single-room-occupancy hotels housing persons with AIDS. Residents were screened by cross matching the New York City Tuberculosis Registry, interviewing for tuberculosis history, skin testing, and chest radiography. Cases were classified as either previously or newly diagnosed. Among the 106 participants, 16 (15%) previously diagnosed tuberculosis cases were identified. Participants' tuberculosis histories were identified by the questionnaire (100%) or by registry match (69%). Eight participants (50%) were noncompliant with therapy. These findings prompted the establishment of a directly observed therapy program on site.

  20. Instrumentation for simultaneous kinetic imaging of multiple fluorophores in single living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephen J.; Beatty, Diane M.; Welling, Larry W.; Wiegmann, Thomas B.

    1991-05-01

    . Intracellular calcium increases rapidly when the bath Ca2+ is raised. The pH remains stable for several seconds, then suddenly collapses. The second example concerns fusion of human red blood cells (RBC) to fibroblasts expressing influenza hemagglutinin. Movement of soluble and membrane-bound dyes follow different kinetics, depending upon the molecular weight of the soluble dye. Furthermore, the swelling of the RBC occurs after the onset of fusion, and therefore cannot provide the driving force.

  1. Source of Scatter in the Creep Lives of NiAl(Hf) Single Crystals Revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis in developing NiAl-based alloys for high- temperature applications in aircraft engines. In comparison to commercial superalloys, binary NiAl has a higher melting temperature, lower density, larger thermal conductivity, and better oxidation resistance. These properties make it a desirable material to replace superalloys as blades and vanes in aircraft engines. Despite this attractive combination of properties, binary NiAl cannot be used as a reliable structural material because of its low-temperature brittleness and poor high-temperature creep strength. GE Aircraft Engines in Cincinnati, Ohio, has recently developed NiAl(Hf) alloys that have creep strengths comparable to commercial superalloys while maintaining the other desirable properties of binary NiAl. The microstructures of these alloys consist of finely distributed G-phase (Ni_(16)Hf_(6)Si_(7)) precipitates, which strengthen the NiAl matrix. However, while the creep properties of these alloys were being evaluated, considerable scatter was observed in the creep lives of specimens tested under identical stress and temperature conditions. Although these alloys had nominally the same composition, the test specimens were obtained from four different ingots (A, B, C, and D) that had been heat treated under similar conditions. The NASA Lewis Research Center began the present study at the request of GE Aircraft Engines under a Space Act Agreement to identify the source of this scatter.

  2. Tracking Single Cells in Live Animals Using a Photoconvertible Near-Infrared Cell Membrane Label

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juwell; Runnels, Judith M.; Turcotte, Raphaël; Celso, Cristina Lo; Scadden, David T.; Strom, Terry B.; Lin, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel photoconversion technique to track individual cells in vivo using a commercial lipophilic membrane dye, DiR. We show that DiR exhibits a permanent fluorescence emission shift (photoconversion) after light exposure and does not reacquire the original color over time. Ratiometric imaging can be used to distinguish photoconverted from non-converted cells with high sensitivity. Combining the use of this photoconvertible dye with intravital microscopy, we tracked the division of individual hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells within the calvarium bone marrow of live mice. We also studied the peripheral differentiation of individual T cells by tracking the gain or loss of FoxP3-GFP expression, a marker of the immune suppressive function of CD4+ T cells. With the near-infrared photoconvertible membrane dye, the entire visible spectral range is available for simultaneous use with other fluorescent proteins to monitor gene expression or to trace cell lineage commitment in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:23990881

  3. Tracking single cells in live animals using a photoconvertible near-infrared cell membrane label.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Alicia L; Fujisaki, Joji; Wu, Juwell; Runnels, Judith M; Turcotte, Raphaël; Spencer, Joel A; Celso, Cristina Lo; Scadden, David T; Strom, Terry B; Lin, Charles P

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel photoconversion technique to track individual cells in vivo using a commercial lipophilic membrane dye, DiR. We show that DiR exhibits a permanent fluorescence emission shift (photoconversion) after light exposure and does not reacquire the original color over time. Ratiometric imaging can be used to distinguish photoconverted from non-converted cells with high sensitivity. Combining the use of this photoconvertible dye with intravital microscopy, we tracked the division of individual hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells within the calvarium bone marrow of live mice. We also studied the peripheral differentiation of individual T cells by tracking the gain or loss of FoxP3-GFP expression, a marker of the immune suppressive function of CD4(+) T cells. With the near-infrared photoconvertible membrane dye, the entire visible spectral range is available for simultaneous use with other fluorescent proteins to monitor gene expression or to trace cell lineage commitment in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  4. Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Living Kidney Donation: A Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, James R; Vishnevsky, Tanya; Fleishman, Aaron; Brann, Tracy; Evenson, Amy R; Pavlakis, Martha; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2015-09-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an initiative at one transplant center to annually assess psychosocial outcomes of living kidney donors. The current analysis focuses on a cohort of adults (n = 208) who donated a kidney at BIDMC between September 2005 and August 2012, in which two post-donation annual assessments could be examined. One and two year post-donation surveys were returned by 59 % (n = 123) and 47 % (n = 98) of LKDs, respectively. Those who did not complete any survey were more likely to be younger (p = 0.001), minority race/ethnicity (p < 0.001), and uninsured at the time of donation (p = 0.01) compared to those who returned at least one of the two annual surveys. The majority of donors reported no adverse physical or psychosocial consequences of donation, high satisfaction with the donation experience, and no donation decision regret. However, a sizable minority of donors felt more pain intensity than expected and recovery time was much slower than expected, and experienced a clinically significant decline in vitality. We describe how these outcomes are used to inform clinical practice at our transplant center as well as highlight challenges in donor surveillance over time.

  5. Extracting the stepping dynamics of molecular motors in living cells from trajectories of single particles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Augusto; Bruno, Luciana; Levi, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible of transporting a wide variety of cargos in the cytoplasm. Current efforts are oriented to characterize the biophysical properties of motors in cells with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of these nanomachines in the complex cellular environment. In this study, we present an algorithm designed to extract motor step sizes and dwell times between steps from trajectories of motors or cargoes driven by motors in cells. The algorithm is based on finding patterns in the trajectory compatible with the behavior expected for a motor step, i.e., a region of confined motion followed by a jump in the position to another region of confined motion with similar characteristics to the previous one. We show that this algorithm allows the analysis of 2D trajectories even if they present complex motion patterns such as active transport interspersed with diffusion and does not require the assumption of a given step size or dwell period. The confidence on the step detection can be easily obtained and allows the evaluation of the confidence of the dwell and step size distributions. To illustrate the possible applications of this algorithm, we analyzed trajectories of myosin-V driven organelles in living cells.

  6. Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Living Kidney Donation: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigue, James R.; Vishnevsky, Tanya; Fleishman, Aaron; Brann, Tracy; Evenson, Amy R.; Pavlakis, Martha; Mandelbrot, Didier A.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an initiative at one transplant center to annually assess psychosocial outcomes of living kidney donors. The current analysis focuses on a cohort of adults (n=208) who donated a kidney at BIDMC between September 2005 and August 2012, in which two post-donation annual assessments could be examined. One and two year post-donation surveys were returned by 59% (n=123) and 47% (n=98) of LKDs, respectively. Those who did not complete any survey were more likely to be younger (p=0.001), minority race/ethnicity (p<0.001), and uninsured at the time of donation (p=0.01) compared to those who returned at least one of the two annual surveys. The majority of donors reported no adverse physical or psychosocial consequences of donation, high satisfaction with the donation experience, and no donation decision regret. However, a sizable minority of donors felt more pain intensity than expected and recovery time was much slower than expected, and experienced a clinically significant decline in vitality. We describe how these outcomes are used to inform clinical practice at our transplant center as well as highlight challenges in donor surveillance over time. PMID:26123551

  7. Non-invasive single-cell biomechanical analysis using live-imaging datasets.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Yanthe E; Lund, Amanda W; Lin, Alex W H; Ng, Chee P; Alsuwaidi, Aysha; Azzeh, Sara; Gater, Deborah L; Teo, Jeremy C M

    2016-09-01

    The physiological state of a cell is governed by a multitude of processes and can be described by a combination of mechanical, spatial and temporal properties. Quantifying cell dynamics at multiple scales is essential for comprehensive studies of cellular function, and remains a challenge for traditional end-point assays. We introduce an efficient, non-invasive computational tool that takes time-lapse images as input to automatically detect, segment and analyze unlabeled live cells; the program then outputs kinematic cellular shape and migration parameters, while simultaneously measuring cellular stiffness and viscosity. We demonstrate the capabilities of the program by testing it on human mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) induced to differentiate towards the osteoblastic (huOB) lineage, and T-lymphocyte cells (T cells) of naïve and stimulated phenotypes. The program detected relative cellular stiffness differences in huMSCs and huOBs that were comparable to those obtained with studies that utilize atomic force microscopy; it further distinguished naïve from stimulated T cells, based on characteristics necessary to invoke an immune response. In summary, we introduce an integrated tool to decipher spatiotemporal and intracellular dynamics of cells, providing a new and alternative approach for cell characterization. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of green fluorescent protein in a single living cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Sharman, Kristin K.; Ahuja, Ramesh C.; Eto, Masumi; Brautigan, David L.

    1999-06-01

    Observing dynamic reorganization and molecular interactions of cellular components on a precise spatial and temporal scale is not possible using existing microscopic techniques. However, fluorescence lifetimes occur on a nanosecond time scale, are independent of local signal intensity and concentration of the fluorophore, and provide sensitive discrimination of the molecular environment. We designed and implemented a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) using a picosecond-gated multi-channel plate image intensifier, providing two-dimensional time-resolved images of single cell specimen. BHK21 cells were transfected with vectors for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and placed on an infinity-corrected Olympus epi-fluorescence microscope, coupled to a Coherent tunable femtosecond ti-sapphire pulsed laser and a frequency doubler to select an appropriate excitation wave length. After synchronizing the high-speed gated image intensifier to the excitation laser pulses, time-resolved nanosecond images of fluorescent emission were acquired. These images were processed pixel-by-pixel for single exponential decay to obtain an image based on fluorescence lifetime. Although the nucleus appeared brighter than the cytoplasm by fluorescence intensity measurement, FILM showed a uniform lifetime of the GFP fluorescence in both compartments, indicating that the GFP was in similar molecular environments. This technology also has important applications in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging.

  9. Living at the border: A community and single-cell assessment of lake bacterioneuston activity

    PubMed Central

    Hörtnagl, Paul; Pérez, María Teresa; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the physicochemical properties of the surface microlayer (SML: first 900 μm) and its underlying water (ULW: 0.2–0.5-m depth) and compared the composition and activity of their bacterial communities in six lakes located across an altitude gradient. Activity was assessed at both the community level, by measuring leucine bulk incorporation, and at the single-cell level, by using microautoradiography. Catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to quantitatively assess the structure of the bacterial assemblage. Dissolved organic matter at the SML was significantly enriched in small-size molecules as compared to the ULW. Bacterial abundance in the SML ranged from 3.2 × 105 cells mL−1 to 3.2 × 106 cells mL−1 and was enriched in four out of six lakes when compared to the ULW. The SML and ULW showed lake-specific differences in bacterial community composition, although in most cases, both layers were dominated by Betaproteobacteria. This group also contributed the most to total activity in both layers in all lakes, followed by Actinobacteria. Despite large differences in environmental conditions among lakes, the fraction of active neustonic bacteria was very similar in most of them. Both bulk and single-cell activities are not necessarily lower in the SML than in the ULW, and well-adapted bacteria exist in the extreme conditions found in this habitat. PMID:20401318

  10. Live-cell single-molecule labeling and analysis of myosin motors with quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Nakahata, Yoshihito; Yarimizu, Hirokazu; Kanzaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a powerful tool for quantitatively analyzing dynamic cellular processes by single-particle tracking. However, tracking of intracellular molecules with QDs is limited by their inability to penetrate the plasma membrane and bind to specific molecules of interest. Although several techniques for overcoming these problems have been proposed, they are either complicated or inconvenient. To address this issue, in this study, we developed a simple, convenient, and nontoxic method for labeling intracellular molecules in cells using HaloTag technology and electroporation. We labeled intracellular myosin motors with this approach and tracked their movement within cells. By simultaneously imaging myosin movement and F-actin architecture, we observed that F-actin serves not only as a rail but also as a barrier for myosin movement. We analyzed the effect of insulin on the movement of several myosin motors, which have been suggested to regulate intracellular trafficking of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4, but found no significant enhancement in myosin motor motility as a result of insulin treatment. Our approach expands the repertoire of proteins for which intracellular dynamics can be analyzed at the single-molecule level. PMID:28035048

  11. Cooling and long-lived single-site localization of an ion in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylinskii, Alexei; Karpa, Leon; Gangloff, Dorian; Cetina, Marko; Vuletic, Vladan

    2013-05-01

    We report on localization of a continuously cooled single ion by a one-dimensional optical lattice. The ion is confined in a hybrid trap formed by an optical dipole potential produced by the standing-wave field of an optical cavity and a two-dimensional radio-frequency Paul trap transverse to the cavity axis. A lattice-assisted resolved Raman sideband process cools the ion to energies 20 times lower than the depth of the lattice potential, close to the vibrational ground state. We observe ion localization by measuring its displacement in the presence of a periodically driven electric field parallel to the lattice. We demonstrate full suppression of the driven ion motion due to optical localization to a single lattice site on a time-scale of 100 μs, which is 100 times longer than the vibrational period of the ion in the lattice site. At a longer time scale of 1 ms, driven motion is suppressed to 50%. The presented system paves the way to the realization of novel experiments studying classical and quantum friction models, and many-body physics with long-range interactions in periodic potentials. Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  12. High-sensitivity measurements of multiple kinase activities in live single cells.

    PubMed

    Regot, Sergi; Hughey, Jacob J; Bajar, Bryce T; Carrasco, Silvia; Covert, Markus W

    2014-06-19

    Increasing evidence has shown that population dynamics are qualitatively different from single-cell behaviors. Reporters to probe dynamic, single-cell behaviors are desirable yet relatively scarce. Here, we describe an easy-to-implement and generalizable technology to generate reporters of kinase activity for individual cells. Our technology converts phosphorylation into a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling event that can be measured by epifluorescence microscopy. Our reporters reproduce kinase activity for multiple types of kinases and allow for calculation of active kinase concentrations via a mathematical model. Using this technology, we made several experimental observations that had previously been technicallyunfeasible, including stimulus-dependent patterns of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. We also measured JNK, p38, and ERK activities simultaneously, finding that p38 regulates the peak number, but not the intensity, of ERK fluctuations. Our approach opens the possibility of analyzing a wide range of kinase-mediated processes in individual cells.

