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Sample records for liver disease conclusion

  1. Liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Delta agent (hepatitis D) Drug-induced cholestasis Fatty liver disease Hemochromatosis Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C ... abscess Reye syndrome Sclerosing cholangitis Wilson disease Images Fatty liver, CT scan Liver with disproportional fattening, CT scan ...

  2. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  3. Progression of Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  4. Liver disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services (C.L.A.S.S.) -- www. ...

  5. Fatty Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... fatty liver disease that is not related to heavy alcohol use. There are two kinds: Simple fatty ... disease? Alcoholic fatty liver disease is due to heavy alcohol use. Your liver breaks down most of ...

  6. Alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Penny, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 100,000 deaths are attributed to alcohol abuse each year. In 2009, the World Health Organization listed alcohol use as one of the leading causes of the global burden of disease and injury. Alcoholic liver disease, a direct result of chronic alcohol abuse, insidiously destroys the normal functions of the liver. The end result of the disease, cirrhosis, culminates in a dysfunctional and diffusely scarred liver. This article discusses the clinical manifestations, imaging considerations, and treatment of alcoholic liver disease and cirrhosis. Normal liver function, liver hemodynamics, the disease of alcoholism, and the deleterious effects of alcohol also are reviewed.

  7. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality.

  8. Liver transplant for cholestatic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Andres F; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan Ram

    2013-05-01

    Cholestatic liver diseases include a group of diverse disorders with different epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, and prognosis. Despite significant advances in the clinical care of patients with cholestatic liver diseases, liver transplant (LT) remains the only definitive therapy for end-stage liver disease, regardless of the underlying cause. As per the United Network for Organ Sharing database, the rate of cadaveric LT for cholestatic liver disease was 18% in 1991, 10% in 2000, and 7.8% in 2008. This review summarizes the available evidence on various common and rare cholestatic liver diseases, disease-specific issues, and pertinent aspects of LT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:59-60. Carithers RL, McClain C. Alcoholic ... Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 86. Haines EJ, Oyama LC. ...

  10. Diet - liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of toxic waste products. Increasing your intake of carbohydrates to be in proportion with the amount of ... severe liver disease include: Eat large amounts of carbohydrate foods. Carbohydrates should be the major source of ...

  11. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    PubMed

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  12. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Excessive alcohol use is a common health care problem worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease represents the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation in North America and Europe. The pretransplant evaluation of patients with alcoholic liver disease should aim at identifying those at high risk for posttransplant relapse of alcohol use disorder, as return to excessive drinking can be deleterious to graft and patient survival. Carefully selected patients with alcoholic liver disease, including those with severe alcoholic hepatitis, will have similar short-term and long-term outcomes when compared with other indications for liver transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gut microbiota and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases. PMID:25684933

  14. Liver fibrosis markers in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chrostek, Lech; Panasiuk, Anatol

    2014-07-07

    Alcohol is one of the main factors of liver damage. The evaluation of the degree of liver fibrosis is of great value for therapeutic decision making in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Staging of liver fibrosis is essential to define prognosis and management of the disease. Liver biopsy is a gold standard as it has high sensitivity and specificity in fibrosis diagnostics. Taking into account the limitations of liver biopsy, there is an exigency to introduce non-invasive serum markers for fibrosis that would be able to replace liver biopsy. Ideal serum markers should be specific for the liver, easy to perform and independent to inflammation and fibrosis in other organs. Serum markers of hepatic fibrosis are divided into direct and indirect. Indirect markers reflect alterations in hepatic function, direct markers reflect extracellular matrix turnover. These markers should correlate with dynamic changes in fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. The assessment of the degree of liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease has diagnostic and prognostic implications, therefore noninvasive assessment of fibrosis remains important. There are only a few studies evaluating the diagnostic and prognostic values of noninvasive biomarkers of fibrosis in patients with ALD. Several noninvasive laboratory tests have been used to assess liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease, including the hyaluronic acid, FibroTest, FibrometerA, Hepascore, Forns and APRI indexes, FIB4, an algorithm combining Prothrombin index (PI), α-2 macroglobulin and hyaluronic acid. Among these tests, Fibrotest, FibrometerA and Hepascore demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy in identifying advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, and additionally, Fibrotest was independently associated with survival. Therefore, the use of biomarkers may reduce the need for liver biopsy and permit an earlier treatment of alcoholic patients.

  15. Endocannabinoids in Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Joseph; Liu, Jie; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Kunos, George

    2010-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are lipid mediators of the same cannabinoid (CB) receptors that mediate the effects of marijuana. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) consists of CB receptors, endocannabinoids, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and degradation, and is present both in brain and peripheral tissues, including the liver. The hepatic ECS is activated in various liver diseases, which contributes to the underlying pathologies. In cirrhosis of various etiologies, activation of vascular and cardiac CB1 receptors by macrophage- and platelet-derived endocannabinoids contribute to the vasodilated state and cardiomyopathy, which can be reversed by CB1 blockade. In mouse models of liver fibrosis, activation of CB1 receptors on hepatic stellate cells is fibrogenic, and CB1 blockade slows the progression of fibrosis. Fatty liver induced by high-fat diets or chronic alcohol feeding depend on activation of peripheral, including hepatic CB1 receptors, which also contribute to insulin resistance and dyslipidemias. Although the documented therapeutic potential of CB1 blockade is limited by neuropsychiatric side effects, these may be mitigated by using novel, peripherally restricted CB1 antagonists. PMID:21254182

  16. [Liver diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Liver diseases in the elderly have aroused less interest than diseases of other organs, since the liver plays a limited role in aging. There are no specific liver diseases of old age, but age-related anatomical and functional modifications of the liver cause changes in the frequency and clinical behavior of some liver diseases compared with those in younger patients. This review discusses the most important features of liver function in the healthy elderly population, as well as the features of the most prevalent liver diseases in this age group, especially the diagnostic approach to the most common liver problems in the elderly: asymptomatic elevation of serum transaminases and jaundice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  17. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver disease can cause what is known as “portal hypertension,” meaning increased blood pressure in the veins that ... diagnosed? A specialist can diagnose POPH by identifying portal hypertension (high pressure in the veins of the liver), ...

  18. Any value in a specialist review of liver biopsies? Conclusions of a 4-year review.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Anna L; Allison, Michael E D; Brais, Rebecca; Davies, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Liver pathology is a challenging subspeciality, with histopathologists frequently seeking specialist opinions. This study aims to determine the impact of specialist reviews on the final diagnosis and patient management. Agreement with the initial reporting centre in the histopathological diagnosis of 1265 liver biopsies was determined. The nature of differences was explored in more depth for 103 discrepant cases. Differences in the histopathological interpretation were present in 749 of 1265 (59%) biopsies, of which 505 of 749 (67%) were predicted at the time of reporting to impact upon patient management. Agreement was good in cases with chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver disease, malignancy and minimal pathological changes, while diagnostic differences occurred in more than 70% with biliary disease, autoimmune hepatitis or vascular/architectural changes. A clinical review of a subset of reports with histopathological differences predicted changes in patient management in 63 of 103 (61%). Clinically significant differences in liver biopsy interpretation between local pathologists and subspecialists are common. Diagnoses with frequent discrepancies, such as biliary disease, may benefit from a specialist review as standard when diagnosed initially, while cases requiring specialist advice from disease subgroups where discrepancies are less common, such as chronic viral hepatitis, could be selected during the clinicopathological conference process. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... fatty liver, alcoholic steatohepatitis, ascites, choline deficiency, cirrhosis, drug-induced fatty liver, edema, encephalopathy, glycogen storage disorder, gynecomastia, hepatic steatosis, hepatomegaly, hereditary fructose intolerance, homocystinuria, hyperlipidemia, ...

  20. Liver Disease in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wijewantha, Hasitha S

    2017-01-01

    Liver disease in Sri Lanka is mainly due to alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In contrast to other South Asian countries, the prevalence of hepatitis B and C is low in Sri Lanka and prevalence of hepatitis A is intermediate. The few reported cases of hepatitis E in Sri Lanka are mainly in people who have traveled to neighboring South Asian countries. Wilson's disease, autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, drug-induced liver disease, and primary biliary cirrhosis are recognized causes of liver disease in Sri Lanka. Pyogenic and amebic liver abscesses and dengue infection are the other causes of liver disease. Some of the commonly used plants as traditional herbal medicine in Sri Lanka have been shown to have deleterious effects on the liver in animal studies. Considering the high popularity of traditional herbal medicine in the country, it is likely that herbal medicine is an etiological factor for liver disease in Sri Lanka, but no published data are available. Address reprint requests to: Wijewantha HS. Liver Disease in Sri Lanka. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2017;7(1):78-81.

  1. Probiotics in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Miloh, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis involves complex interaction between the intestinal microbiome and the liver parenchyma. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are used in a variety of diseases. With currently only 2 randomized-controlled studies (one with Lactobacillus GG and the other with VSL #3), data are scarce to support the clinical effect of probiotic use in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. There is evidence that probiotics decrease the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and thereby reduce the prevalence of total parenteral nutrition-induced chronic liver disease. Probiotics are used with a few reported positive outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis and familial hypercholesterolemia and may be promising in other liver conditions. Probiotics are generally safe and well tolerated in children, premature infants, and in patients after liver transplantation. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the benefit of probiotics in children with liver diseases.

  2. Liver Disease in Mitochondrial Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Way S.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Liver involvement, a common feature in childhood mitochondrial hepatopathies, particularly in the neonatal period, may manifest as neonatal acute liver failure, hepatic steatohepatitis, cholestasis, or cirrhosis with chronic liver failure of insidious onset. There are usually significant neuromuscular symptoms, multisystem involvement, and lactic acidemia. The liver disease is usually progressive and eventually fatal. Current medical therapy of mitochondrial hepatopathies is largely ineffective, and the prognosis is usually poor. The role of liver transplantation in patients with liver failure remains poorly defined because of the systemic nature of the disease that does not respond to transplantation. Several specific molecular defects (mutations in nuclear genes such as SCO1, BCS1L, POLG, DGUOK, and MPV17 and deletion or rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA) have been identified in recent years. Prospective, longitudinal multicenter studies will be needed to address the gaps in our knowledge in these rare liver diseases. PMID:17682973

  3. Polycystic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Linda, Nguyen, E-mail: nguyenli@einstein.edu

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations.more » The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile.« less

  4. Gut microbiome and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert; Cani, Patrice D; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-12-01

    The gut microbiota has recently evolved as a new important player in the pathophysiology of many intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. The liver is the organ which is in closest contact with the intestinal tract, and is exposed to a substantial amount of bacterial components and metabolites. Various liver disorders such as alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic liver disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis have been associated with an altered microbiome. This dysbiosis may influence the degree of hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis through multiple interactions with the host's immune system and other cell types. Whereas few results from clinical metagenomic studies in liver disease are available, evidence is accumulating that in liver cirrhosis an oral microbiome is overrepresented in the lower intestinal tract, potentially contributing to disease process and severity. A major role for the gut microbiota in liver disorders is also supported by the accumulating evidence that several complications of severe liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy are efficiently treated by various prebiotics, probiotics and antibiotics. A better understanding of the gut microbiota and its components in liver diseases might provide a more complete picture of these complex disorders and also form the basis for novel therapies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Folate, Alcohol, and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Halsted, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is typically associated with folate deficiency, which is the result of reduced dietary folate intake, intestinal malabsorption, reduced liver uptake and storage, and increased urinary folate excretion. Folate deficiency favors the progression of liver disease through mechanisms that include its effects on methionine metabolism with consequences for DNA synthesis and stability and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression involved in pathways of liver injury. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease with particular focus on ethanol-induced alterations in methionine metabolism which may act in synergy with folate deficiency to decrease antioxidant defense as well as DNA stability while regulating epigenetic mechanisms of relevant gene expressions. We also review the current evidence available on potential treatments of alcoholic liver disease based on correcting abnormalities in methionine metabolism and the methylation regulation of relevant gene expressions. PMID:23136133

  6. Anesthesia for Patients With Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Safari, Saeid; Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: Liver plays an important role in metabolism and physiological homeostasis in the body. This organ is unique in its structure and physiology. So it is necessary for an anesthesiologist to be familiar with various hepatic pathophysiologic conditions and consequences of liver dysfunction. Evidence Acquisition: We searched MEDLINE (Pub Med, OVID, MD Consult), SCOPUS and the Cochrane database for the following keywords: liver disease, anesthesia and liver disease, regional anesthesia in liver disease, epidural anesthesia in liver disease and spinal anesthesia in liver disease, for the period of 1966 to 2013. Results: Although different anesthetic regimens are available in modern anesthesia world, but anesthetizing the patients with liver disease is still really tough. Spinal or epidural anesthetic effects on hepatic blood flow and function is not clearly investigated, considering both the anesthetic drug-induced changes and outcomes. Regional anesthesia might be used in patients with advanced liver disease. In these cases lower drug dosages are used, considering the fact that locally administered drugs have less systemic effects. In case of general anesthesia it seems that using inhalation agents (Isoflurane, Desflurane or Sevoflurane), alone or in combination with small doses of fentanyl can be considered as a reasonable regimen. When administering drugs, anesthetist must realize and consider the substantially changed pharmacokinetics of some other anesthetic drugs. Conclusions: Despite the fact that anesthesia in chronic liver disease is a scary and pretty challenging condition for every anesthesiologist, this hazard could be diminished by meticulous attention on optimizing the patient’s condition preoperatively and choosing appropriate anesthetic regimen and drugs in this setting. Although there are paucity of statistics and investigations in this specific group of patients but these little data show that with careful monitoring and considering the above

  7. Intestinal microbiota in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tanvir R; Barritt, A Sidney

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota have emerged as a topic of intense interest in gastroenterology and hepatology. The liver is on the front line as the first filter of nutrients, toxins and bacterial metabolites from the intestines and we are becoming increasingly aware of interactions among the gut, liver and immune system as important mediators of liver health and disease. Manipulating the microbiota with therapeutic intent is a rapidly expanding field. In this review, we will describe what is known about the contribution of intestinal microbiota to liver homeostasis; the role of dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of liver disease including alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; and the therapeutic manifestations of altering intestinal microbiota via antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Platelets: No longer bystanders in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David H.; Watson, Steve P.; Lalor, Patricia F.

    2016-01-01

    Growing lines of evidence recognize that platelets play a central role in liver homeostasis and pathobiology. Platelets have important roles at every stage during the continuum of liver injury and healing. These cells contribute to the initiation of liver inflammation by promoting leukocyte recruitment through sinusoidal endothelium. They can activate effector cells, thus amplifying liver damage, and by modifying the hepatic cellular and cytokine milieu drive both hepatoprotective and hepatotoxic processes. Conclusion: In this review we summarize how platelets drive such pleiotropic actions and attempt to reconcile the paradox of platelets being both deleterious and beneficial to liver function; with increasingly novel methods of manipulating platelet function at our disposal, we highlight avenues for future therapeutic intervention in liver disease. (Hepatology 2016;64:1774‐1784) PMID:26934463

  9. Autoimune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver cirrhosis or chronic active hepatitis. Risks Slight risks from having blood drawn include: Excessive bleeding Fainting or feeling lightheaded Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin) Infection ( ...

  10. Liver Disease and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss, and itching. PSC may not improve with medical treatment for IBD and may ultimately require liver transplantation. The cause is not known and there is no effective medication for PSC. To correct severe narrowing of the bile ducts, a balloon-tipped tube may be inserted into the duct ...

  11. Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Perla Oliveira; Ferreira, Fabio Gonçalves; Nascimento, Maria de Fátima Araújo; Vieira, Andrea; Ribeiro, Mauricio Alves; David, André Ibrahim; Szutan, Luiz Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and liver cancer, and NAFLD prevalence in different liver tumors. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of the clinical, laboratory and histological data of 120 patients diagnosed with primary or secondary hepatic neoplasms and treated at a tertiary center where they underwent hepatic resection and/or liver transplantation, with subsequent evaluation of the explant or liver biopsy. The following criteria were used to exclude patients from the study: a history of alcohol abuse, hepatitis B or C infection, no tumor detected in the liver tissue examined by histological analysis, and the presence of chronic autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease, or hepatoblastoma. The occurrence of NAFLD and the association with its known risk factors were studied. The risk factors considered were diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose, body mass index, dyslipidemia, and arterial hypertension. Presence of reticulin fibers in the hepatic neoplasms was assessed by histological analysis using slide-mounted specimens stained with either hematoxylin and eosin or Masson’s trichrome and silver impregnation. Analysis of tumor-free liver parenchyma was carried out to determine the association between NAFLD and its histological grade. RESULTS: No difference was found in the association of NAFLD with the general population (34.2% and 30.0% respectively, 95%CI: 25.8-43.4). Evaluation by cancer type showed that NAFLD was more prevalent in patients with liver metastasis of colorectal cancer than in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (OR = 3.99, 95%CI: 1.78-8.94, P < 0.001 vs OR = 0.60, 95%CI: 0.18-2.01, P = 0.406 and OR = 0.70, 95%CI: 0.18-2.80, P = 0.613, respectively). There was a higher prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 3.50, 95%CI: 1.06-11.57, P = 0.032). Evaluation of the

  12. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether this condition is a

  13. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2008-06-07

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether this condition is a

  14. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  15. Metabonomics Research Progress on Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengqian; Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qingwei; Wu, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics as the new omics technique develops after genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics and has rapid development at present. Liver diseases are worldwide public health problems. In China, chronic hepatitis B and its secondary diseases are the common liver diseases. They can be diagnosed by the combination of history, virology, liver function, and medical imaging. However, some patients seldom have relevant physical examination, so the diagnosis may be delayed. Many other liver diseases, such as drug-induced liver injury (DILI), alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and autoimmune liver diseases, still do not have definite diagnostic markers; the diagnosis consists of history, medical imaging, and the relevant score. As a result, the clinical work becomes very complex. So it has broad prospects to explore the specific and sensitive biomarkers of liver diseases with metabolomics. In this paper, there are several summaries which are related to the current research progress and application of metabolomics on biomarkers of liver diseases.

  16. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    PubMed Central

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  17. Alcoholic liver disease: The gut microbiome and liver crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcoholic fatty liver disease can progress to steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Patients with alcohol abuse show quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Furthermore, patients with alcoholic liver disease have increased intestinal permeability and elevated systemic levels of gut-derived microbial products. Maintaining eubiosis, stabilizing the mucosal gut barrier or preventing cellular responses to microbial products protect from experimental alcoholic liver disease. Therefore, intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation appear fundamental for the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. This review highlights causes for intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation, their relationship and consequences for alcoholic liver disease. We also discuss how the liver affects the intestinal microbiota. PMID:25872593

  18. Liver Disease in Cystic Fibrosis: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Di Dio, Giovanna; Franzonello, Chiara; Gennaro, Alessia; Rotolo, Novella; Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Context Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most widespread autosomal recessive genetic disorder that limits life expectation amongst the Caucasian population. As the median survival has increased related to early multidisciplinary intervention, other manifestations of CF have emergedespecially for the broad spectrum of hepatobiliary involvement. The present study reviews the existing literature on liver disease in cystic fibrosis and describes the key issues for an adequate clinical evaluation and management of patients, with a focus on the pathogenetic, clinical and diagnostic-therapeutic aspects of liver disease in CF. Evidence Acquisition A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for relevant studies published from 1990 about liver disease in cystic fibrosis. The databases searched were: EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library. Results CF is due to mutations in the gene on chromosome 7 that encodes an amino acidic polypeptide named CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator). The hepatic manifestations include particular changes referring to the basic CFTR defect, iatrogenic lesions or consequences of the multisystem disease. Even though hepatobiliary disease is the most common non-pulmonary cause ofmortalityin CF (the third after pulmonary disease and transplant complications), only about the 33%ofCF patients presents clinically significant hepatobiliary disease. Conclusions Liver disease will have a growing impact on survival and quality of life of cystic fibrosis patients because a longer life expectancy and for this it is important its early recognition and a correct clinical management aimed atdelaying the onset of complications. This review could represent an opportunity to encourage researchers to better investigate genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the development of cystic fibrosis liver disease, especially for non-CFTR genetic polymorphisms, and detect predisposed individuals. Therapeutic trials are needed to find strategies of

  19. Treatment options for nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chitturi, Shivakumar

    2008-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease comprises a range of disorders from steatosis and steatohepatitis through to cirrhosis. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis can progress to cirrhosis and liver-related death. Therefore, managing this common disorder is becoming an important public health issue. Lifestyle measures are commonly suggested but robust data are lacking. Trials with antioxidants (vitamin E, betaine) as well as cytoprotectants (ursodeoxycholic acid) have been disappointing. While data for insulin sensitizers such as metformin are less conclusive, thiazolidinediones appear promising. However, not all patients respond to thiazolidinediones. Moreover, issues related to weight gain, cardiovascular risk need to be addressed. The use of endocannabinoid antagonists and insulin secretagogues are novel strategies to combat this disorder.

  20. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-27

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD.

  1. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD. PMID:22312450

  2. [Liver involvement in coeliac disease].

    PubMed

    Riestra, S; Fernández, E; Rodrigo, L

    1999-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy in which, genetic, immunologic and environmental factors are implied. Several extradigestive diseases have been described in association with coeliac disease, which share most of the times an immunologic mechanism. The liver is damaged in coeliac disease, and it has been considered by some authors as an extraintestinal manifestation of the disease. In the present revision we discuss the different hepatic diseases related with the coeliac disease, as well as the best approach to diagnosis and therapy of choice. At diagnosis, it is very frequent to find an asymptomatic hipertransaminasemia, which frequently disappears after gluten suppression; the morphological substratum found in this alteration is a non-specific reactive hepatitis in the majority of cases. Coeliac disease is a demonstrated cause of cryptogenic hipertransaminasemia. In a small percentage of patient with coeliac disease an association has been found with other immunological liver diseases, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis. Few studies exist that include a large number of patient, and the results on occasions are discordant. Nevertheless, the strongest association is with autoimmune hepatitis and with primary biliary cirrhosis. Several communications of isolated cases of rare hepatic diseases, which probably, only reflect a fortuitous association, have been cited in the literature.

  3. Extracorporeal Bioartificial Liver for Treating Acute Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Tripathi, Anuj; Jain, Shivali

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Liver is a vital organ of the human body performing myriad of essential functions. Liver-related ailments are often life-threatening and dramatically deteriorate the quality of life of patients. Management of acute liver diseases requires adequate support of various hepatic functions. Thus far, liver transplantation has been proven as the only effective solution for acute liver diseases. However, broader application of liver transplantation is limited by demand for lifelong immunosuppression, shortage of organ donors, relative high morbidity, and high cost. Therefore, research has been focused on attempting to develop alternative support systems to treat liver diseases. Earlier attempts have been made to use nonbiological therapies based on the use of conventional detoxification procedures such as filtration and dialysis. However, the absence of liver cells in such techniques reduced the overall survival rate of the patients and led to inadequate essential liver-specific functions. As a result, there has been growing interest in the development of biological therapy-based extracorporeal liver support systems as a bridge to liver transplantation or to support the ailing liver. A bioartificial liver support is an extracorporeal device through which plasma is circulated over living and functionally active hepatocytes packed in a bioreactor with the aim to aid the diseased liver until it regenerates or until a suitable graft for transplantation is available. This review article gives a brief overview of efficacy of various liver support systems that are currently available. Also, the development of advanced liver support systems, which has been analyzed for improving the important system component such as cell source and other culture and circulation conditions for the maintenance of the liver-specific functions, have been described. PMID:22416599

  4. Phytoestrogens and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Barbara; Roncaglia, Vera; Viganò, Raffaella; Cremonini, Claudia; De Maria, Nicola; Del Buono, Maria Grazia; Manenti, Federico; Villa, Erica

    2002-07-31

    ) significantly lower genistein intake in HCC only seems due to personal preferences of patients. In conclusion, these differences that we have evidenced in the diet in regard to estrogen-like substances may be relevant in modulating the risk of developing HCC in cirrhotic patients. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  5. Hepatic Dendritic Cells, the Tolerogenic Liver Environment, and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dou, Lei; Ono, Yoshihiro; Chen, Yi-Fa; Thomson, Angus W; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2018-05-01

    The unique liver immune microenvironment favors resistance to inflammation that promotes normal physiological function. At the same time, it endows the liver with tolerogenic properties that may promote pathological processes. Hepatic dendritic cells (HDCs) initiate and orchestrate immune responses depending on signals they receive from the local environment and are thought to contribute to liver tolerance. Thus, HDCs facilitate impaired T cell responses that are observed in persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, hepatocellular carcinoma progression, and liver allograft transplantation. HDCs also participate in anti-inflammatory responses in liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Moreover, they promote the regression of fibrosis from various fibrogenic liver injuries. These findings suggest that HDCs regulate intrahepatic immune responses, allowing the liver to maintain homeostasis and integrity even under pathological conditions. This review focuses on the tolerogenic properties of HDCs based on recent research and in relation to liver disease pathogenesis and its therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed. PMID:26540040

  7. The Effects of Physical Exercise on Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Windt, Dirk J.; Sud, Vikas; Zhang, Hongji; Tsung, Allan; Huang, Hai

    2018-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity has made nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) the most common chronic liver disease. As a consequence, NAFLD and especially its inflammatory form nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are the fastest increasing etiology of end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Physical inactivity is related to the severity of fatty liver disease irrespective of body weight, supporting the hypothesis that increasing physical activity through exercise can improve fatty liver disease. This review summarizes the evidence for the effects of physical exercise on NAFLD and NASH. Several clinical trials have shown that both aerobic and resistance exercise reduce the hepatic fat content. From clinical and basic scientific studies, it is evident that exercise affects fatty liver disease through various pathways. Improved peripheral insulin resistance reduces the excess delivery of free fatty acids and glucose for free fatty acid synthesis to the liver. In the liver, exercise increases fatty acid oxidation, decreases fatty acid synthesis, and prevents mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage through a reduction of the release of damage-associated molecular patterns. In conclusion, physical exercise is a proven therapeutic strategy to improve fatty liver disease. PMID:29212576

  8. The Relationship Between Fatty Liver Disease and Periodontal Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-22

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent and destructive chronic disease. Numerous studies support an association between periodontal disease and other...systemic diseases (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, adverse pregnancy outcome, etc.). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a... chronic inflammatory disease that is characterized by accumulation of triglycerides and fat in the liver which may lead to fibrosis and even cirrhosis

  9. Neurologic Manifestations of Chronic Liver Disease and Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The normal functioning of brain is intimately as well as intricately interrelated with normal functioning of the liver. Liver plays a critical role of not only providing vital nutrients to the brain but also of detoxifying the splanchnic blood. Compromised liver function leads to insufficient detoxification thus allowing neurotoxins (such as ammonia, manganese, and other chemicals) to enter the cerebral circulation. In addition, portosystemic shunts, which are common accompaniments of advanced liver disease, facilitate free passage of neurotoxins into the cerebral circulation. The problem is compounded further by additional variables such as gastrointestinal tract bleeding, malnutrition, and concurrent renal failure, which are often associated with liver cirrhosis. Neurologic damage in chronic liver disease and liver cirrhosis seems to be multifactorial primarily attributable to the following: brain accumulation of ammonia, manganese, and lactate; altered permeability of the blood-brain barrier; recruitment of monocytes after microglial activation; and neuroinflammation, that is, direct effects of circulating systemic proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, IL-1β, and IL-6. Radiologist should be aware of the conundrum of neurologic complications that can be encountered in liver disease, which include hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocerebral degeneration, hepatic myelopathy, cirrhosis-related parkinsonism, cerebral infections, hemorrhage, and osmotic demyelination. In addition, neurologic complications can be exclusive to certain disorders, for example, Wilson disease, alcoholism (Wernicke encephalopathy, alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, etc). Radiologist should be aware of their varied clinical presentation and radiological appearances as the diagnosis is not always straightforward. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Perioperative management of liver surgery-review on pathophysiology of liver disease and liver failure.

    PubMed

    Gasteiger, Lukas; Eschertzhuber, Stephan; Tiefenthaler, Werner

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of patients present for liver surgery. Given the complex pathophysiological changes in chronic liver disease (CLD), it is pivotal to understand the fundamentals of chronic and acute liver failure. This review will give an overview on related organ dysfunction as well as recommendations for perioperative management and treatment of liver failure-related symptoms.

  11. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Evolving paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Lonardo, Amedeo; Nascimbeni, Fabio; Maurantonio, Mauro; Marrazzo, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Luca; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio

    2017-01-01

    In the last years new evidence has accumulated on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) challenging the paradigms that had been holding the scene over the previous 30 years. NAFLD has such an epidemic prevalence as to make it impossible to screen general population looking for NAFLD cases. Conversely, focusing on those cohorts of individuals exposed to the highest risk of NAFLD could be a more rational approach. NAFLD, which can be diagnosed with either non-invasive strategies or through liver biopsy, is a pathogenically complex and clinically heterogeneous disease. The existence of metabolic as opposed to genetic-associated disease, notably including ”lean NAFLD” has recently been recognized. Moreover, NAFLD is a systemic condition, featuring metabolic, cardiovascular and (hepatic/extra-hepatic) cancer risk. Among the clinico-laboratory features of NAFLD we discuss hyperuricemia, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, gallstones, psoriasis and selected endocrine derangements. NAFLD is a precursor of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome and progressive liver disease develops in T2D patients in whom the course of disease is worsened by NAFLD. Finally, lifestyle changes and drug treatment options to be implemented in the individual patient are also critically discussed. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the new concepts on clinical and pathogenic heterogeneity of NAFLD, a systemic disorder with a multifactorial pathogenesis and protean clinical manifestations. It is highly prevalent in certain cohorts of individuals who are thus potentially amenable to selective screening strategies, intensive follow-up schedules for early identification of liver-related and extrahepatic complications and in whom earlier and more aggressive treatment schedules should be carried out whenever possible. PMID:29085206

  12. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  13. Challenges in transplantation for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Berlakovich, Gabriela A

    2014-07-07

    Transplantation for the treatment of alcoholic cirrhosis is more controversially discussed than it is for any other indication. The crucial aspect in this setting is abstinence before and after liver transplantation. We established pre-transplant selection criteria for potential transplant candidates. Provided that the underlying disease can be treated, there is no reason to withhold liver transplantation in a patient suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Evaluation of the patient by a multidisciplinary team, including an addiction specialist, is considered to be the gold standard. However, several centers demand a specified period of abstinence - usually 6 mo- irrespective of the specialist's assessment. The 6-mo rule is viewed critically because liver transplantation was found to clearly benefit selected patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis; the benefit was similar to that achieved for other acute indications. However, the discussion may well be an academic one because the waiting time for liver transplantation exceeds six months at the majority of centers. The actual challenge in liver transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis may well be the need for lifelong post-transplant follow-up rather than the patient's pre-transplant evaluation. A small number of recipients experience a relapse of alcoholism; these patients are at risk for organ damage and graft-related death. Post-transplant surveillance protocols should demonstrate alcohol relapse at an early stage, thus permitting the initiation of adequate treatment. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis are at high risk of developing head and neck, esophageal, or lung cancer. The higher risk of malignancies should be considered in the routine assessment of patients suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Tumor surveillance protocols for liver transplant recipients, currently being developed, should become a part of standard care; these will improve survival by permitting diagnosis at an early stage. In conclusion, the key

  14. Physicians’ practices for diagnosing liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases: A nationwide, Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    Sebastiani, Giada; Ghali, Peter; Wong, Philip; Klein, Marina B; Deschenes, Marc; Myers, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine practices among physicians in Canada for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases. METHODS: Hepatologists, gastroenterologists, infectious diseases specialists, members of the Canadian Gastroenterology Association and/or the Canadian HIV Trials Network who manage patients with liver diseases were invited to participate in a web-based, national survey. RESULTS: Of the 237 physicians invited, 104 (43.9%) completed the survey. Routine assessment of liver fibrosis was requested by the surveyed physicians mostly for chronic hepatitis C (76.5%), followed by autoimmune/cholestatic liver disease (59.6%) and chronic hepatitis B (52.9%). Liver biopsy was the main diagnostic tool for 46.2% of the respondents, Fibroscan (Echosens, France) for 39.4% and Fibrotest (LabCorp, USA) for 7.7%. Etiology-specific differences were observed: noninvasive methods were mostly used for hepatitis C (63% versus 37% liver biopsy) and hepatitis B (62.9% versus 37.1% liver biopsy). For 42.7% of respondents, the use of noninvasive methods reduced the need for liver biopsy by >50%. Physicians’ characteristics associated with higher use of noninvasive methods were older age and being based at a university hospital or in private practice versus community hospital. Physicians’ main concerns regarding noninvasive fibrosis assessment methods were access/availability (42.3%), lack of guidelines for clinical use (26.9%) and cost/lack of reimbursement (14.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Physicians who manage patients with chronic liver diseases in Canada require routine assessment of liver fibrosis stage. Although biopsy remains the primary diagnostic tool for almost one-half of respondents, noninvasive methods, particularly Fibroscan, have significantly reduced the need for liver biopsy in Canada. Limitations in access to and availability of the noninvasive methods represent a significant barrier. Finally, there is a need for clinical guidelines and a better

  15. Endocannabinoids in liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Magen, Iddo; Avraham, Yosefa; Berry, Elliot; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Chronic liver disease results from a variety of causes such as hepatitis virus infections, autoimmune processes and alcohol consumption. Its complications include fat deposition, hemodynamic changes and fibrosis. Clinically there may be progression to portal-hypertension and porto-systemic encephalopathy. Pioneering research from the laboratory of Kunos at NIH has stressed the importance of endocannabinoids (ECs) as mediators of some of the pathological processes in chronic liver disease. The present review summarizes the literature on the association between ECs and liver disease, as well as the therapeutic potential of ECs and exogenous cannabinoids in liver disease with emphasis on hepatic encephalopathy.

  16. Microbiota-Liver Axis in Hepatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit; Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Gewirtz, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the gut microbiota, long appreciated to be a key determinant of intestinal inflammation, is also playing a key role in chronic inflammatory disease of the liver. Such studies have yielded a general central hypothesis whereby microbiota products activate the innate immune system to drive pro-inflammatory gene expression thus promoting chronic inflammatory disease of the liver. This article reviews the background supporting this hypothesis, outlines how it can potentially explain classic and newly emerging epidemiological chronic inflammatory liver disease, and discusses potential therapeutic means to manipulate the microbiota so as to prevent and/or treat liver disease. PMID:23703735

  17. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Current Management

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; Donohue, Terrence M.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.

    2017-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a global healthcare problem. The liver sustains the greatest degree of tissue injury by heavy drinking because it is the primary site of ethanol metabolism. Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption produces a wide spectrum of hepatic lesions, the most characteristic of which are steatosis, hepatitis, and fibrosis/cirrhosis. Steatosis is the earliest response to heavy drinking and is characterized by the deposition of fat in hepatocytes. Steatosis can progress to steatohepatitis, which is a more severe, inflammatory type of liver injury. This stage of liver disease can lead to the development of fibrosis, during which there is excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The fibrotic response begins with active pericellular fibrosis, which may progress to cirrhosis, characterized by excessive liver scarring, vascular alterations, and eventual liver failure. Among problem drinkers, about 35 percent develop advanced liver disease because a number of disease modifiers exacerbate, slow, or prevent alcoholic liver disease progression. There are still no FDA-approved pharmacological or nutritional therapies for treating patients with alcoholic liver disease. Cessation of drinking (i.e., abstinence) is an integral part of therapy. Liver transplantation remains the life-saving strategy for patients with end-stage alcoholic liver disease. PMID:28988570

  19. Inflammation in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H. Joe; Gao, Bin; Zakhari, Samir; Nagy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Frank Burr Mallory’s landmark observation in 1911 on the histopathology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) was the first identification of a link between an inflammation and ALD. In this review, we summarize recent advances regarding the origins and roles of various inflammatory components in ALD. Metabolism of ethanol generates a number of metabolites, including acetate, reactive oxygen species, acetaldehyde, and epigenetic changes, that can induce inflammatory responses. Alcohol and its metabolites can also initiate and aggravate inflammatory conditions by promoting gut leakiness of microbial products, by sensitizing immune cells to stimulation and by activating innate immune pathways, such as complement. Chronic alcohol consumption also sensitizes non-immune cells, e.g., hepatocytes, to inflammatory signals and impairs their ability to respond to protective signals. Based on these advances, a number of inflammatory targets have been identified with potential for therapeutic intervention in ALD, presenting new opportunities and challenges for translational research. PMID:22524187

  20. Tuberculosis and liver disease: management issues.

    PubMed

    Sonika, Ujjwal; Kar, Premashis

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most common diseases in India and has attained epidemic proportions. Tuberculosis and liver are related in many ways. Liver disease can occur due to hepatic tuberculosis or the treatment with various anti-tubercular drugs may precipitate hepatic injury or patients with chronic liver disease may develop tuberculosis and pose special management problems. Tuberculosis per se can affect liver in three forms. The most common form is the diffuse hepatic involvement, seen along with pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. The second is granulomatous hepatitis and the third, much rarer form presents as focal/local tuberculoma or abscess. Tubercular disease of liver occurring along with pulmonary involvement as in disseminated tuberculosis is treated with standard regimen for pulmonary tuberculosis. Granulomatous hepatitis and tubercular liver abscess are treated like any other extra-pulmonary tubercular lesions without any extra risk of hepatotoxicity by anti-tubercular drugs. Treatment of tuberculosis in patients who already have a chronic liver disease poses various clinical challenges. There is an increased risk of drug induced hepatitis in these patients and its implications are potentially more serious in these patients as their hepatic reserve is already depleted. However, hepatotoxic anti-tubercular drugs can be safely used in these patients if the number of drugs used is adjusted appropriately. Thus, the main principle is to closely monitor the patient for signs of worsening liver disease and to reduce the number of hepatotoxic drugs in the anti-tubercular regimen according to the severity of underlying liver disease.

  1. Interaction between periodontitis and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Pengyu; Sun, Dianxing; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an oral disease that is highly prevalent worldwide, with a prevalence of 30–50% of the population in developed countries, but only ~10% present with severe forms. It is also estimated that periodontitis results in worldwide productivity losses amounting to ~54 billion USD yearly. In addition to the damage it causes to oral health, periodontitis also affects other types of disease. Numerous studies have confirmed the association between periodontitis and systemic diseases, such as diabetes, respiratory disease, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence also indicated that periodontitis may participate in the progression of liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as affecting liver transplantation. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no reviews elaborating upon the possible links between periodontitis and liver diseases. Therefore, the current review summarizes the human trials and animal experiments that have been conducted to investigate the correlation between periodontitis and liver diseases. Furthermore, in the present review, certain mechanisms that have been postulated to be responsible for the role of periodontitis in liver diseases (such as bacteria, pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress) are considered. The aim of the review is to introduce the hypothesis that periodontitis may be important in the progression of liver disease, thus providing dentists and physicians with an improved understanding of this issue. PMID:27588170

  2. Cirrhosis and autoimmune liver disease: Current understanding

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) constitute the classic autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). While AIH target the hepatocytes, in PBC and PSC the targets of the autoimmune attack are the biliary epithelial cells. Persistent liver injury, associated with chronic AILD, leads to un-resolving inflammation, cell proliferation and the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins by hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts. Liver cirrhosis, and the resultant loss of normal liver function, inevitably ensues. Patients with cirrhosis have higher risks or morbidity and mortality, and that in the decompensated phase, complications of portal hypertension and/or liver dysfunction lead to rapid deterioration. Accurate diagnosis and monitoring of cirrhosis is, therefore of upmost importance. Liver biopsy is currently the gold standard technique, but highly promising non-invasive methodology is under development. Liver transplantation (LT) is an effective therapeutic option for the management of end-stage liver disease secondary to AIH, PBC and PSC. LT is indicated for AILD patients who have progressed to end-stage chronic liver disease or developed intractable symptoms or hepatic malignancy; in addition, LT may also be indicated for patients presenting with acute liver disease due to AIH who do not respond to steroids. PMID:27729952

  3. Nutritional support for liver disease.

    PubMed

    Koretz, Ronald L; Avenell, Alison; Lipman, Timothy O

    2012-05-16

    Weight loss and muscle wasting are commonly found in patients with end-stage liver disease. Since there is an association between malnutrition and poor clinical outcome, such patients (or those at risk of becoming malnourished) are often given parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, or oral nutritional supplements. These interventions have costs and adverse effects, so it is important to prove that their use results in improved morbidity or mortality, or both. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, and oral nutritional supplements on the mortality and morbidity of patients with underlying liver disease. The following computerised databases were searched: the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded (January 2012). In addition, reference lists of identified trials and review articles and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Trials identified in a previous systematic handsearch of Index Medicus were also considered. Handsearches of a number of medical journals, including abstracts from annual meetings, were done. Experts in the field and manufacturers of nutrient formulations were contacted for potential references. Randomised clinical trials (parallel or cross-over design) comparing groups of patients with any underlying liver disease who received, or did not receive, enteral or parenteral nutrition or oral nutritional supplements were identified without restriction on date, language, or publication status. Six categories of trials were separately considered: medical or surgical patients receiving parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, or supplements. The following data were sought in each report: date of publication; geographical location; inclusion and exclusion criteria; the type of nutritional support and constitution of the nutrient formulation; duration of

  4. Liver Transplantation for Alcoholic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo

    2018-02-09

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the main important causes of cancer-related death and its mortality is increasingly worldwide. In Europe, alcohol abuse accounts for approximately half of all liver cancer cases and it will become the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in the next future with the sharp decline of chronic viral hepatitis. The pathophysiology of alcohol-induced carcinogenesis involves acetaldehyde catabolism, oxidative stress and chronic liver inflammation. Genetic background plays also a significant role and specific patterns of gene mutations in alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma have been characterized. Survival is higher in patients who undergo specific surveillance programmes than in patients who do not. However, patients with alcohol cirrhosis present a significantly greater risk of liver decompensation than those with cirrhosis due to other aetiologies. Furthermore, the adherence to screening program can be suboptimal. Liver transplant for patients with Milan-in hepatocellular carcinoma represents the best possible treatment in case of tumour recurrence/progression despite loco-regional or surgical treatments. Long-term result after liver transplantation for alcohol related liver disease is good. However, cardiovascular disease and de novo malignancies can significantly hamper patients' survival and should be carefully considered by transplant team. In this review, we have focused on the evolution of alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma epidemiology and risk factors as well as on liver transplantation in alcoholic patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Bisphenol A sulfonation is impaired in metabolic and liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Yalcin, Emine B.; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Slitt, Angela L., E-mail: angela_slitt@uri.edu

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical and suspected endocrine disruptor to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. The liver metabolizes and facilitates BPA excretion through glucuronidation and sulfonation. The sulfotransferase enzymes contributing to BPA sulfonation (detected in human and rodents) is poorly understood. Objectives: To determine the impact of metabolic and liver disease on BPA sulfonation in human and mouse livers. Methods: The capacity for BPA sulfonation was determined in human liver samples that were categorized into different stages of metabolic and liver disease (including obesity, diabetes, steatosis, and cirrhosis) and in livers from ob/ob mice. Results:more » In human liver tissues, BPA sulfonation was substantially lower in livers from subjects with steatosis (23%), diabetes cirrhosis (16%), and cirrhosis (18%), relative to healthy individuals with non-fatty livers (100%). In livers of obese mice (ob/ob), BPA sulfonation was lower (23%) than in livers from lean wild-type controls (100%). In addition to BPA sulfonation activity, Sult1a1 protein expression decreased by 97% in obese mouse livers. Conclusion: Taken together these findings establish a profoundly reduced capacity of BPA elimination via sulfonation in obese or diabetic individuals and in those with fatty or cirrhotic livers versus individuals with healthy livers. - Highlights: • Present study demonstrates that hepatic SULT 1A1/1A3 are primarily sulfonate BPA in mouse and human. • Hepatic BPA sulfonation is profoundly reduced steatosis, diabetes and cirrhosis. • With BPA-S detectable in urine under low or common exposures, these findings are novel and important.« less

  6. Limited Knowledge of Acetaminophen in Patients with Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Saab, Sammy; Konyn, Peter G; Viramontes, Matthew R; Jimenez, Melissa A; Grotts, Jonathan F; Hamidzadah, Wally; Dang, Veronica P; Esmailzadeh, Negin L; Choi, Gina; Durazo, Francisco A; El-Kabany, Mohamed M; Han, Steven-Huy B; Tong, Myron J

    2016-12-28

    Background and Aims: Unintentional acetaminophen overdose remains the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States. Patients with underlying liver disease are at higher risk of poor outcomes from acetaminophen overdose. Limited knowledge of acetaminophen may be a preventable contributor to elevated rates of overdose and thus acute liver failure. The purpose of this study is to assess knowledge of acetaminophen dosing and presence of acetaminophen in common combination products in patients with liver disease. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with liver disease at the Pfleger Liver Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles between June 2015 and August 2016. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire and an acetaminophen knowledge survey. Additional information was obtained from the medical record. Results: Of 401 patients with liver disease, 30 (15.7%) were able to correctly identify that people without liver disease can safely take up to 4 g/day of acetaminophen. The majority of patients (79.9%-86.8%) did not know that Norco® (hydrocone/acetaminophen), Vicodin® (hydrocone/acetaminophen) and Percocet® (oxycodone/acetaminophen) contained acetaminophen. Only 45.3% of the patients knew that Tylenol® #3 contained acetaminophen. Conclusions: We conclude that patients with liver disease have critically low levels of knowledge of acetaminophen, putting them at risk both of acetaminophen overdose, as well as undermedication, and inadequate management of chronic pain. We recommend an increase in education efforts regarding acetaminophen dosage and its safety in the setting of liver disease. Increasing education for those at risk of low acetaminophen knowledge is essential to minimizing acetaminophen overdose rates and optimizing pain management.

  7. Limited Knowledge of Acetaminophen in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Sammy; Konyn, Peter G.; Viramontes, Matthew R.; Jimenez, Melissa A.; Grotts, Jonathan F.; Hamidzadah, Wally; Dang, Veronica P.; Esmailzadeh, Negin L.; Choi, Gina; Durazo, Francisco A.; El-Kabany, Mohamed M.; Han, Steven-Huy B.; Tong, Myron J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Unintentional acetaminophen overdose remains the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States. Patients with underlying liver disease are at higher risk of poor outcomes from acetaminophen overdose. Limited knowledge of acetaminophen may be a preventable contributor to elevated rates of overdose and thus acute liver failure. The purpose of this study is to assess knowledge of acetaminophen dosing and presence of acetaminophen in common combination products in patients with liver disease. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with liver disease at the Pfleger Liver Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles between June 2015 and August 2016. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire and an acetaminophen knowledge survey. Additional information was obtained from the medical record. Results: Of 401 patients with liver disease, 30 (15.7%) were able to correctly identify that people without liver disease can safely take up to 4 g/day of acetaminophen. The majority of patients (79.9%–86.8%) did not know that Norco® (hydrocone/acetaminophen), Vicodin® (hydrocone/acetaminophen) and Percocet® (oxycodone/acetaminophen) contained acetaminophen. Only 45.3% of the patients knew that Tylenol® #3 contained acetaminophen. Conclusions: We conclude that patients with liver disease have critically low levels of knowledge of acetaminophen, putting them at risk both of acetaminophen overdose, as well as undermedication, and inadequate management of chronic pain. We recommend an increase in education efforts regarding acetaminophen dosage and its safety in the setting of liver disease. Increasing education for those at risk of low acetaminophen knowledge is essential to minimizing acetaminophen overdose rates and optimizing pain management. PMID:28097095

  8. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. Methods: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including ‘liver cirrhosis’, ‘end-stage liver disease’, ‘liver diseases’, ‘oral health’, ‘periodontal disease’, ‘mouth disease’, ‘gingivitis’, and ‘periodontitis’. Results: Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%–79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among patients who underwent dental treatment versus non-treated patients. Another study suggested an association between periodontal disease and the progression of liver cirrhosis, but data are sparse and conflicting as to whether periodontal disease is correlated to cirrhosis aetiology and severity. Conclusion: Despite the clinical reality of periodontal disease in liver cirrhosis patients, there are few published studies. Before clinical implications can be addressed, more data on the prevalence of and correlation between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis aetiology, duration, and progression are needed. PMID:26770799

  9. Cell and Tissue Engineering for Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Underhill, Gregory H.; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Fox, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the tremendous hurdles presented by the complexity of the liver’s structure and function, advances in liver physiology, stem cell biology and reprogramming, and the engineering of tissues and devices are accelerating the development of cell-based therapies for treating liver disease and liver failure. This State of the Art Review discusses both the near and long-term prospects for such cell-based therapies and the unique challenges for clinical translation. PMID:25031271

  10. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guber, Robert D.; Takyar, Varun; Kokkinis, Angela; Fox, Derrick A.; Alao, Hawwa; Kats, Ilona; Bakar, Dara; Remaley, Alan T.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Kleiner, David E.; Liu, Chia-Ying; Hadigan, Colleen; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.; Rotman, Yaron

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and features of fatty liver disease in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Methods: Two groups of participants with SBMA were evaluated. In the first group, 22 participants with SBMA underwent laboratory analysis and liver imaging. In the second group, 14 participants with SBMA were compared to 13 female carriers and 23 controls. Liver biopsies were done in 4 participants with SBMA. Results: Evidence of fatty liver disease was detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in all participants with SBMA in the first group, with an average dome intrahepatic triacylglycerol of 27% (range 6%–66%, ref ≤5.5%). Liver dome magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements were significantly increased in participants with SBMA in the second group relative to age- and sex-matched controls, with average disease and male control measurements of 17% and 3%, respectively. Liver biopsies were consistent with simple steatosis in 2 participants and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in 2 others. Conclusions: We observed evidence of nonalcoholic liver disease in nearly all of the participants with SBMA evaluated. These observations expand the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and provide a potential biomarker that can be monitored in future studies. PMID:29142082

  11. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  12. Nuclear Receptor Variants in Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Müllenbach, Roman; Weber, Susanne N.; Lammert, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This review aims to provide a snapshot of the actual state of knowledge on genetic variants of nuclear receptors (NR) involved in regulating important aspects of liver metabolism. It recapitulates recent evidence for the application of NR in genetic diagnosis of monogenic (“Mendelian”) liver disease and their use in clinical diagnosis. Genetic analysis of multifactorial liver diseases such as viral hepatitis or fatty liver disease identifies key players in disease predisposition and progression. Evidence from these analyses points towards a role of NR polymorphisms in common diseases, linking regulatory networks to complex and variable phenotypes. The new insights into NR variants also offer perspectives and cautionary advice for their use as handles towards diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22523693

  13. Polycystic liver disease with right pleural effusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggreini, A. Y.; Dairi, L. B.

    2018-03-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PCLD) is a condition in which multiple cysts form in the hepatic parenchyma. The polycystic liver disease is also an autosomal dominant disorder (ADPLD) caused by a mutation in a gene that encodes a protein hepatocystin. PCLD has a prevalence count of 1:200,000 people in the people of America. PCLD occurs ± 24% of patients in the third decade of age to 80% by the sixth decade. Women tend to get larger cysts and more and correlated with the number of pregnancies. The following case report of a woman, 51-years-old who was treated at Haji Adam Malik hospital Medan with a diagnosis of polycystic liver disease with right pleural effusion. Some literature has reported complications of the polycystic liver disease but rarely reported with pleural effusion presentation. The patient had already undergone a puncture of pleural fluid and after three weeks of treatment condition of the patient improved and permitted to be outgoing patient.

  14. Role of Gut Microbiota in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Brenner, David A; Paik, Yong-Han; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Many lines of research have established a relationship between the gut microbiome and patients with liver disease. For example, patients with cirrhosis have increased bacteremia, increased blood levels of lipopolysaccharide, and increased intestinal permeability. Patients with cirrhosis have bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. Selective intestinal decontamination with antibiotics is beneficial for patients with decompensated cirrhosis. In experimental models of chronic liver injury with fibrosis, several toll-like receptors (TLR) are required to make mice sensitive to liver fibrosis. The presumed ligand for the TLRs are bacterial products derived from the gut microbiome, and TLR knockout mice are resistant to liver inflammation and fibrosis. We and others have characterized the association between preclinical models of liver disease in mice with the microbial diversity in their gut microbiome. In each model, including intragastric alcohol, bile duct ligation, chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), administration, and genetic obesity, there is a significant change in the gut microbiome from normal control mice. However, there is not a single clear bacterial strain or pattern that distinguish mice with liver injury from controlled mice. So how can the gut microbiota affect liver disease? We can identify at least 6 changes that would result in liver injury, inflammation, and/or fibrosis. These include: (1) changes in caloric yield of diet; (2) regulation of gut permeability to release bacterial products; (3) modulation of choline metabolism; (4) production of endogenous ethanol; (5) regulation of bile acid metabolism; and (6) regulation in lipid metabolism.

  15. Association of PNPLA3 I148M Variant With Chronic Viral Hepatitis, Autoimmune Liver Diseases and Outcomes of Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ning; Xin, Yong-Ning; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang; Jiang, Man; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Chen, Li-Zhen; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Context: The PNPLA3 I148M variant has been recognized as a genetic determinant of liver fat content and a genetic risk factor of liver damage progression associated with steatohepatitis. The I148M variant is associated with many chronic liver diseases. However, its potential association with inflammatory and autoimmune liver diseases has not been established. Evidence Acquisition: We systemically reviewed the potential associations of I148M variant with chronic viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver diseases and the outcome of liver transplantation, explored the underlying molecular mechanisms and tried to translate them into more individualized decision-making and personalized medicine. Results: There were associations between I148M variant and chronic viral hepatitis and autoimmune liver diseases and differential associations of I148M variant in donors and recipients with post-liver transplant outcomes. I148M variant may activate the development of steatosis caused by host metabolic disorders in chronic viral hepatitis, but few researches were found to illustrate the mechanisms in autoimmune liver diseases. The peripherally mediated mechanism (via extrahepatic adipose tissue) may play a principal role in triglyceride accumulation regardless of adiponutrin activity in the graft liver. Conclusions: Evidences have shown the associations between I148M variant and mentioned diseases. I148M variant induced steatosis may be involved in the mechanism of chronic viral hepatitis and genetic considered personalized therapies, especially for PSC male patients. It is also crucial to pay attention to this parameter in donor selection and prognosis estimation in liver transplantation. PMID:26034504

  16. Markers of autoimmune liver diseases in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Demirdal, Umit Secil; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakkı; Kavuncu, Vural

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic liver diseases. However, there is limited information about autoimmune liver diseases as a factor of secondary osteoporosis. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the autoantibodies of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis. METHODS: One hundred fifty female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy X‐ray absorptiometry. We analysized autoantibodies including antinuclear antibodies, liver membrane antibodies, anti‐liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, liver‐specific protein, anti‐smooth muscle antibodies, and anti‐mitochondrial antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Serum was assayed for the levels of aminotransferases. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 63,13±8,6 years. The mean values of L1‐L4 T‐scores and femur total T‐scores were ‐3,08±0,58 and ‐1,53±0,81, respectively. Among the 150 patients with osteoporosis, 14 (9.3%) were antinuclear antibodies, four (2.7%) were liver membrane antibodies, three (2.0%) were anti‐liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, and two (1.3%) were liver‐specific protein positive. None of the patients had anti‐mitochondrial antibodies or smooth muscle antibodies positivity. The mean values of levels of aminotransferases were within normal range. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of liver membrane antibodies, liver‐specific protein, and anti‐liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1 has permitted us to see that there may be some suspicious clues of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis as a secondary risk factor. On the other hand, there is a need for comprehensive studies with a larger sample size and studies designed to compare the results with a normal population to understand the clinical importance of our findings. PMID:21120296

  17. When can nutritional therapy impact liver disease?

    PubMed

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Benns, Matthew V; McClave, Stephen A; Miller, Keith R; Jones, Christopher M

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the current literature regarding nutritional therapy in liver disease, with an emphasis on patients progressing to liver failure as well as surgical patients. Mechanisms of malnutrition and sarcopenia in liver failure patients as well as nutritional assessment, nutritional requirements of this patient population, and goals and methods of therapy are discussed. Additionally, recommendations for feeding, micronutrient, branched chain amino acid supplementation, and the use of pre- and probiotics are included. The impact of these methods can have on patients with advanced disease and those undergoing surgical procedures will be emphasized.

  18. Exercise manual for liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-01-01

    ascites at the end of the time period had decreased scores on the social aspects SF-36 domain (P = 0.023) compared to those who had no ascites. CONCLUSION: The proposed exercises provide an increase in the inspiratory muscle strength and improve functional capacity, consequently bettering the quality of life of liver disease patients. PMID:27358789

  19. Hepatic inflammation and progressive liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Albert J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic liver inflammation drives hepatic fibrosis, and current immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-viral therapies can weaken this driver. Hepatic fibrosis is reversed, stabilized, or prevented in 57%-79% of patients by conventional treatment regimens, mainly by their anti-inflammatory actions. Responses, however, are commonly incomplete and inconsistently achieved. The fibrotic mechanisms associated with liver inflammation have been clarified, and anti-fibrotic agents promise to improve outcomes as adjunctive therapies. Hepatitis C virus and immune-mediated responses can activate hepatic stellate cells by increasing oxidative stress within hepatocytes. Angiotensin can be synthesized by activated hepatic stellate cells and promote the production of reactive oxygen species. Anti-oxidants (N-acetylcysteine, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and vitamin E) and angiotensin inhibitors (losartin) have had anti-fibrotic actions in preliminary human studies, and they may emerge as supplemental therapies. Anti-fibrotic agents presage a new era of supplemental treatment for chronic liver disease. PMID:24627588

  20. [MRT of the liver in Wilson's disease].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Steiner, S; Hammerstingl, R; Schwarz, S; Kraft, E; Weinzierl, M; Felix, R

    1994-01-01

    To show that Wilson's disease is one likely cause of multiple low-intensity nodules of the liver we obtained MR images in 16 patients with clinically and histopathologically confirmed Wilson's disease. Corresponding to morphological changes MRI enabled the subdivision of the patients into two groups. Using a T2-weighted spin-echo sequence (TR/TE = 2000/45-90) liver parenchyma showed multiple tiny low-intensity-nodules surrounded by high-intensity septa in 10 out of 16 patients. 5 patients had also low-intensity nodules in T1-weighted images (TR/TE = 600/20). In patients of this group histopathology revealed liver cirrhosis (n = 7) and fibrosis (n = 2). Common feature of this patient group was marked inflammatory cell infiltration into fibrous septa, increase of copper concentration in liver parenchyma and distinct pathological changes of laboratory data. In the remaining 6 patients no pathological change of liver morphology was demonstrated by MRI corresponding to slight histopathological changes of parenchyma and normal laboratory data. As low-intensity nodules surrounded by high intensity septa can be demonstrated in patients with marked inflammatory infiltration of liver parenchyma MRI may help to define Wilson patients with poorer prognosis. In patients with low-intensity nodules of the liver and unknown cause of liver cirrhosis laboratory data and histopathology should be checked when searching for disorders of copper metabolism.

  1. Gut Microbiota and Complications of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Chathur; Bajaj, Jasmohan

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis The epidemic of chronic liver disease and how to combat its complications has been a challenging aspect for many years. New laboratory techniques have made analysis of the human intestinal microbiome easier and also more detailed. With insight into dysbiosis and how this dysbiosis impacts liver disease, scientists have new targets in the intestine and liver. Dysbiosis is associated with endotoxemia and propagates liver injury in NASH and alcoholic cirrhosis. The composition of the microbiota changes with the development of cirrhosis and decompensation Apart from microbes, the role that bile acids play in this arena are also being discovered and newer treatments like FXR receptor agonists are coming into the picture. Altered gut microbiota plays an important role in cirrhosis and its modulation to prevent disease progression changes, and concomitantly bile acid physiology must be regulated or augmented to help prevent cirrhosis and its complications. PMID:28164848

  2. Platelets in liver disease, cancer and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tomohiro; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2017-05-14

    Although viral hepatitis treatments have evolved over the years, the resultant liver cirrhosis still does not completely heal. Platelets contain proteins required for hemostasis, as well as many growth factors required for organ development, tissue regeneration and repair. Thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and cirrhosis, can manifest from decreased thrombopoietin production and accelerated platelet destruction caused by hypersplenism; however, the relationship between thrombocytopenia and hepatic pathogenesis, as well as the role of platelets in CLD, is poorly understood. In this paper, experimental evidence of platelets improving liver fibrosis and accelerating liver regeneration is summarized and addressed based on studies conducted in our laboratory and current progress reports from other investigators. In addition, we describe our current perspective based on the results of these studies. Platelets improve liver fibrosis by inactivating hepatic stellate cells, which decreases collagen production. The regenerative effect of platelets in the liver involves a direct effect on hepatocytes, a cooperative effect with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and a collaborative effect with Kupffer cells. Based on these observations, we ascertained the direct effect of platelet transfusion on improving several indicators of liver function in patients with CLD and liver cirrhosis. However, unlike the results of our previous clinical study, the smaller incremental changes in liver function in patients with CLD who received eltrombopag for 6 mo were due to patient selection from a heterogeneous population. We highlight the current knowledge concerning the role of platelets in CLD and cancer and anticipate a novel application of platelet-based clinical therapies to treat liver disease.

  3. Hyaluronic acid concentration in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Gudowska, Monika; Gruszewska, Ewa; Panasiuk, Anatol; Cylwik, Bogdan; Flisiak, Robert; Świderska, Magdalena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Chrostek, Lech

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of liver diseases of different etiologies and clinical severity of liver cirrhosis on the serum level of hyaluronic acid. The results were compared with noninvasive markers of liver fibrosis: APRI, GAPRI, HAPRI, FIB-4 and Forn's index. Serum samples were obtained from 20 healthy volunteers and patients suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis (AC)-57 patients, non-alcoholic cirrhosis (NAC)-30 and toxic hepatitis (HT)-22. Cirrhotic patients were classified according to Child-Pugh score. Hyaluronic acid concentration was measured by the immunochemical method. Non-patented indicators were calculated using special formulas. The mean serum hyaluronic acid concentration was significantly higher in AC, NAC and HT group in comparison with the control group. There were significant differences in the serum hyaluronic acid levels between liver diseases, and in AC they were significantly higher than those in NAC and HT group. The serum hyaluronic acid level differs significantly due to the severity of cirrhosis and was the highest in Child-Pugh class C. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values and the area under the ROC curve for hyaluronic acid and all non-patented algorithms were high and similar to each other. We conclude that the concentration of hyaluronic acid changes in liver diseases and is affected by the severity of liver cirrhosis. Serum hyaluronic acid should be considered as a good marker for noninvasive diagnosis of liver damage, but the combination of markers is more useful.

  4. Epigenetic Events in Liver Cancer Resulting From Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    French, Samuel W.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play an extensive role in the development of liver cancer (i.e., hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC]) associated with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) as well as in liver disease associated with other conditions. For example, epigenetic mechanisms, such as changes in the methylation and/or acetylation pattern of certain DNA regions or of the histone proteins around which the DNA is wrapped, contribute to the reversion of normal liver cells into progenitor and stem cells that can develop into HCC. Chronic exposure to beverage alcohol (i.e., ethanol) can induce all of these epigenetic changes. Thus, ethanol metabolism results in the formation of compounds that can cause changes in DNA methylation and interfere with other components of the normal processes regulating DNA methylation. Alcohol exposure also can alter histone acetylation/deacetylation and methylation patterns through a variety of mechanisms and signaling pathways. Alcohol also acts indirectly on another molecule called toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) that is a key component in a crucial regulatory pathway in the cells and whose dysregulation is involved in the development of HCC. Finally, alcohol use regulates an epigenetic mechanism involving small molecules called miRNAs that control transcriptional events and the expression of genes important to ALD. PMID:24313165

  5. Autoimmune liver disease in children.

    PubMed

    Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    2003-03-01

    Autoimmune liver disorders are characterised by an inflammatory liver histology, circulating non-organ specific autoantibodies and increased levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the absence of a known aetiology. They respond to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted as soon as diagnosis is made. Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC). Two types of AIH are recognised according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1-positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalisation of biochemical parameters and decreased inflammatory activity on follow-up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress and there may be an evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. Whether the juvenile autoimmune form of sclerosing cholangitis and AIH are 2 distinct entities, or different aspects of the same condition, remains to be elucidated.

  6. Pulmonary Vascular Complications of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jason S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension are two pulmonary vascular complications of liver disease. The pathophysiology underlying each disorder is distinct, but patients with either condition may be limited by dyspnea. A careful evaluation of concomitant symptoms, the physical examination, pulmonary function testing and arterial blood gas analysis, and echocardiographic, imaging, and hemodynamic studies is crucial to establishing (and distinguishing) these diagnoses. Our understanding of the pathobiology, natural history, and treatment of these disorders has advanced considerably over the past decade; however, the presence of either still increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with underlying liver disease. There is no effective medical treatment for hepatopulmonary syndrome. Although liver transplantation can resolve hepatopulmonary syndrome, there appears to be worse survival even with transplantation. Liver transplantation poses a very high risk of death in those with significant portopulmonary hypertension, where targeted medical therapies may improve functional status and allow successful transplantation in a small number of select patients. PMID:23155142

  7. Neural net classification of liver ultrasonogram for quantitative evaluation of diffuse liver disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Kim, JongHyo; Kim, Hee C.; Lee, Yong W.; Min, Byong Goo

    1997-04-01

    There have been a number of studies on the quantitative evaluation of diffuse liver disease by using texture analysis technique. However, the previous studies have been focused on the classification between only normal and abnormal pattern based on textural properties, resulting in lack of clinically useful information about the progressive status of liver disease. Considering our collaborative research experience with clinical experts, we judged that not only texture information but also several shape properties are necessary in order to successfully classify between various states of disease with liver ultrasonogram. Nine image parameters were selected experimentally. One of these was texture parameter and others were shape parameters measured as length, area and curvature. We have developed a neural-net algorithm that classifies liver ultrasonogram into 9 categories of liver disease: 3 main category and 3 sub-steps for each. Nine parameters were collected semi- automatically from the user by using graphical user interface tool, and then processed to give a grade for each parameter. Classifying algorithm consists of two steps. At the first step, each parameter was graded into pre-defined levels using neural network. in the next step, neural network classifier determined disease status using graded nine parameters. We implemented a PC based computer-assist diagnosis workstation and installed it in radiology department of Seoul National University Hospital. Using this workstation we collected 662 cases during 6 months. Some of these were used for training and others were used for evaluating accuracy of the developed algorithm. As a conclusion, a liver ultrasonogram classifying algorithm was developed using both texture and shape parameters and neural network classifier. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed algorithm is useful for evaluation of diffuse liver disease.

  8. Genetics of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Valenti, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological, familial, and twin studies indicate that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, now the leading cause of liver damage in developed countries, has a strong heritability. The common I148M variant of PNPLA3 impairing hepatocellular lipid droplets remodeling is the major genetic determinant of hepatic fat content. The I148M variant has a strong impact on the full spectrum of liver damage related to fatty liver, encompassing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, advanced fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, and influences the response to therapeutic approaches. Common variants in GCKR enhance de novo hepatic lipogenesis in response to glucose and liver inflammation. Furthermore, the low-frequency E167K variant of TM6SF2 and rare mutations in APOB, which impair very low-density lipoproteins secretion, predispose to progressive fatty liver. These and other recent findings reviewed here indicate that impaired lipid handling by hepatocytes has a major role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by triggering inflammation, fibrogenesis, and carcinogenesis. These discoveries have provided potential novel biomarkers for clinical use and have revealed intriguing therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gut Microbiota of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Reham M; Zhu, Lixin; Baker, Robert D; Baker, Susan S

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been rapidly increasing worldwide. It has become a leading cause of liver transplantation. Accumulating evidence suggests a significant role for gut microbiota in its development and progression. Here we review the effect of gut microbiota on developing hepatic fatty infiltration and its progression. Current literature supports a possible role for gut microbiota in the development of liver steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis. We also review the literature on possible interventions for NAFLD that target the gut microbiota.

  10. PNPLA3 gene in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Trépo, Eric; Romeo, Stefano; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Nahon, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the field of liver diseases have revealed previously unknown pathogenic loci and generated new biological hypotheses. In 2008, a GWAS performed in a population-based sample study, where hepatic liver fat content was measured by magnetic spectroscopy, showed a strong association between a variant (rs738409 C>G p.I148M) in the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) gene and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Further replication studies have shown robust associations between PNPLA3 and steatosis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma on a background of metabolic, alcoholic, and viral insults. The PNPLA3 protein has lipase activity towards triglycerides in hepatocytes and retinyl esters in hepatic stellate cells. The I148M substitution leads to a loss of function promoting triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes. Although PNPLA3 function has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms leading to hepatic fibrosis and carcinogenesis remain unclear. This unsuspected association has highlighted the fact that liver fat metabolism may have a major impact on the pathophysiology of liver diseases. Conversely, alone, this locus may have limited predictive value with regard to liver disease outcomes in clinical practice. Additional studies at the genome-wide level will be required to identify new variants associated with liver damage and cancer to explain a greater proportion of the heritability of these phenotypes. Thus, incorporating PNPLA3 and other genetic variants in combination with clinical data will allow for the development of tailored predictive models. This attractive approach should be evaluated in prospective cohorts. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Perioperative liver and spleen elastography in patients without chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sam; Borsiin, Hanna; Öberg, Carl-Fredrik; Brange, Hannes; Mijovic, Zoran; Sturesson, Christian

    2018-01-01

    AIM To investigate changes in hepatic and splenic stiffness in patients without chronic liver disease during liver resection for hepatic tumors. METHODS Patients scheduled for liver resection for hepatic tumors were considered for enrollment. Tissue stiffness measurements on liver and spleen were conducted before and two days after liver resection using point shear-wave elastography. Histological analysis of the resected liver specimen was conducted in all patients and patients with marked liver fibrosis were excluded from further study analysis. Patients were divided into groups depending on size of resection and whether they had received preoperative chemotherapy or not. The relation between tissue stiffness and postoperative biochemistry was investigated. RESULTS Results are presented as median (interquartile range). 35 patients were included. The liver stiffness increased in patients undergoing a major resection from 1.41 (1.24-1.63) m/s to 2.20 (1.72-2.44) m/s (P = 0.001). No change in liver stiffness in patients undergoing a minor resection was found [1.31 (1.15-1.52) m/s vs 1.37 (1.12-1.77) m/s, P = 0.438]. A major resection resulted in a 16% (7%-33%) increase in spleen stiffness, more (P = 0.047) than after a minor resection [2 (-1-13) %]. Patients who underwent preoperative chemotherapy (n = 20) did not differ from others in preoperative right liver lobe [1.31 (1.16-1.50) vs 1.38 (1.12-1.56) m/s, P = 0.569] or spleen [2.79 (2.33-3.11) vs 2.71 (2.37-2.86) m/s, P = 0.515] stiffness. Remnant liver stiffness on the second postoperative day did not show strong correlations with maximum postoperative increase in bilirubin (R2 = 0.154, Pearson’s r = 0.392, P = 0.032) and international normalized ratio (R2 = 0.285, Pearson’s r = 0.534, P = 0.003). CONCLUSION Liver and spleen stiffness increase after a major liver resection for hepatic tumors in patients without chronic liver disease. PMID:29492187

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dugum, Mohannad; McCullough, Arthur

    2015-06-28

    Alcohol is a leading cause of liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Several factors, including the amount and duration of alcohol consumption, affect the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD represents a spectrum of liver pathology ranging from fatty change to fibrosis to cirrhosis. Early diagnosis of ALD is important to encourage alcohol abstinence, minimize the progression of liver fibrosis, and manage cirrhosis-related complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. A number of questionnaires and laboratory tests are available to screen for alcohol intake. Liver biopsy remains the gold-standard diagnostic tool for ALD, but noninvasive accurate alternatives, including a number of biochemical tests as well as liver stiffness measurement, are increasingly being utilized in the evaluation of patients with suspected ALD. The management of ALD depends largely on complete abstinence from alcohol. Supportive care should focus on treating alcohol withdrawal and providing enteral nutrition while managing the complications of liver failure. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a devastating acute form of ALD that requires early recognition and specialized tertiary medical care. Assessment of AH severity using defined scoring systems is important to allocate resources and initiate appropriate therapy. Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are commonly used in treating AH but provide a limited survival benefit. Liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapy for patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, with most transplant centers mandating a 6 month period of abstinence from alcohol before listing. Early liver transplantation is also emerging as a therapeutic measure in specifically selected patients with severe AH. A number of novel targeted therapies for ALD are currently being evaluated in clinical trials.

  13. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... not gotten this vaccine or do not have immunity to these diseases Varicella vaccine to protect against ... doses of this vaccine or do not have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and ...

  14. Ursodeoxycholic acid in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    de Caestecker, J S; Jazrawi, R P; Petroni, M L; Northfield, T C

    1991-01-01

    The hydrophilic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid has recently been shown to reduce biochemical markers of both cholestasis and hepatocellular damage in patients with chronic liver diseases. The most compelling evidence available is for chronic cholestatic liver diseases, in particular primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and cholestasis associated with cystic fibrosis. The effects may be less beneficial in patients with advanced liver disease from these conditions. Data from placebo controlled trials are now available in support of earlier uncontrolled observations, but it is not yet clear whether short term benefit results in an improvement in longterm prognosis. The mechanism of action of the compound seems to reside in its displacement of toxic hydrophobic bile acids from both the bile acid pool and hepatocellular membranes. There may be an independent effect on bile flow, which could be of particular importance in cystic fibrosis, and possibly an effect on the immune system. Ursodeoxycholic acid should now be regarded as occupying a central place in the medical management of chronic cholestatic liver diseases, in particular primary biliary cirrhosis, because it improves cholestasis and reduces hepatocellular damage and it is not toxic. Research should now be targeted on whether treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid, initiated early in cholestatic liver conditions, improves the long-term outcome. PMID:1916492

  15. Expression and Function of Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Barbara; Dettmer, Katja; Valletta, Daniela; Saugspier, Michael; Koch, Andreas; Stevens, Axel P.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Müller, Martina; Oefner, Peter J.; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2013-01-01

    To study expression and function of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), the rate-limiting enzyme in the methionine and adenine salvage pathway, in chronic liver disease. Design MTAP expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. Levels of MTA were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results MTAP was downregulated in hepatocytes in murine fibrosis models and in patients with chronic liver disease, leading to a concomitant increase in MTA levels. In contrast, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) showed strong MTAP expression in cirrhotic livers. However, also MTA levels in activated HSCs were significantly higher than in hepatocytes, and there was a significant correlation between MTA levels and collagen expression in diseased human liver tissue indicating that activated HSCs significantly contribute to elevated MTA in diseased livers. MTAP suppression by siRNA resulted in increased MTA levels, NFκB activation and apoptosis resistance, while overexpression of MTAP caused the opposite effects in HSCs. The anti-apoptotic effect of low MTAP expression and high MTA levels, respectively, was mediated by induced expression of survivin, while inhibition of survivin abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of MTA on HSCs. Treatment with a DNA demethylating agent induced MTAP and reduced survivin expression, while oxidative stress reduced MTAP levels but enhanced survivin expression in HSCs. Conclusion MTAP mediated regulation of MTA links polyamine metabolism with NFκB activation and apoptosis in HSCs. MTAP and MTAP modulating mechanisms appear as promising prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for hepatic fibrosis. PMID:24324622

  16. Glutathione S-transferases in neonatal liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, J.; Cattan, A. R.; Hall, A. G.; Hines, J. E.; Nelson, R.; Eastham, E.; Burt, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the distribution of alpha and pi class glutathione S-transferases (GST) in normal fetal, neonatal, and adult liver; and to examine changes in GST expression in neonatal liver disease. METHODS: alpha and pi class GST were immunolocalised in sections of formalin fixed liver tissue obtained from human fetuses (n = 21), neonates (n = 8), young children (n = 9) and adults (n = 10), and from neonates with extrahepatic biliary atresia (n = 15) and neonatal hepatitis (n = 12). Monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibodies were used with a peroxidase-antiperoxidase method. RESULTS: Expression of pi GST was localised predominantly within biliary epithelial cells of developing and mature bile ducts of all sizes from 16 weeks' gestation until term and in neonatal and adult liver. Coexpression of pi and alpha GST was seen in hepatocytes of developing fetal liver between 16 and 34 weeks' gestation. Although pi GST was seen in occasional hepatocytes up to six months of life, this isoenzyme was not expressed by hepatocytes in adult liver. By contrast, alpha GST continued to be expressed by hepatocytes in adult liver; this isoenzyme was also seen in some epithelial cells of large bile ducts in adult liver. No change was observed in the distribution of alpha GST in either neonatal hepatitis or extrahepatic biliary atresia. However, aberrant expression of pi GST was identified in hepatocytes of all but one case of extrahepatic biliary atresia but in only two cases of neonatal hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic alterations noted in extrahepatic biliary atresia may result from the effect of cholate stasis. Evaluation of the pattern of pi and alpha GST distribution by immunohistochemical staining may provide valuable information in distinguishing between these two forms of neonatal liver disease. Images PMID:1401176

  17. Nutrition management in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bavdekar, Ashish; Bhave, Sheila; Pandit, Anand

    2002-05-01

    Liver has a central role in nutritional homeostasis and any liver disease leads to abnormalities in nutrient metabolism and subsequent malnutrition. All children with chronic liver disease (CLD) must undergo a periodic nutritional assessment--medical history, anthropometry esp. skinfold thickness and mid-arm circumference, and biochemical estimation of body nutrients. Nutritional rehabilitation is catered to the individual child but generally the caloric intake is increased to 130% of RDA by adding glucose polymers and/or MCT oil (coconut oil) with essential fatty acid supplementation (sunflower oil). The enteral route is preferred and occasionally nasogastric and/or nocturnal feeding are required to ensure an adequate intake. Proteins rich in branched chain amino acids are given in moderation (2-3 gm/kg/day) in compensated cirrhotics unless encephalopathy occurs when protein restriction may be necessary (1 gm/kg/day). Fat-soluble vitamins are supplemented in large quantities esp. in cholestasis along with other vitamins and minerals. Dietary therapy is the mainstay of management of some metabolic liver diseases and may be curative in disorders like galactosemia, fructosemia and glycogen storage disorders. Pre and postoperative nutritional support is an important factor in improving survival after liver transplantation.

  18. Sarcopenia in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2017-04-28

    Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass and function, affecting up to 70% of patients with advanced liver disease. Liver cirrhosis is characterized by an altered glucose metabolism, lipid oxidation, ketogenesis and protein catabolism, leading to the loss of adipose and muscle tissue. The gastrointestinal dysfunction of cirrhotic patients results in inadequate nutrients intake and is responsible for muscle weakness thus limiting physical exercise and perpetuating the reduction of muscle mass. Recently, alterations of hormonal pathways involved in muscle growth, increased intestinal permeability and changes in the gut microbiota composition have been reported in cirrhotic patients. Interestingly, a role of intestinal bacteria in maintaining muscle health has been hypothesized through the translocation of bacteria and bacterial products into the bloodstream triggering the production of muscle wasting-associated cytokines. Sarcopenia is associated with severe outcomes in patients with liver cirrhosis, mostly due to the incidence of disease complications. Furthermore, sarcopenia may represent an important prognostic factor for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and for those undergoing liver transplantation and can be considered a useful additional tool in the global assessment of patients with advanced liver disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Clinical epidemiology and disease burden of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Perumpail, Brandon J; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Yoo, Eric R; Cholankeril, George; Kim, Donghee; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as the presence of hepatic fat accumulation after the exclusion of other causes of hepatic steatosis, including other causes of liver disease, excessive alcohol consumption, and other conditions that may lead to hepatic steatosis. NAFLD encompasses a broad clinical spectrum ranging from nonalcoholic fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the world and NASH may soon become the most common indication for liver transplantation. Ongoing persistence of obesity with increasing rate of diabetes will increase the prevalence of NAFLD, and as this population ages, many will develop cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. There has been a general increase in the prevalence of NAFLD, with Asia leading the rise, yet the United States is following closely behind with a rising prevalence from 15% in 2005 to 25% within 5 years. NAFLD is commonly associated with metabolic comorbidities, including obesity, type II diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of NAFLD is constantly evolving. Based on NAFLD subtypes, it has the potential to progress into advanced fibrosis, end-stage liver disease and HCC. The increasing prevalence of NAFLD with advanced fibrosis, is concerning because patients appear to experience higher liver-related and non-liver-related mortality than the general population. The increased morbidity and mortality, healthcare costs and declining health related quality of life associated with NAFLD makes it a formidable disease, and one that requires more in-depth analysis. PMID:29307986

  20. Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Targeting Liver Disease: TTR Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Niemietz, Christoph; Chandhok, Gursimran; Schmidt, Hartmut

    2015-09-30

    The liver has become an increasingly interesting target for oligonucleotide therapy. Mutations of the gene encoding transthyretin (TTR), expressed in vast amounts by the liver, result in a complex degenerative disease, termed familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP). Misfolded variants of TTR are linked to the establishment of extracellular protein deposition in various tissues, including the heart and the peripheral nervous system. Recent progress in the chemistry and formulation of antisense (ASO) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) designed for a knockdown of TTR mRNA in the liver has allowed to address the issue of gene-specific molecular therapy in a clinical setting of FAP. The two therapeutic oligonucleotides bind to RNA in a sequence specific manner but exploit different mechanisms. Here we describe major developments that have led to the advent of therapeutic oligonucleotides for treatment of TTR-related disease.

  1. Steatorrhea in patients with liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. N.; Sidorov, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Intestinal function was studied in 26 patients with seven types of acute and chronic liver disease, documented by liver biopsy. Steatorrhea, defined by a stool fat higher than 6 g. per day, was present in 18 of 23 consecutive patients studied, an incidence of 78.3%. Two patients with infectious hepatitis associated with steatorrhea studied previously were added and the 20 cases were analyzed. The malabsorption found was confined to fat and fat-soluble vitamins; stool excretion varied from 6.1 to 22 g. per day in the seven groups studied. No histological abnormality was seen on jejunal biopsy, serum vitamin B12, D-xylose and Schilling tests were normal, and no radiological findings associated with malabsorption were detected in the small bowel. It is concluded that steatorrhea is a common finding in a wide variety of acute and chronic liver diseases and cannot be attributed to a primary defect of the small bowel. PMID:5150072

  2. Pyogenic Liver Abscess as Endemic Disease, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Feng-Chiao; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Luan-Yin

    2008-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess has become a health problem in Taiwanese society. However, the extent of this problem has remained unclear because of the lack of a population-based study. We therefore performed a nationwide analysis of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan from 1996 through 2004. We analyzed 29,703 cases from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database and 506 cases from National Taiwan University Hospital. Our analysis showed that the annual incidence of pyogenic liver abscess increased steadily from 11.15/100,000 population in 1996 to 17.59/100,000 in 2004. Diabetes, malignancy, renal disease, and pneumonia were associated with a higher risk for the disease. By contrast, death due to pyogenic liver abscess decreased over time, although population-based abscess-related death increased slightly. Renal disease, malignancy, pneumonia, and heart disease correlated with higher death rates; Klebsiella pneumoniae infection and therapeutic procedures were related to lower death rates. Diabetes did not significantly change death rates for the 506 patients from the hospital. PMID:18826824

  3. Radiologic evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Soo; Park, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent cause of chronic liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-related liver cirrhosis. Although liver biopsy is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of NAFLD, especially for the diagnosis of NASH, imaging methods have been increasingly accepted as noninvasive alternatives to liver biopsy. Ultrasonography is a well-established and cost-effective imaging technique for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis, especially for screening a large population at risk of NAFLD. Ultrasonography has a reasonable accuracy in detecting moderate-to-severe hepatic steatosis although it is less accurate for detecting mild hepatic steatosis, operator-dependent, and rather qualitative. Computed tomography is not appropriate for general population assessment of hepatic steatosis given its inaccuracy in detecting mild hepatic steatosis and potential radiation hazard. However, computed tomography may be effective in specific clinical situations, such as evaluation of donor candidates for hepatic transplantation. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging are now regarded as the most accurate practical methods of measuring liver fat in clinical practice, especially for longitudinal follow-up of patients with NAFLD. Ultrasound elastography and magnetic resonance elastography are increasingly used to evaluate the degree of liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD and to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis. This article will review current imaging methods used to evaluate hepatic steatosis, including the diagnostic accuracy, limitations, and practical applicability of each method. It will also briefly describe the potential role of elastography techniques in the evaluation of patients with NAFLD. PMID:24966609

  4. Autophagy in alcohol-induced liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dolganiuc, Angela; Thomes, Paul G.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Lemasters, John J.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is the most abused substance worldwide and a significant source of liver injury; the mechanisms of alcohol-induced liver disease are not fully understood. Significant cellular toxicity and impairment of protein synthesis and degradation occur in alcohol-exposed liver cells, along with changes in energy balance and modified responses to pathogens. Autophagy is the process of cellular catabolism through the lysosomal-dependent machinery, which maintains a balance among protein synthesis, degradation, and recycling of self. Autophagy is part of normal homeostasis and it can be triggered by multiple factors that threaten cell integrity including starvation, toxins, or pathogens. Multiple factors regulate autophagy; survival and preservation of cellular integrity at the expense of inadequately-folded proteins and damaged high energy-generating intracellular organelles are prominent targets of autophagy in pathologic conditions. Coincidentally, inadequately-folded proteins accumulate and high energy-generating intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria, are damaged by alcohol abuse; these alcohol-induced pathological findings prompted investigation of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver damage. Our review summarizes the current knowledge about the role and implications of autophagy in alcohol-induced liver disease. PMID:22551004

  5. The nutritional geometry of liver disease including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David; Cogger, Victoria C; Macia, Laurence; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; Le Couteur, David G; George, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Nutrition has a profound effect on chronic liver disease, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Most observational studies and clinical trials have focussed on the effects of total energy intake, or the intake of individual macronutrients and certain micronutrients, such as vitamin D, on liver disease. Although these studies have shown the importance of nutrition on hepatic outcomes, there is not yet any unifying framework for understanding the relationship between diet and liver disease. The Geometric Framework for Nutrition (GFN) is an innovative model for designing nutritional experiments or interpreting nutritional data that can determine the effects of nutrients and their interactions on animal behaviour and phenotypes. Recently the GFN has provided insights into the relationship between dietary energy and macronutrients on obesity and ageing in mammals including humans. Mouse studies using the GFN have disentangled the effects of macronutrients on fatty liver and the gut microbiome. The GFN is likely to play a significant role in disentangling the effects of nutrients on liver disease, especially NAFLD, in humans. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Serum endocan levels in patients with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Tok, Duran; Ekiz, Fuat; Basar, Omer; Coban, Sahin; Ozturk, Gulfer

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Early detection of fibrosis should be the main goal of treatment in liver cirrhosis. Endocan, previously called endothelial cell specific molecule-1, is expressed by endothelial cells, primarily in the lung, liver and kidney. In this study, we aimed to examine the correlation of liver fibrosis stage, histological activity and grade of steatosis between serum levels of endocan in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study includes a total of 146 subjects. 55 CHB patients, 19 CHC patients, 38 NAFLD patients and 34 healthy controls were enrolled consecutively. Liver biopsies were performed in all patients with chronic viral hepatitis. NAFLD patients had either grade 2 or grade 3 steatosis on ultrasonography and elevated liver enzymes above the upper normal limits. Serum endocan levels were assessed from blood samples obtained at admission. Results: Gender distribution was similar among the groups (p=0.056). The mean age of the CHB patients was 45.8±12.1, CHC patients was 55.0±12.8 years, NAFLD patients was 42.8±10.8, while control group was 39.4±13.6 years old. Patients with CHC were older than all the others (p=0.001). Serum endocan levels were statistically significantly lower in CHB, CHC and NAFLD groups when compared with controls. Although levels of endocan were lower in CHB and CHC groups when compared with NAFLD group, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Serum endocan concentrations decrease in patients with liver disease. Unlike previous studies, we showed a negative correlation between endocan levels and inflammation stage of chronic hepatitis. However, further studies are needed to establish the association between endocan levels, liver fibrosis and hepatic inflammation. PMID:25126183

  7. Cadmium Exposure and Liver Disease among US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hyder, Omar; Chung, Michael; Cosgrove, David; Herman, Joseph M.; Li, Zhiping; Firoozmand, Amin; Gurakar, Ahmet; Koteish, Ayman; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effects of chronic cadmium exposure on liver disease and liver-related mortality are unknown. We evaluated the association of creatinine-corrected urinary cadmium levels with hepatic necroinflammation, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), liver-related mortality, and liver cancer mortality in the US general population. Methods We analyzed the relationship of individuals in the top quartile for urinary cadmium measured in 12,732 adults who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 1988–1994 (NHANES III), and hepatic necroinflammation, NAFLD, and NASH. Associations between cadmium, liver-related mortality, and liver cancer mortality were evaluated in the NHANES III mortality follow-up study. Results The cutoffs for highest quartile of urinary cadmium per gram of urinary creatinine were 0.65 and 0.83 μg/g for men and women, respectively (P<0.001). After multivariate adjustment for other factors including smoking, the odds ratios [95 % confidence intervals (CI)] for hepatic necroinflammation, NAFLD, and NASH associated with being in the top quartile of cadmium levels by gender, were 2.21 (95 % CI, 1.64–3.00), 1.30 (95 % CI, 1.01–1.68) and 1.95 (95 % CI, 1.11–3.41) for men and 1.26 (95 % CI, 1.01–1.57), 1.11 (95 % CI, 0.88–1.41) and 1.34 (95 % CI, 0.72–2.50) for women, respectively. The hazard ratios for liver-related mortality and liver cancer mortality for both genders were 3.42 (95 % CI, 1.12–10.47) and 1.25 (95 % CI, 0.37–4.27). Conclusions Environmental cadmium exposure was associated with hepatic necroinflammation, NAFLD, and NASH in men, and hepatic necroinflammation in women. Individuals in the top quartile of creatinine-corrected urinary cadmium had over a threefold increased risk of liver disease mortality but not in liver cancer related mortality. PMID:23636881

  8. Mediterranean diet and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Anania, Caterina; Perla, Francesco Massimo; Olivero, Francesca; Pacifico, Lucia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2018-05-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is emerging as the most common chronic liver disease, and is characterized by a wide spectrum of fat-liver disorders that can result in severe liver disease and cirrhosis. Inflammation and oxidative stress are the major risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Currently, there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment of NAFLD. However, lifestyle interventions based on exercise and a balanced diet for quality and quantity, are considered the cornerstone of NAFLD management. Mediterranean diet (MD), rich in polyunsaturated fats, polyphenols, vitamins and carotenoids, with their anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects, has been suggested to be effective in preventing cardiovascular risk factors. In adults, MD has also been demonstrated to be efficacious in reducing the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, few studies are available on the effects of the MD in both adult and pediatric subjects with NAFLD. Thus, the aims of the present narrative review are to analyze the current clinical evidence on the impact of MD in patients with NAFLD, and to summarize the main mechanisms of action of MD components on this condition.

  9. Probiotic as a Novel Treatment Strategy Against Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Khani, Soghra; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2013-01-01

    Context A symbiotic relationship between the liver and intestinal tract enables the healthy status of both organs. Microflora resident in intestinal lumen plays a significant role in hepatocytes function. Alterations to the type and amount of microorganisms that live in the intestinal tract can result in serious and harmful liver dysfunctions such as cirrhosis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, and hepatic encephalopathy. An increased number of pathogens, especially enterobacteriaceae, enterococci, and streptococci species causes the elevation of intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation. The presence of high levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial substances in the blood result in a portal hypertension and ensuing hepatocytes damage. Several methods including the usage of antibiotics, prebiotics, and probiotics can be used to prevent the overgrowth of pathogens. Compared to prebiotic and antibiotic therapy, probiotics strains are a safer and less expensive therapy. Probiotics are "live microorganisms (according to the FAO/WHO) which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host”. Evidence Acquisitions Data from numerous preclinical and clinical trials allows for control of the flora bacteria quantity, decreases in compounds derived from bacteria, and lowers proinflammatory production such as TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ via down-regulation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κ B). Results On the other hand, probiotic can reduce the urease activity of bacterial microflora. Furthermore, probiotic decreases fecal pH value and reduces ammonia adsorption. In addition, the serum level of liver enzymes and other substances synthesized by the liver are modulated subsequent to probiotic consumption. Conclusions According to our knowledge, Probiotic therapy as a safe, inexpensive and a noninvasive strategy can reduce pathophysiological symptoms and improve different types of liver diseases without side

  10. Herbal medicines for liver diseases in India.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, S P; Jayaram, S; Gopalakrishnan, V; Hari, R; Jeyakumar, P; Sripathi, M S

    2002-12-01

    The use of natural remedies for the treatment of liver diseases has a long history, starting with the Ayurvedhic treatment, and extending to the Chinese, European and other systems of traditional medicines. The 21st century has seen a paradigm shift towards therapeutic evaluation of herbal products in liver diseases by carefully synergizing the strengths of the traditional systems of medicine with that of the modern concept of evidence-based medicinal evaluation, standardization of herbal products and randomized placebo controlled clinical trials to support clinical efficacy. The present review provides the status report on the scientific approaches made to herbal preparations used in Indian systems of medicine for the treatment of liver diseases. In spite of the availability of more than 300 preparations for the treatment of jaundice and chronic liver diseases in Indian systems of medicine using more than 87 Indian medicinal plants, only four terrestrial plants have been scientifically elucidated while adhering to the internationally acceptable scientific protocols. In-depth studies have proved Sylibum marianum to be anti-oxidative, antilipidperoxidative, antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating and liver regenerative. Glycyrrhiza glabra has been shown to be hepatoprotective and capable of inducing an indigenous interferon. Picrorhiza kurroa is proved to be anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and immunomodulatory. Extensive studies on Phyllanthus amarus have confirmed this plant preparation as being anti-viral against hepatitis B and C viruses, hepatoprotective and immunomodulating, as well as possessing anti-inflammatory properties. For the first time in the Indian systems of medicine, a chemo-biological fingerprinting methodology for standardization of P. amarus preparation has been patented. Copyright 2002 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  11. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed. PMID:26494962

  12. Quality of life following liver transplantation: a comparative study between Familial Amyloid Neuropathy and liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated in many studies that quality of life can be improved after liver transplantation in patients with liver disease. Nevertherless quality of life improvement in specific groups of transplantated patients such as those with Familial Amyloid Polineuropathy hasn't yet been explored. The present study aimed to compare the change in quality of life following liver transplantation between patients with Familial Amyloid Polineuropathy (FAP) and patients with liver disease. Results Patient's mental quality of life showed an improvement in all liver disease patients, and a worsening in FAP patients, resulting in a significant difference between the two groups. Regarding physical quality of life, although a similar improvement was seen in both groups, FAP patients had significantly less improvement than the sub-group of decompensated liver disease (Child-Pugh B and C). Conclusion It is concluded that liver transplantation has a less beneficial impact in FAP patient's physical quality of life, probably because they are not so much disabled by their disease at the moment of liver transplantation. The lesser improvement in mental quality of life of FAP patients may be due to their particular psychological profile and greater expectations towards transplantation. PMID:19604387

  13. Rapid diagnostic tests duo as alternative to conventional serological assays for conclusive Chagas disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Egüez, Karina E; Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Terán, Carolina; Chipana, Zenobia; García, Wilson; Torrico, Faustino; Gascon, Joaquim; Lozano-Beltran, Daniel-Franz; Pinazo, María-Jesús

    2017-04-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It affects several million people, mainly in Latin America, and severe cardiac and/or digestive complications occur in ~30% of the chronically infected patients. Disease acute stage is mostly asymptomatic and infection goes undiagnosed. In the chronic phase direct parasite detection is hampered due to its concealed presence and diagnosis is achieved by serological methods, like ELISA or indirect hemagglutination assays. Agreement in at least two tests must be obtained due to parasite wide antigenic variability. These techniques require equipped labs and trained personnel and are not available in distant regions. As a result, many infected people often remain undiagnosed until it is too late, as the two available chemotherapies show diminished efficacy in the advanced chronic stage. Easy-to-use rapid diagnostic tests have been developed to be implemented in remote areas as an alternative to conventional tests. They do not need electricity, nor cold chain, they can return results within an hour and some even work with whole blood as sample, like Chagas Stat-Pak (ChemBio Inc.) and Chagas Detect Plus (InBIOS Inc.). Nonetheless, in order to qualify a rapidly diagnosed positive patient for treatment, conventional serological confirmation is obligatory, which might risk its start. In this study two rapid tests based on distinct antigen sets were used in parallel as a way to obtain a fast and conclusive Chagas disease diagnosis using whole blood samples. Chagas Stat-Pak and Chagas Detect Plus were validated by comparison with three conventional tests yielding 100% sensitivity and 99.3% specificity over 342 patients seeking Chagas disease diagnosis in a reference centre in Sucre (Bolivia). Combined used of RDTs in distant regions could substitute laborious conventional serology, allowing immediate treatment and favouring better adhesion to it.

  14. Evaluation of liver enzyme levels and identification of asymptomatic liver disease patients in primary care.

    PubMed

    Cacciola, Irene; Scoglio, Riccardo; Alibrandi, Angela; Squadrito, Giovanni; Raimondo, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    The evaluation of serum liver enzyme levels is the most used surrogate marker of liver injury in clinical practice. The prevalence and association of abnormal enzyme values with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, and with other major causes of liver damage (obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and alcohol abuse) were evaluated in individuals attending the surgeries of 14 general practitioners (GPs) working in Messina. Alanine-amino-transferase, aspartate-amino-transferase, and gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase measurements were measured in 7816 individuals consecutively attending the GP surgeries between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012. Five-thousand-eight-hundred-six subjects (74.3 %) had the tests performed, and 1189 of them (20.5 %) showed increased liver enzyme levels. Sixty-nine of these 1189 individuals (5.8 %) were HCV positive and 12 HBV positive (1 %), 755 (63.5 %) were overweight or obese, 288 (24.2 %) had diabetes, and 351 (29.5 %) had dyslipidemia; 262 (22 %) drank >2 alcoholic units/day. Overall, 57 % of individuals with abnormal liver enzymes had multiple possible causes of liver disease, 28 % one cause, and 15 % no apparent cause. In conclusion, this study shows that 1/5 of individuals attending GP surgeries have altered liver biochemistry and that overweight and metabolic disorders have become the major causes of liver damage even in South Italy, where HBV and HCV were endemic in the past century. Notably, many HCV and HBV patients are still unaware of their infected status, and GPs are essential for their timely identification.

  15. Evaluation of effect of hybrid bioartificial liver using end-stage liver disease model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Duan, Zhong-Ping; Huang, Chun; Zhao, Chun-Hui

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of hybrid bioartificial liver (HBL) in clearing proinflammatory cytokines and endotoxin in patients with acute and sub-acute liver failure and the effects of HBL on systemic inflammatory syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). METHODS: Five cases with severe liver failure (3 acute and 2 subacute) were treated with HBL. The clinical signs and symptoms, total bilirubin (TBIL), serum ammonia, endotoxin TNF-α, IL-6 and prothrombin activity (PTA), cholinesterase (CHE) were recorded before, during and after treatment. The end-stage liver disease (MELD) was used for the study. RESULTS: Two patients were bridged for spontaneous recovery and 1 patient was bridged for OLT successfully. Another 2 patients died on d 8 and d 21. The spontaneous recovery rate was 30.0%. PTA and CHE in all patients were significantly increased (P < 0.01), while the serum TBIL, endotoxin,TNF-α, IL-6 were decreased. MELD score (mean 43.6) predicted 100% deaths within 3 mo before treatment with HBL. After treatment with HBL, four out of 5 patients had decreased MELD scores (mean 36.6). The MELD score predicted 66% mortalities. CONCLUSION: The proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6 and endotoxin)can be significantly removed by hybrid bioartificial liver and HBL appears to be effective in blocking SIRS and MODS in patients with acute and sub-acute liver failure. MELD is a reliable measure for predicting short-term mortality risk in patients with end-stage liver disease. The prognostic result also corresponds to clinical outcome. PMID:15112365

  16. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations. PMID:25469013

  17. Cardiac Diseases Among Liver Transplant Candidates.

    PubMed

    Gitman, Marina; Albertz, Megan; Nicolau-Raducu, Ramona; Aniskevich, Stephen; Pai, Sher-Lu

    2018-05-27

    Improvements in early survival after liver transplant (LT) have allowed for the selection of LT candidates with multiple comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is a major contributor to post-LT complications. We performed a literature search to identify the causes of cardiac disease in the LT population and to describe techniques for diagnosis and perioperative management. Since no definite guidelines for preoperative assessment (except for pulmonary heart disease) are currently available, we recommend an algorithm for preoperative cardiac work-up. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic Syndrome: Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Although nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not one of the defining criteria for metabolic syndrome, it is a common hepatic manifestation. NAFLD includes a spectrum of histologic findings ranging from simple steatosis, known as nonalcoholic fatty liver, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). To make the diagnosis of NAFLD, other etiologies of steatosis or hepatitis, such as hepatotoxic drugs, excessive alcohol intake, congenital errors of metabolism, or viral hepatitis, must be ruled out. After ruling out other conditions, the diagnosis of NAFLD often is made clinically, but a definitive diagnosis of NASH requires liver biopsy. As with other complications of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance is thought to be an underlying etiology of NAFLD. Management strategies attempt to reverse or improve insulin resistance while minimizing liver damage. The strongest evidence supports lifestyle modifications with weight loss, but there is some evidence to support bariatric surgery, medical therapy with insulin-sensitizing agents, and/or pharmacotherapy to promote weight loss. Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality in patients with NAFLD, so management must include modification of cardiovascular risk factors. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  19. Psoriasis and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, J M; Bonanad, C; Dauden, E; Botella, R; Olveira-Martín, A

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver condition in the West. The prevalence and severity of NAFLD is higher and the prognosis worse in patients with psoriasis. The pathogenic link between psoriasis and NAFLD is chronic inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance, a common finding in diseases associated with psoriasis. NAFLD should therefore be ruled out during the initial evaluation of patients with psoriasis, in particular if they show signs of metabolic syndrome and require systemic treatment. Concomitant psoriasis and NAFLD and the likelihood of synergy between them place limitations on general recommendations and treatment for these patients given the potential for liver toxicity. As hepatotoxic risk is associated with some of the conventional drugs used in this setting (e.g., acitretin, methotrexate, and ciclosporin), patients prescribed these treatments should be monitored as appropriate. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agents hold the promise of potential benefits based on their effects on the inflammatory process and improving peripheral insulin resistance. However, cases of liver toxicity have also been reported in relation to these biologics. No evidence has emerged to suggest that anti-p40 or anti-interleukin 17 agents provide benefits or have adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  1. The Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Arndtz, Katherine; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    Autoimmune liver disease (AILD) encompasses 3 main distinct clinical diseases: autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis (formally known as cirrhosis, PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). These conditions are an important, yet under-appreciated cause of patient morbidity and mortality with ongoing unmet needs for further research and clinical advances. There is observational evidence for genetic predisposition, with all 3 conditions being more common in first degree relatives. AILD is associated with the presence of auto-antibodies and higher risks of other non-hepatic auto-immune conditions. Genetic risk association studies have identified HLA and non-HLA risk loci for the development of disease, with some HLA loci providing prognostic information. This re-enforces the concept that genetic predisposition to autoimmunity is important, likely in the context of environmental exposures. Such environmental triggers are unclear but relevant risks include smoking, drug and xenobiotic exposure as well as the complexities of the microbiome. There is evidence for a loss of immune tolerance to self-antigens playing a part in the development of these conditions. In particular the IL-2 and IL-12 regulatory pathways have been implicated in pre-disposing to an unopposed inflammatory response within the liver. Main immunological themes revolve around loss of immune tolerance leading to T-cell mediated injury, imbalance in the regulation of immune cells and defective immune response to foreign antigens. For PBC and PSC, there is then the added complexity of the consequences of cholestasis on hepato-biliary injury, immune regulation and liver fibrosis. Whilst specific disease causes and triggers are still lacking, AILD arises on the background of collective genetic and environmental risk, leading to chronic and abnormal hepato-biliary immune responses. Effective and more rational therapy will ultimately be developed when the multiple pathways to liver injury are

  2. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is in parallel with the obesity epidemic and it is the most common cause of liver diseases. The development of hepatic steatosis in majority of patients is linked to dietary fat ingestion. NAFLD is characterized by excess accumulation of triglyceride in the hepatocyte due to both increased inflow of free fatty acids and de novo hepatic lipogenesis. Insulin resistance with the deficiency of insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2)-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity causes an increase in intracellular fatty acid-derived metabolites such as diacylglycerol, fatty acyl CoA or ceramides. Lipotoxicity-related mechanism of NAFLD could be explained still best by the "double-hit" hypothesis. Insulin resistance is the major mechanism in the development and progression of NAFLD/Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Metabolic oxidative stress, autophagy, and inflammation induce NASH progression. In the "first hit" the hepatic concentrations of diacylglycerol increase with rising saturated liver fat content in human NAFLD. Activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes are decreased in liver tissue of patients with NASH. Furthermore, hepatocyte lipoapoptosis is a critical feature of NASH. In "second hit" reduced glutathione levels due to oxidative stress lead to overactivation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun signaling that induces cell death in the steatotic liver. Accumulation of toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is caused by the ineffectual cycling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) oxidoreductin (Ero1)-protein disulfide isomerase oxidation cycle through the downstream of the inner membrane mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and Kelch like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)- Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway.

  3. Assessment of Liver Viscoelasticity for the Diagnosis of Early Stage Fatty Liver Disease Using Transient Elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenieras, Jean-Pierre; Dejobert, Maelle; Bastard, Cécile; Miette, Véronique; Perarnau, Jean-Marc; Patat, Frédéric

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by accumulation of fat within the Liver. The main objective of this work is (1) to evaluate the feasibility of measuring in vivo in the liver the shear wave phase velocity dispersion cs(ω) between 20 Hz and 90 Hz using vibration-controlled transient elastography (VCTE); (2) to estimate through the rheological Kelvin-Voigt model the shear elastic μ and shear viscosity η modulus; (3) to correlate the evolution of these viscoelastic parameters on two patients at Tours Hospital with the hepatic fat percentage measured with T1-weighted gradient-echo in-and out-phase MRI sequence. For the first volunteer who has 2% of fat in the liver, we obtained μ = 1233 ± 133 Pa and η = 0.5 ± 0.4 Pa.s. For the patient with 22% of fat, we measure μ = 964 ± 91 Pa and η = 1.77 ± 0.3 Pa.s. In conclusion, this novel method showed to be sensitive in characterizing the visco-elastic properties of fatty liver.

  4. Dietary fructose in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Vos, Miriam B; Lavine, Joel E

    2013-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in adults and children. A number of genetic and environmental factors are known to predispose individuals to NAFLD. Certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are suspected to contribute to the development of NAFLD and its progression. The increasing quantity of fructose in the diet comes from sugar additives (most commonly sucrose and high fructose corn syrup) in beverages and processed foods. Substantial links have been demonstrated between increased fructose consumption and obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. Growing evidence suggests that fructose contributes to the development and severity of NAFLD. In human studies, fructose is associated with increasing hepatic fat, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Whether fructose alone can cause NAFLD or if it serves only as a contributor when consumed excessively in the setting of insulin resistance, positive energy balance, and sedentary lifestyle is unknown. Sufficient evidence exists to support clinical recommendations that fructose intake be limited through decreasing foods and drinks high in added (fructose-containing) sugars. Copyright © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. Targeting Dysbiosis for the Treatment of Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Anand, Gobind; Zarrinpar, Amir; Loomba, Rohit

    2016-02-01

    The gut microbiome is composed of a vast number of microbes in the gastrointestinal tract, which benefit host metabolism, aid in digestion, and contribute to normal immune function. Alterations in microbial composition can result in intestinal dysbiosis, which has been implicated in several diseases including obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and liver diseases. Over the past several years, significant interactions between the intestinal microbiota and liver have been discovered, with possible mechanisms for the development as well as progression of liver disease and promising therapeutic targets to either prevent or halt the progression of liver disease. In this review the authors examine mechanisms of dysbiosis-induced liver disease; highlight current knowledge regarding the role of dysbiosis in nonalcoholic liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, and cirrhosis; and discuss potential therapeutic targets. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Liver disease in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Natasha; Surana, Pallavi; Koh, Christopher

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the current understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis-liver disease (CFLD). CFLD has a variety of manifestations. Previously, it was thought that patients progressed from mild cholestatic disease to cirrhosis to decompensated cirrhosis with portal hypertension. Newer evidence suggests that some patients may develop cirrhosis while others develop noncirrhotic portal hypertension. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of disease necessitate modifications to the current diagnostic criteria. Both fibroscan and noninvasive biomarkers can be used to identify patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Ursodeoxycholic acid remains the mainstay of therapy despite a paucity of rigorous studies supporting its use. Novel therapeutic agents such as CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators and potentiators are encouraging but need to be evaluated specifically in CFLD. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of disease is critical to developing more disease-specific diagnostics and therapeutics.