  13. Pancreas Transplantation From Living Donors: A Single Center Experience of 20 Cases.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Jung, J H; Kwon, H; Shin, S; Kim, Y H; Han, D J

    2016-08-01

    Living donor pancreas transplantation (LDPT) has several advantages over deceased donor pancreas transplantation (DDPT), including better HLA matching, shorter ischemic time, and shorter waiting time. It remains an attractive option for diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with end stage renal disease. We reviewed 20 cases of LDPT performed in Asan Medical Center between October 1992 and March 2015. Six cases (30%) were pancreas transplantation alone (PTA), and the rest (70%) were simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation (SPK). Relations of donor and recipient were parents in 7 (35%), siblings in 6 (30%), spouse in 6 (30%), and cousin in 1 (5%). Graft survival in SPK at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 91.7%, 83.3%, 83.3%, and 83.3%, respectively, and that in PTA recipients was 50%, 33.3%, 16.7%, and 16.7%, respectively (p = 0.005). Causes of graft failure in SPK were thrombosis (one case), and rejection (one case), whereas those in PTA were noncompliance (two cases), thrombosis (one case), reflux pancreatitis (one case), and chronic rejection (one case). In terms of pancreas exocrine drainage, two grafts (25%) maintained their function in bladder drainage, while all grafts maintained in enteric drainage p < 0.05). Seven (35%) donors experienced minor pancreatic juice leakage and one underwent reoperation due to postoperative hematoma. Most donors maintained normoglycemia and normal renal function. However, two donors developed DM (at 1 and 90 months postdonation), and were treated with oral hypoglycemic agents. Graft survival in PTA recipients was poorer than in SPK due to poor compliance and bladder drainage-related problems. The surgical and metabolic complication rates of donors can be minimized by applying strict donor criteria. Therefore, LDPT with enteric drainage is an acceptable treatment for SPK. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  14. Localization of bleomycin in a single living cell using three-photon excitation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Anil T.; Brautigan, David L.; Hecht, Sidney M.; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Bleomycin has been used in the clinic as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of several neoplasms, including non-Hodgkins lymphomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and testicular tumors. The effectiveness of bleomycin is believed to be derived from its ability to bind and oxidatively cleave DNA in the presence of a iron cofactor in vivo. A substantial amount of data on BLM has been collected, there is little information concerning the effects of bleomycin in living cells. In order to obtain data pertinent to the effects of BLM in intact cells, we have exploited the intrinsic fluorescence property of bleomycin to monitor the uptake of the drug in mammalian cells. We employed two light microscopy techniques, a wide-field and three-photon excitation (760 nm) fluorescence microscopy. Treatment of HeLa cells with bleomycin resulted in rapid to localization within the cells. In addition data collected from the wide field experiments, three-photon excitation of BLM which considerably reduced the phototoxic effect compared with UV light excitation in the wide-field microscopy indicated co-localization of the drug to regions of the cytoplasm occupied by the endoplasmic reticulum probe, DiOC5. The data clearly indicates that the cellular uptake of bleomycin after one minute includes the nucleus as well as in cytoplasm. Contrary to previous studies, which indicate chromosomal DNA as the target of bleomycin, the current findings suggest that the drug is distributed to many areas within the cell, including the endoplasmic reticulum, an organelle that is known to contain ribonucleic acids.

  15. Synthesis of Conjugated Diblock Copolymers: Two Mechanistically Distinct, Sequential Living Polymerizations using a Single Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zong-Quan; Radcliffe, Jonathan D.; Ono, Robert J.; Chen, Zheng; Li, Zicheng; Bielawski, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Block copolymers comprised of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and three different poly(isocyanide)s were synthesized in a single pot via the sequential addition of 2-bromo-3-hexyl-5-chloromagnesiothiophene followed by 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl 4-isocyanobenzoate, tert-butyl 4-isocyanobenzoate, or 1-isocyanohexadecane to a solution of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane dichloronickel. Similarly, block copolymers of poly(1-dodecylpyrrole) along with poly(2,5-bis(hexyloxy)phenylene) and a poly(arylisocyanide) were also prepared using an analogous methodology. The respective mechanistically distinct polymerizations proceeded in a controlled fashion, were mediated by a common catalyst, and afforded well-defined block copolymers with tunable molecular weights and compositions. Selected block copolymers exhibited higher-order structures in solution and microphase separation characteristics in the solid state.

  16. Effects of heat treatment on red gemstone spinel: single-crystal X-ray, Raman, and photoluminescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmer, Remo; Malsy, Anna-Kathrin; Armbruster, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A red spinel, MgAl2O4, from Burma (Myanmar) containing as chromophores ca. 0.5 wt% of each Cr2O3 and V2O3, was sequentially heated for at least 72 h at temperatures ranging from 600 °C to 1,100 °C. The untreated and quenched samples were examined with single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. XRD results display a linear decrease of the cell parameter a and a continuous shift of the oxygen coordinate u, u, u at 3 m toward lower values with increasing temperature and associated Mg, Al disorder: T(Mg1- x Al x )M(Al2- x Mg x )O4. The natural spinel has x = 0.157(2) and reaches x = 0.286(4) after quenching from 1,100 °C. In its natural state, M-O and T-O distances are 1.9226(2) and 1.9361(4) Å. With increasing inversion of Mg from the tetrahedrally coordinated T to the octahedrally coordinated M site, M-O distances increase at 1,100 °C to 1.9333(4) Å and T-O distances decrease to 1.9130(8) Å. The crossover temperature, at which T-O and M-O distances become equal (i.e., 1.927 Å), is found to be at 650 °C and corresponds to an inversion parameter x = 0.208(3). With increasing heat treatment, Raman spectra of quenched samples become significantly broadened and a peak characteristic for Mg, Al disorder at 721 cm-1 firstly appears for a crystal quenched from 800 °C with x = 0.248(4). At room temperature, photoluminescence spectra are dominated by a strong R line at 684.5 nm accompanied by poorly resolved N lines: N1 (687 nm), N2 (688 nm), and N3 (689 nm). N lines are caused by different Mg, Al environments of Cr3+. With increasing inversion parameter ( x), the R line decreases in intensity and the N lines become prominent leading to strongly broadened peaks with a maximum shifted toward higher wave lengths (687.5 nm at 1,100 °C). Criteria for the detection of heat treatment on gemstone spinel applicable to gemological routine examination are provided. Extrapolation of u, a, and bond lengths from heat

  17. Highly Informative Single-Copy Nuclear Microsatellite DNA Markers Developed Using an AFLP-SSR Approach in Black Spruce (Picea mariana) and Red Spruce (P. rubens)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yong-Zhong; Forneris, Natascha; Rajora, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea) and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana) and red spruce (Picea rubens) using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies. Principal Findings A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean = 0.67) in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean = 0.62) in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies. Significance The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce

  18. Single-cell evaluation of red blood cell bio-mechanical and nano-structural alterations upon chemically induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ameya; Chu, Trang T T; Dao, Ming; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh

    2015-05-07

    Erythroid cells, specifically red blood cells (RBCs), are constantly exposed to highly reactive radicals during cellular gaseous exchange. Such exposure often exceeds the cells' innate anti-oxidant defense systems, leading to progressive damage and eventual senescence. One of the contributing factors to this process are alterations to hemoglobin conformation and globin binding to red cell cytoskeleton. However, in addition to the aforementioned changes, it is possible that oxidative damage induces critical changes to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton and corresponding bio-mechanical and nano-structural properties of the red cell membrane. To quantitatively characterize how oxidative damage accounts for such changes, we employed single-cell manipulation techniques such as micropipette aspiration and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on RBCs. These investigations demonstrated visible morphological changes upon chemically induced oxidative damage (using hydrogen peroxide, diamide, primaquine bisphosphate and cumene hydroperoxide). Our results provide previously unavailable observations on remarkable changes in red cell cytoskeletal architecture and membrane stiffness due to oxidative damage. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that a pathogen that infects human blood cells, Plasmodium falciparum was unable to penetrate through the oxidant-exposed RBCs that have damaged cytoskeleton and stiffer membranes. This indicates the importance of bio-physical factors pertinent to aged RBCs and it's relevance to malaria infectivity.

  19. Explore various co-substrates for simultaneous electricity generation and Congo red degradation in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunqing; Hu, Yongyou; Sun, Jian; Hou, Bin

    2010-08-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) holds a great promise to harvest electricity directly from a wide range of ready degradable organic matters and enhance degradation of some recalcitrant contaminants. Glucose, acetate sodium and ethanol were separately examined as co-substrates for simultaneous bioelectricity generation and Congo red degradation in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) air-cathode single-chamber MFC. The batch test results showed that more than 98% decolorization at the dye concentration of 300 mg/L were achieved within 36 h for all tested co-substrates during electricity generation. The decolorization rate was different with the co-substrates used. The fastest decolorization rate was achieved with glucose followed by ethanol and sodium acetate. Accumulated intermediates were observed during Congo red degradation which was demonstrated by UV-Visible spectra and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electricity generation was sustained and not significantly affected by the Congo red degradation. Glucose, acetate sodium and ethanol produced maximum power densities of 103 mW/m(2), 85.9 mW/m(2) and 63.2 mW/m(2), respectively, and the maximum voltage output decreased by only 7% to 15%. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of using various co-substrates for simultaneous decolorization of Congo red and bioelectricity generation in the MFC and showed that glucose was the preferred co-substrate.

  20. Single-cell evaluation of red blood cell bio-mechanical and nano-structural alterations upon chemically induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ameya; Chu, Trang T. T.; Dao, Ming; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Erythroid cells, specifically red blood cells (RBCs), are constantly exposed to highly reactive radicals during cellular gaseous exchange. Such exposure often exceeds the cells' innate anti-oxidant defense systems, leading to progressive damage and eventual senescence. One of the contributing factors to this process are alterations to hemoglobin conformation and globin binding to red cell cytoskeleton. However, in addition to the aforementioned changes, it is possible that oxidative damage induces critical changes to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton and corresponding bio-mechanical and nano-structural properties of the red cell membrane. To quantitatively characterize how oxidative damage accounts for such changes, we employed single-cell manipulation techniques such as micropipette aspiration and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on RBCs. These investigations demonstrated visible morphological changes upon chemically induced oxidative damage (using hydrogen peroxide, diamide, primaquine bisphosphate and cumene hydroperoxide). Our results provide previously unavailable observations on remarkable changes in red cell cytoskeletal architecture and membrane stiffness due to oxidative damage. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that a pathogen that infects human blood cells, Plasmodium falciparum was unable to penetrate through the oxidant-exposed RBCs that have damaged cytoskeleton and stiffer membranes. This indicates the importance of bio-physical factors pertinent to aged RBCs and it's relevance to malaria infectivity. PMID:25950144

  1. Comparing live attenuated and inactivated hepatitis A vaccines: an immunogenicity study after one single dose.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Chen, Yuansheng; Wang, Fuzhen; Gong, Xiaohong; Wu, Zhenhua; Miao, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Li, Hui; Chen, Chao; Hou, Xiang; Cui, Fuqiang; Wang, Huaqing

    2011-11-08

    While three types of hepatitis A vaccines are available in China, little data are available to compare them in terms of early antibody response. We conducted a trial to compare antibody response at 7, 14 and 28 days. We randomized primary school children in Gansu and Jilin provinces into four groups to receive either (1) Chinese live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine (H2 strain), (2) domestic inactivated hepatitis A vaccine (Healive(®)), (3) imported inactivated hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix(®)) or (4) hepatitis B vaccine (Control group). We compared groups at 7, 14 and 28 days in terms of proportion of sero-conversions (≥10 mUI/ml), and Geometric Mean Concentration (GMC) of antibodies measured with a Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay (MEIA). We compared rates of self-reported adverse events following immunization (AEFI) in the first three days. 204 children received the H2 vaccine, 208 received Healive(®), 214 received Havrix(®), and 215 received hepatitis B vaccine (no differences across groups in terms of age, sex, weight and height). At seven days, sero-conversion proportions were 25%, 35%, 27% and 2% (p<0.0001) with GMC of 6 mIU/ml, 8 mIU/ml, 6 mIU/ml and 3 mIU/ml, respectively for the four groups. At 28 days, sero-conversion proportions were 98%, 100%, 93% and 3% (p<0.0001) with GMC of 47 mIU/ml, 71 mIU/ml, 67 mIU/ml and 3 mIU/ml, respectively. AEFI were benign and did not differ across groups (p=0.94). While our study was not able to identify differences between Havrix(®), Healive(®) and H2 vaccine in terms of sero-conversion proportion and GMC between seven and 28 days, further studies should evaluate non-inferiority or equivalence of the Chinese vaccines, particularly with respect to the GMC concentration for the H2 vaccine since it could affect long-term protection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Trifunctional lipid probes for comprehensive studies of single lipid species in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, André; Haberkant, Per; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Schifferer, Martina; Stein, Frank; Hauke, Sebastian; Porter, Forbes D.; Schultz, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Lipid-mediated signaling events regulate many cellular processes. Investigations of the complex underlying mechanisms are difficult because several different methods need to be used under varying conditions. Here we introduce multifunctional lipid derivatives to study lipid metabolism, lipid−protein interactions, and intracellular lipid localization with a single tool per target lipid. The probes are equipped with two photoreactive groups to allow photoliberation (uncaging) and photo–cross-linking in a sequential manner, as well as a click-handle for subsequent functionalization. We demonstrate the versatility of the design for the signaling lipids sphingosine and diacylglycerol; uncaging of the probe for these two species triggered calcium signaling and intracellular protein translocation events, respectively. We performed proteomic screens to map the lipid-interacting proteome for both lipids. Finally, we visualized a sphingosine transport deficiency in patient-derived Niemann−Pick disease type C fibroblasts by fluorescence as well as correlative light and electron microscopy, pointing toward the diagnostic potential of such tools. We envision that this type of probe will become important for analyzing and ultimately understanding lipid signaling events in a comprehensive manner. PMID:28154130

  3. Three-dimensional single-particle tracking in live cells: news from the third dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, A.; Gorelashvili, M.; Schüller, V.; Wehnekamp, F.; Arcizet, D.; Katayama, Y.; Lamb, D. C.; Heinrich, D.

    2013-07-01

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) is of growing importance in the biophysical community. It is used to investigate processes such as drug and gene delivery, viral uptake, intracellular trafficking or membrane-bound protein mobility. Traditionally, SPT is performed in two dimensions (2D) because of its technical simplicity. However, life occurs in three dimensions (3D) and many methods have been recently developed to track particles in 3D. Now, is the third dimension worth the effort? Here we investigate the differences between the 2D and 3D analyses of intracellular transport with the 3D development of a time-resolved mean square displacement (MSD) analysis introduced previously. The 3D trajectories, and the 2D projections, of fluorescent nanoparticles were obtained with an orbital tracking microscope in two different cell types: in Dictyostelium discoideum ameba and in adherent, more flattened HuH-7 human cells. As expected from the different 3D organization of both cells’ cytoskeletons, a third of the active transport was lost upon projection in the ameba whereas the identification of the active phases was barely affected in the HuH-7 cells. In both cell types, we found intracellular diffusion to be anisotropic and the diffusion coefficient values derived from the 2D analysis were therefore biased.