  7. Liver Biopsy in Chronic Liver Diseases: Is There a Favorable Benefit: Risk Balance?

    PubMed

    Larrey, Dominique; Meunier, Lucy; Ursic-Bedoya, José

    2017-01-01

    Liver biopsy is still useful in selected clinical situations in which it is the only tool to obtain information necessary for the diagnosis, the prognosis, and the decision for treatment. Main examples are viral hepatitis with confounding co-morbidities, non alcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune liver diseases.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: State-of-the-art

    PubMed Central

    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular

  9. Interleukin-34 as a fibroblast-derived marker of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Hirotaka; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Mano, Yohei; Kumagai, Erina; Sugiyama, Masaya; Korenaga, Masaaki; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Atsukawa, Masanori; Aikata, Hiroshi; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Yoneda, Masashi; Nozaki, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Abe, Masanori; Hiasa, Yoichi; Fukai, Moto; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Taketomi, Akinobu; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic non-viral liver disease. Activation of macrophages and hepatic stellate cells is a critical step that promotes liver fibrosis. We aimed to explore the feasibility of interleukin-34 (IL-34), a key regulator of macrophages, as a fibrosis marker in patients with NAFLD. We enrolled 197 liver biopsy-proven NAFLD patients. We evaluated the serum levels of IL-34, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), soluble CD163 (sCD163), 40 cytokines/chemokines, hyaluronic acid, type IV collagen 7s, and clinically-approved fibrosis scores. IL-34 increased with the progression of fibrosis and was an independent marker for liver fibrosis. Immunostaining experiments, using resected liver specimens from NAFLD patients, revealed that IL-34 was mainly expressed on liver fibroblasts. IL-34 based fibrosis score (0.0387*IL-34 (pg/ml) + 0.3623*type IV collagen 7s (ng/ml) + 0.0184*age (year)–1.1850) was a practical predictive model of liver fibrosis. Using receiver-operating characteristic analyses, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of IL-34 based fibrosis score were superior or comparable to the other fibrosis biomarkers and scores. In conclusion, the IL-34 based fibrosis score, including serum IL-34, type IV collagen 7s and age, is a feasible diagnostic marker of liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:27363523

  10. Circulating Extracellular Vesicles with Specific Proteome and Liver MicroRNAs Are Potential Biomarkers for Liver Injury in Experimental Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Povero, Davide; Eguchi, Akiko; Li, Hongying; Johnson, Casey D.; Papouchado, Bettina G.; Wree, Alexander; Messer, Karen; Feldstein, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in both adult and children. Currently there are no reliable methods to determine disease severity, monitor disease progression, or efficacy of therapy, other than an invasive liver biopsy. Design Choline Deficient L-Amino Acid (CDAA) and high fat diets were used as physiologically relevant mouse models of NAFLD. Circulating extracellular vesicles were isolated, fully characterized by proteomics and molecular analyses and compared to control groups. Liver-related microRNAs were isolated from purified extracellular vesicles and liver specimens. Results We observed statistically significant differences in the level of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in liver and blood between two control groups and NAFLD animals. Time-course studies showed that EV levels increase early during disease development and reflect changes in liver histolopathology. EV levels correlated with hepatocyte cell death (r2 = 0.64, p<0.05), fibrosis (r2 = 0.66, p<0.05) and pathological angiogenesis (r2 = 0.71, p<0.05). Extensive characterization of blood EVs identified both microparticles (MPs) and exosomes (EXO) present in blood of NAFLD animals. Proteomic analysis of blood EVs detected various differentially expressed proteins in NAFLD versus control animals. Moreover, unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a signature that allowed for discrimination between NAFLD and controls. Finally, the liver appears to be an important source of circulating EVs in NAFLD animals as evidenced by the enrichment in blood with miR-122 and 192 - two microRNAs previously described in chronic liver diseases, coupled with a corresponding decrease in expression of these microRNAs in the liver. Conclusions These findings suggest a potential for using specific circulating EVs as sensitive and specific biomarkers for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD. PMID:25470250

  11. Nutritional Needs and Support for Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Christine H.; Yoo, Eric R.; Kerner, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition has become a dangerously common problem in children with chronic liver disease, negatively impacting neurocognitive development and growth. Furthermore, many children with chronic liver disease will eventually require liver transplantation. Thus, this association between malnourishment and chronic liver disease in children becomes increasingly alarming as malnutrition is a predictor of poorer outcomes in liver transplantation and is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Malnutrition requires aggressive and appropriate management to correct nutritional deficiencies. A comprehensive review of the literature has found that infants with chronic liver disease (CLD) are particularly susceptible to malnutrition given their low reserves. Children with CLD would benefit from early intervention by a multi-disciplinary team, to try to achieve nutritional rehabilitation as well as to optimize outcomes for liver transplant. This review explains the multifactorial nature of malnutrition in children with chronic liver disease, defines the nutritional needs of these children, and discusses ways to optimize their nutritional. PMID:29035331

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment (II). The treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Disease nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage same. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in our Western societies, from the point of view liver in its progressive evolution from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This updated January 2016 revision consists of two parts. In this second part, the treatment of NAFLD and its influence on cardiovascular disease and drugs used in the control of cardiovascular risk factors showing a beneficial effect on the liver disease will be reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The Impact of Liver Cell Injury on Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Yvonne; Grimm, Anna; Schlegel, Liesa; Grambihler, Annette; Kittner, Jens M.; Wiltink, Jörg; Galle, Peter R.; Wörns, Marcus A.; Schattenberg, Jörn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic liver disease often suffer from unspecific symptoms and report severe impairment in the quality of life. The underlying mechanisms are multifactorial and include disease-specific but also liver related causes. The current analysis evaluated the association of hepatocellular apoptosis in non-viral chronic liver disease and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Furthermore we examined factors, which influence patient's physical and mental well-being. Methods A total of 150 patients with non-infectious chronic liver disease were included between January 2014 and June 2015. The German version of the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire (CLDQ-D), a liver disease specific instrument to assess HRQL, was employed. Hepatocellular apoptosis was determined by measuring Cytokeratin 18 (CK18, M30 Apoptosense ELISA). Results Female gender (5.24 vs. 5.54, p = 0.04), diabetes mellitus type II (4.75 vs. 5.46, p<0.001) and daily drug intake (5.24 vs. 6.01, p = 0.003) were associated with a significant impairment in HRQL. HRQL was not significantly different between the examined liver diseases. Levels of CK18 were the highest in patients with NASH compared to all other disease entities (p<0.001). Interestingly, CK18 exhibited significant correlations with obesity (p<0.001) and hyperlipidemia (p<0.001). In patients with cirrhosis levels of CK18 correlated with the MELD score (r = 0.18, p = 0.03) and were significantly higher compared to patients without existing cirrhosis (265.5 U/l vs. 186.9U/l, p = 0.047). Additionally, CK18 showed a significant correlation with the presence and the degree of hepatic fibrosis (p = 0.003) and inflammation (p<0.001) in liver histology. Finally, there was a small negative association between CLDQ and CK18 (r = -0.16, p = 0.048). Conclusion Different parameters are influencing HRQL and CK18 levels in chronic non-viral liver disease and the amount of hepatocellular apoptosis correlates with the impairment in HRQL in

  14. [Metastatic disease of the liver: surgical perspective].

    PubMed

    Mercado, M A; Medina, H; Rossano, A; Acosta, E; Rodríguez, M; Chan, C; Orozco, H

    1997-01-01

    Approximately half of patients with colorectal cancer will develop hepatic metastases and it is estimated that up to 10% of that group will have resectable liver disease. Surgical resection remains the first line treatment option of metastatic liver tumors and has yielded a 20 to 40% five year survival rate. Selection of appropriate patients for resection is critical to a successful outcome. The best results are obtained in patients with isolated metastases. Factors that are associated with a poorer results are the presence of four or more lesions or a surgical margin less than 1 cm. Endocrine metastases can be resected in a palliative fashion but each case has to be individualized. This is also true for non colorectal-nonendocrine metastases. For this tumors the experience is anecdotal and confined to limited reported series. Adjuvant treatment (infusional chemotherapy and chemoembolization) can also have a role in treatment as well as cryotherapy.

  15. Fatty Liver Index and Lipid Accumulation Product Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects without Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan-Lung; Wang, Yuan-Jen; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hsieh, Wei-Yao; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background. Fatty liver index (FLI) and lipid accumulation product (LAP) are indexes originally designed to assess the risk of fatty liver and cardiovascular disease, respectively. Both indexes have been proven to be reliable markers of subsequent metabolic syndrome; however, their ability to predict metabolic syndrome in subjects without fatty liver disease has not been clarified. Methods. We enrolled consecutive subjects who received health check-up services at Taipei Veterans General Hospital from 2002 to 2009. Fatty liver disease was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography. The ability of the FLI and LAP to predict metabolic syndrome was assessed by analyzing the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. Results. Male sex was strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, and the LAP and FLI were better than other variables to predict metabolic syndrome among the 29,797 subjects. Both indexes were also better than other variables to detect metabolic syndrome in subjects without fatty liver disease (AUROC: 0.871 and 0.879, resp.), and the predictive power was greater among women. Conclusion. Metabolic syndrome increases the cardiovascular disease risk. The FLI and LAP could be used to recognize the syndrome in both subjects with and without fatty liver disease who require lifestyle modifications and counseling. PMID:28194177

  16. Hepatic protoporphyrin metabolism in patients with advanced protoporphyric liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bloomer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Protoporphyria is a genetic disorder in which liver damage is caused by the toxic effect of protoporphyrin accumulation in the liver. In this study protoporphyrin was measured in the resected livers of 7 patients who had liver transplantation and an additional patient from whom liver tissue was obtained post mortem. Comparison of liver, erythrocyte and serum protoporphyrin levels demonstrated a marked gradient between these compartments: erythrocyte, 5781 +/- 655 micrograms/dl; serum, 384 +/- 102 micrograms/dl; liver 377,238 +/- 55,568 micrograms/100 gm wet weight, (mean +/- SE). Protoporphyrin levels in bile of 3 patients were 55,559, and 1,153 micrograms/dl, indicating a gradient between liver and bile as well. Examination of the livers by polarization microscopy and electron microscopy demonstrated protoporphyrin pigment crystals. In one patient who had recurrent liver disease after transplantation, the protoporphyrin concentration in the graft at the time of death was similar to that in the resected liver. These data indicate that liver protoporphyrin levels in patients with advanced protoporphyric liver disease are much higher than levels in blood and bile, in part because protoporphyrin forms crystalline deposits in liver tissue. Thus, progressive hepatic accumulation of protoporphyrin occurs in the face of impaired biliary excretion. An intrinsic defect in hepatic excretion of protoporphyrin is probably not necessary for this condition to develop because liver disease can occur in the graft following transplantation. PMID:9626752

  17. Aetiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lieber, C S

    1993-09-01

    Until the 1960s, liver disease of the alcoholic patient was attributed exclusively to dietary deficiencies. Since then, however, our understanding of the impact of alcoholism on nutritional status has undergone a progressive evolution. Alcohol, because of its high energy content, was at first perceived to act exclusively as 'empty calories' displacing other nutrients in the diet, and causing primary malnutrition through decreased intake of essential nutrients. With improvement in the overall nutrition of the population, the role of primary malnutrition waned and secondary malnutrition was emphasized as a result of a better understanding of maldigestion and malabsorption caused by chronic alcohol consumption and various diseases associated with chronic alcoholism. At the same time, the concept of the direct toxicity of alcohol came to the forefront as an explanation for the widespread cellular injury. Some of the hepatotoxicity was found to result from the metabolic disturbances associated with the oxidation of ethanol via the liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) pathway and the redox changes produced by the generated NADH, which in turn affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and purines. Exaggeration of the redox change by the relative hypoxia which prevails physiologically in the perivenular zone contributes to the exacerbation of the ethanol-induced lesions in zone 3. In addition to ADH, ethanol can be oxidized by liver microsomes: studies over the last twenty years have culminated in the molecular elucidation of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450IIE1 (CYP2E1) which contributes not only to ethanol metabolism and tolerance, but also to the selective hepatic perivenular toxicity of various xenobiotics. Their activation by CYP2E1 now provides an understanding for the increased susceptibility of the heavy drinker to the toxicity of industrial solvents, anaesthetic agents, commonly prescribed drugs, 'over the counter' analgesics, chemical

  18. The Role of Akt in Chronic Liver Disease and Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Santel, Ansgar; Ribera, Jordi; Jiménez, Wladimiro

    2017-02-01

    The liver is continuously exposed to diverse insults, which may culminate in pathological processes causing liver disease. An effective therapeutic strategy for chronic liver disease should control the causal factors of the disease and stimulate functional liver regeneration. Preclinical studies have shown that interventions aimed at maintaining Akt activity in a dysfunctional liver meet most of the criteria. Although the central function of Akt is cell survival, other cellular aspects such as glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, cell-cycle progression, and lipid metabolism have been shown to be prominent functions of Akt in the context of hepatic physiology. In this review, the authors describe the benefits of the Akt signaling pathway, emphasizing its importance in coordinating proper cellular growth and differentiation during liver regeneration, hepatic function, and liver disease. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Serum YKL-40 as a marker of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Erina; Mano, Yohei; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Shoji, Hirotaka; Sugiyama, Masaya; Korenaga, Masaaki; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Atsukawa, Masanori; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Yoneda, Masashi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Nozaki, Yuichi; Watanabe, Sumio; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-10-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic non-viral liver disease. YKL-40, chitinase-like protein expressed in multiple tissues including liver, is involved in cell proliferation, inflammation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum YKL-40 levels are associated with liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. Serum YKL-40 levels were quantified in 111 NAFLD patients and 23 HCC patients with NAFLD. To identify the source of YKL-40, immunofluorescence staining of liver specimens from NAFLD patients was performed. Serum YKL-40 levels in NAFLD patients increased in accordance with the progression of liver fibrosis. Multivariate analysis revealed that YKL-40 was one of the independent factors significantly associated with severe fibrosis (F3-4). We established a new predictive model for fibrosis of NAFLD, using logistic regression analysis: YKL-40 based fibrosis score = -0.0545 + type IV collagen 7s * 0.3456 + YKL-40 * 0.0024. Serum YKL-40 levels of HCC patients with non-cirrhotic NAFLD were significantly higher than those without HCC. Immunofluorescence staining showed that YKL-40 was expressed by macrophages in liver tissue of NAFLD patients. In conclusion, macrophage-derived YKL-40 is a feasible biomarker of liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients.

  20. Thoracic perspective revisited in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Kumar, Sachin; Arora, Ankur

    2015-08-01

    A variety of chest manifestations are seen in patients with chronic liver diseases, namely hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension, intrathoracic portosystemic collaterals, hepatic hydrothorax, infections, drug-induced changes, manifestations of hepatocellular carcinoma, gynecomastia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, autoimmune changes, aspiration pneumonitis and changes due to α1-antitrypsin deficiency. Gastroenterologists and radiologists should be aware of these entities; knowledge of the imaging findings specific to each condition is of prime importance for managing such patients. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  1. GENETIC MODIFIERS OF LIVER DISEASE IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jaclyn R.; Friedman, Kenneth J.; Ling, Simon C.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Bell, Scott C.; Bourke, Billy; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Castellani, Carlo; Cipolli, Marco; Colombo, Carla; Colombo, John L.; Debray, Dominique; Fernandez, Adriana; Lacaille, Florence; Macek, Milan; Rowland, Marion; Salvatore, Francesco; Taylor, Christopher J.; Wainwright, Claire; Wilschanski, Michael; Zemková, Dana; Hannah, William B.; Phillips, M. James; Corey, Mary; Zielenski, Julian; Dorfman, Ruslan; Wang, Yunfei; Zou, Fei; Silverman, Lawrence M.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Wright, Fred A.; Lange, Ethan M.; Durie, Peter R.; Knowles, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Context A subset (~3–5%) of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) develops severe liver disease (CFLD) with portal hypertension. Objective To assess whether any of 9 polymorphisms in 5 candidate genes (SERPINA1, ACE, GSTP1, MBL2, and TGFB1) are associated with severe liver disease in CF patients. Design, Setting, and Participants A 2-stage design was used in this case–control study. CFLD subjects were enrolled from 63 U.S., 32 Canadian, and 18 CF centers outside of North America, with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) as the coordinating site. In the initial study, we studied 124 CFLD patients (enrolled 1/1999–12/2004) and 843 CF controls (patients without CFLD) by genotyping 9 polymorphisms in 5 genes previously implicated as modifiers of liver disease in CF. In the second stage, the SERPINA1 Z allele and TGFB1 codon 10 genotype were tested in an additional 136 CFLD patients (enrolled 1/2005–2/2007) and 1088 CF controls. Main Outcome Measures We compared differences in distribution of genotypes in CF patients with severe liver disease versus CF patients without CFLD. Results The initial study showed CFLD to be associated with the SERPINA1 (also known as α1-antiprotease and α1-antitrypsin) Z allele (P value=3.3×10−6; odds ratio (OR) 4.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.31–9.61), and with transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFB1) codon 10 CC genotype (P=2.8×10−3; OR 1.53, CI 1.16–2.03). In the replication study, CFLD was associated with the SERPINA1 Z allele (P=1.4×10−3; OR 3.42, CI 1.54–7.59), but not with TGFB1 codon 10. A combined analysis of the initial and replication studies by logistic regression showed CFLD to be associated with SERPINA1 Z allele (P=1.5×10−8; OR 5.04, CI 2.88–8.83). Conclusion The SERPINA1 Z allele is a risk factor for liver disease in CF. Patients who carry the Z allele are at greater odds (OR ~5) to develop severe liver disease with portal hypertension. PMID:19738092

  2. Management of alcohol misuse in patients with liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jennifer L; Patel, Milan Prakash; McGee, Breann; Liang, Tiebing; Chandler, Kristina; Tayarachakul, Sucharat; O’Connor, Sean; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2017-01-01

    Excessive alcohol use not only causes alcoholic liver disease (ALD) but also increases the risk of liver-related mortality in patients who already have other chronic liver diseases. Screening for alcohol misuse or alcohol use disorder (AUD) among patients with underlying liver disease is essential. This clinical review covers what is known about ALD, the impact of alcohol in patients with underlying liver diseases, current management of alcohol misuse and AUD, and the management of alcohol misuse and AUD specifically in patients with liver diseases. Several treatment options for alcohol misuse and AUD exist such as psychosocial intervention and behavioral and pharmacological therapies. The strategies used in the treatment of alcohol misuse and AUD are still applicable in those who consume alcohol and have underlying liver disease. However, certain medications still need to be carefully used due to potentially worsening already compromised liver function. Screening of ongoing alcohol use in subjects with liver disease is important, and prompt intervention is needed to prevent the associated morbidity and mortality from the detrimental effects of continued alcohol use on underlying liver disease. Considering alcoholism is a complex disease, probably a multidisciplinary approach combining psychotherapy and comprehensive medical care will be the most effective. Future research could focus on identifying additional treatment options for addressing the psychotherapy component since the self-determination and will to quit drinking alcohol can play such a crucial role in promoting abstinence. PMID:27940551

  3. Application of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Wang, Xuehao; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Tens of millions of patients are affected by liver disease worldwide. Many of these patients can benefit from therapy involving hepatocyte transplantation. Liver transplantation is presently the only proven treatment for many medically refractory liver diseases including end-stage liver failure and inherited metabolic liver disease. However, the shortage in transplantable livers prevents over 40% of listed patients per year from receiving a liver transplant; many of these patients die before receiving an organ offer or become too sick to transplant. Therefore, new therapies are needed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation and reduce mortality on waiting lists worldwide. Furthermore, the remarkable regenerative capacity of hepatocytes in vivo is exemplified by the increasing number of innovative cell-based therapies and animal models of human liver disorders. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have similar properties to those of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) but bypass the ethical concerns of embryo destruction. Therefore, generation of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using iPSC technology may be beneficial for the treatment of severe liver diseases, screening of drug toxicities, basic research of several hepatocytic disorders, and liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize the growing number of potential applications of iPSCs for treatment of liver disease. PMID:26858888

  4. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Macías, Juan; Pineda, Juan A; Real, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most frequent chronic hepatic conditions worldwide. The spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease goes from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are metabolic, mainly obesity and the accompanying consequences. Treatment and prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease should target those metabolic abnormalities. The frequency of and the factors associated with hepatic steatosis in HIV infection seem to be similar to those reported in the general population, though direct comparisons are lacking. Hepatic steatosis in HIV infection may also be secondary to antiretroviral drugs or HCV-related factors in HCV-coinfected subjects. However, more recent data suggest that hepatic steatosis in HIV infection represents true non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As such, management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in HIV infection should follow the same principles as in the general population.

  5. Determination of glycated hemoglobin in patients with advanced liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lahousen, Theresa; Hegenbarth, Karin; Ille, Rottraut; Lipp, Rainer W.; Krause, Robert; Little, Randie R.; Schnedl, Wolfgang J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c) determination methods and to determine fructosamine in patients with chronic hepatitis, compensated cirrhosis and in patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin. METHODS: HbA1c values were determined in 15 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis and in 20 patients with chronic hepatitis using the ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography and the immunoassay methods. Fructosamine was determined using nitroblue tetrazolium. RESULTS: Forty percent of patients with liver cirrhosis had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method, while fructosamine results were either within the reference range or elevated. Twenty percent of patients with chronic hepatitis (hepatic fibrosis) had HbA1c results below the non -diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method. In patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin, 50% of HbA1c results were below the non-diabetic reference using at least one of the HbA1c methods. CONCLUSION: Only evaluated in context with all liver function parameters as well as a red blood count including reticulocytes, HbA 1c results should be used in patients with advanced liver disease. HbA 1c and fructosamine measurements should be used with caution when evaluating long-term glucose control in patients with hepatic cirrhosis or in patients with chronic hepatitis and ribavirin treatment. PMID:15259084

  6. Hepatitis C: What Happens in End-Stage Liver Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases or liver diseases (hepatologist). Newer, more-effective hepatitis C treatments can eliminate the virus in many people, reducing the risk of end-stage liver disease. With Michael F. Picco, ... and natural history of hepatitis C virus infection. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed ...

  7. Survival Outcomes After Intracranial Hemorrhage in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Carlito; Nagasawa, Daniel T; Azzam, Daniel; Sheppard, John P; Chen, Cheng Hao Jacky; Ong, Vera; Nguyen, Thien; Prashant, Giyarpuram N; Niu, Tianyi; Tucker, Alexander M; Kim, Won; Kaldas, Fady M; Pouratian, Nader; Busuttil, Ronald W; Yang, Isaac

    2018-05-15

    Survival outcomes for patients with liver disease who suffer an intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) have not been thoroughly investigated. To understand survival outcomes for 3 groups: (1) patients with an admission diagnosis of liver disease (end-stage liver disease [ESLD] or non-ESLD) who developed an ICH in the hospital, (2) patients with ESLD who undergo either operative vs nonoperative management, and (3) patients with ESLD on the liver transplant waitlist who developed an ICH in the hospital. We retrospectively reviewed hospital charts from March 2006 through February 2017 of patients with liver disease and an ICH evaluated by the neurosurgery service at a single academic medical center. The primary outcome was survival. We included a total of 53 patients in this study. The overall survival for patients with an admission diagnosis of liver disease who developed an ICH (n = 29, 55%) in the hospital was 22%. Of those patients with an admission diagnosis of liver disease, 27 patients also had ESLD. Kaplan-Meier analysis found no significant difference in survival for ESLD patients (n = 33, 62%) according to operative status. There were 11 ESLD patients on the liver transplant waitlist. The overall survival for patients with ESLD on the liver transplant waitlist who suffered an in-hospital ICH (n = 7, 13%) was 14%. ICH in the setting of liver disease carries a grave prognosis. Also, a survival advantage for surgical hematoma evacuation in ESLD patients is not clear.

  8. Effects of Melatonin on Liver Injuries and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Meng, Xiao; Li, Ya; Zhou, Yue; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Liver injuries and diseases are serious health problems worldwide. Various factors, such as chemical pollutants, drugs, and alcohol, could induce liver injuries. Liver diseases involve a wide range of liver pathologies, including hepatic steatosis, fatty liver, hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocarcinoma. Despite all the studies performed up to now, therapy choices for liver injuries and diseases are very few. Therefore, the search for a new treatment that could safely and effectively block or reverse liver injuries and diseases remains a priority. Melatonin is a well-known natural antioxidant, and has many bioactivities. There are numerous studies investigating the effects of melatonin on liver injuries and diseases, and melatonin could regulate various molecular pathways, such as inflammation, proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, and autophagy in different pathophysiological situations. Melatonin could be used for preventing and treating liver injuries and diseases. Herein, we conduct a review summarizing the potential roles of melatonin in liver injuries and diseases, paying special attention to the mechanisms of action. PMID:28333073

  9. Modeling the epidemic of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease demonstrates an exponential increase in burden of disease

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Homie; Loomba, Rohit; Younossi, Zobair; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and resulting nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are highly prevalent in the United States, where they are a growing cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and increasingly an indicator for liver transplantation. A Markov model was used to forecast NAFLD disease progression. Incidence of NAFLD was based on historical and projected changes in adult prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Assumptions were derived from published literature where available and validated using national surveillance data for incidence of NAFLD‐related HCC. Projected changes in NAFLD‐related cirrhosis, advanced liver disease, and liver‐related mortality were quantified through 2030. Prevalent NAFLD cases are forecasted to increase 21%, from 83.1 million (2015) to 100.9 million (2030), while prevalent NASH cases will increase 63% from 16.52 million to 27.00 million cases. Overall NAFLD prevalence among the adult population (aged ≥15 years) is projected at 33.5% in 2030, and the median age of the NAFLD population will increase from 50 to 55 years during 2015‐2030. In 2015, approximately 20% of NAFLD cases were classified as NASH, increasing to 27% by 2030, a reflection of both disease progression and an aging population. Incidence of decompensated cirrhosis will increase 168% to 105,430 cases by 2030, while incidence of HCC will increase by 137% to 12,240 cases. Liver deaths will increase 178% to an estimated 78,300 deaths in 2030. During 2015‐2030, there are projected to be nearly 800,000 excess liver deaths. Conclusion: With continued high rates of adult obesity and DM along with an aging population, NAFLD‐related liver disease and mortality will increase in the United States. Strategies to slow the growth of NAFLD cases and therapeutic options are necessary to mitigate disease burden. (Hepatology 2018;67:123‐133). PMID:28802062

  10. The interaction among donor characteristics, severity of liver disease, and the cost of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salvalaggio, Paolo R; Dzebisashvili, Nino; MacLeod, Kara E; Lentine, Krista L; Gheorghian, Adrian; Schnitzler, Mark A; Hohmann, Samuel; Segev, Dorry L; Gentry, Sommer E; Axelrod, David A

    2011-03-01

    Accurate assessment of the impact of donor quality on liver transplant (LT) costs has been limited by the lack of a large, multicenter study of detailed clinical and economic data. A novel, retrospective database linking information from the University HealthSystem Consortium and the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network registry was analyzed using multivariate regression to determine the relationship between donor quality (assessed through the Donor Risk Index [DRI]), recipient illness severity, and total inpatient costs (transplant and all readmissions) for 1 year following LT. Cost data were available for 9059 LT recipients. Increasing MELD score, higher DRI, simultaneous liver-kidney transplant, female sex, and prior liver transplant were associated with increasing cost of LT (P < 0.05). MELD and DRI interact to synergistically increase the cost of LT (P < 0.05). Donors in the highest DRI quartile added close to $12,000 to the cost of transplantation and nearly $22,000 to posttransplant costs in comparison to the lowest risk donors. Among the individual components of the DRI, donation after cardiac death (increased costs by $20,769 versus brain dead donors) had the greatest impact on transplant costs. Overall, 1-year costs were increased in older donors, minority donors, nationally shared organs, and those with cold ischemic times of 7-13 hours (P < 0.05 for all). In conclusion, donor quality, as measured by the DRI, is an independent predictor of LT costs in the perioperative and postoperative periods. Centers in highly competitive regions that perform transplantation on higher MELD patients with high DRI livers may be particularly affected by the synergistic impact of these factors. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Armengol, Sandra; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Aguilar, Carmen; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fátima; Porras, José Antonio; Ruiz, Maikel Daniel; Hernández, Mercé; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18), simple steatosis (SS, n = 20), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17). Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis. PMID:27128907

  12. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Armengol, Sandra; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Aguilar, Carmen; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fátima; Porras, José Antonio; Ruiz, Maikel Daniel; Hernández, Mercé; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-04-27

    Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18), simple steatosis (SS, n = 20), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17). Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis.

  13. Comparative effectiveness of liver transplant strategies for end-stage liver disease patients on renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yaojen; Gallon, Lorenzo; Jay, Colleen; Shetty, Kirti; Ho, Bing; Levitsky, Josh; Baker, Talia; Ladner, Daniela; Friedewald, John; Abecassis, Michael; Hazen, Gordon; Skaro, Anton I

    2014-09-01

    There are complex risk-benefit tradeoffs with different transplantation strategies for end-stage liver disease patients on renal support. Using a Markov discrete-time state transition model, we compared survival for this group with 3 strategies: simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation, liver transplantation alone (LTA) followed by immediate kidney transplantation if renal function did not recover, and LTA followed by placement on the kidney transplant wait list. Patients were followed for 30 years from the age of 50 years. The probabilities of events were synthesized from population data and clinical trials according to Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores (21-30 and >30) to estimate input parameters. Sensitivity analyses tested the impact of uncertainty on survival. Overall, the highest survival rates were seen with SLK transplantation for both MELD score groups (82.8% for MELD scores of 21-30 and 82.5% for MELD scores > 30 at 1 year), albeit at the cost of using kidneys that might not be needed. Liver transplantation followed by kidney transplantation led to higher survival rates (77.3% and 76.4%, respectively, at 1 year) than placement on the kidney transplant wait list (75.1% and 74.3%, respectively, at 1 year). When uncertainty was considered, the results indicated that the waiting time and renal recovery affected conclusions about survival after SLK transplantation and liver transplantation, respectively. The subgroups with the longest durations of pretransplant renal replacement therapy and highest MELD scores had the largest absolute increases in survival with SLK transplantation versus sequential transplantation. In conclusion, the findings demonstrate the inherent tension in choices about the use of available kidneys and suggest that performing liver transplantation and using renal transplantation only for those who fail to recover their native renal function could free up available donor kidneys. These results could inform

  14. Vitamin D in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Caroline S; Volmer, Dietrich A; Grünhage, Frank; Lammert, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) and several related extrahepatic manifestations such as hepatic osteodystrophy are associated with deficiency of vitamin D, which has therefore been suggested as therapeutic target. Vitamin D undergoes hepatic 25-hydroxylation, rendering the liver critical to the metabolic activation of this vitamin. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in CLD patients, and vitamin D levels are inversely related to the severity of CLD. Declining levels of carrier proteins such as albumin and vitamin D-binding protein might also be critical in CLD. Intervention studies report improvements of CLD following supplementation, and benefits to health outcomes in particular with respect to hepatitis C virus infection have recently been documented. We discuss vitamin D sources, functions and metabolism with a focus on the inherent complications of analytical measurements, such as the interference of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D C-3 epimers. Global discrepancies in the definition of optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are covered, and the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in CLD is reviewed. We also address the functional mechanisms underlying this deficiency, and refer to associations between genetic variation in vitamin D metabolism and CLD. Lastly, we consider the health implications of a vitamin D deficiency in CLD and consider therapeutic options. Herein, we focus on the epidemiological and functional relationships between vitamin D deficiency and CLD, followed by a discussion of the potential implications for therapeutic interventions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Echocardiography in chronic liver disease: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mota, Vitor Gomes; Markman Filho, Brivaldo

    2013-04-01

    Doppler echocardiography (Echo) is a non-invasive method of excellent accuracy to screen portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and to assess intrapulmonary shunts (IPS) in chronic liver disease (CLD). In the past decade, Echo proved to play a fundamental role in the diagnosis of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM). To perform a systematic review of relevant articles on the subject 'Echo in CLD'. In November 2011, a systematic review was performed in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases, and the characteristics of the studies selected were reported. The search based on descriptors and free terms obtained 204 articles (179 in Pubmed, 21 in LILACS, and 1 in SciELO). Of those 204 articles, 22 were selected for systematic review. A meta-analysis could not be performed because of the heterogeneity of the articles. Echo should be part of CLD stratification for screening PPH, IPS and CCM, because, most of the time, such complications are diagnosed only when patients are already waiting for a liver transplant.

  16. Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiantao; Fox, Caroline S.; Jacques, Paul F.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Hoffmann, Udo; Smith, Caren E.; Saltzman, Edward; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease affects ~30% of US adults, yet the role of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda on these diseases remains unknown. We examined the cross-sectional association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda and fatty liver disease in participants of the Framingham Offspring and Third Generation cohorts. Methods Fatty liver disease was defined using liver attenuation measurements generated from computed tomography in 2634 participants. Alanine transaminase concentration, a crude marker of fatty liver disease, was measured in 5908 participants. Sugar-sweetened beverage and diet soda intake were estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Participants were categorized as either non-consumers or consumers (3 categories: 1 serving/month to <1 serving/week, 1 serving/week to <1 serving/-day, and ⩾1 serving/day) of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda. Results After adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, Framingham cohort, energy intake, alcohol, dietary fiber, fat (% energy), protein (% energy), diet soda intake, and body mass index, the odds ratios of fatty liver disease were 1, 1.16 (0.88, 1.54), 1.32 (0.93, 1.86), and 1.61 (1.04, 2.49) across sugar-sweetened beverage consumption categories (p trend = 0.04). Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was also positively associated with alanine transaminase levels (p trend = 0.007). We observed no significant association between diet soda intake and measures of fatty liver disease. Conclusion In conclusion, we observed that regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was associated with greater risk of fatty liver disease, particularly in overweight and obese individuals, whereas diet soda intake was not associated with measures of fatty liver disease. PMID:26055949

  17. Sweet Conclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley, Britt M.; Wooldridge, Barbara Ross; Camp, Kerri M.

    2012-01-01

    Jen Harrington is the owner and pastry chef of Sweet Conclusion, a bakery in Tampa, Florida. Most of Harrington's business comes from baking wedding cakes, but she has been attempting to attract customers to her retail bakery, where she sells cupcakes, pies, ice cream, and coffee. Nearly four years she opened Sweet Conclusion, the retail part of…

  18. Betaine chemistry, roles, and potential use in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher R; Kempson, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Betaine is the trimethyl derivative of glycine and is normally present in human plasma due to dietary intake and endogenous synthesis in liver and kidney. Betaine is utilized in the kidney primarily as an osmoprotectant, whereas in the liver its primary role is in metabolism as a methyl group donor. In both organs, a specific betaine transporter mediates cellular uptake of betaine from plasma. The abundance of both betaine and the betaine transporter in liver greatly exceeds that of other organs. The remarkable contributions of betaine to normal human and animal health are summarized together with a discussion of the mechanisms and potential beneficial effects of dietary betaine supplements on liver disease. A significant amount of data from animal models of liver disease indicates that administration of betaine can halt and even reverse progression of the disruption of liver function. Betaine is well-tolerated, inexpensive, effective over a wide range of doses, and is already used in livestock feeding practices. The accumulated data indicate that carefully controlled additional investigations in humans are merited. The focus should be on the long-term use of betaine in large patient populations with liver diseases characterized by development of fatty liver, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutritional Considerations for Dogs and Cats with Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Norton, Rebecca D; Lenox, Catherine E; Manino, Paul; Vulgamott, James C

    2016-01-01

    The goals of nutritional management of liver disease in the dog and cat are directed at treating the clinical manifestations as opposed to treating the underlying cause. Specifically, the clinician strives to avoid overwhelming the remaining metabolic capacities of the damaged liver while providing sufficient nutrients for regeneration. A brief overview of liver diseases and associated clinical signs encountered in the dog and cat and a review of specific nutrients are discussed as well as amounts and sources of nutrients recommended to meet nutritional goals in the diseased liver.

  20. Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiantao; Fox, Caroline S; Jacques, Paul F; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Hoffmann, Udo; Smith, Caren E; Saltzman, Edward; McKeown, Nicola M

    2015-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease affects ∼30% of US adults, yet the role of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda on these diseases remains unknown. We examined the cross-sectional association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda and fatty liver disease in participants of the Framingham Offspring and Third Generation cohorts. Fatty liver disease was defined using liver attenuation measurements generated from computed tomography in 2634 participants. Alanine transaminase concentration, a crude marker of fatty liver disease, was measured in 5908 participants. Sugar-sweetened beverage and diet soda intake were estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Participants were categorized as either non-consumers or consumers (3 categories: 1 serving/month to <1 serving/week, 1 serving/week to <1 serving/day, and ⩾1 serving/day) of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, Framingham cohort, energy intake, alcohol, dietary fiber, fat (% energy), protein (% energy), diet soda intake, and body mass index, the odds ratios of fatty liver disease were 1, 1.16 (0.88, 1.54), 1.32 (0.93, 1.86), and 1.61 (1.04, 2.49) across sugar-sweetened beverage consumption categories (p trend=0.04). Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was also positively associated with alanine transaminase levels (p trend=0.007). We observed no significant association between diet soda intake and measures of fatty liver disease. In conclusion, we observed that regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was associated with greater risk of fatty liver disease, particularly in overweight and obese individuals, whereas diet soda intake was not associated with measures of fatty liver disease. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. All rights reserved.

  1. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  2. [Various pathways leading to the progression of chronic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Somogyi, Anikó; Blázovics, Anna; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2016-02-21

    As the result of various effects (viruses, metabolic diseases, nutritional factors, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) abnormal liver function, liver steatosis and connective tissue remodeling may develop. Progression of this process is complex including various pathways and a number of factors. The authors summarize the factors involved in the progression of chronic liver disease. They describe the role of cells and the produced inflammatory mediators and cytokines, as well as the relationship between the disease and the intestinal flora. They emphasize the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in disease progression. Insulin resistance and micro-elements (iron, copper) in relation to liver damage are also discussed, and genetic and epigenetic aspects underlying disease progression are summarized. Discovery of novel treatment options, assessment of the effectiveness of treatment, as well as the success and proper timing of liver transplantation may depend on a better understanding of the process of disease progression.

  3. Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Treatment of Non-cholestatic Liver Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Jillian; Hussaini, Trana; Alsahafi, Majid; Azalgara, Vladimir Marquez; Erb, Siegfried R; Partovi, Nilufar; Yoshida, Eric M

    2016-09-28

    to minor gastrointestinal complaints (most often, diarrhea) and did not occur at increased frequency as compared to controls. As administration of bile acids was often limited to durations of 12 months or less, long-term side effects for non-cholestatic indications cannot be excluded. Conclusions: Based on the available literature, bile acids cannot be widely recommended for non-cholestatic liver diseases at present.

  4. Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Treatment of Non-cholestatic Liver Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Jillian; Hussaini, Trana; Alsahafi, Majid; Azalgara, Vladimir Marquez; Erb, Siegfried R.; Partovi, Nilufar; Yoshida, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    were limited to minor gastrointestinal complaints (most often, diarrhea) and did not occur at increased frequency as compared to controls. As administration of bile acids was often limited to durations of 12 months or less, long-term side effects for non-cholestatic indications cannot be excluded. Conclusions: Based on the available literature, bile acids cannot be widely recommended for non-cholestatic liver diseases at present. PMID:27777888

  5. Advanced MRI Methods for Assessment of Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taouli, Bachir; Ehman, Richard L.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2010-01-01

    MRI plays an increasingly important role for assessment of patients with chronic liver disease. MRI has numerous advantages, including lack of ionizing radiation and the possibility of performing multiparametric imaging. With recent advances in technology, advanced MRI methods such as diffusion-, perfusion-weighted MRI, MR elastography, chemical shift based fat-water separation and MR spectroscopy can now be applied to liver imaging. We will review the respective roles of these techniques for assessment of chronic liver disease. PMID:19542391

  6. The intersection of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Woo Baidal, Jennifer A; Lavine, Joel E

    2016-01-27

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide and recently emerged as the most rapidly increasing indication for liver transplant. Although obesity is a risk factor for NAFLD, overlap between these two entities is incompletely understood. We highlight recent insights into the pathogenesis of human NAFLD in relation to obesity and discuss advances in the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Association between liver fibrosis and coronary heart disease risk in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Serkan; Celikbilek, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Yunus K; Sarikaya, Savas; Zararsiz, Gokmen; Serin, Halil I; Borekci, Elif; Akyol, Lütfi; Pirti, Ilyas; Davarci, Sena E

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is being increasingly recognized as the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. It has been shown that NAFLD in adults is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Because of the limitations of liver biopsy, noninvasive scoring indexes such as the NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS) were developed. The Framingham risk score (FRS) provides an estimate of CHD risk. In our study we aimed to investigate whether the severity of liver fibrosis estimated with the NFS is associated with a higher risk of CHD among individuals with ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. A total of 155 patients and controls (81 patients with NAFLD and 74 controls) with ages ranging from 18 to 70 years were enrolled in this cross-sectional prospective study. Demographic, anthropometric, clinical, and laboratory data were obtained from each individual. The NAFLD patients were divided into subgroups on the basis of the severity of fatty liver. The FRS and NFS were adopted to predict the risk of CHD and the severity of hepatic fibrosis. In our study, we found that the FRS was higher in NAFLD patients than in controls (P<0.05). According to the FRS category, NFSs were higher in the intermediate/high probability CHD risk group in NAFLD (P<0.05). In multiple models, only age, sex, cholesterol, and HDL were independently associated with intermediate/high CHD risk (P<0.05). We also found a positive correlation between the NFS and the FRS (r=0.373, P<0.001). The optimum NFS cutoff point for identifying intermediate/high CHD risk in NAFLD patients was -2.1284, with a sensitivity and specificity of 95.20 and 48.30%, respectively. The predictive performance of the NFS in the determination of intermediate/high CHD risk in NAFLD patients was found to be 72% based on the area under the curve value. The FRS is associated with the NFS in NAFLD. The assessment of liver fibrosis may be useful for the risk stratification of CHD in the absence of liver

  8. Neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin level is a prognostic factor for survival in rat and human chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Kyoko; Iwasa, Motoh; Kojima, Shinichi; Yoshizawa, Naohiko; Tempaku, Mina; Sugimoto, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Norihiko; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Chronic liver disease patients often have complications, such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and acute bacterial infection. Model for end‐stage liver disease and Child‐Pugh scores are useful prognostic factors for chronic liver diseases but not for all chronic conditions, such as HCC. Our investigative aim targeted the prognostic abilities of neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin (NGAL) in rat and human chronic liver diseases. Blood NGAL levels were measured by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay in rats with cirrhosis and 96 patients with chronic liver disease and HCC. We examined the correlation between blood NGAL levels and liver functions as well as survival. In our rat model, liver NGAL expression was assessed by immunostaining, real‐time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot. In rats with cirrhosis, blood NGAL levels were continuously and significantly elevated in the deceased group and were significantly correlated with liver functions. Liver NGAL, toll‐like receptor 4, and interleukin‐6 levels were increased in the deceased group compared to the survival group. Blood NGAL levels were significantly correlated with liver NGAL levels, indicating blood NGAL was derived from the liver. In patients with chronic liver disease, blood NGAL levels were associated with liver function and renal function. Blood NGAL levels were significantly increased in patients with chronic liver disease with HCC compared to without HCC. For the survival group, 38 out of 96 patients were dead in the average follow‐up period of 9.9 months. The patients with blood NGAL ≤119 ng/mL had significantly longer rates of survival compared to patients with blood NGAL >119 ng/mL. Conclusion: Blood NGAL predicts the survival rate in rat and human chronic liver diseases. Our findings suggest blood NGAL may be prognostic of survival in chronic liver diseases complicated by HCC. (Hepatology Communications 2017;1:946–956) PMID:29404502

  9. Liver Disease in the HIV-Infected Individual

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jennifer C.; Thio, Chloe L.

    2010-01-01

    Since the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV), there has been a substantial decrease in deaths related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, in the ART-era liver disease is now the most common non-AIDS related cause of death among HIV-infected patients, accounting for 14-18% of all deaths in this population and almost half of deaths among hospitalized HIV-infected patients. Just as the burden of non-AIDS morbidity and mortality has changed in the ART-era, the types of liver disease the clinician is likely to encounter among these patients have changed as well. This review will discuss the causes of liver disease in the HIV-infected population in the ART-era, including chronic hepatitis C virus, chronic hepatitis B virus, medication-related hepatotoxicity, alcohol abuse, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and AIDS-related liver diseases. PMID:20851211

  10. The Osteopontin Level in Liver, Adipose Tissue and Serum Is Correlated with Fibrosis in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Voican, Cosmin S.; Anty, Rodolphe; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Rosenthal-Allieri, Maria-Alessandra; Agostini, Hélène; Njike, Micheline; Barri-Ova, Nadége; Naveau, Sylvie; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Veillon, Pascal; Calès, Paul; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Tran, Albert; Gual, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) plays an important role in the progression of chronic liver diseases. We aimed to quantify the liver, adipose tissue and serum levels of OPN in heavy alcohol drinkers and to compare them with the histological severity of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Methodology/Principal Findings OPN was evaluated in the serum of a retrospective and prospective group of 109 and 95 heavy alcohol drinkers, respectively, in the liver of 34 patients from the retrospective group, and in the liver and adipose tissue from an additional group of 38 heavy alcohol drinkers. Serum levels of OPN increased slightly with hepatic inflammation and progressively with the severity of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic OPN expression correlated with hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, TGFβ expression, neutrophils accumulation and with the serum OPN level. Interestingly, adipose tissue OPN expression also correlated with hepatic fibrosis even after 7 days of alcohol abstinence. The elevated serum OPN level was an independent risk factor in estimating significant (F≥2) fibrosis in a model combining alkaline phosphatase, albumin, hemoglobin, OPN and FibroMeter® levels. OPN had an area under the receiving operator curve that estimated significant fibrosis of 0.89 and 0.88 in the retrospective and prospective groups, respectively. OPN, Hyaluronate (AUROC: 0.88), total Cytokeratin 18 (AUROC: 0.83) and FibroMeter® (AUROC: 0.90) estimated significance to the same extent in the retrospective group. Finally, the serum OPN levels also correlated with hepatic fibrosis and estimated significant (F≥2) fibrosis in 86 patients with chronic hepatitis C, which suggested that its elevated level could be a general response to chronic liver injury. Conclusion/Significance OPN increased in the liver, adipose tissue and serum with liver fibrosis in alcoholic patients. Further, OPN is a new relevant biomarker for significant liver fibrosis. OPN could thus be an important actor in the

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Liver Histology as Biomarkers of Hepatic Steatosis in Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Middleton, Michael S.; Behling, Cynthia; Newton, Kimberly P.; Awai, Hannah I.; Paiz, Melissa N.; Lam, Jessica; Hooker, Jonathan C.; Hamilton, Gavin; Fontanesi, John; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in children. In order to advance the field of NAFLD, noninvasive imaging methods for measuring liver fat are needed. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown great promise for the quantitative assessment of hepatic steatosis but has not been validated in children. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the correlation and diagnostic accuracy of MRI-estimated liver proton density fat fraction (PDFF), a biomarker for hepatic steatosis, compared to histologic steatosis grade in children. The study included 174 children with a mean age of 14.0 years. MRI-estimated liver PDFF was significantly (p < 0.01) correlated (0.725) with steatosis grade. Correlation of MRI-estimated liver PDFF and steatosis grade was influenced by both sex and fibrosis stage. The correlation was significantly (p<0.01) stronger in girls (0.86) than in boys (0.70). The correlation was significantly (p<0.01) weaker in children with stage 2–4 fibrosis (0.61) than children with no fibrosis (0.76) or stage 1 fibrosis (0.78). The diagnostic accuracy of commonly used threshold values to distinguish between no steatosis and mild steatosis ranged from 0.69 to 0.82. The overall accuracy of predicting the histologic steatosis grade from MRI-estimated liver PDFF was 56%. No single threshold had sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be considered diagnostic for an individual child. Conclusions Advanced magnitude-based MRI can be used to estimate liver PDFF in children, and those PDFF values correlate well with steatosis grade by liver histology. Thus magnitude-based MRI has the potential for clinical utility in the evaluation of NAFLD, but at this time no single threshold value has sufficient accuracy to be considered diagnostic for an individual child. PMID:25529941

  12. Assessment of fibrotic liver disease with multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Tai, Dean C. S.; Lin, Jian; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagens, which may result in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension. In this study, we apply a multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform developed to investigate the fibrotic liver diseases in rat models established by performing bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery. The three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are implemented on the same sectioned tissues of diseased model sequentially: i.e., second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantifies the contents of the collagens, the two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging reveals the morphology of hepatic cells, while coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging maps the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue. Our imaging results show that during the development of liver fibrosis (collagens) in BDL model, fatty liver disease also occurs. The aggregated concentrations of collagen and fat constituents in liver fibrosis model show a certain correlationship between each other.

  13. Genetics of liver disease: From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Tom H; Lammert, Frank; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Paralleling the first 30 years of the Journal of Hepatology we have witnessed huge advances in our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Genetic advances have played no small part in that. Initial studies in the 1970s and 1980s identified the strong major histocompatibility complex associations in autoimmune liver diseases. During the 1990 s, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for Mendelian liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver disorders, in which also environmental co-factors play important roles. Findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and have already pointed to new disease treatments. In the immediate future genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized medicine. Challenges exist with regard to clinical implementation of rapidly developing technologies and interpretation of the wealth of accumulating genetic data. The historical perspective of genetics in liver diseases illustrates the opportunities for future research and clinical care of our patients. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the Americas.

    PubMed

    López-Velázquez, Jorge A; Silva-Vidal, Karen V; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Arrese, Marco; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an alarming public health problem. The disease is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide and is directly linked to the increased prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the general population. The worldwide prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated at 20-30%, but the prevalence is unknown in the Americas because of a lack of epidemiological studies. However, given the trends in the prevalence of diabetes and obesity, the prevalence of NAFLD and its consequences are expected to increase in the near future. The aim of the present study is to present the current data on the prevalence of NAFLD in the Americas. We performed an electronic search of the main databases from January 2000 to September 2013 and identified 356 reports that were reviewed. We focused on the epidemiology and prevalence of known NAFLD risk factors including obesity, T2DM, and the metabolic syndrome (MS). The prevalence of the MS was highest in the United States, Mexico, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Chile, and Venezuela. In addition, Puerto Rico, Guyana, and Mexico have the highest prevalence of T2DM in the Americas, while USA has the most people with T2DM. In conclusion, the prevalence rates of NAFLD and obesity were highest in the United States, Belize, Barbados, and Mexico.

  16. Role of transmethylation reactions in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a major health care problem worldwide. Findings from many laboratories, including ours, have demonstrated that ethanol feeding impairs several of the many steps involved in methionine metabolism. Ethanol consumption predominantly results in a decrease in the hepatocyte level of S-adenosylmethionine and the increases in two toxic metabolites, homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine. These changes, in turn, result in serious functional consequences which include decreases in essential methylation reactions via inhibition of various methyltransferases. Of particular interest to our laboratory is the inhibition of three important enzymes, phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase, isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase and protein L-isoaspartate methyltransferase. Decreased activity of these enzymes results in increased fat deposition, increased apoptosis and increased accumulation of damaged proteins-all of which are hallmark features of alcoholic liver injury. Of all the therapeutic modalities available, betaine has been shown to be the safest, least expensive and most effective in attenuating ethanol-induced liver injury. Betaine, by virtue of aiding in the remethylation of homocysteine, removes both toxic metabolites (homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine), restores S-adenosylmethionine level, and reverses steatosis, apoptosis and damaged proteins accumulation. In conclusion, betaine appears to be a promising therapeutic agent in relieving the methylation and other defects associated with alcoholic abuse. PMID:17854136

  17. Organ allocation for chronic liver disease: model for end-stage liver disease and beyond.

    PubMed

    Asrani, Sumeet K; Kim, W Ray

    2010-05-01

    Implementation of the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score has led to a reduction in waiting list registration and waitlist mortality. Prognostic models have been proposed to either refine or improve the current MELD-based liver allocation. The model for end-stage liver disease - sodium (MELDNa) incorporates serum sodium and has been shown to improve the predictive accuracy of the MELD score. However, laboratory variation and manipulation of serum sodium is a concern. Organ allocation in the United Kingdom is now based on a model that includes serum sodium. An updated MELD score is associated with a lower relative weight for serum creatinine coefficient and a higher relative weight for bilirubin coefficient, although the contribution of reweighting coefficients as compared with addition of variables is unclear. The D-MELD, the arithmetic product of donor age and preoperative MELD, proposes donor-recipient matching; however, inappropriate transplantation of high-risk donors is a concern. Finally, the net benefit model ranks patients according to the net survival benefit that they would derive from the transplant. However, complex statistical models are required and unmeasured characteristics may unduly affect the model. Despite their limitations, efforts to improve the current MELD-based organ allocation are encouraging.

  18. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms for the hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2013-09-01

    Liver plays a central role in the biogenesis of major metabolites including glucose, fatty acids, and cholesterol. Increased incidence of obesity in the modern society promotes insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues in humans, and could cause severe metabolic disorders by inducing accumulation of lipid in the liver, resulting in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD, which is characterized by increased fat depots in the liver, could precede more severe diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulation of lipid in the liver can be traced by increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, or the increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. In this review, I would like to focus on the roles of individual pathways that contribute to the hepatic steatosis as a precursor for the NAFLD.

  19. The Role of Celiac Disease in Severity of Liver Disorders and Effect of a Gluten Free Diet on Diseases Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Haldane, Thea; AlDulaimi, David; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Rostami, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    Context Celiac disease (CD) is defined as a permanent intolerance to ingested gluten. The intolerance to gluten results in immune-mediated damage of small intestine mucosa manifested by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. These abnormalities resolve with initiationa gluten-free diet. Evidence Acquisition PubMed, Ovid, and Google were searched for full text articles published between 1963 and 2012. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of celiac disease on severity of liver disorder were identified. Results Recently evidence has emerged revealingthat celiac disease not only is associated with small intestine abnormalities and malabsorption, but is also a multisystem disorder affecting other systems outside gastrointestinal tract, including musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular and nervous systems. Some correlations have been assumed between celiac and liver diseases. In particular, celiac disease is associated with changes in liver biochemistry and linked to alter the prognosis of other disorders. This review will concentrate on the effect of celiac disease and gluten-free diets on the severity of liver disorders. Conclusions Although GFD effect on the progression of CD associated liver diseases is not well defined, it seems that GFD improves liver function tests in patients with a hypertransaminasemia. PMID:24348636

  20. Common Elements in Rare Kidney Diseases: Conclusions from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Aymé, Ségolène; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Day, Simon; Devuyst, Olivier; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Klein, Jon B; Knoers, Nine V A M; Perrone, Ronald D; Roberts, Julia; Schaefer, Franz; Torres, Vicente E; Cheung, Michael; Wheeler, David C; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2017-10-01

    Rare kidney diseases encompass at least 150 different conditions, most of which are inherited. Although individual rare kidney diseases raise specific issues, as a group these rare diseases can have overlapping challenges in diagnosis and treatment. These challenges include small numbers of affected patients, unidentified causes of disease, lack of biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, and need for complex care. To address common clinical and patient issues among rare kidney diseases, the KDIGO Controversies Conference entitled, Common Elements in Rare Kidney Diseases, brought together a panel of multidisciplinary clinical providers and patient advocates to address five central issues for rare kidney diseases. These issues encompassed diagnostic challenges, management of kidney functional decline and progression of chronic kidney disease, challenges in clinical study design, translation of advances in research to clinical care, and provision of practical and integrated patient support. Thus, by a process of consensus, guidance for addressing these challenges was developed and is presented here. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recurrent viral liver disease (hepatitis B and C) after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Olivera-Martínez, Marco Antonio; Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F

    2007-08-01

    Hepatitis C represents more than 35% of liver transplant candidates worldwide. Meanwhile, hepatitis B continues to be an important cause of end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in Asia and Africa. Recurrent viral liver disease is a significant event after liver transplantation and continues to be one of the main causes of graft dysfunction and loss in the middle and long-term follow-up. Mechanisms of liver reinfection and disease recurrence vary between these two viruses and pre-emptive as well as the therapeutic approaches are different. Hepatitis B patients can be managed with immune globulin immediately after liver transplant and various agents such as nucleotide and nucleoside analogues can be associated. As a result, disease recurrence has been delayed or prevented in these patients. Individuals transplanted for hepatitis C are known to have universal reinfection and a high rate of disease recurrence has been reported in the literature. Strategies to treat hepatitis C recurrence are limited to the use of pegylated interferon and ribavirin when disease is demonstrated histologically and biochemically, although other strategies have been described with limited or no success. We herein review the mechanisms of disease recurrence and the current as well as the future therapeutic approaches to prevent and to treat these diseases.