  4. Live Cell Reporter Systems for Positive-Sense Single Strand RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Ren, Linzhu; Peng, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xinrong; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Cell-based reporter systems have facilitated studies of viral replication and pathogenesis, virus detection, and drug susceptibility testing. There are three types of cell-based reporter systems that express certain reporter protein for positive-sense single strand RNA virus infections. The first type is classical reporter system, which relies on recombinant virus, reporter virus particle, or subgenomic replicon. During infection with the recombinant virus or reporter virus particle, the reporter protein is expressed and can be detected in real time in a dose-dependent manner. Using subgenomic replicon, which are genetically engineered viral RNA molecules that are capable of replication but incapable of producing virions, the translation and replication of the replicon could be tracked by the accumulation of reporter protein. The second type of reporter system involves genetically engineered cells bearing virus-specific protease cleavage sequences, which can sense the incoming viral protease. The third type is based on viral replicase, which can report the specific virus infection via detection of the incoming viral replicase. This review specifically focuses on the major technical breakthroughs in the design of cell-based reporter systems and the application of these systems to the further understanding and control of viruses over the past few decades.

  5. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms: A Window into the Informatics of the Living Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dunston, Georgia M.; Mason, Tshela E.; Hercules, William; Lindesay, James

    2015-01-01

    Nested in the environment of the nucleus of the cell, the 23 sets of chromosomes that comprise the human genome function as one integrated whole system, orchestrating the expression of thousands of genes underlying the biological characteristics of the cell, individual and the species. The extraction of meaningful information from this complex data set depends crucially upon the lens through which the data are examined. We present a biophysical perspective on genomic information encoded in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and introduce metrics for modeling information encoded in the genome. Information, like energy, is considered to be a conserved physical property of the universe. The information structured in SNPs describes the adaptation of a human population to a given environment. The maintained order measured by the information content is associated with entropies, energies, and other state variables for a dynamic system in homeostasis. “Genodynamics” characterizes the state variables for genomic populations that are stable under stochastic environmental stresses. The determination of allelic energies allows the parameterization of specific environmental influences upon individual alleles across populations. The environment drives population-based genome variation. From this vantage point, the genome is modeled as a complex, dynamic information system defined by patterns of SNP alleles and SNP haplotypes. PMID:25635233

  6. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-03-01

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous quantitative clonal fate analyses have led to the proposal that homeostasis occurs as the consequence of neutral competition between dividing stem cells. However, the short-term behaviour of individual Lgr5+ cells positioned at different locations within the crypt base compartment has not been resolved. Here we establish the short-term dynamics of intestinal stem cells using the novel approach of continuous intravital imaging of Lgr5-Confetti mice. We find that Lgr5+ cells in the upper part of the niche (termed `border cells') can be passively displaced into the transit-amplifying domain, after the division of proximate cells, implying that the determination of stem-cell fate can be uncoupled from division. Through quantitative analysis of individual clonal lineages, we show that stem cells at the crypt base, termed `central cells', experience a survival advantage over border stem cells. However, through the transfer of stem cells between the border and central regions, all Lgr5+ cells are endowed with long-term self-renewal potential. These findings establish a novel paradigm for stem-cell maintenance in which a dynamically heterogeneous cell population is able to function long term as a single stem-cell pool.

  7. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging.

    PubMed

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Simons, Benjamin D; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-03-20

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous quantitative clonal fate analyses have led to the proposal that homeostasis occurs as the consequence of neutral competition between dividing stem cells. However, the short-term behaviour of individual Lgr5(+) cells positioned at different locations within the crypt base compartment has not been resolved. Here we establish the short-term dynamics of intestinal stem cells using the novel approach of continuous intravital imaging of Lgr5- Confetti mice. We find that Lgr5(+) cells in the upper part of the niche (termed 'border cells') can be passively displaced into the transit-amplifying domain, after the division of proximate cells, implying that the determination of stem-cell fate can be uncoupled from division. Through quantitative analysis of individual clonal lineages, we show that stem cells at the crypt base, termed 'central cells', experience a survival advantage over border stem cells. However, through the transfer of stem cells between the border and central regions, all Lgr5(+) cells are endowed with long-term self-renewal potential. These findings establish a novel paradigm for stem-cell maintenance in which a dynamically heterogeneous cell population is able to function long term as a single stem-cell pool.

  8. Outcome of Kidney Transplantation From Living Donors With Multiple Renal Arteries Versus Single Renal Artery.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh Afshari, Ali; Mohammadi Fallah, Mohammad Reza; Alizadeh, Mansour; Makhdoomi, Khadijeh; Rahimi, Ezatollah; Vossoghian, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Receiving a kidney transplant from donors with multiple renal arteries (MRAs) is suggested to be associated with higher risk of vascular and urologic complications and poor allograft outcomes compared to the donors with single renal artery (SRA). We evaluated survival rates in the recipients from donors with MRAs compared to those from donors with SRA. In a retrospective study on 115 kidney allograft recipients, demographic characteristics and the outcomes of kidney transplantation were compared between the recipients from donors with MRAs compared to those from donors with SRA. These included acute tubular necrosis, acute allograft rejection, hypertension, vascular complications, urologic complications, kidney function indicators, and allograft survival at 1 year. There was no significant difference in the recipients' age, sex distribution, and weight, donors' age, donor-recipient familial relation, urologic complications, and duration of hospitalization between the two groups. However, MRA was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of right-side kidney donation, longer warm and cold ischemia times, and lower glomerular filtration rate and higher serum creatinine concentrations at discharge and 12 months after transplantation, as compared to SRA transplants. No significant difference was seen in late complications including hypertension and renal artery stenosis. One-year graft survival was slightly poorer in the MRA group than the SRA group. Our results demonstrate that kidney allografts with MRAs are associated with risks but have acceptable outcomes during the 1st year after transplantation, as compared to SRA kidney allografts.

  9. Label-free imaging of gold nanoparticles in single live cells by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chao; Qian, Wei; Shao, Xia; Xie, Zhixing; Cheng, Xu; Liu, Shengchun; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Bing; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored as a model nanostructure in nanomedicine and have been widely used to provide advanced biomedical research tools in diagnostic imaging and therapy. Due to the necessity of targeting AuNPs to individual cells, evaluation and visualization of AuNPs in the cellular level is critical to fully understand their interaction with cellular environment. Currently imaging technologies, such as fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy all have advantages and disadvantages. In this paper, we synthesized AuNPs by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation, modified their surface chemistry through sequential bioconjugation, and targeted the functionalized AuNPs with individual cancer cells. Based on their high optical absorption contrast, we developed a novel, label-free imaging method to evaluate and visualize intracellular AuNPs using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Preliminary study shows that the PAM imaging technique is capable of imaging cellular uptake of AuNPs in vivo at single-cell resolution, which provide an important tool for the study of AuNPs in nanomedicine.

  10. Tracking single Kv2.1 channels in live cells reveals anomalous subdiffusion and ergodicity breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Aubrey; Simon, Blair; Tamkun, Michael; Krapf, Diego

    2011-03-01

    The dynamic organization of the plasma membrane is responsible for essential cellular processes, such as receptor trafficking and signaling. By studying the dynamics of transmembrane proteins a greater understanding of these processes as a whole can be achieved. It is broadly observed that the diffusion pattern of membrane protein displays anomalous subdiffusion. However, the mechanisms responsible for this behavior are not yet established. We explore the dynamics of the voltage gated potassium channel Kv2.1 by using single-particle tracking. We analyze Kv2.1 channel trajectories in terms of the time and ensemble distributions of square displacements. Our results reveal that all Kv2.1 channels experience anomalous subdiffusion and we observe that the Kv2.1 diffusion pattern is non-ergodic. We further investigated the role of the actin cytoskeleton in these channel dynamics by applying actin depolymerizing drugs. It is seen that with the breakdown of the actin cytoskeleton the Kv2.1 channel trajectories recover ergodicity.

  11. Molecular behavior in living mitotic cells of human centromere heterochromatin protein HPLalpha ectopically expressed as a fusion to red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, K; Tasaka, H; Dotsu, M

    2001-12-01

    We constructed stable mammalian cell lines in which human heterochromatin protein HP1alpha and kinetochore protein CENP-A were differentially expressed as fusions to red (RFP-HP1) and green fluorescent proteins (GFP-CENP-A). Heterochromatin localization of RFP-HP1 was clearly shown in mouse and Indian muntjac cells. By preparing mitotic chromosome spreads, the inner centromere localization of RFP-HP1 was observed in human and Indian muntjac cells. To characterize its molecular behavior in living mitotic cells, time-lapse images of RFP-HP1 were obtained by computer-assisted image analyzing system, mainly with mouse cells. In G2 phase, a significant portion of RFP-HP1 diffused homogeneously in the nucleus and further dispersed into the cytoplasm soon after the nuclear membrane breakdown, while some remained in the centromeric region. Simultaneous observations with GFP-CENP-A in human cells showed that RFP-HP1 was located just between the sister kinetochores and then aligned to the spindle midzone. With the onset of anaphase, once it was released from there, it moved to the centromeres of segregating chromosomes or returned to the spindle equator. As cytokinesis proceeded, HP1alpha was predominantly found in the newly formed daughter nuclei and again displayed a heterochromatin-like distribution. These results suggested that, although the majority of HP1alpha diffuses into the cytoplasm, some populations are retained in the centromeric region and involved in the association and segregation of sister kinetochores during mitosis.

  12. Significant reduction of red blood cell transfusion requirements by changing from a double-unit to a single-unit transfusion policy in patients receiving intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Martin David; Gerber, Bernhard; Arn, Kornelius; Senn, Oliver; Schanz, Urs; Stussi, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditionally, single-unit red blood cell transfusions were believed to be insufficient to treat anemia, but recent data suggest that they may lead to a safe reduction of transfusion requirements. We tested this hypothesis by changing from a double- to a single-unit red blood cell transfusion policy. Design and Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study in patients with hematologic malignancies receiving intensive chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The major end-points were the reduction in the total number of red blood cell units per therapy cycle and per day of aplasia. The study comprised 139 patients who received 272 therapy cycles. Overall 2212 red blood cell units were administered in 1548 transfusions. Results During the periods of the double- and single-unit policies, one red blood cell unit was transfused in 25% and 84% of the cases and the median number of red blood cell units per transfusion was two and one, respectively. Single-unit transfusion led to a 25% reduction of red blood cell usage per therapy cycle and 24% per aplasia day, but was not associated with a higher out-patient transfusion frequency. In multivariate analysis, single-unit transfusion resulted in a reduction of 2.7 red blood cell units per treatment cycle (P=0.001). The pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels were lower during the single-unit period (median 61 g/L versus 64 g/L) and more transfusions were administered to patients with hemoglobin values of 60 gl/L or less (47% versus 26%). There was no evidence of more severe bleeding or more platelet transfusions during the single-unit period and the overall survival was similar in both cohorts. Conclusions Implementing a single-unit transfusion policy saves 25% of red blood cell units and, thereby, reduces the risks associated with allogeneic blood transfusions. PMID:21933858

  13. QUANTITATION OF INTRACELLULAR NAD(P)H IN LIVING CELLS CAN MONITOR AN IMBALANCE OF DNA SINGLE STRAND BREAK REPAIR IN REAL TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of intracellular NAD(P)H in living cells can monitor an imbalance of DNA single strand break repair in real time.

    ABSTRACT

    DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) are one of the most frequent DNA lesions in genomic DNA generated either by oxidative stress or du...

  14. QUANTITATION OF INTRACELLULAR NAD(P)H IN LIVING CELLS CAN MONITOR AN IMBALANCE OF DNA SINGLE STRAND BREAK REPAIR IN REAL TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of intracellular NAD(P)H in living cells can monitor an imbalance of DNA single strand break repair in real time.

    ABSTRACT

    DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) are one of the most frequent DNA lesions in genomic DNA generated either by oxidative stress or du...

  15. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.; Eggeling, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy. However, a major disparity in interpretation of data from SPT and STED-FCS remains, namely the proposed existence of a very fast (unhindered) lateral diffusion coefficient, ⩾5 µm2 s-1, in the plasma membrane of live cells at very short length scales, ≈⩽ 100 nm, and time scales, ≈1-10 ms. This fast diffusion coefficient has been advocated in several high-speed SPT studies, for lipids and membrane proteins alike, but the equivalent has not been detected in STED-FCS measurements. Resolving this ambiguity is important because the assessment of membrane dynamics currently relies heavily on SPT for the determination of heterogeneous diffusion. A possible systematic error in this approach would thus have vast implications in this field. To address this, we have re-visited the analysis procedure for SPT data with an emphasis on the measurement errors and the effect that these errors have on the measurement outputs. We subsequently demonstrate that STED-FCS and SPT data, following careful consideration of the experimental errors of the SPT data, converge to a common interpretation which for the case of a diffusing phospholipid analogue in the plasma membrane of live mouse embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of  ≈0.7-1.0 µm2 s-1, and a compartment size of about 100-150 nm.

  16. Mapping Cd²⁺-induced membrane permeability changes of single live cells by means of scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Filice, Fraser P; Li, Michelle S M; Henderson, Jeffrey D; Ding, Zhifeng

    2016-02-18

    Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) is a powerful, non-invasive, analytical methodology that can be used to investigate live cell membrane permeability. Depth scan SECM imaging allowed for the generation of 2D current maps of live cells relative to electrode position in the x-z or y-z plane. Depending on resolution, one depth scan image can contain hundreds of probe approach curves (PACs). Individual PACs were obtained by simply extracting vertical cross-sections from the 2D image. These experimental PACs were overlaid onto theoretically generated PACs simulated at specific geometry conditions. Simulations were carried out using 3D models in COMSOL Multiphysics to determine the cell membrane permeability coefficients at different locations on the surface of the cells. Common in literature, theoretical PACs are generated using a 2D axially symmetric geometry. This saves on both compute time and memory utilization. However, due to symmetry limitations of the model, only one experimental PAC right above the cell can be matched with simulated PAC data. Full 3D models in this article were developed for the SECM system of live cells, allowing all experimental PACs over the entire cell to become usable. Cd(2+)-induced membrane permeability changes of single human bladder (T24) cells were investigated at several positions above the cell, displaced from the central axis. The experimental T24 cells under study were incubated with Cd(2+) in varying concentrations. It is experimentally observed that 50 and 100 μM Cd(2+) caused a decrease in membrane permeability, which was uniform across all locations over the cell regardless of Cd(2+) concentration. The Cd(2+) was found to have detrimental effects on the cell, with cells shrinking in size and volume, and the membrane permeability decreasing. A mapping technique for the analysis of the cell membrane permeability under the Cd(2+) stress is realized by the methodology presented.

  17. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    PubMed Central

    Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M; Clausen, Mathias P; Eggeling, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy. However, a major disparity in interpretation of data from SPT and STED-FCS remains, namely the proposed existence of a very fast (unhindered) lateral diffusion coefficient, ⩾5 µm2 s−1, in the plasma membrane of live cells at very short length scales, ≈⩽ 100 nm, and time scales, ≈1–10 ms. This fast diffusion coefficient has been advocated in several high-speed SPT studies, for lipids and membrane proteins alike, but the equivalent has not been detected in STED-FCS measurements. Resolving this ambiguity is important because the assessment of membrane dynamics currently relies heavily on SPT for the determination of heterogeneous diffusion. A possible systematic error in this approach would thus have vast implications in this field. To address this, we have re-visited the analysis procedure for SPT data with an emphasis on the measurement errors and the effect that these errors have on the measurement outputs. We subsequently demonstrate that STED-FCS and SPT data, following careful consideration of the experimental errors of the SPT data, converge to a common interpretation which for the case of a diffusing phospholipid analogue in the plasma membrane of live mouse embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of  ≈0.7–1.0 µm2 s−1, and a compartment size of about 100–150 nm. PMID:28458397

  18. Localization of protein-protein interactions among three fluorescent proteins in a single living cell: three-color FRET microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Booker, Cynthia F.; Day, Richard N.; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2009-02-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) methodology has been used for over 30 years to localize protein-protein interactions in living specimens. The cloning and modification of various visible fluorescent proteins (FPs) has generated a variety of new probes that can be used as FRET pairs to investigate the protein associations in living cells. However, the spectral cross-talk between FRET donor and acceptor channels has been a major limitation to FRET microscopy. Many investigators have developed different ways to eliminate the bleedthrough signals in the FRET channel for one donor and one acceptor. We developed a novel FRET microscopy method for studying interactions among three chromophores: three-color FRET microscopy. We generated a genetic construct that directly links the three FPs - monomeric teal FP (mTFP), Venus and tandem dimer Tomato (tdTomato), and demonstrated the occurrence of mutually dependent energy transfers among the three FPs. When expressed in cells and excited with the 458 nm laser line, the mTFP-Venus-tdTomato fusion proteins yielded parallel (mTFP to Venus and mTFP to tdTomato) and sequential (mTFP to Venus and then to tdTomato) energy transfer signals. To quantify the FRET signals in the three-FP system in a single living cell, we developed an algorithm to remove all the spectral cross-talk components and also to separate different FRET signals at a same emission channel using the laser scanning spectral imaging and linear unmixing techniques on the Zeiss510 META system. Our results were confirmed with fluorescence lifetime measurements and using acceptor photobleaching FRET microscopy.

  19. Fluorescent Saxitoxins for Live Cell Imaging of Single Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channels beyond the Optical Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Ondrus, Alison E.; Lee, Hsiao-lu D.; Iwanaga, Shigeki; Parsons, William H.; Andresen, Brian M.; Moerner, W.E.; Bois, J. Du

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A desire to better understand the role of voltagegated sodium channels (NaVs) in signal conduction and their dysregulation in specific disease states motivates the development of high precision tools for their study. Nature has evolved a collection of small molecule agents, including the shellfish poison (+)-saxitoxin, that bind to the extracellular pore of select NaV isoforms. As described in this report, de novo chemical synthesis has enabled the preparation of fluorescently labeled derivatives of (+)-saxitoxin, STX-Cy5, and STX-DCDHF, which display reversible binding to NaVs in live cells. Electrophysiology and confocal fluorescence microscopy studies confirm that these STX-based dyes function as potent and selective NaV labels. The utility of these probes is underscored in single-molecule and super-resolution imaging experiments, which reveal NaV distributions well beyond the optical diffraction limit in subcellular features such as neuritic spines and filopodia. PMID:22840778

  20. Optical nanosensors for chemical analysis inside single living cells. 1. Fabrication, characterization, and methods for intracellular delivery of PEBBLE sensors.

    PubMed

    Clark, H A; Hoyer, M; Philbert, M A; Kopelman, R

    1999-11-01

    Spherical optical nanosensors, or PEBBLEs (probes encapsulated by biologically localized embedding), have been produced in sizes including 20 and 200 nm in diameter. These sensors are fabricated in a microemulsion and consist of fluorescent indicators entrapped in a polyacrylamide matrix. A generalized polymerization method has been developed that permits production of sensors containing any hydrophilic dye or combination of dyes in the matrix. The PEBBLE matrix protects the fluorescent dye from interference by proteins, allowing reliable in vivo calibrations of dyes. Sensor response times are less than 1 ms. Cell viability assays indicate that the PEBBLEs are biocompatible, with negligible biological effects compared to control conditions. Several sensor delivery methods have been studied, including liposomal delivery, gene gun bombardment, and picoinjection into single living cells.

  1. Single-Molecule Tracking Photoactivated Localization Microscopy to Map Nano-Scale Structure and Dynamics in Living Spines

    PubMed Central

    MacGillavry, Harold D.; Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy has rapidly become an indispensable tool in cell biology and neuroscience by enabling measurement in live cells of structures smaller than the classical limit imposed by diffraction. The most widely applied super-resolution method currently is localization microscopy, which takes advantage of the ability to determine the position of individual fluorescent molecules with nanometer accuracy even in cells. By iteratively measuring sparse subsets of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, protein distribution in macromolecular structures can be accurately reconstructed. Moreover, the motion trajectories of individual molecules within cells can be measured, providing unique ability to measure transport kinetics, exchange rates, and binding affinities of even small subsets of molecules with high temporal resolution and great spatial specificity. This unit describes protocols to measure and quantify the distribution of scaffold proteins within single synapses of cultured hippocampal neurons, and to track and measure the diffusion of intracellular constituents of the neuronal plasma membrane. PMID:25429311

  2. Super-resolution imaging-based single particle tracking reveals dynamics of nanoparticle internalization by live cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Shang, Li; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-04-14

    By combining super-resolution photoactivation localization microscopy with single particle tracking, we have visualized the endocytic process in the live-cell environment with nanoparticles (NPs) of different size and surface functionalization. This allowed us to analyze the dynamics of NPs interacting with cells with high spatial and temporal resolution. We identified two distinctly different types of pathways by which NPs are internalized via clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). Predominantly, NPs first bind to the membrane and, subsequently, CCPs form at this site. However, there are also instances where a NP diffuses on the membrane and utilizes a preformed CCP. Moreover, we have applied this new method to further explore the effects of size and surface functionalization on the NP dynamics on the plasma membrane and the ensuing endocytosis.

  3. Hyperspectral multiplex single-particle tracking of different receptor subtypes labeled with quantum dots in live neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, Simon; Sylvestre, Jean-Philippe; Marcet, Stephane; Mangiarini, Francesca; Bourgoin, Brice; Verhaegen, Marc; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien; De Koninck, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of existing therapies and the discovery of innovative treatments for central nervous system (CNS) diseases have been limited by the lack of appropriate methods to investigate complex molecular processes at the synaptic level. To improve our capability to investigate complex mechanisms of synaptic signaling and remodeling, we designed a fluorescence hyperspectral imaging platform to simultaneously track different subtypes of individual neurotransmitter receptors trafficking in and out of synapses. This imaging platform allows simultaneous image acquisition of at least five fluorescent markers in living neurons with a high-spatial resolution. We used quantum dots emitting at different wavelengths and functionalized to specifically bind to single receptors on the membrane of living neurons. The hyperspectral imaging platform enabled the simultaneous optical tracking of five different synaptic proteins, including subtypes of glutamate receptors (mGluR and AMPAR) and postsynaptic signaling proteins. It also permitted the quantification of their mobility after treatments with various pharmacological agents. This technique provides an efficient method to monitor several synaptic proteins at the same time, which could accelerate the screening of effective compounds for treatment of CNS disorders.

  4. Real-Time Intracellular Measurements of ROS and RNS in Living Cells with Single Core-Shell Nanowire Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Wei; Qiu, Quan-Fa; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Fu-Li; Liu, Yan-Lin; Amatore, Christian; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2017-08-15

    Nanoelectrodes allow precise and quantitative measurements of important biological processes at the single living-cell level in real time. Cylindrical nanowire electrodes (NWEs) required for intracellular measurements create a great challenge for achieving excellent electrochemical and mechanical performances. Herein, we present a facile and robust solution to this problem based on a unique SiC-core-shell design to produce cylindrical NWEs with superior mechanical toughness provided by the SiC nano-core and an excellent electrochemical performance provided by the ultrathin carbon shell that can be used as such or platinized. The use of such NWEs for biological applications is illustrated by the first quantitative measurements of ROS/RNS in individual phagolysosomes of living macrophages. As the shell material can be varied to meet any specific detection purpose, this work opens up new opportunities to monitor quantitatively biological functions occurring inside cells and their organelles. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Super-Resolution Microscopy and Single-Protein Tracking in Live Bacteria Using a Genetically Encoded, Photostable Fluoromodule.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Saumya; Perez, Adam M; Comerci, Colin J; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W E

    2017-06-19

    Visualization of dynamic protein structures in live cells is crucial for understanding the mechanisms governing biological processes. Fluorescence microscopy is a sensitive tool for this purpose. In order to image proteins in live bacteria using fluorescence microscopy, one typically genetically fuses the protein of interest to a photostable fluorescent tag. Several labeling schemes are available to accomplish this. Particularly, hybrid tags that combine a fluorescent or fluorogenic dye with a genetically encoded protein (such as enzymatic labels) have been used successfully in multiple cell types. However, their use in bacteria has been limited due to challenges imposed by a complex bacterial cell wall. Here, we describe the use of a genetically encoded photostable fluoromodule that can be targeted to cytosolic and membrane proteins in the Gram negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Additionally, we summarize methods to use this fluoromodule for single protein imaging and super-resolution microscopy using stimulated emission depletion. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Single-particle tracking of murine polyoma virus-like particles on live cells and artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Helge; Smith, Alicia E; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Lilie, Hauke; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Helenius, Ari

    2005-10-18

    The lateral mobility of individual murine polyoma virus-like particles (VLPs) bound to live cells and artificial lipid bilayers was studied by single fluorescent particle tracking using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The particle trajectories were analyzed in terms of diffusion rates and modes of motion as described by the moment scaling spectrum. Although VLPs bound to their ganglioside receptor in lipid bilayers exhibited only free diffusion, analysis of trajectories on live 3T6 mouse fibroblasts revealed three distinct modes of mobility: rapid random motion, confined movement in small zones (30-60 nm in diameter), and confined movement in zones with a slow drift. After binding to the cell surface, particles typically underwent free diffusion for 5-10 s, and then they were confined in an actin filament-dependent manner without involvement of clathrin-coated pits or caveolae. Depletion of cholesterol dramatically reduced mobility of VLPs independently of actin, whereas inhibition of tyrosine kinases had no effect on confinement. The results suggested that clustering of ganglioside molecules by the multivalent VLPs induced transmembrane coupling that led to confinement of the virus/receptor complex by cortical actin filaments.

  7. Single-particle tracking of murine polyoma virus-like particles on live cells and artificial membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Helge; Smith, Alicia E.; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Lilie, Hauke; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Helenius, Ari

    2005-01-01

    The lateral mobility of individual murine polyoma virus–like particles (VLPs) bound to live cells and artificial lipid bilayers was studied by single fluorescent particle tracking using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The particle trajectories were analyzed in terms of diffusion rates and modes of motion as described by the moment scaling spectrum. Although VLPs bound to their ganglioside receptor in lipid bilayers exhibited only free diffusion, analysis of trajectories on live 3T6 mouse fibroblasts revealed three distinct modes of mobility: rapid random motion, confined movement in small zones (30–60 nm in diameter), and confined movement in zones with a slow drift. After binding to the cell surface, particles typically underwent free diffusion for 5–10 s, and then they were confined in an actin filament-dependent manner without involvement of clathrin-coated pits or caveolae. Depletion of cholesterol dramatically reduced mobility of VLPs independently of actin, whereas inhibition of tyrosine kinases had no effect on confinement. The results suggested that clustering of ganglioside molecules by the multivalent VLPs induced transmembrane coupling that led to confinement of the virus/receptor complex by cortical actin filaments. PMID:16219700

  8. Precision Optogenetic Tool for Selective Single- and Multiple-Cell Ablation in a Live Animal Model System.

    PubMed

    Makhijani, Kalpana; To, Tsz-Leung; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Lafaye, Céline; Royant, Antoine; Shu, Xiaokun

    2017-01-19

    Cell ablation is a strategy to study cell lineage and function during development. Optogenetic methods are an important cell-ablation approach, and we have previously developed a mini singlet oxygen generator (miniSOG) tool that works in the living Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we use directed evolution to generate miniSOG2, an improved tool for cell ablation via photogenerated reactive oxygen species. We apply miniSOG2 to a far more complex model animal system, Drosophila melanogaster, and demonstrate that it can be used to kill a single neuron in a Drosophila larva. In addition, miniSOG2 is able to photoablate a small group of cells in one of the larval wing imaginal discs, resulting in an adult with one incomplete and one normal wing. We expect miniSOG2 to be a useful optogenetic tool for precision cell ablation at a desired developmental time point in live animals, thus opening a new window into cell origin, fate and function, tissue regeneration, and developmental biology.

  9. [Incidence of fetal macrosomia among single live birth neonates and influencing factors in Xi' an, 2010-2013].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Bai, R H; Wang, L L; Dang, S N; Mi, B B; Yan, H

    2016-08-10

    To analyze the incidence and influencing factors on fetal macrosomia among single live birth neonates in Xi' an. A questionnaire survey was conducted among women at the childbearing age who were selected through multi stage stratified random sampling in Xi 'an during 2010-2013. All the childbearing aged women involved, were in pregnancy or having definite pregnancy outcomes. A total of 4 970 women at childbearing age and their infants were investigated. The overall incidence of fetal macrosomia weight among the single live birth neonates under study, was 9.7% during 2010-2013 (8.9% in 2010, 8.1% in 2011, 10.0% in 2012 and 10.1% in 2013, respectively). The incidence rates of fetal macrosomia appeared 10.5% in the central district and, 8.6% in the rural-urban area of Xi'an. There were statistically significant differences (P<0.05) seen between the two areas. RESULTS of logistic regression analysis suggested that factors as: having male newborn (OR=1.717, 95%CI: 1.402-2.102), drinking during pregnancy (OR=2.174, 95%CI: 1.042-4.533), gestational diabetes (OR=1.680, 95%CI: 1.100-2.568) gestational age≥42 (compared with 37-41, OR=2.565, 95% CI: 1.306-5.039), being multipara (OR=1.874, 95% CI: 1.492-2.354) were risk factors for the fetal macrosomia. The incidence of fetal macrosomia in Xi' an was higher than the national figures. The incidence of fetal macrosomia was higher in the central district than in rural-urban area. Having male neonate, postmature birth, gestational diabetes, being multipara, drinking during pregnancy were the risk factors related to fetal macrosomia.