  2. Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in adult liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Milutinovic, Aleksandra Sokic; Kovacevic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) affects lungs and liver. Liver disease caused by AATD in paediatric patients has been previously well documented. However, the association of liver disease with alpha-1-antitrypsin gene polymorphisms in adults is less clear. Therefore, we aimed to study AAT polymorphisms in adults with liver disease. We performed a case-control study. AAT polymorphisms were investigated by isoelectric focusing in 61 patients with liver cirrhosis and 9 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The control group consisted of 218 healthy blood donors. A significant deviation of observed and expected frequency of AAT phenotypes from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi-square = 34.77, df 11, P = 0.000) in the patient group was caused by a higher than expected frequency of Pi ZZ homozygotes (f = 0.0143 and f = 0.0005, respectively, P = 0.000). In addition, Pi M homozygotes were more frequent in patients than in controls (63% and 46%, respectively, P = 0.025). Our study results show that Pi ZZ homozygosity in adults could be associated with severe liver disease. Presence of Pi M homozygosity could be associated with liver disease via some mechanism different from Z allele-induced liver damage through accumulation of AAT polymers. PMID:19961268

  3. Interactions Between the Intestinal Microbiome and Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schnabl, Bernd; Brenner, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a diverse community of microbes that promote metabolism and digestion in their symbiotic relationship with the host. Disturbance of its homeostasis can result in disease. We review factors that disrupt intestinal homeostasis and contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), steatohepatitis (NASH), alcoholic liver disease, and cirrhosis. Liver disease has long been associated with qualitative and quantitative (overgrowth) dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota. Extrinsic factors, such as the Western diet and alcohol, contribute to these changes. Dysbiosis results in intestinal inflammation, a breakdown of the intestinal barrier, and translocation of microbial products in animal models. However, the contribution of the intestinal microbiome to liver disease goes beyond simple translocation of bacterial products that promote hepatic injury and inflammation. Microbial metabolites produced in a dysbiotic intestinal environment and host factors are equally important in the pathogenesis of liver disease. We review how the combination of liver insult and disruptions in intestinal homeostasis contribute to liver disease. PMID:24440671

  4. Results of percutaneous sclerotherapy and surgical treatment in patients with symptomatic simple liver cysts and polycystic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Deha; van Delden, Otto M; Rauws, Erik AJ; Busch, Olivier RC; Lameris, Johan S; Gouma, Dirk J; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the results of the treatment of simple liver cysts (solitary and multiple) and polycystic liver disease (PLD) using percutaneous sclerotherapy and/or surgical procedures in a single tertiary referral centre. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 54 patients referred for evaluation and possible treatment of simple liver cysts (solitary and multiple) and PLD, from January 1997 to July 2006. RESULTS: Simple liver cysts were treated in 41 pts (76%) with a mean size of 12.6 cm. The most common reason for referral was abdominal pain or discomfort (85%). Percutaneous sclerotherapy was performed as initial treatment in 30 pts, showing cyst recurrence in 6 pts (20%). Surgical treatment was initially performed in 11 pts with cyst recurrence in 3 pts (27%). PLD was treated in 13 pts (24%) with a mean size of the dominant cyst of 13 cm. Percutaneous sclerotherapy for PLD was performed in 9 pts with recurrence in 7 pts (77.8%). Surgical treatment for PLD was undertaken in 4 pts (30.8%) with recurrence in all. Eventually, 2 pts with PLD in the presence of polycystic kidney disease underwent liver- and kidney transplantation because of deterioration of liver and kidney function. CONCLUSION: The majority of patients with simple liver cysts and PLD are referred for progressive abdominal pain. As initial treatment, percutaneous sclerotherapy is appropriate. Surgical deroofing is indicated in case of cyst recurrence after percutaneous sclerotherapy. However, the results of percutaneous sclerotherapy and surgical treatment for PLD are disappointing. Partial liver resection is indicated when there is suspicion of a pre-malignant lesion. PMID:17589926

  5. Discharge Disposition After Stroke in Patients With Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Neal S; Merkler, Alexander E; Schneider, Yecheskel; Navi, Babak B; Kamel, Hooman

    2017-02-01

    Liver disease is associated with both hemorrhagic and thrombotic processes, including an elevated risk of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to assess the relationship between liver disease and outcomes after stroke, as measured by discharge disposition. Using administrative claims data, we identified a cohort of patients hospitalized with stroke in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2013. The predictor variable was liver disease. All diagnoses were defined using validated diagnosis codes. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and worsening discharge disposition: home, nursing/rehabilitation facility, or death. Secondarily, multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and in-hospital mortality. Models were adjusted for demographics, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities. We identified 121 428 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and 703 918 with ischemic stroke. Liver disease was documented in 13 584 patients (1.7%). Liver disease was associated with worse discharge disposition after both intracerebral hemorrhage (global odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.38) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.29). Similarly, liver disease was associated with in-hospital death after both intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.44) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.71). Liver disease was associated with worse hospital discharge disposition and in-hospital mortality after stroke, suggesting worse functional outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Feasibility of detection and intervention for alcohol-related liver disease in the community: the Alcohol and Liver Disease Detection study (ALDDeS)

    PubMed Central

    Sheron, Nick; Moore, Michael; O’Brien, Wendy; Harris, Scott; Roderick, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background In the past 15 years mortality rates from liver disease have doubled in the UK. Brief alcohol advice is cost effective, but clinically meaningful reductions in alcohol consumption only occur in around 1 in 10 individuals. Aim To provide evidence that detecting early liver disease in the community is feasible, practical, and that feedback of liver risk can increase the proportion of subjects reducing alcohol consumption. Design and setting A community feasibility study in nine general practice sites in Hampshire. Method Hazardous and harmful drinkers were identified by WHO AUDIT questionnaire and offered screening for liver fibrosis. Results In total, 4630 individuals responded, of whom 1128 (24%) hazardous or harmful drinkers were offered a liver fibrosis check using the Southampton Traffic Light (STL) test; 393 (38%) attended and test results were returned by post. The STL has a low threshold for liver fibrosis with 45 (11%) red, 157 (40%) amber, and 191 (49%) green results. Follow-up AUDIT data was obtained for 303/393 (77%) and 76/153 (50%) subjects with evidence of liver damage reduced drinking by at least one AUDIT category (harmful to hazardous, or hazardous to low risk) compared with 52/150 (35%, P<0.011) subjects without this evidence; in the subset of harmful drinkers patterns (AUDIT >15), 22/34 (65%) of STL positives, reduced drinking compared with 10/29 (35%, P<0.017) STL negatives. Conclusion Detection of liver disease in the community is feasible, and feedback of liver risk may reduce harmful drinking. PMID:24152485

  7. Ethnic Differences in Presentation and Severity of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Background The frequency of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including alcoholic steatosis, hepatitis and cirrhosis, varies significantly by ethnicity. Methods With the goal to assess the role of ethnicity in determining the age of onset and severity of ALD and to compare the risk factors for its progression among ethnic groups, we conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with ALD who were admitted or were followed as outpatients at University of California Davis Medical Center between 2002 and 2010. After excluding HBsAg and HIV positive subjects, we reviewed the charts of 791 ALD patients including 130 with alcoholic fatty liver, 154 with alcoholic hepatitis, and 507 with alcoholic cirrhosis. Results When controlling for all variables in the model, Hispanic patients presented at significantly 4-10 years younger ages than White/Caucasian patients, in each of the three disease severity categories and the results were confirmed after excluding HCV Ab/RNA positive subjects. There were more obese Hispanic patients than White/Caucasian patients, whereas the proportion of patients with hepatitis C was significantly greater in African/American subjects with alcoholic hepatitis and the proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus was significantly lower in White/Caucasian subjects than in Hispanic subjects with cirrhosis. The proportion of subjects with severe alcoholic hepatitis was similar in Hispanic and White/Caucasian patients, but lower in African/American subjects. Conclusion Ethnicity is a major factor affecting the age and severity of presentation of different subtypes of ALD. PMID:25702770

  8. Zebrafish: An Important Tool for Liver Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Goessling, Wolfram; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2016-01-01

    As the incidence of hepatobiliary diseases increases, we must improve our understanding of the molecular, cellular, and physiological factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of liver disease. Animal models help us identify disease mechanisms that might be targeted therapeutically. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have traditionally been used to study embryonic development but are also important to the study of liver disease. Zebrafish embryos develop rapidly; all of their digestive organs are mature in larvae by 5 days of age. At this stage, they can develop hepatobiliary diseases caused by developmental defects or toxin- or ethanol-induced injury and manifest premalignant changes within weeks. Zebrafish are similar to humans in hepatic cellular composition, function, signaling, and response to injury as well as the cellular processes that mediate liver diseases. Genes are highly conserved between humans and zebrafish, making them a useful system to study the basic mechanisms of liver disease. We can perform genetic screens to identify novel genes involved in specific disease processes and chemical screens to identify pathways and compounds that act on specific processes. We review how studies of zebrafish have advanced our understanding of inherited and acquired liver diseases as well as liver cancer and regeneration. PMID:26319012

  9. Zebrafish: an important tool for liver disease research.

    PubMed

    Goessling, Wolfram; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2015-11-01

    As the incidence of hepatobiliary diseases increases, we must improve our understanding of the molecular, cellular, and physiological factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of liver disease. Animal models help us identify disease mechanisms that might be targeted therapeutically. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have traditionally been used to study embryonic development but are also important to the study of liver disease. Zebrafish embryos develop rapidly; all of their digestive organs are mature in larvae by 5 days of age. At this stage, they can develop hepatobiliary diseases caused by developmental defects or toxin- or ethanol-induced injury and manifest premalignant changes within weeks. Zebrafish are similar to humans in hepatic cellular composition, function, signaling, and response to injury as well as the cellular processes that mediate liver diseases. Genes are highly conserved between humans and zebrafish, making them a useful system to study the basic mechanisms of liver disease. We can perform genetic screens to identify novel genes involved in specific disease processes and chemical screens to identify pathways and compounds that act on specific processes. We review how studies of zebrafish have advanced our understanding of inherited and acquired liver diseases as well as liver cancer and regeneration. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Coffee can be beneficial for patients with liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Kjærgaard, Maria; Thiele, Maja; Krag, Aleksander

    2014-10-20

    Coffee is one of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. Consequently, it is important to consider the impact of coffee on health and disease. A daily intake of at least three cups of coffee is likely to have beneficial health effects, especially in patients at risk of liver diseases. Coffee has been associated with decreased liver inflammation, prevention of cirrhosis, reduced steatosis and lower incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. It is not yet possible to make clear recommendations, but coffee can likely be included as part of a healthy diet for patients with liver diseases.

  11. Laparoscopic management of cystic disease of the liver.

    PubMed

    Albrink, M H; McAllister, E W; Rosemurgy, A S; Karl, R C; Carey, L C

    1994-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgical procedures are increasing in scope and in variety. The benefits of decreased wound morbidity and pain have been well documented for multiple procedures that have traditionally required laparotomy. Although there are few controlled studies to document them, these benefits may be evident from simple clinical observation. Cystic disease of the liver is a condition that is treated largely for symptomatic reasons. The so-called noninvasive or radiographic guided methods of treatment for cystic disease of the liver are fraught with high recurrence rates. We present four cases of cystic disease of the liver treated laparoscopically, followed with pertinent discussion.

  12. Progesterone, prolactin, and gynaecomastia in men with liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Farthing, M J; Green, J R; Edwards, C R; Dawson, A M

    1982-01-01

    Plasma progesterone was raised in 36 of 50 (72%) men with liver disease compared with 20 healthy male control subjects. Plasma progesterone was significantly higher in men with non-alcoholic cirrhosis with gynaecomastia than those without, but no similar relationship was found in men with alcoholic fatty change and alcoholic cirrhosis. Hyperprolactinaemia was found in 14% of men with liver disease but levels were unrelated to the presence of gynaecomastia. Increased circulating levels of progesterone and prolactin alone do not explain the development of gynaecomastia in patients with liver disease, but progesterone may be an additional factor acting in association with the known disturbances of other sex steroids. PMID:7076004

  13. Increase of infiltrating monocytes in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Yong; Yang, Chenchen; Pan, Zhiyun; Xia, Juan; Xiong, Yali; Wang, Guiyang; Sun, Zhenhua; Chen, Jun; Yan, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhaoping; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Infiltrating monocytes have been demonstrated to contribute to tissue damage in experimental models of liver injury and fibrosis. However, less is known about monocyte infiltration in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). In the present study, we demonstrated that CD68+ hepatic macrophages and MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies as compared with normal liver tissue. In addition, CLD patients with higher inflammatory grading scores had more CD68+ macrophages and MAC387+ monocytes infiltration in their livers compared to those with lower scores. Significantly more MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were found in the liver tissue of CLD patients with higher fibrotic staging scores compared to those with lower scores. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression was significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies. MCP-1 staining scores were significantly positively associated with the numbers of MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes in CLD patients. Taken together, our results demonstrate that infiltrating monocytes may play a pathological role in exacerbating chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD. MCP-1 may be involved in the monocyte infiltration and progression of liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD.

  14. Intestinal fungi contribute to development of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, An-Ming; Inamine, Tatsuo; Hochrath, Katrin; Chen, Peng; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Bluemel, Sena; Hartmann, Phillipp; Xu, Jun; Koyama, Yukinori; Kisseleva, Tatiana; Torralba, Manolito G; Moncera, Kelvin; Beeri, Karen; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Freese, Kim; Hellerbrand, Claus; Lee, Serene Ml; Hoffman, Hal M; Mehal, Wajahat Z; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Mutlu, Ece A; Keshavarzian, Ali; Brown, Gordon D; Ho, Samuel B; Bataller, Ramon; Stärkel, Peter; Fouts, Derrick E; Schnabl, Bernd

    2017-06-30

    Chronic liver disease with cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States, and alcoholic liver disease accounts for approximately half of all cirrhosis deaths. Chronic alcohol consumption is associated with intestinal bacterial dysbiosis, yet we understand little about the contribution of intestinal fungi, or mycobiota, to alcoholic liver disease. Here we have demonstrated that chronic alcohol administration increases mycobiota populations and translocation of fungal β-glucan into systemic circulation in mice. Treating mice with antifungal agents reduced intestinal fungal overgrowth, decreased β-glucan translocation, and ameliorated ethanol-induced liver disease. Using bone marrow chimeric mice, we found that β-glucan induces liver inflammation via the C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC7A on Kupffer cells and possibly other bone marrow-derived cells. Subsequent increases in IL-1β expression and secretion contributed to hepatocyte damage and promoted development of ethanol-induced liver disease. We observed that alcohol-dependent patients displayed reduced intestinal fungal diversity and Candida overgrowth. Compared with healthy individuals and patients with non-alcohol-related cirrhosis, alcoholic cirrhosis patients had increased systemic exposure and immune response to mycobiota. Moreover, the levels of extraintestinal exposure and immune response correlated with mortality. Thus, chronic alcohol consumption is associated with an altered mycobiota and translocation of fungal products. Manipulating the intestinal mycobiome might be an effective strategy for attenuating alcohol-related liver disease.

  15. Effect of Liver Disease on Hepatic Transporter Expression and Function.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Nilay; Slizgi, Jason R; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2017-09-01

    Liver disease can alter the disposition of xenobiotics and endogenous substances. Regulatory agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Evaluation Agency recommend, if possible, studying the effect of liver disease on drugs under development to guide specific dose recommendations in these patients. Although extensive research has been conducted to characterize the effect of liver disease on drug-metabolizing enzymes, emerging data have implicated that the expression and function of hepatobiliary transport proteins also are altered in liver disease. This review summarizes recent developments in the field, which may have implications for understanding altered disposition, safety, and efficacy of new and existing drugs. A brief review of liver physiology and hepatic transporter localization/function is provided. Then, the expression and function of hepatic transporters in cholestasis, hepatitis C infection, hepatocellular carcinoma, human immunodeficiency virus infection, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis are reviewed. In the absence of clinical data, nonclinical information in animal models is presented. This review aims to advance the understanding of altered expression and function of hepatic transporters in liver disease and the implications of such changes on drug disposition. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Natural Course of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calzadilla Bertot, Luis; Adams, Leon Anton

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease in the world, paralleling the epidemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD exhibits a histological spectrum, ranging from “bland steatosis” to the more aggressive necro-inflammatory form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may accumulate fibrosis to result in cirrhosis. Emerging data suggests fibrosis, rather than NASH per se, to be the most important histological predictor of liver and non-liver related death. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of individuals develop cirrhosis, however the large proportion of the population affected by NAFLD has led to predictions that NAFLD will become a leading cause of end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and indication for liver transplantation. HCC may arise in non-cirrhotic liver in the setting of NAFLD and is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and male gender. The MetS and its components also play a key role in the histological progression of NAFLD, however other genetic and environmental factors may also influence the natural history. The importance of NAFLD in terms of overall survival extends beyond the liver where cardiovascular disease and malignancy represents additional important causes of death. PMID:27213358

  17. Nuclear Accident Crisis and Liver Disease: A Summary on Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2013-01-01

    The present global concern is on the adverse effect due to exposure to nuclides expelled from the disrupted nuclear power plant accident in Japan. The exposure can induce several adverse effects. In this specific brief review, the author summarizes the evidences on the effect on liver. Discussion is focused on several liver diseases. PMID:25125994

  18. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, to struggle with the strangle: Oxygen availability in fatty livers.

    PubMed

    Anavi, Sarit; Madar, Zecharia; Tirosh, Oren

    2017-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) is one of the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries. Oxygen is a central component of the cellular microenvironment, which participate in the regulation of cell survival, differentiation, functions and energy metabolism. Accordingly, sufficient oxygen supply is an important factor for tissue durability, mainly in highly metabolic tissues, such as the liver. Accumulating evidence from the past few decades provides strong support for the existence of interruptions in oxygen availability in fatty livers. This outcome may be the consequence of both, impaired systemic microcirculation and cellular membrane modifications which occur under steatotic conditions. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the main factors which can affect oxygen supply in fatty liver. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PET/CT with 18F Fluorocholine as an Imaging Biomarker for Chronic Liver Disease: A Preliminary Radiopathologic Correspondence Study in Patients with Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwee, Sandi A; Wong, Linda; Chan, Owen T M; Kalathil, Sumodh; Tsai, Naoky

    2018-04-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between hepatic uptake at preoperative fluorine 18 ( 18 F) fluorocholine combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and the histopathologic features of chronic liver disease in patients with Child-Pugh class A or B disease who are undergoing hepatic resection for liver cancer. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with resectable liver tumors underwent preoperative 18 F fluorocholine PET/CT. Mean liver standardized uptake value (SUV mean ) measurements were obtained from PET images, while histologic indexes of inflammation and fibrosis were applied to nontumor liver tissue from resection specimens. Effects of histopathologic features on liver SUV mean were examined with analysis of variance. Results Liver SUV mean ranged from 4.3 to 11.6, correlating significantly with Knodell histologic activity index (ρ = -0.81, P < .001) and several clinical indexes of liver disease severity. Liver SUV mean also differed significantly across groups stratified by necroinflammatory severity and Metavir fibrosis stage (P < . 001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for 18 F fluorocholine PET/CT detecting Metavir fibrosis stage F1 or higher was 0.89 ± 0.05, with an odds-ratio of 3.03 (95% confidence interval: 1.59, 5.88) and sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 93%, respectively. Conclusion Correlations found in patients undergoing hepatic resection for liver cancer between liver 18 F fluorocholine uptake and histopathologic indexes of liver fibrosis and inflammation support the use of 18 F fluorocholine PET/CT as a potential imaging biomarker for chronic liver disease. © RSNA, 2018.

  20. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Stål, Per

    2015-10-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD.

  1. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Stål, Per

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD. PMID:26494963

  2. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevatedmore » alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.« less

  3. Targeting nuclear receptors for the treatment of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoki; Aoyama, Toshifumi; Kimura, Shioko; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2017-11-01

    Ligand-activated nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), pregnane X receptor, and constitutive androstane receptor, were first identified as key regulators of the responses against chemical toxicants. However, numerous studies using mouse disease models and human samples have revealed critical roles for these receptors and others, such as PPARβ/δ, PPARγ, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), and liver X receptor (LXR), in maintaining nutrient/energy homeostasis in part through modulation of the gut-liver-adipose axis. Recently, disorders associated with disrupted nutrient/energy homeostasis, e.g., obesity, metabolic syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), are increasing worldwide. Notably, in NAFLD, a progressive subtype exists, designated as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that is characterized by typical histological features resembling alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), and NASH/ASH are recognized as major causes of hepatitis virus-unrelated liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Since hepatic steatosis is basically caused by an imbalance between fat/energy influx and utilization, abnormal signaling of these nuclear receptors contribute to the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease. Standard therapeutic interventions have not been fully established for fatty liver disease, but some new agents that activate or inhibit nuclear receptor signaling have shown promise as possible therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the roles of nuclear receptors in fatty liver disease and discuss future perspectives to develop promising pharmacological strategies targeting nuclear receptors for NAFLD/NASH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Perceptions of post-transplant recidivism in liver transplantation for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Kaneko, Junichi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Tamura, Sumihito; Aoki, Taku; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-11-27

    Although alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is regarded as a common indication for liver transplantation (LT), debatable issues exist on the requirement for preceding alcoholic abstinence, appropriate indication criteria, predictive factors for alcoholic recidivism, and outcomes following living-donor LT. In most institutions, an abstinence period of six months before LT has been adopted as a mandatory selection criterion. Data indicating that pre-transplant abstinence is an associated predictive factor for alcoholic recidivism supports the reasoning behind this. However, conclusive evidence about the benefit of adopting an abstinence period is yet to be established. On the other hand, a limited number of reports available on living-donor LT experiences for ALD patients suggest that organ donations from relatives have no suppressive effect on alcoholic recidivism. Prevention of alcoholic recidivism has proved to be the most important treatment after LT based on the resultant inferior long-term outcome of patients. Further evaluations are still needed to establish strategies before and after LT for ALD.

  5. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: MR Imaging of Liver Proton Density Fat Fraction to Assess Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, An; Tan, Justin; Sun, Mark; Hamilton, Gavin; Bydder, Mark; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C.; Middleton, Michael; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Loomba, Rohit; Lavine, Joel E.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–estimated proton density fat fraction (PDFF) for assessing hepatic steatosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by using centrally scored histopathologic validation as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: This prospectively designed, cross-sectional, internal review board–approved, HIPAA-compliant study was conducted in 77 patients who had NAFLD and liver biopsy. MR imaging–PDFF was estimated from magnitude-based low flip angle multiecho gradient-recalled echo images after T2* correction and multifrequency fat modeling. Histopathologic scoring was obtained by consensus of the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Clinical Research Network Pathology Committee. Spearman correlation, additivity and variance stabilization for regression for exploring the effect of a number of potential confounders, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed. Results: Liver MR imaging–PDFF was systematically higher, with higher histologic steatosis grade (P < .001), and was significantly correlated with histologic steatosis grade (ρ = 0.69, P < .001). The correlation was not confounded by age, sex, lobular inflammation, hepatocellular ballooning, NASH diagnosis, fibrosis, or magnetic field strength (P = .65). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves was 0.989 (95% confidence interval: 0.968, 1.000) for distinguishing patients with steatosis grade 0 (n = 5) from those with grade 1 or higher (n = 72), 0.825 (95% confidence interval: 0.734, 0.915) to distinguish those with grade 1 or lower (n = 31) from those with grade 2 or higher (n = 46), and 0.893 (95% confidence interval: 0.809, 0.977) to distinguish those with grade 2 or lower (n = 58) from those with grade 3 (n = 19). Conclusion: MR imaging–PDFF showed promise for assessment of hepatic steatosis grade in patients with NAFLD. For validation, further studies with larger sample sizes are

  6. Genetics Home Reference: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... different populations of microorganisms in the intestines (gut microbiota) on the breakdown and absorption of nutrients are ... Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Interplay between Diet, Gut Microbiota, and Genetic Background. Gastroenterol Res Pract. 2016;2016: ...

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A poorly known pandemic.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Salvador; Graupera, Isabel; Caballeria, Juan

    2017-12-20

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) consists of an excessive depositing of fat in the liver, which can end up by causing inflammation, fibrosis and also cirrhosis with the corresponding complications including liver cancer. NAFLD has become the most common liver disease worldwide. The incidence has increased in parallel with the obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome epidemic, thus resulting in becoming one of the main indications for liver transplant. The diagnosis has principally been through histology but with the development of non-invasive methods, these have helped in simplifying the management of these patients in clinical practice. The only therapeutic strategies currently available are focused on weight loss (lifestyle changes or bariatric surgery). There is still no approved pharmacological option for the treatment of NAFLD, however there are a number of molecular studies in advanced stages of development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Is the Liver Another Target?

    PubMed Central

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is recurrent obstruction of the upper airway during sleep leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH). OSA has been associated with all components of the metabolic syndrome as well as with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a common condition ranging in severity from uncomplicated hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH), liver fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The gold standard for the diagnosis and staging of NAFLD is liver biopsy. Obesity and insulin resistance lead to liver steatosis, but the causes of the progression to NASH are not known. Emerging evidence suggests that OSA may play a role in the progression of hepatic steatosis and the development of NASH. Several cross-sectional studies showed that the severity of IH in patients with OSA predicted the severity of NAFLD on liver biopsy. However, neither prospective nor interventional studies with continuous positive airway pressure treatment have been performed. Studies in a mouse model showed that IH causes triglyceride accumulation in the liver and liver injury as well as hepatic inflammation. The mouse model provided insight in the pathogenesis of liver injury showing that (1) IH accelerates the progression of hepatic steatosis by inducing adipose tissue lipolysis and increasing free fatty acids (FFA) flux into the liver; (2) IH up-regulates lipid biosynthetic pathways in the liver; (3) IH induces oxidative stress in the liver; (4) IH up-regulates hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha and possibly HIF-2 alpha, which may increase hepatic steatosis and induce liver inflammation and fibrosis. However, the role of FFA and different transcription factors in the pathogenesis of IH-induced NAFLD is yet to be established. Thus, multiple lines of evidence suggest that IH of OSA may contribute to the progression of NAFLD but definitive clinical studies and experiments in the mouse model have yet to be done. PMID:23087670

  9. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current “gold standard” for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence. PMID:26494961

  10. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-10-21

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current "gold standard" for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence.

  11. [Comprehensive characteristics of the pulmonary syndrome in chronic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Pashchenko, I G; Romanov, A A; Zhumanbaeva, R M; Osmolovskiĭ, V S; Faliushina, N V

    1988-01-01

    Combined investigations have shown that the pulmonary syndrome in chronic liver diseases is a group of changes (heterogeneous in their structure and origin), most of which are of intercurrent nature (chronic bronchitis and its complications, chronic pneumonia), the lesser part of them is related directly to an inflammatory liver process and constitutes the true pulmonary syndrome (interstitial pneumonitis, fibrosing alveolitis). In view of the fact that chronic liver pathology is attended by concomitant disorders of pulmonary ventilation, hemodynamics and immunologic homestasis, the authors propose that they should be regarded as a risk factor contributing to the development of respiratory diseases.

  12. Long-Term Adult Feline Liver Organoid Cultures for Disease Modeling of Hepatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Kruitwagen, Hedwig S; Oosterhoff, Loes A; Vernooij, Ingrid G W H; Schrall, Ingrid M; van Wolferen, Monique E; Bannink, Farah; Roesch, Camille; van Uden, Lisa; Molenaar, Martijn R; Helms, J Bernd; Grinwis, Guy C M; Verstegen, Monique M A; van der Laan, Luc J W; Huch, Meritxell; Geijsen, Niels; Vries, Robert G; Clevers, Hans; Rothuizen, Jan; Schotanus, Baukje A; Penning, Louis C; Spee, Bart

    2017-04-11

    Hepatic steatosis is a highly prevalent liver disease, yet research is hampered by the lack of tractable cellular and animal models. Steatosis also occurs in cats, where it can cause severe hepatic failure. Previous studies demonstrate the potential of liver organoids for modeling genetic diseases. To examine the possibility of using organoids to model steatosis, we established a long-term feline liver organoid culture with adult liver stem cell characteristics and differentiation potential toward hepatocyte-like cells. Next, organoids from mouse, human, dog, and cat liver were provided with fatty acids. Lipid accumulation was observed in all organoids and interestingly, feline liver organoids accumulated more lipid droplets than human organoids. Finally, we demonstrate effects of interference with β-oxidation on lipid accumulation in feline liver organoids. In conclusion, feline liver organoids can be successfully cultured and display a predisposition for lipid accumulation, making them an interesting model in hepatic steatosis research. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychiatric morbidity in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ewusi-Mensah, I; Saunders, J B; Wodak, A D; Murray, R M; Williams, R

    1983-11-12

    Seventy one patients with alcoholic liver disease and an equal number with non-alcoholic liver disease were interviewed using the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia. Forty seven (66%) of the group with alcoholic liver disease had or had had psychiatric illnesses compared with 23 (32%) of the control group (p less than 0.001). Affective disorder, particularly major depression, neurotic disorders, and antisocial personality, were all more common among the patients with alcoholic liver disease than the controls. No patient had schizophrenia or other forms of psychosis. Among the patients with alcoholic liver disease 11 men (24%) and 14 women (54%) had an affective or a neurotic disorder that had antedated their heavy drinking, and 30 (77%) of those who had had such a problem at any time had symptoms at the time of interview. Abstinence from alcohol is essential for patients with severe alcoholic liver disease. In view of the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in these patients psychiatric assessment is important to increase the patients' likelihood of complying with such advice.

  14. Psychiatric morbidity in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ewusi-Mensah, I; Saunders, J B; Wodak, A D; Murray, R M; Williams, R

    1983-01-01

    Seventy one patients with alcoholic liver disease and an equal number with non-alcoholic liver disease were interviewed using the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia. Forty seven (66%) of the group with alcoholic liver disease had or had had psychiatric illnesses compared with 23 (32%) of the control group (p less than 0.001). Affective disorder, particularly major depression, neurotic disorders, and antisocial personality, were all more common among the patients with alcoholic liver disease than the controls. No patient had schizophrenia or other forms of psychosis. Among the patients with alcoholic liver disease 11 men (24%) and 14 women (54%) had an affective or a neurotic disorder that had antedated their heavy drinking, and 30 (77%) of those who had had such a problem at any time had symptoms at the time of interview. Abstinence from alcohol is essential for patients with severe alcoholic liver disease. In view of the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in these patients psychiatric assessment is important to increase the patients' likelihood of complying with such advice. PMID:6416437

  15. [Current epidemiological status of causes of disease among patients with liver disease hospitalized in Department of Infectious Diseases in a large general hospital within the past 20 years].

    PubMed

    Zhao, R H; Ma, K; Hu, J; Chen, C X; Qi, J Y

    2018-02-20

    Objective: To investigate the causes of disease among patients with liver disease hospitalized in Department of Infectious Diseases in our hospital and the changes in such causes within the past 20 years. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 7570 patients who were admitted to our hospital from January 1995 to December 2015. The chi-square test was used for the statistical analysis of constituent ratio. Results: Of all 7570 patients with liver disease, 4930 (65.13%) had viral hepatitis, 332 (4.39%) had immune disease, 215 (2.84%) had drug-induced liver injury, 192 (2.54%) had fatty liver disease, 88 (1.16%) had schistosome-induced liver disease, 160 (2.11%) had inherited metabolic diseases, and 20 (0.13%) had vascular disease; 689 (9.1%) still had no clear cause of disease at discharge. The proportion of patients with viral hepatitis was 77.61% in the first 10 years and 59.19% in the last 10 years ( P < 0.01). As for liver disease caused by hepatotropic virus, there were significant increases in the proportion of patients with hepatitis C or hepatitis E from the first to the last 10 years (hepatitis C: 2.24% vs 15.56%, P < 0.01; hepatitis E: 18.61% vs 23.07%, P < 0.05), while there were significant reductions in the proportion of patients with hepatitis B (68.14% vs 60.01%, P < 0.05) or hepatitis A (10.7% vs 1.36%, P < 0.05). The proportion of patients with immune diseases was 0.82% in the first 10 years and 6.08% in the last 10 years ( P < 0.01). There were also certain changes in the proportion of patients with liver disease caused by other reasons. Conclusion: There is a large proportion of patients with viral hepatitis among patients with liver disease hospitalized in Department of Infectious Diseases in a large general hospital, especially hepatitis B and E caused by hepatotropic virus. There is a certain change in the epidemiology of liver disease within the past 20 years, with a reduction in the proportion of patients with

  16. Coeliac disease in autoimmune liver disease: a cross-sectional study and a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mirzaagha, Foroozandeh; Azali, Sepideh Hagh; Islami, Farhad; Zamani, Farhad; Khalilipour, Elias; Khatibian, Morteza; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2010-09-01

    Several studies have reported an association between coeliac disease and autoimmune liver disease, but there is little information on the prevalence of coeliac disease in certain autoimmune liver diseases, particularly from non-European, non-American countries. To investigate prevalence of coeliac disease in autoimmune liver disease in Iran and to summarize previous literature. We investigated prevalence of coeliac disease among 100 autoimmune liver disease patients and compared it with the prevalence in healthy individuals. We also performed an extensive search of the English literature in PubMed Database. We found substantially elevated prevalence of coeliac disease in patients with overlap syndrome (10-15%) compared to the general population (0.1-1%). To a lesser extent, the prevalence was high in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (2-4%). In our systematic review, prevalence of coeliac disease in autoimmune hepatitis in the majority of studies was 4% or more; several studies also reported such prevalence in primary biliary cirrhosis. Since coeliac disease is common among patients with autoimmune liver disease, screening autoimmune liver disease patients for coeliac disease is indicated. Although the magnitude of benefit from a gluten-free diet in reversing autoimmune liver disease in patients with coeliac disease is controversial, it may reduce the risk of further complications of coeliac disease. Copyright (c) 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phosphatase and tensin homolog is a differential diagnostic marker between nonalcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Pareja, Andrea; Clément, Sophie; Peyrou, Marion; Spahr, Laurent; Negro, Francesco; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Foti, Michelangelo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protein expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in human liver biopsies of patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease. METHODS: PTEN protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver sections of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 44) or alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 25). Liver resections obtained from 3 healthy subjects candidate for partial liver donation served as controls. Histological evaluations were performed by two experienced pathologists, and diagnoses established based on international criteria. The intensity of the PTEN staining in nuclei was compared between steatotic and non-steatotic areas of each liver fragment analyzed. For each liver specimen, the antibody-stained sections were examined and scored blindly by three independent observers, who were unaware of the patients’ clinical history. RESULTS: In healthy individuals, PTEN immunostaining was intense in both the cytoplasm and nuclei of all hepatocytes. However, PTEN was strongly downregulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of hepatocytes from steatotic areas in patients with NAFLD, independently of the disease stage. In contrast, no changes in PTEN protein expression were observed in patients with ALD, regardless of the presence of steatosis or the stage of the disease. The degree of PTEN downregulation in hepatocytes of patients with NAFLD correlated with the percentage of steatosis (r = 0.3061, P = 0.0459) and the BMI (r = 0.4268, P = 0.0043). Hovewer, in patients with ALD, PTEN expression was not correlated with the percentage of steatosis with or without obesity as a confounding factor (P = 0.5574). Finally, PTEN expression level in steatotic areas of ALD patients was significantly different from that seen in steatotic areas of NAFLD patients (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: PTEN protein expression is downregulated early in NAFLD, but not in ALD. PTEN

  18. Childhood Adiposity and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yinkun; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Wang, Youfa

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of childhood adiposity and change in adiposity status from childhood to adulthood with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and abnormal liver enzyme levels in adulthood. METHODS: Data were obtained from a population-based cohort of children aged 6 to 18 years started in 1987. From 2010 to 2014, 1350 subjects (aged 28–45 years) from the original cohort were followed. Childhood overweight and obesity were defined using BMI and subscapular skinfold thickness, respectively. In adulthood, ultrasound-based NAFLD, abnormal liver enzymes, and related risk factors were assessed. Results Overweight or obese children were more likely to have adult NAFLD (males: odds ratio [OR] = 2.49 for BMI and 2.78 for subscapular skinfold thickness; females: OR = 3.34 and 3.61; all Ps < .001) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation (males: OR = 1.64 and 1.66; females: OR = 2.12 and 3.01; all Ps < .05) than children with normal weight for both sexes. Compared with subjects who had normal weight in childhood and were nonobese in adulthood, subjects who were obese in adulthood, irrespective of their childhood adiposity status, were more likely to have NAFLD and ALT elevation in adulthood for both sexes. However, subjects who were overweight or obese in childhood but became nonobese in adulthood had similar likelihood of having NAFLD and ALT elevation in adulthood for both sexes. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight or obese children are more likely to have NAFLD and ALT elevation in adulthood. However, the risk associated with increased weight during childhood can be mitigated by becoming nonobese in adulthood. PMID:28356335

  19. Chronic Liver Diseases in Children: Clinical Profile and Histology.

    PubMed

    Dhole, Sachin Devidas; Kher, Archana S; Ghildiyal, Radha G; Tambse, Manjusha P

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of the study is to study the clinical profile of disorders of the liver and hepatobiliary system in paediatric patients and to correlate the histopathology findings of liver biopsy in chronic liver disease. Another aim being to assess the prognosis and to know the outcome and the effects of treatment in chronic liver diseases in paediatric age group. It was a prospective study, included the clinical profile of Chronic Liver Diseases (CLD) in children and the histopathological correlation. A total of 55 children were thoroughly investigated by doing relevant investigations and liver biopsy. A male predominance (60%) was noted with maximum incidence in the age group of 6-12 years. The incidence of CLD was 1.1% of total admissions. The most common presenting complaint was jaundice and abdominal distension. Hepatic encephalopathy was noted in 29% patients. Hepatomegaly was seen in 63% patients and spleenomegaly was seen in 60% patients. The incidence of cirrhosis on liver biopsy was 42% (23cases) in CLD patients. The most common diagnosis on histopathology was Wilson's disease (22%), followed by hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis. The predominant spectrum of CLD was metabolic liver disease and also the predominant cause of death. As the incidence of CLD is quite low, a very high index of suspicion is required for its diagnosis. Some uncommon causes of CLD in children were seen in our study like neutral lipid storage disease, α1-Antitrypsin deficiency disease, lupus hepatitis, Alagille syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. A patient of CLD with jaundice and hepatomegaly should be treated aggressively as those are the poor prognostic indicators of the disease. Hepatic encephalopathy and cirrhosis are also associated with poor outcome in patients with CLD. Liver biopsy histopathology by an expert and its correlation with laboratory investigations plays an important role in the diagnosis of CLD. The major cause of deaths in patients with CLD is due to end stage

  20. Epstein-Barr viral load before a liver transplant in children with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Shakibazad, Nader; Honar, Naser; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2014-12-01

    Many children with chronic liver disease require a liver transplant. These patients are prone to various infections, including Epstein-Barr virus infection. This study sought to measure the Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before a liver transplant. This cross-sectional study was done at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2011. All patients were aged younger than 18 years with chronic liver disease and were candidates for a liver transplant at the Shiraz Nemazee Hospital Organ Transplant Center. They had been investigated regarding their demographic characteristics, underlying disease, laboratory findings, and Epstein-Barr viral load by real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. Ninety-eight patients were studied and the mean age was 6.5 ± 5.9 years. Cryptogenic cirrhosis was the most-prevalent reason for liver transplant, and the death rate before a transplant was 15%. Among the study subjects, 6 had measurable Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before the transplant, and 4 of them had considerably higher Epstein-Barr viral loads (more than 1000 copies/mL). With respect to the close prevalence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (6%) and the high Epstein-Barr viral load in the patients before a transplant (4%), high pretransplant Epstein-Barr viral load can be considered a risk factor for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  1. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)--A Review.

    PubMed

    Karim, M F; Al-Mahtab, M; Rahman, S; Debnath, C R

    2015-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging problem in Hepatology clinics. It is closely related to the increased frequency of overweight or obesity. It has recognised association with metabolic syndrome. Central obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia are commonest risk factors. Association with hepatitis C genotype 3 is also recognised. NAFLD is an important cause of cyptogenic cirrhosis of liver. It affects all populations and all age groups. Most patients with NAFLD are asymptomatic or vague upper abdominal pain. Liver function tests are mostly normal or mild elevation of aminotranferases. Histological features almost identical to those of alcohol-induced liver damage and can range from mild steatosis to cirrhosis. Two hit hypothesis is prevailing theory for the development of NAFLD. Diagnosis is usually made by imaging tools like ultrasonogram which reveal a bright liver while liver biopsy is gold standard for diagnosis as well as differentiating simple fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Prognosis is variable. Simple hepatic steatosis generally has a benign long-term prognosis. However, one to two third of NASH progress to fibrosis or cirrhosis and may have a similar prognosis as cirrhosis from other liver diseases. Treatment is mostly control of underlying disorders and dietary advice, exercise, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, or cytoprotective agents. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing. So it needs more research to address this problem.

  2. Albumin in chronic liver disease: structure, functions and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Rosaria; Sawhney, Rohit; Jalan, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin is a critical plasma protein produced by the liver with a number of accepted clinical indications in chronic liver disease including management of circulatory and renal dysfunction in patients with ascites. Advanced cirrhosis is characterised by reduced albumin concentration as well as impaired albumin function as a result of specific structural changes and oxidative damage. Traditionally, the biologic and therapeutic role of albumin in liver disease was attributed to its oncotic effects but it is now understood that albumin has a wide range of other important physiologic functions such as immunomodulation, endothelial stabilisation, antioxidant effects and binding multiple drugs, toxins and other molecules. This review discusses the multifunctional properties of albumin and, in particular, the biologic and clinical implications of structural and functional changes of albumin that are associated with cirrhosis. Based on these insights, we explore the current and potential future therapeutic uses of albumin in liver disease.

  3. Questions and controversies: the role of necroptosis in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Dara, Lily; Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic liver injury results in hepatocyte death and turnover. If injury becomes chronic, the continuous cell death and turnover leads to chronic inflammation, fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Controlling liver cell death both in acute injury, to rescue the liver from acute liver failure, and in chronic injury, to curb secondary inflammation and fibrosis, is of paramount importance as a therapeutic strategy. Both apoptosis and necrosis occur in the liver, but the occurrence of necroptosis in the liver and its contribution to liver disease is controversial. Necroptosis is a form of regulated necrosis which occurs in certain cell types when caspases (+/−cIAPs) are inhibited through the RIPK1-RIPK3 activation of MLKL. The occurrence of necroptosis in the liver has recently been examined in multiple liver injury models with conflicting results. The aim of this review is to summarize the published data with an emphasis on the controversies and remaining questions in the field. PMID:27924226

  4. Oral Anticoagulation in Patients With Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greenberger, Norton J; Giugliano, Robert P

    2018-05-15

    Patients with liver disease are at increased risks of both thrombotic and bleeding complications. Many have atrial fibrillation (AF) or venous thromboembolism (VTE) necessitating oral anticoagulant agents (OACs). Recent evidence has contradicted the assumption that patients with liver disease are "auto-anticoagulated" and thus protected from thrombotic events. Warfarin and non-vitamin K-antagonist OACs have been shown to reduce thrombotic events safely in patients with either AF or VTE. However, patients with liver disease have largely been excluded from trials of OACs. Because all currently approved OACs undergo metabolism in the liver, hepatic dysfunction may cause increased bleeding. Thus, the optimal anticoagulation strategy for patients with AF or VTE who have liver disease remains unclear. This review discusses pharmacokinetic and clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of OACs in patients with liver disease and provides a practical, clinically oriented approach to the management of OAC therapy in this population. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Prophylaxis of alcoholic disease of the liver].

    PubMed

    Beliakin, S A

    2009-08-01

    Military doctors should have a uniform position to the use of alcohol. Now alcohol is the basic pathogenic factor in development of a lethal cirrhosis of a liver. The most known sayings justifying the use of alcohol, are insolvent. Useful doses of alcohol does not exist. The quantity of used alcohol has the great value. Only at achievement of age 21 year it is possible to use safe doses of alcohol. A safe dose of pure alcohol (ethanol) less than 30,0 in day. In a basis of prophylaxis of a cirrhosis of a liver there is a medical educational activity.

  6. Immunology in the liver--from homeostasis to disease.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Felix; Tacke, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The liver is a central immunological organ with a high exposure to circulating antigens and endotoxins from the gut microbiota, particularly enriched for innate immune cells (macrophages, innate lymphoid cells, mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells). In homeostasis, many mechanisms ensure suppression of immune responses, resulting in tolerance. Tolerance is also relevant for chronic persistence of hepatotropic viruses or allograft acceptance after liver transplantation. The liver can rapidly activate immunity in response to infections or tissue damage. Depending on the underlying liver disease, such as viral hepatitis, cholestasis or NASH, different triggers mediate immune-cell activation. Conserved mechanisms such as molecular danger patterns (alarmins), Toll-like receptor signalling or inflammasome activation initiate inflammatory responses in the liver. The inflammatory activation of hepatic stellate and Kupffer cells results in the chemokine-mediated infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells. The ultimate outcome of the intrahepatic immune response (for example, fibrosis or resolution) depends on the functional diversity of macrophages and dendritic cells, but also on the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory T-cell populations. As reviewed here, tremendous progress has helped to understand the fine-tuning of immune responses in the liver from homeostasis to disease, indicating promising targets for future therapies in acute and chronic liver diseases.

  7. [Prolyl hydroxylase activity in liver specimens in chronic liver diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Langness, U; Clausnitzer, H; Verspohl, M; Grasedyck, K

    1978-08-25

    100 patients were laparoscopied, liver tissue specimens taken from atypically altered areas. Prolyl hydroxylase was determined in the specimen, in parallel tissue was examined by light microscope. 8 groups of patients could be differentiated: Patients 1. with active, 2, with inactive cirrhosis, 3. with fatty infiltrations, 4. with fatty infiltration and mesenchymal reaction, 5. with aggressive, 6. with persistent, 7. with reactive hepatitis, 8. patients without histological changes. In the case of connective tissue increase in the liver prolyl hydroxylase activities were statistically significant above normal. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference between the enzyme activities of each group. A correlation could be found between prolyl hydroxylase activity and morphologically estimated connective tissue formation, but not the serum enzyme activities usually determined in liver diseases. Therefore, could be concluded that prolyl hydroxylase activity is an index of actual collagen biosynthesis in chronic liver diseases.

  8. Perioperative liver and spleen elastography in patients without chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Sam; Borsiin, Hanna; Öberg, Carl-Fredrik; Brange, Hannes; Mijovic, Zoran; Sturesson, Christian

    2018-02-27

    To investigate changes in hepatic and splenic stiffness in patients without chronic liver disease during liver resection for hepatic tumors. Patients scheduled for liver resection for hepatic tumors were considered for enrollment. Tissue stiffness measurements on liver and spleen were conducted before and two days after liver resection using point shear-wave elastography. Histological analysis of the resected liver specimen was conducted in all patients and patients with marked liver fibrosis were excluded from further study analysis. Patients were divided into groups depending on size of resection and whether they had received preoperative chemotherapy or not. The relation between tissue stiffness and postoperative biochemistry was investigated. Results are presented as median (interquartile range). 35 patients were included. The liver stiffness increased in patients undergoing a major resection from 1.41 (1.24-1.63) m/s to 2.20 (1.72-2.44) m/s ( P = 0.001). No change in liver stiffness in patients undergoing a minor resection was found [1.31 (1.15-1.52) m/s vs 1.37 (1.12-1.77) m/s, P = 0.438]. A major resection resulted in a 16% (7%-33%) increase in spleen stiffness, more ( P = 0.047) than after a minor resection [2 (-1-13) %]. Patients who underwent preoperative chemotherapy ( n = 20) did not differ from others in preoperative right liver lobe [1.31 (1.16-1.50) vs 1.38 (1.12-1.56) m/s, P = 0.569] or spleen [2.79 (2.33-3.11) vs 2.71 (2.37-2.86) m/s, P = 0.515] stiffness. Remnant liver stiffness on the second postoperative day did not show strong correlations with maximum postoperative increase in bilirubin ( R 2 = 0.154, Pearson's r = 0.392, P = 0.032) and international normalized ratio ( R 2 = 0.285, Pearson's r = 0.534, P = 0.003). Liver and spleen stiffness increase after a major liver resection for hepatic tumors in patients without chronic liver disease.

  9. A comprehensive review of noninvasive liver fibrosis tests in pediatric nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Sana; Collyer, Elizabeth; Alkhouri, Naim

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis have been increasing in the pediatric population. The presence and severity of fibrosis in patients with NAFLD are important prognostic factors for the risk of disease progression to cirrhosis. The gold standard for staging liver fibrosis is a liver biopsy. However, given the risks of this procedure, especially in the pediatric population, the development of noninvasive markers to diagnose and monitor progression of NAFLD is desirable. This paper will review recently developed noninvasive methods for diagnosing liver fibrosis in children with NAFLD. These include simple fibrosis scores, advanced biochemical markers, and radiologic imaging studies. Simple fibrosis scores use readily available laboratory tests; available one include AST/ALT ratio, AST to platelet ratio index (APRI), fibrosis (FIB)-4 index, NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), pediatric NAFLD fibrosis index (PNFI), and pediatric NALFD fibrosis score (PNFS). Advanced biochemical markers include biomarkers of hepatocyte cell death such as cytokeratin 18 fragment levels, and markers of extracellular matrix turnover such as the Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) test and hyaluronic acid. Radiologic imaging studies estimate liver stiffness as a surrogate for liver fibrosis; these include transient elastography (TE), magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI).

  10. Current and Future Burden of Chronic Nonmalignant Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Udompap, Prowpanga; Kim, Donghee; Kim, W Ray

    2015-11-01

    Disease burden is an important indicator of the state of health of a population. It can be measured as the frequency (eg, incidence and prevalence) of a condition or its effects including fatal and non-fatal health loss from disease (eg, disability-adjusted life years) as well as the financial costs (eg, direct healthcare costs and indirect healthcare expenditures related to lost income because of premature death). Accurate disease burden information is essential for policy-making such as prioritization of health interventions and allocation of resources. Chronic liver disease (CLD) causes substantial health and economic burden in the United States, where nearly 2 million deaths annually are attributable to CLD. In the recent past, overall mortality rate of CLD has been increasing. Viral hepatitis and alcoholic liver disease are thought to be the most common etiologies of chronic liver diseases. More recently, the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is rapidly increasing, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis has become a leading indication for liver transplantation. In this article, we assemble available data on the burden of CLD in the United States, focusing on nonmalignant complications, whereas the impact on mortality and healthcare expenses of hepatocellular carcinoma, an important consequence of CLD, is discussed elsewhere. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Liver membrane antibodies in alcoholic liver disease: 1. prevalence and immunoglobulin class.

    PubMed Central

    Burt, A D; Anthony, R S; Hislop, W S; Bouchier, I A; MacSween, R N

    1982-01-01

    Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique liver membrane antibodies of IgG and IgA class have been demonstrated in a statistically significant proportion of sera from patients with alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis. IgG and IgA class antibodies were found respectively in 23 and 25% of 48 patients with alcoholic hepatitis, in 27 and 33% of 84 with active cirrhosis, and 67 and 58% of 12 with inactive cirrhosis. These results provide evidence of a humoral immune response in alcoholic liver disease which is directed against, as yet undefined, liver-cell membrane antigens. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7040177

  12. [Comparison of various noninvasive serum markers of liver fibrosis in chronic viral liver disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Min; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Tae Yeob; Roh, Young Wook; Eun, Chang Soo; Jeon, Yong Cheol; Han, Dong Soo; Oh, Young Ha

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical performances of noninvasive serum markers for the prediction of liver fibrosis in chronic viral liver diseases. We analyzed a total of 225 patients with chronic viral liver diseases (180 with hepatitis B virus, 43 with hepatitis C virus, and 2 with hepatitis B+C virus) who underwent a liver biopsy procedure at the Hanyang University Guri Hospital between March 2002 and February 2007. Serum was also obtained at the time of liver biopsy. Liver fibrosis was staged according to the scoring system proposed by the Korean Study Group for the Pathology of Digestive Diseases. Various noninvasive serum markers were evaluated, including the aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AAR), age-platelet (AP) index, AST/platelet ratio index (APRI), cirrhosis discriminant score (CDS), platelet count, hyaluronic acid (HA), and type IV collagen. There were 17, 40, 61, 74, and 33 patients at stages F0, F1, F2, F3, and F4, respectively. The overall diagnostic accuracies of each marker, as determined by the area under receiver operating characteristics curves, were APRI=0.822, CDS=0.776, platelet count=0.773, AP index=0.756, HA=0.749, type IV collagen=0.718, and AAR=0.642 for predicting significant fibrosis (> or =F2); and CDS=0.835, platelet count=0.795, AP index=0.794, HA=0.766, AAR=0.711, type IV collagen=0.697, and APRI=0.691 for predicting extensive fibrosis (> or =F3). All noninvasive serum markers evaluated in this study were useful for predicting significant or extensive liver fibrosis in chronic viral liver diseases. In particular, APRI was most useful for the prediction of significant fibrosis, and CDS was most useful for the prediction of extensive fibrosis.

  13. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: An Italian position statement

    PubMed Central

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the “6-mo rule”. Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The “Group of Italian Regions” suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups. PMID:25356027

  14. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    PubMed

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013<0.05) and presence of hepatitis C virus were particularly correlated with the presence of diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with

  15. The Enhanced liver fibrosis score is associated with clinical outcomes and disease progression in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katharine M; Wockner, Leesa F; Shanker, Mihir; Fagan, Kevin J; Horsfall, Leigh U; Fletcher, Linda M; Ungerer, Jacobus P J; Pretorius, Carel J; Miller, Gregory C; Clouston, Andrew D; Lampe, Guy; Powell, Elizabeth E

    2016-03-01

    Current tools for risk stratification of chronic liver disease subjects are limited. We aimed to determine whether the serum-based ELF (Enhanced Liver Fibrosis) test predicted liver-related clinical outcomes, or progression to advanced liver disease, and to compare the performance of ELF to liver biopsy and non-invasive algorithms. Three hundred patients with ELF scores assayed at the time of liver biopsy were followed up (median 6.1 years) for liver-related clinical outcomes (n = 16) and clear evidence of progression to advanced fibrosis (n = 18), by review of medical records and clinical data. Fourteen of 73 (19.2%) patients with ELF score indicative of advanced fibrosis (≥9.8, the manufacturer's cut-off) had a liver-related clinical outcome, compared to only two of 227 (<1%) patients with ELF score <9.8. In contrast, the simple scores APRI and FIB-4 would only have predicted subsequent decompensation in six and four patients respectively. A unit increase in ELF score was associated with a 2.53-fold increased risk of a liver-related event (adjusted for age and stage of fibrosis). In patients without advanced fibrosis on biopsy at recruitment, 55% (10/18) with an ELF score ≥9.8 showed clear evidence of progression to advanced fibrosis (after an average 6 years), whereas only 3.5% of those with an ELF score <9.8 (8/207) progressed (average 14 years). In these subjects, a unit increase in ELF score was associated with a 4.34-fold increased risk of progression. The ELF score is a valuable tool for risk stratification of patients with chronic liver disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis using two-dimensional shear wave elastography in patients with autoimmune liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jie; Huang, Ze-Ping; Zheng, Jian; Wu, Tao; Zheng, Rong-Qin

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the diagnostic accuracy of two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE) for the non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) using liver biopsy as the reference standard. METHODS Patients with AILD who underwent liver biopsy and 2D-SWE were consecutively enrolled. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to assess the overall accuracy and to identify optimal cut-off values. RESULTS The characteristics of the diagnostic performance were determined for 114 patients with AILD. The areas under the ROC curves for significant fibrosis, severe fibrosis, and cirrhosis were 0.85, 0.85, and 0.86, respectively, and the optimal cut-off values associated with significant fibrosis (≥ F2), severe fibrosis (≥ F3), and cirrhosis (F4) were 9.7 kPa, 13.2 kPa and 16.3 kPa, respectively. 2D-SWE showed sensitivity values of 81.7% for significant fibrosis, 83.0% for severe fibrosis, and 87.0% for cirrhosis, and the respective specificity values were 81.3%, 74.6%, and 80.2%. The overall concordance rate of the liver stiffness measurements obtained using 2D-SWE vs fibrosis stages was 53.5%. CONCLUSION 2D-SWE showed promising diagnostic performance for assessing liver fibrosis stages and exhibited high cut-off values in patients with AILD. Low overall concordance rate was observed in the liver stiffness measurements obtained using 2D-SWE vs fibrosis stages. PMID:28765706

  17. Identifying areas of need relative to liver disease: geographic clustering within a health service district.

    PubMed

    El-Atem, Nathan; Irvine, Katharine M; Valery, Patricia C; Wojcik, Kyle; Horsfall, Leigh; Johnson, Tracey; Janda, Monika; McPhail, Steven M; Powell, Elizabeth E

    2017-08-01

    Background Many people with chronic liver disease (CLD) are not detected until they present to hospital with advanced disease, when opportunities for intervention are reduced and morbidity is high. In order to build capacity and liver expertise in the community, it is important to focus liver healthcare resources in high-prevalence disease areas and specific populations with an identified need. The aim of the present study was to examine the geographic location of people seen in a tertiary hospital hepatology clinic, as well as ethnic and sociodemographic characteristics of these geographic areas. Methods The geographic locations of hepatology out-patients were identified via the out-patient scheduling database and grouped into statistical area (SA) regions for demographic analysis using data compiled by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Results During the 3-month study period, 943 individuals from 71 SA Level 3 regions attended clinic. Nine SA Level 3 regions accounted for 55% of the entire patient cohort. Geographic clustering was seen especially for people living with chronic hepatitis B virus. There was a wide spectrum of socioeconomic advantage and disadvantage in areas with high liver disease prevalence. Conclusions The geographic area from which people living with CLD travel to access liver health care is extensive. However, the greatest demand for tertiary liver disease speciality care is clustered within specific geographic areas. Outreach programs targeted to these areas may enhance liver disease-specific health service resourcing. What is known about the topic? The demand for tertiary hospital clinical services in CLD is rising. However, there is limited knowledge about the geographic areas from which people living with CLD travel to access liver services, or the ethnic, socioeconomic and education characteristics of these areas. What does this paper add? The present study demonstrates that a substantial proportion of people living with CLD and

  18. Weight reduction for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lijun; Wang, Jiyao; Li, Feng

    2011-06-15

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming a wide spread liver disease. The present recommendations for treatment are not evidence-based. Some of them are various weight reduction measures with diet, exercise, drug, or surgical therapy. To assess the benefits and harms of intended weight reduction for patients with NAFLD. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and ClinicalTrials.gov until February 2011. We included randomised clinical trials evaluating weight reduction with different measures versus no intervention or placebo in NAFLD patients. We extracted data independently. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) for dichotomous data and calculated the mean difference (MD) for continuous data, both with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The review includes seven trials; five on aspects of lifestyle changes (eg, diet, physical exercise) and two on treatment with a weight reduction drug 'orlistat'. In total, 373 participants were enrolled, and the duration of the trials ranged from 1 month to 1 year. Only one trial on lifestyle programme was judged to be of low risk of bias. We could not perform meta-analyses for the main outcomes as they were either not reported or there were insufficient number of trials for each outcome to be meta-analysed. We could meta-analyse the available data for body weight and body mass index only. Adverse events were poorly reported. The sparse data and high risk of bias preclude us from drawing any definite conclusion on lifestyle programme or orlistat for treatment of NAFLD. Further randomised clinical trials with low risk of bias are needed to test the beneficial and harmful effects of weight reduction for NAFLD patients. The long-term prognosis of development of fibrosis, mortality, and quality of life should be studied.