  10. Super-resolution imaging-based single particle tracking reveals dynamics of nanoparticle internalization by live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiming; Shang, Li; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    By combining super-resolution photoactivation localization microscopy with single particle tracking, we have visualized the endocytic process in the live-cell environment with nanoparticles (NPs) of different size and surface functionalization. This allowed us to analyze the dynamics of NPs interacting with cells with high spatial and temporal resolution. We identified two distinctly different types of pathways by which NPs are internalized via clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). Predominantly, NPs first bind to the membrane and, subsequently, CCPs form at this site. However, there are also instances where a NP diffuses on the membrane and utilizes a preformed CCP. Moreover, we have applied this new method to further explore the effects of size and surface functionalization on the NP dynamics on the plasma membrane and the ensuing endocytosis.By combining super-resolution photoactivation localization microscopy with single particle tracking, we have visualized the endocytic process in the live-cell environment with nanoparticles (NPs) of different size and surface functionalization. This allowed us to analyze the dynamics of NPs interacting with cells with high spatial and temporal resolution. We identified two distinctly different types of pathways by which NPs are internalized via clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). Predominantly, NPs first bind to the membrane and, subsequently, CCPs form at this site. However, there are also instances where a NP diffuses on the membrane and utilizes a preformed CCP. Moreover, we have applied this new method to further explore the effects of size and surface functionalization on the NP dynamics on the plasma membrane and the ensuing endocytosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, supporting figures and videos. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01495j

  11. Domain Structure of the Redβ Single-Strand Annealing Protein: the C-terminal Domain is Required for Fine-Tuning DNA-binding Properties, Interaction with the Exonuclease Partner, and Recombination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher E; Bell, Charles E

    2016-02-13

    Redβ is a component of the Red recombination system of bacteriophage λ that promotes a single strand annealing (SSA) reaction to generate end-to-end concatemers of the phage genome for packaging. Redβ interacts with λ exonuclease (λexo), the other component of the Red system, to form a "synaptosome" complex that somehow integrates the end resection and annealing steps of the reaction. Previous work using limited proteolysis and chemical modification revealed that Redβ consists of an N-terminal DNA binding domain, residues 1-177, and a flexible C-terminal "tail", residues 178-261. Here, we quantitatively compare the binding of the full-length protein (Redβ(FL)) and the N-terminal domain (Redβ(177)) to different lengths of ssDNA substrate and annealed duplex product. We find that in general, Redβ(FL) binds more tightly to annealed duplex product than to ssDNA substrate, while Redβ(177) binds more tightly to ssDNA. In addition, the C-terminal region of Redβ corresponding to residues 182-261 was purified and found to fold into an α-helical domain that is required for the interaction with λexo to form the synaptosome complex. Deletion analysis of Redβ revealed that removal of just eleven residues from the C-terminus disrupts the interaction with λexo as well as ssDNA and dsDNA recombination in vivo. By contrast, the determinants for self-oligomerization of Redβ appear to reside solely within the N-terminal domain. The subtle but significant differences in the relative binding of Redβ(FL) and Redβ(177) to ssDNA substrate and annealed duplex product may be important for Redβ to function as a SSA protein in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-lived charge-separated configuration of a push-pull archetype of Disperse Red 1 end-capped poly[9,9-bis(4-diphenylaminophenyl)fluorene].

    PubMed

    El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Chen, Yu; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2009-05-13

    The photoinduced electron-transfer process in Disperse Red 1 end-capped poly[9,9-bis(4-diphenylaminophenyl)-2,7-fluorene], a promising material for electronic and optoelectronic devices, is reported here. The charge-separated configuration was found to be long-lived, with a lifetime of up to 2.2 ms in the polar benzonitrile, as inferred from time-resolved absorption measurements.

  13. Estimation of single-year-of-age counts of live births, fetal losses, abortions, and pregnant women for counties of Texas.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bismark; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2017-05-08

    We provide a methodology for estimating counts of single-year-of-age live-births, fetal-losses, abortions, and pregnant women from aggregated age-group counts. As a case study, we estimate counts for the 254 counties of Texas for the year 2010. We use interpolation to estimate counts of live-births, fetal-losses, and abortions by women of each single-year-of-age for all Texas counties. We then use these counts to estimate the numbers of pregnant women for each single-year-of-age, which were previously available only in aggregate. To support public health policy and planning, we provide single-year-of-age estimates of live-births, fetal-losses, abortions, and pregnant women for all Texas counties in the year 2010, as well as the estimation method source code.

  14. RecET direct cloning and Redαβ recombineering of biosynthetic gene clusters, large operons or single genes for heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Li, Zhen; Jia, Ruonan; Hou, Yu; Yin, Jia; Bian, Xiaoying; Li, Aiying; Müller, Rolf; Stewart, A Francis; Fu, Jun; Zhang, Youming

    2016-07-01

    Full-length RecE and RecT from Rac prophage mediate highly efficient linear-linear homologous recombination that can be used to clone large DNA regions directly from genomic DNA into expression vectors, bypassing library construction and screening. Homologous recombination mediated by Redαβ from lambda phage has been widely used for recombinant DNA engineering. Here we present a protocol for direct cloning and engineering of biosynthetic gene clusters, large operons or single genes from genomic DNA using one Escherichia coli host that harbors both RecET and Redαβ systems. The pipeline uses standardized cassettes for horizontal gene transfer options, as well as vectors with different replication origins configured to minimize recombineering background through the use of selectively replicating templates or CcdB counterselection. These optimized reagents and protocols facilitate fast acquisition of transgenes from genomic DNA preparations, which are ready for heterologous expression within 1 week.

  15. Imaging the inhibition by anti-β1 integrin antibody of lung seeding of single osteosarcoma cells in live mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroaki; Tome, Yasunori; Momiyama, Masashi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    Integrins play a role in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the effect of integrin inhibition has not been visualized on single cancer cells in vivo. In this study, we used a powerful subcellular in vivo imaging model to demonstrate how an anti-integrin antibody affects seeding and growth of osteosarcoma cells on the lung. The 143B human osteosarcoma cell line, expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus, was established. Such double-labeled cells enable imaging of apoptosis and mitosis and other nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics. Using the double-labeled osteosarcoma cells, single cancer-cell seeding in the lung after i.v. injection of osteosarcoma cells was imaged. The anti-β1 integrin monoclonal antibody, AIIB2, greatly inhibited the seeding of cancer cells on the lung (experimental metastasis) while a control antibody had no effect. To image the efficacy of the anti-integrin antibody on spontaneous metastasis, mice with orthotopically-growing 143B-RFP cells in the tibia were also treated with AIIB2 or control anti-rat IgG1 antibody. After 3 weeks treatment, mice were sacrificed and primary tumors and lung metastases were evaluated with fluorescence imaging. AIIB2 significantly inhibited spontaneous lung metastasis but not primary tumor growth, possibly due to inhibition of lung seeding of the cancer cells as imaged in the experimental metastasis study. AIIB2 treatment also increased survival of mice with orthotopically growing 143B-RFP. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  16. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer on single living cells. Application to binding of monovalent haptens to cell-bound immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed Central

    Kubitscheck, U; Kircheis, M; Schweitzer-Stenner, R; Dreybrodt, W; Jovin, T M; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the specific binding of 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP)-haptens to two different monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgE) molecules bound to Fc epsilon-receptors on the cell surface of single, living rat basophilic leukemia cells subclone 2H3 cells. The measurements were performed at 4 degrees, 15 degrees, and 25 degrees C using a recently developed technique that permits the quantitative determination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two fluorophores on single cells in a microscope from the photobleaching kinetics of the donor fluorophore. We introduce here a method for performing binding studies on individual attached cells. At 25 degrees C, the titration studies yielded equilibrium binding constants Kint of 9 x 10(8), 8 x 10(8), and 8 x 10(7) M-1 for the monovalent haptens N-2,4-DNP-epsilon-amino-n-caproic acid, N epsilon-2,4-DNP-L-lysine, and N-2,4-DNP-gamma-amino-n-butyric acid, respectively. Our data indicate that the affinity constants for the first two haptens binding to IgE on adherent cells are 4 to 11 times larger than that of the corresponding values obtained by fluorescence quenching experiments with the same haptens and IgE molecules either in solution or bound to cells in suspension. PMID:1832974

  17. Casting new physicochemical light on the fundamental biological processes in single living cells by using Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaliaperumal, Venkatesh; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2012-12-01

    This Personal Account highlights the capabilities of spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy for studying fundamental biological processes in a single living cell. Raman microspectroscopy provides time- and space-resolved vibrational Raman spectra that contain detailed information on the structure and dynamics of biomolecules in a cell. By using yeast as a model system, we have made great progress in the development of this methodology. The results that we have obtained so far are described herein with an emphasis placed on how three cellular processes, that is, cell-division, respiration, and cell-death, are traced and elucidated with the use of time- and space-resolved structural information that is extracted from the Raman spectra. For cell-division, compositional- and structural changes of various biomolecules are observed during the course of the whole cell cycle. For respiration, the redox state of mitochondrial cytochromes, which is inferred from the resonance Raman bands of cytochromes, is used to evaluate the respiration activity of a single cell, as well as that of isolated mitochondrial particles. Special reference is made to the "Raman spectroscopic signature of life", which is a characteristic Raman band at 1602 cm(-1) that is found in yeast cells. This signature reflects the cellular metabolic activity and may serve as a measure of mitochondrial dysfunction. For cell-death, "cross-talk" between the mitochondria and the vacuole in a dying cell is suggested. Copyright © 2012 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Single-molecule tracking of tau reveals fast kiss-and-hop interaction with microtubules in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Janning, Dennis; Igaev, Maxim; Sündermann, Frederik; Brühmann, Jörg; Beutel, Oliver; Heinisch, Jürgen J; Bakota, Lidia; Piehler, Jacob; Junge, Wolfgang; Brandt, Roland

    2014-11-05

    The microtubule-associated phosphoprotein tau regulates microtubule dynamics and is involved in neurodegenerative diseases collectively called tauopathies. It is generally believed that the vast majority of tau molecules decorate axonal microtubules, thereby stabilizing them. However, it is an open question how tau can regulate microtubule dynamics without impeding microtubule-dependent transport and how tau is also available for interactions other than those with microtubules. Here we address this apparent paradox by fast single-molecule tracking of tau in living neurons and Monte Carlo simulations of tau dynamics. We find that tau dwells on a single microtubule for an unexpectedly short time of ∼40 ms before it hops to the next. This dwell time is 100-fold shorter than previously reported by ensemble measurements. Furthermore, we observed by quantitative imaging using fluorescence decay after photoactivation recordings of photoactivatable GFP-tagged tubulin that, despite this rapid dynamics, tau is capable of regulating the tubulin-microtubule balance. This indicates that tau's dwell time on microtubules is sufficiently long to influence the lifetime of a tubulin subunit in a GTP cap. Our data imply a novel kiss-and-hop mechanism by which tau promotes neuronal microtubule assembly. The rapid kiss-and-hop interaction explains why tau, although binding to microtubules, does not interfere with axonal transport.

  19. Recent Developments in the Synthesis of Biomacromolecules and their Conjugates by Single Electron Transfer-Living Radical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lligadas, Gerard; Grama, Silvia; Percec, Virgil

    2017-04-10

    Single electron transfer-living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) represents a robust and versatile tool for the synthesis of vinyl polymers with well-defined topology and chain end functionality. The crucial step in SET-LRP is the disproportionation of the Cu(I)X generated by activation with Cu(0) wire, powder, or nascent Cu(0) generated in situ into nascent, extremely reactive Cu(0) atoms and nanoparticles and Cu(II)X2. Nascent Cu(0) activates the initiator and dormant chains via a homogeneous or heterogeneous outer-sphere single-electron transfer mechanism (SET-LRP). SET-LRP provides an ultrafast polymerization of a plethora of monomers (e.g., (meth)-acrylates, (meth)-acrylamides, styrene, and vinyl chloride) including hydrophobic and water insoluble to hydrophilic and water soluble. Some advantageous features of SET-LRP are (i) the use of Cu(0) wire or powder as readily available catalysts under mild reaction conditions, (ii) their excellent control over molecular weight evolution and distribution as well as polymer chain ends, (iii) their high functional group tolerance allowing the polymerization of commercial-grade monomers, and (iv) the limited purification required for the resulting polymers. In this Perspective, we highlight the recent advancements of SET-LRP in the synthesis of biomacromolecules and of their conjugates.

  20. Molecular and optical properties of tree-derived dissolved organic matter in throughfall and stemflow from live oaks and eastern red cedar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, Aron; Silva, Leticia M.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Van Stan, John T.

    2017-03-01

    Studies of dissolved organic matter (DOM) transport through terrestrial aquatic systems usually start at the stream. However, the interception of rainwater by vegetation marks the beginning of the terrestrial hydrological cycle making trees the headwaters of aquatic carbon cycling. Rainwater interacts with trees picking up tree-DOM, which is then exported from the tree in stemflow and throughfall. Stemflow denotes water flowing down the tree trunk, while throughfall is the water that drips through the leaves of the canopy. We report the concentrations, optical properties (light absorbance) and molecular signatures (ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry) of tree-DOM in throughfall and stemflow from two tree species (live oak and eastern red cedar) with varying epiphyte cover on Skidaway Island, Savannah, Georgia, USA. Both stemflow and throughfall were enriched in DOM compared to rainwater, indicating trees were a significant source of DOM. The optical and molecular properties of tree-DOM were broadly consistent with those of DOM in other aquatic ecosystems. Stemflow was enriched in highly colored DOM compared to throughfall. Elemental formulas identified clustered the samples into three groups: oak stemflow, oak throughfall and cedar. The molecular properties of each cluster are consistent with an autochthonous aromatic-rich source associated with the trees, their epiphytes and the microhabitats they support. Elemental formulas enriched in oak stemflow were more diverse, enriched in aromatic formulas, and of higher molecular mass than for other tree-DOM classes, suggesting greater contributions from fresh and partially modified plant-derived organics. Oak throughfall was enriched in lower molecular weight, aliphatic and sugar formulas, suggesting greater contributions from foliar surfaces. While the optical properties and the majority of the elemental formulas within tree-DOM were consistent with vascular plant-derived organics, condensed aromatic formulas were

  1. Transcription-Factor-Mediated DNA Looping Probed by High-Resolution, Single-Molecule Imaging in Live E. coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Zach; Xiao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The “genetic switch” of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences OR and OL (separated by 2.3 kb), mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034), play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms. PMID:23853547

  2. Transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping probed by high-resolution, single-molecule imaging in live E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Zach; Weng, Xiaoli; Lagda, Arvin Cesar; Xiao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The "genetic switch" of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences O(R) and O(L) (separated by 2.3 kb), mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034), play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms.