  19. Liver-brain interactions in inflammatory liver diseases: implications for fatigue and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Charlotte; Swain, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory liver diseases are often accompanied by behavior alterations including fatigue, mood disorders, cognitive dysfunction and sleep disturbances. These altered behaviors can adversely affect patient quality of life. The communication pathways between the inflamed liver and the brain that mediate changes in central neural activity leading to behavior alterations during liver inflammation are poorly understood. Neural and humoral communication pathways have been most commonly implicated as driving peripheral inflammation to brain signaling. Classically, the cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 have received the greatest scientific attention as potential mediators of this communication pathway. In mice with liver inflammation we have identified a novel immune-mediated liver-to-brain communication pathway whereby CCR2(+) monocytes found within the peripheral circulation transmigrate into the brain parenchyma in response to MCP-1/CCL2 expressing activated microglia. Inhibition of cerebral monocyte infiltration in these mice significantly improved liver inflammation associated sickness behaviors. Importantly, in recent work we have found that at an earlier time point, when cerebral monocyte infiltration is not evident in mice with liver inflammation, increased monocyte:cerebral endothelial cell adhesive interactions are observed using intravital microscopy of the brain. These monocyte:cerebral endothelial cell adhesive interactions are P-selectin mediated, and inhibition of these interactions attenuated microglial activation and sickness behavior development. Delineating the pathways that the periphery uses to communicate with the brain during inflammatory liver diseases, and the central neurotransmitter systems that are altered through these communication pathways (e.g., serotonin, corticotrophin releasing hormone) to give rise to liver inflammation-associated sickness behaviors, will allow for the identification of novel therapeutic targets to decrease the

  20. Characteristics and outcome of autoimmune liver disease in Asian children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Way S; Lum, Su H; Lim, Chooi B; Chong, Sze Y; Khoh, Kim M; Ng, Ruey T; Teo, Kai M; Boey, Christopher C M; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about autoimmune liver disease (AILD) in Asian children. We studied the clinical features and predictors of outcome in childhood AILD in an Asian population. Retrospective review of AILD [autoimmune hepatitis type 1 and 2 (AIH1, AIH2), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC)] seen at two pediatric liver units in Malaysia. At presentation, 17 (56%) of the 32 children [19 females, 59%; median (range) age 7.7 (1.8-15.5) years] with AILD (AIH1 = 18, AIH2 = 5, PSC = 0, ASC = 9) had liver cirrhosis. At final review [median (range) duration of follow-up 4.8 (0.4-12) years], 24 patients (75%) survived with a native liver. Twenty-one (66%) were in remission; 19 (AIH1 = 11; AIH2 = 4, ASC = 4) were on prednisolone and/or azathioprine, one on cyclosporine and another on mycophenolate mofetil. Three (AIH1 = 3) were in partial remission. Of the two who underwent liver transplantation (LT; 6.5%; both ASC), one died of primary graft failure after LT. Six patients (19%) died without LT (acute liver failure, n = 1; end-stage liver disease, n = 5). The overall survival rate (native liver and survival post-LT) was 78%. A delay in seeking treatment adversely affected the final outcome [survival with native liver vs. LT or death (duration between onset of disease and treatment; median ± standard error) = 2.5 ± 2.9 months vs. 24.0 ± 13.3 months; p = 0.012]. Although remission was achieved in the majority of patients with prednisolone and/or azathioprine therapy, delay in seeking diagnosis and treatment adversely affects the outcome of childhood AILD in Malaysia.

  1. Assessment of School Readiness in Chronic Cholestatic Liver Disease: A Pilot Study Examining Children with and without Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gold, Anna; Rogers, Alaine; Cruchley, Elizabeth; Rankin, Stephanie; Parmar, Arpita; Kamath, Binita M; Avitzur, Yaron; Ng, Vicky Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background. Assessment of school readiness evaluates physical, social-emotional, and neuropsychological domains essential for educational success. Cognitive testing of preschool aged children with chronic liver disease may guide more timely interventions and focused efforts by health care providers. Patients and Methods. Children with chronic cholestatic liver disease diagnosed as an infant and still with their native liver (NL) and children who received a liver transplant (LT) before age of 2 years underwent testing with a battery of well-validated pediatric psychometric measures. Results. Eighteen (13 LT, 5 NL) patients (median age of 4.45 and 4.05 years, resp.) were tested. Median Full-Scale IQ was 98 (range 102-116) for LT and 116 [(range 90-106), p = 0.35, NS] for NL subjects. LT recipients had significantly greater visual based difficulties, poorer caregiver rated daily living skills ( p = 0.04), and higher levels of executive function based difficulties (e.g., inattention, inhibition). Conclusion. This pilot study highlights the risk of neuropsychological difficulties in early school age children who were under 2 years of age at time of LT. Comprehensive early school age assessment should integrate psychometric measures to identify children at greatest risk, thus allowing for proactive educational intervention.

  2. Resolution of donor non-alcoholic fatty liver disease following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Posner, Andrew D; Sultan, Samuel T; Zaghloul, Norann A; Twaddell, William S; Bruno, David A; Hanish, Steven I; Hutson, William R; Hebert, Laci; Barth, Rolf N; LaMattina, John C

    2017-09-01

    Transplant surgeons conventionally select against livers displaying high degrees (>30%) of macrosteatosis (MaS), out of concern for primary non-function or severe graft dysfunction. As such, there is relatively limited experience with such livers, and the natural history remains incompletely characterized. We present our experience of transplanted livers with high degrees of MaS and microsteatosis (MiS), with a focus on the histopathologic and clinical outcomes. Twenty-nine cases were identified with liver biopsies available from both the donor and the corresponding liver transplant recipient. Donor liver biopsies displayed either MaS or MiS ≥15%, while all recipients received postoperative liver biopsies for cause. The mean donor MaS and MiS were 15.6% (range 0%-60%) and 41.3% (7.5%-97.5%), respectively. MaS decreased significantly from donor (M=15.6%) to recipient postoperative biopsies (M=0.86%), P<.001. Similarly, MiS decreased significantly from donor biopsies (M=41.3%) to recipient postoperative biopsies (M=1.8%), P<.001. At a median of 68 days postoperatively (range 4-384), full resolution of MaS and MiS was observed in 27 of 29 recipients. High degrees of MaS and MiS in donor livers resolve in recipients following liver transplantation. Further insight into the mechanisms responsible for treating fatty liver diseases could translate into therapeutic targets. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Kukuk, Guido M; Schaefer, Stephanie G; Fimmers, Rolf; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R; Ezziddin, Samer; Spengler, Ulrich; Schild, Hans H; Willinek, Winfried A

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p < 0.001), GLDH (r = -0.55; p = 0.044), INR (r = -0.42; p = 0.003), and MELD Score (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). After administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA bilirubin (r = -0.45; p = 0.001), GGT (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), PT (r = 0.54; p < 0.001), AST (r = -0.46; p = 0.002), ALT (r = -0.31; p = 0.030), INR (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and MELD Score (r = -0.56; p < 0.001) significantly correlated with LSCR. RLE correlated with bilirubin (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), PT (r = 0.42; p = 0.003), GGT (r = -0.33; p = 0.020), INR (r = -0.36; p = 0.011) and MELD Score (r = -0.43; p = 0.003). Liver-spleen contrast ratio and relative liver enhancement using Gd-EOB-DTPA correlate with a number of routinely used biochemical liver function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a

  4. PNPLA3 I148M polymorphism and progressive liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Donati, Benedetta; Fares, Roberta; Lombardi, Rosa; Mancina, Rosellina Margherita; Romeo, Stefano; Valenti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The 148 Isoleucine to Methionine protein variant (I148M) of patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3), a protein is expressed in the liver and is involved in lipid metabolism, has recently been identified as a major determinant of liver fat content. Several studies confirmed that the I148M variant predisposes towards the full spectrum of liver damage associated with fatty liver: from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and progressive fibrosis. Furthermore, the I148M variant represents a major determinant of progression of alcohol related steatohepatitis to cirrhosis, and to influence fibrogenesis and related clinical outcomes in chronic hepatitis C virus hepatitis, and possibly chronic hepatitis B virus hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. All in all, studies suggest that the I148M polymorphism may represent a general modifier of fibrogenesis in liver diseases. Remarkably, the effect of the I148M variant on fibrosis was independent of that on hepatic steatosis and inflammation, suggesting that it may affect both the quantity and quality of hepatic lipids and the biology of non-parenchymal liver cells besides hepatocytes, directly promoting fibrogenesis. Therefore, PNPLA3 is a key player in liver disease progression. Assessment of the I148M polymorphism will possibly inform clinical practice in the future, whereas the determination of the effect of the 148M variant will reveal mechanisms involved in hepatic fibrogenesis. PMID:24222941

  5. Hepatic cholesterol ester hydrolase in human liver disease.

    PubMed

    Simon, J B; Poon, R W

    1978-09-01

    Human liver contains an acid cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH) of presumed lysosomal origin, but its significance is unknown. We developed a modified CEH radioassay suitable for needle biopsy specimens and measured hepatic activity of this enzyme in 69 patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy. Histologically normal livers hydrolyzed 5.80 +/- 0.78 SEM mumoles of cholesterol ester per hr per g of liver protein (n, 10). Values were similar in alcoholic liver disease (n, 17), obstructive jaundice (n, 9), and miscellaneous hepatic disorders (n, 21). In contrast, mean hepatic CEH activity was more than 3-fold elevated in 12 patients with acute hepatitis, 21.05 +/- 2.45 SEM mumoles per hr per g of protein (P less than 0.01). In 2 patients studied serially, CEH returned to normal as hepatitis resolved. CEH activity in all patients paralleled SGOT levels (r, 0.84; P less than 0.01). There was no correlation with serum levels of free or esterified cholesterol nor with serum activity of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. These studies confirm the presence of CEH activity in human liver and show markedly increased activity in acute hepatitis. The pathogenesis and clinical significance of altered hepatic CEH activity in liver disease require further study.

  6. Review article: Probiotics in gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, D; Stockbrügger, R

    2007-12-01

    Probiotics, defined as live micro-organisms with beneficial effects for the host, are widely applied in gastrointestinal and liver diseases. To review the available evidence of clinical trials on probiotics in gastrointestinal and liver diseases, with a major focus on irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis and chronic liver diseases. Evidence for the therapeutic or preventive application of particular probiotic strains is available for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, rota-virus-associated diarrhoea and pouchitis. Results are encouraging for irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis and for reducing side effects by Helicobacter pylori eradication therapies, but are less clear for Crohn's disease, lactose intolerance and constipation. In general, for most of these patient groups, more placebo-controlled methodologically well-designed studies that pay attention to both clinical outcome and mechanistic aspects are required. The application in liver disease and pancreatitis is promising, but more human trials have to be awaited. Possible mechanisms of probiotics include modulation of the intestinal microbiota and the immune system, but different bacterial may have different effects. Further insight into disease entities and the functioning of probiotic strains is required to be able to select disease-specific strains, which have to be tested in well-designed placebo-controlled studies.

  7. Management of cytomegalovirus infection and disease in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bruminhent, Jackrapong; Razonable, Raymund R

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most common viral pathogens causing clinical disease in liver transplant recipients, and contributing to substantial morbidity and occasional mortality. CMV causes febrile illness often accompanied by bone marrow suppression, and in some cases, invades tissues including the transplanted liver allograft. In addition, CMV has been significantly associated with an increased predisposition to acute and chronic allograft rejection, accelerated hepatitis C recurrence, and other opportunistic infections, as well as reduced overall patient and allograft survival. To negate the adverse effects of CMV infection on transplant outcome, its prevention, whether through antiviral prophylaxis or preemptive therapy, is an essential component to the management of liver transplant recipients. Two recently updated guidelines have suggested that antiviral prophylaxis or preemptive therapy are similarly effective in preventing CMV disease in modest-risk CMV-seropositive liver transplant recipients, while antiviral prophylaxis is the preferred strategy over preemptive therapy for the prevention of CMV disease in high-risk recipients [CMV-seronegative recipients of liver allografts from CMV-seropositive donors (D+/R-)]. However, antiviral prophylaxis has only delayed the onset of CMV disease in many CMV D+/R- liver transplant recipients, and such occurrence of late-onset CMV disease was significantly associated with increased all-cause and infection-related mortality after liver transplantation. Therefore, a search for better strategies for prevention, such as prolonged duration of antiviral prophylaxis, a hybrid approach (antiviral prophylaxis followed by preemptive therapy), or the use of immunologic measures to guide antiviral prophylaxis has been suggested to prevent late-onset CMV disease. The standard treatment of CMV disease consists of intravenous ganciclovir or oral valganciclovir, and if feasible, reduction in pharmacologic immunosuppression

  8. Clinical approaches to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwenger, Katherine JP; Allard, Johane P

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), leading to fibrosis and potentially cirrhosis, and it is one of the most common causes of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is associated with other medical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. NASH can only be diagnosed through liver biopsy, but noninvasive techniques have been developed to identify patients who are most likely to have NASH or fibrosis, reducing the need for liver biopsy and risk to patients. Disease progression varies between individuals and is linked to a number of risk factors. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are associated with diet and lifestyle, influx of free fatty acids to the liver from adipose tissue due to insulin resistance, hepatic oxidative stress, cytokines production, reduced very low-density lipoprotein secretion and intestinal microbiome. Weight loss through improved diet and increased physical activity has been the cornerstone therapy of NAFLD. Recent therapies such as pioglitazone and vitamin E have been shown to be beneficial. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and statins may offer additional benefits. Bariatric surgery should be considered in morbidly obese patients. More research is needed to assess the impact of these treatments on a long-term basis. The objective of this article is to briefly review the diagnosis, management and treatment of this disease in order to aid clinicians in managing these patients. PMID:24587650

  9. New Insights from Rodent Models of Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Rodent models of fatty liver disease are essential research tools that provide a window into disease pathogenesis and a testing ground for prevention and treatment. Models come in many varieties involving dietary and genetic manipulations, and sometimes both. High-energy diets that induce obesity do not uniformly cause fatty liver disease; this has prompted close scrutiny of specific macronutrients and nutrient combinations to determine which have the greatest potential for hepatotoxicity. At the same time, diets that do not cause obesity or the metabolic syndrome but do cause severe steatohepatitis have been exploited to study factors important to progressive liver injury, including cell death, oxidative stress, and immune activation. Rodents with a genetic predisposition to overeating offer yet another model in which to explore the evolution of fatty liver disease. In some animals that overeat, steatohepatitis can develop even without resorting to a high-energy diet. Importantly, these models and others have been used to document that aerobic exercise can prevent or reduce fatty liver disease. This review focuses primarily on lessons learned about steatohepatitis from manipulations of diet and eating behavior. Numerous additional insights about hepatic lipid metabolism, which have been gained from genetically engineered mice, are also mentioned. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 535–550. PMID:21126212

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Management: Dietary and Lifestyle Modifications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vi; George, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of abnormalities that can range from bland liver fat (steatosis), to hepatic inflammation and liver injury (steatohepatitis). It is estimated that NAFLD will become the principal cause of liver disease in Western nations and the leading indication for liver transplantation. Advancements in disease recognition and management are therefore paramount. Although the development of new, reliable drug therapies is vital, lifestyle interventions remain the most effective treatment modality. In addition to weight loss as a primary measure of treatment success, there is growing recognition that other endpoints, including the prevention or delay of diabetes onset, reduced cardiovascular events, prevention of cancer, and improved overall mortality, are equally important outcomes that can be independently modified by lifestyle change. Moreover, NAFLD is inextricably part of a complex, systemic disease process that is linked with deeply entrenched maladaptive lifestyle behaviors. Thus, a holistic, multidisciplinary, and individualized approach to disease management will be the key to achieving any realistic population-level change. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Fibrosis Assessment in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in 2016.

    PubMed

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H; Lai, Michelle; Afdhal, Nezam H

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of liver pathologies characterized by hepatic steatosis with a history of little to no alcohol consumption or secondary causes of hepatic steatosis. The prevalence of NAFLD is 20-25 % of the general population in the Western countries and is associated with metabolic risk factors such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. The spectrum of disease ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Advanced fibrosis is the most significant predictor of mortality in NAFLD. It is crucial to assess for the presence and degree of hepatic fibrosis in order to make therapeutic decisions and predict clinical outcomes. Liver biopsy, the current gold standard to assess the liver fibrosis, has a number of drawbacks such as invasiveness, sampling error, cost, and inter-/intra-observer variability. There are currently available a number of noninvasive tests as an alternative to liver biopsy for fibrosis staging. These noninvasive fibrosis tests are increasingly used to rule out advanced fibrosis and help guide disease management. While these noninvasive tests perform relatively well for ruling out advanced fibrosis, they also have limitations. Understanding the strengths and limitations of liver biopsy and the noninvasive tests is necessary for deciding when to use the appropriate tests in the evaluation of patients with NAFLD.

  12. Functions of autophagy in normal and diseased liver

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Mark J.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Donohue, Terrence M.; Friedman, Scott L.; Kim, Jae-Sung; Komatsu, Masaaki; Lemasters, John J.; Lemoine, Antoinette; Lin, Jiandie D.; Ou, Jing-hsiung James; Perlmutter, David H.; Randall, Glenn; Ray, Ratna B.; Tsung, Allan; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy has emerged as a critical lysosomal pathway that maintains cell function and survival through the degradation of cellular components such as organelles and proteins. Investigations specifically employing the liver or hepatocytes as experimental models have contributed significantly to our current knowledge of autophagic regulation and function. The diverse cellular functions of autophagy, along with unique features of the liver and its principal cell type the hepatocyte, suggest that the liver is highly dependent on autophagy for both normal function and to prevent the development of disease states. However, instances have also been identified in which autophagy promotes pathological changes such as the development of hepatic fibrosis. Considerable evidence has accumulated that alterations in autophagy are an underlying mechanism of a number of common hepatic diseases including toxin-, drug- and ischemia/reperfusion-induced liver injury, fatty liver, viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the roles that autophagy plays in normal hepatic physiology and pathophysiology with the intent of furthering the development of autophagy-based therapies for human liver diseases. PMID:23774882

  13. Pediatric fatty liver disease: Role of ethnicity and genetics

    PubMed Central

    Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Santoro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprehends a wide range of conditions, encompassing from fatty liver or steatohepatitis with or without fibrosis, to cirrhosis and its complications. NAFLD has become the most common form of liver disease in childhood as its prevalence has more than doubled over the past 20 years, paralleling the increased prevalence of childhood obesity. It currently affects between 3% and 11% of the pediatric population reaching the rate of 46% among overweight and obese children and adolescents. The prevalence of hepatic steatosis varies among different ethnic groups. The ethnic group with the highest prevalence is the Hispanic one followed by the Caucasian and the African-American. This evidence suggests that there is a strong genetic background in the predisposition to fatty liver. In fact, since 2008 several common gene variants have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease. The most important is probably the patatin like phospholipase containing domain 3 gene (PNPLA3) discovered by the Hobbs’ group in 2008. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the role of ethnicity and genetics in pathogenesis of pediatric fatty liver. PMID:24966605

  14. Surgically-Induced Weight Loss Significantly Improves Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Samer G.; Velcu, Laura M.; Rabinovitz, Mordechai; Demetris, A J.; Krasinskas, A M.; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Eid, George M.; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Taylor, Debra S.; Schauer, Philip R.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of surgical weight loss on fatty liver disease in severely obese patients. Summary Background Data: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a spectrum that extends to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, is rising at an alarming rate. This increase is occurring in conjunction with the rise of severe obesity and is probably mediated in part by metabolic syndrome (MS). Surgical weight loss operations, probably by reversing MS, have been shown to result in improvement in liver histology. Methods: Patients who underwent laparoscopic surgical weight loss operations from March 1999 through August 2004, and who agreed to have an intraoperative liver biopsy followed by at least one postoperative liver biopsy, were included. Results: There were 70 patients who were eligible. All patients underwent laparoscopic operations, the majority being laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The mean excess body weight loss at time of second biopsy was 59% ± 22% and the time interval between biopsies was 15 ± 9 months. There was a reduction in prevalence of metabolic syndrome, from 70% to 14% (P < 0.001), and a marked improvement in liver steatosis (from 88% to 8%), inflammation (from 23% to 2%), and fibrosis (from 31% to 13%; all P < 0.001). Inflammation and fibrosis resolved in 37% and 20% of patients, respectively, corresponding to improvement of 82% (P < 0.001) in grade and 39% (P < 0.001) in stage of liver disease. Conclusion: Surgical weight loss results in significant improvement of liver morphology in severely obese patients. These beneficial changes may be associated with a significant reduction in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:16192822

  15. The increasing burden of potentially preventable liver disease among adult liver transplant recipients: A comparative analysis of liver transplant indication by era in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jessica; Balderson, Glenda; Hellard, Margaret; Gow, Paul; Strasser, Simone; Stuart, Katherine; Wigg, Alan; Jeffrey, Gary; Gane, Ed; Angus, Peter W

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B (HBV), alcohol-related liver disease (ALD), and non-alcohol-related fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are leading indications for adult liver transplantation in Australia and New Zealand. However, these diseases are potentially preventable through effective primary and/or secondary prevention strategies. This study evaluates the relative contribution of potentially preventable liver diseases to liver transplant numbers in Australia and New Zealand over time. Prospectively recorded clinical, demographic, and outcome data were collected from the Australian and New Zealand Liver Transplant Registry for all primary adult liver transplants performed in Australia and New Zealand from 1 January 1985 until 31 December 2012. Potentially preventable liver disease was defined as HBV, HCV, NAFLD, ALD, and HCC. The etiology of liver disease leading to liver transplantation and the proportion of preventable liver disease-related liver transplantation was compared between Era 1 (1985-1993), Era 2 (1994-2003), and Era 3 (2004-2012). Overall, 1252 of 3266 adult primary liver transplants (38.3%) were performed for potentially preventable liver disease. There was a significant increase in the proportion of liver transplants because of preventable liver disease from 21.2% (93 of 439) in Era 1, to 49.8% (623 of 1252) in Era 2 and 63.5% (1000 of 1575) in Era 3 (P < 0.0001). Over time, there was a significant increase in HCV (P < 0.0001), ALD (P = 0.002), and NAFLD (P < 0.0001) as a primary indication for adult liver transplant, whereas HBV has significantly decreased from Era 1 to Era 3 as an indication for transplant (P < 0.0001). The number of transplants performed for HCC also increased across Eras (P < 0.0001), with 84% due to underlying potentially preventable liver disease. Since 2004, the majority of primary adult liver transplants within Australia and New Zealand have been because of potentially preventable liver diseases and the

  16. (131)I therapy in patients with benign thyroid disease does not conclusively lead to a higher risk of subsequent malignancies.

    PubMed

    Verburg, F A; Luster, M; Lassmann, M; Reiners, C

    2011-01-01

    Due to its excellent tolerability and low incidence of side effects, 131I therapy has been the treatment of choice for benign thyroid diseases for over 60 years. A potentially increased risk of malignancies due to this therapy is however still subject of debate. To review the literature pertaining to 131I therapy of benign thyroid diseases in order to establish whether there is an increased incidence of, or increased mortality due to malignancies of the thyroid or other organs. In order to allow for sufficient long-term follow-up time after 131I therapy, only literature after 1990 was reviewed. Two criteria were applied to consider an increased incidence of malignancies linked to 131I therapy: a) there should be a latency period of at least 5 years between 131I therapy and the observation of an increased risk b) an elevated risk should increase with increasing radiation exposure. A total of 7 studies reporting cancer incidence and / or mortality in 4 different patient collectives spanning a total of 54510 patients over an observation period varying from 2-49 years were found. Although some studies detected a slightly increased risk for malignancies of the thyroid or the digestive system, others did not find these effects - while other studies even reported a slightly lower risk of malignant (thyroid) disease after 131I therapy for benign thyroid diseases. As over 60 years of experience has thus far failed to produce conclusive evidence to the contrary, it can be concluded that there is no increased risk of malignancies after 131I therapy for benign thyroid disease.

  17. Nod2 deficiency protects mice from cholestatic liver disease by increasing renal excretion of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lirui; Hartmann, Phillipp; Haimerl, Michael; Bathena, Sai P.; Sjöwall, Christopher; Almer, Sven; Alnouti, Yazen; Hofmann, Alan F.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Chronic liver disease is characterized by fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis. Nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), a member of the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family of intracellular immune receptors, plays an important role in the defense against bacterial infection through binding to the ligand muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Here, we investigated the role of Nod2 in the development of liver fibrosis. Methods We studied experimental cholestatic liver disease induced by bile duct ligation or toxic liver disease induced by carbon tetrachloride in wild type and Nod2−/− mice. Results Nod2 deficiency protected mice from cholestatic but not toxin-induced liver injury and fibrosis. Most notably, the hepatic bile acid concentration was lower in Nod2−/− mice than wild type mice following bile duct ligation for 3 weeks. In contrast to wild type mice, Nod2−/− mice had increased urinary excretion of bile acids, including sulfated bile acids, and an upregulation of the bile acid efflux transporters MRP2 and MRP4 in tubular epithelial cells of the kidney. MRP2 and MRP4 were downregulated by IL-1β in a Nod2 dependent fashion. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Nod2 deficiency protects mice from cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis through enhancing renal excretion of bile acids that in turn contributes to decreased concentration of bile acids in the hepatocyte. PMID:24560660

  18. Conclusions and recommendations from the symposium, Beyond Cholesterol: Prevention and Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease with n-3 Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Deckelbaum, Richard J; Leaf, Alexander; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Jacobson, Terry A; Harris, William S; Akabas, Sharon R

    2008-06-01

    After the symposium "Beyond Cholesterol: Prevention and Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease with n-3 Fatty Acids," faculty who presented at the conference submitted manuscripts relating to their conference topics, and these are presented in this supplement. The content of these manuscripts was reviewed, and 2 conference calls were convened. The objective was to summarize existing evidence, gaps in evidence, and future research needed to strengthen recommendations for specific intakes of n-3 fatty acids for different conditions relating to cardiovascular disease. The following 2 questions were the main items discussed. What are the roles of n-3 fatty acids in primary versus secondary prevention of coronary heart disease? What are the roles of n-3 fatty acids in hypertriglyceridemia, in the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and in sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmias, and vulnerable plaque? Each area was summarized by using 2 general categories: 1) current knowledge for which general consensus exists, and 2) recommendations for research and policy. Additional references for these conclusions can be found in the articles included in the supplement.

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and aging: Epidemiology to management

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotti, Marco; Lonardo, Amedeo; Mussi, Chiara; Baldelli, Enrica; Pellegrini, Elisa; Ballestri, Stefano; Romagnoli, Dante; Loria, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common in the elderly, in whom it carries a more substantial burden of hepatic (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) and extra-hepatic manifestations and complications (cardiovascular disease, extrahepatic neoplasms) than in younger age groups. Therefore, proper identification and management of this condition is a major task for clinical geriatricians and geriatric hepatologists. In this paper, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of this condition are reviewed, and a full discussion of the link between NAFLD and the aspects that are peculiar to elderly individuals is provided; these aspects include frailty, multimorbidity, polypharmacy and dementia. The proper treatment strategy will have to consider the peculiarities of geriatric patients, so a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory. Non-pharmacological treatment (diet and physical exercise) has to be tailored individually considering the physical limitations of most elderly people and the need for an adequate caloric supply. Similarly, the choice of drug treatment must carefully balance the benefits and risks in terms of adverse events and pharmacological interactions in the common context of both multiple health conditions and polypharmacy. In conclusion, further epidemiological and pathophysiological insight is warranted. More accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of geriatric NAFLD will help in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach for individual elderly patients. PMID:25339806

  20. Transient elastography compared to liver biopsy and morphometry for predicting fibrosis in pediatric chronic liver disease: Does etiology matter?

    PubMed Central

    Behairy, Behairy El-Sayed; Sira, Mostafa Mohamed; Zalata, Khaled Refat; Salama, El-Sayed Ebrahem; Abd-Allah, Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    associated with higher LSM (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: TE appears reliable in distinguishing different stages of liver fibrosis in children. However, its values vary according to the disease type. For that, a disease-specific estimation of cut-off values for fibrosis staging is worthy. PMID:27122674

  1. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bambino, Kathryn; Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish; Chu, Jaime; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2018-02-26

    The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt , which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt, which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29361514

  3. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation - Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Filipec-Kanizaj, Tajana; Mijic, Maja; Jakopcic, Ivan; Milic, Sandra; Hrstic, Irena; Sobocan, Nikola; Stimac, Davor; Burra, Patrizia

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH) is a challenging and multisystem disease that has a high socioeconomic impact. NAFLD/NASH is a main cause of macrovesicular steatosis and has multiple impacts on liver transplantation (LT), on patients on the waiting list for transplant, on post-transplant setting as well as on organ donors. Current data indicate new trends in the area of chronic liver disease. Due to the increased incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, NASH cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma caused by NASH will soon become a major indication for LT. Furthermore, due to an increasing incidence of MetS and, consequently, NAFLD, there will be more steatotic donor livers and less high quality organs available for LT, in addition to a lack of available liver allografts. Patients who have NASH and are candidates for LT have multiple comorbidities and are unique LT candidates. Finally, we discuss long-term grafts and patient survival after LT, the recurrence of NASH and NASH appearing de novo after transplantation. In addition, we suggest topics and areas that require more research for improving the health care of this increasing patient population. PMID:29662288

  4. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Pathophysiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rotonya M.; Oranu, Amanke; Khungar, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract/Summary NAFLD is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide both because of cardiovascular, hepatic and oncologic sequelae as well as because it is rapidly becoming the leading cause of end stage liver disease and liver transplant. With a prevalence of 30% in the US, it has reached epidemic proportions. While the metabolic syndrome is a common risk factor, there are differences among racial and ethnic groups, suggesting the complex interaction between hormonal, nutritional and genetic factors at play in disease pathogenesis. The clinical syndrome of NAFLD spans from bland steatosis to steatohepatitis which can progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis. The pathogenesis including roles of hormones, nutritional and intestinal dysbiosis, insulin resistance, lipotoxicity, and hepatic inflammation, and genes are examined. Non-invasive testing and liver biopsy indications are reviewed. Approved and investigational therapies for NAFLD and NASH are outlined in this review of a disease that is currently an area of great interest to the hepatology community. PMID:27837778

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and dyslipidemia: An update.

    PubMed

    Katsiki, Niki; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide, progressing from simple steatosis to necroinflammation and fibrosis (leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), and in some cases to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance are involved in NAFLD development and progression. NAFLD has been associated with several cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension and smoking. NAFLD is also characterized by atherogenic dyslipidemia, postprandial lipemia and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction. Most importantly, NAFLD patients have an increased risk for both liver and CV disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. In this narrative review, the associations between NAFLD, dyslipidemia and vascular disease in NAFLD patients are discussed. NAFLD treatment is also reviewed with a focus on lipid-lowering drugs. Finally, future perspectives in terms of both NAFLD diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets are considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Senescence in chronic liver disease: Is the future in aging?

    PubMed

    Aravinthan, Aloysious D; Alexander, Graeme J M

    2016-10-01

    Cellular senescence is a fundamental, complex mechanism with an important protective role present from embryogenesis to late life across all species. It limits the proliferative potential of damaged cells thus protecting against malignant change, but at the expense of substantial alterations to the microenvironment and tissue homeostasis, driving inflammation, fibrosis and paradoxically, malignant disease if the process is sustained. Cellular senescence has attracted considerable recent interest with recognition of pathways linking aging, malignancy and insulin resistance and the current focus on therapeutic interventions to extend health-span. There are major implications for hepatology in the field of fibrosis and cancer, where cellular senescence of hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, stellate cells and immune cells has been implicated in chronic liver disease progression. This review focuses on cellular senescence in chronic liver disease and explores therapeutic opportunities. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Glycyrrhizic Acid in the Treatment of Liver Diseases: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-yuan; Cao, Hong-yan; Cheng, Gen-hong; Sun, Ming-yu

    2014-01-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is a triterpene glycoside found in the roots of licorice plants (Glycyrrhiza glabra). GA is the most important active ingredient in the licorice root, and possesses a wide range of pharmacological and biological activities. GA coupled with glycyrrhetinic acid and 18-beta-glycyrrhetic acid was developed in China or Japan as an anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antiallergic drug for liver disease. This review summarizes the current biological activities of GA and its medical applications in liver diseases. The pharmacological actions of GA include inhibition of hepatic apoptosis and necrosis; anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory actions; antiviral effects; and antitumor effects. This paper will be a useful reference for physicians and biologists researching GA and will open the door to novel agents in drug discovery and development from Chinese herbs. With additional research, GA may be more widely used in the treatment of liver diseases or other conditions. PMID:24963489

  8. Drug-induced Liver Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Iryna, Klyarytskaya; Helen, Maksymova; Elena, Stilidi

    2015-01-01

    The study presented here was accomplished to assess the course of drug-induced liver diseases in patient's rheumatoid arthritis receiving long-term methotrexate therapy. Diabetes mellitus was revealed as the most significant risk factor. The combination of diabetes mellitus with other risk factors (female sex) resulted in increased hepatic fibrosis, degree of hepatic encephalopathy and reduction of hepatic functions. The effectiveness and safety of ursodeoxycholic acid and cytolytic type-with S-Adenosyl methionine was also evaluated. 13C-MBT: 13C-methacetin breath test; ALT: alanine aminotransferase; AP: alkaline phosphatase; AST: aspartic transaminase; DILD: drug-induced liver disease; DM: diabetes mellitus; HE: hepatic encephalopathy; HFM: hepatic functional mass; SAMe: S-Adenosyl methionine; UDCA: ursodeoxycholic acid. Iryna K, Helen M, Elena S. Drug-induced Liver Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2015;5(2):83-86.

  9. Current treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Moctezuma-Velázquez, C

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most prevalent hepatopathy, estimated at 30% in the general population. In the coming years, it will likely be the most common indication for liver transplantation and the most frequent cause of hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is based on dietary and exercise interventions that have been shown to be efficacious, even for reverting fibrosis. Unfortunately, compliance with general measures involving lifestyle modifications is very poor, making pharmacologic strategies a necessary option. At present, there are no treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease approved by regulatory agencies, and the only ones with sufficient evidence and recommended by international societies are treatments with pioglitazone and vitamin E, which are not exempt from adverse effects. We review herein the current management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including dietary and physical activity interventions, available treatments, equivocal therapies, emerging treatments, and treatments presently in clinical trials. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Emerging roles of SIRT1 in fatty liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ren-Bo; Bao, Jiaolin; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Fatty liver diseases, which are commonly associated with high-fat/calorie diet, heavy alcohol consumption and/or other metabolic disorder causes, lead to serious medical concerns worldwide in recent years. It has been demonstrated that metabolic homeostasis disruption is most likely to be responsible for this global epidemic. Sirtuins are a group of conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) dependent histone and/or protein deacetylases belonging to the silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) family. Among seven mammalian sirtuins, sirtuin 1 (SIRT 1) is the most extensively studied one and is involved in both alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases. SIRT1 plays beneficial roles in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism, controlling hepatic oxidative stress and mediating hepatic inflammation through deacetylating some transcriptional regulators against the progression of fatty liver diseases. Here we summarize the latest advances of the biological roles of SIRT1 in regulating lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation in the liver, and discuss the potential of SIRT1 as a therapeutic target for treating alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases. PMID:28808418

  11. Expression and function of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Czech, Barbara; Dettmer, Katja; Valletta, Daniela; Saugspier, Michael; Koch, Andreas; Stevens, Axel P; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Müller, Martina; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2013-01-01

    To study expression and function of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), the rate-limiting enzyme in the methionine and adenine salvage pathway, in chronic liver disease. MTAP expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. Levels of MTA were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. MTAP was downregulated in hepatocytes in murine fibrosis models and in patients with chronic liver disease, leading to a concomitant increase in MTA levels. In contrast, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) showed strong MTAP expression in cirrhotic livers. However, also MTA levels in activated HSCs were significantly higher than in hepatocytes, and there was a significant correlation between MTA levels and collagen expression in diseased human liver tissue indicating that activated HSCs significantly contribute to elevated MTA in diseased livers. MTAP suppression by siRNA resulted in increased MTA levels, NFκB activation and apoptosis resistance, while overexpression of MTAP caused the opposite effects in HSCs. The anti-apoptotic effect of low MTAP expression and high MTA levels, respectively, was mediated by induced expression of survivin, while inhibition of survivin abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of MTA on HSCs. Treatment with a DNA demethylating agent induced MTAP and reduced survivin expression, while oxidative stress reduced MTAP levels but enhanced survivin expression in HSCs. MTAP mediated regulation of MTA links polyamine metabolism with NFκB activation and apoptosis in HSCs. MTAP and MTAP modulating mechanisms appear as promising prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for hepatic fibrosis.

  12. Ursodeoxycholic acid for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Katharine; Ashby, Deborah; Smyth, Rosalind L

    2014-12-15

    Abnormal biliary secretion leads to the thickening of bile and the formation of plugs within the bile ducts; the consequent obstruction and abnormal bile flow ultimately results in the development of cystic fibrosis-related liver disease. This condition peaks in adolescence with up to 20% of adolescents with cystic fibrosis developing chronic liver disease. Early changes in the liver may ultimately result in end-stage liver disease with people needing transplantation. One therapeutic option currently used is ursodeoxycholic acid. To analyse evidence that ursodeoxycholic acid improves indices of liver function, reduces the risk of developing chronic liver disease and improves outcomes in general in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane CF and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted drug companies.Date of the most recent search of the Group's trials register: 29 May 2014. Randomised controlled trials of the use of ursodeoxycholic acid for at least three months compared with placebo or no additional treatment in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and quality. Ten trials have been identified, of which three trials involving 118 participants were included; the dose of ursodeoxycholic acid ranged from 10 to 20 mg/kg/day for up to 12 months. The complex design used in two trials meant that data could only be analysed for subsets of participants. There was no significant difference in weight change, mean difference -0.90 kg (95% confidence interval -1.94 to 0.14) based on 30 participants from two trials. Improvement in biliary excretion was reported in only one trial and no significant change after treatment was shown. There were no data available for analysis for long-term outcomes such as death or need for liver transplantation. There are few

  13. A Different Perspective for Management of Diabetes Mellitus: Controlling Viral Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Xing, Huichun

    2017-01-01

    Knowing how to prevent and treat diabetes mellitus (DM) earlier is essential to improving outcomes. Through participating in synthesis and catabolism of glycogen, the liver helps to regulate glucose homeostasis. Viral related liver diseases are associated with glycometabolism disorders, which means effective management of viral liver diseases may be a therapeutic strategy for DM. The present article reviews the correlation between DM and liver diseases to give an update of the management of DM rooted by viral liver diseases.

  14. ADV36 adipogenic adenovirus in human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Garozzo, Adriana; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and liver steatosis are usually described as related diseases. Obesity is regarded as exclusive consequence of an imbalance between food intake and physical exercise, modulated by endocrine and genetic factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is a condition whose natural history is related to, but not completely explained by over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance. There is evidence that environmental infections, and notably adipogenic adenoviruses (ADV) infections in humans, are associated not only with obesity, which is sufficiently established, but also with allied conditions, such as fatty liver. In order to elucidate the role, if any, of previous ADV36 infection in humans, we investigated association of ADV36-ADV37 seropositivity with obesity and fatty liver in humans. Moreover, the possibility that lifestyle-nutritional intervention in patients with NAFLD and different ADV36 seropositive status, achieves different clinical outcomes on ultrasound bright liver imaging, insulin resistance and obesity was challenged. ADV36 seropositive patients have a more consistent decrease in insulin resistance, fatty liver severity and body weight in comparison with ADV36 seronegative patients, indicating a greater responsiveness to nutritional intervention. These effects were not dependent on a greater pre-interventional body weight and older age. These results imply that no obvious disadvantage - and, seemingly, that some benefit - is linked to ADV36 seropositivity, at least in NAFLD. ADV36 previous infection can boost weight loss and recovery of insulin sensitivity under interventional treatment. PMID:25356033

  15. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--new view].

    PubMed

    Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Lawniczak, Małgorzata; Marlicz, Wojciech; Miezyńska-Kurtycz, Joanna; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2008-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology--from steatosis alone, through the necroinflammatory disorder of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to cirrhosis and liver cancer. NAFLD/NASH is mostly related with visceral adiposity, obesity, type 2 diabetes melitus (DM t.2) and metabolic syndrome. Pathogenetic concepts of NAFLD include overnutrition and underactivity, insulin resistance (IR) and genetic factor. The prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated to be 17-33% in some countries, NASH may be present in about 1/3 of such cases, while 20-25% of NASH cases could progress to cirrhosis. NAFLD is now recognized as one of the most frequent reason of liver tests elevation without clinical symptoms. Insulin resistance is considering as having a central role in NAFLD pathogenesis. In hepatocytes, IR is related to hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, formation of advanced glycation end-products, increased free fatty acids and their metabolites, oxidative stress and altered profiles of adipocytokines. Early stages of fatty liver are clinically silent and include elevation of ALT and GGTP, hyperechogenic liver in USG and/or hepatomegaly. Among clinical symptoms, abdominal discomfort is relatively common as well as chronic fatigue. NAFLD/NASH is not a benign disease, progressive liver biopsy have shown histological progression of fibrosis in 32%, the estimated rate of cirrhosis development is 20% and a liver--related death is 12% over 10 years. No treatment has scientifically proved to ameliorate NAFLD or to avoid its progression. The various therapeutic alternatives are aimed at interfering with the risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder in order to prevent the progression to end-stage liver disease. The most important therapeutic measure is increasing insulin sensitivity by an attempt to change a lifestyle mostly by dieting and physical activity in order to loose weight. The most used agent is metformin, the others

  16. Role of autoimmunity in nonviral chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Amarapurkar, D N; Amarapurkar, A D

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and clinical profile of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in patients with chronic liver disease. Four hundred and thirty five consecutive patient with chronic liver disease seen in our department from January 1997 to December 1998 were studied with detailed history and clinical examination. All the patients underwent liver function tests, ultrasonography, isotope liver scanning, viral markers, autoimmune markers ANA, ASMA, LKM1 and AMA (by immunofluorescence technique) and liver histology whenever permissible. Appropriate work up for Wilson's disease was done whenever suspected clinically. Diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was made by the composite scoring system by international autoimmune hepatitis group. Twenty out of the 435 patients met the criteria of definite autoimmune hepatitis and seven patient had probable autoimmune hepatitis. Forty out of 408 patients showed markers of autoimmunity positive but did not qualify diagnosis of AIH on composite scores. Demographic profile of 27 patients with autoimmune hepatitis was as follows; male:female ratio 1:8, mean age 39.8 +/- 13 years (Range 4-65 years); mode of presentation as cirrhosis 11/27 (40.7%), chronic hepatitis 12/27 (44.4%) and acute hepatitis 4/27 (14.8%). Elevated serum bilirubin levels were seen in 12 (44.4%) patients while mean serum aminotransferases levels were 249 +/- 343 and 262 +/- 418 respectively. Other disease associations seen were as follows: diabetes in 4 (14.8%), rheumatoid arthritis in 3 (11%), hypothyroidism in 2 (7.4%) and ulcerative colitis in 1 (3.7%). The pattern of autoimmune markers was ANA +ve 23/27 (85%) (+ve titres of ANA > 1:80 in adults and 1:20 in children), ASMA +ve in 16/27 (59.2%) (+ve titres of ASMA > 1:40) and LKM1 in 3 patients. AMA in tires less than 1:80 was found in 3 patients. Liver histology changes seen were lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates (100%), bridging necrosis (93%), liver cell rossetting (80%) and fibrosis with or without cirrhosis (50

  17. Diagnosis of liver disease in domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius).

    PubMed

    Huynh, Minh; Laloi, Flora

    2013-01-01

    Liver disease in ferrets is often subclinical and underdiagnosed. Clinical pathology and diagnostic imaging are needed to guide clinicians but definite diagnosis is based on histopathologic lesions. Inflammatory digestive conditions can lead to ascending tract infection and hepatobiliary inflammation. Ferrets have a specific sensitivity to hepatic lipidosis. Incidence of hepatic neoplasia is high in ferrets. After a summary of anatomy and physiology of the ferret liver, hepatic diseases known in ferret species are reviewed with their subsequent diagnostic procedures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ursodeoxycholic acid in the treatment of liver diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Saksena, S.; Tandon, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid is a dihydroxy bile acid with a rapidly expanding spectrum of usage in acute and chronic liver diseases. The various mechanisms of action of this hydrophilic bile acid include direct cytoprotection, detergent action on dysfunctional microtubules, immunomodulation and induction of hypercholeresis. Its efficacy in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis as an adjunct to medical therapy has been well established. Newer indications include its use in the management of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, post liver transplant rejection, graft-versus-host disease and acute viral hepatitis, where it not only relieves symptoms of cholestasis but also arrests ongoing hepatocyte necrosis. PMID:9122101

  19. Sexual dysfunction in chronic liver disease: is liver transplantation an effective cure?

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia; Germani, Giacomo; Masier, Annalisa; De Martin, Eleonora; Gambato, Martina; Salonia, Andrea; Bo, Patrizio; Vitale, Alessandro; Cillo, Umberto; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Senzolo, Marco

    2010-06-27

    The goal of liver transplantation is not only to ensure patient long-term survival but also to offer the opportunity to achieve psychologic and physical integrity. Quality of life after liver transplantation may be affected by unsatisfactory sexual function. Before liver transplantation, sexual dysfunction and sex hormone disturbances are reported in men and women mainly due to abnormality of physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and, in some cases, origin of liver disease. Successful liver transplantation should theoretically restore hormonal balance and improve sexual function both in men and women, thus improving the reproductive performance. However, after transplantation, up to 25% of patients report persistent sexual dysfunction, and approximately one third of patients describe the appearance of de novo sexual dysfunction. Despite the described high prevalence of this condition, epidemiologic data are relatively scant. Further studies on pathophysiology and risk factors in the field of sexual function after liver transplantation along with new strategies to support and inform patients on the waiting list and after surgery are needed.

  20. Increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease after diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Norelle R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Green, Peter H R; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease. Celiac disease alters intestinal permeability and treatment with a gluten-free diet often causes weight gain, but so far there are few reports of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with celiac disease. Population-based cohort study. We compared the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosed from 1997 to 2009 in individuals with celiac disease (n = 26,816) to matched reference individuals (n = 130,051). Patients with any liver disease prior to celiac disease were excluded, as were individuals with a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol-related disorder to minimize misclassification of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were determined. During 246,559 person-years of follow-up, 53 individuals with celiac disease had a diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (21/100,000 person-years). In comparison, we identified 85 reference individuals diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease during 1,488,413 person-years (6/100,000 person-years). This corresponded to a hazard ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 2.0-3.8), with the highest risk estimates seen in children (HR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.3-9.1). The risk increase in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis was 13.3 (95% CI 3.5-50.3) but remained significantly elevated even beyond 15 years after the diagnosis of celiac disease (HR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.0-5.9). Individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease compared to the general population. Excess risks were highest in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis, but persisted through 15 years after diagnosis with celiac disease. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasma phospholipids and fatty acid composition differ between liver biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D W L; Arendt, B M; Hillyer, L M; Fung, S K; McGilvray, I; Guindi, M; Allard, J P

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with perturbations in liver lipid metabolism. Liver phospholipid and fatty acid composition have been shown to be altered in NAFLD. However, detailed profiles of circulating lipids in the pathogenesis of NAFLD are lacking. Objective: Therefore, the objective of the present study was to examine circulating lipids and potential mechanisms related to hepatic gene expression between liver biopsy-proven simple steatosis (SS), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and healthy subjects. Subjects: Plasma phospholipid and fatty acid composition were determined in 31 healthy living liver donors as healthy controls (HC), 26 patients with simple hepatic steatosis (SS) and 20 with progressive NASH. Hepatic gene expression was analyzed by Illumina microarray in a subset of 22 HC, 16 SS and 14 NASH. Results: Concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) increased relative to disease progression, HCConclusions: The present study demonstrates that there is a disruption in phospholipid metabolism that is present in SS, but more pronounced in NASH. Intervention studies targeted at lipid metabolism could benefit SS and NASH. PMID:27428872

  2. Single-Pass Percutaneous Liver Biopsy for Diffuse Liver Disease Using an Automated Device: Experience in 154 Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Sanfeliz, Gerant, E-mail: gerantrivera@ucsd.edu; Kinney, Thomas B.; Rose, Steven C.

    2005-06-15

    Purpose: To describe our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous liver biopsies using the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system.Methods: One hundred and fifty-four consecutive percutaneous core liver biopsy procedures were performed in 153 men in a single institution over 37 months. The medical charts, pathology reports, and radiology files were retrospectively reviewed. The number of needle passes, type of guidance, change in hematocrit level, and adequacy of specimens for histologic analysis were evaluated.Results: All biopsies were performed for histologic staging of chronic liver diseases. The majority of patients had hepatitis C (134/153, 90.2%). All patients were discharged to homemore » after 4 hr of postprocedural observation. In 145 of 154 (94%) biopsies, a single needle pass was sufficient for diagnosis. US guidance was utilized in all but one of the procedures (153/154, 99.4%). The mean hematocrit decrease was 1.2% (44.1-42.9%). Pain requiring narcotic analgesia, the most frequent complication, occurred in 28 of 154 procedures (18.2%). No major complications occurred. The specimens were diagnostic in 152 of 154 procedures (98.7%).Conclusions: Single-pass percutaneous US-guided liver biopsy with the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system is safe and provides definitive pathologic diagnosis of chronic liver disease. It can be performed on an outpatient basis. Routine post-biopsy monitoring of hematocrit level in stable, asymptomatic patients is probably not warranted.« less

  3. Beneficial effects of naringenin in liver diseases: Molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aquino, Erika; Muriel, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    Liver diseases are caused by different etiological agents, mainly alcohol consumption, viruses, drug intoxication or malnutrition. Frequently, liver diseases are initiated by oxidative stress and inflammation that lead to the excessive production of extracellular matrix (ECM), followed by a progression to fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been reported that some natural products display hepatoprotective properties. Naringenin is a flavonoid with antioxidant, antifibrogenic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties that is capable of preventing liver damage caused by different agents. The main protective effects of naringenin in liver diseases are the inhibition of oxidative stress, transforming growth factor (TGF-β) pathway and the prevention of the transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), leading to decreased collagen synthesis. Other effects include the inhibition of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), toll-like receptor (TLR) and TGF-β non-canonical pathways, the inhibition of which further results in a strong reduction in ECM synthesis and deposition. In addition, naringenin has shown beneficial effects on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) through the regulation of lipid metabolism, modulating the synthesis and oxidation of lipids and cholesterol. Moreover, naringenin protects from HCC, since it inhibits growth factors such as TGF-β and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), inducing apoptosis and regulating MAPK pathways. Naringenin is safe and acts by targeting multiple proteins. However, it possesses low bioavailability and high intestinal metabolism. In this regard, formulations, such as nanoparticles or liposomes, have been developed to improve naringenin bioavailability. We conclude that naringenin should be considered in the future as an important candidate in the treatment of different liver diseases. PMID:29713125

  4. Portopulmonary Hypertension in Liver Disease Presenting in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Ecochard-Dugelay, Emmanuelle; Lambert, Virginie; Schleich, Jean-Marc; Duché, Mathieu; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (POPH) is a known complication of cirrhosis in adults, but there is little information on its incidence and outcome in children with liver disease. We report 14 patients with POPH and present a synthesis of the medical literature. Diagnosis of POPH in the 14 patients was based on right-sided heart catheterization displaying mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg, indexed pulmonary vascular resistances >3 Wood units · m, and pulmonary wedge pressure <15 mmHg. A literature review added 84 patients. In our unit, POPH was found in 0.5% of the children with portal hypertension, 0.9% of the children with end-stage liver disease awaiting transplantation, and 3 children with congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSSs). Analysis of 98 reported patients, including the 14 presented here, showed the cause of liver disease to be chronic liver disease or portal cavernoma in 76 instances (34 with a history of surgical portosystemic shunt) and CPSS in 22 instances. There was a precession with proven hypoxemia caused by hepatopulmonary syndrome in 6 patients. Median survival was 3 months in 56 untreated patients. An 80% 5-year probability of survival in 42 patients was treated by CPSS closure, pulmonary vasodilators, and/or liver transplantation. Mean pretransplant mPAP was 34 and 49 mmHg in transplant survivors and nonsurvivors, respectively. POPH is a rare but extremely severe complication of childhood liver disease. Portosystemic shunts, whether congenital or acquired, likely play an important causative role. Early diagnosis is crucial and requires systematic screening by echocardiography in children at risk.

  5. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment. (I). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its association with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically lesions similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in the Western world and, from the point of view of the liver, in its gradual progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with acceleration of arteriosclerosis and events related to it, being the main cause of its morbidity and mortality. This review, updated to January 2016, consists of two parts, with the first part analysing the association of NAFLD with cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Multicausality in fatty liver disease: Is there a rationale to distinguish between alcoholic and non-alcoholic origin?