  3. Nature of red luminescence band in research-grade ZnO single crystals: A “self-activated” configurational transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. N.; Xu, S. J. Zheng, C. C.; Ning, J. Q.; Ling, F. C. C.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Skorupa, W.

    2014-07-28

    By implanting Zn{sup +} ions into research-grade intentionally undoped ZnO single crystal for facilitating Zn interstitials (Zn{sub i}) and O vacancies (V{sub O}) which is revealed by precise X-Ray diffraction rocking curves, we observe an apparent broad red luminescence band with a nearly perfect Gaussian lineshape. This red luminescence band has the zero phonon line at ∼2.4 eV and shows distinctive lattice temperature dependence which is well interpreted with the configurational coordinate model. It also shows a low “kick out” thermal energy and small thermal quenching energy. A “self-activated” optical transition between a shallow donor and the defect center of Zn{sub i}-V{sub O} complex or V{sub Zn}V{sub O} di-vacancies is proposed to be responsible for the red luminescence band. Accompanied with the optical transition, large lattice relaxation simultaneously occurs around the center, as indicated by the generation of multiphonons.

  4. Single low-dose red light is as efficacious as methyl-aminolevulinate--photodynamic therapy for treatment of acne: clinical assessment and fluorescence monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hörfelt, Camilla; Stenquist, Bo; Halldin, Christina B; Ericson, Marica B; Wennberg, Ann-Marie

    2009-01-01

    This controlled study investigated single low-dose red light photodynamic therapy and methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) for treatment of moderate to severe facial acne in 19 patients. The right cheek was treated with MAL (160 mg/g) for 3 h prior to illumination. The left cheek received red light only. Both cheeks were illuminated with narrow-band red light (635 nm) at a light dose of 15 J/cm2. The global severity of acne was assessed at baseline and at follow-up, 10 and 20 weeks after treatment. Fluorescence images, clinical photographs and skin surface biopsies were obtained. Both MAL-photodynamic therapy and control areas showed a significant decrease in acne score at follow-up; no significant difference was found compared with control. MAL-photodynamic therapy was associated with adverse effects such as erythema and stinging. Fluorescence images revealed poor selectivity of MAL-induced fluorescence to the acne lesions, suggesting a general photoablating mechanism rather than selective destruction of sebaceous glands. No significant reduction in Propionibacterium acnes or sebum excretion was found.

  5. Study of Multidrug Membrane Transporter of Single Living Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cells Using Size-Dependent Plasmonic Nanoparticle Optical Probes†

    PubMed Central

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Lee, Kerry J.; Desai, Tanvi; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug membrane transporters (efflux pumps) in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes are responsible for impossible treatments of a wide variety of diseases, including infections and cancer, underscoring the importance of better understanding their structures and functions for design of effective therapies. In this study, we designed and synthesized two silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) solution with average diameters of 13.1 ± 2.5 nm (8.1–38.6 nm) and 91.0 ± 9.3 nm (56–120 nm), and used the size-dependent plasmonic spectra of single NPs to probe the size-dependent transport kinetics of MexAB-OprM (multidrug transporter) in Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa in real-time at nanometer resolution. We found that the accumulation of intracellular NPs in wild-type (WT) cells was higher than in nalB1 (over-expression of MexAB-OprM), but less than ΔABM (deletion of MexAB-OprM). In the presence of proton ionophores (CCCP, inhibitor of proton-motive-force), we found that intracellular NPs in nalB1 were nearly doubled. These results suggest that the MexAB-OprM is responsible for the extrusion of NPs out of cells and NPs (orders of magnitude larger than conventional antibiotics) are the substrates of the transporter, which indicates that the substrates may trigger the assembly of the efflux pump optimized for the extrusion of the encountered substrates. We found that the smaller NPs stayed longer inside the cells than larger NPs, suggesting the size-dependent efflux kinetics of the cells. This study shows that multi-sized NPs can be used to mimic various sizes of antibiotics for probing the size-dependent efflux kinetics of multidrug membrane transporters in single living cells. PMID:20540528

  6. Optical control and study of biological processes at the single-cell level in a live organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhiping; Zhang, Weiting; Xu, Jianmin; Gauron, Carole; Ducos, Bertrand; Vriz, Sophie; Volovitch, Michel; Jullien, Ludovic; Weiss, Shimon; Bensimon, David

    2013-07-01

    Living organisms are made of cells that are capable of responding to external signals by modifying their internal state and subsequently their external environment. Revealing and understanding the spatio-temporal dynamics of these complex interaction networks is the subject of a field known as systems biology. To investigate these interactions (a necessary step before understanding or modelling them) one needs to develop means to control or interfere spatially and temporally with these processes and to monitor their response on a fast timescale (< minute) and with single-cell resolution. In 2012, an EMBO workshop on ‘single-cell physiology’ (organized by some of us) was held in Paris to discuss those issues in the light of recent developments that allow for precise spatio-temporal perturbations and observations. This review will be largely based on the investigations reported there. We will first present a non-exhaustive list of examples of cellular interactions and developmental pathways that could benefit from these new approaches. We will review some of the novel tools that have been developed for the observation of cellular activity and then discuss the recent breakthroughs in optical super-resolution microscopy that allow for optical observations beyond the diffraction limit. We will review the various means to photo-control the activity of biomolecules, which allow for local perturbations of physiological processes. We will end up this review with a report on the current status of optogenetics: the use of photo-sensitive DNA-encoded proteins as sensitive reporters and efficient actuators to perturb and monitor physiological processes.

  7. Single-dose live-attenuated Nipah virus vaccines confer complete protection by eliciting antibodies directed against surface glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    DeBuysscher, Blair L.; Scott, Dana; Marzi, Andrea; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Background Nipah virus (NiV), a zoonotic pathogen causing severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans, emerged in Malaysia in 1998 with subsequent outbreaks on an almost annual basis since 2001 in parts of the Indian subcontinent. The high case fatality rate, human-to-human transmission, wide-ranging reservoir distribution and lack of licensed intervention options are making NiV a serious regional and potential global public health problem. The objective of this study was to develop a fast-acting, single-dose NiV vaccine that could be implemented in a ring vaccination approach during outbreaks. Methods In this study we have designed new live-attenuated vaccine vectors based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSV) expressing NiV glycoproteins (G or F) or nucleoprotein (N) and evaluated their protective efficacy in Syrian hamsters, an established NiV animal disease model. We further characterized the humoral immune response to vaccination in hamsters using ELISA and neutralization assays and performed serum transfer studies. Results Vaccination of Syrian hamsters with a single dose of the rVSV vaccine vectors resulted in strong humoral immune responses with neutralizing activities found only in those animals vaccinated with rVSV expressing NiV G or F proteins. Vaccinated animals with neutralizing antibody responses were completely protected from lethal NiV disease, whereas animals vaccinated with rVSV expressing NiV N showed only partial protection. Protection of NiV G or F vaccinated animals was conferred by antibodies, most likely the neutralizing fraction, as demonstrated by serum transfer studies. Protection of N-vaccinated hamsters was not antibody-dependent indicating a role of adaptive cellular responses for protection. Conclusions The rVSV vectors expressing Nipah virus G or F are prime candidates for new ‘emergency vaccines’ to be utilized for NiV outbreak management. PMID:24631094

  8. Single-molecule imaging of UvrA and UvrB recruitment to DNA lesions in living Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stracy, Mathew; Jaciuk, Marcin; Uphoff, Stephan; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.; Nowotny, Marcin; Sherratt, David J.; Zawadzki, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes chemically diverse DNA lesions in all domains of life. In Escherichia coli, UvrA and UvrB initiate NER, although the mechanistic details of how this occurs in vivo remain to be established. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to provide a comprehensive characterization of the lesion search, recognition and verification process in living cells. We show that NER initiation involves a two-step mechanism in which UvrA scans the genome and locates DNA damage independently of UvrB. Then UvrA recruits UvrB from solution to the lesion. These steps are coordinated by ATP binding and hydrolysis in the ‘proximal' and ‘distal' UvrA ATP-binding sites. We show that initial UvrB-independent damage recognition by UvrA requires ATPase activity in the distal site only. Subsequent UvrB recruitment requires ATP hydrolysis in the proximal site. Finally, UvrA dissociates from the lesion complex, allowing UvrB to orchestrate the downstream NER reactions. PMID:27562541

  9. Rapid isolation of nuclei from living immune cells by a single centrifugation through a multifunctional lysis gradient.

    PubMed

    Poglitsch, Marko; Katholnig, Karl; Säemann, Marcus D; Weichhart, Thomas

    2011-10-28

    Due to their low protein content and limited nuclear detergent stability, primary human immune cells such as monocytes or T lymphocytes represent a great challenge for standard nuclear isolation protocols. Nuclei clumping during the multiple centrifugation steps or contamination of isolated nuclei with cytoplasmic proteins due to membrane lysis is a frequently observed problem. Here we describe a versatile and novel method for the isolation of clean and intact nuclei from primary human monocytes, which can be applied for virtually any cell type. Living cells were applied on an iso-osmolar discontinuous iodixanol-based density gradient including a detergent-containing lysis layer. Mild cell lysis as well as efficient washing of the nuclei was performed during the course of one single low g-force centrifugation step. The isolation procedure, which we call lysis gradient centrifugation (LGC), results in the recovery of 90-95% of highly pure nuclei. This easy and highly reproducible procedure allows an effective preparation of nuclei and the cytoplasm in only 15 min with the ability to handle as little as one million cells per sample and easy parallel processing of multiple samples.

  10. Visualization of ATP levels inside single living cells with fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based genetically encoded indicators

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Hiromi; Huynh Nhat, Kim P.; Togawa, Hiroko; Saito, Kenta; Iino, Ryota; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is the major energy currency of cells and is involved in many cellular processes. However, there is no method for real-time monitoring of ATP levels inside individual living cells. To visualize ATP levels, we generated a series of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based indicators for ATP that were composed of the ε subunit of the bacterial FoF1-ATP synthase sandwiched by the cyan- and yellow-fluorescent proteins. The indicators, named ATeams, had apparent dissociation constants for ATP ranging from 7.4 μM to 3.3 mM. By targeting ATeams to different subcellular compartments, we unexpectedly found that ATP levels in the mitochondrial matrix of HeLa cells are significantly lower than those of cytoplasm and nucleus. We also succeeded in measuring changes in the ATP level inside single HeLa cells after treatment with inhibitors of glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation, revealing that glycolysis is the major ATP-generating pathway of the cells grown in glucose-rich medium. This was also confirmed by an experiment using oligomycin A, an inhibitor of FoF1-ATP synthase. In addition, it was demonstrated that HeLa cells change ATP-generating pathway in response to changes of nutrition in the environment. PMID:19720993

  11. Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Sindbis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Allows Single Particle Analysis of Virus Budding from Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Jose, Joyce; Tang, Jinghua; Taylor, Aaron B; Baker, Timothy S; Kuhn, Richard J

    2015-11-27

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne alphavirus. Here we generated and characterized a fluorescent protein-tagged (FP-tagged) SINV and found that the presence of the FP-tag (mCherry) affected glycoprotein transport to the plasma membrane whereas the specific infectivity of the virus was not affected. We examined the virions by transmission electron cryo-microscopy and determined the arrangement of the FP-tag on the surface of the virion. The fluorescent proteins are arranged icosahedrally on the virus surface in a stable manner that did not adversely affect receptor binding or fusion functions of E2 and E1, respectively. The delay in surface expression of the viral glycoproteins, as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis, contributed to a 10-fold reduction in mCherry-E2 virus titer. There is a 1:1 ratio of mCherry to E2 incorporated into the virion, which leads to a strong fluorescence signal and thus facilitates single-particle tracking experiments. We used the FP-tagged virus for high-resolution live-cell imaging to study the spatial and temporal aspects of alphavirus assembly and budding from mammalian cells. These processes were further analyzed by thin section microscopy. The results demonstrate that SINV buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is dispersed into the surrounding media or spread to neighboring cells facilitated by its close association with filopodial extensions.

  12. Effect of a single session of aerobic walking exercise on arterial pressure in community-living elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Lima, Leandra G; Moriguti, Júlio C; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Lima, Nereida K C

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that one exercise session (ES) on a cycloergometer or ergometric treadmill causes a reduction in blood pressure (BP). However, there are few similar studies on walking, which is the exercise modality most available to the elderly. We investigated the immediate and 24-h effects of walking on BP in independent, community-living elderly individuals. Volunteers participated in a single ES and resting control session (CS). Before and after each session, BP was measured by auscultatory and oscillometric methods. After each session, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted. An accelerometer was installed 48 h before the sessions and left in place for 5 days. The mean volunteer age was 67.7±3.5 years; 11 were hypertensive patients under treatment, and 12 were normotensive. In the total sample, there were immediate 14mm Hg and 12 mm Hg reductions in systolic BP (SBP) after the ES according to the auscultatory and oscillometric methods, respectively. Diastolic BP (DBP) was reduced by 4 mm Hg after the ES according to both methods. SBP during wakefulness and sleep and DBP during wakefulness were lower after the ES than after the CS (P<0.01), when wakefulness and sleep were determined individually (variable-time pattern) using data from the activity monitors and provided by the volunteers. The variable-time pattern was more effective in detecting reductions in BP than the fixed-time pattern.

  13. A New Genetically Encoded Single-Chain Biosensor for Cdc42 Based on FRET, Useful for Live-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Dianne; Hodgson, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Cdc42 is critical in a myriad of cellular morphogenic processes, requiring precisely regulated activation dynamics to affect specific cellular events. To facilitate direct observations of Cdc42 activation in live cells, we developed and validated a new biosensor of Cdc42 activation. The biosensor is genetically encoded, of single-chain design and capable of correctly localizing to membrane compartments as well as interacting with its upstream regulators including the guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor. We characterized this new biosensor in motile mouse embryonic fibroblasts and observed robust activation dynamics at leading edge protrusions, similar to those previously observed for endogenous Cdc42 using the organic dye-based biosensor system. We then extended our validations and observations of Cdc42 activity to macrophages, and show that this new biosensor is able to detect differential activation patterns during phagocytosis and cytokine stimulation. Furthermore, we observe for the first time, a highly transient and localized activation of Cdc42 during podosome formation in macrophages, which was previously hypothesized but never directly visualized. PMID:24798463

  14. Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Sindbis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Allows Single Particle Analysis of Virus Budding from Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Joyce; Tang, Jinghua; Taylor, Aaron B.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne alphavirus. Here we generated and characterized a fluorescent protein-tagged (FP-tagged) SINV and found that the presence of the FP-tag (mCherry) affected glycoprotein transport to the plasma membrane whereas the specific infectivity of the virus was not affected. We examined the virions by transmission electron cryo-microscopy and determined the arrangement of the FP-tag on the surface of the virion. The fluorescent proteins are arranged icosahedrally on the virus surface in a stable manner that did not adversely affect receptor binding or fusion functions of E2 and E1, respectively. The delay in surface expression of the viral glycoproteins, as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis, contributed to a 10-fold reduction in mCherry-E2 virus titer. There is a 1:1 ratio of mCherry to E2 incorporated into the virion, which leads to a strong fluorescence signal and thus facilitates single-particle tracking experiments. We used the FP-tagged virus for high-resolution live-cell imaging to study the spatial and temporal aspects of alphavirus assembly and budding from mammalian cells. These processes were further analyzed by thin section microscopy. The results demonstrate that SINV buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is dispersed into the surrounding media or spread to neighboring cells facilitated by its close association with filopodial extensions. PMID:26633461

  15. Interaction between single molecules of Mac-1 and ICAM-1 in living cells: An atomic force microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Huayan; Yu Junping; Fu Guo; Shi Xiaoli; Xiao Lin; Chen Yizhang; Fang Xiaohong He Cheng

    2007-10-01

    The interaction between integrin macrophage differentiation antigen associated with complement three receptor function (Mac-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is controlled tightly by the ligand-binding activity of Mac-1, is central to the regulation of neutrophil adhesion in host defense. Several 'inside-out' signals and extracellular metal ions or antibodies have been found to activate Mac-1, resulting in an increased adhesiveness of Mac-1 to its ligands. However, the molecular basis for Mac-1 activation is not well understood yet. In this work, we have carried out a single-molecule study of Mac-1/ICAM-1 interaction force in living cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results showed that the binding probability and adhesion force of Mac-1 with ICAM-1 increased upon Mac-1 activation. Moreover, by comparing the dynamic force spectra of different Mac-1 mutants, we expected that Mac-1 activation is governed by the downward movement of its {alpha}7 helix.

  16. Temperature-Dependent Model of Multi-step Transcription Initiation in Escherichia coli Based on Live Single-Cell Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Tran, Huy; Ribeiro, Andre S.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription kinetics is limited by its initiation steps, which differ between promoters and with intra- and extracellular conditions. Regulation of these steps allows tuning both the rate and stochasticity of RNA production. We used time-lapse, single-RNA microscopy measurements in live Escherichia coli to study how the rate-limiting steps in initiation of the Plac/ara-1 promoter change with temperature and induction scheme. For this, we compared detailed stochastic models fit to the empirical data in maximum likelihood sense using statistical methods. Using this analysis, we found that temperature affects the rate limiting steps unequally, as nonlinear changes in the closed complex formation suffice to explain the differences in transcription dynamics between conditions. Meanwhile, a similar analysis of the PtetA promoter revealed that it has a different rate limiting step configuration, with temperature regulating different steps. Finally, we used the derived models to explore a possible cause for why the identified steps are preferred as the main cause for behavior modifications with temperature: we find that transcription dynamics is either insensitive or responds reciprocally to changes in the other steps. Our results suggests that different promoters employ different rate limiting step patterns that control not only their rate and variability, but also their sensitivity to environmental changes. PMID:27792724

  17. Ultralow frequency Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of single living cells and microparticles using a hot rubidium vapor filter.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing

    2014-01-01

    We report on ultralow frequency Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of single living cells and microsized particles in an aqueous medium with a frequency shift down to 10 cm(-1) by the combination of a hot rubidium (Rb) vapor filter, a confocal pinhole, and optical trapping. A single frequency-stabilized diode laser beam at 780.2 nm is used to optically trap and excite a single living cell or microparticle, and the Rayleigh scattering light from the particle is effectively blocked with a Rb vapor cell and a confocal pinhole. Ultralow frequency Raman spectra of the trapped cells or microparticles in both Stokes and anti-Stokes regions are then measured with a single-stage CCD spectrograph.

  18. Detection of sodium and potassium in single human red blood cells by 193-nm laser ablative sampling: a feasibility demonstration.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W; Cheung, N H

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of quantifying sodium and potassium in single human erythrocytes was demonstrated by spectrochemical analysis of emissions from plasmas produced by 193-nm laser ablation of blood cells confined in a sheath flow. In one scheme, single blood cells that happened to be in the ablation volume were sampled. In another scheme, individual blood cells were first sighted and then synchronously ablated downstream. Plasma emission spectra of single ablated cells were captured, and the ratios of the analyte line intensity to the root-mean-square fluctuation of the continuum background were measured to be about 18 for sodium and 30 for potassium.

  19. Incidence of single and mixed infections with Eimeria kofoidi, E. caucasica and E. legionensis on the health of experimentally infected red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa).

    PubMed

    Naciri, M; Fort, G; Briant, J; Duperray, J; Benzoni, G

    2014-09-15

    Little is known about Eimeria-induced coccidiosis in partridges. After a coccidiosis outbreak in a farm rearing red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) in Brittany (France), three Eimeria species were identified as Eimeria kofoidi, Eimeria caucasica and Eimeria legionensis. This study aimed to reproduce the effects of the disease occurring in field conditions, in the absence of preventive treatments, to further build a coccidiosis model, helpful for coccidiostatic development. The pathogenic effects of a single infection with Eimeria kofoidi, E. caucasica and E. legionensis were evaluated, as well as the effects of multiple infections associating two or three of these species in red-legged partridges. Thirty-one-day-old birds were individually inoculated with Eimeria spp. and clinically followed up until 49 days of age. Mortality, lesion scores, daily oocyst production and growth were used as assessment criteria. Single infections with 250,000 E. kofoidi, 30,000 E. caucasica or 100,000 E. legionensis oocysts did not increase mortality rate compared to uninfected birds, whereas the combination of 3 species caused significant 28% mortality (P<0.05). Five days post inoculation, lesions scores in the proximal intestine (duodenum/jejunum) decreased in dual-infected birds and tended to decrease in triple-infected birds compared to lesions in mono-infected birds. The highest caecal lesion score was recorded in birds co-infected with E. kofoidi and E. legionensis. In multi-infected birds, the total number of oocysts excreted per gram of faeces was lower than the sum of oocysts excreted by mono-infected birds. Each single infection caused significant growth depression and even weight loss in E. legionensis infected birds (P<0.05). Dual or triple infections worsened this effect. Eighteen days post inoculation, only mono-infected birds had recovered. Their weight gains were not different from that of uninfected birds, whereas growth was significantly depressed in dual

  20. Laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) vs laparoscopic living-donor nephrectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Autorino, Riccardo; Brandao, Luis Felipe; Sankari, Bashir; Zargar, Homayoun; Laydner, Humberto; Akça, Oktay; De Sio, Marco; Mirone, Vincenzo; Chueh, Shih-Chieh J; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a systematic review and meta-analysis of reports comparing laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) living-donor nephrectomy (LDN) vs standard laparoscopic LDN (LLDN). A systematic review of the literature was performed in September 2013 using PubMed, Scopus, Ovid and The Cochrane library databases. Article selection proceeded according to the search strategy based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses criteria. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) were used to measure continuous variables and odds ratios (ORs) to measure categorical ones. Nine publications meeting eligibility criteria were identified, including 461 LESS LDN and 1006 LLDN cases. There were more left-side cases in the LESS LDN group (96.5% vs 88.6%, P < 0.001). Meta-analysis of extractable data showed that LLDN had a shorter operative time (WMD 15.06 min, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9-25.1; P = 0.003), without a significant difference in warm ischaemia time (WMD 0.41 min, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.84; P = 0.06). Estimated blood loss was lower for LESS LDN (WMD -22.09 mL, 95% CI -29.5 to -14.6; P < 0.001); however, this difference was not clinically significant. There was a greater likelihood of conversion for LESS LDN (OR 13.21, 95% CI 4.65-37.53; P < 0.001). Hospital stay was similar (WMD -0.11 days, 95% CI -0.33 to 0.12; P = 0.35), as well as the visual analogue pain score at discharge (WMD -0.31, 95% CI -0.96 to 0.35; P = 0.36), but the analgesic requirement was lower for LESS LDN (WMD -2.58 mg, 95% CI -5.01 to -0.15; P = 0.04). Moreover, there was no difference in the postoperative complication rate (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.65-1.54; P = 0.99). Renal function of the recipient, as based on creatinine levels at 1 month, showed similar outcomes between groups (WMD 0.10 mg/dL, -0.09 to 0.29; P = 0.29). In conclusion, LESS LDN represents an emerging option for living kidney donation. This procedure offers comparable surgical and early

  1. Fibre-coupled red diode-pumped Alexandrite TEM00 laser with single and double-pass end-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabzadah, E. A.; Damzen, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the investigation of an Alexandrite laser end-pumped by a fibre-coupled red diode laser module. Power, efficiency, spatial, spectral, and wavelength tuning performance are studied as a function of pump and laser cavity parameters. It is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of greater than 1 W power and also highest laser slope efficiency (44.2%) in a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser with diffraction-limited TEM00 mode operation. Spatial quality was excellent with beam propagation parameter M 2 ~ 1.05. Wavelength tuning from 737-796 nm was demonstrated using an intracavity birefringent tuning filter. Using a novel double pass end-pumping scheme to get efficient absorption of both polarisation states of the scrambled fibre-delivered diode pump, a total output coupled power of 1.66 W is produced in TEM00 mode with 40% slope efficiency.

  2. Demonstration of specific binding of heparin to Plasmodium falciparum-infected vs. non-infected red blood cells by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Urbán, Patricia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force ranging between 28 and 46 pN depending on the loading rate. No significant binding of heparin to non-infected RBCs has been observed in control experiments. This work represents the first approach to quantitatively evaluate GAG-pRBC molecular interactions at the individual molecule level.Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force

  3. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-01-01

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories. PMID:26526410

  4. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-11-03

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories.

  5. A single phase, red emissive Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ nanophosphor prepared via rapid propellant combustion route.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ramachandra; Prashantha, S C; Nagabhushana, H; Sharma, S C; Nagaswarupa, H P; Anantharaju, K S; Nagabhushana, B M; Premkumar, H B; Girish, K M

    2015-04-05

    Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ (1-11 mol%) nanoparticles were prepared by a rapid low temperature solution combustion route. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns exhibit orthorhombic structure with α-phase. The average crystallite size estimated using Scherer's method, W-H plot and strain-size plots were found to be in the range 25-50 nm and the same was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures show porous structure and crystallites were agglomerated. The effect of Sm3+ cations on luminescence of Mg2SiO4 was well studied. Interestingly the samples could be effectively excited with 315 nm and emitted light in the red region, which was suitable for the demands of high efficiency WLEDs. The emission spectra consists of four main peaks which can be assigned to the intra 4-f orbital transitions of Sm3+ ions 4G5/2→6H5/2 (576 nm), 4G5/2→6H7/2 (611 nm), 4G5/2→6H9/2 (656 nm) and 4G5/2→6H11/2 (713 nm). The optimal luminescence intensity was obtained for 5 mol% Sm3+ ions. The CIE (Commission International de I'Eclairage) chromaticity co-ordinates were calculated from emission spectra, the values (0.588, 0.386) were close to the NTSC (National Television Standard Committee) standard value of red emission. Coordinated color temperature (CCT) was found to be 1756 K. Therefore optimized Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ (5 mol%) phosphor was quite useful for solid state lighting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells in lumbar spine surgery: a single institution experience about red bone marrow and fat tissue derived MSCs.

    PubMed

    Piccirilli, Manolo; Delfinis, Catia P; Santoro, Antonio; Salvati, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undifferentiated, multipotent cells, which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into many tissue types. MSCs have shown therapeutic applications in different medical fields and could represent a successful treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD). Several studies have demonstrated, ex vivo or in animal models, the MSCs efficacy in spine surgery. The authors aim to demonstrate their efficacy in humans. Twenty-two consecutive patients, who suffered of spine DDD, were submitted: in 11 cases the MSCs were harvested from red bone marrow, 11 from fat tissue. The red bone marrow withdrawal was performed from the vertebral bodies; processed by a fully-automated, mobile system. The fat tissue withdrawal was acted from the subcutaneous adipose tissue; processed through a microfluidic fractioning procedure. MSCs were implanted in the central part of the nucleus pulposus of the DDD or added to bone chips to accelerate posterolateral arthrodesis. All the 14 posterolateral fusions and MSCs implantations showed at three months a complete bone bridge, stable at follow-up. The one intersomatic implantation gained a complete interbody fusion after one month; while 80% black discs treated with MSCs presented a new T2-W hyperintensity at postoperative MRI. The mean Visual Analogue Scale Pain Score improved from 70±20 to 10±5 at 12 months, as the ODI score from 70±5% to 20±10%. There are several questions that need to be answered but MCSs look promising in lumbar spine surgery, both to block the aging of the disc both to accelerate the fusion processes in arthrodesis.

  7. Polymerization Induced Self-Assembly of Alginate Based Amphiphilic Graft Copolymers Synthesized by Single Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kapishon, Vitaliy; Whitney, Ralph A; Champagne, Pascale; Cunningham, Michael F; Neufeld, Ronald J

    2015-07-13

    Alginate-based amphiphilic graft copolymers were synthesized by single electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP), forming stable micelles during polymerization induced self-assembly (PISA). First, alginate macroinitiator was prepared by partial depolymerization of native alginate, solubility modification and attachment of initiator. Depolymerized low molecular weight alginate (∼12 000 g/mol) was modified with tetrabutylammonium, enabling miscibility in anhydrous organic solvents, followed by initiator attachment via esterification yielding a macroinitiator with a degree of substitution of 0.02, or 1-2 initiator groups per alginate chain. Then, methyl methacrylate was polymerized from the alginate macroinitiator in mixtures of water and methanol, forming poly(methyl methacrylate) grafts, prior to self-assembly, of ∼75 000 g/mol and polydispersity of 1.2. PISA of the amphiphilic graft-copolymer resulted in the formation of micelles with diameters of 50-300 nm characterized by light scattering and electron microscopy. As the first reported case of LRP from alginate, this work introduces a synthetic route to a preparation of alginate-based hybrid polymers with a precise macromolecular architecture and desired functionalities. The intended application is the preparation of micelles for drug delivery; however, LRP from alginate can also be applied in the field of biomaterials to the improvement of alginate-based hydrogel systems such as nano- and microhydrogel particles, islet encapsulation materials, hydrogel implants, and topical applications. Such modified alginates can also improve the function and application of native alginates in food and agricultural applications.

  8. Single molecule analysis of a red fluorescent RecA protein reveals a defect in nucleoprotein filament nucleation that relates to its reduced biological functions.