    PubMed Central

    Völzke, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Apart from alcohol, there are other factors that may induce complications, which resemble alcohol-related liver disorders. In particular, obesity has been brought into focus as a risk factor for fatty liver disease. The term “non-alcoholic” fatty liver disease is commonly used to distinguish between obesity-related and alcohol-related hepatic steatosis. This review uses the epidemiological perspective to critically assess whether it is necessary and useful to differentiate between alcoholic and “non-alcoholic” fatty liver disease. The MEDLINE database was searched using the PubMed search engine, and a review of reference lists from original research and review articles was conducted. The concept to distinguish between alcoholic and “non-alcoholic” fatty liver disease is mainly based on specific pathomechanisms. This concept has, however, several limitations including the common overlap between alcohol misuse and obesity-related metabolic disorders and the non-consideration of additional causal factors. Both entities share similar histopathological patterns. Studies demonstrating differences in clinical presentation and outcome are often biased by selection. Risk factor reduction is the main principle of prevention and treatment of both disease forms. In conclusion, alcoholic and “non-alcoholic” fatty liver diseases are one and the same disease caused by different risk factors. A shift from artificial categories to a more general approach to fatty liver disease as a multicausal disorder may optimize preventive strategies and help clinicians more effectively treat patients at the individual level. PMID:22826613

  7. Gut Microbiota and Host Reaction in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Although alcohol feeding produces evident intestinal microbial changes in animals, only some alcoholics show evident intestinal dysbiosis, a decrease in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Gut dysbiosis is related to intestinal hyperpermeability and endotoxemia in alcoholic patients. Alcoholics further exhibit reduced numbers of the beneficial Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Large amounts of endotoxins translocated from the gut strongly activate Toll-like receptor 4 in the liver and play an important role in the progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), especially in severe alcoholic liver injury. Gut microbiota and bacterial endotoxins are further involved in some of the mechanisms of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). There is experimental evidence that a high-fat diet causes characteristic dysbiosis of NAFLD, with a decrease in Bacteroidetes and increases in Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and gut dysbiosis itself can induce hepatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome. Clinical data support the above dysbiosis, but the details are variable. Intestinal dysbiosis and endotoxemia greatly affect the cirrhotics in relation to major complications and prognosis. Metagenomic approaches to dysbiosis may be promising for the analysis of deranged host metabolism in NASH and cirrhosis. Management of dysbiosis may become a cornerstone for the future treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27682116

  8. [Legionnaire's disease with predominant liver involvement].

    PubMed

    Magro Molina, A; Plaza Poquet, V; Giner Galvañ, V

    2002-04-01

    Like other pneumonias due to atypical agents, pneumonia due to Legionela Pneumophila has no characteristic clinical facts, although fever and non-productive cough are almost constant and diarrhea with changes in mental status are common. Hyponatremia and moderate transient hypertransaminasemia are common too. Severe systemic affectation after hematogenous dissemination similar to those described with typical bacterial pneumonias is a prominent difference with other atypical agents, with high mortality rates in the absence of appropriate treatment. Etiological diagnosis is very difficult and it is normally achieved late in the course of the infection. Because of diagnostic difficulties and potential mortality in predisposed patients, empirical antibiotherapy has been extensively recommended. We present a patient affected by critical community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionela Pneumophila serogroup 1 with liver alteration as the main manifestation and good response to empirical antibiotherapy with claritromycine and rifampin. We recommended the empirical use of such therapy in those pneumonias without microbiological diagnosis and torpid evolution.

  9. Epidemiology and Mortality of Liver Abscess in End-Stage Renal Disease Dialysis Patients: Taiwan National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Chang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Yang, Chun-Ming; Chu, Chin-Chen; Chio, Chung-Ching; Chang, Fu-Lin; Chien, Chih-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives To determine the incidence rates and mortality of liver abscess in ESRD patients on dialysis. Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we collected data from all ESRD patients who initiated dialysis between 2000 and 2006. Patients were followed until death, end of dialysis, or December 31, 2008. Predictors of liver abscess and mortality were identified using Cox models. Results Of the 53,249 incident dialysis patients identified, 447 were diagnosed as having liver abscesses during the follow-up period (224/100,000 person-years). The cumulative incidence rate of liver abscess was 0.3%, 1.1%, and 1.5% at 1 year, 5 years, and 7 years, respectively. Elderly patients and patients on peritoneal dialysis had higher incidence rates. The baseline comorbidities of diabetes mellitus, polycystic kidney disease, malignancy, chronic liver disease, biliary tract disease, or alcoholism predicted development of liver abscess. Overall in-hospital mortality was 10.1%. Conclusions The incidence of liver abscess is high among ESRD dialysis patients. In addition to the well known risk factors of liver abscess, two other important risk factors, peritoneal dialysis and polycystic kidney disease, were found to predict liver abscess in ESRD dialysis patients. PMID:24551077

  10. Gut-Liver Axis Derangement in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Marco; Pierri, Luca; Vajro, Pietro

    2017-08-02

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent type of chronic liver disease in the pediatric age group, paralleling an obesity pandemic. A "multiple-hit" hypothesis has been invoked to explain its pathogenesis. The "first hit" is liver lipid accumulation in obese children with insulin resistance. In the absence of significant lifestyle modifications leading to weight loss and increased physical activity, other factors may act as "second hits" implicated in liver damage progression leading to more severe forms of inflammation and hepatic fibrosis. In this regard, the gut-liver axis (GLA) seems to play a central role. Principal players are the gut microbiota, its bacterial products, and the intestinal barrier. A derangement of GLA (namely, dysbiosis and altered intestinal permeability) may promote bacteria/bacterial product translocation into portal circulation, activation of inflammation via toll-like receptors signaling in hepatocytes, and progression from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH). Among other factors a relevant role has been attributed to the farnesoid X receptor, a nuclear transcriptional factor activated from bile acids chemically modified by gut microbiota (GM) enzymes. The individuation and elucidation of GLA derangement in NAFLD pathomechanisms is of interest at all ages and especially in pediatrics to identify new therapeutic approaches in patients recalcitrant to lifestyle changes. Specific targeting of gut microbiota via pre-/probiotic supplementation, feces transplantation, and farnesoid X receptor modulation appear promising.

  11. Management of Neurologic Manifestations in Patients with Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Viana, Pedro; Santos, Patrícia

    2016-08-01

    Liver disease, both in its acute and chronic forms, can be associated with a wide spectrum of neurologic manifestations, both central and peripheral, ranging in severity from subclinical changes to neurocritical conditions. Neurologists are frequently consulted to participate in their management. In this review, we present an overview of management strategies for patients with hepatic disease whose clinical course is complicated by neurologic manifestations. Type A hepatic encephalopathy (HE), which occurs in acute liver failure, is a neurologic emergency, and multiple measures should be taken to prevent and treat cerebral edema. In Type C HE, which occurs in chronic liver disease, management should be aimed at correcting precipitant factors and hyperammonemia. There is an increasing spectrum of drug treatments available to minimize ammonia toxicity. Acquired hepatocerebral degeneration is a rare complication of the chronic form of HE, with typical clinical and brain MRI findings, whose most effective treatment is liver transplantation. Epilepsy is frequent and of multifactorial cause in patients with hepatic disease, and careful considerations should be made regarding choice of the appropriate anti-epileptic drugs. Several mechanisms increase the risk of stroke in hepatic disease, but many of the drugs used to treat and prevent stroke are contraindicated in severe hepatic failure. Hepatitis C infection increases the risk of ischemic stroke. Hemorrhagic stroke is more frequent in patients with liver disease of alcoholic etiology. Viral hepatitis is associated with a wide range of immune-mediated complications, mostly in the peripheral nervous system, which respond to different types of immunomodulatory treatment. Several drugs used to treat hepatic disease, such as the classical and the new direct-acting antivirals, may have neurologic complications which in some cases preclude its continued use.

  12. The global burden of liver disease: the major impact of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Fan, Jian-Gao; Zhang, Zheng; Gao, Bin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Liver disease is a major cause of illness and death worldwide. In China alone, liver diseases, primarily viral hepatitis (predominantly hepatitis B virus [HBV]), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and alcoholic liver disease, affect approximately 300 million people. The establishment of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1992 has resulted in a substantial decline in the number of newly HBV-infected patients; however, the number of patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases is rising at an alarming rate. Liver cancer, one of the most deadly cancers, is the second-most common cancer in China. Approximately 383,000 people die from liver cancer every year in China, which accounts for 51% of the deaths from liver cancer worldwide. Over the past 10 years, China has made some significant efforts to shed its "leader in liver diseases" title by investing large amounts of money in funding research, vaccines, and drug development for liver diseases and by recruiting many Western-trained hepatologists and scientists. Over the last two decades, hepatologists and scientists in China have made significant improvements in liver disease prevention, diagnosis, management, and therapy. They have been very active in liver disease research, as shown by the dramatic increase in the number of publications in Hepatology. Nevertheless, many challenges remain that must be tackled collaboratively. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and characteristics of liver diseases and liver-related research in China. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. The significance of mouse liver tumor formation for carcinogenic risk assessment: results and conclusions from a survey of ten years of testing by the agrochemical industry.

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, N G; Enzmann, H; Pate, I; Waechter, F

    1997-01-01

    A survey was performed on the results of 138 carcinogenicity studies conducted in various mouse strains by the agrochemical industry over the period 1983-1993. Data for liver tumor incidence, liver weight, and histopathology were collected along with data on genotoxicity. Studies were judged positive or negative for liver tumor formation on the basis of apparent dose response, malignancy, and difference from historical control values using a weight of evidence approach. Thirty-seven studies were judged to be positive for liver tumorigenicity in one or both sexes. There was no evidence showing an influence of the mouse strain and the duration of the study on the proportion of positive studies. Although 8 of the chemicals tested in the 138 studies were positive in the Ames test, only one of these was judged positive for carcinogenicity. Only 6 of the 37 positive chemicals had any other reported positive genotoxicity findings. A clear relationship between hepatomegaly at 1 year after exposure and a positive tumorigenic outcome at 18 months or 2 years after exposure was demonstrated. Whereas the average relative liver weight of top dose animals was 110% of control in negative studies, it was 150% in positive studies. Likewise, very few negative studies demonstrated significant pathological findings after 1 year, whereas the majority of positive studies had significant liver pathology. The implications of these findings for extrapolation to humans are discussed. Images p1196-a Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 1. D Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. PMID:9370513

  14. New Discriminant Method for Identifying the Aggressive Disease Phenotype of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yusuke; Ikeda, Kenji; Arase, Yasuji; Fujiyama, Shunichiro; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Saitoh, Satoshi; Sezaki, Hitomi; Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2017-01-01

    Objective To detect the aggressive phenotype (AP) of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on the initial laboratory data and clinical characteristics. Methods We enrolled 144 patients with histologically proven NAFLD. For the first analysis, 24 NAFLD patients underwent repeat biopsy to establish a discriminant formula for predicting the AP of NAFLD (D-APN). The AP was defined by NAFLD that had been maintained or progressed to a fibrotic stage beyond stage 2. In the second analysis, we analyzed the distribution of the AP in each stage of disease and the incidence of the PNPLA3 rs738409 GG genotype in AP in 120 other patients. Results After the analysis, the following function was found to discriminate the disease phenotype: z=0.150×body mass index (kg/m 2 )+0.085×age (years)+1.112×ln (AST) (IU/L)+0.127×ln (m-AST)-12.96. A positive result indicates the AP of NAFLD. The discriminant functions had a positive predictive value of 94% and a negative predictive value of 71%. The distribution of the AP and the incidence of the PNPLA3 GG genotype in the AP in each stage of the disease among the 120 patients were as follows: non-alcoholic fatty liver, 30%/33%; non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) stage 1, 53%/26%; stage 2, 71%/70%; stage 3, 92%/57%; and stage 4, 93%/64%; there was a significant increase in the incidence of the AP as the disease progressed (p<0.001). Conclusion The new discriminant formula was useful for predicting disease progression potential in NAFLD patients and the incidence of the PNPLA3 GG genotype was elevated according to the distribution of AP.

  15. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease phenotypes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Alessandro; Gitto, Stefano; Bianchini, Marcello; Verga, Maria Chiara; Di Girolamo, Maria; Bertani, Angela; Del Buono, Mariagrazia; Schepis, Filippo; Lei, Barbara; De Maria, Nicola; Villa, Erica

    2018-01-24

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can be detected in up to 33.6% of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, often in absence of metabolic risk factors. Nevertheless, most of previous studies on such issue were conducted within the IBD population only. The primary aim of this study was to compare clinical and metabolic features of NAFLD in patients with and without IBD (w/o IBD) and to identify specific NAFLD phenotypes within the IBD population. Among 223 NAFLD patients, 78 patients with IBD were younger compared to 145 without (w/o) IBD, were less likely to have altered liver enzymes, had lower mean body weight, smaller waist circumference and lower body mass index (BMI); at the same time, MetS was more prevalent among patients w/o IBD (56.6 vs. 23.1%, p < 0.001). Within IBD population, patients with severe IBD showed more often severe steatosis (S3) at ultrasound (US) (32.1 vs. 16.6%, p = 0.01), compared to mild-to-moderate disease. Independent risk factors for S3 US steatosis in IBD patients at the multivariate logistic regression analysis were: more than 1 IBD relapse per year during disease history (OR 17.3, 95% CI 3.6-84), surgery for IBD (OR 15.1, 95% CI 3.1-73.7) and more extensive intestinal involvement (OR 19.4, 95% CI 3.4-110.9); the ongoing anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (antiTNFα) therapy was the only independent factor which protect toward the presence of altered liver enzymes (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0-0.8, p = 0.02). In conclusion, NAFLD in IBD patients is different from that in patients w/o IBD, who seem to develop different NAFLD phenotypes according to intestinal disease clinical course. More severe IBD seem to predict the presence of more severe steatosis. Therapy with antiTNFα antibodies could prevent alteration of liver enzymes in such population.

  16. Serum adipokines might predict liver histology findings in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Raika; Razavizade, Mohsen; Arj, Abbas; Aarabi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-06-07

    To assess significance of serum adipokines to determine the histological severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients with persistent elevation in serum aminotransferase levels and well-defined characteristics of fatty liver at ultrasound were enrolled. Individuals with a history of alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic medication, viral hepatitis or known liver disease were excluded. Liver biopsy was performed to confirm non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD). The degrees of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis were determined based on the non-alcoholic fatty liver activity score (NAS) by a single expert pathologist. Patients with a NAS of five or higher were considered to have steatohepatitis. Those with a NAS of two or lower were defined as simple fatty liver. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent association of adipokines with histological findings. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to determine cut-off values of serum adipokines to discriminate the grades of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis. Fifty-four participants aged 37.02 ± 9.82 were enrolled in the study. Higher serum levels of visfatin, IL-8, TNF-α levels were associated independently with steatosis grade of more than 33% [β = 1.08 (95%CI: 1.03-1.14), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.008-1.07), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.004-1.08), P < 0.05]. Elevated serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels were associated independently with advanced lobular inflammation [β = 1.4 (95%CI: 1.09-1.8), 1.07 (95%CI: 1.003-1.15), P < 0.05]. Similarly, higher TNF-α, resistin, and hepcidin levels were associated independently with advanced fibrosis stage [β = 1.06 (95%CI: 1.002-1.12), 19.86 (95%CI: 2.79-141.19), 560.72 (95%CI: 5.98-5255.33), P < 0.05]. Serum IL-8 and TNF-α values were associated independently with the NAS score, considering a NAS score of 5 as the reference value [β = 1.05 (95%CI: 1.01-1.1), 1.13 (95%CI: 1.04-1.22), P < 0.05]. Certain adipokines may

  17. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: East Versus West

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Duseja, Ajay K

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important cause of liver disease worldwide with prevalence ranging from 10% to 30% in various countries. It has become an important cause of unexplained rise in transaminases, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma. Pathogenesis is related to obesity, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, lipotoxicity, and resultant inflammation in the liver progressing to fibrosis. Pharmacological treatment in patients with NAFLD is still evolving and the treatment of these patients rests upon lifestyle modification with diet and exercise being the cornerstones of therapy. While there are many similarities between patients with NAFLD from Asia and the West, there are certain features which make the patients with NAFLD from Asia stand apart. This review highlights the data on NAFLD from Asia comparing it with the data from the West. PMID:25755421

  18. Insulin resistance in clinical and experimental alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rotonya M.; Correnti, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the number one cause of liver failure worldwide; its management costs billions of health care dollars annually. Since the advent of the obesity epidemic, insulin resistance and diabetes have become common clinical findings in patients with ALD; and the development of insulin resistance predicts the progression from simple steatosis to cirrhosis in ALD patients. Both clinical and experimental data implicate the impairment of several mediators of insulin signaling in ALD, and experimental data suggest that insulin-sensitizing therapies improve liver histology. This review explores the contribution of impaired insulin signaling in ALD and summarizes the current understanding of the synergistic relationship between alcohol and nutrient excess in promoting hepatic inflammation and disease. PMID:25998863

  19. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Alcoholic liver disease confers a worse prognosis than HCV infection and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease among patients with cirrhosis: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Marot, Astrid; Henrion, Jean; Knebel, Jean-François; Moreno, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis is a heterogeneous clinical condition that includes patients at wide-ranging stages of severity. The role of the underlying liver disease on patient prognosis remains unclear. Aim To assess the impact of the underlying liver disease on the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and death. Methods Data related to the occurrence of HCC and death were collected during a 21-year period among patients with cirrhosis related to alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 529), chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (n = 145) or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 78). Results At inclusion, ALD patients were younger than HCV and NAFLD patients (56 vs. 67 vs. 63 years; p<0.001) and had worse liver function (percent of patients with Child-Pugh stages B or C: 48% vs. 8% vs. 17%; p<0.001). During follow-up, 85 patients developed HCC and 379 died. The 10-year cumulative incidence rate of HCC was lower in ALD patients than in HCV and NAFLD patients (8.4% vs. 22.0% vs. 23.7%; p<0.001). The 10-year cumulative incidence rates of mortality were not statistically different between ALD, HCV and NAFLD patients (58.1% vs. 47.7% vs. 49.9%; p = 0.078). Alcohol abstinence and viral eradication were associated with reduced mortality among ALD and HCV patients, respectively. In multivariate analyses, ALD was associated with a reduced risk of HCC (0.39; 95% CI, 0.20–0.76; p = 0.005) but with a higher risk of mortality (1.53; 95% CI, 1.20–1.95; p<0.001). ALD patients died more frequently from decompensation of cirrhosis. Conclusion Despite a lower incidence of HCC, patients with ALD-related cirrhosis have a worse outcome than those with chronic HCV infection or NAFLD-related cirrhosis. PMID:29077714

  1. Risk for development of severe liver disease in lean patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hagström, Hannes; Nasr, Patrik; Ekstedt, Mattias; Hammar, Ulf; Stål, Per; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Kechagias, Stergios

    2018-01-01

    Most patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are overweight or obese. However, a significant proportion of patients have a normal body mass index (BMI), denoted as lean NAFLD. The long-term prognosis of lean NAFLD is unclear. We conducted a cohort study of 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Patients were defined as lean (BMI < 25.0), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9), or obese (BMI ≥ 30.0) at the time of biopsy. Each case was matched for age, sex, and municipality to 10 controls. Overall mortality and development of severe liver disease were evaluated using population-based registers. Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, type 2 diabetes, and fibrosis stage were used to examine the long-term risk of mortality and liver-related events in lean and nonlean NAFLD. Lean NAFLD was seen in 19% of patients, while 52% were overweight and 29% were obese. Patients with lean NAFLD were older, had lower transaminases, lower stages of fibrosis, and lower prevalence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis at baseline compared to patients with a higher BMI. During a mean follow-up of 19.9 years (range 0.4-40 years) representing 12,631 person years and compared to patients who were overweight, patients with lean NAFLD had no increased risk for overall mortality (hazard ratio 1.06; P =  0.73) while an increased risk for development of severe liver disease was found (hazard ratio 2.69; P =  0.007). Conclusion : Although patients with lean NAFLD have lower stages of fibrosis, they are at higher risk for development of severe liver disease compared to patients with NAFLD and a higher BMI, independent of available confounders. ( Hepatology Communications 2018;2:48-57).

  2. Serum proinflammatory cytokines and nutritional status in pediatric chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Santetti, Daniele; de Albuquerque Wilasco, Maria Inês; Dornelles, Cristina Toscani Leal; Werlang, Isabel Cristina Ribas; Fontella, Fernanda Urruth; Kieling, Carlos Oscar; dos Santos, Jorge Luiz; Vieira, Sandra Maria Gonçalves; Goldani, Helena Ayako Sueno

    2015-01-01

    -Pugh score (P = 0.001). This association remained significant after adjusting for nutritional status in a linear regression model. CONCLUSION: High IL-6 levels were found in children with chronic liver disease at nutritional risk. Inflammatory activity may be related to nutritional status deterioration in these patients. PMID:26269683

  3. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vassilatou, Evangeline

    2014-07-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world comprising a spectrum of liver damage from fatty liver infiltration to end-stage liver disease, in patients without significant alcohol consumption. Increased prevalence of NAFLD has been reported in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common endocrinopathies in premenopausal women, which has been redefined as a reproductive and metabolic disorder after the recognition of the important role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Obesity, in particular central adiposity and insulin resistance are considered as the main factors related to NAFLD in PCOS. Moreover, existing data support that androgen excess, which is the main feature of PCOS and is interrelated to insulin resistance, may be an additional contributing factor to the development of NAFLD. Although the natural history of NAFLD remains unclear and hepatic steatosis seems to be a relatively benign condition in most patients, limited data imply that advanced stage of liver disease is possibly more frequent in obese PCOS patients with NAFLD. PCOS patients, particularly obese patients with features of the metabolic syndrome, should be submitted to screening for NAFLD comprising assessment of serum aminotransferase levels and of hepatic steatosis by abdominal ultrasound. Lifestyle modifications including diet, weight loss and exercise are the most appropriate initial therapeutic interventions for PCOS patients with NAFLD. When pharmacologic therapy is considered, metformin may be used, although currently there is no medical therapy of proven benefit for NAFLD. Long-term follow up studies are needed to clarify clinical implications and guide appropriate diagnostic evaluation, follow-up protocol and optimal treatment for PCOS patients with NAFLD.

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vassilatou, Evangeline

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world comprising a spectrum of liver damage from fatty liver infiltration to end-stage liver disease, in patients without significant alcohol consumption. Increased prevalence of NAFLD has been reported in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common endocrinopathies in premenopausal women, which has been redefined as a reproductive and metabolic disorder after the recognition of the important role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Obesity, in particular central adiposity and insulin resistance are considered as the main factors related to NAFLD in PCOS. Moreover, existing data support that androgen excess, which is the main feature of PCOS and is interrelated to insulin resistance, may be an additional contributing factor to the development of NAFLD. Although the natural history of NAFLD remains unclear and hepatic steatosis seems to be a relatively benign condition in most patients, limited data imply that advanced stage of liver disease is possibly more frequent in obese PCOS patients with NAFLD. PCOS patients, particularly obese patients with features of the metabolic syndrome, should be submitted to screening for NAFLD comprising assessment of serum aminotransferase levels and of hepatic steatosis by abdominal ultrasound. Lifestyle modifications including diet, weight loss and exercise are the most appropriate initial therapeutic interventions for PCOS patients with NAFLD. When pharmacologic therapy is considered, metformin may be used, although currently there is no medical therapy of proven benefit for NAFLD. Long-term follow up studies are needed to clarify clinical implications and guide appropriate diagnostic evaluation, follow-up protocol and optimal treatment for PCOS patients with NAFLD. PMID:25024594

  5. Wilson disease: changes in methionine metabolism and inflammation affect global DNA methylation in early liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Shibata, Noreene M.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; LaSalle, Janine M.; Woods, Rima; Liu, Sarah; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Devaraj, Sridevi; Török, Natalie J.; Jiang, Joy X.; Havel, Peter J.; Lönnerdal, Bo; Kim, Kyoungmi; Halsted, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic methionine metabolism may play an essential role in regulating methylation status and liver injury in Wilson disease (WD) through the inhibition of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) by copper (Cu) and the consequent accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). We studied the transcript levels of selected genes related to liver injury, levels of SAHH, SAH, DNA methyltransferases genes (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b) and global DNA methylation in the tx-j mouse (tx-j), an animal model of WD. Findings were compared to those in control C3H mice, and in response to Cu chelation by penicillamine (PCA) and dietary supplementation of the methyl donor betaine to modulate inflammatory and methylation status. Transcript levels of selected genes related to endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation were down-regulated at baseline in tx-j mice, further down-regulated in response to PCA, and showed little to no response to betaine. Hepatic Sahh transcript and protein levels were reduced in tx-j mice with consequent increase of SAH levels. Hepatic Cu accumulation was associated with inflammation, as indicated by histopathology and elevated serum ALT and liver tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnf-α) levels. Dnmt3b was down-regulated in tx-j mice together with global DNA hypomethylation. PCA treatment of tx-j mice reduced Tnf-α and ALT levels, betaine treatment increased S-adenosylmethionine and up-regulated Dnmt3b levels, and both treatments restored global DNA methylation levels. Conclusion: reduced hepatic Sahh expression was associated with increased liver SAH levels in the tx-j model of WD, with consequent global DNA hypomethylation. Increased global DNA methylation was achieved by reducing inflammation by Cu chelation or by providing methyl groups. We propose that increased SAH levels and inflammation affect widespread epigenetic regulation of gene expression in WD. PMID:22945834

  6. Three-dimensional printing and pediatric liver disease.

    PubMed

    Alkhouri, Naim; Zein, Nizar N

    2016-10-01

    Enthusiastic physicians and medical researchers are investigating the role of three-dimensional printing in medicine. The purpose of the current review is to provide a concise summary of the role of three-dimensional printing technology as it relates to the field of pediatric hepatology and liver transplantation. Our group and others have recently demonstrated the feasibility of printing three-dimensional livers with identical anatomical and geometrical landmarks to the native liver to facilitate presurgical planning of complex liver surgeries. Medical educators are exploring the use of three-dimensional printed organs in anatomy classes and surgical residencies. Moreover, mini-livers are being developed by regenerative medicine scientist as a way to test new drugs and, eventually, whole livers will be grown in the laboratory to replace organs with end-stage disease solving the organ shortage problem. From presurgical planning to medical education to ultimately the bioprinting of whole organs for transplantation, three-dimensional printing will change medicine as we know in the next few years.

  7. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Gut-Liver Axis, Nutrition, and Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kirpich, Irina A.; Marsano, Luis S.; McClain, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of diseases involving hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation with the potential progression to fibrosis and cirrhosis over time. NAFLD is often associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The interactions between the liver and the gut, the so-called ”gut-liver axis”, play a critical role in NAFLD onset and progression. Compelling evidence links the gut microbiome, intestinal barrier integrity, and NAFLD. The dietary factors may alter the gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, favoring the occurrence of metabolic endotoxemia and low grade inflammation, thereby contributing to the development of obesity and obesity-associated fatty liver disease. Therapeutic manipulations with prebiotics and probiotics to modulate the gut microbiota and maintain intestinal barrier integrity are potential agents for NAFLD management. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the complex interplay between the gut microbiota, intestinal barrier, and dietary factors in NAFLD pathogenesis. The concepts addressed in this review have important clinical implications, although more work needs to be done to understand how dietary factors affect the gut barrier and microbiota, and to comprehend how microbe-derived components may interfere with the host’s metabolism contributing to NAFLD development. PMID:26151226

  9. Systematic review: unmet supportive care needs in people diagnosed with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Valery, Patricia C; Powell, Elizabeth; Moses, Neta; Volk, Michael L; McPhail, Steven M; Clark, Paul J; Martin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objective People with chronic liver disease, particularly those with decompensated cirrhosis, experience several potentially debilitating complications that can have a significant impact on activities of daily living and quality of life. These impairments combined with the associated complex treatment mean that they are faced with specific and high levels of supportive care needs. We aimed to review reported perspectives, experiences and concerns of people with chronic liver disease worldwide. This information is necessary to guide development of policies around supportive needs screening tools and to enable prioritisation of support services for these patients. Design Systematic searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO from the earliest records until 19 September 2014. Data were extracted using standardised forms. A qualitative, descriptive approach was utilised to analyse and synthesise data. Results The initial search yielded 2598 reports: 26 studies reporting supportive care needs among patients with chronic liver disease were included, but few of them were patient-reported needs, none used a validated liver disease-specific supportive care need assessment instrument, and only three included patients with cirrhosis. Five key domains of supportive care needs were identified: informational or educational (eg, educational material, educational sessions), practical (eg, daily living), physical (eg, controlling pruritus and fatigue), patient care and support (eg, support groups), and psychological (eg, anxiety, sadness). Conclusions While several key domains of supportive care needs were identified, most studies included hepatitis patients. There is a paucity of literature describing the supportive care needs of the chronic liver disease population likely to have the most needs—namely those with cirrhosis. Assessing the supportive care needs of people with chronic liver disease have potential utility in clinical practice for facilitating timely referrals

  10. Utility in Treating Kidney Failure in End-Stage Liver Disease With Simultaneous Liver-Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingxing S.; Stedman, Margaret R.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Kim, W. Ray; Tan, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation plays an important role in treating kidney failure in patients with end-stage liver disease. It used 5% of deceased donor kidney transplanted in 2015. We evaluated the utility, defined as posttransplant kidney allograft lifespan, of this practice. Methods Using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we compared outcomes for all SLK transplants between January 1, 1995, and December 3, 2014, to their donor-matched kidney used in kidney-alone (Ki) or simultaneous pancreas kidney (SPK) transplants. Primary outcome was kidney allograft lifespan, defined as the time free from death or allograft failure. Secondary outcomes included death and death-censored allograft failure. We adjusted all analyses for donor, transplant, and recipient factors. Results The adjusted 10-year mean kidney allograft lifespan was higher in Ki/SPK compared with SLK transplants by 0.99 years in the Model for End-stage Liver Disease era and 1.71 years in the pre-Model for End-stage Liver Disease era. Death was higher in SLK recipients relative to Ki/SPK recipients: 10-year cumulative incidences 0.36 (95% confident interval 0.33-0.38) versus 0.19 (95% confident interval 0.17-0.21). Conclusions SLK transplantation exemplifies the trade-off between the principles of utility and medical urgency. With each SLK transplantation, about 1 year of allograft lifespan is traded so that sicker patients, that is, SLK transplant recipients, are afforded access to the organ. These data provide a basis against which benefits derived from urgency-based allocation can be measured. PMID:28437790

  11. Crosstalk between the gut and the liver via susceptibility loci: Novel advances in inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyang; Shen, Jun; Ran, Zhihua

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic, relapsing intestinal inflammation. Autoimmune liver disease (AILD) may be involved in IBD as an extra-intestinal manifestation (EIM). Epidemiologic and anatomic evidence have demonstrated an intimate crosstalk between the gut and the liver. In this review, we briefly introduced nine groups of susceptibility loci shared by inflammatory bowel and autoimmune liver disease for the first time. The genome-wide association studies (GWAS) evidence of pathways involving crosstalk between the gut and the liver is clarified and explained. It has been found that HNF4-α, GPR35, MST1R, CARD9, IL2/IL21/IL2R, BACH2, TNFRSF14, MAdCAM-1, and FUT2 are the genes involved in tight junction formation, macrophage function, T helper cell or T reg cell cycle and function, TNF secretion, lymphocyte homing or intestinal dysbiosis, respectively. The intimate crosstalk between the gut and liver in immunity is also highlighted and discussed in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Aqel, Bashar; DiBaise, John K

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) continues to increase with prevalence estimates ranging from 17%-33%, making it is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in North America. Its importance is due to not only its prevalence but also its association with increased cardiovascular morbidity and progression to cirrhosis in a subset of patients. NAFLD encompasses a pathologic spectrum of disease, from relatively benign accumulation of lipid (steatosis) to progressive nonalcoholic steatohepatitis associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and necrosis. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis remains an important phenotypic state because this subgroup of patients is deemed at high risk for developing cirrhosis and progressing to liver failure requiring transplantation or to death. Gut microbiota has recently been identified as regulators of energy homeostasis and fat deposition, thereby implicating them in the development of obesity and associated metabolic diseases. The growing evidence that alteration in gut microbiota (dysbiosis) may affect liver pathology may allow for a better understanding of its role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD, help to identify patients at risk of progression, and expose a microbial target for prevention and therapeutic intervention. In this review, we discuss the growing evidence that highlights the relationship between gut microbiota and its association with NAFLD. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. Role of folate in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sid, Victoria; Siow, Yaw L; O, Karmin

    2017-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of chronic liver conditions that are characterized by steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and liver injury. The global prevalence of NAFLD is rapidly increasing in proportion to the rising incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Because NAFLD is a multifaceted disorder with many underlying metabolic abnormalities, currently, there is no pharmacological agent that is therapeutically approved for the treatment of this disease. Folate is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays an essential role in one-carbon transfer reactions involved in nucleic acid biosynthesis, methylation reactions, and sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism. The liver is the primary organ responsible for storage and metabolism of folates. Low serum folate levels have been observed in patients with obesity and diabetes. It has been reported that a low level of endogenous folates in rodents perturbs folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism, and may be associated with development of metabolic diseases such as NAFLD. This review highlights the biological role of folate in the progression of NAFLD and its associated metabolic complications including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Understanding the role of folate in metabolic disease may position this vitamin as a potential therapeutic for NAFLD.

  14. [Nutritional Assessment and Management for Patients with Chronic Liver Disease].

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hee

    2018-04-25

    When liver disease is severe, the prognosis can be worse if the patient is malnourished. Adequate nutritional support for patients with liver diseases can improve the patient's condition and prognosis. In the case of liver cirrhosis, malnutrition can occur due to a variety of causes, including poor oral intake, maldigestion, malabsorption, associated renal disease, and metabolic abnormalities. For a nutritional assessment, it is important to check the dietary intake, change in body composition, including anthropometry, and a functional assessment of muscle. Counselling and oral or enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition as in other diseases. If esophageal varices are present, care should be taken when installing a feeding tube, but if there are ascites, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated because of the risk of complications. Calories of 30-35 kcal/kg/day and protein from 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg/day are appropriate. Protein restriction is unnecessary unless the hepatic encephalopathy is severe. A late evening snack and branched chain amino acids can be helpful. In the case of cholestasis, the supply of manganese and copper should be restricted. Sarcopenia in patients with liver cirrhosis is also prevalent and associated with the prognosis.

  15. Alcoholism and liver disease in Mexico: Genetic and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sonia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Moreno-Luna, Laura Eugenia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism and cirrhosis, which are two of the most serious health problems worldwide, have a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes. Both diseases are influenced by genetic susceptibility and cultural traits that differ globally but are specific for each population. In contrast to other regions around the world, Mexicans present the highest drinking score and a high mortality rate for alcoholic liver disease with an intermediate category level of per capita alcohol consumption. Mexico has a unique history of alcohol consumption that is linked to profound anthropological and social aspects. The Mexican population has an admixture genome inherited from different races, Caucasian, Amerindian and African, with a heterogeneous distribution within the country. Thus, genes related to alcohol addiction, such as dopamine receptor D2 in the brain, or liver alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, such as alcohol dehydrogenase class I polypeptide B, cytochrome P450 2E1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 2, may vary from one individual to another. Furthermore, they may be inherited as risk or non-risk haplogroups that confer susceptibility or resistance either to alcohol addiction or abusive alcohol consumption and possibly liver disease. Thus, in this era of genomics, personalized medicine will benefit patients if it is directed according to individual or population-based data. Additional association studies will be required to establish novel strategies for the prevention, care and treatment of liver disease in Mexico and worldwide. PMID:24307790

  16. Valproic acid and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A possible association?

    PubMed Central

    Farinelli, Edoardo; Giampaoli, David; Cenciarini, Anja; Cercado, Ephraim; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most prescribed drugs in children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Weight gain and obesity have been observed as side effects of VPA. These are often linked with other metabolic disturbances such as development of insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD refers to a group of liver disorders with marked hepatic steatosis. It is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases and overall reduced life expectancy. NAFLD occurs in 20%-25% of the general population and it is known to be the most common cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD therefore represents a major public health issue worldwide. This study reviews and summarizes relevant literature that supports the existence of an association between VPA therapy and the development of NAFLD in children. Long-term VPA-therapy appears to be associated with an increased risk of developing NAFLD. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenic mechanisms that lie behind this association and to standardize the options for the use of this drug in overweight patients and in those with risks for developing MetS and NAFLD. PMID:26019740

  17. Alcoholism and liver disease in Mexico: genetic and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sonia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Moreno-Luna, Laura Eugenia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-11-28

    Alcoholism and cirrhosis, which are two of the most serious health problems worldwide, have a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes. Both diseases are influenced by genetic susceptibility and cultural traits that differ globally but are specific for each population. In contrast to other regions around the world, Mexicans present the highest drinking score and a high mortality rate for alcoholic liver disease with an intermediate category level of per capita alcohol consumption. Mexico has a unique history of alcohol consumption that is linked to profound anthropological and social aspects. The Mexican population has an admixture genome inherited from different races, Caucasian, Amerindian and African, with a heterogeneous distribution within the country. Thus, genes related to alcohol addiction, such as dopamine receptor D2 in the brain, or liver alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, such as alcohol dehydrogenase class I polypeptide B, cytochrome P450 2E1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 2, may vary from one individual to another. Furthermore, they may be inherited as risk or non-risk haplogroups that confer susceptibility or resistance either to alcohol addiction or abusive alcohol consumption and possibly liver disease. Thus, in this era of genomics, personalized medicine will benefit patients if it is directed according to individual or population-based data. Additional association studies will be required to establish novel strategies for the prevention, care and treatment of liver disease in Mexico and worldwide.

  18. Chronic Liver Disease in Peru: Role of Viral Hepatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    hepatocellular carcinoma . Only two (1.6%) comparison patients without liver disease had anti- HCV. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was found in 23% of...patients with chronic hepatitis, 12% of patients with cirrhosis, and three of seven patients with hepatocellular carcinoma . There was no evidence of chronic

  19. Hepatitis A and B superimposed on chronic liver disease: vaccine-preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Keeffe, Emmet B

    2006-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the acquisition of hepatitis A or hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Superimposition of acute hepatitis A in patients with chronic hepatitis C has been associated with a particularly high mortality rate, and chronic hepatitis B virus coinfection with hepatitis C virus is associated with an accelerated progression of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. With the availability of vaccines against hepatitis B and hepatitis A since 1981 and 1995, respectively, these are vaccine-preventable diseases. Studies have confirmed that hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are safe and immunogenic in patients with mild to moderate chronic liver disease. However, hepatitis A and B vaccination is less effective in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. These observations have led to the recommendation that patients undergo hepatitis A and B vaccination early in the natural history of their chronic liver disease. Vaccination rates are low in clinical practice, and public health and educational programs are needed to overcome barriers to facilitate timely implementation of these recommendations.

  20. Hepatitis A and B Superimposed on Chronic Liver Disease: Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Keeffe, Emmet B

    2006-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the acquisition of hepatitis A or hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Superimposition of acute hepatitis A in patients with chronic hepatitis C has been associated with a particularly high mortality rate, and chronic hepatitis B virus coinfection with hepatitis C virus is associated with an accelerated progression of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. With the availability of vaccines against hepatitis B and hepatitis A since 1981 and 1995, respectively, these are vaccine-preventable diseases. Studies have confirmed that hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are safe and immunogenic in patients with mild to moderate chronic liver disease. However, hepatitis A and B vaccination is less effective in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. These observations have led to the recommendation that patients undergo hepatitis A and B vaccination early in the natural history of their chronic liver disease. Vaccination rates are low in clinical practice, and public health and educational programs are needed to overcome barriers to facilitate timely implementation of these recommendations. PMID:18528476

  1. [Bio-ecological control of chronic liver disease and encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Bengmark, S; Di Cocco, P; Clemente, K; Corona, L; Angelico, R; Manzia, T; Famulari, A; Pisani, F; Orlando, G

    2011-08-01

    Minimal encephalopathy was originally associated with chronic liver disease but is increasingly associated with most other chronic diseases and particularly with diabetes and also chronic disorders in other organs: kidneys, lungs, thyroid and with obesity. It is increasingly with dramatically increased and more or less permanent increase in systemic inflammation, most likely a result of Western lifestyle. Frequent physical exercise and intake of foods rich in vitamins, antioxidants, fibres, lactic acid bacteria etc in combination with reduction in intake of refined and processed foods is known to reduce systemic inflammation and prevent chronic diseases. Some lactic acid bacteria, especially Lb paracasei, lb plantarum and pediococcus pentosaceus have proven effective to reduce inflammation and eliminate encephalopathy. Significant reduction in blood ammonia levels and endotoxin levels were reported in parallel to improvement of liver disease. Subsequent studies with other lactic acid bacteria seem to demonstrate suppression of inflammation and one study also provides evidence of clinical improvement.

  2. Is alveolar hydatid disease of the liver incurable?

    PubMed Central

    Mosimann, F

    1980-01-01

    The etiologic agent of alveolar hydatid disease is Echinococcus multilocularis. Infestation of the liver by the larvae of this Cestode results in an infiltrative mass that behaves biologically very much like a malignant tumor. From 1955 to 1978, 13 patients with alveolar hydatid disease of the liver were investigated, operated and followed at the University Medical Center of Lausanne, Switzerland. Due to the extension of the lesions, six patients had exploratory laparotomy with biopsy only; the other seven were submitted to hepatic resection. Follow-up demonstrated that the disease progresses slowly and that a resection, even if incomplete, can afford long-lasting relief. However the present data suggest that surgical cure of alveolar hydatid disease must be very rare. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:7406556

  3. Characterization of the liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) proteome indicates potential for application in liver disease biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Ma, Jie; Wu, Songfeng; Yang, Dong; Yan, Yujuan; Liu, Kehui; Wang, Jinglan; Sun, Longqin; Chen, Ning; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Xing, Baocai; Zhao, Xiaohang; Qian, Xiaohong; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2010-02-05

    Tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) forms the interface between circulating body fluids and intracellular fluid. Pathological alterations of liver cells could be reflected in TIF, making it a promising source of liver disease biomarkers. Mouse liver TIF was extracted, separated by SDS-PAGE, analyzed by linear ion trap mass spectrometer, and 1450 proteins were identified. These proteins may be secreted, shed from membrane vesicles, or represent cellular breakdown products. They show different profiling patterns, quantities, and possibly modification/cleavage of intracellular proteins. The high solubility and even distribution of liver TIF supports its suitability for proteome analysis. Comparison of mouse liver TIF data with liver tissue and plasma proteome data identified major proteins that might be released from liver to plasma and serve as blood biomarkers of liver origin. This result was partially supported by comparison of human liver TIF data with human liver and plasma proteome data. Paired TIFs from tumor and nontumor liver tissues of a hepatocellular carcinoma patient were analyzed and the profile of subtracted differential proteins supports the potential for biomarker discovery in TIF. This study is the first analysis of the liver TIF proteome and provides a foundation for further application of TIF in liver disease biomarker discovery.

  4. Pathophysiology and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease: Update 2016.

    PubMed

    Stickel, Felix; Datz, Christian; Hampe, Jochen; Bataller, Ramon

    2017-03-15

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of cirrhosis, liver cancer, and acute and chronic liver failure and as such causes significant morbidity and mortality. While alcohol consumption is slightly decreasing in several European countries, it is rising in others and remains high in many countries around the world. The pathophysiology of ALD is still incompletely understood but relates largely to the direct toxic effects of alcohol and its main intermediate, acetaldehyde. Recently, novel putative mechanisms have been identified in systematic scans covering the entire human genome and raise new hypotheses on previously unknown pathways. The latter also identify host genetic risk factors for significant liver injury, which may help design prognostic risk scores. The diagnosis of ALD is relatively easy with a panel of well-evaluated tests and only rarely requires a liver biopsy. Treatment of ALD is difficult and grounded in abstinence as the pivotal therapeutic goal; once cirrhosis is established, treatment largely resembles that of other etiologies of advanced liver damage. Liver transplantation is a sound option for carefully selected patients with cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis because relapse rates are low and prognosis is comparable to other etiologies. Still, many countries are restrictive in allocating donor livers for ALD patients. Overall, few therapeutic options exist for severe ALD. However, there is good evidence of benefit for only corticosteroids in severe alcoholic hepatitis, while most other efforts are of limited efficacy. Considering the immense burden of ALD worldwide, efforts of medical professionals and industry partners to develop targeted therapies in ALF has been disappointingly low.

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An expanded review

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Mark; Zhang, Xuchen

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses the simple steatosis to more progressive steatosis with associated hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is a growing epidemic, not only in the United States, but worldwide in part due to obesity and insulin resistance leading to liver accumulation of triglycerides and free fatty acids. Numerous risk factors for the development of NAFLD have been espoused with most having some form of metabolic derangement or insulin resistance at the core of its pathophysiology. NAFLD patients are at increased risk of liver-related as well as cardiovascular mortality, and NAFLD is rapidly becoming the leading indication for liver transplantation. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for definitive diagnosis, but the development of noninvasive advanced imaging, biochemical and genetic tests will no doubt provide future clinicians with a great deal of information and opportunity for enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis and targeted treatment. As it currently stands several medications/supplements are being used in the treatment of NAFLD; however, none seem to be the “magic bullet” in curtailing this growing problem yet. In this review we summarized the current knowledge of NAFLD epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, pathogenesis, pathologic changes, natural history, and treatment in order to aid in further understanding this disease and better managing NAFLD patients. PMID:28652891

  6. Factors predicting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and advanced fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Tasneem, Abbas Ali; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Majid, Zain

    2018-04-01

    Introduction To determine the factors predicting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and advanced fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methodology All patients aged >18 years and having a fatty liver on abdominal ultrasound (US), presenting from January 2011 to January 2017, were included. A liver biopsy was performed on all the patients. Results Of 96 patients undergoing liver biopsy for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), 76 (79.2%) were men. On liver US, diffuse fatty liver (DFL) was noted in 68 (70.8%) patients. Liver biopsy showed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in 78 (81.3%) patients. Factors associated with NASH were male gender, body mass index (BMI) > 27 kg/m 2 , DFL and raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT). A GULAB score (based on gender, US liver findings, lipid (fasting) levels, ALT level and BMI) of ≥5 predicted NASH with 82.05% sensitivity. Factors associated with advanced fibrosis in NAFLD were age >40 years, diabetes mellitus, AST/ALT ratio > 1 and raised GGT. Conclusion NASH is common in patients with male gender, high BMI, DFL on liver US, raised ALT and GULAB score ≥5.

  7. Alcoholic Liver Disease: A Mouse Model Reveals Protection by Lactobacillus fermentum

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Rosario; Rappa, Francesca; Macaluso, Filippo; Caruso Bavisotto, Celeste; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Di Paola, Gaia; Tomasello, Giovanni; Di Felice, Valentina; Marcianò, Vito; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly; J.L. Macario, Alberto; Cocchi, Massimo; Cappello, MD, Francesco; Marino Gammazza, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Alcoholism is one of the most devastating diseases with high incidence, but knowledge of its pathology and treatment is still plagued with gaps mostly because of the inherent limitations of research with patients. We developed an animal model for studying liver histopathology, Hsp (heat-shock protein)-chaperones involvement, and response to treatment. Methods: The system was standardized using mice to which ethanol was orally administered alone or in combination with Lactobacillus fermentum following a precise schedule over time and applying, at predetermined intervals, a battery of techniques (histology, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, 3-nitrotyrosine labeling) to assess liver pathology (e.g., steatosis, fibrosis), and Hsp60 and iNOS (inducible form of nitric oxide synthase) gene expression and protein levels, and post-translational modifications. Results: Typical ethanol-induced liver pathology occurred and the effect of the probiotic could be reliably monitored. Steatosis score, iNOS levels, and nitrated proteins (e.g., Hsp60) decreased after probiotic intake. Conclusions: We describe a mouse model useful for studying liver disease induced by chronic ethanol intake and for testing pertinent therapeutic agents, e.g., probiotics. We tested L. fermentum, which reduced considerably ethanol-induced tissue damage and deleterious post-translational modifications of the chaperone Hsp60. The model is available to test other agents and probiotics with therapeutic potential in alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26795070

  8. "Immune activation, aging and gender" and progression of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Nasta, Paola

    2011-08-01

    Hepatitis C is the predominant cause of liver disease in the HIV-positive population and the most important of the non-AIDS-related causes of death. HCV disease tends to become chronic more frequently in HIV-positive subjects, and to evolve more rapidly into cirrhosis of the liver. The rapidity of the evolution varies considerably from one individual to the next and, if in HIV-negative subjects cirrhosis manifests itself after approx. 40-50 years of disease, in HIV-positive subjects it emerges 10-15 years earlier (1, 2). The severity of the fibrosis is not a gradual event and can be worsened by many factors. Age, sex, duration of the infection and assumption of alcohol are the most well-known variables; obesity, diabetes, steatosis and metabolic disorders are equally important factors that affect the progression of liver disease (3). The severity of the liver disease is very different in men compared to women. Being male is undoubtedly one of the factors most closely related to the gravity of fibrosis (4). In HCV mono-infected women, cirrhosis appears from the age of 60 onwards. With the onset of the menopause, in fact, the progression of liver disease accelerates and the risk of developing cirrhosis or cancer of the liver becomes particularly significant in women over 50. The conditions of menopause or of amenorrhea, irrespective of age, are therefore correlated with the progression of liver disease (5). This evidence led researchers to theorize on the possible anti-fibrogenic role of estrogens. In fact, estrogens in physiological doses in the plasma of women in fertile age contribute to controlling the progression of liver disease through antioxidant mechanisms and lipid peroxidation control mechanisms (6). The reduction of estrogens during the menopause is closely linked to the increase of metabolic disorders. During the menopause, steatosis and cardiovascular diseases increase in parallel with the increase of atherogenic lipoproteins, the accumulation ofintra

  9. Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  10. Factors influencing health-related quality of life in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sobhonslidsuk, Abhasnee; Silpakit, Chatchawan; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Satitpornkul, Patchareeya; Sripetch, Chaleaw; Khanthavit, Anya

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the factors contributing to health-related quality of life (HRQL) in chronic liver disease (CLD). METHODS: Patients with CLD and age- and sex-matched normal subjects performed the validated Thai versions of the short-form 36 (SF-36) by health survey and chronic liver disease questionnaire (CLDQ). Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to assess the impact of disease severity, demography, causes of CLD, socioeconomic factors, and self-rating health perception on HRQL. RESULTS: Two-hundred and fifty patients with CLD and fifty normal subjects were enrolled into the study. Mean age and the numbers of low educated, unemployed, blue-collar career and poor health perception increased significantly from chronic hepatitis to Child’s Classes A to B to C. Advanced stage of CLD was related to deterioration of HRQL. Increasing age and female reduced physical health area. Low socioeconomic factors and financial burden affected multiple areas of HRQL. In overall, the positive impact of self-rating health perception on HRQL was consistently showed. CONCLUSION: Advanced stages of chronic liver disease, old age, female sex, low socioeconomic status and financial burden are important factors reducing HRQL. Good health perception improves HRQL regardless of stages of liver disease. PMID:17203521

  11. Rodent Models of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Imajo, Kento; Yoneda, Masato; Kessoku, Takaomi; Ogawa, Yuji; Maeda, Shin; Sumida, Yoshio; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Wada, Koichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Research in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), has been limited by the availability of suitable models for this disease. A number of rodent models have been described in which the relevant liver pathology develops in an appropriate metabolic context. These models are promising tools for researchers investigating one of the key issues of NASH: not so much why steatosis occurs, but what causes the transition from simple steatosis to the inflammatory, progressive fibrosing condition of steatohepatitis. The different rodent models can be classified into two large groups. The first includes models in which the disease is acquired after dietary or pharmacological manipulation, and the second, genetically modified models in which liver disease develops spontaneously. To date, no single rodent model has encompassed the full spectrum of human disease progression, but individual models can imitate particular characteristics of human disease. Therefore, it is important that researchers choose the appropriate rodent models. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the metabolic abnormalities present in the currently available rodent models of NAFLD, summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the established models and the key findings that have furthered our understanding of the disease’s pathogenesis. PMID:24192824

  12. Basal values and changes of liver stiffness predict the risk of disease progression in compensated advanced chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pons, Mònica; Simón-Talero, Macarena; Millán, Laura; Ventura-Cots, Meritxell; Santos, Begoña; Augustin, Salvador; Genescà, Joan

    2016-10-01

    Transient elastography has been proposed as a tool to predict the risk of decompensation in patients with chronic liver disease. We aimed to identify risk groups of disease progression, using a combination of baseline liver stiffness measurement (LSM) and its change over time (delta-LSM) in patients with compensated advanced chronic liver disease (cACLD). Ninety-four patients with baseline LSM ≥10kPa, Child-Pugh score 5 and without previous decompensation were included. A second LSM was performed during follow-up and data on liver function and liver-related events were collected. The primary endpoint was a composite that included death, liver decompensation and impairment in at least 1 point in Child-Pugh score. After a median follow-up of 43.6 months, 15% of patients presented the primary endpoint. Multivariate analysis identified baseline LSM (OR 1.12, P=0.002) and delta-LSM (OR 1.02, P=0.048) as independent predictors of the primary endpoint. A high risk group represented by patients with baseline LSM ≥21kPa and delta-LSM ≥10% (risk of progression 47.1%, 95% CI: 23-71%) was identified, while patients with LSM <21kPa and delta-LSM <10% presented zero risk of progression (P=0.03). Simple classification rules using baseline LSM and delta-LSM identify cACLD patients at low or high risk of disease progression. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An Evaluation of the Usefulness of Extracorporeal Liver Support Techniques in Patients Hospitalized in the ICU for Severe Liver Dysfunction Secondary to Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piechota, Mariusz; Piechota, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background The mortality rate in patients with severe liver dysfunction secondary to alcoholic liver disease (ALD) who do not respond to the standard treatment is exceptionally high. Objectives The main aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of applying extracorporeal liver support techniques to treat this group of patients. Patients and Methods The data from 23 hospital admissions of 21 patients with ALD who were admitted to the department of anesthesiology and intensive therapy (A&IT) at the Dr Wł. Biegański Regional Specialist Hospital in Łódź between March 2013 and July 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Results A total of 111 liver dialysis procedures were performed during the 23 hospitalizations, including 13 dialyses using fractionated plasma separation and adsorption (FPSA) with the Prometheus® system, and 98 procedures using the single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD) system. Upon admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), the median (interquartile range [IQR]) Glasgow coma scale (GCS), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II scores were 15 (14 - 15), 9 (7 - 13), 17 (14 - 24), and 32 (22 - 50), respectively. The ICU, 30-day, and three-month mortality rates were 43.48%, 39.13%, and 73.91%, respectively. As determined by the receiver operative characteristic (ROC) analysis for single-factor models, the significant predictors of death in the ICU included the patients’ SOFA, APACHE II, SAPS II, and model of end-stage liver disease modified by the united network for organ sharing (MELD UNOS Modification) scores; the duration of stay (in days) in the A&IT Department; and bile acid, creatinine and albumin levels upon ICU admission. The ROC analysis indicated the significant discriminating power of the SOFA, APACHE II, SAPS II, and MELD UNOS modification scores on the three-month mortality rate. Conclusions The application of

  14. Real time shear wave elastography in chronic liver diseases: Accuracy for predicting liver fibrosis, in comparison with serum markers

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae Yoon; Kim, Tae Yeob; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Yongsoo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Oh, Young-Ha; Yoo, Kyo-Sang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the correlation between liver stiffness measurement (LSM) by real-time shear wave elastography (SWE) and liver fibrosis stage and the accuracy of LSM for predicting significant and advanced fibrosis, in comparison with serum markers. METHODS: We consecutively analyzed 70 patients with various chronic liver diseases. Liver fibrosis was staged from F0 to F4 according to the Batts and Ludwig scoring system. Significant and advanced fibrosis was defined as stage F ≥ 2 and F ≥ 3, respectively. The accuracy of prediction for fibrosis was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curves. RESULTS: Seventy patients, 15 were belonged to F0-F1 stage, 20 F2, 13 F3 and 22 F4. LSM was increased with progression of fibrosis stage (F0-F1: 6.77 ± 1.72, F2: 9.98 ± 3.99, F3: 15.80 ± 7.73, and F4: 22.09 ± 10.09, P < 0.001). Diagnostic accuracies of LSM for prediction of F ≥ 2 and F ≥ 3 were 0.915 (95%CI: 0.824-0.968, P < 0.001) and 0.913 (95%CI: 0.821-0.967, P < 0.001), respectively. The cut-off values of LSM for prediction of F ≥ 2 and F ≥ 3 were 8.6 kPa with 78.2% sensitivity and 93.3% specificity and 10.46 kPa with 88.6% sensitivity and 80.0% specificity, respectively. However, there were no significant differences between LSM and serum hyaluronic acid and type IV collagen in diagnostic accuracy. CONCLUSION: SWE showed a significant correlation with the severity of liver fibrosis and was useful and accurate to predict significant and advanced fibrosis, comparable with serum markers. PMID:25320528

  15. Drug metabolism alterations in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, Matthew D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes play a vital role in the elimination of the majority of therapeutic drugs. The major organ involved in drug metabolism is the liver. Chronic liver diseases have been identified as a potential source of significant interindividual variation in metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the United States, affecting between 60 and 90 million Americans, yet the vast majority of NAFLD patients are undiagnosed. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of pathologies, ranging from steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Numerous animal studies have investigated the effects of NAFLD on hepatic gene expression, observing significant alterations in mRNA, protein, and activity levels. Information on the effects of NAFLD in human patients is limited, though several significant investigations have recently been published. Significant alterations in the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes may affect the clearance of therapeutic drugs, with the potential to result in adverse drug reactions. With the enormous prevalence of NAFLD, it is conceivable that every drug currently on the market is being given to patients with NAFLD. The current review is intended to present the results from both animal models and human patients, summarizing the observed alterations in the expression and activity of the phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes. PMID:21612324

  16. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4: A key player in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Itou, Minoru; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Sata, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is a membrane-associated peptidase, also known as CD26. DPP-4 has widespread organ distribution throughout the body and exerts pleiotropic effects via its peptidase activity. A representative target peptide is glucagon-like peptide-1, and inactivation of glucagon-like peptide-1 results in the development of glucose intolerance/diabetes mellitus and hepatic steatosis. In addition to its peptidase activity, DPP-4 is known to be associated with immune stimulation, binding to and degradation of extracellular matrix, resistance to anti-cancer agents, and lipid accumulation. The liver expresses DPP-4 to a high degree, and recent accumulating data suggest that DPP-4 is involved in the development of various chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C virus infection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, DPP-4 occurs in hepatic stem cells and plays a crucial role in hepatic regeneration. In this review, we described the tissue distribution and various biological effects of DPP-4. Then, we discussed the impact of DPP-4 in chronic liver disease and the possible therapeutic effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor. PMID:23613622

  17. Ultrasound imaging in an experimental model of fatty liver disease and cirrhosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Domestic dogs and cats are very well known to develop chronic hepatic diseases, including hepatic lipidosis and cirrhosis. Ultrasonographic examination is extensively used to detect them. However, there are still few reports on the use of the ultrasound B-mode scan in correlation with histological findings to evaluate diffuse hepatic changes in rodents, which represent the most important animal group used in experimental models of liver diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of ultrasound findings in the assessment of fatty liver disease and cirrhosis when compared to histological results in Wistar rats by following up a murine model of chronic hepatic disease. Results Forty Wistar rats (30 treated, 10 controls) were included. Liver injury was induced by dual exposure to CCl4 and ethanol for 4, 8 and 15 weeks. Liver echogenicity, its correlation to the right renal cortex echogenicity, measurement of portal vein diameter (PVD) and the presence of ascites were evaluated and compared to histological findings of hepatic steatosis and cirrhosis. Liver echogenicity correlated to hepatic steatosis when it was greater or equal to the right renal cortex echogenicity, with a sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 100%, positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 76.9% respectively, and accuracy of 92.5%. Findings of heterogeneous liver echogenicity and irregular surface correlated to liver cirrhosis with a sensitivity of 70.6%, specificity of 100%, positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 82.1% respectively, and accuracy of 87.5%. PVD was significantly increased in both steatotic and cirrhotic rats; however, the later had greater diameters. PVD cut-off point separating steatosis from cirrhosis was 2.1 mm (sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.5%). One third of cirrhotic rats presented with ascites. Conclusion The use of ultrasound imaging in the follow-up of murine diffuse liver disease models is feasible and

  18. Living donor liver transplantation: eliminating the wait for death in end-stage liver disease?

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (A2ALDLT), outside of Asia, remains an important yet underutilized gift of life. For patients with end-stage liver disease, A2ALDLT is a proven transplantation option, with lower waiting list mortality and suffering, and equivalent or better allograft and patient survival than deceased-donor liver transplantation (DDLT). The risks to living donors and the benefit to their recipients have been carefully defined with long-term level 1 and 2 evidence-based study. An overview of the development and practice of living donor liver transplant (LDLT), including donor and recipient surgical allograft innovation, is provided. The issues of recipient selection, outcomes and morbidity, including disease-variable study and challenges past and present are presented in comparison with DDLT cohorts, and future insights are described. Central to practice is the careful and concise review of donor evaluation and selection and donor outcome, morbidity, quality of life and present and future strategies for donor advocacy and growth of the technique.

  19. PNPLA3 polymorphism increases risk for and severity of chronic hepatitis C liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Habeeb; Masadeh, Maen; Al Hanayneh, Muhannad; Petros, Vincent; Maslonka, Matthew; Nanda, Arjun; Singal, Ashwani K

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the association of PNPLA3 polymorphisms in chronic hepatitis C patients and development of liver disease spectrum. METHODS Literature was searched systematically from PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane search engines for full-length articles written in English that examined PNPLA3 polymorphism in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. Studies evaluating the association of PNPLA3 polymorphism spectrum (fatty liver, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma) of CHC were included. Pooled data are reported as OR with 95%CI. Our study endpoint was the risk of the entire liver disease spectrum including: Steatosis/fatty liver, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in CHC patients with PNPLA3 polymorphisms. RESULTS Of 380 studies identified, a total of 53 studies were included for full-text review. Nineteen on chronic hepatitis C were eligible for analysis. Pooled ORs for rs738409 GG compared to CC and CG among patients with fatty liver was 2.214 (95%CI: 1.719-2.853). ORs among advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis were 1.762 (95%CI: 1.258-2.468). Similar odds ratios among hepatocellular carcinoma patients were 2.002 (95%CI: 1.519-2.639). Pooled ORs for rs738409 GG and CG compared to CC among patients with fatty liver were 1.750 (95%CI: 1.542-1.986). Pooled ORs for advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis patients were 1.613 (95%CI: 1.211-2.147). All analyses were homogenous and without publication bias except one. The associations were maintained after adjusting for publication bias and heterogeneity. CONCLUSION PNPLA3 polymorphisms have strong association with increased risk and severity of the liver disease spectrum in CHC patients. PMID:28050240

  20. LiverAtlas: a unique integrated knowledge database for systems-level research of liver and hepatic disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Yang, Chunyuan; Wang, Shaochuang; Chen, Tao; Li, Mansheng; Wang, Xue; Li, Dongsheng; Wang, Kang; Ma, Jie; Wu, Songfeng; Zhang, Xueli; Zhu, Yunping; Wu, Jinsheng; He, Fuchu

    2013-09-01

    A large amount of liver-related physiological and pathological data exist in publicly available biological and bibliographic databases, which are usually far from comprehensive or integrated. Data collection, integration and mining processes pose a great challenge to scientific researchers and clinicians interested in the liver. To address these problems, we constructed LiverAtlas (http://liveratlas.hupo.org.cn), a comprehensive resource of biomedical knowledge related to the liver and various hepatic diseases by incorporating 53 databases. In the present version, LiverAtlas covers data on liver-related genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and hepatic diseases. Additionally, LiverAtlas provides a wealth of manually curated information, relevant literature citations and cross-references to other databases. Importantly, an expert-confirmed Human Liver Disease Ontology, including relevant information for 227 types of hepatic disease, has been constructed and is used to annotate LiverAtlas data. Furthermore, we have demonstrated two examples of applying LiverAtlas data to identify candidate markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at the systems level and to develop a systems biology-based classifier by combining the differential gene expression with topological features of human protein interaction networks to enhance the ability of HCC differential diagnosis. LiverAtlas is the most comprehensive liver and hepatic disease resource, which helps biologists and clinicians to analyse their data at the systems level and will contribute much to the biomarker discovery and diagnostic performance enhancement for liver diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2016-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) increases risk of mortality from liver and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is the major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which may develop without cirrhosis. NAFLD predicts type 2 diabetes, even independently of obesity. Globally, the prevalence of NAFLD averages 25% and is as common as the metabolic syndrome. The majority of patients with type 2 diabetes have NAFLD. The challenge for the diabetologist is to identify patients at risk of advanced liver disease and HCC. At a minimum, liver function tests (LFTs), despite being neither specific nor sensitive, should be performed in all patients with the metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. Increases in LFTs, for which the updated reference values are lower (serum ALT ≈30 U/l in men and ≈20 U/l in women) than those hitherto used in many laboratories, should prompt assessment of fibrosis biomarkers and referral of individuals at risk to a NAFLD/hepatology clinic. Preferably, evaluation of NAFLD should be based on measurement of steatosis biomarkers or ultrasound if easily available. A large number of individuals carry the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) I148M variant (30-50%) or the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2) E167K variant (11-15%). These variants increase the risk of advanced liver disease and HCC but not of diabetes or CVD. Genotyping of selected patients for these variants is recommended. Many patients have 'double trouble', i.e. carry both a genetic risk factor and have the metabolic syndrome. Excess use of alcohol could be a cause of 'triple trouble', but such patients would be classified as having alcoholic fatty liver disease. This review summarises a presentation given at the symposium 'The liver in focus' at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Kenneth Cusi, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3952-1 , and by John Jones, DOI: 10.1007/s00125

  2. Assessing an AI knowledge-base for asymptomatic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Babic, A; Mathiesen, U; Hedin, K; Bodemar, G; Wigertz, O

    1998-01-01

    Discovering not yet seen knowledge from clinical data is of importance in the field of asymptomatic liver diseases. Avoidance of liver biopsy which is used as the ultimate confirmation of diagnosis by making the decision based on relevant laboratory findings only, would be considered an essential support. The system based on Quinlan's ID3 algorithm was simple and efficient in extracting the sought knowledge. Basic principles of applying the AI systems are therefore described and complemented with medical evaluation. Some of the diagnostic rules were found to be useful as decision algorithms i.e. they could be directly applied in clinical work and made a part of the knowledge-base of the Liver Guide, an automated decision support system.

  3. [Liver diseases in high-production cows with ruminal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, I B; Mikhaĭlov, G; Pham, T H

    1987-01-01

    Studied was the relation of the subclinical, recurring, and chronic rumen acidosis, on the one hand, to the disturbed function, resp., injuries of the liver, on the other. Experiments were carried out with a total of 862 high-producing cows, 54 out of which had massive injuries of the liver. Full clinical examination was performed, 22 of the animals being subject to laboratory investigations with regard to the rumen content (pH, infusorial count per 1 cm3 with the differentiation of bacteria, activity with regard to glucose, nitrates, sedimentation, and flotation), blood (whole blood picture, coagulation tests, bilirubin, SGOT, SGPT, serum aldolase, alkaline phosphatase, alkaline reserves, blood sugar), and urine (pH, protein, ketone bodies, sugar, and CSR). It is concluded that three inferences could be drawn, pointing to the relation between recurring rumen acidosis and the liver diseases.

  4. The Global Burden of Liver Disease: The Major Impact of China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Fan, Jian-Gao; Zhang, Zheng; Gao, Bin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Liver disease is a major cause of illness and death worldwide. In China alone, liver diseases, primarily viral hepatitis (predominantly hepatitis B virus, HBV), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease affect approximately 300 million people. The establishment of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1992 has resulted in a substantial decline in the number of newly HBV-infected patients; however, the number of patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases is rising at an alarming rate. Liver cancer, one of the most deadly cancers, is the second most common cancer in China. Approximately 383,000 people die from liver cancer every year in China, which accounts for 51% of the deaths from liver cancer worldwide. Over the past 10 years, China has made some significant efforts to shed its “leader in liver diseases” title by investing large amounts of money in funding research, vaccines and drug development for liver diseases, and by recruiting many Western-trained hepatologists and scientists. Over the last two decades, hepatologists and scientists in China have made significant improvements in liver disease prevention, diagnosis, management and therapy. They have been very active in liver disease research, as shown by the dramatic increase in the number of publications in Hepatology. Nevertheless, many challenges remain that must be tackled collaboratively. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and characteristics of liver diseases and liver-related research in China. PMID:25164003

  5. Progression of liver fibrosis is associated with non‐liver‐related mortality in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Sone, Yasuhiro; Akita, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Junko

    2017-01-01

    In patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), prognosis and outcome, especially non‐liver‐related mortality, remain incompletely elucidated. We clarified the mortality from all causes in patients with NAFLD. A total of 4,073 patients with NAFLD diagnosed by ultrasonography were enrolled. We investigated the causes of death and analyzed the mortality from non‐liver‐related diseases according to the degrees of steatosis and fibrosis using the competing risk method. We used the NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS) to assess fibrosis severity and the ultrasonography fatty liver score to evaluate steatosis severity. The numbers of patients with NFS indicating low, intermediate, and high probabilities of advanced fibrosis were 2,451 (60.2%), 1,462 (35.9%), and 160 (3.9%), respectively. Of the 4,073 patients, 179 died during follow‐up, but only nine deaths were due to liver‐related diseases. Of the remaining 170 patients who died due to non‐liver‐related diseases, 83 (48.8%), 42 (24.7%), and 45 (26.5%) patients died due to malignancies, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases, and benign diseases (excluding cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the intermediate and high NFS groups were independently associated with each disease category: hazard ratio (HR) 2.163 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.354‐3.457) and HR 4.814 (95% CI, 2.323‐9.977) for malignancies; HR 2.265 (95% CI, 1.141‐4.497) and HR 8.482 (95% CI, 3.558‐20.220) for cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases; and HR 3.216 (95% CI, 1.641‐6.303) and HR 5.558 (95% CI, 1.923‐16.070) for benign diseases, respectively. Conversely, the status of steatosis was not associated with risk of mortality in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Progression of liver fibrosis severity was associated with mortality from various non‐liver‐related causes in patients with NAFLD. (Hepatology Communications 2017;1:928–945) PMID:29404500

  6. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease in liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsoo; Son, Seok Hyun; Won, Yong Kyun; Kay, Chul Seung

    2014-01-01

    Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  7. An extended fatty liver index to predict non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kantartzis, K; Rettig, I; Staiger, H; Machann, J; Schick, F; Scheja, L; Gastaldelli, A; Bugianesi, E; Peter, A; Schulze, M B; Fritsche, A; Häring, H-U; Stefan, N

    2017-06-01

    In clinical practice, there is a strong interest in non-invasive markers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Our hypothesis was that the fold-change in plasma triglycerides (TG) during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (fold-change TG OGTT ) in concert with blood glucose and lipid parameters, and the rs738409 C>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in PNPLA3 might improve the power of the widely used fatty liver index (FLI) to predict NAFLD. The liver fat content of 330 subjects was quantified by 1 H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Blood parameters were measured during fasting and after a 2-h OGTT. A subgroup of 213 subjects underwent these measurements before and after 9 months of a lifestyle intervention. The fold-change TG OGTT was closely associated with liver fat content (r=0.51, P<0.0001), but had less power to predict NAFLD (AUROC=0.75) than the FLI (AUROC=0.79). Not only was the fold-change TG OGTT independently associated with liver fat content and NAFLD, but so also were the 2-h blood glucose level and rs738409 C>G SNP in PNPLA3. In fact, a novel index (extended FLI) generated from these and the usual FLI parameters considerably increased its power to predict NAFLD (AUROC=0.79-0.86). The extended FLI also increased the power to predict changes in liver fat content with a lifestyle intervention (n=213; standardized beta coefficient: 0.23-0.29). This study has provided novel data confirming that the OGTT-derived fold-change TG OGTT and 2-h glucose level, together with the rs738409 C>G SNP in PNPLA3, allow calculation of an extended FLI that considerably improves its power to predict NAFLD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu; Chirra, Shivani; Kohli, Rohit

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in livermore » that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.« less

  9. The Riddle of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Progression From Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mithun; Mitnala, Shasikala; Vishnubhotla, Ravi K.; Mukherjee, Rathin; Reddy, Duvvur N.; Rao, Padaki N.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is an emerging global epidemic which progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis in a subset of subjects. Various reviews have focused on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. This review highlights specifically the triggers implicated in disease progression from NAFL to NASH. The integrating role of genes, dietary factors, innate immunity, cytokines and gut microbiome have been discussed. PMID:26155043

  10. Ursodeoxycholic acid for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Katharine; Ashby, Deborah; Smyth, Rosalind L

    2017-09-11

    Abnormal biliary secretion leads to the thickening of bile and the formation of plugs within the bile ducts; the consequent obstruction and abnormal bile flow ultimately results in the development of cystic fibrosis-related liver disease. This condition peaks in adolescence with up to 20% of adolescents with cystic fibrosis developing chronic liver disease. Early changes in the liver may ultimately result in end-stage liver disease with people needing transplantation. One therapeutic option currently used is ursodeoxycholic acid. This is an update of a previous review. To analyse evidence that ursodeoxycholic acid improves indices of liver function, reduces the risk of developing chronic liver disease and improves outcomes in general in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane CF and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted drug companies and searched online trial registries.Date of the most recent search of the Group's trials register: 09 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials of the use of ursodeoxycholic acid for at least three months compared with placebo or no additional treatment in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and quality. The authors used GRADE to assess the quality of the evidence. Twelve trials have been identified, of which four trials involving 137 participants were included; data were only available from three of the trials (118 participants) since one cross-over trial did not report appropriate data. The dose of ursodeoxycholic acid ranged from 10 to 20 mg/kg/day for up to 12 months. The complex design used in two trials meant that data could only be analysed for subsets of participants. There was no significant difference in weight change, mean difference -0.90 kg (95% confidence interval -1.94 to 0.14) based on 30

  11. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the liver disease of our age?

    PubMed

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-07-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients.

  12. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The liver disease of our age?

    PubMed Central

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients. PMID:25083080

  13. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Wilson’s Disease Associated with Fulminant Hepatic Failure: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Hara, Takanobu; Okada, Satomi; Hamada, Takashi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2018-01-01

    Patient: Female, 17 Final Diagnosis: Fulminant Wilson’s disease Symptoms: General jaundice • malaise • abdominal pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: ICU Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Rare disease Background: Liver transplantation is indicated for patients with Wilson’s disease (WD) who present either with acute liver failure or with end-stage liver disease and severe hepatic insufficiency as the first sign of disease. However, almost all reported cases have been treated with death donor liver transplantation. Here we report the case of a patient with WD associated with fulminant hepatic failure (WD-FHF) who underwent living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Case Report: A 17-year-old female was diagnosed with WD-FHF based on high uric copper (10 603 μg/day, normal <100 μg/day), low serum ceruloplasmin (15 mg/dL, normal >20 mg/dL) and Kayser-Fleischer (K-F) corneal ring, and acute liver failure (ALF), acute renal failure (ARF) and grade 2 hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score was 35. Due to her critical condition, the patient underwent LDLT utilizing a right liver graft from her 44-year-old mother. The right hepatic vein (RHV) and inferior right hepatic vein (iRHV) were reconstructed. She developed severe liver dysfunction due to a crooked hepatic vein caused by compression from the large graft. To straighten the bend, a reoperation was performed. During the operation, we tried to relieve the compressed hepatic vein by adjusting the graft location, but the benefits were limited. We therefore performed stenting in both the RHV and iRHV on postoperative day 9. The patient gradually improved, exhibiting good liver and renal functions, and was finally discharged on postoperative day 114. Conclusions: When WD-FHF deteriorates too rapidly for conservative management, LDLT is an effective therapeutic strategy. PMID:29549236

  14. Deficiency of intestinal mucin-2 ameliorates experimental alcoholic liver disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Chen, Peng; Wang, Hui J.; Wang, Lirui; McCole, Declan F.; Brandl, Katharina; Stärkel, Peter; Belzer, Clara; Hellerbrand, Claus; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Ho, Samuel B.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal mucus layer protects the epithelium from noxious agents, viruses, and pathogenic bacteria present in the gastrointestinal tract. It is composed of mucins, predominantly mucin-2 (Muc2), secreted by goblet cells of the intestine. Experimental alcoholic liver disease requires translocation of bacterial products across the intestinal barrier into the systemic circulation, which induces an inflammatory response in the liver and contributes to steatohepatitis. We investigated the roles of the intestinal mucus layer, and in particular Muc2, in development of experimental alcohol-associated liver disease in mice. We studied experimental alcohol-induced liver disease, induced by the Tsukamoto-French method (which involves continuous intragastric feeding of an isocaloric diet or alcohol) in wild-type and Muc2−/− mice. Muc2−/− mice showed less alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis that developed in wild-type mice. Most notably, Muc2−/− mice had significantly lower plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide than wild-type mice after alcohol feeding. In contrast to wild-type mice, Muc2−/− mice were protected from alcohol-associated microbiome changes that are dependent on intestinal mucins. The anti-microbial proteins Reg3b and Reg3g were expressed at significantly higher levels in the jejunum of Muc2−/− mice fed the isocaloric diet or alcohol, compared with wild-type mice. Consequently, Muc2−/− mice showed increased killing of commensal bacteria and prevented intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Conclusion: Muc2−/− mice are protected from intestinal bacterial overgrowth and dysbiosis in response to alcohol feeding. Subsequently, lower amounts of bacterial products such as endotoxin translocate into the systemic circulation, decreasing liver disease. PMID:23408358

  15. Secondhand tobacco exposure is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Connie; Rountree, Carl B.; Department of Pediatrics, Bon Secour St. Mary's Hospital, 5801 Bremo Rd, Richmond, VA 23226

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of liver disease in children in the United States, and prevalence rates are rising. Smoking is associated with NAFLD, but the association of secondhand smoke exposure with NAFLD is unknown. Aims: To investigate the association of secondhand tobacco exposure with NAFLD in children. Methods: We surveyed parents/guardians of 304 children aged 3–12 years who had received an abdominal ultrasound at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. The survey addressed demographics, medical history, secondhand tobacco exposure, activity level, screen viewing time and other environmental exposures. A pediatric radiologist and sonographer reviewed themore » ultrasounds to grade the presence of bight liver compatible with NAFLD. We conducted logistic regression analysis to assess the association of secondhand tobacco exposure and NAFLD. Results: 54% of eligible potential participants responded to the survey. Fatty liver was present in 3% of the children. Increasing child age was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 1.63 95% CI 1.1, 2.4). Reported child obesity was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 44.5 95% CI 5.3, 371.7). The rate of NAFLD was higher in the smoke exposed group (6.7% vs. 1.7%). For every extra pack per day smoked at home, the odds of a child having NAFLD increased 1.8 times (AOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2, 2.8), and any exposure increased a child's odds of NAFLD four-fold (AOR 4.0, 95% CI 1.02, 15.8). Conclusion: We found an association of secondhand smoke exposure and NAFLD in children. This may represent an area for future prevention efforts. - Highlights: • We evaluated the relation of tobacco exposure with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure may be an addressable risk factor.« less

  16. Effects of purified eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: results from the Welcome* study.

    PubMed

    Scorletti, Eleonora; Bhatia, Lokpal; McCormick, Keith G; Clough, Geraldine F; Nash, Kathryn; Hodson, Leanne; Moyses, Helen E; Calder, Philip C; Byrne, Christopher D

    2014-10-01

    There is no licensed treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition that increases risk of chronic liver disease, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We tested whether 15-18 months treatment with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) plus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (Omacor/Lovaza) (4 g/day) decreased liver fat and improved two histologically-validated liver fibrosis biomarker scores (primary outcomes). Patients with NAFLD were randomised in a double blind placebo-controlled trial [DHA+EPA(n=51), placebo(n=52)]. We quantified liver fat percentage (%) by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in three liver zones. We measured liver fibrosis using two validated scores. We tested adherence to the intervention (Omacor group) and contamination (with DHA and EPA) (placebo group) by measuring erythrocyte percentage DHA and EPA enrichment (gas chromatography). We undertook multivariable linear regression to test effects of: a) DHA+EPA treatment (ITT analyses) and b) erythrocyte DHA and EPA enrichment (secondary analysis). Median (IQR) baseline and end of study liver fat% were 21.7 (19.3) and 19.7 (18.0) (placebo), and 23.0 (36.2) and 16.3 (22.0), (DHA+EPA). In the fully adjusted regression model there was a trend towards improvement in liver fat% with DHA+EPA treatment (β=-3.64 (95%CI -8.0,0.8); p=0.1) but there was evidence of contamination in the placebo group and variable adherence to the intervention in the Omacor group. Further regression analysis showed that DHA enrichment was independently associated with a decrease in liver fat% (for each 1% enrichment, β=-1.70 (95%CI -2.9,-0.5); p=0.007). No improvement in the fibrosis scores occurred. Conclusion. Erythrocyte DHA enrichment with DHA+EPA treatment is linearly associated with decreased liver fat%. Substantial decreases in liver fat% can be achieved with high percentage erythrocyte DHA enrichment in NAFLD. (Hepatology 2014;).

  17. Resveratrol inhibits nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Hijona, Elizabeth; Larzabal, Mikel; Beraza, Marta; Aldazabal, Pablo; García-Urkia, Nerea; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Cosme, Angel; Irastorza, Belen; González, Alberto; Arenas, Juan I

    2008-01-01

    Background The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is high. NAFLD is linked to obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertriglyceridemia. Approximately 20% of patients with NAFLD will eventually develop cirrhosis. Our purpose was to investigate whether resveratrol decreased hepatic steatosis in an animal model of steatosis, and whether this therapeutic approach resulted in a decrease in tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production, lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. Methods Male Wistar CRL: Wi (Han) (225 g) rats were randomized into three groups. A control group (n = 12) was given free access to regular dry rat chow for 4 weeks. The steatosis (n = 12) and resveratrol (n = 12) groups were given free access to feed (a high carbohydrate-fat free modified diet) and water 4 days per week, and fasted for the remaining 3 days for 4 weeks. Rats in the resveratrol group were given resveratrol 10 mg daily by the oral route. All rats were killed at 4 weeks and assessed for fatty infiltration and bacterial translocation. Levels of TNF-α in serum, hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and nitric oxide synthase) and biochemical parameters were measured. Results Fat deposition was decreased in the resveratrol group as compared to the steatosis group (Grade 1 vs Grade 3, P < 0.05). TNF-α and MDA levels were significantly increased in the steatosis group (TNF-α; 33.4 ± 5.2 vs 26.24 ± 3.47 pg/ml and MDA; 9.08 ± 0.8 vs 3.17 ± 1.45 μM respectively, P < 0.05). This was accompanied by increased superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and decreased nitric oxide synthase in the liver of resveratrol group significantly (P < 0.05 vs steatosis group). Bacterial translocation was not found in any of the groups. Glucose levels were decreased in the group of rats given resveratrol (P < 0.05). Conclusion Resveratrol decreased NAFLD severity in rats. This effect was mediated, at least

  18. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Study of Demographic and Predictive Factors.

    PubMed

    Shil, Bimal Chandra; Saha, Madhusudan; Ahmed, Faruque; Dhar, Swapan Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of liver disease characterized by excess of fat in liver which ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the absence of excessive alcohol consumption. The study was carried out in 216 with serologically defined fatty liver. They underwent detailed history evaluation, clinical examination and anthropometric measurements, biochemical and serological tests. The cut-off values for central obesity were waist hip ratio (WHR) > 0.85 in women and > 0.9 in men. The prevalence of NAFLD was highest in the age group of 31 to 60 years. It was more common in males than females. Twenty cases (11.7%) had discomfort at right upper abdomen. Hepatomegaly was found in 27 patients (13.2%), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in 29 (14.21%) and diabetes mellitus in 38 (18.63%) patients. Overweight or obesity was found in 110 (53.92%) cases and central obesity was seen in 129 (63.23%) patients. Hence, metabolic syndrome (according to International Diabetes Federation Criteria) was present in 62.25% cases of NAFLD. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) more than upper limit of normal was found in 36.76% cases. Risk factors for NAFLD in Bangladesh are similar to reported from the rest of the world. Age more than 30 years, male sex, WHR > 0.9 in men and more than 0.85 in female, BMI more than 25, glucose intolerance are predictive factors for NAFLD. Shil BC, Saha M, Ahmed F, Dhar SC. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Study of Demographic and Predictive Factors. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2015;5(1):4-6.

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management.

    PubMed

    Başaranoğlu, Metin; Örmeci, Necati

    2014-04-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an umbrella term that covers both a relatively benign condition, which is simple steatosis, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is characterized by a chronic and progressive liver pathology that may progress to cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation. Despite the growing body of evidence, one of the important and unresolved problems is the pathogenesis of NASH. It might be a metabolic disturbance as a primary abnormality in NAFLD. Insulin resistance is at the center of these metabolic abnormalities. Then, hepatocyte injury might be induced by oxidative stress. This ongoing process progresses to NASH, even to cirrhosis in some patients. In addition to oxidative stress, possibilities for the next hit are lipid peroxidation, reactive metabolites, adipose tissue products, transforming growth factor-β₁, Fas ligand, mitochondrial dysfunction, respiratory chain deficiency, and intestinal microbiota. Currently, there is no well-established and approved therapy. Recommendations are to improve existing co-morbidities, such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, or type 2 diabetes, and lifestyle modification with weight loss and exercise.

  20. Activity of essential phospholipids (EPL) from soybean in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Gundermann, Karl-Josef; Kuenker, Ann; Kuntz, Erwin; Droździk, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Essential phospholipids (EPL) contain a highly purified extract of polyenylphosphatidylcholine (PPC) molecules from soybean. The main active ingredient is 1,2-dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), which differentiates it from other phospholipids, lecithins, or extracts from other sources. Although EPLis widely used in liver diseases of various origins, its mode of action and pharmacological and clinical evidence of its efficacy have not yet been concisely reviewed. This paper critically summarizes experimental and clinical results. With regard to in-vitro and animal tests, EPL influenced membrane-dependent cellular functions and showed anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, apoptosis-modulating, regenerative, membrane-repairing and -protective, cell-signaling and receptor-influencing, as well as lipid-regulating effects in intoxication models with chemicals or drugs. Clinical studies, primarily from European and Asian countries, have shown improvement in subjective symptoms; clinical, biochemical and imaging findings; and histology in liver indications such as fatty liver of different origin, drug hepatotoxicity, and adjuvant in chronic viral hepatitis and hepatic coma. The available studies characterize EPL as evidence-based medicine, although further long-term controlled clinical trials are required to precisely determine its benefit for alleviating symptoms, improving well-being, inducing histological changes and slowing the progression of liver disease. EPL-related relevant side effects were not observed.

  1. Necroptosis: an emerging type of cell death in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Waqar Khalid; Jun, Dae Won

    2014-09-21

    Cell death has been extensively evaluated for decades and it is well recognized that pharmacological interventions directed to inhibit cell death can prevent significant cell loss and can thus improve an organ's physiological function. For long, only apoptosis was considered as a sole form of programmed cell death. Recently necroptosis, a RIP1/RIP3-dependent programmed cell death, has been identified as an apoptotic backup cell death mechanism with necrotic morphology. The evidences of necroptosis and protective effects achieved by blocking necroptosis have been extensively reported in recent past. However, only a few studies reported the evidence of necroptosis and protective effects achieved by inhibiting necroptosis in liver related disease conditions. Although the number of necroptosis initiators is increasing; however, interestingly, it is still unclear that what actually triggers necroptosis in different liver diseases or if there is always a different necroptosis initiator in each specific disease condition followed by specific downstream signaling molecules. Understanding the precise mechanism of necroptosis as well as counteracting other cell death pathways in liver diseases could provide a useful insight towards achieving extensive therapeutic significance. By targeting necroptosis and/or other parallel death pathways, a significant cell loss and thus a decrement in an organ's physiological function can be prevented.

  2. Cryoglobulins in acute and chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Florin-Christensen, A.; Roux, María E. B.; Arana, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Cryoglobulins were detected in the sera of thirteen patients with acute viral hepatitis and of twelve with chronic hepatic diseases (active chronic hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cryptogenic cirrhosis). Their nature and antibody activity was studied. In both groups, most of them consisted of mixed cryoimmunoglobulins (IgM, IgG and/or IgA), but some were single-class immunoglobulins with one or both types of light chains. Unusual components were also found. α1-fetoprotein was present in four cryoprecipitates: in two as the single constituent and in two associated to immunoglobulins; hepatitis-associated antigen co-existed in one of the latter. Some cryoglobulins showed antibody activity against human IgG, smooth muscle and mitochondrial antigens. In one case, the IgM-kappa of the cryoprecipitate had antibody activity against α1-fetoprotein; this antigen was also present in the cryoprecipitate, suggesting immune-complex formation. Autoantibodies were also looked for in the sera of the twenty-five patients; apart from the most common ones, antibodies to α1-fetoprotein were found in two patients. PMID:4143195

  3. From the liver to the heart: Cardiac dysfunction in obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Sessa, Anna; Umano, Giuseppina Rosaria; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Santoro, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased as a consequence of the childhood obesity world epidemic. The liver damage occurring in NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. Recent findings reported that fatty liver disease is related to early atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction even in the pediatric population. Moreover, some authors have shown an association between liver steatosis and cardiac abnormalities, including rise in left ventricular mass, systolic and diastolic dysfunction and epicardial adipose tissue thickness. In this editorial, we provide a brief overview of the current knowledge concerning the association between NAFLD and cardiac dysfunction. PMID:28144387

  4. From the liver to the heart: Cardiac dysfunction in obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Di Sessa, Anna; Umano, Giuseppina Rosaria; Miraglia Del Giudice, Emanuele; Santoro, Nicola

    2017-01-18

    In the last decades the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased as a consequence of the childhood obesity world epidemic. The liver damage occurring in NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. Recent findings reported that fatty liver disease is related to early atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction even in the pediatric population. Moreover, some authors have shown an association between liver steatosis and cardiac abnormalities, including rise in left ventricular mass, systolic and diastolic dysfunction and epicardial adipose tissue thickness. In this editorial, we provide a brief overview of the current knowledge concerning the association between NAFLD and cardiac dysfunction.

  5. Glycosyltransferases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yu-Tao; Su, Hai-Ying; An, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to the development of NAFLD are still not fully understood. Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are a diverse class of enzymes involved in catalyzing the transfer of one or multiple sugar residues to a wide range of acceptor molecules. GTs mediate a wide range of functions from structure and storage to signaling, and play a key role in many fundamental biological processes. Therefore, it is anticipated that GTs have a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In this article, we present an overview of the basic information on NAFLD, particularly GTs and glycosylation modification of certain molecules and their association with NAFLD pathogenesis. In addition, the effects and mechanisms of some GTs in the development of NAFLD are summarized. PMID:26937136

  6. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing nutritional status in children with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachel M; Dhawan, Anil

    2005-12-01

    The metabolic changes compounded by anorexia associated with chronic liver disease adversely affect growth in children. In many cases, this requires the administration of artificial nutritional support. It is important in this group of patients that those who are becoming nutritionally depleted are identified quickly and in those receiving artificial nutritional support, the effectiveness is monitored. The current review is an examination of methods available to assess nutritional status. These include anthropometry, methods available in the laboratory and a selection of less commonly used methods undergoing evaluation at research level. A brief discussion accompanies each technique, outlining the limitations of its use in children with chronic liver disease. The review concludes with an outline of how nutritional status should be assessed in this group of children, and suggests further research.

  8. Rising Rates of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Leading to Liver Transplantation in Baby Boomer Generation with Chronic Hepatitis C, Alcohol Liver Disease, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Related Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cholankeril, George; Perumpail, Ryan B.; Liu, Andy; Sandhu, Jeevin S.; Nair, Satheesh; Hu, Menghan; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    We aim to study the impact of the baby boomer (BB) generation, a birth-specific cohort (born 1945–1965) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related liver transplantation (LT) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We performed a retrospective analysis using the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN) database from 2003 to 2014 to compare HCC-related liver transplant surgery trends between two cohorts—the BB and non-BB—with a secondary diagnosis of HCV, ALD, or NASH. From 2003–2014, there were a total of 8313 liver transplant recipients for the indication of HCC secondary to HCV, ALD, or NASH. Of the total, 6658 (80.1%) HCC-related liver transplant recipients were BB. The number of liver transplant surgeries for the indication of HCC increased significantly in NASH (+1327%), HCV (+382%), and ALD (+286%) during the study period. The proportion of BB who underwent LT for HCC was the highest in HCV (84.7%), followed by NASH (70.3%) and ALD (64.7%). The recommendations for birth-cohort specific HCV screening stemmed from a greater understanding of the high prevalence of chronic HCV and HCV-related HCC within BB. The rising number of HCC-related LT among BB with ALD and NASH suggests the need for increased awareness and improved preventative screening/surveillance measures within NASH and ALD cohorts as well. PMID:28954412

  9. Rising Rates of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Leading to Liver Transplantation in Baby Boomer Generation with Chronic Hepatitis C, Alcohol Liver Disease, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Related Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Cholankeril, George; Yoo, Eric R; Perumpail, Ryan B; Liu, Andy; Sandhu, Jeevin S; Nair, Satheesh; Hu, Menghan; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-09-26

    We aim to study the impact of the baby boomer (BB) generation, a birth-specific cohort (born 1945-1965) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related liver transplantation (LT) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We performed a retrospective analysis using the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN) database from 2003 to 2014 to compare HCC-related liver transplant surgery trends between two cohorts-the BB and non-BB-with a secondary diagnosis of HCV, ALD, or NASH. From 2003-2014, there were a total of 8313 liver transplant recipients for the indication of HCC secondary to HCV, ALD, or NASH. Of the total, 6658 (80.1%) HCC-related liver transplant recipients were BB. The number of liver transplant surgeries for the indication of HCC increased significantly in NASH (+1327%), HCV (+382%), and ALD (+286%) during the study period. The proportion of BB who underwent LT for HCC was the highest in HCV (84.7%), followed by NASH (70.3%) and ALD (64.7%). The recommendations for birth-cohort specific HCV screening stemmed from a greater understanding of the high prevalence of chronic HCV and HCV-related HCC within BB. The rising number of HCC-related LT among BB with ALD and NASH suggests the need for increased awareness and improved preventative screening/surveillance measures within NASH and ALD cohorts as well.

  10. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Goodship, Timothy H J; Cook, H Terence; Fakhouri, Fadi; Fervenza, Fernando C; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Kavanagh, David; Nester, Carla M; Noris, Marina; Pickering, Matthew C; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Roumenina, Lubka T; Sethi, Sanjeev; Smith, Richard J H

    2017-03-01

    In both atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) complement plays a primary role in disease pathogenesis. Herein we report the outcome of a 2015 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference where key issues in the management of these 2 diseases were considered by a global panel of experts. Areas addressed included renal pathology, clinical phenotype and assessment, genetic drivers of disease, acquired drivers of disease, and treatment strategies. In order to help guide clinicians who are caring for such patients, recommendations for best treatment strategies were discussed at length, providing the evidence base underpinning current treatment options. Knowledge gaps were identified and a prioritized research agenda was proposed to resolve outstanding controversial issues. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or indexes of liver health: a systematic review and meta-analysis1234

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mei; Ma, Jiantao; Patel, Kamal; Berger, Samantha; Lau, Joseph; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Concerns have been raised about the concurrent temporal trend between simple sugar intakes, especially of fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), and rates of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the United States. Objective: We examined the effect of different amounts and forms of dietary fructose on the incidence or prevalence of NAFLD and indexes of liver health in humans. Design: We conducted a systematic review of English-language, human studies of any design in children and adults with low to no alcohol intake and that reported at least one predetermined measure of liver health. The strength of the evidence was evaluated by considering risk of bias, consistency, directness, and precision. Results: Six observational studies and 21 intervention studies met the inclusion criteria. The overall strength of evidence for observational studies was rated insufficient because of high risk of biases and inconsistent study findings. Of 21 intervention studies, 19 studies were in adults without NAFLD (predominantly healthy, young men) and 1 study each in adults or children with NAFLD. We found a low level of evidence that a hypercaloric fructose diet (supplemented by pure fructose) increases liver fat and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations in healthy men compared with the consumption of a weight-maintenance diet. In addition, there was a low level of evidence that hypercaloric fructose and glucose diets have similar effects on liver fat and liver enzymes in healthy adults. There was insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion for effects of HFCS or sucrose on NAFLD. Conclusions: On the basis of indirect comparisons across study findings, the apparent association between indexes of liver health (ie, liver fat, hepatic de novo lipogenesis, alanine aminotransferase, AST, and γ-glutamyl transpeptase) and fructose or sucrose intake appear to be confounded by excessive energy intake. Overall, the available evidence is not sufficiently robust

  12. [Social medicine and chronic liver disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hoppe, R

    1980-06-01

    Reports of 1,033 insured person in file of the Landesversicherungsanstalt Rheinprovinz, a public insurance agency, were evaluated; these individuals had started receiving annuities because of liver disease in the years 1969 and 1970. On evaluation 7-8 years later the following was found: annuities still running 21,3%, stop of annuities 1,3%, time limited annuities 3,5%, change to retirement annuities 34,8%, death 39,1%.

  13. Screening for nutritional risk in hospitalized children with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Song, Tiantian; Mu, Ying; Gong, Xue; Ma, Wenyan; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality from pediatric liver disease. We investigated the prevalence of both malnutrition and high nutritional risk in hospitalized children with liver disease as well as the rate of in-hospital nutritional support. A total of 2,874 hospitalized children and adolescents with liver disease aged 1 to 17 years (inclusive) were enrolled. Malnutrition was screened by anthropometric measures (height-for-age, weight-for-height, weight-for-age, and BMI- for-age z-scores). The Screening Tool for Risk on Nutritional Status and Growth (STRONGkids) was used to evaluate nutritional risk status. Nutrition markers in blood, rate of nutritional support, length of hospital stay, and hospital fees were compared among nutritional risk groups. The overall prevalence of malnutrition was 38.6%. About 20.0% of children had high nutritional risk, and prevalence of malnutrition was markedly greater in the high nutritional risk group compared with the moderate risk group (67.9% vs 31.3%). Serum albumin and prealbumin differed significantly between high and moderate risk groups (p<0.001). Only 8.9% of children with high nutritional risk and 3.5% with moderate nutritional risk received nutrition support during hospitalization. Children with high nutritional risk had longer hospital stays and greater hospital costs (p<0.001). The prevalence of malnutrition is high in children with liver disease. High nutritional risk is also prevalent at admission. Albumin and prealbumin are sensitive markers for distinguishing nutritional risk groups. High nutritional risk prolongs length of stay and increases hospital costs. The nutritional support rate is still low and requires standardization.

  14. Prevalence of Hypothyroidism in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Pagadala, Mangesh R.; Zein, Claudia O.; Dasarathy, Srinivasan; Yerian, Lisa; Lopez, Rocio; McCullough, Arthur J.

    2014-01-01

    Background A possible association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and hypothyroidism has been suggested. Possible explanations for this association are the recognized links between hypothyroidism and various elements of the metabolic syndrome which is often present in NAFLD. To further explore this association, we determined the prevalence of hypothyroidism in a cohort of patients with NAFLD and analyzed the potential factors associated with hypothyroidism in this patient population. Methods Two hundred and forty six patients with biopsy proven NAFLD attending hepatology clinics at the Cleveland Clinic between October 2006 to June 2009 and 430 age, gender, race and BMI matched control subjects seen in the general internal medicine clinic were included. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism who were on thyroid replacement therapy were considered to be hypothyroid. Results Hypothyroidism was more frequent among patients with NAFLD (21%vs 9.5%.; P<0.01) compared to controls and was higher in NASH patients than NAFLD patients without NASH (25% vs 12.8%, P=0.03). Subjects with hypothyroidism were 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1, 3.9,P=0.02)) and 3.8 (95% CI:2,6.9, P<0.001) times more likely to have NAFLD and NASH respectively. By Multivariate analysis, female gender (P<0.001) and increased BMI (P=.03) were associated with hypothyroidism. NAFLD subjects who reported mild alcohol consumption were less likely to have hypothyroidism compared to those who reported complete abstinence (OR 0.37, P=0.008). Conclusions A higher prevalence of hypothyroidism was demonstrated in patients with NAFLD compared to controls. Patients with hypothyroidism were more likely to have NASH. Among subjects with NALFD, female gender, increased BMI and history of abstinence from alcohol were associated with hypothyroidism. Further studies are needed in order to confirm and better characterized these findings as well as the described associations and their pathogenesis. PMID

  15. Pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease: Role of oxidative metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a predominant etiological factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases, resulting in fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) involves complex and still unclear biological processes, the oxidative metabolites of ethanol such as acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a preeminent role in the clinical and pathological spectrum of ALD. Ethanol oxidative metabolism influences intracellular signaling pathways and deranges the transcriptional control of several genes, leading to fat accumulation, fibrogenesis and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. Acetaldehyde is known to be toxic to the liver and alters lipid homeostasis, decreasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and increasing sterol regulatory element binding protein activity via an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. AMPK activation by ROS modulates autophagy, which has an important role in removing lipid droplets. Acetaldehyde and aldehydes generated from lipid peroxidation induce collagen synthesis by their ability to form protein adducts that activate transforming-growth-factor-β-dependent and independent profibrogenic pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Furthermore, activation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to ethanol metabolism plays a key role in the development and progression of ALD. Acetaldehyde alters the intestinal barrier and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation by disrupting tight and adherent junctions in human colonic mucosa. Acetaldehyde and LPS induce Kupffer cells to release ROS and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines that contribute to neutrophils infiltration. In addition, alcohol consumption inhibits natural killer cells that are cytotoxic to HSCs and thus have an important antifibrotic function in the liver. Ethanol metabolism may also interfere with cell

  16. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease1

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Matthew C.; Clair, Heather B.; Hardesty, Josiah E.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J.; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A.; McClain, Craig J.; Prough, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  17. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    GAO, BIN; BATALLER, RAMON

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide and can lead to fibrosis and cirrhosis. The latest surveillance report published by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism showed that liver cirrhosis was the 12th leading cause of death in the United States, with a total of 29,925 deaths in 2007, 48% of which were alcohol related. The spectrum of ALD includes simple steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and superimposed hepatocellular carcinoma. Early work on the pathogenesis of the disease focused on ethanol metabolism–associated oxidative stress and glutathione depletion, abnormal methionine metabolism, malnutrition, and production of endotoxins that activate Kupffer cells. We review findings from recent studies that have characterized specific intracellular signaling pathways, transcriptional factors, aspects of innate immunity, chemokines, epigenetic features, microRNAs, and stem cells that are associated with ALD, improving our understanding of its pathogenesis. Despite this progress, no targeted therapies are available. The cornerstone of treatment for alcoholic hepatitis remains as it was 40 years ago: abstinence, nutritional support, and corticosteroids. There is an urgent need to develop new pathophysiology-oriented therapies. Recent translational studies of human samples and animal models have identified promising therapeutic targets. PMID:21920463

  18. Genetic background in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Maida, Marcello; Petta, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In the Western world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered as one of the most significant liver diseases of the twenty-first century. Its development is certainly driven by environmental factors, but it is also regulated by genetic background. The role of heritability has been widely demonstrated by several epidemiological, familial, and twin studies and case series, and likely reflects the wide inter-individual and inter-ethnic genetic variability in systemic metabolism and wound healing response processes. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide association studies have clearly identified Patatin-like phosholipase domain-containing 3 gene variant I148M as a major player in the development and progression of NAFLD. More recently, the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 E167K variant emerged as a relevant contributor in both NAFLD pathogenesis and cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, numerous case-control studies have been performed to elucidate the potential role of candidate genes in the pathogenesis and progression of fatty liver, although findings are sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we performed a comprehensive literature search and review on the role of genetics in NAFLD. We emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of the available literature and outline the putative role of each genetic variant in influencing susceptibility and/or progression of the disease. PMID:26494964

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Asia: emerging perspectives.

    PubMed

    Seto, Wai-Kay; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2017-02-01

    As in the West, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest chronic liver disease in Asia, with a prevalence higher than 40 % in some countries. The risk factors for NAFLD development are similar to those in Western countries, including increased body mass index, diabetes, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. NAFLD in Asians is associated with different extrahepatic manifestations involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and renal systems. A considerable proportion of Asians with NAFLD are described as having "lean" NAFLD. Present in approximately 20 % of the Asian population, lean NAFLD is closely linked with insulin resistance, diabetes, and other metabolic complications, but its association with disease progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis remains to be defined. There is emerging evidence of the interactions of NAFLD with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in Asia. Unlike in Western countries, NAFLD constitutes only a minority of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma cases in Asia. Possible explanations are the lower prevalence of obesity and the overwhelming problem of viral hepatitis in Asia. With aging of the obesity cohort in Asia, NAFLD-related liver complications are expected to increase.

  20. Fructose Consumption, Lipogenesis, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ter Horst, Kasper W; Serlie, Mireille J

    2017-09-06

    Increased fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, but a causal role of fructose in these metabolic diseases remains debated. Mechanistically, hepatic fructose metabolism yields precursors that can be used for gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis (DNL). Fructose-derived precursors also act as nutritional regulators of the transcription factors, including ChREBP and SREBP1c, that regulate the expression of hepatic gluconeogenesis and DNL genes. In support of these mechanisms, fructose intake increases hepatic gluconeogenesis and DNL and raises plasma glucose and triglyceride levels in humans. However, epidemiological and fructose-intervention studies have had inconclusive results with respect to liver fat, and there is currently no good human evidence that fructose, when consumed in isocaloric amounts, causes more liver fat accumulation than other energy-dense nutrients. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the seemingly contradicting literature on fructose and NAFLD. We outline fructose physiology, the mechanisms that link fructose to NAFLD, and the available evidence from human studies. From this framework, we conclude that the cellular mechanisms underlying hepatic fructose metabolism will likely reveal novel targets for the treatment of NAFLD, dyslipidemia, and hepatic insulin resistance. Finally, fructose-containing sugars are a major source of excess calories, suggesting that a reduction of their intake has potential for the prevention of NAFLD and other obesity-related diseases.

  1. Mechanisms and cell signaling in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Juliane I.; McClain, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. For example, the Veterans Administration Cooperative Studies reported that patients with cirrhosis and superimposed alcoholic hepatitis had a 4-year mortality of >60%. The poor prognosis of ALD implies that preventing disease progression would be more effective than treating end-stage liver disease. An obvious avenue of prevention would be to remove the damaging agent; however, the infamously high rate of recidivism in alcoholics makes maintaining abstinence a difficult treatment goal to prevent ALD. Indeed, although the progression of ALD is well-characterized, there is no universally accepted therapy available to halt or reverse this process in humans. With better understanding of the mechanism(s) and risk factors that mediate the initiation and progression of ALD, rational targeted therapy can be developed to treat or prevent ALD. The purpose of this review is to summarize the established and proposed mechanisms by which chronic alcohol abuse damages the liver and to highlight key signaling events known or hypothesized to mediate these effects. PMID:20868231

  2. Cystic fibrosis liver disease - from diagnosis to risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ciucă, Ioana Mihaiela; Pop, Liviu; Tămaş, Liviu; Tăban, Sorina

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent monogenic genetic disease, autosomal recessive transmitted, characterized by an impressive clinical polymorphism and appreciative fatal prospective. Liver disease is the second non-pulmonary cause of death in cystic fibrosis, which, with increasing life expectancy, became an important management problem. Predisposing factors like male gender, pancreatic insufficiency, meconium ileus and severe mutation are incriminated to influence the occurrence of cystic fibrosis associated liver disease (CFLD). Our study included 174 patients with CF, monitored in the National Cystic Fibrosis Centre, Timisoara, Romania. They were routinely followed-up by clinical assessment, liver biochemical tests, ultrasound examinations and other methods like transient elastography, biopsy, in selected cases. Sixty-six patients, with median age at diagnosis 4.33 years, diagnosed with CFLD, without significant gender gap. CFLD was frequent in patients aged over eight years, with meconium ileus history, carriers of severe mutations (p=0.002). Pancreatic insufficiency, although present in 75% of patients with CFLD was not confirmed as risk factor, not male gender, in our study. CF children older than eight years, carriers of a severe genotype, with a positive history of meconium ileus, were more likely predisposed to CFLD.

  3. Pathophysiology and Mechanisms of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Joel T; Francque, Sven; Staels, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of liver disorders characterized by abnormal hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation, and hepatocyte dysfunction. Importantly, it is also closely linked to obesity and the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD predisposes susceptible individuals to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cardiovascular disease. Although the precise signals remain poorly understood, NAFLD pathogenesis likely involves actions of the different hepatic cell types and multiple extrahepatic signals. The complexity of this disease has been a major impediment to the development of appropriate metrics of its progression and effective therapies. Recent clinical data place increasing importance on identifying fibrosis, as it is a strong indicator of hepatic disease-related mortality. Preclinical modeling of the fibrotic process remains challenging, particularly in the contexts of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Future studies are needed to define the molecular pathways determining the natural progression of NAFLD, including key determinants of fibrosis and disease-related outcomes. This review covers the evolving concepts of NAFLD from both human and animal studies. We discuss recent clinical and diagnostic methods assessing NAFLD diagnosis, progression, and outcomes; compare the features of genetic and dietary animal models of NAFLD; and highlight pharmacological approaches for disease treatment.

  4. The Honolulu Liver Disease Cluster at the Medical Center: Its Mysteries and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Rolf; Eickhoff, Axel

    2016-03-31

    In 2013, physicians at the Honolulu Queen's Medical Center (QMC) noticed that seven liver disease patients reported the use of OxyELITE Pro (OEP), a widely consumed dietary supplement (DS). Assuming a temporal association between OEP use and disease, they argued that OEP was the cause of this mysterious cluster. Subsequent reexamination, however, has revealed that this QMC cohort is heterogeneous and not a cluster with a single agent causing a single disease. It is heterogeneous because patients used multiple DS's and drugs and because patients appeared to have suffered from multiple liver diseases: liver cirrhosis, liver failure by acetaminophen, hepatotoxicity by non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), resolving acute viral hepatitis by hepatitis B virus (HBV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV), and suspected hepatitis E virus (HEV). Failing to exclude these confounders and to consider more viable diagnoses, the QMC physicians may have missed specific treatment options in some of their patients. The QMC physicians unjustifiably upgraded their Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (RUCAM) causality scores so that all patients would appear to be "probable" for OEP. However, subsequent RUCAM reassessments by our group demonstrated a lack of causality for OEP in the evaluated QMC cases. The QMC's questionable approaches explain the extraordinary accumulation of suspected OEP cases at the QMC in Hawaii as single place, whereas similar cohorts were not published by any larger US liver center, substantiating that the problem is with the QMC. In this review article, we present and discuss new case data and critically evaluate upcoming developments of problematic regulatory assessments by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Hawaii Department of Health (HDOH), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as based on invalid QMC conclusions, clarifying now also basic facts and facilitating constructive

  5. The Honolulu Liver Disease Cluster at the Medical Center: Its Mysteries and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, Rolf; Eickhoff, Axel

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, physicians at the Honolulu Queen’s Medical Center (QMC) noticed that seven liver disease patients reported the use of OxyELITE Pro (OEP), a widely consumed dietary supplement (DS). Assuming a temporal association between OEP use and disease, they argued that OEP was the cause of this mysterious cluster. Subsequent reexamination, however, has revealed that this QMC cohort is heterogeneous and not a cluster with a single agent causing a single disease. It is heterogeneous because patients used multiple DS’s and drugs and because patients appeared to have suffered from multiple liver diseases: liver cirrhosis, liver failure by acetaminophen, hepatotoxicity by non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), resolving acute viral hepatitis by hepatitis B virus (HBV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV), and suspected hepatitis E virus (HEV). Failing to exclude these confounders and to consider more viable diagnoses, the QMC physicians may have missed specific treatment options in some of their patients. The QMC physicians unjustifiably upgraded their Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (RUCAM) causality scores so that all patients would appear to be “probable” for OEP. However, subsequent RUCAM reassessments by our group demonstrated a lack of causality for OEP in the evaluated QMC cases. The QMC’s questionable approaches explain the extraordinary accumulation of suspected OEP cases at the QMC in Hawaii as single place, whereas similar cohorts were not published by any larger US liver center, substantiating that the problem is with the QMC. In this review article, we present and discuss new case data and critically evaluate upcoming developments of problematic regulatory assessments by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Hawaii Department of Health (HDOH), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as based on invalid QMC conclusions, clarifying now also basic facts and facilitating constructive

  6. A non-human primate model of human radiation-induced venocclusive liver disease and hepatocyte injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Locker, Joseph; Abe, Michio; Enke, Charles A.; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina; Solberg, Timothy D.; Guha, Chandan; Fox, Ira J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Since the characteristic venocclusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic venocclusive disease. Methods We performed a dose escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results At doses ≥40Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses where radiation-induced liver disease was mild or non-existent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human venocclusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury. PMID:24315566

  7. Microbiota, a key player in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cassard, Anne-Marie; Ciocan, Dragos

    2017-12-22

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Only 20% of heavy alcohol consumers develop alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The intestinal microbiota (IM) has been recently identified as a key player in the severity of liver injury in ALD. Common features of ALD include a decrease of gut epithelial tight junction protein expression, mucin production, and antimicrobial peptide levels. This disruption of the gut barrier, which is a prerequisite for ALD, leads to the passage of bacterial products into the blood stream (endotoxemia). Moreover, metabolites produced by bacteria, such as short chain fatty acids, volatile organic compounds (VOS), and bile acids (BA), are involved in ALD pathology. Probiotic treatment, IM transplantation, or the consumption of dietary fiber, such as pectin, which all alter the ratio of bacterial species, have been shown to improve liver injury in animal models of ALD and to be associated with an improvement in gut barrier function. Although the connections between the microbiota and the host in ALD are well established, the underlying mechanisms are still an active area of research. Targeting the microbiome through the use of prebiotic, probiotic, and postbiotic modalities could be an attractive new approach to manage ALD.