    PubMed

    Handa, Naofumi; Amitani, Ichiro; Gumlaw, Nathan; Sandler, Steven J; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2009-07-10

    Fluorescent fusion proteins are exceedingly useful for monitoring protein localization in situ or visualizing protein behavior at the single molecule level. Unfortunately, some proteins are rendered inactive by the fusion. To circumvent this problem, we fused a hyperactive RecA protein (RecA803 protein) to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) to produce a functional protein (RecA-RFP) that is suitable for in vivo and in vitro analysis. In vivo, the RecA-RFP partially restores UV resistance, conjugational recombination, and SOS induction to recA(-) cells. In vitro, the purified RecA-RFP protein forms a nucleoprotein filament whose k(cat) for single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase activity is reduced approximately 3-fold relative to wild-type protein, and which is largely inhibited by single-stranded DNA-binding protein. However, RecA protein is also a dATPase; dATP supports RecA-RFP nucleoprotein filament formation in the presence of single-stranded DNA-binding protein. Furthermore, as for the wild-type protein, the activities of RecA-RFP are further enhanced by shifting the pH to 6.2. As a consequence, RecA-RFP is proficient for DNA strand exchange with dATP or at lower pH. Finally, using single molecule visualization, RecA-RFP was seen to assemble into a continuous filament on duplex DNA, and to extend the DNA approximately 1.7-fold. Consistent with its attenuated activities, RecA-RFP nucleates onto double-stranded DNA approximately 3-fold more slowly than the wild-type protein, but still requires approximately 3 monomers to form the rate-limited nucleus needed for filament assembly. Thus, RecA-RFP reveals that its attenuated biological functions correlate with a reduced frequency of nucleoprotein filament nucleation at the single molecule level.

  9. Comparison of the urinary excretion of quercetin glycosides from red onion and aglycone from dietary supplements in healthy subjects: a randomized, single-blinded, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuanlu; Williamson, Gary

    2015-05-01

    Some intervention studies have shown that quercetin supplementation can regulate certain biomarkers, but it is not clear how the doses given relate to dietary quercetin (e.g. from onion). We conducted a two-period, two-sequence crossover study to compare the bioavailability of quercetin when administered in the form of a fresh red onion meal (naturally glycosylated quercetin) or dietary supplement (aglycone quercetin) under fasting conditions. Six healthy, non-smoking, adult males with BMI 22.7 ± 4.0 kg m(-2) and age 35.3 ± 12.3 y were grouped to take the two study meals in random order. In each of the 2 study periods, one serving of onion soup (made from 100 g fresh red onion, providing 156.3 ± 3.4 μmol (47 mg) quercetin) or a single dose of a quercetin dihydrate tablet (1800 ± 150 μmol (544 mg) of quercetin) were administered following 3 d washout. Urine samples were collected up to 24 h, and after enzyme deconjugation, quercetin was quantified by LC-MS. The 24 h urinary excretion of quercetin (1.69 ± 0.79 μmol) from red onion in soup was not significantly different to that (1.17 ± 0.44 μmol) for the quercetin supplement tablet (P = 0.065, paired t-test). This means that, in practice, 166 mg of quercetin supplement would be comparable to about 10 mg of quercetin aglycone equivalents from onion. These data allow intervention studies on quercetin giving either food or supplements to be more effectively compared.

  10. Demonstration of specific binding of heparin to Plasmodium falciparum-infected vs. non-infected red blood cells by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Urbán, Patricia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2013-05-07

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force ranging between 28 and 46 pN depending on the loading rate. No significant binding of heparin to non-infected RBCs has been observed in control experiments. This work represents the first approach to quantitatively evaluate GAG-pRBC molecular interactions at the individual molecule level.

  11. Warm-white light-emitting diode with high color rendering index fabricated by combining trichromatic InGaN emitter with single red phosphor.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Chen, Fu-Bang; Wang, Yen-Chin; Chang, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Shih-Hsien; Liu, Chun-Nan; Lee, Ming-Lun

    2015-04-06

    We present a trichromatic GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) that emits near-ultraviolet (n-UV) blue and green peaks combined with red phosphor to generate white light with a low correlated color temperature (CCT) and high color rendering index (CRI). The LED structure, blue and green unipolar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) stacked with a top p-i-n structure containing an InGaN/GaN MQW emitting n-UV light, was grown epitaxially on a single substrate. The trichromatic LED chips feature a vertical conduction structure on a silicon substrate fabricated through wafer bonding and laser lift-off techniques. The blue and green InGaN/GaN MQWs were pumped with n-UV light to re-emit low-energy photons when the LEDs were electrically driven with a forward current. The emission spectrum included three peaks at approximately 405, 468, and 537 nm. Furthermore, the trichromatic LED chips were combined with red phosphor to generate white light with a CCT and CRI of approximately 2900 and 92, respectively.

  12. Dynamical color-controllable lasing with extremely wide tuning range from red to green in a single alloy nanowire using nanoscale manipulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhicheng; Yin, Leijun; Ning, Hao; Yang, Zongyin; Tong, Limin; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2013-10-09

    Multicolor lasing and dynamic color-tuning in a wide spectrum range are challenging to realize but critically important in many areas of technology and daily life, such as general lighting, display, multicolor detection, and multiband communication. By exploring nanoscale growth and manipulation, we have demonstrated the first active dynamical color control of multicolor lasing, continuously tunable between red and green colors separated by 107 nm in wavelength. This is achieved in a purposely engineered single CdSSe alloy nanowire with composition varied along the wire axis. By looping the wide-gap end of the alloy nanowire through nanoscale manipulation, two largely independent (only weakly coupled) laser cavities are formed respectively for the green and red color modes. Our approach simultaneously overcomes the two fundamental challenges for multicolor lasing in material growth and cavity design. Such multicolor lasing and continuous color tuning in a wide spectral range represents a new paradigm shift and would eventually enable color-by-design and white-color lasers for lighting, illumination, and many other applications.

  13. Degradation behavior and thermal properties of red (650 nm) high-power diode single emitters and laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomm, Jens W.; Tien, Tran Q.; Ziegler, Mathias; Weik, Fritz; Sumpf, Bernd; Zorn, Martin; Zeimer, Ute; Erbert, Götz

    2007-02-01

    The degradation behavior of broad-area laser diodes and bars emitting at 650 nm under constant power operation is investigated. In addition to the increase in operation current the temperature of the laser facets was monitored using Raman spectroscopy. The formation of defects was studied using photocurrent spectroscopy while cathodoluminescence provided insight into the position of extended non-radiative defects at different stages of degradation. Although the facet does not show any visible alteration even for failed devices, its immediate vicinity appears to be the starting point of the observed gradual degradation effects. At the same time the local facet temperature is increased. The observed aging behavior is compared to the known degradation scenarios for devices emitting at 808 nm. In both cases there is a clear correlation between packaging-induced strain and observed degradation effects as demonstrated by the results obtained for bars. For the red devices a correlation between optical load and facet temperature exists which proves that here facet heating is indeed caused by re-absorption processes. Furthermore, the gradual degradation process is not accompanied by the creation of dark bands along 100 directions as observed earlier for 808 nm devices. The observed gradual degradation of the 650 nm devices is primarily accompanied by the formation of deep-level point defects, followed by the creation of macroscopic areas of reduced luminescence intensity. Packaging induced strains become important when gradual bar degradation is monitored at early stages.

  14. [Raman spectra of single human living erythrocyte with the effect of pH and serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng-Jie; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Zheng-Chun; Jiao, Qing-Ze

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, a cell environment which mimicked the real body environment according to the concentration radio between serum albumin and hemoglobin was built, and the cell morphology, the membrane deformation capacity, and the structure of intracellular hemoglobin of single human living erythrocyte under the effect of pH and serum albumin were studied. It was found that at different suspension pH, the magnitude of variations in cell shape and membrane deformation capacity changes with the structural changes of the intracellular hemoglobin. At pH 4. 14, 4. 76 and 10. 18, the loss of helical structure for hemoglobin, exposing of the hydrophobic amino acid in the globin chains, and changing of the combination of heme and globin, would completely destroy the stability of hemoglobin's structure, which seriously changes RBC's morphology and membrane deformation capacity. While at pH 6. 51 and 7. 80, the Raman spectra of erythrocytes are found to have no such changes, indicating that the structure of intracellular hemoglobin was not varied, thus the cell morphology and membrane deformation capacity are quite close to the normal values. At pH 5. 49 and 8. 76, RBC's morphology and membrane deformation capacity have different degrees of variation, but the structure of intracellular hemoglobin has not changed, suggesting that the cell morphology and membrane deformation capacity may be reversible. The results suggest that in the suspension solution containing serum albumin, erythrocytes have better ability to regulate and control the variation of the extracellular pH. In summary, upon building an environment which contains the same concentration radio of serum albumin to hemoglobin in the blood, this work performed systematic studies on the effect of pH on human erythrocytes. It can not only help to solve the problems about the mechanism of the structural and functional changes of erythrocytes induced by environmental pH, but also elucidates the possible variation of

  15. Stress system dynamics during "life as it is lived": an integrative single-case study on a healthy woman.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Christian; Geser, Willi; Noisternig, Bianca; Fuchs, Dietmar; Welzenbach, Natalie; König, Paul; Schüßler, Gerhard; Ocaña-Peinado, Francisco M; Lampe, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the dynamic characteristics of stress system activity during "life as it is lived". Using as representative a study design as possible, this investigation sought to gain insights into this area. A healthy 25-year-old woman collected her entire urine over a period of 63 days in 12-h intervals (126 measurements) to determine cortisol and neopterin (immune activation marker) levels. In addition, she filled out questionnaires on emotional state and daily routine in 12-h intervals, and was interviewed weekly to identify emotionally negative and positive everyday incidents. Adjusted cross-correlational analyses revealed that stressful incidents were associated with cyclic response patterns in both urinary cortisol and urinary neopterin concentrations. Urinary cortisol levels first decreased 12-24 h after stressful incidents occurred (lag 1: -.178; p = 0.048) and then increased a total of 72-84 h later (lag 6: +.224; p = 0.013). Urinary neopterin levels first increased 0-12 h before the occurrence of stressful incidents (-lag 1: +.185; p = 0.040) and then decreased a total of 48-60 h following such stressors (lag 4: -.181; p = 0.044). Decreases in urinary neopterin levels were also found 24-36 and 48-60 h after increases in pensiveness (lag 2: -.215; p = 0.017) and depressiveness (lag 4: -.221; p = 0.014), respectively. Findings on emotionally positive incidents sharply contrasted with those dealing with negative experiences. Positive incidents were followed first by urinary cortisol concentration increases within 12 h (lag 0: +.290; p = 0.001) and then by decreases after a total of 60-72 h (lag 5: -.186; p = 0.039). Urinary neopterin levels first decreased 12-24 h before positive incidents occurred (-lag 2: -.233; p = 0.010) and then increased a total of 12-24 h following these incidents (lag 1: +.222; p = 0.014). As with previous investigations on patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), this study showed that stress system response can be

  16. Consumption of a single serving of red raspberries per day reduces metabolic syndrome parameters in high-fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, T; Miranda-Garcia, O; Sasaki, G; Shay, N F

    2017-10-06

    Using an animal model for diet-induced metabolic disease, we have shown previously that the addition of raspberry juice concentrate (RJC) and raspberry puree concentrate (RPC) at a level of 10% of kcal, equivalent to four servings per day, to an obesogenic high-fat, western-style diet (HF) significantly reduced body weight gain, serum resistin levels, and altered the expression of hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. This study was designed to examine the effect of a lower level of RJC or RPC consumption, at a level representing a single serving of food per day (2.5% of kcal). For ten weeks, four groups of C57BL/6J mice (n = 8 ea.) were fed: low fat (LF), HF, HF + RJC, or HF + RPC diets. Intake of RJC and RPC decreased final body weight. Hepatic lipid accumulation was significantly decreased in HF + RPC- and HF + RJC-fed mice, compared to HF-fed mice. Further, the relative expression of hepatic genes including Heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) and Hormone sensitive lipase (Lipe), were altered by RPC or RJC consumption. In this mouse model of diet-induced metabolic disease, consumption of the equivalent of a single daily serving of either RPC or RJC improved metabolism in mice fed HF diet. We hypothesize that the phytochemicals contained in raspberries, and/or their subsequent metabolites, may be acting to influence gene expression and other regulatory pathways, to produce the metabolic improvements observed in this study.

  17. Scan-Free Absorbance Spectral Imaging A(x, y, λ) of Single Live Algal Cells for Quantifying Absorbance of Cell Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Isono, Takumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Momose, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kudo, Ayane; Okada, Norihide; Yagi, Takafumi; Nakata, Kazuaki; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Label-free, non-invasive, rapid absorbance spectral imaging A(x,y,λ) microscopy of single live cells at 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm resolution with an NA = 0.85 objective was developed and applied to unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. By introducing the fiber assembly to rearrange a two-dimensional image to the one-dimensional array to fit the slit of an imaging spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector, scan-free acquisition of three-dimensional information of A(x,y,λ) was realized. The space-resolved absorbance spectra of the eyespot, an orange organelle about 1 μm, were extracted from the green-color background in a chlorophyll-rich single live cell absorbance image. Characteristic absorbance change in the cell suspension after hydrogen photoproduction in C. reinhardtii was investigated to find a single 715-nm absorption peak was locally distributed within single cells. The formula to calculate the absorbance of cell suspensions from that of single cells was presented to obtain a quantitative, parameter-free agreement with the experiment. It is quantitatively shown that the average number of chlorophylls per cell is significantly underestimated when it is evaluated from the absorbance of the cell suspensions due to the package effect.

  18. Scan-Free Absorbance Spectral Imaging A(x, y, λ) of Single Live Algal Cells for Quantifying Absorbance of Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Isono, Takumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Momose, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kudo, Ayane; Okada, Norihide; Yagi, Takafumi; Nakata, Kazuaki; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Label-free, non-invasive, rapid absorbance spectral imaging A(x,y,λ) microscopy of single live cells at 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm resolution with an NA = 0.85 objective was developed and applied to unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. By introducing the fiber assembly to rearrange a two-dimensional image to the one-dimensional array to fit the slit of an imaging spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector, scan-free acquisition of three-dimensional information of A(x,y,λ) was realized. The space-resolved absorbance spectra of the eyespot, an orange organelle about 1 μm, were extracted from the green-color background in a chlorophyll-rich single live cell absorbance image. Characteristic absorbance change in the cell suspension after hydrogen photoproduction in C. reinhardtii was investigated to find a single 715-nm absorption peak was locally distributed within single cells. The formula to calculate the absorbance of cell suspensions from that of single cells was presented to obtain a quantitative, parameter-free agreement with the experiment. It is quantitatively shown that the average number of chlorophylls per cell is significantly underestimated when it is evaluated from the absorbance of the cell suspensions due to the package effect. PMID:26061268

  19. Exercise-induced oxidative stress in elderly subjects: the effect of red orange supplementation on the biochemical and cellular response to a