  8. Microbiota-based treatments in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hotaik; Kim, Seung Woo; Hong, Meegun; Suk, Ki Tae

    2016-08-07

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Consumption of alcohol leads to increased gut permeability, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and enteric dysbiosis. These factors contribute to the increased translocation of microbial products to the liver via the portal tract. Subsequently, bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide, in association with the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway, induce a gamut of damaging immune responses in the hepatic milieu. Because of the close association between deleterious inflammation and ALD-induced microbiota imbalance, therapeutic approaches that seek to reestablish gut homeostasis should be considered in the treatment of alcoholic patients. To this end, a number of preliminary studies on probiotics have confirmed their effectiveness in suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and improving liver function in the context of ALD. In addition, there have been few studies linking the administration of prebiotics and antibiotics with reduction of alcohol-induced liver damage. Because these preliminary results are promising, large-scale randomized studies are warranted to elucidate the impact of these microbiota-based treatments on the gut flora and associated immune responses, in addition to exploring questions about optimal delivery. Finally, fecal microbiota transplant has been shown to be an effective method of modulating gut microbiota and deserve further investigation as a potential therapeutic option for ALD.

  9. Microbiota-based treatments in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hotaik; Kim, Seung Woo; Hong, Meegun; Suk, Ki Tae

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Consumption of alcohol leads to increased gut permeability, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and enteric dysbiosis. These factors contribute to the increased translocation of microbial products to the liver via the portal tract. Subsequently, bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide, in association with the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway, induce a gamut of damaging immune responses in the hepatic milieu. Because of the close association between deleterious inflammation and ALD-induced microbiota imbalance, therapeutic approaches that seek to reestablish gut homeostasis should be considered in the treatment of alcoholic patients. To this end, a number of preliminary studies on probiotics have confirmed their effectiveness in suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and improving liver function in the context of ALD. In addition, there have been few studies linking the administration of prebiotics and antibiotics with reduction of alcohol-induced liver damage. Because these preliminary results are promising, large-scale randomized studies are warranted to elucidate the impact of these microbiota-based treatments on the gut flora and associated immune responses, in addition to exploring questions about optimal delivery. Finally, fecal microbiota transplant has been shown to be an effective method of modulating gut microbiota and deserve further investigation as a potential therapeutic option for ALD. PMID:27547010

  10. Gender and racial differences in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jen-Jung; Fallon, Michael B

    2014-05-27

    Due to the worldwide epidemic of obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver injury ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may progress to advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis. Individuals with NAFLD, especially those with metabolic syndrome, have higher overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and liver-related mortality compared with the general population. According to the population-based studies, NAFLD and NASH are more prevalent in males and in Hispanics. Both the gender and racial ethnic differences in NAFLD and NASH are likely attributed to interaction between environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors. Using genome-wide association studies, several genetic variants have been identified to be associated with NAFLD/NASH. However, these variants account for only a small amount of variation in hepatic steatosis among ethnic groups and may serve as modifiers of the natural history of NAFLD. Alternatively, these variants may not be the causative variants but simply markers representing a larger body of genetic variations. In this article, we provide a concise review of the gender and racial differences in the prevalence of NAFLD and NASH in adults. We also discuss the possible mechanisms for these disparities.

  11. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L’Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development. PMID:25621497

  12. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L'Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-03-02

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development.

  13. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Noninvasive Methods of Diagnosing Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    AlShaalan, Rasha; Aljiffry, Murad; Al-Busafi, Said; Metrakos, Peter; Hassanain, Mazen

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is the buildup of lipids within hepatocytes. It is the simplest stage in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It occurs in approximately 30% of the general population and as much as 90% of the obese population in the United States. It may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which is a state of hepatocellular inflammation and damage in response to the accumulated fat. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard tool to diagnose and stage NAFLD. However, it comes with the risk of complications ranging from simple pain to life-threatening bleeding. It is also associated with sampling error. For these reasons, a variety of noninvasive radiological markers, including ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the controlled attenuation parameter using transient elastography and Xenon-133 scan have been proposed to increase our ability to diagnose NAFLD, hence avoiding liver biopsy. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility and accuracy of using available noninvasive diagnostic modalities for fatty liver in NAFLD. PMID:25843191

  14. Reduced Uptake of FDOPA PET in End-Stage Liver Disease with Elevated Manganese Levels

    PubMed Central

    Criswell, Susan R; Perlmutter, Joel S; Crippin, Jeffrey S; Videen, Tom O; Moerlein, Stephen M; Flores, Hubert P; Birke, Angela M; Racette, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether manganese toxicity secondary to end state liver disease is associated with nigrastriatal dysfunction as measured by 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) PET imaging. Design Observational case report. Setting The Movement Disorder Center at Washington University in St. Louis. Patients An individual with manganese toxicity secondary to end stage liver disease. His FDOPA PET was compared with those of 10 idiopathic Parkinson disease patients and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Main Outcome Measure The average estimated net FDOPA uptake by Patlak graphical analysis for caudate, anterior putamen and posterior putamen. Results The FDOPA uptake for the patient with secondary manganese toxicity was reduced across all regions by more than 2 SDs compared with healthy controls: caudate (reduced 24.7%), anterior putamen (28.0%), and posterior putamen (29.3%). The ratio of uptake between the caudate/posterior putamen was 0.99 and was different from that of idiopathic Parkinson disease patients, in whom the greatest reduction of FDOPA was in the posterior putamen (mean [SD] ratio, 1.65 [0.41]). Conclusions Reduce striatal uptake of FDOPA uptake indicates dysfunction of the nigrostriatal pathways in manganese toxicity secondary to end stage liver disease. The pattern of striatal involvement with equal reduction of FDOPA uptake in the caudate compared with posterior putamen appears different from those previously reported in individuals with occupational manganese toxicity and idiopathic Parkinson disease and may be specific to manganese toxicity secondary to end stage liver disease. PMID:22410448

  15. Circulating lipocalin 2 is neither related to liver steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease nor to residual liver function in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elisabeth M; Pohl, Rebekka; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Schacherer, Doris; Eisinger, Kristina; Wiest, Reiner; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa

    2016-09-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is induced in the injured liver and associated with inflammation. Aim of the present study was to evaluate whether serum LCN2 is a non-invasive marker to assess hepatic steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or residual liver function in patients with liver cirrhosis. Therefore, LCN2 was measured by ELISA in serum of 32 randomly selected patients without fatty liver (controls), 24 patients with ultrasound diagnosed NAFLD and 42 patients with liver cirrhosis mainly due to alcohol. Systemic LCN2 was comparable in patients with liver steatosis, those with liver cirrhosis and controls. LCN2 negatively correlated with bilirubin in both cohorts. In cirrhosis, LCN2 was not associated with more advanced liver injury defined by the CHILD-PUGH score and model for end-stage liver disease score. Resistin but not C-reactive protein or chemerin positively correlated with LCN2. LCN2 levels were not increased in patients with ascites or patients with esophageal varices. Consequently, reduction of portal pressure by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt did not affect LCN2 levels. Hepatic venous blood (HVS), portal venous blood and systemic venous blood levels of LCN2 were similar. HVS LCN2 was unchanged in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis compared to those with well-compensated disease arguing against increased hepatic release. Current data exclude that serum LCN2 is of any value as steatosis marker in patients with NAFLD and indicator of liver function in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: an emerging driving force in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Targher, Giovanni; Byrne, Christopher D

    2017-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by an accumulation of fat in the liver; the condition can progress over time to increase the risk of developing cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing rapidly owing to the global epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and NAFLD has been predicted to become the most important indication for liver transplantation over the next decade. It is now increasingly clear that NAFLD not only affects the liver but can also increase the risk of developing extra-hepatic diseases, including T2DM, cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD), which have a considerable impact on health-care resources. Accumulating evidence indicates that NAFLD exacerbates insulin resistance, predisposes to atherogenic dyslipidaemia and releases a variety of proinflammatory factors, prothrombotic factors and profibrogenic molecules that can promote vascular and renal damage. Furthermore, communication or 'crosstalk' between affected organs or tissues in these diseases has the potential to further harm function and worsen patient outcomes, and increasing amounts of evidence point to a strong association between NAFLD and CKD. Whether a causal relationship between NAFLD and CKD exists remains to be definitively established.

  17. Neglected features of lifestyle: Their relevance in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Martines, Giuseppe Fabio; Brischetto, Daniela; Trovato, Guglielmo; Catalano, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigated in non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD), with ultrasound (US)-detected fatty liver, and in a group of non-alcoholic and otherwise healthy subjects, relationship of neglected features of lifestyle with NAFLD and obesity. METHODS Five hundred and thirty-two NAFLD and 667 non-NAFLD healthy subjects, age 21-60 years were studied. Severity of liver steatosis was assessed by US bright liver score. The adherence to mediterranean diet score (AMDS) was assessed on the basis of a 1-wk recall computerized questionnaire which included a detailed physical activity reports (Baecke questionnaire). The western dietary profile score, as a simplified paradigm of unhealthy diet, a questionnaire quantifying sun exposure score and a sleep habits questionnaires provided a further comprehensive lifestyle assessment. RESULTS Body mass index (BMI), insulin resistance (HOMA), and triglycerides, poorer adherence to a mediterranean diet profile, sedentary habits, minor sun exposure and use of “western diet” foods are greater in NAFLD. Multiple linear regression analysis, weighted by years of age, displays BMI, HOMA and AMDS as the most powerful independent predictors of fatty liver severity; however, also the physical activity score, the western diet habit and the sun exposure score are acting inside the model with significant independent effects. CONCLUSION Articulated clinical intervention, according to our results, are justified in NAFLD and can be pursued addressing by focused intervention nutritional profile, physical exercise mainly in open-air subsets for enhancing sun exposure and healthier sleep duration and rhythm. PMID:27957244

  18. New evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Inzaugarat, María Eugenia; De Matteo, Elena; Baz, Placida; Lucero, Diego; García, Cecilia Claudia; Gonzalez Ballerga, Esteban; Daruich, Jorge; Sorda, Juan Antonio; Wald, Miriam Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The immune system acts on different metabolic tissues that are implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Leptin and linoleic acid have the ability to potentially affect immune cells, whereas curcumin is a known natural polyphenol with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Aims This study was designed to evaluate the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects of leptin and linoleic acid on immune cells from patients with NAFLD and to corroborate the modulatory effects of curcumin and its preventive properties against the progression of NAFLD using a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model. Results The ex vivo experiments showed that linoleic acid increased the production of reactive oxygen species in monocytes and liver macrophages, whereas leptin enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production in monocytes and interferon-γ production in circulating CD4+ cells. Conversely, oral administration of curcumin prevented HFD-induced liver injury, metabolic alterations, intrahepatic CD4+ cell accumulation and the linoleic acid- and leptin- induced pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects on mouse liver macrophages. Conclusion Our findings provide new evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin to treat human NAFLD. However, the development of a preventive treatment targeting human circulating monocytes and liver macrophages as well as peripheral and hepatic CD4+ cells requires additional research. PMID:28257515

  19. Combination of vildagliptin and rosiglitazone ameliorates nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Mookkan, Jeyamurugan; De, Soumita; Shetty, Pranesha; Kulkarni, Nagaraj M.; Devisingh, Vijayaraj; Jaji, Mallikarjun S.; Lakshmi, Vinitha P.; Chaudhary, Shilpee; Kulathingal, Jayanarayan; Rajesh, Navin B.; Narayanan, Shridhar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of vildagliptin alone and in combination with metformin or rosiglitazone on murine hepatic steatosis in diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Materials and Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high fat diet (60 Kcal %) and fructose (40%) in drinking water for 60 days to induce NAFLD. After the induction period, animals were divided into different groups and treated with vildagliptin (10 mg/kg), metformin (350 mg/kg), rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg), vildagliptin (10 mg/kg) + metformin (350 mg/kg), or vildagliptin (10 mg/kg) + rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg) orally for 28 days. Following parameters were measured: body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol, liver function tests, and liver TG. Liver histopathology was also examined. Results: Oral administration of vildagliptin and rosiglitazone in combination showed a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose, hepatic steatosis, and liver TGs. While other treatments showed less or no improvement in the measured parameters. Conclusions: These preliminary results demonstrate that administration of vildagliptin in combination with rosiglitazone could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:24550584

  20. Systematic review: microbial dysbiosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wieland, A; Frank, D N; Harnke, B; Bambha, K

    2015-11-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a key regulator of host metabolic and immune functions and alterations in the microbiome ('dysbiosis') have been implicated in several human diseases. Because of the anatomical links between the intestines and the liver, dysbiosis may also disrupt hepatic function and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To perform a comprehensive review of the medical literature investigating associations between intestinal dysbiosis and NAFLD, with a particular emphasis on studies that characterise the microbiome in NAFLD. We conducted a search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science using multiple search terms including: 'NAFLD, NASH, fatty liver, steatohepatitis' combined with 'metagenome, microbiom*, microbiota*, fecal flora, intestinal flora, gut bacteria'. Results were manually reviewed and studies selected based on relevance to intestinal microbiota and NAFLD. We also included studies that addressed potential mechanistic models of pathways linking the dysbiosis to NAFLD. Nine studies (five human and four animal models) were identified in our search that assessed associations between specific intestinal microbiota composition and NAFLD. We reviewed and summarised the results of additional investigations that more broadly addressed the mechanisms by which the microbiome may impact NAFLD pathogenesis. Investigations in humans and animals demonstrate associations between intestinal dysbiosis and NAFLD; however, causality has not been proven and mechanistic links require further delineation. As the field of microbiome research matures in techniques and study design, more detailed insights into NAFLD pathogenesis and its associations with the intestinal microbiota will be elucidated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Altered Hepatic Tubulin Code in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Groebner, Jennifer L.; Tuma, Pamela L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that lead to the progression of alcoholic liver disease have been actively examined for decades. Because the hepatic microtubule cytoskeleton supports innumerable cellular processes, it has been the focus of many such mechanistic studies. It has long been appreciated that α-tubulin is a major target for modification by highly reactive ethanol metabolites and reactive oxygen species. It is also now apparent that alcohol exposure induces post-translational modifications that are part of the natural repertoire, mainly acetylation. In this review, the modifications of the “tubulin code” are described as well as those adducts by ethanol metabolites. The potential cellular consequences of microtubule modification are described with a focus on alcohol-induced defects in protein trafficking and enhanced steatosis. Possible mechanisms that can explain hepatic dysfunction are described and how this relates to the onset of liver injury is discussed. Finally, we propose that agents that alter the cellular acetylation state may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating liver disease. PMID:26393662

  2. The Altered Hepatic Tubulin Code in Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Groebner, Jennifer L; Tuma, Pamela L

    2015-09-18

    The molecular mechanisms that lead to the progression of alcoholic liver disease have been actively examined for decades. Because the hepatic microtubule cytoskeleton supports innumerable cellular processes, it has been the focus of many such mechanistic studies. It has long been appreciated that α-tubulin is a major target for modification by highly reactive ethanol metabolites and reactive oxygen species. It is also now apparent that alcohol exposure induces post-translational modifications that are part of the natural repertoire, mainly acetylation. In this review, the modifications of the "tubulin code" are described as well as those adducts by ethanol metabolites. The potential cellular consequences of microtubule modification are described with a focus on alcohol-induced defects in protein trafficking and enhanced steatosis. Possible mechanisms that can explain hepatic dysfunction are described and how this relates to the onset of liver injury is discussed. Finally, we propose that agents that alter the cellular acetylation state may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating liver disease.

  3. Low Hepatic Tissue Copper in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Michael; Caltharp, Shelley; Song, Ming; Collin, Lindsay; Konomi, Juna V; McClain, Craig J; Vos, Miriam B

    2017-07-01

    Animal models and studies in adults have demonstrated that copper restriction increases severity of liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This has not been studied in children. We aimed to determine if lower tissue copper is associated with increased NAFLD severity in children. This was a retrospective study of pediatric patients who had a liver biopsy including a hepatic copper quantitation. The primary outcome compared hepatic copper concentration in NAFLD versus non-NAFLD. Secondary outcomes compared hepatic copper levels against steatosis, fibrosis, lobular inflammation, balloon degeneration, and NAFLD activity score (NAS). The study analysis included 150 pediatric subjects (102 with NAFLD and 48 non-NAFLD). After adjusting for age, body mass index z score, gamma glutamyl transferase, alanine aminotransferase, and total bilirubin, NAFLD subjects had lower levels of hepatic copper than non-NAFLD (P = 0.005). In addition, tissue copper concentration decreased as steatosis severity increased (P < 0.001). Copper levels were not associated with degree of fibrosis, lobular inflammation, portal inflammation, or balloon degeneration. In this cohort of pediatric subjects with NAFLD, we observed decreased tissue copper levels in subjects with NAFLD when compared with non-NAFLD subjects. In addition, tissue copper levels were lower in subjects with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, a more severe form of the disease, when compared with steatosis alone. Further studies are needed to explore the relationship between copper levels and NAFLD progression.

  4. Liver Fatty acid binding protein (L-Fabp) modulates murine stellate cell activation and diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Anping; Tang, Youcai; Davis, Victoria; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Kennedy, Susan M.; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Newberry, Elizabeth P.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is crucial to the development of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Quiescent HSCs contain lipid droplets (LDs), whose depletion upon activation induces a fibrogenic gene program. Here we show that liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-Fabp), an abundant cytosolic protein that modulates fatty acid (FA) metabolism in enterocytes and hepatocytes also modulates HSC FA utilization and in turn regulates the fibrogenic program. L-Fabp expression decreased 10-fold following HSC activation, concomitant with depletion of LDs. Primary HSCs isolated from L-FABP−/− mice contain fewer LDs than wild type (WT) HSCs, and exhibit upregulated expression of genes involved in HSC activation. Adenoviral L-Fabp transduction inhibited activation of passaged WT HSCs and increased both the expression of prolipogenic genes and also augmented intracellular lipid accumulation, including triglyceride and FA, predominantly palmitate. Freshly isolated HSCs from L-FABP−/− mice correspondingly exhibited decreased palmitate in the free FA pool. To investigate whether L-FABP deletion promotes HSC activation in vivo, we fed L-FABP−/− and WT mice a high fat diet supplemented with trans-fatty acids and fructose (TFF). TFF-fed L-FABP−/− mice exhibited reduced hepatic steatosis along with decreased LD abundance and size compared to WT mice. In addition, TFF-fed L-FABP−/− mice exhibited decreased hepatic fibrosis, with reduced expression of fibrogenic genes, compared to WT mice. Conclusion L-FABP deletion attenuates both diet-induced hepatic steatosis and fibrogenesis, despite the observation that L-Fabp paradoxically promotes FA and LD accumulation and inhibits HSC activation in vitro. These findings highlight the importance of cell-specific modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism in promoting fibrogenesis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:23401290

  5. Echocardiography and NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease).

    PubMed

    Trovato, Francesca M; Martines, Giuseppe F; Catalano, Daniela; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2016-10-15

    Non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD) is associated with atherosclerosis, increased cardiovascular risks and mortality. We investigated if, independently of insulin resistance, diet, physical activity and obesity, fatty liver involvement has any relationship with echocardiographic measurements in NAFLD. 660 NAFLD and 791 non-NAFLD subjects, referred to the same out-patients medical unit for lifestyle-nutritional prescription, were studied. Congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, malignancies, diabetes mellitus, extreme obesity, underweight-bad-nourished subjects and renal insufficiency were exclusion criteria. Liver steatosis was assessed by Ultrasound-Bright-Liver-Score (BLS), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), trans-mitral E/A doppler ratio (diastolic relaxation) and left ventricular myocardial mass (LVMM/m(2)) by echocardiography. Doppler Renal artery Resistive Index (RRI), insulin resistance (HOMA) and lifestyle profile were also included in the clinical assessment. LVMM/m(2) is significantly greater in NAFLD, 101.62±34.48 vs. 88.22±25.61, p<0.0001 both in men and in women. Ejection fraction is slightly smaller only in men with NAFLD; no significant difference was observed for the E/A ratio. BMI (30.42±5.49 vs. 24.87±3.81; p<0.0001) and HOMA (2.90±1.70 vs. 1.85±1.25; p: 0.0001) were significantly greater in NAFLD patients. By Multiple-Linear-Regression, NAFLD and unhealthy dietary profile are associated also in lean non-diabetic subjects with lower systolic function, independently of BMI, dietary profile, physical activity, RRI and insulin resistance. NAFLD may be a meaningful early clue suggestive of diminishing heart function, with similar determining factors. NAFLD is amenable to management and improvement by lifestyle change counseling, addressing a dual target: reducing fatty liver, which is easily monitored by ultrasound, and, independently, maintaining a normal heart function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  6. Systematic review of bariatric surgery liver biopsies clarifies the natural history of liver disease in patients with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Bedossa, Pierre; Tordjman, Joan; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Poitou, Christine; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Torcivia, Adriana; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Paradis, Valerie; Ratziu, Vlad; Clément, Karine

    2017-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent complication of morbid obesity, but its severity varies greatly and thus there is a strong need to better define its natural history in these patients. Liver biopsies were systematically performed in 798 consecutive patients with severe obesity undergoing bariatric surgery. Histology was compared with clinical, biological, anthropometrical and body composition characteristics. Patients with presumably normal liver (n=179, 22%) were significantly younger at bariatric surgery than patients with NAFLD (37.0 vs 44.4 years, p<0.0001). However, both groups showed quite similar obesity duration, since patients with presumably normal liver reported the onset of obesity at a significantly younger age than those with NAFLD (14.8 vs 20.0 year, p<0.0001). The trunk/limb fat mass ratio increased according to liver disease severity (presumably normal liver: 1.00, steatosis: 1.21, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH): 1.34, p<0.0001), although the total body fat mass decreased (presumably normal liver: 50%, steatosis: 49.1%, NASH: 47.4%, p<0.0001). The volume of subcutaneous adipocytes increased according to severity of liver disease but only in female patients (presumably normal liver: 8543 picolitres, steatosis: 9156 picolitres, NASH: 9996 picolitres). These results suggest that young adults are more prone to store fat in subcutaneous tissue and reach the threshold of bariatric surgery indication before their liver is damaged. A shift of fat storage from subcutaneous to visceral adipose tissue compartment is associated with liver damages. Liver might also be targeted by subcutaneous hypertrophic adipocytes in females since hypertrophic adipocytes are more exposed to lipolysis and to the production of inflammatory mediators. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Trend of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases in Iran: Results of the Global Burden of Disease Study, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sepanlou, Sadaf Ghajarieh; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Naghavi, Mohsen; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Shahraz, Saeid; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND The general pattern of epidemiologic transition from communicable to noncommunicable diseases is also observed for gastrointestinal and liver diseases (GILD), which constitute a heterogeneous array of causes of death and disability. We aimed to describe the trend of GILD in Iran based on the global burden of disease (GBD2010) study from 1990 to 2010. METHODS The trend of number of deaths, disability, adjusted life years (DALYs) and their age-standardized rates caused by 5 major GILD have been reported. The change in the rankings of major causes of death and DALY has been described as well. RESULTS The age standardized rates of death and DALYs in both sexes have decreased from 1990 to 2010 for most GILD. The most prominent decreases in death rates are observed for diarrheal diseases, gastritis and duodenitis, and peptic ulcer disease. Positive trends are observed for liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, and gall bladder cancer. Diarrheal diseases have retained their 1st rank among children under 5. Among adults, decreased ranks are observed for diarrheal diseases, appendicitis, gastritis and duodenitis, gall bladder diseases, pancreatitis, and all types of cirrhosis. The trends in age standardized rates of DALYs, deaths, and YLLs are negative for almost all GILD, and especially for diarrheal diseases. However, there is no upward or downward trend in rates of years lost due to disability (YLDs) for most diseases. Total numbers of DALYs and deaths due to acute hepatitis C, stomach cancer, and liver cancers are rising. The total DALYs due to overall digestive diseases except cirrhosis and DALYs due to cirrhosis are both somehow stable. No data has been reported for GILD that are mainly diagnosed in outpatient settings, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. CONCLUSION The results of GBD 2010 demonstrate that the rates of most GILD are decreasing in Iran but total DALYs are somehow stable

  8. Fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or indexes of liver health: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mei; Ma, Jiantao; Patel, Kamal; Berger, Samantha; Lau, Joseph; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2014-09-01

    Concerns have been raised about the concurrent temporal trend between simple sugar intakes, especially of fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), and rates of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the United States. We examined the effect of different amounts and forms of dietary fructose on the incidence or prevalence of NAFLD and indexes of liver health in humans. We conducted a systematic review of English-language, human studies of any design in children and adults with low to no alcohol intake and that reported at least one predetermined measure of liver health. The strength of the evidence was evaluated by considering risk of bias, consistency, directness, and precision. Six observational studies and 21 intervention studies met the inclusion criteria. The overall strength of evidence for observational studies was rated insufficient because of high risk of biases and inconsistent study findings. Of 21 intervention studies, 19 studies were in adults without NAFLD (predominantly healthy, young men) and 1 study each in adults or children with NAFLD. We found a low level of evidence that a hypercaloric fructose diet (supplemented by pure fructose) increases liver fat and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations in healthy men compared with the consumption of a weight-maintenance diet. In addition, there was a low level of evidence that hypercaloric fructose and glucose diets have similar effects on liver fat and liver enzymes in healthy adults. There was insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion for effects of HFCS or sucrose on NAFLD. On the basis of indirect comparisons across study findings, the apparent association between indexes of liver health (ie, liver fat, hepatic de novo lipogenesis, alanine aminotransferase, AST, and γ-glutamyl transpeptase) and fructose or sucrose intake appear to be confounded by excessive energy intake. Overall, the available evidence is not sufficiently robust to draw conclusions regarding effects of fructose

  9. Epigenetic Modifications in the Biology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Carlos J.; Scian, Romina; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Dopazo, Hernán; Rohr, Cristian; Martino, Julio San; Castaño, Gustavo O.; Sookoian, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is an epigenetic modification whose role in the pathogenesis of metabolic-related complex diseases remains unexplored; 5-hmC appears to be prevalent in the mitochondrial genome. The Ten-Eleven-Translocation (TET) family of proteins is responsible for catalyzing the conversion of 5-methylcytosine to 5-hmC. We hypothesized that epigenetic editing by 5-hmC might be a novel mechanism through which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)-associated molecular traits could be explained. Hence, we performed an observational study to explore global levels of 5-hmC in fresh liver samples of patients with NAFLD and controls (n = 90) using an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay and immunohistochemistry. We also screened for genetic variation in TET 1–3 loci by next generation sequencing to explore its contribution to the disease biology. The study was conducted in 2 stages (discovery and replication) and included 476 participants. We observed that the amount of 5-hmC in the liver of both NAFLD patients and controls was relatively low (up to 0.1%); a significant association was found with liver mitochondrial DNA copy number (R = 0.50, P = 0.000382) and PPARGC1A-mRNA levels (R = −0.57, P = 0.04). We did not observe any significant difference in the 5-hmC nuclear immunostaining score between NAFLD patients and controls; nevertheless, we found that patients with NAFLD (0.4 ± 0.5) had significantly lower nonnuclear-5-hmC staining compared with controls (1.8 ± 0.8), means ± standard deviation, P = 0.028. The missense p.Ile1123Met variant (TET1-rs3998860) was significantly associated with serum levels of caspase-generated CK-18 fragment-cell death biomarker in the discovery and replication stage, and the disease severity (odds ratio: 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.10–1.97; P = 0.005). The p.Ile1762Val substitution (TET2-rs2454206) was associated with liver PPARGC1A-methylation and

  10. Probiotics in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis, and Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Amir A

    2015-01-01

    With the growing epidemic of obesity, the incidence of both nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing. The intestinal microbiota differs between individuals who are obese or have normal body mass indices. Animal studies have shown increased intestinal permeability in NAFL, NASH, and cirrhosis. This increases the risk of oxidative and inflammatory injury to the liver from intestinal microbacteria. It may also increase the risk of fatty acid injury and fatty deposition. Bacterial translocation is associated with increased portal hypertension and hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhosis. By preventing bacterial adhesion and translocation, probiotics may have a role in the management of patients with NAFL, NASH, and cirrhosis. Multiple small studies have suggested that probiotics improve some of the clinical markers of activity in patients with NAFL and NASH. Controlled studies have also shown improved outcomes in patients with cirrhosis who were treated with probiotics.

  11. Regenerative medicine using dental pulp stem cells for liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Ohkoshi, Shogo; Hara, Hajime; Hirono, Haruka; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Katsuhiko

    2017-02-06

    Acute liver failure is a refractory disease and its prognosis, if not treated using liver transplantation, is extremely poor. It is a good candidate for regenerative medicine, where stem cell-based therapies play a central role. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to differentiate into multiple cell lineages including hepatocytes. Autologous cell transplant without any foreign gene induction is feasible using MSCs, thereby avoiding possible risks of tumorigenesis and immune rejection. Dental pulp also contains an MSC population that differentiates into hepatocytes. A point worthy of special mention is that dental pulp can be obtained from deciduous teeth during childhood and can be subsequently harvested when necessary after deposition in a tooth bank. MSCs have not only a regenerative capacity but also act in an anti-inflammatory manner via paracrine mechanisms. Promising efficacies and difficulties with the use of MSC derived from teeth are summarized in this review.

  12. Impact of Renal Impairment on Cardiovascular Disease Mortality After Liver Transplantation for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    VanWagner, Lisa B.; Lapin, Brittany; Skaro, Anton I.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Rinella, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity after liver transplantation, but its impact on CVD mortality is unknown. We sought to assess the impact of NASH on CVD mortality after liver transplantation and to predict which NASH recipients are at highest risk of a CVD-related death following a liver transplant. METHODS Using the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network database we examined associations between NASH and post liver transplant CVD mortality, defined as primary cause of death from thromboembolism, arrhythmia, heart failure, myocardial infarction, or stroke. A physician panel reviewed cause of death. RESULTS Of 48,360 liver transplants (2/2002–12/2011), 5,057 (10.5%) were performed for NASH cirrhosis. NASH recipients were more likely to be older, female, obese, diabetic, and have history of renal failure or prior CVD versus non-NASH (p<0.001 for all). Although there was no difference in overall all-cause mortality (log-rank p=0.96), both early (30-day) and long-term CVD-specific mortality was increased among NASH recipients (Odds ratio=1.30, 95% Confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.66; Hazard ratio=1.42, 95% CI: 1.07–1.41, respectively). These associations were no longer significant after adjustment for pre-transplant diabetes, renal impairment or CVD. A risk score comprising age ≥ 55, male sex, diabetes and renal impairment was developed for prediction of post liver transplant CVD mortality (c-statistic 0.60). CONCLUSION NASH recipients have an increased risk of CVD mortality after liver transplantation explained by a high prevalence of co-morbid cardiometabolic risk factors that in aggregate identify those at highest risk of post-transplant CVD mortality. PMID:25977117

  13. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Protects against Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ritze, Yvonne; Bárdos, Gyöngyi; Claus, Anke; Ehrmann, Veronika; Bergheim, Ina; Schwiertz, Andreas; Bischoff, Stephan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Experimental evidence revealed that obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is linked to changes in intestinal permeability and translocation of bacterial products to the liver. Hitherto, no reliable therapy is available except for weight reduction. Within this study, we examined the possible effect of the probiotic bacterial strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) as protective agent against experimental NAFLD in a mouse model. Methods Experimental NAFLD was induced by a high-fructose diet over eight weeks in C57BL/J6 mice. Fructose was administered via the drinking water containing 30% fructose with or without LGG at a concentration resulting in approximately 5×107 colony forming units/g body weight. Mice were examined for changes in small intestinal microbiota, gut barrier function, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) concentrations in the portal vein, liver inflammation and fat accumulation in the liver. Results LGG increased beneficial bacteria in the distal small intestine. Moreover, LGG reduced duodenal IκB protein levels and restored the duodenal tight junction protein concentration. Portal LPS (P≤0.05) was reduced and tended to attenuate TNF-α, IL-8R and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver feeding a high-fructose diet supplemented with LGG. Furthermore liver fat accumulation and portal alanine-aminotransferase concentrations (P≤0.05) were attenuated in mice fed the high-fructose diet and LGG. Conclusions We show for the first time that LGG protects mice from NAFLD induced by a high-fructose diet. The underlying mechanisms of protection likely involve an increase of beneficial bacteria, restoration of gut barrier function and subsequent attenuation of liver inflammation and steatosis. PMID:24475018

  14. Gut-liver axis and probiotics: Their role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Paolella, Giulia; Mandato, Claudia; Pierri, Luca; Poeta, Marco; Di Stasi, Martina; Vajro, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and its related conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), has dramatically increased in all age groups worldwide. Given the health consequences of these conditions, and the subsequent economic burden on healthcare systems, their prevention and treatment have become major priorities. Because standard dietary and lifestyle changes and pathogenically-oriented therapies (e.g., antioxidants, oral hypoglycemic agents, and lipid-lowering agents) often fail due to poor compliance and/or lack of efficacy, novel approaches directed toward other pathomechanisms are needed. Here we present several lines of evidence indicating that, by increasing energy extraction in some dysbiosis conditions or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, specific gut microbiota and/or a “low bacterial richness” may play a role in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver. Under conditions involving a damaged intestinal barrier (“leaky gut”), the gut-liver axis may enhance the natural interactions between intestinal bacteria/bacterial products and hepatic receptors (e.g., toll-like receptors), thus promoting the following cascade of events: oxidative stress, insulin-resistance, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. We also discuss the possible modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics, as attempted in NAFLD animal model studies and in several pilot pediatric and adult human studies. Globally, this approach appears to be a promising and innovative add-on therapeutic tool for NAFLD in the context of multi-target therapy. PMID:25400436

  15. Association between nocturnal hypoxia and liver injury in the setting of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qi-Chang; Chen, Li-Da; Chen, Gong-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Ming; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Jie-Feng; Wu, Li-Hua

    2015-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is suggested as a potential risk factor of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the underlying mechanism is still far from clear. The aim of this observational study was to investigate the influence of OSA-related hypoxia on severity of liver injury in patients with NAFLD. Consecutive patients with ultrasound-diagnosed NAFLD who underwent standard polysomnography were enrolled. Fasting blood samples were obtained from all patients for biological profile measurements, and demographic data were collected. Subjects were divided into control, moderate, and severe groups. A total of 85 subjects with 73 males and 12 females were included (mean age, 44.67 ± 1.28 years; mean body mass index, 27.28 ± 0.33 kg/m(2)). Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), ALT/AST, gamma glutamyltransferase, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, fasting glucose, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein significantly increased with the aggravation of OSA. In multivariate analysis, oxygen desaturation index was the major contributing factor for elevated ALT (β = 0.435, p = 0.000), average O2 saturation was the major independent predictor of elevated AST (β = -0.269, p = 0.020). OSA-related hypoxia was independently associated with the biochemical evidence of liver injury in the presence of NAFLD.

  16. Spatial Systems Lipidomics Reveals Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Hepatocellular lipid accumulation characterizes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the types of lipids associated with disease progression are debated, as is the impact of their localization. Traditional lipidomics analysis using liver homogenates or plasma dilutes and averages lipid concentrations, and does not provide spatial information about lipid distribution. We aimed to characterize the distribution of specific lipid species related to NAFLD severity by performing label-free molecular analysis by mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Fresh frozen liver biopsies from obese subjects undergoing bariatric surgery (n = 23) with various degrees of NAFLD were cryosectioned and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MSI. Molecular identification was verified by tandem MS. Tissue sections were histopathologically stained, annotated according to the Kleiner classification, and coregistered with the MSI data set. Lipid pathway analysis was performed and linked to local proteome networks. Spatially resolved lipid profiles showed pronounced differences between nonsteatotic and steatotic tissues. Lipid identification and network analyses revealed phosphatidylinositols and arachidonic acid metabolism in nonsteatotic regions, whereas low–density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low–density lipoprotein (VLDL) metabolism was associated with steatotic tissue. Supervised and unsupervised discriminant analysis using lipid based classifiers outperformed simulated analysis of liver tissue homogenates in predicting steatosis severity. We conclude that lipid composition of steatotic and nonsteatotic tissue is highly distinct, implying that spatial context is important for understanding the mechanisms of lipid accumulation in NAFLD. MSI combined with principal component–linear discriminant analysis linking lipid and protein pathways represents a novel tool enabling detailed, comprehensive studies of the heterogeneity of NAFLD. PMID:29570976

  17. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The Emerging Burden in Cardiometabolic and Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Lee, Yong Ho

    2017-12-01

    As the number of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased, the influence of NAFLD on other metabolic diseases has been highlighted. Accumulating epidemiologic evidence indicates that NAFLD not only affects the liver but also increases the risk of extra-hepatic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, an advanced type of NAFLD, can aggravate these inter-organ relationships and lead to poorer outcomes. NAFLD induces insulin resistance and exacerbates systemic chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, which leads to organ dysfunction in extra-hepatic tissues. Although more research is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms and causal relationship between NAFLD and cardiometabolic and renal diseases, screening for heart, brain, and kidney diseases, risk assessment for diabetes, and a multidisciplinary approach for managing these patients should be highly encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Korean Diabetes Association.

  18. Fructose, high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and non-alcoholic liver disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), formerly called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, is characterized by hepatic steatosis and abnormal triglyceride accumulation in liver cells. Its etiology, pathophysiology, and pathogenesis are still poorly understood. Some have suggested that the increased in...

  19. Shear-Wave Elastography for the Estimation of Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Liver Disease: Determining Accuracy and Ideal Site for Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Dhyani, Manish; Vij, Abhinav; Bhan, Atul K.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Méndez-Navarro, Jorge; Corey, Kathleen E.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the accuracy of shear-wave elastography (SWE) for staging liver fibrosis in patients with diffuse liver disease (including patients with hepatitis C virus [HCV]) and to determine the relative accuracy of SWE measurements obtained from different hepatic acquisition sites for staging liver fibrosis. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this single-institution prospective study, which was performed between January 2010 and March 2013 in 136 consecutive patients who underwent SWE before their scheduled liver biopsy (age range, 18–76 years; mean age, 49 years; 70 men, 66 women). Informed consent was obtained from all patients. SWE measurements were obtained at four sites in the liver. Biopsy specimens were reviewed in a blinded manner by a pathologist using METAVIR criteria. SWE measurements and biopsy results were compared by using the Spearman correlation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results SWE values obtained at the upper right lobe showed the highest correlation with estimation of fibrosis (r = 0.41, P < .001). Inflammation and steatosis did not show any correlation with SWE values except for values from the left lobe, which showed correlation with steatosis (r = 0.24, P = .004). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) in the differentiation of stage F2 fibrosis or greater, stage F3 fibrosis or greater, and stage F4 fibrosis was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68, 0.86), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.91), and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70, 0.95), respectively, for all subjects who underwent liver biopsy. The corresponding AUCs for the subset of patients with HCV were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.92), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70, 0.95), and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.00). The adjusted AUCs for differentiating stage F2 or greater fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease and those with HCV were 0.84 and 0.87, respectively. Conclusion SWE estimates of liver stiffness obtained from the right upper lobe showed the best

  20. Oral Probiotic Microcapsule Formulation Ameliorates Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Bio F1B Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Bhathena, Jasmine; Martoni, Christopher; Kulamarva, Arun; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Paul, Arghya; Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effect of a microencapsulated feruloyl esterase producing Lactobacillus fermentum ATCC 11976 formulation for use in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was investigated. For which Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a methionine deficient/choline devoid diet to induce non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Results, for the first time, show significant clinical benefits in experimental animals. Examination of lipids show that concentrations of hepatic free cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids were significantly lowered in treated animals. In addition, serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid and insulin resistance were found to decrease in treated animals. Liver histology evaluations showed reduced fat deposits. Western blot analysis shows significant differences in expression levels of key liver enzymes in treated animals. In conclusion, these findings suggest the excellent potential of using an oral probiotic formulation to ameliorate NAFLD. PMID:23554890

  1. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) Regulates Liver Cells Proteome and Methylproteome: Implications in Liver Biology and Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Bigaud, Emilie; Corrales, Fernando J.

    2016-01-01

    Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), a key enzyme in the adenine and methionine salvage pathways, catalyzes the hydrolysis of methylthioadenosine (MTA), a compound suggested to affect pivotal cellular processes in part through the regulation of protein methylation. MTAP is expressed in a wide range of cell types and tissues, and its deletion is common to cancer cells and in liver injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteome and methyl proteome alterations triggered by MTAP deficiency in liver cells to define novel regulatory mechanisms that may explain the pathogenic processes of liver diseases. iTRAQ analysis resulted in the identification of 216 differential proteins (p < 0.05) that suggest deregulation of cellular pathways as those mediated by ERK or NFκB. R-methyl proteome analysis led to the identification of 74 differentially methylated proteins between SK-Hep1 and SK-Hep1+ cells, including 116 new methylation sites. Restoring normal MTA levels in SK-Hep1+ cells parallels the specific methylation of 56 proteins, including KRT8, TGF, and CTF8A, which provides a novel regulatory mechanism of their activity with potential implications in carcinogenesis. Inhibition of RNA-binding proteins methylation is especially relevant upon accumulation of MTA. As an example, methylation of quaking protein in Arg242 and Arg256 in SK-Hep1+ cells may play a pivotal role in the regulation of its activity as indicated by the up-regulation of its target protein p27kip1. The phenotype associated with a MTAP deficiency was further verified in the liver of MTAP± mice. Our data support that MTAP deficiency leads to MTA accumulation and deregulation of central cellular pathways, increasing proliferation and decreasing the susceptibility to chemotherapeutic drugs, which involves differential protein methylation. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002957 (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002957). PMID:26819315

  2. Role of docosahexaenoic acid treatment in improving liver histology in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Carpino, Guido; Alisi, Anna; De Vito, Rita; Franchitto, Antonio; Alpini, Gianfranco; Onori, Paolo; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity and mortality in children. Recently, we have reported the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, in children with NAFLD. DHA exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity through the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)120. Our aim was to investigate in pediatric NAFLD the mechanisms underlying the effects of DHA administration on histo-pathological aspects, GPR120 expression, hepatic progenitor cell activation and macrophage pool. 20 children with untreated NAFLD were included. Children were treated with DHA for 18 months. Liver biopsies before and after the treatment were analyzed. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage pool and GPR120 expression were evaluated and correlated with clinical and histo-pathological parameters. GPR120 was expressed by hepatocytes, liver macrophages, and hepatic progenitor cells. After DHA treatment, the following modifications were present: i) the improvement of histo-pathological parameters such as NAFLD activity score, ballooning, and steatosis; ii) the reduction of hepatic progenitor cell activation in correlation with histo-pathological parameters; iii) the reduction of the number of inflammatory macrophages; iv) the increase of GPR120 expression in hepatocytes; v) the reduction of serine-311-phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation in hepatocytes and macrophages in correlation with serum inflammatory cytokines. DHA could modulate hepatic progenitor cell activation, hepatocyte survival and macrophage polarization through the interaction with GPR120 and NF-κB repression. In this scenario, the modulation of GPR120 exploits a novel crucial role in the regulation of the cell-to-cell cross-talk that drives inflammatory response, hepatic progenitor cell activation and hepatocyte survival.

  3. Dietary modification dampens liver inflammation and fibrosis in obesity-related fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Larter, Claire Z; Yeh, Matthew M; Haigh, W Geoffrey; Van Rooyen, Derrick M; Brooling, John; Heydet, Deborah; Nolan, Christopher J; Teoh, Narci C; Farrell, Geoffrey C

    2013-06-01

    Alms1 mutant (foz/foz) mice develop hyperphagic obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver (steatosis). High-fat (HF) feeding converts pathology from bland steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis, which leads to cirrhosis in humans. We sought to establish how dietary composition contributes to NASH pathogenesis. foz/foz mice were fed HF diet or chow 24 weeks, or switched HF to chow after 12 weeks. Serum ALT, NAFLD activity score (NAS), fibrosis severity, neutrophil, macrophage and apoptosis immunohistochemistry, uncoupling protein (UCP)2, ATP, NF-κB activation/expression of chemokines/adhesion molecules/fibrogenic pathways were determined. HF intake upregulated liver fatty acid and cholesterol transporter, CD36. Dietary switch expanded adipose tissue and decreased hepatomegaly by lowering triglyceride, cholesterol ester, free cholesterol and diacylglyceride content of liver. There was no change in lipogenesis or fatty acid oxidation pathways; instead, CD36 was suppressed. These diet-induced changes in hepatic lipids improved NAS, reduced neutrophil infiltration, normalized UCP2 and increased ATP; this facilitated apoptosis with a change in macrophage phenotype favoring M2 cells. Dietary switch also abrogated NF-κB activation and chemokine/adhesion molecule expression, and arrested fibrosis by dampening stellate cell activation. Reversion to a physiological dietary composition after HF feeding in foz/foz mice alters body weight distribution but not obesity. This attenuates NASH severity and fibrotic progression by suppressing NF-κB activation and reducing neutrophil and macrophage activation. However, adipose inflammation persists and is associated with continuing apoptosis in the residual fatty liver disease. Taken together, these findings indicate that other measures, such as weight reduction, may be required to fully reverse obesity-related NASH. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  4. Prevalence of Fatty Liver Disease and Hepatic Iron Overload in a Northeastern German Population by Using Quantitative MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Jens-Peter; Meffert, Peter; Heske, Christian; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mensel, Birger; Völzke, Henry; Lerch, Markus M; Hernando, Diego; Mayerle, Julia; Reeder, Scott B

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To quantify liver fat and liver iron content by measurement of confounder-corrected proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and R2* and to identify clinical associations for fatty liver disease and liver iron overload and their prevalence in a large-scale population-based study. Materials and Methods From 2008 to 2013, 2561 white participants (1336 women; median age, 52 years; 25th and 75th quartiles, 42 and 62 years) were prospectively recruited to the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Complex chemical shift-encoded magnetic resonance (MR) examination of the liver was performed, from which PDFF and R2* were assessed. On the basis of previous histopathologic calibration, participants were stratified according to their liver fat and iron content as follows: none (PDFF, ≤5.1%; R2*, ≤41.0 sec -1 ), mild (PDFF, >5.1%; R2*, >41 sec -1 ), moderate (PDFF, >14.1%; R2*, >62.5 sec -1 ), high (PDFF: >28.0%; R2*: >70.1 sec -1 ). Prevalence of fatty liver diseases and iron overload was calculated (weighted by probability of participation). Clinical associations were identified by using boosting for generalized linear models. Results Median PDFF was 3.9% (range, 0.6%-41.5%). Prevalence of fatty liver diseases was 42.2% (1082 of 2561 participants); mild, 28.5% (730 participants); moderate, 12.0% (307 participants); high content, 1.8% (45 participants). Median R2* was 34.4 sec -1 (range, 14.0-311.8 sec -1 ). Iron overload was observed in 17.4% (447 of 2561 participants; mild, 14.7% [376 participants]; moderate, 0.8% [20 participants]; high content, 2.0% [50 participants]). Liver fat content correlated with waist-to-height ratio, alanine transaminase, uric acid, serum triglycerides, and blood pressure. Liver iron content correlated with mean serum corpuscular hemoglobin, male sex, and age. Conclusion In a white German population, the prevalence of fatty liver diseases and liver iron overload is 42.2% (1082 of 2561) and 17.4% (447 of 2561). Whereas liver fat is associated

  5. Prevalence of Fatty liver Disease and hepatic iron Overload in a northeastern german Population by Using Quantitative Mr imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Jens-Peter; Meffert, Peter; Heske, Christian; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Mensel, Birger; Völzke, Henry; Lerch, Markus M.; Hernando, Diego; Mayerle, Julia; Reeder, Scott B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To quantify liver fat and liver iron content by measurement of confounder-corrected proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and R2* and to identify clinical associations for fatty liver disease and liver iron overload and their prevalence in a large-scale population-based study. Materials and Methods From 2008 to 2013, 2561 white participants (1336 women; median age, 52 years; 25th and 75th quartiles, 42 and 62 years) were prospectively recruited to the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Complex chemical shift–encoded magnetic resonance (MR) examination of the liver was performed, from which PDFF and R2* were assessed. On the basis of previous histopathologic calibration, participants were stratified according to their liver fat and iron content as follows: none (PDFF, ≤5.1%; R2*, ≤41.0 sec−1), mild (PDFF, >5.1%; R2*, >41 sec−1), moderate (PDFF, >14.1%; R2*, >62.5 sec−1), high (PDFF: >28.0%; R2*: >70.1 sec−1). Prevalence of fatty liver diseases and iron overload was calculated (weighted by probability of participation). Clinical associations were identified by using boosting for generalized linear models. Results Median PDFF was 3.9% (range, 0.6%–41.5%). Prevalence of fatty liver diseases was 42.2% (1082 of 2561 participants); mild, 28.5% (730 participants); moderate, 12.0% (307 participants); high content, 1.8% (45 participants). Median R2* was 34.4 sec−1 (range, 14.0–311.8 sec−1). Iron overload was observed in 17.4% (447 of 2561 participants; mild, 14.7% [376 participants]; moderate, 0.8% [20 participants]; high content, 2.0% [50 participants]). Liver fat content correlated with waist-to-height ratio, alanine transaminase, uric acid, serum triglycerides, and blood pressure. Liver iron content correlated with mean serum corpuscular hemoglobin, male sex, and age. Conclusion In a white German population, the prevalence of fatty liver diseases and liver iron overload is 42.2% (1082 of 2561) and 17.4% (447 of 2561). Whereas liver fat is

  6. Osteoporosis and skeletal fractures in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T; Stiel, D; Lunzer, M; Wilkinson, M; Roche, J; Posen, S

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the prevalence and severity of hepatic osteodystrophy by non-invasive means we compared 115 consecutive ambulant patients with histologically proven chronic liver disease to 113 age and sex matched control subjects. Methods used included the assessment of fracture prevalence rates, spinal radiography, and measurements of bone mineral density in the spine and the forearm. Spinal and peripheral fractures were more prevalent in the patients than in the control subjects (p less than 0.03 and p less than 0.01 respectively). The type of the underlying liver disease did not significantly affect the fracture prevalence rates, but alcoholic patients sustained more peripheral fractures than patients with other hepatic disorders (p less than 0.05). The bone mineral densities of the spines and the forearms were significantly reduced in male patients of all age groups and in female patients aged 60 years or more (p less than 0.001 for men and p less than 0.01 for women for both measurements). The prevalence rates of spinal and forearm osteoporosis were twice as high among patients with liver disease than in control subjects regardless of the definitions used. The presence of cirrhosis and hypogonadism were major risk factors for development of both spinal (Beta coef = 0.190 and 0.176; SE = 0.079 and 0.086 respectively) and forearm osteoporosis (Beta coef = 0.20 and 0.29; SE = 0.073 and 0.80 respectively). Spinal bone density was the predominant determinant of spinal fractures (Beta coef = -0.007; SE = 0.001), while hypogonadism (Beta coef = 0.363; SE = 0.075) and cirrhosis (Beta coef = 0.185; SE = 0.068) were the major predictors of peripheral fractures. The concentrations of serum calcium and serum vitamin D metabolites and the use of corticosteroids were apparently without effect on the prevalence of skeletal fractures or bone density. PMID:2318434

  7. Sarcopenia in Alcoholic Liver Disease: Clinical and Molecular Advances.

    PubMed

    Dasarathy, Jaividhya; McCullough, Arthur J; Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2017-08-01

    Despite advances in treatment of alcohol use disorders that focus on increasing abstinence and reducing recidivism, alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is projected to be the major cause of cirrhosis and its complications. Malnutrition is recognized as the most frequent complication in ALD, and despite the high clinical significance, there are no effective therapies to reverse malnutrition in ALD. Malnutrition is a relatively imprecise term, and sarcopenia or skeletal muscle loss, the major component of malnutrition, is primarily responsible for the adverse clinical consequences in patients with liver disease. It is, therefore, critical to define the specific abnormality (sarcopenia) rather than malnutrition in ALD, so that therapies targeting sarcopenia can be developed. Skeletal muscle mass is maintained by a balance between protein synthesis and proteolysis. Both direct effects of ethanol (EtOH) and its metabolites on the skeletal muscle and the consequences of liver disease result in disturbed proteostasis (protein homeostasis) and consequent sarcopenia. Once cirrhosis develops in patients with ALD, abstinence is unlikely to be effective in completely reversing sarcopenia, as other contributors including hyperammonemia, hormonal, and cytokine abnormalities aggravate sarcopenia and maintain a state of anabolic resistance initiated by EtOH. Cirrhosis is also a state of accelerated starvation, with increased gluconeogenesis that requires amino acid diversion from signaling and substrate functions. Novel therapeutic options are being recognized that are likely to supplant the current "deficiency replacement" approach and instead focus on specific molecular perturbations, given the increasing availability of small molecules that can target specific signaling components. Myostatin antagonists, leucine supplementation, and mitochondrial protective agents are currently in various stages of evaluation in preclinical studies to prevent and reverse sarcopenia, in cirrhosis in

  8. A Nutrigenomic Approach to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Valenti, Luca

    2017-07-16

    Following the epidemics of obesity due to the consumption of high-calorie diet and sedentary lifestyle, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the leading cause of liver disease in Western countries. NAFLD is epidemiologically associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, and in susceptible individuals it may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Genetic factors play a key role in NAFLD predisposition by interacting with nutritional and other environmental factors. To date, there is no drug therapy for the treatment of NAFLD, and the main clinical recommendation is lifestyle modification. In the last years, nutrigenomics is promoting an increased understanding of how nutrition affects the switch from health to disease by altering the expression of an individual's genetic makeup. The present review tries to summarize the most recent data evidencing how the interactions between nutrients and genetic factors can influence NAFLD development. The final goal should be to develop tools to quantify these complex interactions. The definition of a "nutrigenomic risk score" for each individual may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the management of NAFLD patients.

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